WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing in-house research

  1. Role of in-house safety analysis and research activities in regulatory decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Santosh K.; Nagrale, Dhanesh B.; Gaikwad, Avinash J.

    2015-01-01

    Achievement of an acceptable level of nuclear safety is an essential requirement for the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy. The success of Global Nuclear Safety Regime is built upon a foundation of research. Such research has been sponsored by Governments and industry and has led to improved designs, safer and more reliable plant operation, and improvements in operating plant efficiency. A key element of this research has been the nuclear safety research performed or sponsored by regulatory organizations. In part, it has been the safety research performed or sponsored by regulatory organizations that has contributed to improved safety and has laid the foundation for activities such as risk-informed regulation, plant life extension, improved plant performance (e.g. power uprates) and new plant designs. The regulatory research program is meant to improve the regulatory authority’s knowledge where uncertainty exists, where safety margins are not well-characterized, and where regulatory decisions need to be confirmed in existing or new designs and technologies. The regulatory body get research initiated either in-house or by the licensee or through technical support organizations (TSOs). Research and analysis carried out within the regulatory body is of immense value in this context. This could be in the form of analysis of safety significant events, analysis of severe accidents, review of operating experience, independent checks of critical designs and even review of operator responses under different situations towards arriving at modifications to training programmes and licensing procedures for operating personnel. A latent benefit of regulatory research carried out by the regulators themselves is that it improves their technical competence considerably which in turn leads to high quality safety reviews and improved regulation in general. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview of role of regulatory research and the in-house regulatory safety

  2. Training of Unskilled Child Care Providers: An In-House Program to Overcome Management's Financial Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brian

    An in-house staff development program was designed and implemented for unskilled child caregivers employed at Tiny Tots Educare Academies, Inc., a privately owned and operated child care center located in Ellenton, Florida. Employees had little knowledge of child development and other topics related to early childhood education and, therefore,…

  3. Quantum Confined Semiconductors - In-House Interim Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Laboratory, Materials & Manufacturing Directorate, Wright Patterson AFB, OH 45433-7707, USA blnstituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Aut6noma...111is work was supported by the Ai1· Force Office of Scientific Research (AFRU RS E, Dr. Kitt Reinhardt). • Also with lnstituto de Ciencias Fisicas

  4. [Quality management in a clinical research facility: Evaluation of changes in quality in-house figures and the appraisal of in-house quality indicators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aden, Bile; Allekotte, Silke; Mösges, Ralph

    2016-12-01

    For long-term maintenance and improvement of quality within a clinical research institute, the implementation and certification of a quality management system is suitable. Due to the implemented quality management system according to the still valid DIN EN ISO 9001:2008 desired quality objectives are achieved effectively. The evaluation of quality scores and the appraisal of in-house quality indicators make an important contribution in this regard. In order to achieve this and draw quality assurance conclusions, quality indicators as sensible and sensitive as possible are developed. For this, own key objectives, the retrospective evaluation of quality scores, a prospective follow-up and also discussions establish the basis. In the in-house clinical research institute the measures introduced by the quality management led to higher efficiency in work processes, improved staff skills, higher customer satisfaction and overall to more successful outcomes in relation to the self-defined key objectives. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. Development of TRITN : In-house technical information network of Technical Research Institute in The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebara, Hisao

    With the increase in information amount, progress in information network, diversified technology and change in in-house organization the Technical Research Institute has necessitated to shift the conventional technical database processing by use of personal computers into new system promised for future use. It enables to; provide classification system which meets the needs of the institute; execute distributed processing using workstations; make the low cost processing using commercial softwares; make networks using LAN, WAN personal computer communication, and provide primary materials (text data) on facsimiles using optical disks. Such features are those of technical information database system "TRITN" which is available to any persons and at any time. This paper describes how TRITN was developed and the system outline.

  6. In-house manufacturing of cylindrical silicone models for hemodynamic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisenko, Nikita S.; Kulik, Viktor M.

    2017-10-01

    Laboratory studies of fluid motion in artificial vessels modeling a distinct part of circulatory system of human are of a great importance for fundamental biomechanics and for medical applications. In the medicine they are used for advancing known and developing new methods for curing cardiovascular diseases. In biomechanics, the phantoms of blood vessels are used for studying the fluid motion. However, they are quite expensive. Therefore, a development of technique for in-house manufacturing of phantoms is quite attractive. In this paper methods of manufacturing cylindrical channels of silicone rubbers (the model of the straight part of an artery) and determination of their elastic properties are described. A specially developed acrylic mold is used for this purpose. The phantoms are cast from a mixture of SKTN-A silicone and PMS-5 oil (Penta-91, Novosibirsk, Russia). The oil is used for changing elasticity properties of the silicone.

  7. Providing Real Research Opoportunities to Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragozzine, Darin

    2016-01-01

    The current approach to undergraduate education focuses on teaching classes which provide the foundational knowledge for more applied experiences such as scientific research. Like most programs, Florida Institute of Technology (Florida Tech or FIT) strongly encourages undergraduate research, but is dominated by content-focused courses (e.g., "Physical Mechanics"). Research-like experiences are generally offered through "lab" classes, but these are almost always reproductions of past experiments: contrived, formulaic, and lacking the "heart" of real (i.e., potentially publishable) scientific research. Real research opportunities 1) provide students with realistic insight into the actual scientific process; 2) excite students far more than end-of-chapter problems; 3) provide context for the importance of learning math, physics, and astrophysics concepts; and 4) allow unique research progress for well-chosen problems. I have provided real research opportunities as an "Exoplanet Lab" component of my Introduction to Space Science (SPS1020) class at Florida Tech, generally taken by first-year majors in our Physics, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrobiology degree programs. These labs are a hybrid between citizen science (e.g., PlanetHunters) and simultaneously mentoring ~60 undergraduates in similar small research projects. These projects focus on problems that can be understood in the context of the course, but which benefit from "crowdsourcing". Examples include: dividing up the known planetary systems and developing a classification scheme and organizing them into populations (Fall 2013); searching through folded light curves to discover new exoplanets missed by previous pipelines (Fall 2014); and fitting n-body models to all exoplanets with known Transit Timing Variations to estimate planet masses (Fall 2015). The students love the fact that they are doing real potentially publishable research: not many undergraduates can claim to have discovered

  8. Research utilization among children's mental health providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson H Bruce

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with emotional and behavioural disorders should be able to count on receiving care that meets their needs and is based on the best scientific evidence available, however, many do not receive these services. Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP relies, in part, on the research utilization practices of mental health care providers. This study reports on a survey of research utilization practices among 80 children's mental health (CMH service provider organizations in Ontario, Canada. Methods A web-based survey was distributed to 80 CMH service provider organizations, to which 51 executive directors and 483 children's mental health practitioners responded. Research utilization was assessed using questions with Likert-type responses based on the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation's Four-A's approach: access, assess, adapt, apply. Results There was general agreement among executive directors and practitioners regarding the capacity of their organizations to use – access, assess, adapt, and apply – research evidence. Overall, both groups rated their organizations as using research information 'somewhat well.' The low response rate to the practitioner survey should be noted. Conclusion These findings provide a useful benchmark from which changes in reported research utilization in the Ontario CMH sector can be tracked over time, as a function of EBP training and implementation initiatives, for instance. The need to improve access to research evidence should be addressed because it relates to the eventual implementation and uptake of evidence-based practices. Communities of practice are recommended as a strategy that would enable practitioners to build capacity in their adaptation and application of research evidence.

  9. Research utilization among children's mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Melanie A; Boydell, Katherine M; Stasiulis, Elaine; Ferguson, H Bruce; Blase, Karen; Fixsen, Dean

    2008-04-09

    Children with emotional and behavioural disorders should be able to count on receiving care that meets their needs and is based on the best scientific evidence available, however, many do not receive these services. Implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) relies, in part, on the research utilization practices of mental health care providers. This study reports on a survey of research utilization practices among 80 children's mental health (CMH) service provider organizations in Ontario, Canada. A web-based survey was distributed to 80 CMH service provider organizations, to which 51 executive directors and 483 children's mental health practitioners responded. Research utilization was assessed using questions with Likert-type responses based on the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation's Four-A's approach: access, assess, adapt, apply. There was general agreement among executive directors and practitioners regarding the capacity of their organizations to use - access, assess, adapt, and apply - research evidence. Overall, both groups rated their organizations as using research information 'somewhat well.' The low response rate to the practitioner survey should be noted. These findings provide a useful benchmark from which changes in reported research utilization in the Ontario CMH sector can be tracked over time, as a function of EBP training and implementation initiatives, for instance. The need to improve access to research evidence should be addressed because it relates to the eventual implementation and uptake of evidence-based practices. Communities of practice are recommended as a strategy that would enable practitioners to build capacity in their adaptation and application of research evidence.

  10. Providing Data Access for Interdisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, R. P.; Couch, A.

    2012-12-01

    Developing an interdisciplinary understanding of human and environmental interactions with water requires access to a variety of data kinds collected by various organizations. The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) is a standards-based, services-oriented architecture designed for time-series data. Such data represents an important type of data in water studies. Through the efforts of HIS, a standard transmission language, WaterML2, has been adopted by the Open Geospatial Consortium and is under consideration by the World Meteorologic Organization as an international standards. Web services have also been developed to retrieve data and metadata. HIS is completed with a metadata catalog, hosted by San Diego Supercomputing Center, which indexes more than 20 million time series provided from over 90 different services. This catalog is supported through a hierarchically organized controlled vocabulary that is open for community input and mediation. Data publishers include federal agencies, universities, state agencies, and non-profit organizations such as watershed associations. Accessing data from such a broad spectrum of sources through a uniform service standard promises to truly transform the way in which hydrologic research is done. CUAHSI HIS is a large-scale prototype at this time, but a proposal is under consideration by the National Science Foundation to operationalize HIS through a data facility, tentatively called the CUAHSI Water Data Center. Establishing HIS is an important step to enable research into human-environment interactions with water, but it is only one step. Other data structures will need to be made accessible and interoperable to support this research. Some data—such as two-dimensional GIS coverages—already have widely used standards for transmission and sharing. The US Federal government has long operated a clearinghouse for federal geographic data that is now being augmented with other services such as ArcGIS OnLine. Other data

  11. Research of Executives' Perceptions in Companies and Organizations on the Importance of Mentoring in the Frame of In-House Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulis, Iosif; Valkanos, Efthymios; Voula, Florou

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to present the outcomes of a research on the executives' perceptions in companies and organizations on the importance of mentoring in the frame of in-house education and training. The paper researches the perceptions of people who work for companies and organizations as far as their participation in mentoring…

  12. The strategic facilities management organisation in housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Per Anker; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2012-01-01

    implementation of sustainable facilities management in housing administration. The concept provides a frame for understanding the roles and relations of tenants, owners, administrators and operators. The paper is based on a Danish research project on environmentally sound building operation including literature...

  13. In-house (disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Pavey

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In May 2007 UNHCR established an internal working group to look at developing in-house policies for people with disabilities both for the benefit of people of concern to us and for staff members.

  14. What is the use of lifestyle research in housing?’ A case study from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, A.; Doff, W.

    2011-01-01

    At the turn of the century the supposed change from a supply oriented to a demand oriented housing market and the increasing complexity of the multicultural society have boosted the development and application of lifestyle research in the domain of housing in the Netherlands. Lifestyle is expected

  15. Analysis of Trends in Housing Construction Cost in Nigeria from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The upward trends in housing construction costs have been a major issue in the economy as a whole. The research uses typical 3 - bedroom bungalow in Lagos to analyze the trends in housing construction cost from 2000 to 2009. The basic question for this research is whether the inflation in housing construction costs ...

  16. Research and Practice Communications Between Oral Health Providers and Prenatal Health Providers: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvoretz, John; Dyer, Karen; Daley, Ellen; Debate, Rita; Vamos, Cheryl; Kline, Nolan; Thompson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine scholarly collaboration between oral health and prenatal providers. Oral disease is a silent epidemic with significant public health implications for pregnant women. Evidence linking poor oral health during pregnancy to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes requires oral health and prenatal providers to communicate on the prevention, treatment and co-management matters pertaining to oral health issues among their pregnant patients. The need for inter-professional collaboration is highlighted by guidelines co-endorsed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Dental Association, stressing the importance of oral health care during pregnancy. Methods To assess if interdisciplinary communication occurs between oral health and prenatal disciplines, we conducted a network analysis of research on pregnancy-related periodontal disease. Results Social Network analysis allowed us to identify communication patterns between communities of oral health and prenatal professionals via scientific journals. Analysis of networks of citations linking journals in different fields reveals a core-periphery pattern dominated by oral health journals with some participation from medicine journals. However, an analysis of dyadic ties of citation reveals statistically significant "inbreeding" tendencies in the citation patterns: both medical and oral health journals tend to cite their own kind at greater-than-chance levels. Conclusions Despite evidence suggesting that professional collaboration benefits patients' overall health, findings from this research imply that little collaboration occurs between these two professional groups. More collaboration may be useful in addressing women's oral-systemic health concerns that result in adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  17. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A; Carnahan, Robert H; Brown, Abigail M; Gould, Kathleen L

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical team-based projects aimed at solving real business problems encountered by institutional shared--resource core facilities. The program also included a retreat featuring presentations by and networking with local life science entrepreneurs and final team presentations to expert judges. Quantitative and qualitative metrics were used to evaluate the program's impact on trainees. A pretest-posttest approach was used to assess trainees' baseline knowledge and mastery of module concepts, and each individual's pretest and posttest responses were compared. The mean score improved by more than 17 percentage points. Trainees also took an online survey to provide feedback about the module. Nearly all participants agreed or strongly agreed that the module was a valuable use of their time and will help guide their career decisions and that project work helped drive home module concepts. More than 75% of trainees reported discussing the module with their research advisors, and all of these participants reported supportive or neutral responses. Collectively, the trainee feedback about the module, improvement in test scores, and trainee perception of advisor support suggest that this short module is an effective method of providing scientists with efficient and meaningful exposure to business concepts. © 2017 K. A. Petrie et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  18. In-house cyclotron and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateno, Yukio; Shishido, Fumio; Yamazaki, Toshiro

    1982-01-01

    In-house cyclotron produced radioisotopes and positron computed tomography provide a unique technique which gives cross-sectional bodyimages of various kinds of physiological activities of living human body. Applications of the technique to clinical study might throw a new light on the etiologically unknown disorders of human central nervous system and etc. However, some difficulties should be settled before the establishment of this technique as an useful research and diagnostic tool. One of them was spatial resolution of positron computed tomography, and another was selection and development of really effective labeled compounds for the disease in question. A rotary positron emission computed tomography device was developed by our physicist team, and our chemist team developed various kinds of radiopharmaceuticals. Clinical applications of the technique started in our institute in November 1979, using the positron computed tomography machine named Positrologica I and the pharmaceuticals, 13sup( n h3, )11sup( C o and )18 F-2-fluoro-deoxy-glucose. (author)

  19. Mapping a Research Agenda for Home Care Safety: Perspectives from Researchers, Providers, and Decision Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella; MacDonald, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive design was to explore the perspectives of researchers, health care providers, policy makers, and decision makers on key risks, concerns, and emerging issues related to home care safety that would inform a line of research inquiry. Defining safety specifically in this home care context has yet to be…

  20. Administration in the Research Environment--The Provider's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    Factors in effective research program administration are discussed, and administrators are urged to focus on understanding and supporting what's important, and subordinating all other organizational functions to that; using good managerial skills (effective planning, organization, staffing, delegation of duties, control, creativity, and positive…

  1. Environmental Health Disparities in Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The physical infrastructure and housing make human interaction possible and provide shelter. How well that infrastructure performs and which groups it serves have important implications for social equity and health. Populations in inadequate housing are more likely to have environmental diseases and injuries. Substantial disparities in housing have remained largely unchanged. Approximately 2.6 million (7.5%) non-Hispanic Blacks and 5.9 million Whites (2.8%) live in substandard housing. Segregation, lack of housing mobility, and homelessness are all associated with adverse health outcomes. Yet the experience with childhood lead poisoning in the United States has shown that housing-related disparities can be reduced. Effective interventions should be implemented to reduce environmental health disparities related to housing. PMID:21551378

  2. Radionuclides in house dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Dodd, N J; Hammond, D J

    1985-04-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate authorising Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, although radionuclides originating rom the BNFL site can be detected in house dust, this source of contamination is a negligible route of exposure for members of the public in West Cumbria. This report presents the results of the Board's study of house dust in twenty homes in Cumbria during the spring and summer of 1984. A more intensive investigation is being carried out by Imperial College. (author)

  3. Establishing a distributed national research infrastructure providing bioinformatics support to life science researchers in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Maria Victoria; Griffin, Philippa C; Tyagi, Sonika; Flannery, Madison; Dayalan, Saravanan; Gladman, Simon; Watson-Haigh, Nathan; Bayer, Philipp E; Charleston, Michael; Cooke, Ira; Cook, Rob; Edwards, Richard J; Edwards, David; Gorse, Dominique; McConville, Malcolm; Powell, David; Wilkins, Marc R; Lonie, Andrew

    2017-06-30

    EMBL Australia Bioinformatics Resource (EMBL-ABR) is a developing national research infrastructure, providing bioinformatics resources and support to life science and biomedical researchers in Australia. EMBL-ABR comprises 10 geographically distributed national nodes with one coordinating hub, with current funding provided through Bioplatforms Australia and the University of Melbourne for its initial 2-year development phase. The EMBL-ABR mission is to: (1) increase Australia's capacity in bioinformatics and data sciences; (2) contribute to the development of training in bioinformatics skills; (3) showcase Australian data sets at an international level and (4) enable engagement in international programs. The activities of EMBL-ABR are focussed in six key areas, aligning with comparable international initiatives such as ELIXIR, CyVerse and NIH Commons. These key areas-Tools, Data, Standards, Platforms, Compute and Training-are described in this article. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Research Involving Health Providers and Managers: Ethical Issues Faced by Researchers Conducting Diverse Health Policy and Systems Research in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Sassy; Tsofa, Benjamin; Barasa, Edwine; Nyikuri, Mary Muyoka; Waweru, Evelyn Wanjiku; Goodman, Catherine; Gilson, Lucy

    2016-12-01

    There is a growing interest in the ethics of Health Policy and Systems Research (HPSR), and especially in areas that have particular ethical salience across HPSR. Hyder et al (2014) provide an initial framework to consider this, and call for more conceptual and empirical work. In this paper, we respond by examining the ethical issues that arose for researchers over the course of conducting three HPSR studies in Kenya in which health managers and providers were key participants. All three studies involved qualitative work including observations and individual and group interviews. Many of the ethical dilemmas researchers faced only emerged over the course of the fieldwork, or on completion, and were related to interactions and relationships between individuals operating at different levels or positions in health/research systems. The dilemmas reveal significant ethical challenges for these forms of HPSR, and show that potential 'solutions' to dilemmas often lead to new issues and complications. Our experiences support the value of research ethics frameworks, and suggest that these can be enriched by incorporating careful consideration of context embedded social relations into research planning and conduct. Many of these essential relational elements of ethical practice, and of producing quality data, are given stronger emphasis in social science research ethics than in epidemiological, clinical or biomedical research ethics, and are particularly relevant where health systems are understood as social and political constructs. We conclude with practical and research implications. © 2016 The Authors Developing World Bioethics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Development and upscaling of integral sustainable energy innovations in housing : the role of practice and underlying drivers, combining theoretical perspectives for a new research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Petra; Hoppe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to elaborate a theoretical framework and research design for further research related to the question ‘What practices and underlying drivers explain adoption of integral sustainable energy innovations in the Dutch housing sector?’. Although there are many efforts to speed

  6. Usability evaluation of in-housed developed ERP system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Chaudhry Muhammad Nadeem; Shakeel Faridi, Muhammad; Javed, Zahid

    2011-10-01

    Enterprise Resource Planning systems are the combination of different business IS (Information System) applications that are designed according to the organization requirements. Generally ERP systems are suffering from complex user interface issues. Recent research shows that there is a need for improvement concerning, the user interface from their perspectives. In order to design the software applications that are easy to use, memorize and apply to new problems, we must know the users philosophy and something about learning, reminiscence and problems solving. The Usability engineering is the only way to study the deeds of users while interacting with ERP (Enterprise Resource & Planning). This paper will focus on the users' experiences view of financial module in ERP system. The HCI research method, explicitly survey questionnaire method was adopted to gather users understanding in order to evaluate the selected modules for in-housed ERP system. The study involved group of users from two industries, the results can not be generalized as a whole. The study was first time successfully applied Usability evaluation on in-housed ERP in local industry (Masood Textile Mills, Interloop Ltd) in Pakistan. The results may hopefully opened-up an area of research and methodology that could provide considerable further benefits to Industry in developments of Industrial information systems.

  7. Preliminary construction of a service provider--informed domestic violence research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christine E; Welch, Metoka L

    2010-12-01

    This article presents the results of a statewide survey of domestic violence (DV) service providers that focused on the needs, background characteristics, and opinions of service providers related to research. The survey included an examination of service providers' motivation for working in the field, research background and training, and perceptions of research as well as the topics they believe are important for researchers to study, the resources they consult to learn about DV, and their suggestions to help researchers learn more about the nature of their work. The results are integrated into a preliminary agenda for future DV research that accounts for the needs and insight of service providers.

  8. Teaching Technical Writing and Editing -- In-House Programs That Work. Anthology Series No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, James G., Ed.

    The 12 articles in this publication provide indepth treatment of important aspects of in-house training programs for technical writing and editing. The articles deal with the following topics: the value of an in-house writing course, teaching in industry, developing an in-house writing course for engineers and scientists, a new approach to…

  9. EMS providers and exception from informed consent research: benefits, ethics, and community consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Elizabeth; Ramsey, Cornelia; Prorock-Ernest, Amy; Foco, Rebecca; Luckett, Solomon; Ornato, Joseph P

    2012-01-01

    As attention to, and motivation for, emergency medical services (EMS)-related research continues to grow, particularly exception from informed consent (EFIC) research, it is important to understand the thoughts, beliefs, and experiences of EMS providers who are actively engaged in the research. We explored the attitudes, beliefs, and experiences of EMS providers regarding their involvement in prehospital emergency research, particularly EFIC research. Using a qualitative design, 24 participants were interviewed including nationally registered paramedics and Virginia-certified emergency medical technicians employed at Richmond Ambulance Authority, the participating EMS agency. At the time of our interviews, the EMS agency was involved in an EFIC trial. Transcribed interview data were coded and analyzed for themes. Findings were presented back to the EMS agency for validation. Overall, there appeared to be support for prehospital emergency research. Participants viewed research as necessary for the advancement of the field of EMS. Improvement in patient care was identified as one of the most important benefits. A number of ethical considerations were identified: individual risk versus public good and consent. The EMS providers in our study were open to working with EMS researchers throughout the community consultation and public disclosure process. The EMS providers in our study valued research and were willing to participate in studies. Support for research was balanced with concerns and challenges regarding the role of providers in the research process.

  10. Ethical principles of informed consent: exploring nurses' dual role of care provider and researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judkins-Cohn, Tanya M; Kielwasser-Withrow, Kiersten; Owen, Melissa; Ward, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, and justice within the nurse researcher-participant relationship as these principles relate to the informed consent process for research. Within this process, the nurse is confronted with a dual role. This article describes how nurses, who are in the dual role of care provider and researcher, can apply these ethical principles to their practice in conjunction with the American Nurses Association's code of ethics for nurses. This article also describes, as an element of ethical practice, the importance of using participant-centered quality measures to aid informed decision making of participants in research. In addition, the article provides strategies for improving the informed consent process in nursing research. Finally, case scenarios are discussed, along with the application of ethical principles within the awareness of the dual role of the nurse as care provider and researcher. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Research on Logistics Service Providers Selection Based on AHP and VIKOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lu

    The logistics service providers supply a kind of service which is a service product, thus there is a plenty of uncertainty and fuzzy in selecting logistics service providers. AHP is first used to calculate the weights of logistics services providers evaluations and then VIKOR method developed for multi-criteria optimization determining a compromise solution is applied to select the logistics services providers. The latter method provides a maximum "group utility" for the "majority" and minimum of an individual regret for the "opponent". This decision making process of logistics services providers selection is verified to be scientific and feasible through the empirical research.

  12. Social Media in Health Research: An Example from Childcare Provider Message Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    Social media sites, such as message boards and blogs, provide innovative data sources for researchers as these sites feature people sharing advice and discussing issues in a public arena. Research has found the online context can encourage people to reveal more information than do such traditional methods as interviews or focus groups. However,…

  13. Comparison of two text message (mHealth) campaigns for the Deaf: Contracted out v. conducted in-house.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacking, Damian; Lau, Yan Kwan; Haricharan, Hanne Jensen; Heap, Marion

    2015-11-20

    Cell phone-based health information (mobile health or mHealth) campaigns are an emerging technology. This evaluation focused on the aspect of cost of two health information campaigns, one on hypertension and one on pregnancy. Researchers could either contract out the technical components of the campaigns or attempt to run the campaigns themselves, in-house. The in-house campaigns cost an estimated ZAR13 548.72 v. the private provider quotes which ranged from ZAR27 542.97 to ZAR34 227.59. Running the campaigns in-house was more labour intensive and required more technical expertise, but had a reduced delivery failure rate (9.2% in-house v. 30.0% private provider). Running small to medium SMS (text message) campaigns for evaluative purposes proved advantageous over contracting out to private providers. Larger-scale evaluations and full-scale roll-out will require the services of private providers, but it is still essential that researchers actively engage with and monitor the technical aspects of these campaigns.

  14. Data Citation Policies of Data Providers within the scope of Longitudinal Studies in Life Course Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold, A.; Rittberger, M.; Mahrholz, N.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a small-scale case study analyzing the nature of data citation policies within the scope of longitudinal studies in life course research is presented. The sample consists of eight data providers from Europe, North-America and Australia and was evaluated with regard to eight criteria which potentially affect data citation behavior of researchers in the field, for example the wording of data citation obligations or sanctions for not citing research data in accordance to given requirements. The study demonstrates that research data providers follow a wide range of approaches to data citation, especially in terms of data citation location within a publication as well as disposal obligations for data-related publications. However, this diversity might lead to inconsistency in data citation behaviour and also to a general lack of comparability of data citation quantity and quality as relevant factors in research evaluation. (Author)

  15. An Action Research in Science: Providing Metacognitive Support to Year 9 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagaba, Francis; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Won, Mihye

    2016-01-01

    An action research study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of providing metacognitive support to enhance Year 9 students' metacognitive capabilities in order to better understand science concepts related to light, environmental health, ecosystems, genetics, ecology, atoms and the Periodic Table. The study was conducted over three years…

  16. Organising, Providing and Evaluating Technical Training for Early Career Researchers: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besouw, Rachel M.; Rogers, Katrine S.; Powles, Christopher J.; Papadopoulos, Timos; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the importance of providing technical training opportunities for Early Career Researchers (ECRs) worldwide through the case study of a MATLAB training programme, which was proposed, organised, managed and evaluated by a team of five ECRs at the University of Southampton. The effectiveness of the programme in terms of the…

  17. 48 CFR 1545.309 - Providing Government production and research property under special restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... improvements necessary for installing special tooling, special test equipment, or plant equipment, shall not be... production and research property under special restrictions. 1545.309 Section 1545.309 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Providing...

  18. RESEARCH ACTION: IMPLEMENTATION ZERO BASED BUDGET (ZBB IN THE PROVIDER SERVICE LEASING EQUIPAMENTS OF CARGO HANDLING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi Gimenez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present the implementation of zero-based budgeting in a rental service provider of cargo handling equipment using the action research methodology. The goal was to examine the possibility of concomitant use of this instrument in service providers in need of accurate information that enables targeting at the best result in a setting avid for quick decisions and actions. Action research was used as research method. It was concluded that it is suitable for this branch, confirming its position as a useful model for restructuring and cutting costs, improving operational and financial results, and as a factor improving organizational environment (behavioral aspects, indirectly creating value to stakeholders.

  19. In-House Career Coaching: An International Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Debra; Neault, Roberta A.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a project in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to develop an in-house career coaching program to support and develop young employees recruited on an affirmative action initiative. The project involved the international partnership of a financial services organization in the UAE and a training provider in Canada to train human…

  20. Research Needs Assessment in the Health Insurance Organization: Level of Health Care Provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Setting research priorities in the research management cycle is a key. It is important to set the research priorities to make optimal use of scarce resources. The aim of this research was to determine the research needs of Health Insurance Organization based on its health care centers research needs.Methods: This is a qualitative, descriptive and cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2011. A purposeful sample of 60 participants from 14 hospitals, seven dispensaries, five dental clinics, two rehabilitation centers, four radiology centers, six medical diagnostic laboratories, 12 pharmacies, and 20 medical offices that were contracted with the Health Insurance Organization in Iran was interviewed. The framework analysis method (a qualitative research method was used for analysis of interviews. Atlas-Ti software was used to analyze quantitative data, respectively. The topics were prioritized using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method through Expert Choice software.Results: Based on the problems extracted in our qualitative study, 12 research topics were proposed by the experts. Among these “Design of standard treatment protocols,” “Designing model of ranking the health care centers under contract,” and “Pathology of payment system” took the priority ranks of 1 to 3, earning the scores of 0.44, 0.42, and 0.37, respectively.Conclusion: Considering limited resources and unlimited needs and to prevent research resource wasting, conducting research related to health care providers in the Health Insurance Organization can help it achieve its goals.

  1. Stepping Stones to Research: Providing Pipelines from Middle School through PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Baum, S. A.; RIT Insight Lab SSR Team; Carlson CenterImaging Science Faculty, Chester F.

    2014-01-01

    We present a decade's worth of strategies designed to promote and provide "Stepping Stones to Research" to provide a realistic pipeline of educational opportunities, with multiple gateways and exit points, for students moving towards STEM careers along the "STEM pipeline". We also illustrate how the Stepping Stones are designed to incidentally co-inside with related external opportunities through which we can also guide and support our mentees on their paths. We present programs such as middle school family science programs, high school research opportunities, high school internships, undergraduate research pathways, research experiences for undergraduates, and other opportunities. We will highlight the presentations being made at this very meeting -- from the first presentation of a high school student, to a dissertation presentation of a PhD graduate -- that have benefited from this stepping stone principle. We also reflect on the essential nature of building a "researcher-trust", even as a young student, of advocates and mentors who can support the continuation of a scientific career.

  2. A Scenario to Provide Atomic Data for Fusion Research in the Stage of Precision Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiaming; Gao Xiang; Cheng Cheng; Zhang Xiaole; Qing Bo

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide abundant atomic data for fusion research in the stage of precision physics, a scenario, being a combination of indispensable theoretical calculations and bench-mark experimental measurements, is proposed. Such abundant atomic data are compiled mainly by theoretical calculations. Accuracies of such abundant data (i.e., atomic energy levels and corresponding cross sections) are ascertained only by a finite number of bench-mark experimental measurements based on analytical calculation of scattering matrices.

  3. Telemedicine Provides Non-Inferior Research Informed Consent for Remote Study Enrollment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobb, Morgan R.; Van Heukelom, Paul G.; Faine, Brett A.; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Messerly, Jeffrey T.; Bell, Gregory; Harland, Karisa K.; Simon, Christian; Mohr, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Telemedicine networks are beginning to provide an avenue for conducting emergency medicine research, but using telemedicine to recruit participants for clinical trials has not been validated. The goal of this consent study is to determine whether patient comprehension of telemedicine-enabled research informed consent is non-inferior to standard face-to-face research informed consent. Methods A prospective, open-label randomized controlled trial was performed in a 60,000-visit Midwestern academic Emergency Department (ED) to test whether telemedicine-enabled research informed consent provided non-inferior comprehension compared with standard consent. This study was conducted as part of a parent clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of oral chlorhexidine gluconate 0.12% in preventing hospital-acquired pneumonia among adult ED patients with expected hospital admission. Prior to being recruited into the study, potential participants were randomized in a 1:1 allocation ratio to consent by telemedicine versus standard face-to-face consent. Telemedicine connectivity was provided using a commercially available interface (REACH platform, Vidyo Inc., Hackensack, NJ) to an emergency physician located in another part of the ED. Comprehension of research consent (primary outcome) was measured using the modified Quality of Informed Consent (QuIC) instrument, a validated tool for measuring research informed consent comprehension. Parent trial accrual rate and qualitative survey data were secondary outcomes. Results One-hundred thirty-one patients were randomized (n = 64, telemedicine), and 101 QuIC surveys were completed. Comprehension of research informed consent using telemedicine was not inferior to face-to-face consent (QuIC scores 74.4 ± 8.1 vs. 74.4 ± 6.9 on a 100-point scale, p = 0.999). Subjective understanding of consent (p=0.194) and parent trial study accrual rates (56% vs. 69%, p = 0.142) were similar. Conclusion Telemedicine is non-inferior to face

  4. USDA food and nutrient databases provide the infrastructure for food and nutrition research, policy, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Jaspreet K C; Moshfegh, Alanna J; Holden, Joanne M; Harris, Ellen

    2013-02-01

    The USDA food and nutrient databases provide the basic infrastructure for food and nutrition research, nutrition monitoring, policy, and dietary practice. They have had a long history that goes back to 1892 and are unique, as they are the only databases available in the public domain that perform these functions. There are 4 major food and nutrient databases released by the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC), part of the USDA's Agricultural Research Service. These include the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database, the Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies, and the USDA Food Patterns Equivalents Database. The users of the databases are diverse and include federal agencies, the food industry, health professionals, restaurants, software application developers, academia and research organizations, international organizations, and foreign governments, among others. Many of these users have partnered with BHNRC to leverage funds and/or scientific expertise to work toward common goals. The use of the databases has increased tremendously in the past few years, especially the breadth of uses. These new uses of the data are bound to increase with the increased availability of technology and public health emphasis on diet-related measures such as sodium and energy reduction. Hence, continued improvement of the databases is important, so that they can better address these challenges and provide reliable and accurate data.

  5. Forging New Service Paths: Institutional Approaches to Providing Research Data Management Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Raboin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper describes three different institutional experiences in developing research data management programs and services, challenges/opportunities and lessons learned.Overview: This paper is based on the Librarian Panel Discussion during the 4th Annual University of Massachusetts and New England Region e-Science Symposium. Librarians representing large public and private research universities presented an overview of service models developed at their respective organizations to bring support for data management and eScience to their communities. The approaches described include two library-based, integrated service models and one collaboratively-staffed, center-based service model.Results: Three institutions describe their experiences in creating the organizational capacity for research data management support services. Although each institutional approach is unique, common challenges include garnering administrative support, managing the integration of services with new or existing staff structures, and continuing to meet researchers needs as they evolve.Conclusions: There is no one way to provide research data management services, but any staff position, committee, or formalized center reflects an overarching organizational commitment to data management support.

  6. Improving Science and IT Literacy by Providing Urban-Based Environmental Science Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, K. E.; Corazza, L.; Liang, J.

    2007-12-01

    A U.C. Berkeley-based outreach program known as Environmental Science Information Technology Activities has been in operation over the past four years. The primary aim of the program is to provide opportunities for grades 9 and 10 students in diverse East San Francisco Bay Area communities to develop deeper understandings of the nature and conduct of science, which will increase their capacity to enroll and perform successfully in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses in the future. Design of the program has been informed by recent research that indicates a close relationship between educational activities that promote the perception of STEM as being relevant and the ability to foster development of deeper conceptual understandings among teens. Accordingly, ESITA includes an important student-led environmental science research project component, which provides participants with opportunities to engage in research investigations that are directly linked to relevant, real-world environmental problems and issues facing their communities. Analysis of evidence gleaned from questionnaires, interviews with participants and specific assessment/evaluation instruments indicates that ESITA program activities, including after-school meetings, summer and school year research projects, and conference preparations and presentations has provided students with high-quality inquiry science experiences that increased their knowledge of STEM and IT concepts, as well as their understanding of the nature of the scientific enterprise. In addition, the program has achieved a high degree of success in that it has: enhanced participants' intellectual self-confidence with regard to STEM; developed deeper appreciation of how scientific research can contribute to the maintenance of healthy local environments; developed a greater interest in participating in STEM-related courses of study and after school programs; and improved attitudes toward STEM. Overall

  7. Putting research in place: an innovative approach to providing contextualized evidence synthesis for decision makers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Bornstein

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Contextualized Health Research Synthesis Program (CHRSP, developed in 2007 by the Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research, produces contextualized knowledge syntheses for health-system decision makers. The program provides timely, relevant, and easy-to-understand scientific evidence; optimizes evidence uptake; and, most importantly, attunes research questions and evidence to the specific context in which knowledge users must apply the findings. Methods As an integrated knowledge translation (KT method, CHRSP: Involves intensive partnerships with senior healthcare decision makers who propose priority research topics and participate on research teams; Considers local context both in framing the research question and in reporting the findings; Makes economical use of resources by utilizing a limited number of staff; Uses a combination of external and local experts; and Works quickly by synthesizing high-level systematic review evidence rather than primary studies. Although it was developed in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador, the CHRSP methodology is adaptable to a variety of settings with distinctive features, such as those in rural, remote, and small-town locations. Results CHRSP has published 25 syntheses on priority topics chosen by the provincial healthcare system, including: Clinical and cost-effectiveness: telehealth, rural renal dialysis, point-of-care testing; Community-based health services: helping seniors age in place, supporting seniors with dementia, residential treatment centers for at-risk youth; Healthcare organization/service delivery: reducing acute-care length of stay, promoting flu vaccination among health workers, safe patient handling, age-friendly acute care; and Health promotion: diabetes prevention, promoting healthy dietary habits. These studies have been used by decision makers to inform local policy and practice decisions. Conclusions By asking the health

  8. Implementing community-based provider participation in research: an empirical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Since 2003, the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) has sought to restructure the clinical research enterprise in the United States by promoting collaborative research partnerships between academically-based investigators and community-based physicians. By increasing community-based provider participation in research (CBPPR), the NIH seeks to advance the science of discovery by conducting research in clinical settings where most people get their care, and accelerate the translation of research results into everyday clinical practice. Although CBPPR is seen as a promising strategy for promoting the use of evidence-based clinical services in community practice settings, few empirical studies have examined the organizational factors that facilitate or hinder the implementation of CBPPR. The purpose of this study is to explore the organizational start-up and early implementation of CBPPR in community-based practice. Methods We used longitudinal, case study research methods and an organizational model of innovation implementation to theoretically guide our study. Our sample consisted of three community practice settings that recently joined the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) in the United States. Data were gathered through site visits, telephone interviews, and archival documents from January 2008 to May 2011. Results The organizational model for innovation implementation was useful in identifying and investigating the organizational factors influencing start-up and early implementation of CBPPR in CCOP organizations. In general, the three CCOP organizations varied in the extent to which they achieved consistency in CBPPR over time and across physicians. All three CCOP organizations demonstrated mixed levels of organizational readiness for change. Hospital management support and resource availability were limited across CCOP organizations early on, although they improved in one CCOP organization

  9. Empowering nurses in providing palliative care to cancer patients: Action research study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Taleghani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic diseases such as cancer would lead to various health needs in patients and their families. To meet needs, developing new educational nursing courses is necessary. Therefore this study was conducted to empower nurses through designing and conducting short-term educational courses for training palliative care nurses. Materials and Methods: This study was a community-based action research which was conducted at Isfahan hospitals that provide services for cancer patients during 2015 at four stages (planning, acting, reflection, and evaluation. Participants (33 samples included nurses, head nurses, managers of nursing services, nursing professors and professors of oncology department. Data were gathered through individual and group interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in 3 categories of "professional development of nursing in palliative care" which included subcategories of: knowledge-based performance and positive change in attitude, "obstacles to provide palliative care" with subcategories of: insufficient professional responsibility, insufficient ability in managing some of patients' symptoms and inappropriate interaction between nurses and physicians and "strategies for improving provision of palliative care" with subcategories of: improving the interactions between physicians and nurses, continuous trainings for palliative care and the necessity of developing palliative care in the country. Conclusions: To facilitate the process of providing palliative care to cancer patients, necessary actions and measures must be conducted including improvement of interaction between the members of health team, organizing continuing educational courses on palliative care and development of providing palliative care all over the country by managers of health centers.

  10. The DEDUCE Guided Query tool: providing simplified access to clinical data for research and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Monica M; Winfield, Stephanie; Evans, Steve; Slopek, Steve; Shang, Howard; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    In many healthcare organizations, comparative effectiveness research and quality improvement (QI) investigations are hampered by a lack of access to data created as a byproduct of patient care. Data collection often hinges upon either manual chart review or ad hoc requests to technical experts who support legacy clinical systems. In order to facilitate this needed capacity for data exploration at our institution (Duke University Health System), we have designed and deployed a robust Web application for cohort identification and data extraction--the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE). DEDUCE is envisioned as a simple, web-based environment that allows investigators access to administrative, financial, and clinical information generated during patient care. By using business intelligence tools to create a view into Duke Medicine's enterprise data warehouse, DEDUCE provides a Guided Query functionality using a wizard-like interface that lets users filter through millions of clinical records, explore aggregate reports, and, export extracts. Researchers and QI specialists can obtain detailed patient- and observation-level extracts without needing to understand structured query language or the underlying database model. Developers designing such tools must devote sufficient training and develop application safeguards to ensure that patient-centered clinical researchers understand when observation-level extracts should be used. This may mitigate the risk of data being misunderstood and consequently used in an improper fashion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. RESEARCH OF PROBLEMS OF DESIGN OF COMPLEX TECHNICAL PROVIDING AND THE GENERALIZED MODEL OF THEIR DECISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Skrypnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In this work the general ideas of a method of V. I. Skurikhin taking into account the specified features develop and questions of the analysis and synthesis of a complex of technical means, with finishing them to the level suitable for use in engineering practice of design of information management systems are in more detail considered. In work the general system approach to the solution of questions of a choice of technical means of the information management system is created, the general technique of the sys tem analysis and synthesis of a complex of the technical means and its subsystems providing achievement of extreme value of criterion of efficiency of functioning of a technical complex of the information management system is developed. The main attention is paid to the applied party of system researches of complex technical providing, in particular, to definition of criteria of quality of functioning of a technical complex, development of methods of the analysis of information base of the information management system and definition of requirements to technical means, and also methods of structural synthesis of the main subsystems of complex technical providing. Thus, the purpose is research on the basis of system approach of complex technical providing the information management system and development of a number of methods of the analysis and the synthesis of complex technical providing suitable for use in engineering practice of design of systems. The well-known paradox of development of management information consists of that parameters of the system, and consequently, and requirements to the complex hardware, can not be strictly reasonable to development of algorithms and programs, and vice versa. The possible method of overcoming of these difficulties is prognostication of structure and parameters of complex hardware for certain management informations on the early stages of development, with subsequent clarification and

  12. [Does co-operation research provide approaches to explain the changes in the German hospital market?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, C; Leidl, R

    2004-11-01

    The German hospital market faces an extensive process of consolidation. In this change hospitals consider cooperation as one possibility to improve competitiveness. To investigate explanations of changes in the German hospital market by theoretical approaches of cooperation research. The aims and mechanism of the theories, their relevance in terms of contents and their potential for empirical tests were used as criteria to assess the approaches, with current and future trends in the German hospital market providing the framework. Based on literature review, six theoretical approaches were investigated: industrial organization, transaction cost theory, game theory, resource dependency, institutional theory, and co-operative investment and finance theory. In addition, the data needed to empirically test the theories were specified. As a general problem, some of the theoretical approaches set a perfect market as a precondition. This precondition is not met by the heavily regulated German hospital market. Given the current regulations and the assessment criteria, industrial organization as well as resource-dependency and institutional theory approaches showed the highest potential to explain various aspects of the changes in the hospital market. So far, none of the approaches investigated provides a comprehensive and empirically tested explanation of the changes in the German hospital market. However, some of the approaches provide a theoretical background for part of the changes. As this dynamic market is economically of high significance, there is a need for further development and empirical testing of relevant theoretical approaches.

  13. The TLRR II – Providing Digital Infrastructure to Research Roman Republican Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Jahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The project Trials in the Late Roman Republic II (TLRR II aims at collecting, organizing, and analyzing information about Roman legal cases in an XML database. M. Alexander published the book “Trials in the Late Roman Republic, 149 BC to 50 BC” (TLRR I in 1990, and initiated the current project that will make Roman republican trials easily accessible with modern technology. For each case a short description is provided, a clear distinction between assumptions and facts is made, and an updated bibliography can be found at the end of each entry. The open access database can serve both as a reference work and as a starting point for further research in Roman Republican history. It could be a connecting link within the developing digital infrastructure for that era.

  14. Globus Nexus: A Platform-as-a-Service Provider of Research Identity, Profile, and Group Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Kyle; Lidman, Mattias; McCollam, Brendan; Bryan, Josh; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Tuecke, Steven; Foster, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Globus Nexus is a professionally hosted Platform-as-a-Service that provides identity, profile and group management functionality for the research community. Many collaborative e-Science applications need to manage large numbers of user identities, profiles, and groups. However, developing and maintaining such capabilities is often challenging given the complexity of modern security protocols and requirements for scalable, robust, and highly available implementations. By outsourcing this functionality to Globus Nexus, developers can leverage best-practice implementations without incurring development and operations overhead. Users benefit from enhanced capabilities such as identity federation, flexible profile management, and user-oriented group management. In this paper we present Globus Nexus, describe its capabilities and architecture, summarize how several e-Science applications leverage these capabilities, and present results that characterize its scalability, reliability, and availability.

  15. Globus Nexus: A Platform-as-a-Service provider of research identity, profile, and group management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chard, Kyle; Lidman, Mattias; McCollam, Brendan; Bryan, Josh; Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Tuecke, Steven; Foster, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Globus Nexus is a professionally hosted Platform-as-a-Service that provides identity, profile and group management functionality for the research community. Many collaborative e-Science applications need to manage large numbers of user identities, profiles, and groups. However, developing and maintaining such capabilities is often challenging given the complexity of modern security protocols and requirements for scalable, robust, and highly available implementations. By outsourcing this functionality to Globus Nexus, developers can leverage best-practice implementations without incurring development and operations overhead. Users benefit from enhanced capabilities such as identity federation, flexible profile management, and user-oriented group management. In this paper we present Globus Nexus, describe its capabilities and architecture, summarize how several e-Science applications leverage these capabilities, and present results that characterize its scalability, reliability, and availability.

  16. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  17. Computational psychotherapy research: scaling up the evaluation of patient-provider interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imel, Zac E; Steyvers, Mark; Atkins, David C

    2015-03-01

    In psychotherapy, the patient-provider interaction contains the treatment's active ingredients. However, the technology for analyzing the content of this interaction has not fundamentally changed in decades, limiting both the scale and specificity of psychotherapy research. New methods are required to "scale up" to larger evaluation tasks and "drill down" into the raw linguistic data of patient-therapist interactions. In the current article, we demonstrate the utility of statistical text analysis models called topic models for discovering the underlying linguistic structure in psychotherapy. Topic models identify semantic themes (or topics) in a collection of documents (here, transcripts). We used topic models to summarize and visualize 1,553 psychotherapy and drug therapy (i.e., medication management) transcripts. Results showed that topic models identified clinically relevant content, including affective, relational, and intervention related topics. In addition, topic models learned to identify specific types of therapist statements associated with treatment-related codes (e.g., different treatment approaches, patient-therapist discussions about the therapeutic relationship). Visualizations of semantic similarity across sessions indicate that topic models identify content that discriminates between broad classes of therapy (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. psychodynamic therapy). Finally, predictive modeling demonstrated that topic model-derived features can classify therapy type with a high degree of accuracy. Computational psychotherapy research has the potential to scale up the study of psychotherapy to thousands of sessions at a time. We conclude by discussing the implications of computational methods such as topic models for the future of psychotherapy research and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. A novel Internet-based blended learning programme providing core competency in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugihashi, Yukio; Kakudate, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Mishina, Hiroki; Fukumori, Norio; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Takegami, Misa; Ohno, Shinya; Wakita, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2013-04-01

    We developed a novel Internet-based blended learning programme that allows busy health care professionals to attain core competency in clinical research. This study details the educational strategies and learning outcomes of the programme. This study was conducted at Kyoto University and seven satellite campuses from September 2009 to March 2010. A total of 176 health care professionals who had never attempted to attain core competency in clinical research were enrolled. The participants were supplied with a novel programme comprising the following four strategies: online live lectures at seven satellite campuses, short examinations after each lecture, an Internet-based feedback system and an end-of-course examination. We assessed the proportion of attendance at the lectures as the main outcome. In addition, we evaluated interaction via the feedback system and scores for end-of-course examination. Of the 176 participants, 134 (76%) reported working more than 40 hours per week. The mean proportion of attendance over all 23 lectures was 82%. A total of 156 (89%) participants attended more than 60% of all lectures and were eligible for the end-of-course examination. A total of the participants accessed the feedback system 3564 times and asked 284 questions. No statistically significant differences were noted in the end-of-course scores among medical doctors, pharmacists, registered nurses and other occupations. We developed an Internet-based blended learning programme providing core competency in clinical research. Most busy health care professionals completed the programme successfully. In addition, the participants could attain the core competency effectively, regardless of their occupation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Providing Total Quality Fundamentals: 1995 Workshops for the NASA Lewis Research Center's Technical Services Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antczak, Paul; Jacinto,Gilda; Simek, Jimmy

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) agency-wide movement to cultivate a quality workplace is the basis for Lewis Research Center to implement Total Quality Fundamentals (TQF) initiatives. The Lewis Technical Services Directorate (TSD) introduced the Total Quality Fundamentals (TQF) workshops to its work force as an opportunity to introduce the concepts and principles of TQF. These workshops also provided the participants with the opportunity to dialogue with fellow TSD employees and managers. This report describes, through the perspective of the Lewis TSD TQF Coaches, how the TQF work- shop process was accomplished in TSD. It describes the structure for addressing the need, implementation process, input the TSD Coaches provided, common themes and concerns raised, conclusions, and recommendations. The Coaches concluded that these types of workshops could be the key to open the communication channels that are necessary to help everyone at Lewis understand where they fit in the organization. TQF workshops can strengthen the participant's connection with the Mission, Vision of the Center, and Vision of the Agency. Reconunendations are given based on these conclusions that can help the TSD Quality Board develop attainable measures towards a quality workplace.

  20. Providing open hydrological data for decision making and research - hypeweb.smhi.se

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömbäck, Lena; Andersson, Jafet; Donnelly, Chantal; Gustafsson, David; Isberg, Kristina; Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Strömqvist, Johan; Arheimer, Berit

    2015-04-01

    resources and dynamics; (ii) The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) for characterization and development of measure programs to improve the ecological status of water bodies; (iii) Design variables for infrastructure constructions; (iv) Spatial water-resource mapping; (v) Operational forecasts (1-10 days and seasonal) on floods and droughts; (vi) Input to oceanographic models for operational forecasts and marine status assessments; (vii) Research. The presentation will give an overview of the functionality of the web site and the available hydrological datasets. We will also discuss a number of challenges experienced and solutions found during the construction of the website. One such is the functionality and interface design of the web site which involves cooperation between IT-specialists and hydrologists. Here, an important goal has been the software and database design to provide an efficient website which can easily be extended with new data and functionality. Another important issue is providing relevant information about the provided datasets and models to make it easy for external user to reuse the data as well as the use of standards and limitations due to dependencies of other datasets. The openly available data has been attractive by other research teams and agencies and led to new collaborations.

  1. Cloud hosting of the IPython Notebook to Provide Collaborative Research Environments for Big Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Philip; Lawrence, Bryan; Gomez-Dans, Jose; Holt, John

    2015-04-01

    We explore how the popular IPython Notebook computing system can be hosted on a cloud platform to provide a flexible virtual research hosting environment for Earth Observation data processing and analysis and how this approach can be expanded more broadly into a generic SaaS (Software as a Service) offering for the environmental sciences. OPTIRAD (OPTImisation environment for joint retrieval of multi-sensor RADiances) is a project funded by the European Space Agency to develop a collaborative research environment for Data Assimilation of Earth Observation products for land surface applications. Data Assimilation provides a powerful means to combine multiple sources of data and derive new products for this application domain. To be most effective, it requires close collaboration between specialists in this field, land surface modellers and end users of data generated. A goal of OPTIRAD then is to develop a collaborative research environment to engender shared working. Another significant challenge is that of data volume and complexity. Study of land surface requires high spatial and temporal resolutions, a relatively large number of variables and the application of algorithms which are computationally expensive. These problems can be addressed with the application of parallel processing techniques on specialist compute clusters. However, scientific users are often deterred by the time investment required to port their codes to these environments. Even when successfully achieved, it may be difficult to readily change or update. This runs counter to the scientific process of continuous experimentation, analysis and validation. The IPython Notebook provides users with a web-based interface to multiple interactive shells for the Python programming language. Code, documentation and graphical content can be saved and shared making it directly applicable to OPTIRAD's requirements for a shared working environment. Given the web interface it can be readily made into a hosted

  2. Accounting Research Methodology Textbook Development to Provide College Students in Accounting Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Muchson, Mochamad

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lackness of a research accounting methodology book (accounting research methodology) causing difficulties for college students to understand the steps of research in accounting, so that's the textbook is needed to completing Accounting Research Methodology book that has been exist and aimed to guide students for proposal composing or accounting research report so that it is easier to study by students.This textbook contains of accounting research methodology definition, accounting ...

  3. Mars Public Mapping Project: Public Participation in Science Research; Providing Opportunities for Kids of All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L. D.; Valderrama Graff, P.; Bandfield, J. L.; Christensen, P. R.; Klug, S. L.; Deva, B.; Capages, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Mars Public Mapping Project is a web-based education and public outreach tool developed by the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University. This tool allows the general public to identify and map geologic features on Mars, utilizing Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) visible images, allowing public participation in authentic scientific research. In addition, participants are able to rate each image (based on a 1 to 5 star scale) to help build a catalog of some of the more appealing and interesting martian surface features. Once participants have identified observable features in an image, they are able to view a map of the global distribution of the many geologic features they just identified. This automatic feedback, through a global distribution map, allows participants to see how their answers compare to the answers of other participants. Participants check boxes "yes, no, or not sure" for each feature that is listed on the Mars Public Mapping Project web page, including surface geologic features such as gullies, sand dunes, dust devil tracks, wind streaks, lava flows, several types of craters, and layers. Each type of feature has a quick and easily accessible description and example image. When a participant moves their mouse over each example thumbnail image, a window pops up with a picture and a description of the feature. This provides a form of "on the job training" for the participants that can vary with their background level. For users who are more comfortable with Mars geology, there is also an advanced feature identification section accessible by a drop down menu. This includes additional features that may be identified, such as streamlined islands, valley networks, chaotic terrain, yardangs, and dark slope streaks. The Mars Public Mapping Project achieves several goals: 1) It engages the public in a manner that encourages active participation in scientific research and learning about geologic features and processes. 2) It helps to

  4. Construction of In-house Databases in a Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Haruki; Mezaki, Koji

    This paper describes fundamental idea of technical information management in Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., and present status of the activities. Then it introduces the background and history of the development, problems and countermeasures against them regarding Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Technical Information Retrieval System (called MARON) which started its service in May, 1985. The system deals with databases which cover information common to the whole company (in-house research and technical reports, holding information of books, journals and so on), and local information held in each business division or department. Anybody from any division can access to these databases through the company-wide network. The in-house interlibrary loan subsystem called Orderentry is available, which supports acquiring operation of original materials.

  5. A model of sustainable development of scientific research health institutions, providing high-tech medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Bedoreva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of sustainability is relevant for all types of businesses and organizations. Long-term development has always been and remains one of the most difficult tasks faced by organizations. The implementation the provisions of international standards ISO series 9000 has proven to be effective. The ISO standards are concentrated on the global experience for sustainable success of organizations. The standards incorporated all the rational that has been accumulated in this field of knowledge and practice. These standards not only eliminate technical barriers in collaboration and have established standardized approaches, but also serve as a valuable source of international experience and ready management solutions. They became a practical guide for the creation of management systems for sustainable development in organizations of different spheres of activity.Problem and purpose. The article presents the author’s approach to the problem of sustainable development health of the organization. The purpose of this article is to examine the approaches to management for sustainable success of organizations and to describe a model of sustainable development applied in research healthcare institutions providing high-tech medical care.Methodology. The study used general scientific methods of empirical and theoretical knowledge, general logical methods and techniques and methods of system analysis, comparison, analogy, generalization, the materials research for the development of medical organizations.The main results of our work are to first develop the technique of complex estimation of activity of the scientific-research institutions of health and deploy key elements of the management system that allows the level of maturity of the management system of the institution to be set in order to identify its strengths and weaknesses, and to identify areas for improvements and innovation, and to set priorities for determining the sequence of action when

  6. Genetics and evolution of hybrid male sterility in house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael A; Stubbings, Maria; Dumont, Beth L; Payseur, Bret A

    2012-07-01

    Comparative genetic mapping provides insights into the evolution of the reproductive barriers that separate closely related species. This approach has been used to document the accumulation of reproductive incompatibilities over time, but has only been applied to a few taxa. House mice offer a powerful system to reconstruct the evolution of reproductive isolation between multiple subspecies pairs. However, studies of the primary reproductive barrier in house mice-hybrid male sterility-have been restricted to a single subspecies pair: Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus. To provide a more complete characterization of reproductive isolation in house mice, we conducted an F(2) intercross between wild-derived inbred strains from Mus musculus castaneus and M. m. domesticus. We identified autosomal and X-linked QTL associated with a range of hybrid male sterility phenotypes, including testis weight, sperm density, and sperm morphology. The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) was strongly associated with hybrid sterility phenotypes when heterozygous. We compared QTL found in this cross with QTL identified in a previous F(2) intercross between M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus and found three shared autosomal QTL. Most QTL were not shared, demonstrating that the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility largely differs between these closely related subspecies pairs. These results lay the groundwork for identifying genes responsible for the early stages of speciation in house mice.

  7. Researching the acceptability of using Skype to provide Speech and Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Rebecca Alison; Woll, Bencie; Clarke, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In the current economic climate, whilst the demand for health services, including Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) continues to rise, there is pressure to reduce health service budgets, Tele-technology—the use of tele-communication technology to link patient and clinician remotely—could potentially provide a solution to meeting the demand for SLT with reduced resources. However, only a few SLT services in the United Kingdom (UK) have reported on using tele-technology to provide their service (Howell, Tripoliti and Pring, 2009; Styles, 2008; McCullough, 2001; Katsavarus, 2001). In 2002 the American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) surveyed its members on their experience and views of using tele-technology and specifically video-conferencing to provide an SLT service. The analysis of the responses identified five areas of concern—lack of professional guidelines, limited evidence of clinical efficacy, disruption and problems managing the technology, change in the interaction and loss of rapport as well as anticipated, additional costs to provide the service. The study reported here set up an SLT service using the desktop videoconferencing system, Skype, in an independent SLT practice based in the UK. Data were collected to evaluate the acceptability of the clinical sessions, the technology, the quality of interaction and costs of an SLT service using Skype. Eleven participants aged between 7 and 14 years with varying therapy needs took part. Each received a mix of face-to-face (F2F) and Skype SLT over the ten session trial period. Data were collected for every session using a report card; adults supporting the children were asked for their views using a questionnaire at the beginning and end of the trial; the child participants were interviewed after the trial period was over; one F2F and one Skype session was video recorded for each participant; work activity was recorded along with identifiable costs of F2F and Skype SLT sessions. A total of 110 session

  8. Variation in housing design: identifying customer preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Erwin; Halman, Johannes I.M.; Ion, Roxana A.

    2006-01-01

    House builders in different countries are exploring ways to deliver higher levels of customisation in housing design. To create such variety at acceptable cost, it is important to know how potential buyers of new houses prioritise the different elements such as bathroom, kitchen and roof type of a

  9. Variation in housing design: identitying customer preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, E.; Halman, J.I.M.; Ion, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    House builders in different countries are exploring ways to deliver higher levels of customisation in housing design. To create such variety at acceptable cost, it is important to know how potential buyers of new houses prioritise the different elements such as bathroom, kitchen and roof type of a

  10. Escalation research: Providing new frontiers for applying behavior analysis to organizational behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Sonia M.

    2000-01-01

    Decision fiascoes such as escalation of commitment, the tendency of decision makers to “throw good money after bad,” can have serious consequences for organizations and are therefore of great interest in applied research. This paper discusses the use of behavior analysis in organizational behavior research on escalation. Among the most significant aspects of behavior-analytic research on escalation is that it has indicated that both the patterns of outcomes that decision makers have experienced for past decisions and the patterns of responses that they make are critical for understanding escalation. This research has also stimulated the refinement of methods by researchers to better assess decision making and the role reinforcement plays in it. Finally, behavior-analytic escalation research has not only indicated the utility of reinforcement principles for predicting more complex human behavior but has also suggested some additional areas for future exploration of decision making using behavior analysis. PMID:22478347

  11. Is Public Relations Research Providing the Unified Body of Knowledge Necessary for Professional Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudino, James L.; Steele, Michael E.

    To investigate whether researchers are developing empirically-based public relations research efforts, and whether such efforts could be considered useful to public relations practitioners, a study conducted a content analysis of all articles published in "Public Relations Review" from 1977 through 1987. Articles (196 were coded in all)…

  12. Impact of perceived innovation characteristics on adoption of pharmacy-based in-house immunization services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Salisa C; Mount, Jeanine K

    2009-02-01

    An in-house immunization service in which staff pharmacists administer vaccines was conceptualized as an innovation. Prior to making adoption decisions, community pharmacies evaluated characteristics of in-house immunization services. This study examined the impact of three specific characteristics (perceived benefit, perceived compatibility and perceived complexity) of in-house immunization services on community pharmacies' adoption decisions. A multi-stage mixed-mode survey design was used to collect data from key informants of community pharmacies in Washington State, USA. Key informants included pharmacy managers or pharmacists-on-duty who were able to answer questions related to immunization activities in their pharmacies. Perceived characteristics of in-house immunization services and pharmacy adoption decisions were measured in 2004 and in 2006-2007, respectively. Each perceived characteristic individually predicted adoption of in-house immunization services. When all three characteristics were included in logistic regression, perceived benefit was the only significant predictor of in-house immunization service adoption. Appropriate strategies, particularly promoting the benefit of in-house immunization services, should be implemented. The proposed model and findings may be applicable to other pharmacy-based innovative practices or other public health initiatives. We recommend that organizational leaders, researchers and practitioners consider the impact of perceived benefit and incorporate it when they design strategies to foster adoption of innovative practices. Doing this may increase the number of adopters and also increase diffusion rates for innovative services.

  13. Perspectives on Research Participation and Facilitation Among Dialysis Patients, Clinic Personnel, and Medical Providers: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flythe, Jennifer E; Narendra, Julia H; Dorough, Adeline; Oberlander, Jonathan; Ordish, Antoinette; Wilkie, Caroline; Dember, Laura M

    2017-12-19

    Most prospective studies involving individuals receiving maintenance dialysis have been small, and many have had poor clinical translatability. Research relevance can be enhanced through stakeholder engagement. However, little is known about dialysis clinic stakeholders' perceptions of research participation and facilitation. The objective of this study was to characterize the perspectives of dialysis clinic stakeholders (patients, clinic personnel, and medical providers) on: (1) research participation by patients and (2) research facilitation by clinic personnel and medical providers. We also sought to elucidate stakeholder preferences for research communication. Qualitative study. 7 focus groups (59 participants: 8 clinic managers, 14 nurses/patient care technicians, 8 social workers/dietitians, 11 nephrologists/advanced practice providers, and 18 patients/care partners) from 7 North Carolina dialysis clinics. Clinics and participants were purposively sampled. Focus groups were recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis. We identified 11 themes that captured barriers to and facilitators of research participation by patients and research facilitation by clinic personnel and medical providers. We collapsed these themes into 4 categories to create an organizational framework for considering stakeholder (narrow research understanding, competing personal priorities, and low patient literacy and education levels), relationship (trust, buy-in, and altruistic motivations), research design (convenience, follow-up, and patient incentives), and dialysis clinic (professional demands, teamwork, and communication) aspects that may affect stakeholder interest in participating in or facilitating research. These themes appear to shape the degree of research readiness of a dialysis clinic environment. Participants preferred short research communications delivered in multiple formats. Potential selection bias and inclusion of English-speaking participants only. Our findings

  14. Qwest provides high-speed network for major research institutions in Illinois eight campuses interconnected to foster collaborative, virtual research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Qwest Communications International Inc. today announced that Argonne National Laboratory has deployed Qwest's broadband fiber optic network for the Illinois Wired/Wireless Infrastructure for Research and Education (I-WIRE) project (1 page).

  15. Ethics and governance in digital mental health research – a joint academic and provider perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aislinn Bergin

    2015-10-01

    In DMH research the use of “ethics-as-process” can enable adaptation to the ‘unknown unknowns’ but there will be an increasing need for protocols to be established and maintained. Significant in these protocols will be guidance from DMH services as to how research can be encouraged as well as their position of responsibility. DMH services would benefit from a ‘toolkit’ to support their decision-making on which research to participate in, and how best to involve their users in this process.

  16. The G4R GMES Academy - linking research, academia, service providers and local authorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeil, Peter; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2013-04-01

    The GMES Academy intends to enhance the role of the academic and R&D communities in the evolution of EO & GI services. The GMES4Regions G4R initiative, aiming to strengthen the link between GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) and European regions, inaugurated the GMES Academy at the University Mozarteum of Salzburg (Austria) on 13th - 14th September 2012. This academy has been created with the objective of fostering a dialogue among the private sector, Local and Regional Administration (LRA) and the academic and research community, in order to improve the development of Earth Observation (EO) and Geographic Information (GI) services. On this occasion, Z_GIS, the Interfaculty Department of Geoinformatics of Salzburg University, hosted the round table "Fostering Downstream Services for the Regions - contributions from Research & Academia," during which the participants had the opportunity to discuss with representatives of the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA) the future role of the academic community in this domain. Stakeholders from the academic and R&D world adopted the 'Salzburg Declaration on GMES related Research', calling for strengthening connections between research activities and educational programmes to improve GMES services. The Declaration calls mainly for: • fostering education and training on GMES • ensuring cooperation among the academic and research community through the GMES Academy • maintaining a political commitment towards the implementation of such academic initiatives. The GMES Academy is established as a platform with six components: GATEWAY - the directory of Universities and Research Centres BRIDGE - an inventory of research briefs documenting the latest offerings from research to effective applications FACILITATOR - a portal to seek or propose internships or contract research across Europe and addressing outreach and advocacy: LINK - Access to the repository of on-going GMES related

  17. AskFuse Origins: System Barriers to Providing the Research That Public Health Practice and Policy Partners Say They Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushmer, Rosemary; Shucksmith, Janet

    2018-01-01

    In this paper the development of askFuse is used as a case study to illustrate contextual and system barriers to universities providing useful, usable and timely research evidence in response to local practice and policy partners' stated public health research needs. Entrenched systems (research excellence framework, academic career pathways,…

  18. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) Any list that may be prepared by the Food and Drug Administration of testing and research...

  19. 77 FR 1708 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Technology To Provide Wireless Precise Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... Systems (GPS) as a means of providing precise time. The alternative under consideration is a wireless... authorized by the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99- 502, codified at 15 U.S.C. 3710(a)). A..., and document at least one alternative to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) as a means of providing...

  20. Provider Experiences with Chronic Care Management (CCM) Services and Fees: A Qualitative Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Sarwar, Rumin; Keith, Rosalind; Balke, Patrick; Ma, Sai; McCall, Nancy

    2017-12-01

    Support for ongoing care management and coordination between office visits for patients with multiple chronic conditions has been inadequate. In January 2015, Medicare introduced the Chronic Care Management (CCM) payment policy, which reimburses providers for CCM activities for Medicare beneficiaries occurring outside of office visits. To explore the experiences, facilitators, and challenges of practices providing CCM services, and their implications going forward. Semi-structured telephone interviews from January to April 2016 with 71 respondents. Sixty billing and non-billing providers and practice staff knowledgeable about their practices' CCM services, and 11 professional society representatives. Practice respondents noted that most patients expressed positive views of CCM services. Practice respondents also perceived several patient benefits, including improved adherence to treatment, access to care team members, satisfaction, care continuity, and care coordination. Facilitators of CCM provision included having an in-practice care manager, patient-centered medical home recognition, experience developing care plans, patient trust in their provider, and supplemental insurance to cover CCM copayments. Most billing practices reported few problems obtaining patients' consent for CCM, though providers felt that CMS could better facilitate consent by marketing CCM's goals to beneficiaries. Barriers reported by professional society representatives and by billing and non-billing providers included inadequacy of CCM payments to cover upfront investments for staffing, workflow modification, and time needed to manage complex patients. Other barriers included inadequate infrastructure for health information exchange with other providers and limited electronic health record capabilities for documenting and updating care plans. Practices owned by hospital systems and large medical groups faced greater bureaucracy in implementing CCM than did smaller, independent practices

  1. Advancing Prostate Cancer Research by Providing Summer Research Opportunities for HBCU Students at the Cancer Center at UTHSCSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    encouraging the students to attend the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) meeting in Chicago in April 2018. The abstracts for this...Updates: Elucidating the Effects of Obesity on Bladder Cancer Progression - completed CTRC at UTHSCSA: Genomics Shared Resource; reduced from

  2. Providing Undergraduate Research Opportunities Through the World Rivers Observatory Collaborative Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, S. L.; Marsh, S. J.; Janmaat, A.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Voss, B.; Holmes, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Successful research collaboration exists between the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV), a primarily undergraduate-serving university located on the Fraser River in British Columbia, and the World Rivers Observatory that is coordinated through the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) and the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC). The World Rivers Observatory coordinates time-series sampling of 15 large rivers, with particular focus on the large Arctic rivers, the Ganges-Brahmaputra, Congo, Fraser, Yangtze (Changjiang), Amazon, and Mackenzie River systems. The success of this international observatory critically depends on the participation of local collaborators, such as UFV, that are necessary in order to collect temporally resolved data from these rivers. Several faculty members and undergraduate students from the Biology and Geography Departments of UFV received on-site training from the lead-PIs of the Global Rivers Observatory. To share information and ensure good quality control of sampling methods, WHOI and WHRC hosted two international workshops at Woods Hole for collaborators. For the past four years, faculty and students from UFV have been collecting a variety of bi-monthly water samples from the Fraser River for the World Rivers Observatory. UFV undergraduate students who become involved learn proper sampling techniques and are given the opportunity to design and conduct their own research. Students have collected, analyzed and presented data from this project at regional, national, and international scientific meetings. UFV undergraduate students have also been hosted by WHOI and WHRC as guest students to work on independent research projects. While at WHOI and WHRC, students are able to conduct research using state-of-the-art specialized research facilities not available at UFV.

  3. The control of radon levels in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jarallah, M. B. I.

    2007-01-01

    The article speaks about radon entry ways to houses, the technologies of controlling the level of radon in indoors and four possible ways to solve the problem of high concentration of radon gas in housing and protection from being gathered to a certain extent that is harmful to health. These methods are: removal of the radon source, modifying the radon source, ventilation and air filtration. The article also addresses the impact of reducing the consumption of heating energy in homes and buildings using thermal insulators in floors, walls, ceilings and doors and making double glazed windows that confine the air. It has been proven that there is a steady relationship between energy conservation measures in housing and the increase of radon concentration by two to three times. In a lot of buildings, where conservation measures have been taken, materials to conserve heat are used, which themselves launch radon and this may lead to increased levels of the gas in the housing.

  4. In-house characterization of protein powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Christian Grundahl; Nielsen, Ole Faurskov; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction patterns of lysozyme and insulin were recorded on a standard in-house powder diffractometer. The experimental powder diffraction patterns were compared with patterns calculated from Protein Data Bank coordinate data. Good agreement was obtained by including straightforward...... to include calculated H-atom positions did not improve the overall fit and was abandoned. The method devised was shown to be a quick and convenient tool for distinguishing precipitates and polymorphs of proteins....

  5. Shedding Light: Private "For Profit" Training Providers and Young Early School Leavers. NCVER Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myconos, George; Clarke, Kira; te Riele, Kitty

    2016-01-01

    This research investigates the oft-criticised segment of the vocational education and training (VET) sector in Australia--private, for-profit registered training organisations (RTOs)--with the aim of gaining a clearer understanding of the approaches they adopt in training 15 to 19-year-olds who have left school early. Through a nationwide survey…

  6. Can Research Homework Provide a Vehicle for Assessment for Learning in Science Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Louise; Winterbottom, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Many English schools have a homework policy which prescribes how much homework should be set for each pupil each week, irrespective of whether it can be made meaningful. Research recommends "Assessment for Learning" (AfL) as supportive of students' learning, but teachers can find it difficult to incorporate AfL techniques into their…

  7. Implementation of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI Practices in Industry: Providing the Right Incentives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Gurzawska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI is a term used by policy-makers and academics to refer to research and innovation that is ethically acceptable and socially desirable. Despite the fact that the vast majority of research and innovation (R&I is funded and produced by industry, companies tend to have no awareness or recognition of this concept. This is unfortunate, as the RRI paradigm could be mutually beneficial for both business and society: it could help businesses realise competitive opportunities while also leading to positive economic, societal and environmental impacts. This paper investigates how industry can be incentivised to engage in research and innovation following the approach of RRI. We propose a matrix of incentives for stimulating the adoption of RRI. We categorise incentives according to three dichotomies: external and internal, instrumental and non-instrumental, direct and indirect. The incentives are formalised in a causal loop diagram, which can be used to demonstrate the sound character of investing in RRI from a business perspective. We discuss examples of incentives, including corporate reputation and critical consumerism, certification, employee engagement, and governance. Lastly, to ensure effective implementation of RRI, we outline factors for the realisation of successful incentives for RRI in industry.

  8. Summer research training provides effective tools for underrepresented minorities to obtain doctoral level degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ethnic, racial, and cultural diversity of the USA is not reflected in its healthcare and biomedical workforce. Undergraduate research programs are used to encourage underrepresented minorities to pursue training for biomedical careers, but there is limited published data on doctoral degree compl...

  9. Mixing students and performance artists to provide innovative ways of communicating scientific research

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    In May 2007 the Open University (U.K.) in conjunction with the MK (Milton Keynes) Gallery invited performance artists Noble and Silver to work with a group of students to design innovative methods of disseminating their research to a general audience. The students created a multitude of well-received live and multimedia performances based on their research. Students found they greatly benefited from the artists' and each others' different viewpoints and backgrounds, resulting in improved communication skills and varying interpretations of their own topic of interest. This work focuses on research aimed at identifying precursory activity at volcanoes using temperature, earthquake and ground movement data, to aid improvement of early warning systems. For this project an aspect of the research relevant to the public was chosen: the importance of appropriately timed warnings regarding the possibility of an eruption. If a warning is issued too early it may cause complacency and apathy towards the situation, whereas issuing a warning too late may endanger lives and property. An interactive DVD was produced which leads the user through the events preceding a volcanic eruption. The goal is to warn the public about the impending eruption at the most appropriate time. Data is presented in short film clips, after which questions are posed. Based on the player's answers the consequences or follow-up events of the choices are explored. We aim to improve and expand upon this concept in the near future, as well as making the DVD available to schools for educational purposes.

  10. The JRC Nanomaterials Repository: A unique facility providing representative test materials for nanoEHS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totaro, Sara; Cotogno, Giulio; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Pianella, Francesca; Roncaglia, Marco; Olsson, Heidi; Riego Sintes, Juan M; Crutzen, Hugues P

    2016-11-01

    The European Commission has established a Nanomaterials Repository that hosts industrially manufactured nanomaterials that are distributed world-wide for safety testing of nanomaterials. In a first instance these materials were tested in the OECD Testing Programme. They have then also been tested in several EU funded research projects. The JRC Repository of Nanomaterials has thus developed into serving the global scientific community active in the nanoEHS (regulatory) research. The unique Repository facility is a state-of-the-art installation that allows customised sub-sampling under the safest possible conditions, with traceable final sample vials distributed world-wide for research purposes. This paper describes the design of the Repository to perform a semi-automated subsampling procedure, offering high degree of flexibility and precision in the preparation of NM vials for customers, while guaranteeing the safety of the operators, and environmental protection. The JRC nanomaterials are representative for part of the world NMs market. Their wide use world-wide facilitates the generation of comparable and reliable experimental results and datasets in (regulatory) research by the scientific community, ultimately supporting the further development of the OECD regulatory test guidelines. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Training: Who Needs It? Research Report 1995. Key Issues for Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotel and Catering Training Co., London (England).

    Aimed at all those involved in the supply of training and vocational education for the hospitality industry, this report summarizes findings of the research report, "Training Who Needs It?" It draws out and explores in more detail key issues relating to the provision of training, support, and related initiatives for the industry. Section…

  12. Using a Financial Health Model to Provide Context for Financial Literacy Education Research: A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    In the article, "Enhancing links between research and practice to improve consumer financial education and well-being" Billy J. Hensley, Director of Education at National Endowment for Financial Education® (NEFE®), outlines his perspective on the current relation between financial education and financial outcome (downstream financial…

  13. Will Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer Provide Biological Samples for Research Purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley A Harris

    Full Text Available Little is known about the response rates for biological sample donation and attitudes towards control recruitment, especially in younger women. The goals of this pilot study were to determine in women recently diagnosed with breast cancer, the proportion of cases willing to provide biological samples and for purposes of control recruitment, contact information for friends or colleagues.A population-based sample of breast cancer cases (n = 417, 25-74 years was recruited from the Ontario Cancer Registry in 2010 and self-administered questionnaires were completed to determine willingness to provide samples (spot or 24-hr urine, saliva, blood and contact information for friends/colleagues for control recruitment. Using Χ2 analyses of contingency tables we evaluated if these proportions varied by age group (<45 and 45+ and other factors such as ethnicity, education, income, body mass index (BMI, smoking status and alcohol consumption.Cases were willing to provide blood samples, by visiting a clinic (62% or by having a nurse visit the home (61%. Moreover, they would provide saliva (73%, and morning or 24-hr urine samples (66% and 52%. Younger cases (≤45 were 3 times (OR more likely more than older cases to agree to collect morning urine (95% CI: 1.15-8.35. Only 26% of cases indicated they would provide contact information of friends or work colleagues to act as controls. Educated cases were more likely to agree to provide samples, and cases who consumed alcohol were more willing to provide contact information. Ethnicity, income, BMI and smoking had little effect on response rates.Reasonable response rates for biological sample collection should be expected in future case controls studies in younger women, but other methods of control selection must be devised.

  14. CE: Original Research: Primary Care Providers and Screening for Military Service and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Kristin Michelle; Sankey-Deemer, Cydnee

    2017-11-01

    : Background: Most veterans have the option of receiving their health care from the Veterans Health Administration or through primary care providers in the private sector. However, there is some evidence that fewer than half of community-based, private sector primary care and mental health providers screen their patients for military service, particularly in rural areas, leaving these veterans less likely to be screened for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other military service-related conditions. To determine whether primary care providers in the private sector are screening patients for military service and subsequent PTSD. We designed and piloted a survey to determine whether primary care providers in a rural Pennsylvania region routinely screen for military service and service-related PTSD. We distributed the survey to a convenience sample of more than 250 primary care providers in central and western Pennsylvania through the U.S. Postal Service, via Facebook, and via work e-mails for those who worked in a local health system. Among 50 eligible respondents, only four (8%) said they screen all their patients for military service, and 20 (40%) reported screening none; only two respondents (4%) screened all their patients who have served in the military for PTSD, and 30 (60%) screened none. Veterans who rely on private sector providers may not receive evidence-based care for military service-related health problems, including PTSD. To improve care for these patients, providers in the private sector should be educated on why all patients should be screened for military service, how to conduct such screening properly, and veterans' general health concerns.

  15. Troubling Futures: Can Participatory Design Research provide a Constitutive Anthropology for the 21st Century?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Light

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues there is value in considering participatory design as a form of anthropology at a time when we recognise that we need not only to understand cultures but to change them towards sustainable living. Holding up the democratically-oriented practices of some participatory design research to definitions of anthropology allows the essay to explore the role of intervention in social process. And, challenging definitional boundaries, it examines design as a participatory tool for cultural change, creating and interrogating futures (and the idea of futures. In analysing how designing moves towards change in the world, the paper brings together design research and anthropological concepts to help us better understand and operationalise our interventions and pursue them in a fair and sustainable manner.

  16. Providing Middle School Students With Science Research Experiences Through Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D.

    2007-12-01

    Science research courses have been around for years at the university and high school level. As inquiry based learning has become more and more a part of the science teacher's vocabulary, many of these courses have adopted an inquiry model for studying science. Learners of all ages benefit from learning through the natural process of inquiry. I participated in the CIRES Earthworks program for science teachers (Colorado University) in the summer of 2007 and experienced, first hand, the value of inquiry learning. With the support and vision of my school administration, and with the support and commitment of community partners, I have developed a Middle School Science Research Program that is transforming how science is taught to students in my community. Swift Creek Middle School is located in Tallahassee, Florida. There are approximately 1000 students in this suburban public school. Students at Swift Creek are required to take one science class each year through 8th grade. As more emphasis is placed on learning a large number of scientific facts and information, in order to prepare students for yearly, standardized tests, there is a concern that less emphasis may be placed on the process and nature of science. The program I developed draws from the inquiry model followed at the CIRES Earthworks program, utilizes valuable community partnerships, and plays an important role in meeting that need. There are three major components to this Middle School Research Program, and the Center for Integrated Research and Learning (CIRL) at the National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) at Florida State University is playing an important role in all three. First, each student will develop their own research question and design experiments to answer the question. Scientists from the NHMFL are serving as mentors, or "buddy scientists," to my students as they work through the process of inquiry. Scientists from the CIRES - Earthworks program, Florida State University, and other

  17. Continuity and Change: Employers' Training Practices and Partnerships with Training Providers. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erica; Smith, Andy; Tuck, Jacqueline; Callan, Victor

    2017-01-01

    A number of factors influence the motivations of employers to train their workforce and the ways in which they engage with the training system. This study combines a national survey and interviews with Australian employers and registered training organisations (RTOs) to provide a comprehensive picture of the way in which employers navigate the…

  18. For love or money? The saga of Korean women who provided eggs for embryonic stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Françoise

    2009-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005, Woo-Suk Hwang achieved international stardom with publications in Science reporting on successful research involving the creation of stem cells from cloned human embryos. The wonder and success all began to unravel, however, when serious ethical concerns were raised about the source of the eggs for this research. When the egg scandal had completely unfolded, it turned out that many of the women who provided eggs for stem cell research had not provided valid consents and that nearly 75% of the women egg providers had received cash or in-kind payments. Among those who did not receive direct benefits, some cited patriotism as their reason for participating in embryonic stem cell research, hence the question "for love or money?"--namely, patriotism versus payment. This paper summarizes the Hwang debacle with particular attention to the egg scandal and ends with some preliminary thoughts on patriotism as a motive for research participation.

  19. Providing a setup and opportunities for better training of postdoctoral research fellows in an academic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of young researchers come from different parts of the world every year to take up postdoctoral (postdoc research fellowship positions in the developed countries. In the US alone, there were 48,601 postdocs in the year 2005 working in different labs in the fields of science, health and engineering. Many pursue this option for lack of other alternatives. Expectedly, these individuals face a lot of difficulties in making this transition from being a student to becoming an employee of an institution. Many institutions are prepared to make this transition and period of stay easy for their fellows while others are not equipped at all. The presence of a postdoc office (established by an institution or an association (formed by the fellows can be of immense help to postdocs. Additionally, the availability of institutional professional development and leadership programs can also help to nurture and polish postdoc fellows into future faculty members and valuable members of the community at large. To name a few, these professional development programs can focus on communication and presentation skills, medical education, teaching and learning, bioethics and mentorship. There is an urgent need to address some or all of these issues so that better training environment and opportunities are available to this group of postdoc fellows.

  20. Crop to wild gene flow: Does more sophisticated research provide better risk assessment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, Tom J. de; Rong, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Genes can sometimes flow from genetically modified crops to wild plants. ► The probability can be predicted from seed production of hybrids and backcrosses. ► Nevertheless predictions about introgression remain uncertain. ► One should be reluctant to ask too much detail in Environmental Risk Assessment. ► Instead possible harm should have a more central place. -- Abstract: Research into introgression, the permanent incorporation of alleles of one species into another, is flourishing and gives new insights into evolution and speciation. The possible transfer of transgenes from crop species to wild relatives is of major concern for regulators. Applicants that want to introduce a genetically modified (GM) crop on the European market need to indicate the likelihood of introgression and its anticipated effects in an Environmental Risk Analysis (ERA). The European Food Safety Association (EFSA) and competent authorities of different countries evaluate the ERA. Predicting which crop alleles will or will not be permanently incorporated into wild populations requires, apart from information on seed production of hybrids, information on how these crop alleles are associated with fitness. Advances in genetics open new avenues to address this question in more detail. We argue, however, that, even with the best techniques, predicting introgression from crop to wild species will always have a considerable margin of uncertainty. One must therefore be prudent to demand more detailed research for the ERA, especially since the possible harm of transgenes in natural populations remains so poorly defined by regulators

  1. The IceCube MasterClass: providing high school students an authentic research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Gallart, Silvia; Bechtol, Ellen; Schultz, David; Madsen, Megan; Demerit, Jean; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In May 2014, the first one-day long IceCube Masterclass for high school students was offered. The program was inspired by the masterclasses started in 2005 by the International Particle Physics Outreach Group and supported in the U.S. by QuarkNet. Participation in the IceCube masterclasses has grown each year, with a total of over 500 students in three U.S states and three European countries after three editions. In a masterclass, students join an IceCube research team to learn about astrophysics and replicate the results of a published paper, such as the discovery of astrophysical neutrinos or a measurement of the cosmic ray flux. We will discuss both the scientific and educational goals of the program as well as the organizational challenges. Data from the program evaluation will be used to support the need of educational activities based on actual research as a powerful approach for motivating more students to pursue STEM college programs, making science and scientists more approachable to teenagers, and helping students envision a career in science.

  2. DOE-HUD Initiative on Energy Efficiency in Housing: A federal partnership. Program summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinch, J. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1996-06-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Department of Housing and urban Development (HUD) is the expansion of home ownership and affordable housing opportunities. Recognizing that energy efficiency is a key component in an affordable housing strategy, HUD and the US Department of Energy (DOE) created the DOE-HUD Initiative on Energy Efficiency in Housing. The DOE-HUD Initiative was designed to share the results of DOE research with housing providers throughout the nation, to reduce energy costs in federally-subsidized dwelling units and improve their affordability and comfort. This Program Summary Report provides an overview of the DOE-HUD Initiative and detailed project descriptions of the twenty-seven projects carried out with Initiative funding.

  3. A Systematic Review of Research Studies Examining Telehealth Privacy and Security Practices Used By Healthcare Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J.M. Watzlaf

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this systematic review was to systematically review papers in the United States that examine current practices in privacy and security when telehealth technologies are used by healthcare providers. A literature search was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols (PRISMA-P. PubMed, CINAHL and INSPEC from 2003 – 2016 were searched and returned 25,404 papers (after duplications were removed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were strictly followed to examine title, abstract, and full text for 21 published papers which reported on privacy and security practices used by healthcare providers using telehealth.  Data on confidentiality, integrity, privacy, informed consent, access control, availability, retention, encryption, and authentication were all searched and retrieved from the papers examined. Papers were selected by two independent reviewers, first per inclusion/exclusion criteria and, where there was disagreement, a third reviewer was consulted. The percentage of agreement and Cohen’s kappa was 99.04% and 0.7331 respectively. The papers reviewed ranged from 2004 to 2016 and included several types of telehealth specialties. Sixty-seven percent were policy type studies, and 14 percent were survey/interview studies. There were no randomized controlled trials. Based upon the results, we conclude that it is necessary to have more studies with specific information about the use of privacy and security practices when using telehealth technologies as well as studies that examine patient and provider preferences on how data is kept private and secure during and after telehealth sessions. Keywords: Computer security, Health personnel, Privacy, Systematic review, Telehealth

  4. EFFECTIVENESS OF CAPITAL MARKET DERIVATIVES IN HOUSING DELIVERY OF NIGERIA EMERGING MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Adjekophori

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The capital market is unarguably the most robust institution in any economy notable for mobilizing the necessary fund for financing long-term productive project. It controls relatively large amounts of capital and represent the largest institutional providing long-term credits for capital project like real estate that requires huge capital outlay. This study therefore, attempts an investigation into the effectiveness of capital market derivatives in housing delivery in Lagos. An empirical survey research was conducted in Lagos, using a random sampling technique with a structured questionnaire to collect data from 147 respondents comprising 89 stockbrokers and 58 real estate developers in Lagos mega-city. Data collected were analyzed with SPSS using descriptive and inferential statistics. The result revealed that 56.7% of the observed variations in housing delivery (R2= 0.567; p< 0.05 is explained by capital market derivatives, which suggests that, proper utilization of capital market derivatives will enhance and improve housing delivery in Nigeria. However, this is not been adequately used by developers of real estate projects in the study. Thus, the study recommends amongst other remedial steps that a synergetic effort should be created between the capital market and real estate developers which will enhance effective housing delivery, the development of people and the Nation.

  5. Yoga for Depression and Anxiety: A Review of Published Research and Implications for Healthcare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelacker, Lisa A; Broughton, Monica K

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of yoga as way to manage or treat depression and anxiety. Yoga is afford- able, appealing, and accessible for many people, and there are plausible cognitive/affective and biologic mechanisms by which yoga could have a positive impact on depression and anxiety. There is indeed preliminary evidence that yoga may be helpful for these problems, and there are several ongoing larger-scale randomized clinical trials. The current evidence base is strongest for yoga as efficacious in reducing symptoms of unipolar depression. However, there may be risks to engaging in yoga as well. Healthcare providers can help patients evaluate whether a particular community-based yoga class is helpful and safe for them.

  6. The WIPP research and development program: providing the technical basis for defense waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Th.O.

    1983-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes from the defense programs of the United States. Underground workings are at a depth of 660 in a bedded-salt formation. Site investigations began in the early 1970s and are culminating with the completion of the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) program in 1983 in which two shafts and several thousand feet of underground drifts are being constructed. The underground facility will be used for in situ tests and demonstrations that address technical issues associated with the disposal of transuranic and defense high-level wastes (DHLW) in bedded salt. These tests are based on several years of laboratory tests, field tests in mines, and analytical modeling studies. They primarily address repository development in bedded salt, including thermal-structural interactions plugging and sealing, and facility operations; and waste package interactions, including the effects of the waste on local rock salt and the evaluation of waste package materials. In situ testing began in the WIPP with the initiation of the SPDV program in 1981. In 1983, a major series of tests will begin to investigate the response of the rock salt without the use of any radioactivity

  7. S'COOL Provides Research Opportunities and Current Data for Today's Technological Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carolyn J.; Chambers, Lin H.; Racel, Anne M.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) project, a hands-on educational project, was an innovative idea conceived by the scientists in the Radiation Sciences Branch at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, in 1996. It came about after a local teacher expressed the idea that she wanted her students to be involved in real-life science. S'COOL supports NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument, which was launched on the Tropical Rainforest Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November, 1997, as part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. With the S'COOL project students observe clouds and related weather conditions, compute data and note vital information while obtaining ground truth observations for the CERES instrument. The observations can then be used to help validate the CERES measurements, particularly detection of clear sky from space. In addition to meeting math, science and geography standards, students are engaged in using the computer to obtain, report and analyze current data, thus bringing modern technology into the realm of classroom, a paradigm that demands our attention.

  8. Developing and providing an online (web-based) clinical research design course in Japan: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Glenn T; Mulligan, Roseann; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2011-04-01

    This article reports on the lessons learned while teaching an 8-week-long online course about the principles of clinical research design in Japan. Student activity data and how it relates to performance in the course are presented. As prolog, this article focuses on the barriers and solutions to creating and delivering a web-based course and it lists and discusses the most common concerns that educators often have about this process, namely, cost of the system and time requirement of the faculty. Options that must be considered when selecting the support software and hardware needed to conduct live streaming lecture, online video-based conference course are presented. The ancillary role of e-mail based distribution lists as an essential instruction tool within an interactive, instructor-supervised online course is discussed. This article then discusses the inclusion of active learning elements within an online course as well as the pros and cons regarding open-book versus closed book, proctored testing. Lastly, copyright issues the online instructor should know about are discussed. The student tracking data show that as the course progresses, students will reduce the number for page viewings. We speculate that this reduction is due to a combination of conflicting priorities plus increasing efficiency of the students at extracting the critical information. The article also concludes that software and hardware costs to deliver an online course are relatively minor but the faculty's time requirement is initially substantially higher than teaching in a conventional face-to-face course. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Becoming a health literate organization: Formative research results from healthcare organizations providing care for undeserved communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsul, Prajakta; Wray, Ricardo; Gautam, Kanak; Jupka, Keri; Weaver, Nancy; Wilson, Kristin

    2017-11-01

    Background Integrating health literacy into primary care institutional policy and practice is critical to effective, patient centered health care. While attributes of health literate organizations have been proposed, approaches for strengthening them in healthcare systems with limited resources have not been fully detailed. Methods We conducted key informant interviews with individuals from 11 low resourced health care organizations serving uninsured, underinsured, and government-insured patients across Missouri. The qualitative inquiry explored concepts of impetus to transform, leadership commitment, engaging staff, alignment to organization wide goals, and integration of health literacy with current practices. Findings Several health care organizations reported carrying out health literacy related activities including implementing patient portals, selecting easy to read patient materials, offering community education and outreach programs, and improving discharge and medication distribution processes. The need for change presented itself through data or anecdotal staff experience. For any change to be undertaken, administrators and medical directors had to be supportive; most often a champion facilitated these changes in the organization. Staff and providers were often resistant to change and worried they would be saddled with additional work. Lack of time and funding were the most common barriers reported for integration and sustainability. To overcome these barriers, managers supported changes by working one on one with staff, seeking external funding, utilizing existing resources, planning for stepwise implementation, including members from all staff levels and clear communication. Conclusion Even though barriers exist, resource scarce clinical settings can successfully plan, implement, and sustain organizational changes to support health literacy.

  10. The eICU research institute - a collaboration between industry, health-care providers, and academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShea, Michael; Holl, Randy; Badawi, Omar; Riker, Richard R; Silfen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As the volume of data that is electronically available promliferates, the health-care industry is identifying better ways to use this data for patient care. Ideally, these data are collected in real time, can support point-of-care clinical decisions, and, by providing instantaneous quality metrics, can create the opportunities to improve clinical practice as the patient is being cared for. The business-world technology supporting these activities is referred to as business intelligence, which offers competitive advantage, increased quality, and operational efficiencies. The health-care industry is plagued by many challenges that have made it a latecomer to business intelligence and data-mining technology, including delayed adoption of electronic medical records, poor integration between information systems, a lack of uniform technical standards, poor interoperability between complex devices, and the mandate to rigorously protect patient privacy. Efforts at developing a health care equivalent of business intelligence (which we will refer to as clinical intelligence) remains in its infancy. Until basic technology infrastructure and mature clinical applications are developed and implemented throughout the health-care system, data aggregation and interpretation cannot effectively progress. The need for this approach in health care is undisputed. As regional and national health information networks emerge, we need to develop cost-effective systems that reduce time and effort spent documenting health-care data while increasing the application of knowledge derived from that data.

  11. In-house characterization of protein powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Christian Grundahl; Harris, Pernille; Ståhl, Kenny

    2011-01-01

    . For safe identification of the crystal form the experimental patterns have to be compared with patterns calculated from known crystal structures. Very good agreement with Protein Data Bank data was obtained after including corrections for background, unit cell parameters, disordered bulk......Collecting protein powder diffraction data on standard in-house powder diffractometers requires careful handling of the samples. Specially designed sample holders combined with optimized collimation were found to be the key factors in improving the data quality and reducing the data collection time......-solvent, and geometric factors. The data collection and correction procedures were demonstrated by the identification of three different crystal forms of insulin....

  12. Cadmium decontamination using in-house resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Sangita; Thalor, K.L; Prabhakar, S.; Srivastava, V.K.; Goswami, J.L.; Tewari, P.K.; Dhanpal, Pranav; Goswami, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    A selective and strong in-house chelator has been studied w.r.t. basic parameters like concentration, time, and elution. De-contamination of cadmium, mercury, chromium, lead etc by using high uptake values fro cadmium ions proves its selectivity with high elution ratio ensures further decontamination of run-off water during natural calamities. In three step cascade use the concentration of original cadmium solution (500 ppm) decocted to safe disposable attribute. This polymeric ligand exchanger displayed outlet effluent concentration to 1 ppm and less than 200 ppb when treated for inlet feed concentration of 50 ppm and 500 ppm respectively. (author)

  13. Providing policy-relevant information for greenhouse gas management: Perspectives from science and technology policy research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, L.

    2009-12-01

    will discuss some of the key elements of successful interactions between science and policy, as well as some specifics for the carbon management context. I will draw on case studies of previous monitoring efforts developed for policy and illustrate some of the key elements to be considered as well as lessons learned. The paper will also examine how the carbon context may be different from other contexts we have encountered in the past. Finally, I will conclude with some implications for structuring decision support science policies within the U.S. Global Change Research Program and other related programs.

  14. Adopting Product Modularity in House Building to Support Mass Customisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília G. da Rocha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Product modularity is a concept that can contribute to the improvement of product quality and production efficiency in house-building. However, there is a lack of consensus in the literature on the concepts that define product modularity. Furthermore, little attention has been given to the differences between building construction and manufacturing, for which product modularity was originally developed. This research aims to address that gap by adapting the conceptualization of product modularity so that it can effectively be used in the house-building industry. The methodological approach adopted in this study was Design Science Research, and two empirical studies were carried out on construction companies based in Brazil and in the U.K. Those studies are used to illustrate the applicability and utility of the proposed concepts and tools. Research findings indicate that the adoption of product modularity concepts results in benefits to both traditional construction technologies and pre-fabricated building systems.

  15. In-House Energy Management Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    DOE facilities are required to develop a documented energy management program encompassing owned and leased facilities and vehicles and equipment. The program includes an Energy Management Plan consistent with the requirements of the DOE ten-year In-House Energy Management Plan, an ECP specifying actions associated with the sudden disruption in the supply of critical fuels, an Energy Management Committee comprised of WIPP employees, and reporting criteria for quarterly energy consumption reporting to DOE Headquarters. The In-House Energy Management Program will include an implementation plan, a budget, and an interaction and coordination plan. The goal of this program is to sensitize the WIPP employees to the energy consequences of their actions and to motivate them to use energy more efficiently. To achieve this goal, the program is designed to both improve energy conservation at the WIPP through the direct efforts of every employee, and to encourage employees to take the lead in conserving energy at home, on the road, and in the community

  16. Hypertension management research priorities from patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers: A report from the Hypertension Canada Priority Setting Partnership Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadia; Bacon, Simon L; Khan, Samia; Perlmutter, Sara; Gerlinsky, Carline; Dermer, Mark; Johnson, Lonni; Alves, Finderson; McLean, Donna; Laupacis, Andreas; Pui, Mandy; Berg, Angelique; Flowitt, Felicia

    2017-11-01

    Patient- and stakeholder-oriented research is vital to improving the relevance of research. The authors aimed to identify the 10 most important research priorities of patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers (family physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and dietitians) for hypertension management. Using the James Lind Alliance approach, a national web-based survey asked patients, caregivers, and care providers to submit their unanswered questions on hypertension management. Questions already answered from randomized controlled trial evidence were removed. A priority setting process of patient, caregiver, and healthcare providers then ranked the final top 10 research priorities in an in-person meeting. There were 386 respondents who submitted 598 questions after exclusions. Of the respondents, 78% were patients or caregivers, 29% lived in rural areas, 78% were aged 50 to 80 years, and 75% were women. The 598 questions were distilled to 42 unique questions and from this list, the top 10 research questions prioritized included determining the combinations of healthy lifestyle modifications to reduce the need for antihypertensive medications, stress management interventions, evaluating treatment strategies based on out-of-office blood pressure compared with conventional (office) blood pressure, education tools and technologies to improve patient motivation and health behavior change, management strategies for ethnic groups, evaluating natural and alternative treatments, and the optimal role of different healthcare providers and caregivers in supporting patients with hypertension. These priorities can be used to guide clinicians, researchers, and funding bodies on areas that are a high priority for hypertension management research for patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers. This also highlights priority areas for improved knowledge translation and delivering patient-centered care. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Create a translational medicine knowledge repository--research downsizing, mergers and increased outsourcing have reduced the depth of in-house translational medicine expertise and institutional memory at many pharmaceutical and biotech companies: how will they avoid relearning old lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Bruce H; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-05-10

    Pharmaceutical industry consolidation and overall research downsizing threatens the ability of companies to benefit from their previous investments in translational research as key leaders with the most knowledge of the successful use of biomarkers and translational pharmacology models are laid off or accept their severance packages. Two recently published books may help to preserve this type of knowledge but much of this type of information is not in the public domain. Here we propose the creation of a translational medicine knowledge repository where companies can submit their translational research data and access similar data from other companies in a precompetitive environment. This searchable repository would become an invaluable resource for translational scientists and drug developers that could speed and reduce the cost of new drug development.

  18. Create a translational medicine knowledge repository - Research downsizing, mergers and increased outsourcing have reduced the depth of in-house translational medicine expertise and institutional memory at many pharmaceutical and biotech companies: how will they avoid relearning old lessons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pharmaceutical industry consolidation and overall research downsizing threatens the ability of companies to benefit from their previous investments in translational research as key leaders with the most knowledge of the successful use of biomarkers and translational pharmacology models are laid off or accept their severance packages. Two recently published books may help to preserve this type of knowledge but much of this type of information is not in the public domain. Here we propose the creation of a translational medicine knowledge repository where companies can submit their translational research data and access similar data from other companies in a precompetitive environment. This searchable repository would become an invaluable resource for translational scientists and drug developers that could speed and reduce the cost of new drug development.

  19. Responding to the Challenge of Providing Stronger Research Base for Teacher Education: Research Discourses in the Norwegian National Research School for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østern, Anna-Lena

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this article is to shed light on how the research projects of 140 PhD candidates in the National Research School for Teacher Education in Norway (NAFOL) respond to the challenges faced by Norwegian teacher education regarding the demand for higher competence and a stronger research base. The concept of NAFOL…

  20. COPPER CORROSION AND SOLUBILITY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster provides a very cursory summary of TTEB in-house copper research experimental systems, and extramural research projects. The field studies summarized are the Indian Hill (OH) study of the use of orthophosphate for reducing cuprosolvency in a high alkalinity water, an...

  1. Determination of radon in housing rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, F.; Sorantin, H.; Kozuh-Schneeberger, J.; Lovranich, E.; Khademi, B.

    1988-03-01

    Radon concentration in 171 apartments with 503 rooms in and around Vienna was measured by a passive measuring system. Polycarbonate foils were exposed during 3 months; the nuclear tracks were visualized by electro-chemical method and evaluated. In housing- and sleeping rooms the mean concentration was 1,03 pCi/l, in cellars 2,15 pCi/l. The equivalent dosis, with 1,03 pCi/l was estimated to 90 mrem/a. At the same time the external radiation dose in the same rooms was measured by TL dosimeters and the dose estimated is again 90 mrem/a. 34 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs. (qui)

  2. Realising participation within an action research project on two Care Innovation Units providing care for older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs Miranda Snoeren; MSc Donna Frost

    2011-01-01

    Background: On two Care Innovation Units in the Netherlands, staff, students and Lecturer Practitioners work intensively together to provide care, create a rich learning environment, and to foster innovation and research. In striving to advance the quality of care and to develop person centred

  3. SOLAR ENERGY APPLICATION IN HOUSES HEATING SYSTEMS IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna Mingaleva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The solar energy is widely used around the world for electricity generation and heating systems in municipal services. But its use is complicated in the number of territories with uneven receipts of solar radiation on the earth’s surface and large number of cloudy days during a year. A hypothesis on the possibility of application of individual solar collectors for heating of houses in the number of cities of Russia has been tested. The existing designs of solar collectors and checking the possibility of their application in northern territories of Russia are investigated. The analysis was carried out taking into account features of relief and other climatic conditions of the Perm and Sverdlovsk regions. As the result of research, the basic recommended conditions for application of solar batteries in houses of the northern Russian cities have been resumed.

  4. A human tissue and data resource: an overview of opportunities, challenges, and development of a provider/researcher partnership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, Eric J; Campbell, Bryon; Resau, James H

    2003-02-01

    As we continue to strive to apply the findings of in vitro and animal studies to human disease and transition from genomics to proteomics, we will experience an ever-increasing need for human tissues. A web based system that provides access to tissues repositories and associated data will best facilitate the access to these vital resources and the application of research information to human disease treatment. There are organizational and design requirements that must be addressed in the implementation of the infrastructures that are needed to implement such a system, with special attention paid to the protection of patient anonymity. This report describes the implementation of a prototype human tissue network in the hope of encouraging implementation of similar systems among other consortia of providers and researchers.

  5. An analysis of market development strategy of a point-of-sale solutions provider's market research database

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a strategic analysis of Vivonet Inc. and its restaurant performance-benchmarking tool ZATA. Vivonet is a Point of Sales (POS) systems provider for the hospitality and the retail industry. Its ZATA product captures POS and other related information from restaurants and allows the restaurants to compare their performance with restaurants in their market segment. With ZATA, Vivonet has the opportunity to extend beyond the POS systems segment and compete in the market research i...

  6. In-house training, formal education and public outreach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, Y.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper assumes that a stronger national commitment to public education on nuclear energy and, most particularly radioactive waste management, it needed to overcome public resistance to nuclear projects. Effective public education must become the superordinate goal uniting industry, government, professional societies, national laboratories and the educational community. Since instruction is labor intensive, we must search for more cost effective ways of achieving results. Therefore, this paper proposes: Collaborative training and educational strategies involving as many of the stakeholders as possible; and Innovative tools to improve the credibility, quality and cost effectiveness of education. This win-win approach can reduce the collective expenditures through cost-sharing, as well as the sharing of resources and products. It can close gaps in both in-house training and formal education. Finally, in public outreach, the joint approach addresses the politics of sponsorship by providing checks and balances, and thus improving credibility and public acceptance

  7. Radon and its decay products in housing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Methods have been worked out for evaluation of the uncertainties due to temporal variations in the annual averages for the concentrations of radon-222 (radon) and radon daughters (RnD) indoors. These methods have been applied to the results from long-term measurements of radon in a few houses. The possible use of correction factors in order to get a more adequate annual average have also been studied and some examples have been given. On the basis of country-wide investigations carried out during 1955-56 and during 1972-75 averages of the radon concentrations in housing existing in 1950 and 1975 were calculated six years ago to be 29 and 71 Bq m -3 respectively. A new country-wide investigation with the aim of obtaining values representative for the country was carried out during 1980-82. On the basis of these results a new calculation was made of the concentrations in dwelllings existing in 1975 to 101 Bq m -3 and also for the 1980 housing stock to 98 Bq m -3 . These results are discussed and the collective dose equivalents in the Swedish population have been calculated. (author)

  8. In-House vs. Off-the-Shelf e-HRM Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Ibraheem, Nawaf; Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Guiderdoni-Jourdain, Karine; Oiry, Ewan

    2009-01-01

    Companies new to the e-HRM technologies are overwhelmed by the dilemma of choosing either the ready-made, off-the-shelf e-HRM systems, or develop their own e-HRM systems in house in order to implement the e-HR transformation. Therefore, this research was done to shed some light on the differences

  9. A qualitative study of diverse providers' behaviour in response to commissioners, patients and innovators in England: research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaff, Rod; Halliday, Joyce; Exworthy, Mark; Allen, Pauline; Mannion, Russell; Asthana, Sheena; Gibson, Alex; Clark, Jonathan

    2016-05-13

    The variety of organisations providing National Health Service (NHS)-funded services in England is growing. Besides NHS hospitals and general practitioners (GPs), they include corporations, social enterprises, voluntary organisations and others. The degree to which these organisational types vary, however, in the ways they manage and provide services and in the outcomes for service quality, patient experience and innovation, remains unclear. This research will help those who commission NHS services select among the different types of organisation for different tasks. The main research questions are how organisationally diverse NHS-funded service providers vary in their responsiveness to patient choice, NHS commissioning and policy changes; and their patterns of innovation. We aim to assess the implications for NHS commissioning and managerial practice which follow from these differences. Systematic qualitative comparison across a purposive sample (c.12) of providers selected for maximum variety of organisational type, with qualitative studies of patient experience and choice (in the same sites). We focus is on NHS services heavily used by older people at high risk of hospital admission: community health services; out-of-hours primary care; and secondary care (planned orthopaedics or ophthalmology). The expected outputs will be evidence-based schemas showing how patterns of service development and delivery typically vary between different organisational types of provider. We will ensure informants' organisational and individual anonymity when dealing with high profile case studies and a competitive health economy. The frail elderly is a key demographic sector with significant policy and financial implications. For NHS commissioners, patients, doctors and other stakeholders, the main outcome will be better knowledge about the relative merits of different kinds of healthcare provider. Dissemination will make use of strategies suggested by patient and public

  10. Failures of Corporate Governance in Housing Cooperatives – Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Walczak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is a discussion and in-depth analysis of the legal and organizational circumstances associated with the activities of Supervisory Boards in housing cooperatives.Methodology: A critical analysis of the existing legislation, own analytical analysis of the source documents, supplemented by conclusions and observations formulated on the basis of a case study, for the preparation of which information has been used obtained from primary sources in the form of documents of the analyzed housing cooperative and information obtained through participant observation.Findings: What has a decisive impact on the mechanisms of corporate governance in housing cooperatives are the direct behaviors of Supervisory Board members, as well as the lack of awareness and involvement of the residents, who do not want to actively participate in the life of the cooperative. A diagnosis is presented of the most important factors that infl uence the actual operations of the analyzed Supervisory Board. While the current legal regulations make it possible to ensure effective and proper control as well as adequate supervision over the activities of cooperatives.Originality: The paper enriches the theory of management sciences in terms of a wider perception of the term corporate governance in relation to other organizations than companies. The presented methodological approach that is the basis for a comprehensive and thorough inspection of the activities of the Management Board can be used in other cooperatives as well. In the literature on the subject no similar analysis, supported by the results of own analytical research, had been found.

  11. User Involvement in In-house Developed Software : Case Study of a Nigerian Financial Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Owoseni, Adebowale; Imhanyehor, Germaine

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, researchers have argued that user friendly and result oriented systems were not necessarily products of participatory user involvement; however there is a degree of user involvement required in the development process of any Information System. The aim of this research is to discover the level of user involvement in in-house software development process in All Nigerian Bank (ANB). We use two research methods - survey and process observation. A survey was conducted for 107 end ...

  12. Provider-based research networks and diffusion of surgical technologies among patients with early-stage kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hung-Jui; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Smith, Angela B; Wheeler, Stephanie B; Carpenter, William R; Nielsen, Matthew E

    2015-03-15

    Provider-based research networks such as the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) have been shown to facilitate the translation of evidence-based cancer care into clinical practice. This study compared the utilization of laparoscopy and partial nephrectomy among patients with early-stage kidney cancer according to their exposure to CCOP-affiliated providers. With linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data, patients with T1aN0M0 kidney cancer who had been treated with nephrectomy from 2000 to 2007 were identified. For each patient, the receipt of care from a CCOP physician or hospital and treatment with laparoscopy or partial nephrectomy were determined. Adjusted for patient characteristics (eg, age, sex, and marital status) and other organizational features (eg, community hospital and National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center), multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the association between each surgical innovation and CCOP affiliation. During the study interval, 1578 patients (26.8%) were treated by a provider with a CCOP affiliation. Trends in the utilization of laparoscopy and partial nephrectomy remained similar between affiliated and nonaffiliated providers (P ≥ .05). With adjustments for patient characteristics, organizational features, and clustering, no association was noted between CCOP affiliation and the use of laparoscopy (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81-1.53) or partial nephrectomy (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.82-1.32) despite the more frequent receipt of these treatments in academic settings (P kidney cancer, indicating perhaps a more limited scope to provider-based research networks as they pertain to translational efforts in cancer care. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  13. Towards sentiment analysis application in housing projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadzir, Nurul Husna; Omar, Mohd Faizal; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd

    2016-08-01

    In becoming a develop nation by 2020, Malaysia Government realized the need in providing affordable house to the public. Since Second Malaysia Plan, government has implemented various affordable housing projects and it continues until recent Malaysia Plan. To measure the effectiveness of the initiatives taken, public opinion is necessary. A social media platform has been seen as the most effective mechanism to get information on people's thought and feeling towards certain issues. One of the best ways to extract emotions and thoughts from what people post in social media is through Sentiment Analysis (SA). There are three different levels of analysis: document level, sentence level and feature level. Most of previous research focused on the classification of sentiment at document or sentence level. Unfortunately, both document and sentence level does not discover what exactly people like or not. While the analysis based on feature, there exist accuracy problem when classifying the sentiment scores. This paper will propose a new framework that focuses on sentiment classification scores at feature level to overcome the uncertainty and accuracy issues on the result.

  14. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockey David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care.

  15. A metasynthesis of patient-provider communication in hospital for patients with severe communication disabilities: informing new translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Balandin, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Poor patient-provider communication in hospital continues to be cited as a possible causal factor in preventable adverse events for patients with severe communication disabilities. Yet to date there are no reports of empirical interventions that investigate or demonstrate an improvement in communication in hospital for these patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the findings of research into communication in hospital for people with severe communication disabilities arising from lifelong and acquired stable conditions including cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disability, aphasia following stroke, but excluding progressive conditions and those solely related to sensory impairments of hearing or vision. Results revealed six core strategies suggested to improve communication in hospital: (a) develop services, systems, and policies that support improved communication, (b) devote enough time to communication, (c) ensure adequate access to communication tools (nurse call systems and communication aids), (d) access personally held written health information, (e) collaborate effectively with carers, spouses, and parents, and (f) increase the communicative competence of hospital staff. Currently there are no reports that trial or validate any of these strategies specifically in hospital settings. Observational and evaluative research is needed to investigate the ecological validity of strategies proposed to improve communication.

  16. Research on customer satisfaction with the quality of services provided by public utilities of the city of Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Radmila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monopoly market conditions, in which public companies used to operate ten to twenty years ago, substantially dictated the way of considering and creating business of public companies in Serbia. However, introduction of changes to the environment, such as more intensive competition and changes of needs and demands of the customers requires abandoning old orientations to business. Public companies are in position to create and offer a higher level of service quality, based on better and more intensified communication with their customers. Public enterprises are monitored by public authorities, especially in the areas of restrictions on the choice of business strategies, pricing and price restrictions, selection of suppliers and the like. On the other hand, there is a branch competition occurring, on which public companies must count. In such an environment, creating effective services should be the key strategic objective for the development of public utility companies of the city of Belgrade. Service companies should be modern service companies, able to actively participate in the market, looking upon customers - citizens as users of their services. The aim of the research is to determine the perception of value and customer satisfaction with the services provided by the public utilities of Belgrade. The results of the study indicate that respondents are not satisfied with provided services and do not have clearly defined attitudes towards key aspects of public enterprises, which are supposed to be important for positioning and improving the quality of services in the market.

  17. Building Better Homes: Government Strategies for Promoting Innovation in Housing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassell, Scott

    2003-01-01

    .... In this context, the report identifies options and strategies for the federal government to consider as it continues to further advance innovation in housing to make homes more affordable, durable...

  18. Department of Defense In-House RDT&E Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-10-30

    C14AINCIS0 CLINICAL AKM) LAII S1(3(31 S 01I INrccT ION IN IIUPN P41 lENT S. STUDIY OF ACUIJI RENAL I Al IllRf ANI) Al NAI 11IMYMIILIIGY. Sitlly orI...hose eserchanddevelopment, plus sc hnsa travl, ublcatons n oter ype ofservices In support of In-house funcion an M.PA. xclded romtheIn-house total

  19. Translating research into practice: the role of provider-based research networks in the diffusion of an evidence-based colon cancer treatment innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, William R; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Wu, Yang; Qaqish, Bahjat; Sanoff, Hanna K; Goldberg, Richard M; Weiner, Bryan J

    2012-08-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs)--collaborative research partnerships between academic centers and community-based practitioners--are a promising model for accelerating the translation of research into practice; however, empirical evidence of accelerated translation is limited. Oxaliplatin in adjuvant combination chemotherapy is an innovation with clinical trial-proven survival benefit compared with prior therapies. The goal of this study is to examine the diffusion of oxaliplatin into community practice, and whether affiliation with the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP)--a nationwide cancer-focused PBRN--is associated with accelerated innovation adoption. This retrospective observational study used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare and NCI CCOP data to examine Medicare participants with stage III colon cancer initiating treatment in 2003 through 2006, the years surrounding oxaliplatin's Food and Drug Administration approval. A fixed-effects analysis examined chemotherapy use among patients treated outside academic centers at CCOP-affiliated practices compared with non-CCOP practices. Two-group modeling controlled for multiple levels of clustering, year of chemotherapy initiation, tumor characteristics, patient age, race, comorbidity, Medicaid dual-eligibility status, and education. Of 4055 community patients, 35% received 5-fluoruracil, 20% received oxaliplatin, 7% received another chemotherapy, and 38% received no chemotherapy. Twenty-five percent of CCOP patients received oxaliplatin, compared with 19% of non-CCOP patients. In multivariable analysis, CCOP exposure was associated with higher odds of receiving guideline-concordant treatment in general, and oxaliplatin specifically. These findings contribute to a growing set of evidence linking PBRNs with a greater probability of receiving treatment innovations and high-quality cancer care, with implications for clinical and research

  20. panMetaDocs and DataSync - providing a convenient way to share and publish research data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbricht, D.; Klump, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years research institutions, geological surveys and funding organizations started to build infrastructures to facilitate the re-use of research data from previous work. At present, several intermeshed activities are coordinated to make data systems of the earth sciences interoperable and recorded data discoverable. Driven by governmental authorities, ISO19115/19139 emerged as metadata standards for discovery of data and services. Established metadata transport protocols like OAI-PMH and OGC-CSW are used to disseminate metadata to data portals. With the persistent identifiers like DOI and IGSN research data and corresponding physical samples can be given unambiguous names and thus become citable. In summary, these activities focus primarily on 'ready to give away'-data, already stored in an institutional repository and described with appropriate metadata. Many datasets are not 'born' in this state but are produced in small and federated research projects. To make access and reuse of these 'small data' easier, these data should be centrally stored and version controlled from the very beginning of activities. We developed DataSync [1] as supplemental application to the panMetaDocs [2] data exchange platform as a data management tool for small science projects. DataSync is a JAVA-application that runs on a local computer and synchronizes directory trees into an eSciDoc-repository [3] by creating eSciDoc-objects via eSciDocs' REST API. DataSync can be installed on multiple computers and is in this way able to synchronize files of a research team over the internet. XML Metadata can be added as separate files that are managed together with data files as versioned eSciDoc-objects. A project-customized instance of panMetaDocs is provided to show a web-based overview of the previously uploaded file collection and to allow further annotation with metadata inside the eSciDoc-repository. PanMetaDocs is a PHP based web application to assist the creation of metadata in

  1. Performing accountability: Making environmental credentials visible in housing design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Isabel; Ozaki, Ritsuko

    2015-01-01

    Making housing developments ‘environmentally sustainable’ requires housing developers to be accountable for their ‘green’ credentials. Accountability is promoted by both the UK government's environmental policy for housing design – the Code for Sustainable Homes – and local councils in their planning criteria. These accountability practices are key to how relationships between housing professionals and local planning authorities influence practices and outcomes of environmental sustainability. In this article, we examine how accountability is performed in housing design and development. We argue that accountability practices involve the management of making environmental sustainability visible through demonstrating the utilization of sustainable technologies. We contend that these ‘visibility’ practices are carried out to the detriment of an appreciation of how energy is both provided and consumed. We contend that using the installation phase of sustainable technologies as a point of adequate assessment of the environmental effectiveness of a building is short-sighted. Policy needs to look beyond this, and consult with professionals who develop and sell houses to understand better their working priorities and contexts that shape the provision of renewable energy in the planning phase and post-build. - Highlights: • Accountability practices shape environmental sustainability practices and outcomes. • Making sustainability ‘visible’ involves the use of sustainable technologies. • Policy should consider how it affects professionals work and energy provision. • Visibility practices influence energy provision and potential consumption.

  2. Is Dual Agency in Housing Transactions Ethically Acceptable?: A Japan-U.S. Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Okoshi, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of real estate agentsʼ disloyalty to their clients (buyers or sellers of houses) caused by asymmetric information, and compares several previous studies in the US to this research on the effects of dual agency deals in Japan. Dual agency means that the same real estate agent represents both seller and buyer in a housing transaction. Furthermore, this paper considers whether dual agency can be ethically accepted in housing transactions. The important point is ...

  3. Demonstration and evaluation of recent air-sealing techniques in housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayhew, W.J.

    1987-09-01

    The Airtight Drywall Approach (ADA) and the sealed polyethylene approach were developed as two distinct systems for reducing air leakage in housing. Builders have not totally accepted either method but have instead tended to borrow the most practical and cost-effective techniques and materials from each system and combined them into hybrid systems. This project evaluated current air-sealing techniques, developed refinements to some of those techniques and incorporated them into the construction of the Cold Climate Demonstration House (CCDH), a research and demonstration facility in Alberta. By comparing the effectiveness and practical use of different air and vapour retarder materials and techniques, it was found that for the air barrier, ADA materials and techniques were more easily installed. The resulting air seal was more reliable. However, until inspectors accept alkyd or vapor barrier paints as the vapor retarder, polyethylene is recommended. The construction techniques recommended in this report can be installed with a minimum of experience and with minimal involvement of other subtrades. The cost to provide an air/vapor barrier for a 1000 ft /sup 2/ bilevel with both levels fully developed (as demonstrated in the CCDH) was approximately $360. 26 figs.

  4. Energy Resources Consumption Minimization in Housing Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balastov Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the energy savings analysis during operation of buildings, provides the heat balance of residential premises, considers options for energy-efficient solutions for hot water supply systems in buildings. As technical facilities that allow the use of secondary heat sources and solar energy, there are also considered the systems with heat recovery of “gray” wastewater, heat pumps, solar collectors and photoelectric converters.

  5. Maximizing industry benefit through cooperation between federal, state and private-sector floricultural research efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    he USDA-ARS Greenhouse Production Research Group was established to provide a federally funded research emphasis on greenhouse crop production. It has focused on broad production issues (nutrition, water management, and energy conservation) by coordinating research between in-house researchers, Uni...

  6. In-house zinc SAD phasing at Cu Kα edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sangmin; An, Young Jun; Jeong, Chang-Sook; Ji, Chang-Jun; Lee, Jin-Won; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2013-07-01

    De novo zinc single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (Zn-SAD) phasing has been demonstrated with the 1.9 Å resolution data of glucose isomerase and 2.6 Å resolution data of Staphylococcus aureus Fur (SaFur) collected using in-house Cu Kα X-ray source. The successful in-house Zn-SAD phasing of glucose isomerase, based on the anomalous signals of both zinc ions introduced to crystals by soaking and native sulfur atoms, drove us to determine the structure of SaFur, a zinc-containing transcription factor, by Zn-SAD phasing using in-house X-ray source. The abundance of zinc-containing proteins in nature, the easy zinc derivatization of the protein surface, no need of synchrotron access, and the successful experimental phasing with the modest 2.6 Å resolution SAD data indicate that inhouse Zn-SAD phasing can be widely applicable to structure determination.

  7. In-House Communication Support System Based on the Information Propagation Model Utilizes Social Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Susumu; Teranishi, Yuuichi; Harumoto, Kaname; Shimojo, Shinji

    Almost all companies are now utilizing computer networks to support speedier and more effective in-house information-sharing and communication. However, existing systems are designed to support communications only within the same department. Therefore, in our research, we propose an in-house communication support system which is based on the “Information Propagation Model (IPM).” The IPM is proposed to realize word-of-mouth communication in a social network, and to support information-sharing on the network. By applying the system in a real company, we found that information could be exchanged between different and unrelated departments, and such exchanges of information could help to build new relationships between the users who are apart on the social network.

  8. Investigation of black soot staining in houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fugler, D. [Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Air quality investigators are frequently called upon to determine the origin of streaking, staining or soot marks in both new and old homes. Those marks display common characteristics: black marks along baseboards at interior or exterior walls, behind furniture and at doorways; black smudges on window frames and plastic cabinets; and even shadowing of studs on exterior wall drywall in a few cases. In most instances, carbon soot from a combustion source is the culprit. The combustion sources include furnaces, water heaters, fireplaces, gas dryers, gas ranges, smoking, vehicle exhaust and candle burning. Scepticism about candle soot is prevalent among callers. As a result, a study was initiated in homes where occupants burn candles regularly to investigate soot problems. Samples were collected from five homes, and included stained carpets, filters, and swab samples of black dust or soot. All the houses selected for the study had been built within a three-year period. Some samples of candles commonly burned in those homes were burnt in a laboratory. Air quality audits had been performed in the homes and had revealed other potential pollutant sources. Best practices for cost-effective clean up and control of soot were researched in industry information. The tests conducted in the laboratory found materials consistent with candle soot or residue during microscopic investigations, but no link was established with the stained material obtained from the homes. A few tips for homeowners were included concerning candle burning, and tips for builders were also offered. 1 tab.

  9. Department of Defense In-House RDT and E Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-10-30

    DETERMINE ADEQUACY OF TROOPS DIET IN ALL ENVIRONMENTS AND RECOMMEND NUTRITIONAL MEASURES FOR OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE. CONDUCI RESEARCH ON MEDICAL, SURGICAL AND...RESEARCH EFFORTS ALONG PRESENT LINES WITHIN THE SCOPE OF RESEARCH ACTIVITIES, TO PROVIDE DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY CONSLLTATION FOR MALAYSIAN CIVILIAN AND

  10. 36 CFR 1254.8 - What information do I need to provide when applying for a researcher identification card?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other identification is not current. Students who consider the home of their parents as their permanent address, but who do not live there during the academic session, must provide their current student address...

  11. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of marine sediment in-house reference material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Mohd Suhaimi Elias; Siong, W.B.; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Azian Hashim; Shakirah Abdul Shukor

    2013-01-01

    Reference materials play an important role in demonstrating the quality and reliability of analytical data. The advantage of using in-house reference materials is that they provide a relatively cheap option as compared to using commercially available certified reference material (CRM) and can closely resemble the laboratory routine test sample. A marine sediment sample was designed as an in-house reference material, in the framework of quality assurance and control (QA/QC) program of the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Laboratory at Nuclear Malaysia. The NAA technique was solely used for the homogeneity test of the marine sediment sample. The CRM of IAEA- Soil 7 and IAEA- SL1 (Lake Sediment) were applied in the analysis as compatible matrix based reference materials for QA purposes. (Author)

  12. A wide array research model for providing evidence in person-centered psychotherapies, or what we can learn from LOFAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doesum, N.J.; Takens, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the World Association for Person-Centered and Experiential Psychotherapy and Counseling (WAPCEPC) has installed a Scientific Committee to promote empirical research to support the person-centered and experiential (PCE) approach. For this endeavor to be successful, traditional methods may

  13. Establishing an In-House Wind Maintenance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-01

    Update to the 2008 guidebook titled “Establishing an In-house Wind Maintenance Program”, which was developed to support utilities in developing O&M strategies. This update includes significant contributions from utilities and other stakeholders around the country, representing all perspectives and regardless of whether or not they own wind turbines or projects.

  14. Acute myeloid leukaemia in relation to background radiation in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelson, O.; Flodin, U.

    1993-01-01

    A review is presented on the results of several studies performed since the late 1970s to elucidate the role of background gamma radiation in houses and the incidence of cancer, especially leukemia. The influence of exposure time is discussed and the age dependence of the latency period is outlined. Estimation of dose-response relationships are presented. (MG)

  15. Rural - Urban differential in housing characteristics in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rural - Urban differential in housing characteristics in Nigeria: Empirical evidence. EC Nwogu, IS Iwueze. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Social Sciences Vol. 5 (2) 2006: pp. 83-89. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  16. Evaluation of In-House versus Contract Computer Hardware Maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, H.P.

    1981-09-01

    The issue of In-House versus Contract Computer Hardware Maintenance is one which every organization who uses computers must resolve. This report discusses the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches to computer maintenance, the costs involved (based on the current AGNS computer inventory), and the AGNS maintenance experience to date. A recommendation on an appropriate approach for AGNS is made

  17. A qualitative research on Spanish farmers and citizens perceptions of ecosystem services provided by mountain livestock farming

    OpenAIRE

    Bernués Jal, Alberto; Rodríguez Ortega, Tamara; Ripoll Bosch, Raimon; Casasús Pueyo, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    There is a strong debate nowadays on the public goods derived from certain agro-ecosystems and their valuation for establishing payments for ecosystem services (ES). In this context, we carried out a qualitative research on the spontaneous knowledge of ecosystem services and the perceptions of farmers and citizens on relationships between mountain farming and the environment. Five focus groups (2 with farmers and 3 with citizens; n=33) were organized in north-eastern Spain. Discus...

  18. Failure to report and provide commentary on research ethics board approval and informed consent in medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, K A; Fernandez, C V

    2008-10-01

    The Declaration of Helsinki prohibits the publication of articles that do not meet defined ethical standards for reporting of research ethics board (REB) approval and informed consent. Despite this prohibition and a call to highlight the deficiency for the reader, articles with potential ethical shortcomings continue to be published. To determine what proportion of articles in major medical journals lack statements confirming REB approval and informed consent, and whether accompanying commentary alerts readers to this deficiency. Retrospective, observational study. Online review of five major medical journals. All clinical research articles published online between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2006 in the BMJ, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA and the New England Journal of Medicine. Statement of REB approval and informed consent. Of 1780 articles reviewed, 1133 (63.7%) met inclusion criteria (manuscripts reporting human subjects, human tissue or identifiable personal data research), 36 (3.2%) articles lacked a statement of REB approval, 62 (5.5%) lacked disclosure of informed consent and 15 (1.3%) articles lacked both. Articles that did not state REB approval were associated with not stating informed consent (pjournals without editorial statements to alert the reader to this deficiency.

  19. Sense of community and homeowner participation in housing management: A study of Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Yau

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of homeowner participation in housing management (free riding has rendered the management of many apartment buildings in Hong Kong ineffective. Proper apartment-building management depends on the voluntary contributions of individual homeowners. Individual homeowners are likely to free-ride on the management efforts of others because they consider the benefits of good housing management to be common goods. Apart from incentives such as subsidies offered by public entities and stricter law enforcement against homeowners that neglect building care, researchers have claimed that communitarian solutions may also work to tackle housing-management problems. In particular, there has been growing interest in the use of social capital, which is regarded as an asset of trust, reciprocity and cooperation, to foster a participatory culture among individual property owners. Empirical study of whether social capital plays a necessary role in housing management has been lacking. This study examines the linkage between social capital and homeowner participation in housing management in Hong Kong. The findings of this study have significant policy and practical implications. In addition to financial incentives or disincentives, public administrators can work to build a sense of community to achieve sustainable management of the existing housing stock in Hong Kong.

  20. Perceptions of nonsurgical permanent contraception among potential users, providers, and influencers in Wardha district and New Delhi, India: Exploratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aengst, Jennifer C; Harrington, Elizabeth K; Bahulekar, Pramod; Shivkumar, Poonam; Jensen, Jeffrey T; Garg, B S

    2017-01-01

    New permanent contraceptive methods are in development, including nonsurgical permanent contraception (NSPC). In the present study, perceptions of NSPC in India among married women, married men, mothers-in-law, providers, and health advocates in Eastern Maharashtra (Wardha district) and New Delhi were examined. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 married women and 20 mothers-in-law; surveys with 150 married men; and focus group discussions with obstetrics/gynecology providers and advocates. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach, where emerging themes are analyzed during the data collection period. The majority of female respondents expressed support of permanent contraception and interest in NSPC, stating the importance of avoiding surgery and minimizing recovery time. They expressed concerns about safety and efficacy; many felt that a confirmation test would be necessary regardless of the failure rate. Most male respondents were supportive of female permanent contraception (PC) and preferred NSPC to a surgical method, as long as it was safe and effective. Providers were interested in NSPC yet had specific concerns about safety, efficacy, cost, uptake, and government pressure. They also had concerns that a nonsurgical approach could undermine the inherent seriousness of choosing PC. Advocates were interested in NSPC but had concerns about safety and potential misuse in the Indian context. Although perceptions of NSPC were varied, all study populations indicated interest in NSPC. Concerns about safety, efficacy, appropriate patient counseling, and ethics emerged from the present study and should be considered as NSPC methods continue to be developed.

  1. Seasonal and occupational trends of five organophosphate pesticides in house dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marissa N; Workman, Tomomi; McDonald, Katie M; Vredevoogd, Melinda A; Vigoren, Eric M; Griffith, William C; Thompson, Beti; Coronado, Gloria D; Barr, Dana; Faustman, Elaine M

    2017-07-01

    Since 1998, the University of Washington's Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research has followed a community-based participatory research strategy in the Lower Yakima Valley of Washington State to assess pesticide exposure among families of Hispanic farmworkers. As a part of this longitudinal study, house dust samples were collected from both farmworker and non-farmworker households, across three agricultural seasons (thinning, harvest and non-spray). The household dust samples were analyzed for five organophosphate pesticides: azinphos-methyl, phosmet, malathion, diazinon, and chlorpyrifos. Organophosphate pesticide levels in house dust were generally reflective of annual use rates and varied by occupational status and agricultural season. Overall, organophosphate pesticide concentrations were higher in the thinning and harvest seasons than in the non-spray season. Azinphos-methyl was found in the highest concentrations across all seasons and occupations. Farmworker house dust had between 5- and 9-fold higher concentrations of azinphos-methyl than non-farmworker house dust. Phosmet was found in 5-7-fold higher concentrations in farmworker house dust relative to non-farmworker house dust. Malathion and chlorpyriphos concentrations in farmworker house dust ranged between 1.8- and 9.8-fold higher than non-farmworker house dust. Diazinon showed a defined seasonal pattern that peaked in the harvest season and did not significantly differ between farmworker and non-farmworker house dust. The observed occupational differences in four out of five of the pesticide residues measured provides evidence supporting an occupational take home pathway, in which workers may bring pesticides home on their skin or clothing. Further, these results demonstrate the ability of dust samples to inform the episodic nature of organophosphate pesticide exposures and the need to collect multiple samples for complete characterization of exposure potential.

  2. Determinants of research use in clinical decision making among physical therapists providing services post-stroke: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaglal Susan B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence of the benefits of research use in post-acute stroke rehabilitation where compliance with clinical practice guidelines has been associated with functional recovery and patient satisfaction, the rate of reliance on the research literature in clinical decision making among physical therapists is low. More research examining factors that motivate physical therapists to consider research findings in neurological practice is needed to inform efforts to intervene. The objective of this study was to identify practitioner, organizational, and research characteristics associated with research use among physical therapists providing services post-stroke. Methods A cross-sectional mail survey of physical therapists providing services to people with stroke in Ontario, Canada was conducted. The survey questionnaire contained items to evaluate practitioner and organizational characteristics and perceptions of research considered to influence evidence-based practice (EBP, as well as the frequency of using research evidence in clinical decision making in a typical month. Ordinal regression was used to identify factors associated with research use. Results The percentage of respondents reporting research use in clinical decision making 0 to 1, 2 to 5, or 6+ times in a typical month was 33.8%, 52.9%, and 13.3%, respectively (n = 263. Academic preparation in the principles of EBP, research participation, service as a clinical instructor, self-efficacy to implement EBP, a positive attitude towards research, perceived organizational support of research use, and Internet access to bibliographic databases at work were each associated with research use and placed in the final regression model. In the final model (n = 244, academic preparation in EBP, EBP self-efficacy, agreement that research findings are useful, and research participation each remained significantly associated with research use after adjusting for the effects of

  3. Ethical implication of providing scientific data and services to diverse stakeholders: the case of the EPOS research infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, Carmela; Atakan, Kuvvet; Cocco, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    EPOS, the European Plate Observing System, is an ESFRI infrastructure serving the needs of the solid Earth science community as a whole. EPOS promotes the use of multidisciplinary solid Earth data to improve the understanding of physical and chemical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis as well as those driving tectonics and surface dynamics. The EPOS mission is to create a single, sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European research infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework with the final goal of delivering a suite of domain-specific and multidisciplinary data, products, and services in one single and integrated platform. Addressing ethics issues is a relevant challenge for any initiative, program or project dealing with scientific data and products provision, access to services for scientific purposes and communication with different stakeholders, including industry and society at large. In examining the role of EPOS on openly and freely delivering scientific data and products to diverse stakeholders including but not limited to scientists, we are looking at ethical issues associated with the use and re-use of these data and products possibly leading to a malevolent use and/or misuse of the data with implications on, for example, national security, environmental protection and risk communication. Moreover, EPOS is aware that the research promoted by the use of data delivered through its platform can have a profound influence on the environment, human health and wellbeing, economic development, and other facets of societies. We know there is nothing intrinsically bad about openly and freely delivering scientific data, as it serves as a tool for leveraging researches leading to solutions for a responsible management of Earth's resources and mitigation of natural hazards. However, we must evaluate the effects of such a data provision and feel the obligation to adopt a responsible

  4. Creating symbiosis in research and education. Preserve nuclear competencies for Germany and provide highest safety standards to international markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niessen, Stefan [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). Research and Development, Innovations and Patent Management

    2015-06-15

    AREVA participates actively in networks of industry and science via university cooperation and gives new ideas born from practical experience for the academic training of future nuclear engineers. Thus, the company ensures both the availability of new talents for its export strategy and relevant expertise for nuclear safety in Germany. When it comes to education and science after the German nuclear phase-out decision, the efforts must focus on internationalization. Greater integration in international networks can contribute to keeping the nuclear know-how in Germany alive. This concerns both industry and science. By having foreign experts use German training facilities, participate in research projects and gather professional practice, they contribute to the safe operation here and experience first-hand our safety culture grown over decades. In this context, AREVA outlines its university cooperation in Germany and abroad.

  5. Creating symbiosis in research and education. Preserve nuclear competencies for Germany and provide highest safety standards to international markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niessen, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    AREVA participates actively in networks of industry and science via university cooperation and gives new ideas born from practical experience for the academic training of future nuclear engineers. Thus, the company ensures both the availability of new talents for its export strategy and relevant expertise for nuclear safety in Germany. When it comes to education and science after the German nuclear phase-out decision, the efforts must focus on internationalization. Greater integration in international networks can contribute to keeping the nuclear know-how in Germany alive. This concerns both industry and science. By having foreign experts use German training facilities, participate in research projects and gather professional practice, they contribute to the safe operation here and experience first-hand our safety culture grown over decades. In this context, AREVA outlines its university cooperation in Germany and abroad.

  6. Radiology 24/7 In-House Attending Coverage: Do Benefits Outweigh Cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Stephanie; Holalkere, Nagaraj Setty; O׳Malley, Julie; Doherty, Gemma; Norbash, Alexander; Kadom, Nadja

    2016-01-01

    Many radiology practices, including academic centers, are moving to in-house 24/7 attending coverage. This could be costly and may not be easily accepted by radiology trainees and attending radiologists. In this article, we evaluated the effects of 24/7 in-house attending coverage on patient care, costs, and qualitative aspects such as trainee education. We retrospectively collected report turnaround times (TAT) and work relative value units (wRVU). We compared these parameters between the years before and after the implementation of 24/7 in-house attending coverage. The cost to provide additional attending coverage was estimated from departmental financial reports. A qualitative survey of radiology residents and faculty was performed to study perceived effects on trainee education. There were decreases in report TAT following 24/7 attending implementation: 69% reduction in computed tomography, 43% reduction in diagnostic radiography, 7% reduction in magnetic resonance imaging, and 43% reduction in ultrasound. There was an average daytime wRVU decrease of 9%, although this was compounded by a decrease in total RVUs of the 2013 calendar year. The financial investment by the institution was estimated at $850,000. Qualitative data demonstrated overall positive feedback from trainees and faculty in radiology, although loss of independence was reported as a negative effect. TAT and wRVU metrics changed with implementation of 24/7 attending coverage, although these metrics do not directly relate to patient outcomes. Additional clinical benefits may include fewer discrepancies between preliminary and final reports that may improve emergency and inpatient department workflows and liability exposure. Radiologists reported the impression that clinicians appreciated 24/7 in-house attending coverage, particularly surgical specialists. Loss of trainee independence on call was a perceived disadvantage of 24/7 attending coverage and raised a concern that residency education

  7. Energy saving in housing in Syria; Energieeinsparung im Wohnungsbau in Syrien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantouch, Yaser

    2009-06-03

    The demand for energy is increasing in Syria annually by 10-11% and the population increases annually 2.54% This growth leads also to increase in the housing,that it is energy-unconscious and consumes many energy. This large increase in energy consumption is an important problem in the housing in Syria, particularly with the lack of observance of various climatic factors,this leads to install the heating or cooling system in all housing in order to improve thermal comfort. The aim of this work is to provide insights into residential buildings with very high energy efficiency. The starting point is the experience from other countries (such as Germany), which have extensive policies, experience and rules for energy-saving buildings. The aim of this work is to provide insights into residential buildings with very high energy efficiency to win. The starting point is the experience from other countries such as Germany, which has extensive policies and rules for energy-saving buildings have. These are transferred with appropriate additions to residential buildings in Syria, and they are specified for special conditions, as well as the economic, social, climatic and regulatory requirements in Syria. There is a new architectural concepts in the design of residential buildings in Syria on their energy issues to research.it was discussed the links between architecture, energy and ecology, concepts of energy-saving building and influencing factors in energy consumption in buildings analyzed and influence of these factors on building and energy in the study area (Syria). This work includes the calculations of energy-efficient building (temperature and energy consumption) for different variants with different simulation programs, and these are assessed socially and economically through interviews, surveys and calculations of Energy Price and the Cost of Buildings. It turns out that there are many opportunities for energy saving in housing in Syria by architectural, design

  8. Are In-House and Outsourcing Innovation Strategies Correlated? Evidence from the European Agri-Food Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Materia, Valentina C.; Pascucci, Stefano; Dries, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    We analyse European agri-food firms’ choices about innovation in-house or through outsourcing and provide empirical evidence about the correlation between these strategies. The relationship between the innovation strategy and firm-, industry- and innovation-specific characteristics is analysed

  9. Feasibility of a patient-driven approach to recruiting older adults, caregivers, and clinicians for provider-patient communication research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingler, Jennifer H; Martire, Lynn M; Hunsaker, Amanda E; Greene, Michele G; Dew, Mary Amanda; Schulz, Richard

    2009-07-01

    This report describes the implementation of a novel, patient-driven approach to recruitment for a study of interpersonal communication in a primary care setting involving persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), their family caregivers, and their primary care providers (PCPs). Patients and caregivers were centrally recruited from a university-based memory clinic, followed by the recruitment of patient's individual PCPs. Recruitment tracking, naturalistic observation, and survey methods were used to evaluate recruitment success. About half of the patients and caregivers (n = 54; 51%) and most of the PCPs (n = 31; 76%) who we approached agreed to an audiorecording of the patient's next PCP visit. Characteristics of patient, caregiver, and PCP participants were compared to those of nonparticipants. Patient characteristics did not differ by participation status. Caregivers who volunteered for the study were more likely to be female and married than were those who declined to participate. Compared to nonparticipants, PCPs who agreed to the study were appraised slightly more favorably by patients' caregivers on a measure of satisfaction with care on the day of the visit. The vast majority of participating PCPs (95%) reported that the study had little or no impact on the flow of routine clinical operations. Findings support the feasibility of a patient-driven approach to recruitment for studies involving multiple linked participants. Our discussion highlights possible advantages of such an approach, including the potential to empower patient participants while achieving maximum variability within the pool of clinician participants.

  10. In-house developed methodologies and tools for decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, Michel; Centner, Baudouin

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes different methodologies and tools developed in-house by Tractebel Engineering to facilitate the engineering works to be carried out especially in the frame of decommissioning projects. Three examples of tools with their corresponding results are presented: - The LLWAA-DECOM code, a software developed for the radiological characterization of contaminated systems and equipment. The code constitutes a specific module of more general software that was originally developed to characterize radioactive waste streams in order to be able to declare the radiological inventory of critical nuclides, in particular difficult-to-measure radionuclides, to the Authorities. In the case of LLWAA-DECOM, deposited activities inside contaminated equipment (piping, tanks, heat exchangers...) and scaling factors between nuclides, at any given time of the decommissioning time schedule, are calculated on the basis of physical characteristics of the systems and of operational parameters of the nuclear power plant. This methodology was applied to assess decommissioning costs of Belgian NPPs, to characterize the primary system of Trino NPP in Italy, to characterize the equipment of miscellaneous circuits of Ignalina NPP and of Kozloduy unit 1 and, to calculate remaining dose rates around equipment in the frame of the preparation of decommissioning activities; - The VISIMODELLER tool, a user friendly CAD interface developed to ease the introduction of lay-out areas in a software named VISIPLAN. VISIPLAN is a 3D dose rate assessment tool for ALARA work planning, developed by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK.CEN. Both softwares were used for projects such as the steam generators replacements in Belgian NPPs or the preparation of the decommissioning of units 1 and 2 of Kozloduy NPP; - The DBS software, a software developed to manage the different kinds of activities that are part of the general time schedule of a decommissioning project. For each activity, when relevant

  11. HIV and cancer in Africa: mutual collaboration between HIV and cancer programs may provide timely research and public health data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbulaiteye Sam M

    2011-10-01

    merits for integrating cancer research in established HIV programs to obtain timely data about the incidence and burden of cancer in HIV-infected persons in Africa.

  12. Radon in houses: how large is the risk?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, S.; Doll, R.

    1990-01-01

    Based on the revised estimates of the average annual effective dose equivalents received from natural radiation, it is suggested that radon in houses may be responsible for some of cases of lung cancer. Moreover radon and smoking interact more than additively but less than multiplicatively in the production of lung cancer. In conclusion it is postulated that current estimates of the size of the risk associated with exposures in houses of the order of 20 Bq m -3 or about 6 % of the current lifetime risk of the incidence of lung cancer in the United Kingdom may be too high or they may be too low by a factor of two. 35 refs., 6 tabs

  13. Visualization of microvessels with in-house micro-angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiku, Masaaki; Nishigami, Kazuhiro; Takeshita, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Although therapeutic angiogenesis improved critical limb ischemia in humans, microvessels promoted by therapeutic angiogenesis needed further improvement to be visualized well by conventional angiographic system, because of its limited spatial resolution of 200 μm. We have developed an in-house micro-angiographic system consisting of a high-voltage power X-ray source and a detecting system with high levels of spatial resolution and sensitivity. The in-house microvessel angiographic system demonstrated its ability to evaluate the function of microvessels in vivo, as well as to visualize them with higher precision than the conventional angiographic system. The findings of our study suggest that a novel micro-angiographic system may be useful in evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic angiogenesis in clinical settings. (author)

  14. In House HSV PCR, Process Improvement and Cost Effectiveness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    TYPE 09/15/2017 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cost-Analysis: In-hous(l HSV P(’R capabilities 6. AUTHOR(S) Ma.i Nich() las R CaJT 7. PERFORMING...ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMIT A TIC ".’ OF 18. NUMBER a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE ABSTRACT OF PAGES 3

  15. The challenge of making architecture in housing projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskemose Andersen, Jørgen; Andreasen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    For the architect is is a constant challeng to deliver architeture and not just buildings. In a foreign context and essential in the developing world housing the urban poor is more about shelter than architecture as such. However even under server economic constraints good design in housing can m...... make a difference. The international organisation Archtecture Sans Frontieres, Denmark has for years been operating in very poor contexts and still in some cases have succeeded to deliver decent and sustainable architecture....

  16. Inequality in Housing and Basic Amenities in India

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, Rama; Aneja, Neil; Nagpal, Dhruv

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses inequality in housing conditions for India for two time period 2008-09 and 2012. Housing conditions are important determinants of health status. Access to descent housing and basic amenities is essential to improve health status of people. Given this backdrop, we examine the distribution of housing and basic amenities, namely, drinking water, toilets and electricity, across regions and over time. We also study the determinants of access to these basic amenities. The re...

  17. Software pro podporu in-house affiliate programu

    OpenAIRE

    RUCZKOWSKI, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with a proposal for software supporting in-house affiliate program. The theoretical part explains the issue and advantages of affiliate marketing. Proposal for the software is made in the practical part, based on analysis of the existing solutions. Special emphasis is put on the solution of conversions tracking. The result of my thesis is an application model which allows us to clearly define requirements for the developing system and gives better idea of any other potential...

  18. In-house recruiters: on the inside looking out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavala, D

    1995-09-01

    Few smaller hospitals or managed care companies have in-house physician recruiting departments. Their low hiring volume simply doesn't support such an operation. But most health systems and large managed care organizations say they literally couldn't afford to be without an internal system for the recruitment of physician executives and other health care professionals. They also claim they can find a better candidate faster than their counterparts on the outside. A number of them explain why.

  19. In-house consultation to support professionals' responses to child abuse and neglect: Determinants of professionals' use and the association with guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnendijk, Annemieke A J; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Kaya, Anna H; Haasnoot, Maria E; Need, Ariana

    2017-07-01

    This study examined the presence and strengths of determinants associated with consultation of an in-house expert on child abuse and neglect (CAN) by preventive child health care professionals who suspect CAN. This study also assessed the relationship between in-house CAN expert consultation and professionals' performance of six recommended activities described in a national guideline on preventing CAN for preventive child health care professionals. A total of 154 professionals met the study's inclusion criteria. They filled in a questionnaire that measured in-house consultation practices and twelve determinants associated with the professional, the in-house expert, and the organizational context. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Almost half of the participants (46.8%) reported to consult the in-house expert in (almost) all of their suspected CAN cases. Professionals who reported better recollection of consulting the in-house expert (i.e. not forgetting to consult the expert) (p=.001), who were more familiar with consultation (p=.002), who had more positive attitudes and beliefs about consultation (p=.011) and who reported being more susceptible to the behavior (p=.001) and expectations/opinions (p=.025) of colleagues regarding in-house expert consultation were more likely to consult the in-house expert. Furthermore, in-house expert consultation was positively associated with two of six key guideline activities: consulting the regional child protection service and monitoring whether support was provided to families. The implications of these results for improving professionals' responses to CAN are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Alemán

    Full Text Available As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial

  1. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Yoan; Vinken, Lore; Kourí, Vivian; Pérez, Lissette; Álvarez, Alina; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Fonseca, Carlos; Pérez, Jorge; Correa, Consuelo; Soto, Yudira; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial assays.

  2. Radon as a radiation problem in underground mines and in houses - historical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper briefly recalls the discovery of the radioisotope radon and the research into its properties and effects, referring among other things to the underground mining sites in the Erzgebirge and the Schneeberg lung disease. Today, the radiation exposure of underground miners in a radioactive environment is regarded to be a well-known risk manageable by today's state of the art in radiological protection. Radon as a radiation source in houses, however, remains the problem of great significance today. The paper reviews the current knowledge and approaches for solving this problem. (DG) [de

  3. Mixed Methods for Implementation Research: Application to Evidence-Based Practice Implementation and Staff Turnover in Community Based Organizations Providing Child Welfare Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Fettes, Danielle L.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Palinkas, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Many public sector services systems and provider organizations are in some phase of learning about or implementing evidence-based interventions. Child welfare service systems represent a context where implementation spans system, management, and organizational concerns. Research utilizing mixed methods that combine qualitative and quantitative design, data collection, and analytic approaches are particularly well-suited to understanding both the process and outcomes of dissemination and implementation efforts in child welfare systems. This paper describes the process of using mixed methods in implementation research and provides an applied example of an examination of factors impacting staff retention during an evidence-based intervention implementation in a statewide child welfare system. We integrate qualitative data with previously published quantitative analyses of job autonomy and staff turnover during this statewide implementation project in order to illustrate the utility of mixed method approaches in providing a more comprehensive understanding of opportunities and challenges in implementation research. PMID:22146861

  4. Mixed methods for implementation research: application to evidence-based practice implementation and staff turnover in community-based organizations providing child welfare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Fettes, Danielle L; Sommerfeld, David H; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2012-02-01

    Many public sector service systems and provider organizations are in some phase of learning about or implementing evidence-based interventions. Child welfare service systems represent a context where implementation spans system, management, and organizational concerns. Research utilizing mixed methods that combine qualitative and quantitative design, data collection, and analytic approaches are particularly well suited to understanding both the process and outcomes of dissemination and implementation efforts in child welfare systems. This article describes the process of using mixed methods in implementation research and provides an applied example of an examination of factors impacting staff retention during an evidence-based intervention implementation in a statewide child welfare system. The authors integrate qualitative data with previously published quantitative analyses of job autonomy and staff turnover during this statewide implementation project in order to illustrate the utility of mixed method approaches in providing a more comprehensive understanding of opportunities and challenges in implementation research.

  5. Library Research Instruction for Doctor of Ministry Students: Outcomes of Instruction Provided by a Theological Librarian and by a Program Faculty Member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Kamilos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At some seminaries the question of who is more effective teaching library research is an open question.  There are two camps of thought: (1 that the program faculty member is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is intimately engaged in the subject of the course(s, or (2 that the theological librarian is more effective in providing library research instruction as he or she is more familiar with the scope of resources that are available, as well as how to obtain “hard to get” resources.   What began as a librarian’s interest in determining the extent to which Doctor of Ministry (DMin students begin their research using Google, resulted in the development of a survey.  Given the interesting results returned from the first survey in fall of 2008, the survey was conducted again in the fall of 2011.  The results of the comparative data led to the discovery of some useful data that will be used to adjust future instruction sessions for DMin students.  The results of the surveys indicated that the instruction provided by the theological librarian was more effective as students were more prepared to obtain and use resources most likely to provide the best information for course projects. Additionally, following the instruction of library research skills by the librarian (2011 survey, DMin students were more likely to begin the search process for information resources using university provided catalogs and databases than what was reported in the 2008 survey. The responses to the two surveys piqued interest regarding both eBook use during the research process and the reduction of research frustration to be addressed in a follow-up survey to be given in 2014, results of which we hope to report in a future article.

  6. Analisis Sistem Informasi Pelayanan Jasa In-House Training pada PT. Sigma Global Internasional Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Hamdi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One key to success is the company's strategy to improve performance in information systems that are reliable. Effective information is expected to help companies to do things related to the mechanism of decision-making quality, efficient management process, as well as effective communication and collaboration culture. PT Sigma Global International Jakarta is a private training and consulting services nationwide that provides consulting services in the aspects of customer satisfaction and do sales through creative and innovative work of all competent employees. To see and resolve the weaknesses that occur in the system in-house training services PT Sigma Global International Jakarta needs evaluation and analysis. 

  7. RELAP5/MOD3.2 investigation of loss of in-house supply power for WWER 1000/320V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gencheva, R.; Pavlova, M.; Groudev, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of the thermal-hydraulic investigations of the 'Loss of in-house supply power' accident at the Kozloduy NPP Unit 6. The RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer code has been used to stimulate the loss of in-house supply power accident in a WWER 1000 Nuclear Power Plant model. This model was developed at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy for analyses of operational occurrences, abnormal events and design basis scenarios. It will provide a significant analytical capability for the Bulgarian technical specialists located at the Kozloduy NPP. The criteria used in selecting transient are: importance to safety, availability and suitability of data followed by suitability for RELAP5 code validation. The investigation of 'Loss of normal and reverse AC power' is a process that compares the analytical results obtained by RELAP5/MOD3.2 model of the WWER 1000 against experimental transient data obtained from Kozloduy NPP Unit 6. The comparisons between the RELAP5 results and the test data indicate good agreement

  8. DO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS PROVIDE ADEQUATE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CAPITALIZATION OF COSTS RELATED TO INTANGIBLE ASSETS?: AN EMPIRICAL RESEARCH ON ITALIAN LISTED COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Vignini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research is to verify if Italian listed companies financial statements provide adequate information about the capitalization of costs related to intangible assets and if the information provided are reliable. Moreover, we investigated if they merely comply with law or provide additional information on cost capitalization and reveal if internal control systems (especially managerial accounting systems or other information systems are applied to support the measurement process and the cost control, thus guaranteeing the verifiability and representational faithfulness of the information disclosed. This paper is an empirical analysis and is concerned to investigate the financial statements of 250 Italian listed companies.

  9. Tablet and Face-to-Face Hybrid Professional Development: Providing Earth Systems Science Educators Authentic Research Opportunities through The GLOBE Program at Purdue University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, K.; Branch, B. D.; Smith, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program (www.globe.gov). GLOBE's vision promotes and supports students, teachers and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based authentic science investigations of the environment and the Earth system working in close partnership with NASA, NOAA and NSF Earth System Science Projects (ESSP's) in study and research about the dynamics of Earth's environment. GLOBE Partners conduct face-to-face Professional Development in more than 110 countries, providing authentic scientific research experience in five investigation areas: atmosphere, earth as a system, hydrology, land cover, and soil. This presentation will provide a sample for a new framework of Professional Development that was implemented in July 2013 at Purdue University lead by Mr. Steven Smith who has tested GLOBE training materials for future training. The presentation will demonstrate how institutions can provide educators authentic scientific research opportunities through various components, including: - Carrying out authentic research investigations - Learning how to enter their authentic research data into the GLOBE database and visualize it on the GLOBE website - Learn how to access to NASA's Earth System Science resources via GLOBE's new online 'e-Training Program' - Exploring the connections of their soil protocol measurements and the history of the soil in their area through iPad soils app - LIDAR data exposure, Hydrology data exposure

  10. Visions and Options: A Report on Five Forums Introducing the Research Consortium on Building Vocational Education and Training Provider Capability. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Berwyn; Robinson, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    This publication outlines the outcomes of forums held in 2005 to introduce the consortium research program which has investigated ways of building vocational education and training (VET) provider capability. It found a range of issues were of concern to participants as they considered how registered training organisations might position themselves…

  11. The Impact of Individual Learning Accounts: A Study of the Early and Potential Impact of Individual Learning Accounts on Learning Providers and Learning. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michael; Peters, Jane; Fletcher, Mick; Kirk, Gordon

    The impact of individual learning accounts (ILAs) on the success of learners in post-16 education sector in the United Kingdom was explored through an examination of available research on ILAs. The following were among the study's 12 messages for providers, the Department for Education and Skills, and the Individual Learning Account Centre: (1)…

  12. Vocations: The Link between Post-Compulsory Education and the Labour Market. What the Research Says For... Tertiary Education Providers & School Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelahan, Leesa; Buchanan, John; Yu, Serena

    2015-01-01

    This summary brings together the relevant key findings for tertiary education providers and school educators from the research program "Vocations: The Link between Post-Compulsory Education and the Labour Market." The program was comprised of three different strands: (1) pathways from VET in Schools, (2) pathways within and between…

  13. Envri Cluster - a Community-Driven Platform of European Environmental Researcher Infrastructures for Providing Common E-Solutions for Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, A.; Sorvari, S.; Kutsch, W. L.; Laj, P.

    2017-12-01

    European long-term environmental research infrastructures (often referred as ESFRI RIs) are the core facilities for providing services for scientists in their quest for understanding and predicting the complex Earth system and its functioning that requires long-term efforts to identify environmental changes (trends, thresholds and resilience, interactions and feedbacks). Many of the research infrastructures originally have been developed to respond to the needs of their specific research communities, however, it is clear that strong collaboration among research infrastructures is needed to serve the trans-boundary research requires exploring scientific questions at the intersection of different scientific fields, conducting joint research projects and developing concepts, devices, and methods that can be used to integrate knowledge. European Environmental research infrastructures have already been successfully worked together for many years and have established a cluster - ENVRI cluster - for their collaborative work. ENVRI cluster act as a collaborative platform where the RIs can jointly agree on the common solutions for their operations, draft strategies and policies and share best practices and knowledge. Supporting project for the ENVRI cluster, ENVRIplus project, brings together 21 European research infrastructures and infrastructure networks to work on joint technical solutions, data interoperability, access management, training, strategies and dissemination efforts. ENVRI cluster act as one stop shop for multidisciplinary RI users, other collaborative initiatives, projects and programmes and coordinates and implement jointly agreed RI strategies.

  14. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  15. Preparation of in-house graphite reference material for boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Venkatesh, K.; Swain, Kallola K.; Manisha, V.; Kamble, Granthali S.; Pandey, Shailaja P.; Remya Devi, P.S.; Ghosh, M.; Verma, R.

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is extensively used in nuclear technology. Boron concentration in graphite is one of the important parameters that decide its acceptability for nuclear applications. Reliable analytical methods are essential for the determination of boron in graphite at concentration about 5 mg kg -1 . Reference materials are used for validation of existing analytical methods and developing new methodologies. In view of the importance of determination of boron in graphite and unavailability of graphite reference material, an In-house graphite reference material was prepared in Analytical Chemistry Division. Graphite source material was procured, processed to obtain powder of ≤ 75 μm (200 mesh) and bottled. Procedures were developed for the determination of boron in graphite using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) techniques. Homogeneity testing was carried out on the bottled units and boron content along with the combined and expanded uncertainties were established. The assigned boron concentration in the In-house graphite reference material is (7.3±0.46) mg kg -1 . (author)

  16. Efficacy of in-house fluorescent stain for fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. L. Surya Kirani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mycotic infections are gaining importance in the present day medicine, and definite demonstration of fungus is essential for diagnosis. Small numbers of organisms in the smear can be identified by fluorescence microscopy. Calcofluor white (CFW fluorescent stain is a textile brightener mixed with Evans blue. It is expensive and not easily available. Aims: (1 To assess the efficacy of in-house CFW fluorescent stain for fungus in relation to conventional CFW stain, histopathology, and culture. (2 To determine sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV, and positive predictive value (PPV with culture as gold standard. Settings and Design: One hundred cases of suspected dermatophytosis and 15 cases of systemic mycosis were included in the study. Subjects and Methods: The local whitener Ranipal is added with Robin blue, another brightener, and was used to stain teased fungal cultures. Skin, hair, and nails require pretreatment with potassium hydroxide (KOH. Biopsy slides require deparaffinization and pretreatment with KOH before staining. Conventional calcofluor stain, histopathology, and culture were done. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using sensitivity, specificity, NPV, and PPV. Results: The results are consistently comparable with conventional stain. The sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 93.3%, NPV was 100%, and PPV was 85.7%. It is also cost effective when compared to commercial stains. Conclusions: In-house stain can be used for screening of fungus in direct samples, biopsies as alternative in resource-constrained laboratories.

  17. Thermal Storage Systems Assessment for Energy Sustainability in Housing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania I. Lagunes Vega

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve greater enhancements in energy sustainability for housing, the function and efficiency of two different passive cooling systems were studied: encapsulated water in recycled bottles of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET and polystyrene plates, in comparison with standard concrete slab systems, which are customarily used in housing. Experiments were placed over a tile surface, in which temperature changes were monitored for a period of 20 days from 08:00 to 20:00. The efficiency of passive thermal storage systems was endorsed through statistical analysis using the “SPSS” software. This resulted in a 17% energy saving, thus promoting energy sustainability in housing units, which reduces the use of electrical appliances required to stabilize conditions to achieve optimum thermal comfort for the human body inside a house, therefore, reducing electrical power consumption, CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and generating savings. Due to the complexity of a system with temperature changes, a fractal analysis was performed for each experimental system, using the “Benoit” software (V.1.3 with self-compatible tools of rescaled range (R/S and a wavelets method, showing that the thermal fluctuations on the tiles with the thermal storage system adapt to the rescaled range analysis and the regular tiles adapt to the wavelets method.

  18. Outsourcing versus in-house maintenance of medical devices: a longitudinal, empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Miguel-Cruz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine what factors have a significant influence on the performance of medical device maintenance outsourcing, and to determine how the performance of external governance structures differs depending on whether a hospital is private or public. METHODS: This was a longitudinal study of 590 maintenance transactions at 20 hospitals in Bogotá, Colombia, involving 764 medical devices and 72 maintenance service providers. Maintenance performance data (i.e., turn-around time in hours; TAT for the service providers (either in-house or outsourced were primarily collected over a 20-month period, from December 2009-August 2011, by means of a monitoring procedure; then, a hazards model was run. RESULTS: The availability of specific repair parts, in-stock, in the city in which the medical devices were located, had a positive impact on the performance of both internal and external governance structures. Online service also had a positive impact on both, with a stronger positive impact on the performance of internal governance than on that of external governance. For transactions governed by external structures, better performance was seen in private hospitals than in public ones. In public health institutions, internal governance showed better performance than external governance. Both internal and external governance structures showed better performance in private healthcare institutions than in public ones. CONCLUSIONS: In public health institutions, internal governance shows better performance than external governance; this suggests that healthcare managers should reconsider the trend to eliminate in-house maintenance service staff in public healthcare institutions.

  19. Outsourcing versus in-house maintenance of medical devices: a longitudinal, empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel-Cruz, Antonio; Rios-Rincón, Adriana; Haugan, Gregory L

    2014-03-01

    To determine what factors have a significant influence on the performance of medical device maintenance outsourcing, and to determine how the performance of external governance structures differs depending on whether a hospital is private or public. This was a longitudinal study of 590 maintenance transactions at 20 hospitals in Bogotá, Colombia, involving 764 medical devices and 72 maintenance service providers. Maintenance performance data (i.e., turn-around time in hours; TAT) for the service providers (either in-house or outsourced) were primarily collected over a 20-month period, from December 2009-August 2011, by means of a monitoring procedure; then, a hazards model was run. The availability of specific repair parts, in-stock, in the city in which the medical devices were located, had a positive impact on the performance of both internal and external governance structures. Online service also had a positive impact on both, with a stronger positive impact on the performance of internal governance than on that of external governance. For transactions governed by external structures, better performance was seen in private hospitals than in public ones. In public health institutions, internal governance showed better performance than external governance. Both internal and external governance structures showed better performance in private healthcare institutions than in public ones. In public health institutions, internal governance shows better performance than external governance; this suggests that healthcare managers should reconsider the trend to eliminate in-house maintenance service staff in public healthcare institutions.

  20. Providing an Authentic Research Experience for University of the Fraser Valley Undergraduate Students by Investigating and Documenting Seasonal and Longterm Changes in Fraser Valley Stream Water Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, S. L.; Marsh, S. J.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Janmaat, A.; Bourdages, M.; Paulson, D.; Groeneweg, A.; Bogaerts, P.; Robertson, K.; Clemence, E.; Smith, S.; Yakemchuk, A.; Faber, A.

    2017-12-01

    Undergraduate students in the Geography and Biology Departments at the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV) have been provided the opportunity to participate in the time series sampling of the Fraser River at Fort Langley and Fraser Valley tributaries as part of the Global Rivers Observatory (GRO, www.globalrivers.org) which is coordinated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Research Center. Student research has focussed on Clayburn, Willband and Stoney Creeks that flow from Sumas Mountain northwards to the Fraser River. These watercourses are increasingly being impacted by anthropogenic activity including residential developments, industrial activity, and agricultural landuse. Students are instructed in field sampling protocols and the collection of water chemistry data and the care and maintenance of the field equipment. Students develop their own research projects and work in support of each other as teams in the field to collect the data and water samples. Students present their findings as research posters at local academic conferences and at UFV's Student Research Day. Through their involvement in our field research our students have become more aware of the state of our local streams, the methods used to monitor water chemistry and how water chemistry varies seasonally.

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-07-12

    Jul 12, 2016 ... multiple risk factors provides support for multiple-behavior interventions as ... consumption) with smoking therefore needs further research. As such this study .... restaurants, in bars, and on a statewide basis. They preferred to.

  2. Bridging the gaps among research, policy and practice in ten low- and middle-income countries: Development and testing of questionnaire for health-care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boupha Boungnong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reliability and validity of instruments used to survey health-care providers' views about and experiences with research evidence have seldom been examined. Methods Country teams from ten low- and middle-income countries (China, Ghana, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Laos, Mexico, Pakistan, Senegal and Tanzania participated in the development, translation, pilot-testing and administration of a questionnaire designed to measure health-care providers' views and activities related to improving their clinical practice and their awareness of, access to and use of research evidence, as well as changes in their clinical practice that they attribute to particular sources of research evidence that they have used. We use internal consistency as a measure of the questionnaire's reliability and, whenever possible, we use explanatory factor analyses to assess the degree to which questions that pertain to a single domain actually address common themes. We assess the questionnaire's face validity and content validity and, to a lesser extent, we also explore its criterion validity. Results The questionnaire has high internal consistency, with Cronbach's alphas between 0.7 and 0.9 for 16 of 20 domains and sub-domains (identified by factor analyses. Cronbach's alphas are greater than 0.9 for two domains, suggesting some item redundancy. Pre- and post-field work assessments indicate the questionnaire has good face validity and content validity. Our limited assessment of criterion validity shows weak but statistically significant associations between the general influence of research evidence among providers and more specific measures of providers' change in approach to preventing or treating a clinical condition. Conclusion Our analysis points to a number of strengths of the questionnaire - high internal consistency (reliability and good face and content validity - but also to areas where it can be shortened without losing important conceptual

  3. Wasted research when systematic reviews fail to provide a complete and up-to-date evidence synthesis: the example of lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cr?quit, Perrine; Trinquart, Ludovic; Yavchitz, Am?lie; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple treatments are frequently available for a given condition, and clinicians and patients need a comprehensive, up-to-date synthesis of evidence for all competing treatments. We aimed to quantify the waste of research related to the failure of systematic reviews to provide a complete and up-to-date evidence synthesis over time. Methods We performed a series of systematic overviews and networks of randomized trials assessing the gap between evidence covered by systematic revie...

  4. Project quality assurance plan for research and development services provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the Hanford Grout Disposal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1991-11-01

    This Project Quality Assurance Plan (PQAP) is being published to provide the sponsor with referenceable documentation for work conducted in support of the Hanford WHC Grout Disposal Program. This plan, which meets NQA-1 requirements, is being applied to work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during FY 1991 in support of this program. It should also be noted that with minor revisions, this plan should be applicable to other projects involving research and development that must comply with NQA-1 requirements

  5. Project quality assurance plan for research and development services provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the Hanford Grout Disposal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1991-11-01

    This Project Quality Assurance Plan (PQAP) is being published to provide the sponsor with referenceable documentation for work conducted in support of the Hanford WHC Grout Disposal Program. This plan, which meets NQA-1 requirements, is being applied to work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during FY 1991 in support of this program. It should also be noted that with minor revisions, this plan should be applicable to other projects involving research and development that must comply with NQA-1 requirements.

  6. The Community Mentorship Program: Providing Community-Engagement Opportunities for Early-Stage Clinical and Translational Scientists to Facilitate Research Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Cecilia M; Kubicek, Katrina; Robles, Marisela; Kiger, Holly; Dzekov, Jeanne

    2017-02-01

    A goal of the Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute (SC-CTSI) at the University of Southern California and Children's Hospital Los Angeles is to train early-stage clinical and translational scientists (CTSs) to conduct research that improves the health of diverse communities. This goal aligns well with the Institute of Medicine's recommendations emphasizing community engagement in biomedical research that facilitates research translation. The Community Mentorship Program (CMP), created to complement community-engaged research didactics, matches CTSs with community mentors who help them identify and complete community-engaged experiences that inform their research. The CMP was piloted in 2013-2015 by the SC-CTSI Workforce Development and Community Engagement cores. The CMP team matched three CTSs (assistant professors pursuing mentored career development awards) with mentors at community-based organizations (CBOs) aligned with their research interests. Each mentor-mentee pair signed a memorandum of understanding. The CMP team checked in regularly, monitoring progress and addressing challenges in CTSs' completion of their community-engaged experience. Each pair completed at least one community-engaged activity informing the CTS's research. In exit interviews, the CTSs and CBO mentors expressed satisfaction with the program and stated that they would continue to work together. The CTSs reported that the program provided opportunities to develop networks outside academia, build trust within the community, and receive feedback and learn from individuals in communities affected by their research. The CMP will be expanded to include all eligible early-career CTSs and promoted for use in similar settings outside the SC-CTSI.

  7. Computer-Aided Surgical Simulation in Head and Neck Reconstruction: A Cost Comparison among Traditional, In-House, and Commercial Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sean S; Copeland-Halperin, Libby R; Kaminsky, Alexander J; Li, Jihui; Lodhi, Fahad K; Miraliakbari, Reza

    2018-06-01

     Computer-aided surgical simulation (CASS) has redefined surgery, improved precision and reduced the reliance on intraoperative trial-and-error manipulations. CASS is provided by third-party services; however, it may be cost-effective for some hospitals to develop in-house programs. This study provides the first cost analysis comparison among traditional (no CASS), commercial CASS, and in-house CASS for head and neck reconstruction.  The costs of three-dimensional (3D) pre-operative planning for mandibular and maxillary reconstructions were obtained from an in-house CASS program at our large tertiary care hospital in Northern Virginia, as well as a commercial provider (Synthes, Paoli, PA). A cost comparison was performed among these modalities and extrapolated in-house CASS costs were derived. The calculations were based on estimated CASS use with cost structures similar to our institution and sunk costs were amortized over 10 years.  Average operating room time was estimated at 10 hours, with an average of 2 hours saved with CASS. The hourly cost to the hospital for the operating room (including anesthesia and other ancillary costs) was estimated at $4,614/hour. Per case, traditional cases were $46,140, commercial CASS cases were $40,951, and in-house CASS cases were $38,212. Annual in-house CASS costs were $39,590.  CASS reduced operating room time, likely due to improved efficiency and accuracy. Our data demonstrate that hospitals with similar cost structure as ours, performing greater than 27 cases of 3D head and neck reconstructions per year can see a financial benefit from developing an in-house CASS program. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Summaries of FY 1978 research in the chemical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    This report provides on indexed compilation of individual research projects that make up the DOE Chemical Sciences basic energy research program. The DOE in-house projects and projects supported at university and other non-DOE laboratories are reported in separate sections. An analysis and summary of funding levels are given. The research covers areas such as coal chemistry, catalysis, H 2 , combustion, solar photoconversion, fusion, atmospheric chemistry, and MHD

  9. Summaries of FY 1978 research in the chemical sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Elliot S.

    1979-04-01

    This report provides on indexed compilation of individual research projects that make up the DOE Chemical Sciences basic energy research program. The DOE in-house projects and projects supported at university and other non-DOE laboratories are reported in separate sections. An analysis and summary of funding levels are given. The research covers areas such as coal chemistry, catalysis, H/sub 2/, combustion, solar photoconversion, fusion, atmospheric chemistry, and MHD. (DLC)

  10. The Business Case for Provider Participation in Clinical Trials Research: An Application to the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H.; Reiter, Kristin L.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-01-01

    Background Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. Purpose This study explores whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. Methodology/Approach We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program, a longstanding federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. Findings We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis, and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. Practice Implications As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally-funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research. PMID:23044836

  11. The business case for provider participation in clinical trials research: an application to the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L; Weiner, Bryan J; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2013-01-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. The aim of this study was to explore whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program, a long-standing federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research.

  12. Nose-to-tail analysis of an airbreathing hypersonic vehicle using an in-house simplified tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscitelli, Filomena; Cutrone, Luigi; Pezzella, Giuseppe; Roncioni, Pietro; Marini, Marco

    2017-07-01

    SPREAD (Scramjet PREliminary Aerothermodynamic Design) is a simplified, in-house method developed by CIRA (Italian Aerospace Research Centre), able to provide a preliminary estimation of the performance of engine/aeroshape for airbreathing configurations. It is especially useful for scramjet engines, for which the strong coupling between the aerothermodynamic (external) and propulsive (internal) flow fields requires real-time screening of several engine/aeroshape configurations and the identification of the most promising one/s with respect to user-defined constraints and requirements. The outcome of this tool defines the base-line configuration for further design analyses with more accurate tools, e.g., CFD simulations and wind tunnel testing. SPREAD tool has been used to perform the nose-to-tail analysis of the LAPCAT-II Mach 8 MR2.4 vehicle configuration. The numerical results demonstrate SPREAD capability to quickly predict reliable values of aero-propulsive balance (i.e., net-thrust) and aerodynamic efficiency in a pre-design phase.

  13. Security in In-House Developed Information Systems: The Case of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magreth Mushi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this 21st century, the world is moving more and more into the information economy; and information held by organization's information systems is among the most valuable assets in the organization's care and is considered a critical resource, enabling the organizations to achieve their strategic objectives. In-house developed information systems meant to enable organizations to achieve their strategic objectives, are on the increase and security has become a major concern in recent years. Hackers are using new techniques to gain access to sensitive data, disable information systems and administer other malicious activities aimed at the information systems. The need to secure an information system is imperative for use in today's world. Until recently, information systems security was an afterthought; developers were typically focused on functionality and features, waiting to implement security at the end of development. This approach to information systems security has proven to be disastrous because vulnerabilities have gone undetected allowing information systems to be attacked and damaged. A survey done in three (3 organizations in Tanzania has proved that most of the information systems developers have drawn their background from traditional systems development without the sense of implementing security in the early stage of information system development. This paper attempts to identify in-house developed information system's security deficiencies and related risks to organizations, the paper also attempt to establish technique that can be used to detect those deficiencies. Lastly the paper provide guidance that can be used by organizations to mitigate the risks.

  14. Acceptability of the flipped classroom approach for in-house teaching in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eunicia; Brainard, Andrew; Larkin, Gregory L

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the relative acceptability of the flipped classroom approach compared with traditional didactics for in-house teaching in emergency medicine. Our department changed its learning model from a 'standard' lecture-based model to a 'flipped classroom' model. The 'flipped classroom' included provided pre-session learning objectives and resources before each 2 h weekly session. In-session activities emphasised active learning strategies and knowledge application. Feedback was sought from all medical staff regarding the acceptability of the new approach using an online anonymous cross-sectional qualitative survey. Feedback was received from 49/57 (86%) medical staff. Ninety-eight per cent (48/49) of respondents preferred the flipped classroom over the traditional approach. Aspects of the flipped classroom learners liked most included case-based discussion, interaction with peers, application of knowledge, self-directed learning and small-group learning. Barriers to pre-session learning include work commitments, 'life', perceived lack of time, family commitments, exam preparation and high volume of learning materials. Reported motivational factors promoting pre-session learning include formal assessment, participation requirements, more time, less material, more clinical relevance and/or more interesting material. Case studies and 'hands-on' activities were perceived to be the most useful in-session activities. The flipped classroom shows promise as an acceptable approach to in-house emergency medicine teaching. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  15. Consumer participation in housing: reflecting on consumer preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Graeme; Hemsley, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Historically, people living with mental illness have had limited chance to participate in mental health services other than as patients. Following on from a recent review focusing on consumer participation in mental health services, this paper looks at consumer participation in housing. Housing is a critical element in recovery from mental illness. Without suitable housing, people have little chance of maintaining other resources in their lives, such as supportive social relationships and meaningful activities. Consumer participation is not a common topic in the recent literature, despite the significant public policy push to promote it. The importance of appropriate housing to the recovery of people living with mental illness cannot be underestimated. Even well-meaning and well-resourced housing initiatives can fall short of meeting consumers' recovery goals when they do not incorporate the expressed needs of consumers. These expressed needs include keeping units small in size and employing drop-in support models.

  16. Radon in houses - identification of sources and pathways of transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robe, M.C.; Rannou, A.; Le Bronec, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN) is studying the remedial actions to reduce high concentration of radon in houses. The first step to know how to modify houses is to identify radon sources and pathways of transfer to upper floors. A pilot study in Brittany was designed to develop a simple method of diagnosis. This investigation was based on indoor and outdoor measurements of 222 Rn activity concentration in the air and 222 Rn area exhalation rate from the soils and walls, measurements of the potential alpha energy concentration of 222 Rn daughters and the ventilation rate. The structural characteristics of houses and the influence of the life style of the inhabitants were examined. Analysis of the results showed that a limited number of parameters can be selected for use in a rapid radon diagnosis. (author)

  17. In-house polymerase chain reaction for affordable and sustainable Chlamydia trachomatis detection in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersad, Joanne; Wang, Xiaohui; Gayadeen, Helen; Ramsewak, Samuel; Ammons, David

    2007-11-01

    To provide a preliminary assessment of in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as an alternative to the more costly commercial test for detection of asymptomatic infection by Chlamydia trachomatis and to provide much needed demographic data on infection indicators within the Trinidad and Tobago public health care system. An inexpensive in-house nested-PCR with an Internal Amplification Control was used to detect C. trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in urine samples collected from 273 apparently healthy, pregnant women from March-September 2004 in Trinidad, West Indies. Demographic information on participants was collected and subjected to statistical analyses. C. trachomatis was detected in 57/273 (21%) samples, of which 5 (2%) were also positive for N. gonorrhoeae. Infection correlated well with certain demographic parameters, with the highest incidence of C. trachomatis infection found among pregnant women that were single or of African descent. Given the lack of commercial tests in Trinidad, in-house PCR is an inexpensive alternative that can be used to detect asymptomatic infections of C. trachomatis and to provide demographic information needed for interventions by the public health care system.

  18. Identifying and Prioritizing Gaps in Neuroendocrine Tumor Research: A Modified Delphi Process With Patients and Health Care Providers to Set the Research Action Plan for the Newly Formed Commonwealth Neuroendocrine Tumor Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelov, Eva; Chan, David; Lawrence, Ben; Pavlakis, Nick; Kennecke, Hagen F; Jackson, Christopher; Law, Calvin; Singh, Simron

    2017-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a diverse group of malignancies that pose challenges common to all rare tumors. The Commonwealth Neuroendocrine Tumor Collaboration (CommNETS) was established in 2015 to enhance outcomes for patients with NETs in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. A modified Delphi process was undertaken involving patients, clinicians, and researchers to identify gaps in NETs research to produce a comprehensive and defensible research action plan. A three-round modified Delphi process was undertaken with larger representation than usual for medical consensus processes. Patient/advocate and health care provider/researcher expert panels undertook Round 1, which canvassed 17 research priorities and 42 potential topics; in Round 2, these priorities were ranked. Round 3 comprised a face-to-face meeting to generate final consensus rankings and formulate the research action plan. The Delphi groups consisted of 203 participants in Round 1 (64% health care providers/researchers, 36% patient/advocates; 52% Canadian, 32% Australian, and 17% New Zealander), of whom 132 participated in Round 2. The top eight priorities were biomarker development; peptide receptor radionuclide therapy optimization; trials of new agents in advanced NETs; functional imaging; sequencing therapies for metastatic NETs, including development of validated surrogate end points for studies; pathologic classification; early diagnosis; interventional therapeutics; and curative surgery. Two major areas were ranked significantly higher by patients/advocates: early diagnosis and curative surgery. Six CommNETS working parties were established. This modified Delphi process resulted in a well-founded set of research priorities for the newly formed CommNETS collaboration by involving a large, diverse group of stakeholders. This approach to setting a research agenda for a new collaborative group should be adopted to ensure that research plans reflect unmet needs and priorities in the field.

  19. Identifying and Prioritizing Gaps in Neuroendocrine Tumor Research: A Modified Delphi Process With Patients and Health Care Providers to Set the Research Action Plan for the Newly Formed Commonwealth Neuroendocrine Tumor Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Segelov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs are a diverse group of malignancies that pose challenges common to all rare tumors. The Commonwealth Neuroendocrine Tumor Collaboration (CommNETS was established in 2015 to enhance outcomes for patients with NETs in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. A modified Delphi process was undertaken involving patients, clinicians, and researchers to identify gaps in NETs research to produce a comprehensive and defensible research action plan. Methods: A three-round modified Delphi process was undertaken with larger representation than usual for medical consensus processes. Patient/advocate and health care provider/researcher expert panels undertook Round 1, which canvassed 17 research priorities and 42 potential topics; in Round 2, these priorities were ranked. Round 3 comprised a face-to-face meeting to generate final consensus rankings and formulate the research action plan. Results: The Delphi groups consisted of 203 participants in Round 1 (64% health care providers/researchers, 36% patient/advocates; 52% Canadian, 32% Australian, and 17% New Zealander, of whom 132 participated in Round 2. The top eight priorities were biomarker development; peptide receptor radionuclide therapy optimization; trials of new agents in advanced NETs; functional imaging; sequencing therapies for metastatic NETs, including development of validated surrogate end points for studies; pathologic classification; early diagnosis; interventional therapeutics; and curative surgery. Two major areas were ranked significantly higher by patients/advocates: early diagnosis and curative surgery. Six CommNETS working parties were established. Conclusion: This modified Delphi process resulted in a well-founded set of research priorities for the newly formed CommNETS collaboration by involving a large, diverse group of stakeholders. This approach to setting a research agenda for a new collaborative group should be adopted to ensure that research plans

  20. Translating research into practice: evaluation of an e-learning resource for health care professionals to provide nutrition advice and support for cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane; Worswick, Louise; Pulman, Andy; Ford, Grainne; Jeffery, Jaana

    2015-01-01

    Nurses and other allied health professionals are in a key position to provide appropriate and consistent advice on nutritional issues to support cancer survivors. However gaps in their nutrition knowledge and education warrant the need for enhanced learning as part of their Continued Professional Development (CPD). In the UK there are currently no formally recognised nutrition education programmes. Therefore e-learning offers a solution to provide flexible learning to target this need. This study aimed to develop and evaluate the efficacy of a freely available, internet-based learning resource, for nurses and allied health professionals who provide nutrition, diet and lifestyle advice for cancer survivors. It sought to explore the attitudes and conceptions of the resource and current knowledge base of those involved in the care pathway for cancer survivors. The design and development of the e-learning resource were informed by the best available research and policy evidence and in a format to facilitate on-line learning. A robust evaluation strategy incorporated focus groups and telephone interviews to gain in depth insights into the experiences of using the resource. Themes included 'Plugging a Gap' which shows an improved knowledge base for nutrition. Information was 'All in One Place' showing that the resource was valued as being within a 'trusted' organisation. 'Everyone Benefits' illustrates how learners felt that the resource provided them with an evidence base, whilst the 'Current and Live' theme captured how professionals felt about the information being up-to-date. The project has shown the benefits of interprofessional working to develop an e-learning resource for Health Care Professionals to support cancer survivors in following healthier lifestyles. Positive attitudes and potential improvements in the knowledge base and changes for professional practice were demonstrated. Further research is required to gauge sustained impact in the work environment by

  1. Learning to deal constructively with troubled conscience related to care providers' perceptions of deficient teamwork in residential care of older people--a participatory action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2015-06-01

    Conscience can be perceived as an asset that helps care providers to provide good care, but it can also be a burden that generates stress of conscience (stress related to a troubled conscience). Participatory action research (PAR) has been shown to be successful in supporting care providers in residential care of older people to learn to deal with their troubled conscience in challenging and demanding care situations. The aim of the study was to describe an intervention process to assist care providers in residential care of older people to constructively deal with their troubled conscience related to perceptions of deficient teamwork. The study design was grounded in PAR. Nine enrolled nurses (ENs), two nursing aids (NAs), one Registered Nurse (RN) and their manager participated in 12 PAR sessions. All sessions were tape-recorded, and a domain analysis of the transcriptions was performed. Findings show that a PAR-based intervention can support care providers to understand, handle and take measures against deficient teamwork. Using troubled conscience as a driving force can increase the opportunities to improve quality of care in residential care for older people. During the PAR process, participants raised their awareness of the need to view the team in a wider sense and that the manager and the Registered Nurse should also be members of the team to improve team outcome. To improve clinical practice, we suggest that teams in residential care of older people should be enabled to share and reflect on challenging situations that generate troubled conscience. However, as shown in this study, care providers might need support in order to facilitate and promote sharing and reflecting on what their conscience tells them. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Simplified Deployment of Health Informatics Applications by Providing Docker Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbe, Matthias; Ganslandt, Thomas; Lotzmann, Lydia; Mate, Sebastian; Christoph, Jan; Baum, Benjamin; Sariyar, Murat; Wu, Jie; Stäubert, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Due to the specific needs of biomedical researchers, in-house development of software is widespread. A common problem is to maintain and enhance software after the funded project has ended. Even if many tools are made open source, only a couple of projects manage to attract a user basis large enough to ensure sustainability. Reasons for this include complex installation and configuration of biomedical software as well as an ambiguous terminology of the features provided; all of which make evaluation of software laborious. Docker is a para-virtualization technology based on Linux containers that eases deployment of applications and facilitates evaluation. We investigated a suite of software developments funded by a large umbrella organization for networked medical research within the last 10 years and created Docker containers for a number of applications to support utilization and dissemination.

  3. A development and integration analysis of commercial and in-house control subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.M.; Dalesio, L.R.

    1998-01-01

    The acquisition and integration of commercial automation and control subsystems in physics research is becoming more common. It is presumed these systems present lower risk and less cost. This paper studies four subsystems used in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) resonance-control cooling subsystem (RCCS), the high-power RF subsystem and the RFQ vacuum subsystem were outsourced; the low-level RF (LLRF) subsystem was developed in-house. Based on the authors experience a careful evaluation of the costs and risks in acquisition, implementation, integration, and maintenance associated with these approaches is given

  4. An in-house developed resettable MOSFET dosimeter for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verellen, Dirk; Van Vaerenbergh, Sven; Tournel, Koen; Heuninckx, Karina; Joris, Laurent; Duchateau, Michael; Linthout, Nadine; Gevaert, Thierry; Reynders, Truus; Van de Vondel, Iwein; Coppens, Luc; Depuydt, Tom; De Ridder, Mark; Storme, Guy

    2010-02-21

    The purpose of this note is to report the feasibility and clinical validation of an in-house developed MOSFET dosimetry system and describe an integrated non-destructive reset procedure. Off-the-shelf MOSFETs are connected to a common PC using an 18 bit/analogue-input and 16 bit/output data acquisition card. A reading algorithm was developed defining the zero-temperature-coefficient point (ZTC) to determine the threshold voltage. A wireless interface was established for ease of use. The reset procedure consists of an internal circuit generating a local heating induced by an electrical current. Sensitivity has been investigated as a function of bias voltage (0-9 V) to the gate. Dosimetric properties have been evaluated for 6 MV and 15 MV clinical photon beams and in vivo benchmarking was performed against thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) for conventional treatments (two groups of ten patients for each energy) and total body irradiation (TBI). MOSFETS were pre-irradiated with 20 Gy. Sensitivity of 0.08 mV cGy(-1) can be obtained for 200 cGy irradiations at 5 V bias voltage. Ten consecutive measurements at 200 cGy yield a SD of 2.08 cGy (1.05%). Increasing the dose in steps from 5 cGy to 1000 cGy yields a 1.00 Pearson correlation coefficient and agreement within 2.0%. Dose rate dependence (160-800 cGy min(-1)) was within 2.5%, temperature dependence within 2.0% (25-37 degrees C). A strong angular dependence has been observed for gantry incidences exceeding +/-30 degrees C. Dose response is stable up to 50 Gy (saturation occurs at approximately 90 Gy), which is used as threshold dose before resetting the MOSFET. An average measured-over-calculated dose ratio within 1.05 (SD: 0.04) has been obtained in vivo. TBI midplane-dose assessed by entrance and exit dose measurements agreed within 1.9% with ionization chamber in phantom, and within 1.0% with TLD in vivo. An in-house developed resettable MOSFET-based dosimetry system is proposed. The system has been validated

  5. Presentations provided

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H; Beverly, D [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1999-12-31

    The following topics covered in detail at the workshop included: temperature instrumentation; pressure instrumentation; in-situ calibration and response time testing of RTDs and pressure transmitters; on-line performance monitoring and preventive maintenance of critical equipment; automated measurement of critical parameters; nuclear power plant infrastructure, management and Quality Assurance issues and recent developments for WWER and RBMK reactors. Conclusions drawn were: aging can adversely affect the performance of nuclear plant pressure transmitters; current testing interval of once in every fuel cycle is adequate for aging management; in-situ response time measurements and on-line calibration testing methods have been developed and validated for nuclear plant pressure transmitters; NUREG/CR-5851 should be taken into account for details of aging research on pressure transmitters

  6. Presentations provided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.; Beverly, D.

    1998-01-01

    The following topics covered in detail at the workshop included: temperature instrumentation; pressure instrumentation; in-situ calibration and response time testing of RTDs and pressure transmitters; on-line performance monitoring and preventive maintenance of critical equipment; automated measurement of critical parameters; nuclear power plant infrastructure, management and Quality Assurance issues and recent developments for WWER and RBMK reactors. Conclusions drawn were: aging can adversely affect the performance of nuclear plant pressure transmitters; current testing interval of once in every fuel cycle is adequate for aging management; in-situ response time measurements and on-line calibration testing methods have been developed and validated for nuclear plant pressure transmitters; NUREG/CR-5851 should be taken into account for details of aging research on pressure transmitters

  7. Providing affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guglielmi, Michel; Johannesen, Hl

    2004-01-01

    , Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. Research found that there was a lack of identity or sense of belonging and nothing anchoring people to the region as a whole. Common affinity is somehow forced to the people of East England and thereby we came to the conclusion that a single landmark...... and potential situations but also virtual events that calls for an undeterminated process of resolution. This process is activated by the user who co-produces the actualisation as an answer to a virtual reality that we defined at the first place. The potential situations or the possible it is a fantomatic real....... The possible is like the real. It is determinated and it only lakes existence. While the possible is already made, the virtual is like a problematic which needs to be resolved and actualized. Our installations are based on high tech interactivity where we use sensors and remote communication to offer a sense...

  8. A rapid and economic in-house DNA purification method using glass syringe filters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Cheol Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Purity, yield, speed and cost are important considerations in plasmid purification, but it is difficult to achieve all of these at the same time. Currently, there are many protocols and kits for DNA purification, however none maximize all four considerations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now describe a fast, efficient and economic in-house protocol for plasmid preparation using glass syringe filters. Plasmid yield and quality as determined by enzyme digestion and transfection efficiency were equivalent to the expensive commercial kits. Importantly, the time required for purification was much less than that required using a commercial kit. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This method provides DNA yield and quality similar to that obtained with commercial kits, but is more rapid and less costly.

  9. Radon mitigation experience in houses with basements and adjoining crawl spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messing, M.; Henschel, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Active soil depressurization systems were installed in four basement houses with adjoining crawl spaces in Maryland. In addition, existing soil depressurization systems were modified in two additional basement-plus-crawl-space houses. These six houses were selected to include both good and poor communication beneath the basement slab, and different degrees of importance of the crawl space as a source of the indoor radon. The radon reduction effectiveness was compared for: depressurization only under the basement slab; depressurization only under a polyethylene liner over the unpaved crawl-space floor; and simultaneous depressurization under both the basement slab and the crawl-space liner. The objective of this paper is to identify under what conditions treatment of the basement alone might provide sufficient radon reductions in houses of this substructure, and what incremental benefits might be achieved by also treating the crawl space

  10. In-house L-band niobium single cell cavities at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Koizumi, Susumu; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Kako, Eiji; Shishido, Toshio

    1993-01-01

    For the TESLA (TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) as an energy frontier accelerator of the next generation improving the performance of the niobium superconducting cavities is the most important issue and much reduction of fabrication cost of cavities is another key. Since manufacturing of niobium material requires hard techniques due to the easily oxidizable metal, fabrication of niobium cavities has been conducted in only companies providing enough equipments in Japan. KEK has accumulated the fabrication technics such as forming method by deep drawing, trimming, centering of beam tubes, electron beam welding and measurement of manufacturing error so on. We made in-house L-band single cell cavities using these technologies. In this paper we present these manufacturing of the niobium cavities and estimate the fabrication cost as exactly as possible. The manufacturing error is also described. (author)

  11. OSIRIS, an entirely in-house developed drug discovery informatics system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Thomas; Freyss, Joel; von Korff, Modest; Reich, Jacqueline Renée; Rufener, Christian

    2009-02-01

    We present OSIRIS, an entirely in-house developed drug discovery informatics system. Its components cover all information handling aspects from compound synthesis via biological testing to preclinical development. Its design principles are platform and vendor independence, a consistent look and feel, and complete coverage of the drug discovery process by custom tailored applications. These include electronic laboratory notebook applications for biology and chemistry, tools for high-throughput and secondary screening evaluation, chemistry-aware data visualization, physicochemical property prediction, 3D-pharmacophore comparisons, interactive modeling, computing grid based ligand-protein docking, and more. Most applications are developed in Java and are built on top of a Java library layer that provides reusable cheminformatics functionality and GUI components such as chemical editors, structure canonicalization, substructure search, combinatorial enumeration, enhanced stereo perception, force field minimization, and conformation generation.

  12. Radon in houses due to radon in potable water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, C.T.; Korsah, J.K.; Einloth, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Radon concentration in the air of 10 houses has been measured as a function of water use and meterological parameters such as barometric pressure, wind velocity and direction, indoor and outdoor temperature, and rainfall. Results of calibrations and data collected in winter, spring, fall, and summer are given for selected houses. Average values of radon concentration in air are from 0.80 to 77 rhoCi/1. Water use average ranges from 70 to 240 gal/day. Average potential alpha energy concentrations in these houses range from 0.02 to 1.6 working levels. The radon level due to water use ranges from 0 to 36% of the house radon from soil and water combined. The radon level change due to use of a filter on the water supply shows a 60% reduction in radon in the house. Conclusions are that water radon can be a major fraction of the radon in houses. The ratio of airborne radon concentration due to water use to the radon concentration in water is 4.5 x 10/sup -5/ - 13 x 10/sup -5/

  13. A Study Identifying and Validating Competencies Needed for Mid-Managers That Work in Housing and Residence Life at Colleges and Universities in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Hassel Andre

    2016-01-01

    The researcher identified a gap in the knowledge of competencies needed for midmanagers that work in housing and residence life at the southeast colleges and universities in the United States. The purpose of this study was to identify and develop a consensus on competencies needed by mid-managers. The review of the literature describes and…

  14. Wasted research when systematic reviews fail to provide a complete and up-to-date evidence synthesis: the example of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Créquit, Perrine; Trinquart, Ludovic; Yavchitz, Amélie; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-01-20

    Multiple treatments are frequently available for a given condition, and clinicians and patients need a comprehensive, up-to-date synthesis of evidence for all competing treatments. We aimed to quantify the waste of research related to the failure of systematic reviews to provide a complete and up-to-date evidence synthesis over time. We performed a series of systematic overviews and networks of randomized trials assessing the gap between evidence covered by systematic reviews and available trials of second-line treatments for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other resources sequentially by year from 2009 to March 2, 2015. We sequentially compared the amount of evidence missing from systematic reviews to the randomized evidence available for inclusion each year. We constructed cumulative networks of randomized evidence over time and evaluated the proportion of trials, patients, treatments, and treatment comparisons not covered by systematic reviews on December 31 each year from 2009 to 2015. We identified 77 trials (28,636 patients) assessing 47 treatments with 54 comparisons and 29 systematic reviews (13 published after 2013). From 2009 to 2015, the evidence covered by existing systematic reviews was consistently incomplete: 45 % to 70 % of trials; 30 % to 58 % of patients; 40 % to 66 % of treatments; and 38 % to 71 % of comparisons were missing. In the cumulative networks of randomized evidence, 10 % to 17 % of treatment comparisons were partially covered by systematic reviews and 55 % to 85 % were partially or not covered. We illustrate how systematic reviews of a given condition provide a fragmented, out-of-date panorama of the evidence for all treatments. This waste of research might be reduced by the development of live cumulative network meta-analyses.

  15. Definition of Terms Used in Limitation of Treatment and Providing Palliative Care at the End of Life: The Indian Council of Medical Research Commission Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salins, Naveen; Gursahani, Roop; Mathur, Roli; Iyer, Shivakumar; Macaden, Stanley; Simha, Nagesh; Mani, Raj Kumar; Rajagopal, M. R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Indian hospitals, in general, lack policies on the limitation of inappropriate life-sustaining interventions at the end of life. To facilitate discussion, preparation of guidelines and framing of laws, terminologies relating to the treatment limitation, and providing palliative care at the end-of-life care (EOLC) need to be defined and brought up to date. Methodology: This consensus document on terminologies and definitions of terminologies was prepared under the aegis of the Indian Council of Medical Research. The consensus statement was created using Nominal Group and Delphi Method. Results: Twenty-five definitions related to the limitations of treatment and providing palliative care at the end of life were created by reviewing existing international documents and suitably modifying it to the Indian sociocultural context by achieving national consensus. Twenty-five terminologies defined within the scope of this document are (1) terminal illness, (2) actively dying, (3) life-sustaining treatment, (4) potentially inappropriate treatment, (5) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), (6) do not attempt CPR, (7) withholding life-sustaining treatment, (8) withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, (9) euthanasia (10) active shortening of the dying process, (11) physician-assisted suicide, (12) palliative care, (13) EOLC, (14) palliative sedation, (15) double effect, (16) death, (17) best interests, (18) health-care decision-making capacity, (19) shared decision-making, (20) advance directives, (21) surrogates, (22) autonomy, (23) beneficence, (24) nonmaleficence, and (25) justice.

  16. Does an in-house internist at a GP practice result in reduced referrals to hospital-based specialist care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjel, Tessa C C; Winkens, Anne; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; Struijs, Jeroen N; Winkens, Ron A G; Baan, Caroline A; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2018-03-01

    Consistent evidence on the effects of specialist services in the primary care setting is lacking. Therefore, this study evaluated the effects of an in-house internist at a GP practice on the number of referrals to specialist care in the hospital setting. Additionally, the involved GPs and internist were asked to share their experiences with the intervention. A retrospective interrupted times series study. Two multidisciplinary general practitioner (GP) practices. An internist provided in-house patient consultations in two GP practices and participated in the multidisciplinary meetings. The referral data extracted from the electronic medical record system of the GP practices, including all referral letters from the GPs to specialist care in the hospital setting. The number of referrals to internal medicine in the hospital setting. This study used an autoregressive integrated moving average model to estimate the effect of the intervention taking account of a time trend and autocorrelation among the observations, comparing the pre-intervention period with the intervention period. It was found that the referrals to internal medicine did not statistically significant decrease during the intervention period. This small explorative study did not find any clues to support that an in-house internist at a primary care setting results in a decrease of referrals to internal medicine in the hospital setting. Key Points An in-house internist at a primary care setting did not result in a significant decrease of referrals to specialist care in the hospital setting. The GPs and internist experience a learning-effect, i.e. an increase of knowledge about internal medicine issues.

  17. Overcoming the research-to-practice gap: A randomized trial with two brief homework and organization interventions for students with ADHD as implemented by school mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M; Dvorsky, Melissa R; Molitor, Stephen J; Bourchtein, Elizaveta; Eddy, Laura D; Smith, Zoe R; Oddo, Lauren E; Eadeh, Hana-May

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of 2 brief school-based interventions targeting the homework problems of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) intervention and the Completing Homework by Improving Efficiency and Focus (CHIEF) intervention, as implemented by school mental health providers during the school day. A secondary goal was to use moderator analyses to identify student characteristics that may differentially predict intervention response. Two-hundred and eighty middle school students with ADHD were randomized to the HOPS or CHIEF interventions or to waitlist, and parent and teacher ratings were collected pre, post, and at a 6-month follow-up. Both interventions were implemented with fidelity by school mental health providers. Participants were pulled from elective periods and sessions averaged less than 20 min. Participants in HOPS and CHIEF demonstrated significantly greater improvements in comparison with waitlist on parent ratings of homework problems and organizational skills and effect sizes were large. HOPS participants also demonstrated moderate effect size improvements on materials management and organized action behaviors according to teachers. HOPS participants made significantly greater improvements in parent- and teacher-rated use of organized actions in comparison with CHIEF, but not on measures of homework problems. Moderation analyses revealed that participants with more severe psychopathology and behavioral dysregulation did significantly better with the HOPS intervention as compared to the CHIEF intervention. Brief school-based interventions implemented by school providers can be effective. This type of service delivery model may facilitate overcoming the oft cited research-to-practice gap. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. On the abundance of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart, 1897) (Pyroglyphidae: Acarina) in house dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronswijk, van J.E.M.H.; Schoonen, J.M.C.P.; Berlie, M.A.F.; Lukoschus, F.S.

    1971-01-01

    The dominance of the Pyroglyphidae in house dust has been influenced by a number of factors. The humidity in houses dropped recently to such an extent that only Pyroglyphidae can survive. When temperature and relative humidity are favorable for Acarus siro and Glycyphagus destructor as well as

  19. 32 CFR 169a.9 - Reviews: Existing in-house commercial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... either government or contractor personnel, whichever is more cost effective. Core logistics activities... review schedules. Existing in-house CAs, once reviewed shall be retained in-house without a cost.... In most cases, application of this criteria shall be made considering the wartime and peacetime...

  20. Comparison of In-House and Contracted-Out Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straussner, Shulamith Lala Ashenberg

    1988-01-01

    Compared 15 selected management-sponsored in-house and eight contracted-out employee assistance programs in the New York area. Examined advantages and disadvantages of in-house and contractual programs from the viewpoints of top management, employees, and the employee assistance program itself. Concluded that which program model was best depended…

  1. Science Translational Medicine – improving human health care worldwide by providing an interdisciplinary forum for idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsythe, Katherine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Science Translational Medicine’s mission is to improve human health care worldwide by providing a forum for communication and interdisciplinary idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners from all relevant established and emerging disciplines. The weekly journal debuted in October 2009 and is published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, the publisher of Science and Science Signaling. The journal features peer-reviewed research articles, perspectives and commentary, and is guided by an international Advisory Board, led by Chief Scientific Adviser, Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., former Director of the National Institutes of Health, and Senior Scientific Adviser, Elazer R. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas D. and Virginia W. Cabot Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Science Translational Medicine editorial team is led by Katrina L. Kelner, Ph.D., AAAS. A profound transition is required for the science of translational medicine. Despite 50 years of advances in our fundamental understanding of human biology and the emergence of powerful new technologies, the rapid transformation of this knowledge into effective health measures is not keeping pace with the challenges of global health care. Creative experimental approaches, novel technologies, and new ways of conducting scientific explorations at the interface of established and emerging disciplines are now required to an unprecedented degree if real progress is to be made. To aid in this reinvention, Science and AAAS have created a new interdisciplinary journal, Science Translational Medicine. The following interview exemplefies the pioneering content found in Science Translational Medicine. It is an excerpt from a Podcast interview with Dr. Samuel Broder, former director of the National Cancer Institute and current Chief Medical Officer at Celera. The Podcast was produced in tangent with Dr

  2. The Pace of Hybrid Incompatibility Evolution in House Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Richard J; White, Michael A; Payseur, Bret A

    2015-09-01

    Hybrids between species are often sterile or inviable. This form of reproductive isolation is thought to evolve via the accumulation of mutations that interact to reduce fitness when combined in hybrids. Mathematical formulations of this "Dobzhansky-Muller model" predict an accelerating buildup of hybrid incompatibilities with divergence time (the "snowball effect"). Although the Dobzhansky-Muller model is widely accepted, the snowball effect has only been tested in two species groups. We evaluated evidence for the snowball effect in the evolution of hybrid male sterility among subspecies of house mice, a recently diverged group that shows partial reproductive isolation. We compared the history of subspecies divergence with patterns of quantitative trait loci (QTL) detected in F2 intercrosses between two pairs of subspecies (Mus musculus domesticus with M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus with M. m. castaneus). We used a recently developed phylogenetic comparative method to statistically measure the fit of these data to the snowball prediction. To apply this method, QTL were partitioned as either shared or unshared in the two crosses. A heuristic partitioning based on the overlap of QTL confidence intervals produced unambiguous support for the snowball effect. An alternative approach combining data among crosses favored the snowball effect for the autosomes, but a linear accumulation of incompatibilities for the X chromosome. Reasoning that the X chromosome analyses are complicated by low mapping resolution, we conclude that hybrid male sterility loci have snowballed in house mice. Our study illustrates the power of comparative genetic mapping for understanding mechanisms of speciation. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Prospective comparison of PI-RADS version 2 and qualitative in-house categorization system in detection of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Sonia; Harmon, Stephanie; Mehralivand, Sherif; Bednarova, Sandra; Calio, Brian P; Sugano, Dordaneh; Sidana, Abhinav; Merino, Maria J; Pinto, Peter A; Wood, Bradford J; Shih, Joanna H; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2018-03-31

    Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System v. 2 (PI-RADSv2) provides standardized nomenclature for interpretation of prostate multiparametric MRI (mpMRI). Inclusion of additional features for categorization may provide benefit to stratification of disease. To prospectively compare PI-RADSv2 to a qualitative in-house system for detecting prostate cancer on mpMRI. Prospective. In all, 338 patients who underwent mpMRI May 2015-May 2016, with subsequent MRI/transrectal ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy. 3T mpMRI (T 2 W, diffusion-weighted [DW], apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] map, b-2000 DWI acquisition, and dynamic contrast-enhanced [DCE] MRI). One genitourinary radiologist prospectively read mpMRIs using both in-house and PI-RADSv2 5-category systems. In lesion-based analysis, overall and clinically significant (CS) tumor detection rates (TDR) were calculated for all PI-RADSv2 and in-house categories. The ability of each scoring system to detect cancer was assessed by area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Within each PI-RADSv2 category, lesions were further stratified by their in-house categories to determine if TDRs can be increased by combining features of both systems. In 338 patients (median prostate-specific antigen [PSA] 6.5 [0.6-113.6] ng/mL; age 64 [44-84] years), 733 lesions were identified (47% tumor-positive). Predictive abilities of both systems were comparable for all (AUC 76-78%) and CS cancers (AUCs 79%). The in-house system had higher overall and CS TDRs than PI-RADSv2 for categories 3 and 4 (P house 65%, PI-RADSv2 22.1%). For lesions categorized as PI-RADSv2 = 4, characterization of suspicious/indeterminate extraprostatic extension (EPE) and equivocal findings across all mpMRI sequences contributed to significantly different TDRs for both systems (TDR range 19-75%, P < 0.05). PI-RADSv2 behaves similarly to an existing validated system that relies on the number of sequences on which a lesion is seen. This prospective

  4. Kikiskawâwasow - prenatal healthcare provider perceptions of effective care for First Nations women: an ethnographic community-based participatory research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Richard T; Bruno, Grant; Montour, Margaret; Roasting, Matilda; Lightning, Rick; Rain, Patricia; Graham, Bonny; Mayan, Maria J; Toth, Ellen L; Bell, Rhonda C

    2016-08-11

    Pregnant Indigenous women suffer a disproportionate burden of risk and adverse outcomes relative to non-Indigenous women. Although there has been a call for improved prenatal care, examples are scarce. Therefore, we explored the characteristics of effective care with First Nations women from the perspective of prenatal healthcare providers (HCPs). We conducted an ethnographic community-based participatory research study in collaboration with a large Cree First Nations community in Alberta, Canada. We carried out semi-structured interviews with 12 prenatal healthcare providers (HCPs) that were recorded, transcribed, and subjected to qualitative content analysis. According to the participants, relationships and trust, cultural understanding, and context-specific care were key features of effective prenatal care and challenge the typical healthcare model. HCPs that are able to foster sincere, non-judgmental, and enjoyable interactions with patients may be more effective in treating pregnant First Nations women, and better able to express empathy and understanding. Ongoing HCP cultural understanding specific to the community served is crucial to trusting relationships, and arises from real experiences and learning from patients over and above relying only on formal cultural sensitivity training. Consequently, HCPs report being better able to adapt a more flexible, all-inclusive, and accessible approach that meets specific needs of patients. Aligned with the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, improving prenatal care for First Nations women needs to allow for genuine relationship building with patients, with enhanced and authentic cultural understanding by HCPs, and care approaches tailored to women's needs, culture, and context.

  5. Donations and dependence: Individual contributor strategies in house elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerwig, Jennifer A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the importance of individual contributors to financing federal candidates, past work has largely neglected this crucial financial constituency in favor of research on corporate and trade political action committees (PACs). By contrast, in this study I offer the first analysis of aggregate contributions from the population of individual contributors to House candidates. Using an original big dataset constructed from over fifteen million Federal Election Commission (FEC) disclosure records, I identify individual contributors (rather than contributions) and trace the variation in their strategies across types of House candidates. I distinguish between frequent donors, who are theorized to have more contact with members of Congress, versus infrequent donors in these elections. I find evidence that the character of aggregate donations from repeat donors is more access-oriented even while controlling for other salient candidate characteristics. Funds from infrequent donors, in contrast, appear more ideologically motivated. By also examining the percentage of funds that House candidates receive from repeat donors, I show that the fundraising coalitions of candidates may reproduce reliance on more access-oriented, repeat donors despite the influx of dollars from infrequent donors. I suggest that my findings provide a persuasive case for re-evaluating the diversity of roles individual contributors play in the campaign finance system, and for systematically analyzing variation in contributor strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding Social Sustainability in Housing Form the Case Study "Wohnen Mit Uns" in Vienna and Adaptibility to Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Kalfaoglu Hatipoglu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper is to contribute to the design of socially sustainable housing by discussing the significance of social sustainability and assessing this quality according to the determined criterias of social sustainability. There is a massive construction industry in Turkey, most of which is in the housing sector. These residential areas generally have been built as chaotic mass productions and lack a vision related to social quality.  Today, there are significant problems confronting the building sector, such as globalisation, industrialisation, the imbalance between nature and humanity. These problems determine the quality of life we will have in the future. The intention of this paper is to demonstrate more socially orientated housing design, especially in countries such as Turkey in which this aspect is not a real concern in the housing practice according to the perception of author, especially in comparison to Europe. İn order to achieve this goal, this paper first points out the importance of social sustainability in housing within architectural quality. The description and necessity of social sustainability in multi-unit housing have been discussed and the criteria have been determined to evaluate the quality of social sustainability. An award-winning project in Austria has been chosen as a case study to analyse and perceive social sustainability in residential areas, according to the described criteria. These criteria for assessment and the concrete case study including the emerging phase of the project background provide a guideline for developing housing projects towards social quality in Turkey. In conclusion a general evaluation of the success of the case study with its background and applicability of this concept to Turkish housing which is used by middle-class has been discussed.

  7. Radon in Houses of Vukovar-Srijem County

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radolic, V.; Novakovic, L.; Jerkovic, G.; Vukovic, B.

    2008-01-01

    During years 2003 and 2004, a long-term indoor radon measurements in some, randomly selected, homes in Croatia were performed by LR-115 track etch detectors. The number of exposed detectors in each of 20 Croatian counties was set according to population criteria (one detector per 4000 inhabitants) and around 40 measurements were performed in Vukovar-Srijem County. Additional measurements are followed in years 2006-07 and these results rapidly improve the knowledge of spatial distribution of indoor radon concentration in this County. Radon was measured by method with two LR-115 type II nuclear track detectors which enable the estimation of equilibrium factor as well as the assessment of the annual effective dose. The obtained values were in range of 18 to 548 Bq m -3 , with the arithmetic and geometric means of 95 Bq m -3 and 74 Bq m -3 , respectively. The municipality with lowest average radon level of 51 Bq m -3 is city of Vukovar while Andrijasevci has the highest average radon concentration of 269 Bq m -3 . The average estimated equilibrium factor in Vukovar-Srijem County is 0.512; the relative error of the estimation is 14.8 percent. The statistical χ 2 -test, applied on the empirical and theoretical frequencies, show that the empirical frequency distribution for the radon in houses of Vukovar-Srijem County belonged to the log-normal distribution (calculated parameter, χ 2 = 7.39, was lower than the theoretical one, χ 2 0.05 = 9.49, for 4 degrees of freedom and significance level of 0.05). The percentage of houses with radon concentrations above 200 or 400 Bq/m 3 was 8.7 percent and 1.4 percent, respectively. The assessment of the annual effective dose from the indoor radon and its short-lived progenies for the inhabitants of Vukovar-Srijem County (for the average equilibrium factor of 0.512 and occupancy factor of 0.6) gave the average effective dose of 2.4 mSv/y.(author)

  8. Challenges faced by healthcare providers offering infant feeding counseling to HIV-positive women in sub-Saharan Africa: A review of current research

    OpenAIRE

    Tuthill, Emily L.; Chan, Jessica; Butler, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) has been identified as the optimal nutrition and critical behavior in attaining human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-free infant survival in resource-limited settings. Healthcare providers (HCPs) in clinic- and community-settings throughout sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) provide infant feeding counseling. However, rates of EBF at 6 months of age are suboptimal. Healthcare providers (HCPs) are uniquely positioned to educate HIV-positive mothers and provide support by addr...

  9. Is there a reasonable excuse for not providing post-operative analgesia when using animal models of peripheral neuropathic pain for research purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hestehave

    Full Text Available The induction of neuropathic pain-like behaviors in rodents often requires surgical intervention. This engages acute nociceptive signaling events that contribute to pain and stress post-operatively that from a welfare perspective demands peri-operative analgesic treatment. However, a large number of researchers avoid providing such care based largely on anecdotal opinions that it might interfere with model pathophysiology in the longer term.To investigate effects of various peri-operative analgesic regimens encapsulating different mechanisms and duration of action, on the development of post-operative stress/welfare and pain-like behaviors in the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI-model of neuropathic pain.Starting on the day of surgery, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered either vehicle (s.c., carprofen (5.0mg/kg, s.c., buprenorphine (0.1mg/kg s.c. or 1.0mg/kg p.o. in Nutella®, lidocaine/bupivacaine mixture (local irrigation or a combination of all analgesics, with coverage from a single administration, and up to 72 hours. Post-operative stress and recovery were assessed using welfare parameters, bodyweight, food-consumption, and fecal corticosterone, and hindpaw mechanical allodynia was tested for assessing development of neuropathic pain for 28 days.None of the analgesic regimes compromised the development of mechanical allodynia. Unexpectedly, the combined treatment with 0.1mg/kg s.c. buprenorphine and carprofen for 72 hours and local irrigation with lidocaine/bupivacaine, caused severe adverse effects with peritonitis. This was not observed when the combination included a lower dose of buprenorphine (0.05mg/kg, s.c., or when buprenorphine was administered alone (0.1mg/kg s.c. or 1.0mg/kg p.o. for 72 hours. An elevated rate of wound dehiscence was observed especially in the combined treatment groups, underlining the need for balanced analgesia. Repeated buprenorphine injections had positive effects on body weight the first day after surgery

  10. 20 CFR 364.3 - Publication of missing children information in the Railroad Retirement Board's in-house...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... in the Railroad Retirement Board's in-house publications. 364.3 Section 364.3 Employees' Benefits... the Railroad Retirement Board's in-house publications. (a) All-A-Board. Information about missing... publication. (b) Other in-house publications. The Board may publish missing children information in other in...

  11. Analysis of FDA in-house food reference materials with anticoincidence INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.L.; Cunningham, W.C.

    2013-01-01

    In-house reference material (IRM) cocoa powder (CCP) has been in use at US Food and Drug Administration laboratories for about 15 years. A single lot of commercial material was originally characterized for 32 elements by several laboratories and five techniques. A unique approach for basis weight determination based upon ambient relative humidity was developed for CCP, eliminating the need for dry weight determinations. The CCP Reference Sheet is updated by incorporating new results approximately every 5 years. The last update occurred in 2006. As part of an effort to revalidate and update values for CCP, anticoincidence instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine mass fractions for 16 of the originally characterized elements, as well as to provide information on 16 other elements. Results were in very good agreement with 2006 Reference Sheet values. A new candidate IRM, fresh-frozen swordfish (FFSF) powder, was produced by adding inorganic As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Sb, and Se to liquid nitrogen-frozen commercial swordfish filets which were then homogenized. Portions of FFSF were analyzed by INAA to provide mass fraction and homogeneity information for As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Sb, and Se as well as for eight other elements occurring naturally in the material. Non-homogeneities were ≤2.5 % for As, Br, Cd, and Cs, and ≤1.8 % for Cr, Hg, Rb, Sb, and Se. Certified reference materials DORM-3 Fish Protein powder and fresh-frozen SRM 1947 Lake Michigan Fish Tissue were analyzed as controls. (author)

  12. Develop security architecture for both in-house healthcare information systems and electronic patient record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Jun; Jiang, Jianrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a new security approach to provide security measures and features in both healthcare information systems (PACS, RIS/HIS), and electronic patient record (EPR). We introduced two security components, certificate authoring (CA) system and patient record digital signature management (DSPR) system, as well as electronic envelope technology, into the current hospital healthcare information infrastructure to provide security measures and functions such as confidential or privacy, authenticity, integrity, reliability, non-repudiation, and authentication for in-house healthcare information systems daily operating, and EPR exchanging among the hospitals or healthcare administration levels, and the DSPR component manages the all the digital signatures of patient medical records signed through using an-symmetry key encryption technologies. The electronic envelopes used for EPR exchanging are created based on the information of signers, digital signatures, and identifications of patient records stored in CAS and DSMS, as well as the destinations and the remote users. The CAS and DSMS were developed and integrated into a RIS-integrated PACS, and the integration of these new security components is seamless and painless. The electronic envelopes designed for EPR were used successfully in multimedia data transmission.

  13. Challenge of providing wireless connectivity across Africa is about researching the ways and means to develop sustainable information and communications technology in developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mass Media

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available office. Internationally, the W3C is managed by three organisations on three continents: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US, the European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (ERCIM) in France, and the Keio...

  14. Research and Teaching: Exploring the Use of an Online Quiz Game to Provide Formative Feedback in a Large-Enrollment, Introductory Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Rachel; Parrish, Jonathan; Wright, Adrienne; Gnarpe, Judy; Keenan, Louanne

    2015-01-01

    In a large-enrollment, introductory biochemistry course for nonmajors, the authors provide students with formative feedback through practice questions in PDF format. Recently, they investigated possible benefits of providing the practice questions via an online game (Brainspan). Participants were randomly assigned to either the online game group…

  15. Department of Defense In-House RDT&E Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-30

    MICROWAVE EXPOSURE SYSP BEHAVIORAL RES INSTRUMEN- TATION AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPES ADDITIONAL RESEARCH FACILITIES ARE LOCATED IN GERMANYo MALAYSIA ... OBESITY & PHYS FITNESS AMONG HAV PERS DEVELOPMENT & PILOT TESTING OF NAVY OCCUPATION•AL INFO MONITORING SYS ... FUNCTIOHS/EQUFIPMENT/CAPABILITIES

  16. Coma of unknown origin in the emergency department: implementation of an in-house management routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Mischa; Schmidt, Wolf Ulrich; Möckel, Martin; Römer, Michael; Ploner, Christoph J; Lindner, Tobias

    2016-04-27

    Coma of unknown origin is an emergency caused by a variety of possibly life-threatening pathologies. Although lethality is high, there are currently no generally accepted management guidelines. We implemented a new interdisciplinary standard operating procedure (SOP) for patients presenting with non-traumatic coma of unknown origin. It includes a new in-house triage process, a new alert call, a new composition of the clinical response team and a new management algorithm (altogether termed "coma alarm"). It is triggered by two simple criteria to be checked with out-of-hospital emergency response teams before the patient arrives. A neurologist in collaboration with an internal specialist leads the in-hospital team. Collaboration with anaesthesiology, trauma surgery and neurosurgery is organised along structured pathways that include standardised laboratory tests and imaging. Patients were prospectively enrolled. We calculated response times as well as sensitivity and false positive rates, thus proportions of over- and undertriaged patients, as quality measures for the implementation in the SOP. During 24 months after implementation, we identified 325 eligible patients. Sensitivity was 60 % initially (months 1-4), then fluctuated between 84 and 94 % (months 5-24). Overtriage never exceeded 15 % and undertriage could be kept low at a maximum of 11 % after a learning period. We achieved a median door-to-CT time of 20 minutes. 85 % of patients needed subsequent ICU treatment, 40 % of which required specialised neuro-ICUs. Our results indicate that our new simple in-house triage criteria may be sufficient to identify eligible patients before arrival. We aimed at ensuring the fastest possible proceedings given high portions of underlying time-sensitive neurological and medical pathologies while using all available resources as purposefully as possible. Our SOP may provide an appropriate tool for efficient management of patients with non-traumatic coma. Our results

  17. Radiocesium contamination in house dust within evacuation areas close to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Yoshida-Ohuchi, Hiroko

    2018-05-01

    Outdoor decontamination efforts have been ongoing since the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident; however, little is known about indoor contamination. Therefore, house dust was sampled based on particle size in 21 wooden buildings (19 residential houses and 2 community centers) within the evacuation area close to the FDNPP, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Activities of radiocesium ( 137 Cs) per gram of house dust increased with decreasing particle size (mean: 6.1 × 10 3 , 2.6 × 10 3 , 1.6 × 10 3 , 7.5 × 10 2 , 5.0 × 10 2 , and 4.6 × 10 2  Bq/g for house dust were inversely related to the square of distance from the FDNPP for house dust. It was found that 19%, 33%, and 48% of 137 Cs in house dust were extracted in water, 1 M HCl, and not extracted, respectively. Considering the bioaccessibility and assuming a 20 mg/day daily intake of house dust, the daily doses would be 7.2 Bq/day (mean) and 18 Bq/day (95th percent quantile). These results provide valuable insight into indoor radioactive Cs contamination in the area around the FDNPP and possible oral exposure to indoor radioactive Cs after returning home. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Deployment of an in-house designed training process in a quaternary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Bhatia, Saurabh; Chiang, I-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare providers, such as doctors and nurses, have been famous for high resistance to change. A careful change management plan, particularly training process, is utmost necessary. A quaternary care hospital in India changed its system, from manual to Electronic Medical Record/Health Information System (EMR/HIS). The hospital management wanted to train its 4000 diverse end-users on the EMR/HIS in two months' time. This paper describes an in-house designed training process and its deployment in the given healthcare organizational settings. We designed a training process named DRIPDA. The training process was deployed to train 4000 end-users of EMR/HIS, in the quaternary care hospital. Various factors, such as methods and tools of training, constraints of trainees, trainers, and organization were considered while deploying the training process. The effectiveness of the DRIPDA was assessed using the Kirkpatrick model. End-users received training on the new system only in 25% of estimated time and 28% of the projected expense, without having any distraction in their usual workflow, or any productivity loss. We found that the DRIPDA training process could train all employees effectively and efficiently. A decent training process can help in managing the change, thereby reduce the training time and cost.

  19. An in-house alternative to traditional SDI services at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, R.E.; Dominiak, R.R.

    1997-02-20

    Selective Dissemination of Information (SDIs) are based on automated, well-defined programs that regularly produce precise, relevant bibliographic information. Librarians have typically turned to information vendors such as Dialog or STN international to design and implement these searches for their users in business, academia, and the science community. Because Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) purchases the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Current Contents tapes (all subject areas excluding Humanities). ANL scientists enjoy the benefit of in-house developments with BASISplus software programming and no longer need to turn to outside companies for reliable SDI service. The database and its customized services are known as ACCESS (Argonne Current Contents Electronic Search Service). Through collaboration with librarians on Boolean logic and selection of terms, users can now design their own personal profiles to comb the new data, thereby avoiding service fees from outside providers. Based on the feedback from scientists, it seems that this new service can help transform the ANL distributed libraries into more efficient central functioning entities that better serve the users. One goal is to eliminate the routing of paper copies of many new journal issues to different library locations for users to browse; instead users may be expected to rely more on electronic dissemination of both table of contents and customized SDIs for new scientific and technical information.

  20. Quality assurance considerations related to in-house radiopharmaceutical preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.D.; Boothe, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration through its interpretation of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act with various amendments not only oversees the clinical investigation of new drugs, including short-lived radiopharmaceuticals but also monitors specific basic research protocols through the activities of the approved Radioactive Drug Research Committees. Concurrent with the technical improvements being made with positron emission tomographs is the increased availability of a variety of radiolabeled substrates possessing the unique potential to serve as indicators of in vivo alteration of biochemical processes. The syntheses of certain positron emitting radioligands with specific emphasis on the quality control procedures and current good manufacturing practices are discussed

  1. A rural/urban comparison of privacy and confidentiality concerns associated with providing sensitive location information in epidemiologic research involving persons who use drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Abby E; Young, April M; Havens, Jennifer R

    2017-11-01

    Analyses that link contextual factors with individual-level data can improve our understanding of the "risk environment"; however, the accuracy of information provided by participants about locations where illegal/stigmatized behaviors occur may be influenced by privacy/confidentiality concerns that may vary by setting and/or data collection approach. We recruited thirty-five persons who use drugs from a rural Appalachian town and a Mid-Atlantic city to participate in in-depth interviews. Through thematic analyses, we identified and compared privacy/confidentiality concerns associated with two survey methods that (1) collect self-reported addresses/cross-streets and (2) use an interactive web-based map to find/confirm locations in rural and urban settings. Concerns differed more by setting than between methods. For example, (1) rural participants valued interviewer rapport and protections provided by the Certificate of Confidentiality more; (2) locations considered to be sensitive differed in rural (i.e., others' homes) and urban (i.e., where drugs were used) settings; and (3) urban participants were more likely to view providing cross-streets as an acceptable alternative to providing exact addresses for sensitive locations and to prefer the web-based map approach. Rural-urban differences in privacy/confidentiality concerns reflect contextual differences (i.e., where drugs are used/purchased, population density, and prior drug-related arrests). Strategies to alleviate concerns include: (1) obtain a Certificate of Confidentiality, (2) collect geographic data at the scale necessary for proposed analyses, and (3) permit participants to provide intersections/landmarks in close proximity to actual locations rather than exact addresses or to skip questions where providing an intersection/landmark would not obfuscate the actual address. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Testing for bubbles in housing markets: a panel data approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikhed, V.; Zemčík, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 4 (2009), s. 366-386 ISSN 0895-5638 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : house prices * cointegration * panel data Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.659, year: 2009

  3. Selection of population controls for a Salmonella case-control study in the UK using a market research panel and web-survey provides time and resource savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, P; Kanagarajah, S; Maguire, H; Adak, G K; Dabrera, G; Waldram, A; Freeman, R; Charlett, A; Oliver, I

    2016-04-01

    Timely recruitment of population controls in infectious disease outbreak investigations is challenging. We evaluated the timeliness and cost of using a market research panel as a sampling frame for recruiting controls in a case-control study during an outbreak of Salmonella Mikawasima in the UK in 2013. We deployed a web-survey by email to targeted members of a market research panel (panel controls) in parallel to the outbreak control team interviewing randomly selected public health staff by telephone and completing paper-based questionnaires (staff controls). Recruitment and completion of exposure history web-surveys for panel controls (n = 123) took 14 h compared to 15 days for staff controls (n = 82). The average staff-time cost per questionnaire for staff controls was £13·13 compared to an invoiced cost of £3·60 per panel control. Differences in the distribution of some exposures existed between these control groups but case-control studies using each group found that illness was associated with consumption of chicken outside of the home and chicken from local butchers. Recruiting market research panel controls offers time and resource savings. More rapid investigations would enable more prompt implementation of control measures. We recommend that this method of recruiting controls is considered in future investigations and assessed further to better understand strengths and limitations.

  4. Private Training Providers in Australia: Their Characteristics and Training Activities. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; McCarthy, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the nature of the training activity of private registered training organisations (RTOs) offered to Australian students in 2003, based on data from a national sample of 330 RTOs. The study also provides estimates of the private sector's overall contribution to the total vocational education and training (VET) effort in Australia…

  5. "To Provide for the Edifice of Learning": Researching 450 Years of Jesuit Educational and Cultural History, with Particular Reference to the British Jesuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Maurice

    2007-01-01

    Jesuit education provided the first rigorous educational "system" in the Western world from the 1540s onwards. By 1773 more than 700 Jesuit colleges and universities educating some 250,000 students worldwide constituted the largest educational network in existence up to that time. At the present day, in 68 countries worldwide, the…

  6. Challenges faced by health-care providers offering infant-feeding counseling to HIV-positive women in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Emily L; Chan, Jessica; Butler, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) has been identified as the optimal nutrition and critical behavior in attaining human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-free infant survival in resource-limited settings. Health-care providers (HCPs) in clinic- and community-settings throughout sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) provide infant-feeding counseling. However, rates of EBF at 6 months of age are suboptimal. HCPs are uniquely positioned to educate HIV-positive mothers and provide support by addressing known barriers to EBF. However, limited evidence exists on the experiences faced by HCPs in providing counseling on infant feeding to HIV-positive women. Our objective is to describe experiences faced by HCPs when delivering infant-feeding counseling in the context of HIV in program settings in sSA. We searched a range of electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO from January 1990 to February 2013, in addition to hand-searching, cross-reference searching, and personal communications. The search was limited to publications in English. Empirical studies of HCP experiences providing infant-feeding counseling in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV programs in sSA were selected. We identified 10 peer-reviewed articles reporting HCP challenges in infant-feeding counseling that met inclusion criteria. Articles included qualitative, cross-sectional and mixed-method studies, and cumulatively reported 31 challenges faced by HCPs. Among the challenges identified, the most commonly reported were personal beliefs held by the HCPs toward infant feeding in the context of HIV, contradictory messages, staff workload, directive counseling styles, and a lack of practical strategies to offer mothers, often leading to improvised counseling approaches. Counseling strategies need to be developed that are relevant, meaningful, and responsive to the needs of both HCPs and mothers.

  7. Listing of engineering research contract reports under the DREAM, AERD and ERDAF programs of the Research Branch, 1973-1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, B A; Thuns, A; Feldman, M

    1988-01-01

    To supplement in-house investigations, Agriculture Canada contracted out research in a number of programs including three which supported engineering work. This document lists the contracts awarded under the programs and provides reference citations of the contract reports. Reports are grouped by file number, scientific authority, author or contractor, and subject, and a subject index is also included. The three programs are: Development, Research and Evaluation in Agricultural Mechanization (DREAM), Agricultural Engineering Research and Development Program (AERD), and Energy Research and Development in Agriculture and Food (ERDAF). AERD, which replaced DREAM, has been terminated, but the ERDAF program is still continuing as of the date of this document.

  8. ILIR 󈧅: SSC San Diego In-House Laboratory Independent Research 2001 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    data.* 3. Sixt, N., A. Cardoso, A. Vallier, J. Fayolle, R. Buckland, T. F. Wild. 1998. “Canine Distemper Virus DNA Vaccination Induces Humoral and...interface or by inhomogeneities just below the interface (though not too far below since volume attenuation limits the sediment penetration...note that using larger wavelength spacing will necessitate using in-line attenuators after the modulators to fine-tune the second-harmonic distortion

  9. Edgewood Chemical Biological Center In-House Laboratory Independent Research Program Annual Report FY11

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    processes or products in mind ”. ECBC views the ILIR program as a critical part of its efforts to ensure a high level of basic science, foster innovation in...this project, density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level was used to explore the ability of molecules structurally derived from the purine...effect on embryonic development, leading to neural tube deficits, autism , and cognitive dysfunction.[5] Cezar et al. used LC-MS to examine the

  10. AGRIS: providing access to agricultural research data exploiting open data on the web [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/599

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Celli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AGRIS is the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology. It is supported by a large community of data providers, partners and users. AGRIS is a database that aggregates bibliographic data, and through this core data, related content across online information systems is retrieved by taking advantage of Semantic Web capabilities. AGRIS is a global public good and its vision is to be a responsive service to its user needs by facilitating contributions and feedback regarding the AGRIS core knowledgebase, AGRIS’s future and its continuous development. Periodic AGRIS e-consultations, partner meetings and user feedback are assimilated to the development of the AGRIS application and content coverage. This paper outlines the current AGRIS technical set-up, its network of partners, data providers and users as well as how AGRIS’s responsiveness to clients’ needs inspires the continuous technical development of the application. The paper concludes by providing a use case of how the AGRIS stakeholder input and the subsequent AGRIS e-consultation results influence the development of the AGRIS application, knowledgebase and service delivery.

  11. NASA's computer science research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Following a major assessment of NASA's computing technology needs, a new program of computer science research has been initiated by the Agency. The program includes work in concurrent processing, management of large scale scientific databases, software engineering, reliable computing, and artificial intelligence. The program is driven by applications requirements in computational fluid dynamics, image processing, sensor data management, real-time mission control and autonomous systems. It consists of university research, in-house NASA research, and NASA's Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) and Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE). The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA to exploit advancing computing technology in aerospace applications.

  12. Bacterial Diversity Studies Using the 16S rRNA Gene Provide a Powerful Research-Based Curriculum for Molecular Biology Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan E. Dutton

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a ten-week curriculum for molecular biology that uses 16S ribosomal RNA genes to characterize and compare novel bacteria from hot spring communities in Yellowstone National Park. The 16S rRNA approach bypasses selective culture-based methods. Our molecular biology course offered the opportunity for students to learn broadly applicable methods while contributing to a long-term research project. Specifically, students isolated and characterized clones that contained novel 16S rRNA inserts using restriction enzyme, DNA sequencing, and computer-based phylogenetic methods. In both classes, students retrieved novel bacterial 16S rRNA genes, several of which were most similar to Green Nonsulfur bacterial isolates. During class, we evaluated student performance and mastery of skills and concepts using quizzes, formal lab notebooks, and a broad project assignment. For this report, we also assessed student performance alongside data quality and discussed the significance, our goal being to improve both research and teaching methods.

  13. PERSPECTIVE ON OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESEARCH AND INTERVENTIONS PROVIDED BY COMMUNITY BASED HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEM ILLUSTRATED BY THE POTENTIAL USE OF MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING INTERVENTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisore, P; Were, F; Ayuku, D; Kaseje, D

    2012-05-01

    With the growth of Community-Based Health Information (CBHIS) for decision making and service provision in the low income settings, innovative models of addressing Maternal and Newborn Health (MNH) morbidity and mortality are necessary. World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that five hundred thousand mothers and about three million newborns die each year in middle and low income countries. To stimulate interest in utilisation CBHIS for research and interventions, with an illustration of potential using on Motivational Interviewing intervention. Literature searched electronically, discussion with behavioural experts, health system researchers, and maternal and Newborn Health (MNH) experts, and book reviews. Broad selection criteria including all current literature relevantsubjects including CBHIS, behaviour change methods and Community MNH. A checklist for relevance was used to identify the relevant behaviour change intervention to use in the illustration. A method that met the criteria was identified, and based on a discussion with behavioural experts, the decision to use it the illustration was reached. Motivational Interviewing Intervention (MII) should be considered for implementation and study on near-term Pregnant women in a setting where these mothers can be identified and a targeted intervention instituted.

  14. Comparison of Recipient Outcomes After Kidney Transplantation: In-House Versus Imported Deceased Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S Y; Gwon, J G; Kim, M G; Jung, C W

    2018-05-01

    Increased cold ischemia time in cadaveric kidney transplants has been associated with a high rate of delayed graft function (DGF), and even with graft survival. Kidney transplantation using in-house donors reduces cold preservation time. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes after transplantation in house and externally. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of donors and recipients of 135 deceased-donor kidney transplantations performed in our center from March 2009 to March 2016. Among the 135 deceased donors, 88 (65.2%) received the kidneys from in-house donors. Median cold ischemia time of transplantation from in-house donors was shorter than for imported donors (180.00 vs 300.00 min; P house donors. Imported kidney was independently associated with greater odds of DGF in multivariate regression analysis (odds ratio, 4.165; P = .038). However, the renal function of recipients at 1, 3, 5, and 7 years after transplantation was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Transplantation with in-house donor kidneys was significantly associated with a decreased incidence of DGF, but long-term graft function and survival were similar compared with imported donor kidneys. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Studies on uranium recovery from inlet stream of Effluent Treatment Plant by novel 'In-House' sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangita Pal; Tewari, P.K.; Suchismita Mishra; Pandit, G.G.; Puranik, V.D.; Satpati, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    'In-House' resin Polyacrylhydroxamic acid (PHOA) has been synthesized and utilized targeting ground water remediation; recovery of uranium from low concentration aqueous solution e.g., mining activities related water, flooding of excavated or deplumed areas, nuclear plant washed effluent and process generated effluents in nuclear plant during front-end as well as back-end treatment. In the present study, treatment of field effluent containing heavy metals and radio-nuclides from contaminated mining sites reflected preference for uranium with respect to manganese. The specific complexation between the extractant and metal ion especially uranium provides high distribution co-efficient (K d ) for uranium (K d,U = 1,450 mL/g from inlet of Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) and K d,U = 74,950 mL/g for synthetic solution) compared to high level impurity (1,000 times higher concentration) of manganese (K d,Mn = 111 mL/g from inlet of ETP and K d,Mn = 10,588 mL/g for synthetic solution). The 'In-House' resin showed significant extractability (70-95% elution efficiency) and indicates a possibility of selective removal/recovery of the valuable metal ions even from secondary sources. As a specialty, resin can be regenerated and reused. (author)

  16. Research and Development of a portable microfocus x-ray system capable of providing ultra-high resolutions images of improvised explosive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korkala, G.

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of x-ray screening has long been a recognized valuable tool as a means to evaluate and identify suspect articles for possible improvised explosive devices. Recent bombings indicate an increase in technical sophistication by the terrorist which demand additional means to further the possibility of detecting these devices before they reach their target or detonate. This paper discusses history of the use of x-ray and the design parameters of a portable micro-focus x-ray system capable of providing ultra high resolution radiographs as well as being able to be used with additional state-of-the-art imaging systems

  17. Department of Defense In-House RDT and E Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-10-30

    be WW". w 1.-- wW"A.44444U .5. W0W O4 .we 0.-.e𔄃.-4 j00 W.~ 400 0 4C 04 zI- z z U . 4A 444 LL) ACCA w " 6 0491. > 0 .W.-W 4 0 K W u x4 " W- h 6l.0~s...AND APPLIED RESEARCH IN jUBMARINE AND DIVINU MEDICINE, CLOSED ENVIRONMENTS INi AREAS OF PHYSIOL. MEDICAL PSYCHOL.VISION AUDITION HUMAN FAC.ENG

  18. Department of Defense In-House RDT and E Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-30

    8217mI L). u~~’I ki XLL-V I ~ ~ t~.A.* ..I*VA’ .. -j ala j l03v AL) Q L Ix AL 1:[ VV C, -4 0~5 6 ft a wL t- ’kW " - 4 U.’ AL -4>-- ABA ~ t 0 4,1 d Ř j A...INSTITUTF OF SURGICAL RESEARCH FT•SAM HOUSTONTX. CDR.OIR.COL. BASIL A. PRUITTJR. CH.SCI.DR. ARTHUR D. MASON PROGRAM DATA BY FISCAL YEAR (MILLION

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Joseph Daniels1,&, Ruth Nduati1,2, James Kiarie1,3, Carey Farquhar1,4,5 .... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, .... a research environment that supports knowledge sharing to develop research ...

  20. A Systematic Review of End-of-Life Care Communication Skills Training for Generalist Palliative Care Providers: Research Quality and Reporting Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Lisa Jane; Koffman, Jonathan; Hawkins, Amy; McDonald, Christine; O'Brien, Suzanne; Robinson, Vicky; Khan, Shaheen A; George, Rob; Higginson, Irene J; Selman, Lucy Ellen

    2017-09-01

    End-of-life care (EoLC) communication skills training for generalist palliative care providers is recommended in policy guidance globally. Although many training programs now exist, there has been no comprehensive evidence synthesis to inform future training delivery and evaluation. To identify and appraise how EoLC communication skills training interventions for generalist palliative care providers are developed, delivered, evaluated, and reported. Systematic review. Ten electronic databases (inception to December 2015) and five relevant journals (January 2004 to December 2015) were searched. Studies testing the effectiveness of EoLC communication skills training for generalists were included. Two independent authors assessed study quality. Descriptive statistics and narrative synthesis are used to summarize the findings. From 11,441 unique records, 170 reports were identified (157 published, 13 unpublished), representing 160 evaluation studies of 153 training interventions. Of published papers, eight were of low quality, 108 medium, and 41 high. Few interventions were developed with service user involvement (n = 7), and most were taught using a mixture of didactics (n = 123), reflection and discussion (n = 105), and role play (n = 86). Evaluation designs were weak: communication skills training interventions in the literature, evidence is limited by poor reporting and weak methodology. Based on our findings, we present a CONSORT statement supplement to improve future reporting and encourage more rigorous testing. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Experiences and meanings of integration of TCAM (Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medical) providers in three Indian states: results from a cross-sectional, qualitative implementation research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, D; Narayan, V V; Josyula, L K; Porter, J D H; Sathyanarayana, T N; Sheikh, K

    2014-11-25

    Efforts to engage Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medical (TCAM) practitioners in the public health workforce have growing relevance for India's path to universal health coverage. We used an action-centred framework to understand how policy prescriptions related to integration were being implemented in three distinct Indian states. Health departments and district-level primary care facilities in the states of Kerala, Meghalaya and Delhi. In each state, two or three districts were chosen that represented a variation in accessibility and distribution across TCAM providers (eg, small or large proportions of local health practitioners, Homoeopaths, Ayurvedic and/or Unani practitioners). Per district, two blocks or geographical units were selected. TCAM and allopathic practitioners, administrators and representatives of the community at the district and state levels were chosen based on publicly available records from state and municipal authorities. A total of 196 interviews were carried out: 74 in Kerala, and 61 each in Delhi and Meghalaya. We sought to understand experiences and meanings associated with integration across stakeholders, as well as barriers and facilitators to implementing policies related to integration of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative (TCA) providers at the systems level. We found that individual and interpersonal attributes tended to facilitate integration, while system features and processes tended to hinder it. Collegiality, recognition of stature, as well as exercise of individual personal initiative among TCA practitioners and of personal experience of TCAM among allopaths enabled integration. The system, on the other hand, was characterised by the fragmentation of jurisdiction and facilities, intersystem isolation, lack of trust in and awareness of TCA systems, and inadequate infrastructure and resources for TCA service delivery. State-tailored strategies that routinise interaction, reward individual and system

  2. Year-Round Use Of Thermography In House Doctoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, Kenneth J.; Harrje, David T.; Dutt, Gautam S.

    1983-03-01

    There have been many presentations of thermographic residential building analyses at the past ThermosInse conferences. A number of these papers have dealt with evaluation of insulation voids and more recently a few have described air leakage detection 2,3 during the colder winter months. This paper will focus on the thermographic application in the House Doctor instrumented energy analysis approach as developed by Princeton University. The central theme will be the application to a year-round research or commercial activity. Some of the conditions that could create thermographic problems, as well as techniques that may be used to lessen these difficulties, thereby extending the thermographic "season" is discussed. Our experiences in summer thermography with and without the use of a building pressurization system is also covered.

  3. Putting integrated reservoir characterization into practice - in house training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, F.M. Jr.; Best, D.A.; Clarke, R.T. [Mobile Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The need for even more efficient reservoir characterization and management has forced a change in the way Mobil Oil provides technical support to its production operations. We`ve learned that to be successful, a good understanding of the reservoir is essential. This includes an understanding of the technical and business significance of reservoir heterogeneities at different stages of field development. A multi-disciplinary understanding of the business of integrated reservoir characterization is essential and to facilitate this understanding, Mobil has developed a highly successful {open_quotes}Reservoir Characterization Field Seminar{close_quotes}. Through specific team based case studies that incorporate outcrop examples and data the program provides participants the opportunity to explore historic and alternative approaches to reservoir description, characterization and management. We explore appropriate levels and timing of data gathering, technology applications, risk assessment and management practices at different stages of field development. The case studies presented throughout the course are a unique element of the program which combine real life and hypothetical problem sets that explore how different technical disciplines interact, the approaches to a problem solving they use, the assumptions and uncertainties contained in their contributions and the impact those conclusions may have on other disciplines involved in the overall reservoir management process. The team building aspect of the course was an added bonus.

  4. Speciation and reduced hybrid female fertility in house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Taichi A; Nachman, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In mammals, intrinsic postzygotic isolation has been well studied in males but has been less studied in females, despite the fact that female gametogenesis and pregnancy provide arenas for hybrid sterility or inviability that are absent in males. Here, we asked whether inviability or sterility is observed in female hybrids of Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. musculus, taxa which hybridize in nature and for which male sterility has been well characterized. We looked for parent-of-origin growth phenotypes by measuring adult body weights in F1 hybrids. We evaluated hybrid female fertility by crossing F1 females to a tester male and comparing multiple reproductive parameters between intrasubspecific controls and intersubspecific hybrids. Hybrid females showed no evidence of parent-of-origin overgrowth or undergrowth, providing no evidence for reduced viability. However, hybrid females had smaller litter sizes, reduced embryo survival, fewer ovulations, and fewer small follicles relative to controls. Significant variation in reproductive parameters was seen among different hybrid genotypes, suggesting that hybrid incompatibilities are polymorphic within subspecies. Differences in reproductive phenotypes in reciprocal genotypes were observed and are consistent with cyto-nuclear incompatibilities or incompatibilities involving genomic imprinting. These findings highlight the potential importance of reduced hybrid female fertility in the early stages of speciation. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  5. Usefulness of in-house PCR methods for hepatitis B virus DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilho, Moyra Machado; Baptista, Marcia Leite; da Silva, Messias; de Sousa, Paulo Sérgio Fonseca; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of three in-house PCR techniques for HBV DNA detection and compare it with commercial quantitative methods to evaluate the usefulness of in-house methods for HBV diagnosis. Three panels of HBsAg reactive sera samples were evaluated: (i) 50 samples were examined using three methods for in-house qualitative PCR and the Cobas Amplicor HBV Monitor Assay; (ii) 87 samples were assayed using in-house semi-nested PCR and the Cobas TaqMan HBV test; (iii) 11 serial samples obtained from 2 HBV-infected individuals were assayed using the Cobas Amplicor HBV test and semi-nested PCR. In panel I, HBV DNA was detected in 44 samples using the Cobas Amplicor HBV test, 42 samples using semi-nested PCR (90% concordance with Cobas Amplicor), 22 samples using PCR for the core gene (63.6% concordance) and 29 samples using single-round PCR for the pre-S/S gene (75% concordance). In panel II, HBV DNA was quantified in 78 of the 87 HBsAg reactive samples using Cobas TaqMan but 52 samples using semi-nested PCR (67.8% concordance). HBV DNA was detected in serial samples until the 17th and 26th week after first donation using in-house semi-nested PCR and the Cobas Amplicor HBV test, respectively. In-house semi-nested PCR presented adequate concordance with commercial methods as an alternative method for HBV molecular diagnosis in low-resource settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In-house R&D and External Knowledge Acquisition What Makes Chinese Firms Productive?

    OpenAIRE

    Böing, Philipp; Müller, Elisabeth; Sandner, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the influence of in-house R&D and external knowledge acquisition on the total factor productivity (TFP) of listed Chinese firms for the time period 2001-2010. We find a quantitatively important positive effect of in-house R&D. The achieved level of technological sophistication of Chinese firms is sufficient to benefit from R&D collaboration with domestic partners. We do not find a significant effect for employing inventors with access to international knowledge or for coll...

  7. Mass Housing and Changings in Housing Demand, Case of Diyarbakir, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    M. Oguz Sinemillioglu; Can Tuncay Akın; Havva Özyılmaz

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze changings in housing demand, especially in term of house size in Diyarbakır case, in Turkey. Though Housing in Turkey is in a free market system, there is a Mass Housing Administration (TOKÃ ) has been doing mass houses for, relatively, middle class income people. Diyarbakır, one of the cities that TOKÃ has done two thousand houses, has taken too much migration, so that the demand in housing form and structure has different alterations. This process should ...

  8. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive qualitative research design was used to determine whether participants ... simulation as a teaching method; a manikin offering effective learning; confidence ..... Tesch R. Qualitative Research: Analysis Types and Software Tools.

  9. In-house Preparation of 188W/188Re Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriwiang, Wiranee; Minsakorn, Napharat; Wardwilai, Charudej; Yindirum, Chareon; Sangsuriyan, Jatupol

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Low activity 188W/188Re generators were developed for the purpose of routinely supplying rhenium-188 for laboratory experiments and research works. Chromatography technology was applied in the construction of the generators. The chromatography columns containing 1.74 g alumina (Al2O3) were housed in plastic (PE) shielding inside the 30mm thick lead shield. Three generators were loaded with three different 188W activities; 25mCi (RG1), 25 mCi (RG2) and 50 mCi (RG3). Generator performances were determined in terms of elution yields, radiochemical purity, Al-breakthrough, 188W-breakthrough, and radionuclidic purity of the eluted products. These generators can be used for more than 6 months with average elution yields greater than 90 %. Radiochemical purity of 188ReO4- was high (> 99.7 % by ITLC), low level of 188W -breakthrough and low contamination of 192Ir and 191Os. There were only less than 1 ppm of 186W carrier and less than 3 ppm of Al-breakthrough. Key words: 188W/188Re, Generator, 188Re, Radionuclide

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research process, as part of which students must find and appraise evidence from research.[5] This highlights that teaching research methodology is inclined towards equipping students ... Students believed that evidence-based practice was vital, yet their understanding of the concept was restricted when compared with the.

  11. The seed of change in society. Diffusion of solar cell systems in housing by means of pilot projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Mierlo, B.C.

    2002-01-01

    . The development of solar cell systems in housing units was stimulated financially by pilot projects. The government programme was characterised by a number of key elements known in the niche approach as 'strategic niche management', such as attention to both the technical and the social aspects, a phased build-up, and flanking measures. It is for this reason that solar cell systems in housing units form an appropriate case for studying the contribution of pilot projects to the diffusion of new technologies. One of the suppositions was that the importance of a pilot project is demonstrated in the first place in its direct impact on the actors involved in the project. It was also presupposed that this impact is largely influenced by internal processes. This would mean that guidelines could be formulated for raising the quality of the internal processes. The broader effect of pilot projects is dependent on external actors who promote structural changes based on the learning experiences obtained in pilot projects. This was the supposition. This 'social embedding' was supposed to be influenced by the learning environment of pilot projects, i.e. by the innovation diffusion network and the exchange of learning experience between actors from pilot projects and external actors. Based on the supposition, the central question was subdivided into the four research questions set out below: (1) What is the direct impact on the actors involved in pilot projects with solar cells in housing projects?; (2) What is the influence of the internal processes on the direct impact of pilot projects?; (3) Are the learning experiences of pilot projects with solar cells in housing socially embedded?; (4) What is the influence of the learning environment on the social embedding? [nl

  12. Investigation of Indoor Air Quality in Houses of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Vilčeková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available People who live in buildings are exposed to harmful effects of indoor air pollution for many years. Therefore, our research is aimed to investigate the indoor air quality in family houses. The measurements of indoor air temperature, relative humidity, total volatile organic compounds (TVOC, particulate matters (PM and sound pressure level were carried out in 25 houses in several cities of the Republic of Macedonia. Mean values of indoor air temperature and relative humidity ranged from 18.9 °C to 25.6 °C and from 34.1% to 68.0%, respectively. With regard to TVOC, it can be stated that excessive occurrence was recorded. Mean values ranged from 50 μg/m3 to 2610 μg/m3. Recommended value (200 μg/m3 for human exposure to TVOC was exceeded in 32% of houses. Mean concentrations of PM2.5 (particular matter with diameter less than 2.5 μm and PM10 (diameter less than 10 μm are determined to be from 16.80 μg/m3 to 30.70 μg/m3 and from 38.30 μg/m3 to 74.60 μg/m3 individually. Mean values of sound pressure level ranged from 29.8 dB(A to 50.6 dB(A. Dependence between characteristics of buildings (Year of construction, Year of renovation, Smoke and Heating system and data from measurements (Temperature, Relative humidity, TVOC, PM2.5 and PM10 were analyzed using R software. Van der Waerden test shows dependence of Smoke on TVOC and PM2.5. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance shows the effect of interaction of Renovation and Smoke.

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... unregistered gold miners, East-Akim District, Ghana – 2010” was accepted for ... provided opportunities for feedback, inter-sectoral discussions leading to .... value they place on the service provided by graduates of the ...

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    youth, least-developed countries, media, students, and community influencers. SIDA provided ... about tuberculosis/HIV/AIDS/sexually transmitted infections and networking opportunities. .... Other healthcare worker/social services provider.

  15. Seasonal variations in house dust mite influence the circadian peak expiratory flow amplitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, DS; vanderHeide, S; deReus, DM; Koeter, GH; vanAalderen, WMC; Meijer, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether seasonal differences in house dust mite (HDM) allergen exposure influence the circadian peak expiratory flow (PEF) amplitude in asthmatic children. Asthmatic children (n = 25) with a solitary allergy to HDM were studied in spring and in autumn. All

  16. Managing In-House Development of a Campus-Wide Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurville, Simon; Williams, John

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To show how a combination of hard and soft project and change management methodologies guided successful in-house development of a campus-wide information system. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of the methodologies and management structures that guided the development is presented. Findings: Applying a combination of the…

  17. Accurate localization technique for smart fiber-wireless in-house networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangdiongga, E.; Abraha, S.T.; Crivellaro, A.; Okonkwo, C.M.; Gaudino, R.; Koonen, A.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a RoF scheme for localization purposes of mobile stations for in-house networks is presented. Using impulse radio UWB over SMF and time-of-arrival localization method, mobile stations can be localized within centimeters accuracy.

  18. In-House Automation of a Small Library Using a Mainframe Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waranius, Frances B.; Tellier, Stephen H.

    1986-01-01

    An automated library routine management system was developed in-house to create system unique to the Library and Information Center, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, Texas. A modular approach was used to allow continuity in operations and services as system was implemented. Acronyms and computer accounts and file names are appended.…

  19. The willingness to pay for in-house piped water in urban and rural Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suparman, Yusep; Folmer, Henk; Oud, Johan H. L.

    This paper analyses household preferences for in-house pipedwater in urban and rural Indonesia via a hedonic price model, specified as a constrained autoregression-structural equation model (ASEM). ASEM reduces bias due to time-varying omitted variables and measurement errors. In addition, it

  20. Indoor radon in houses built on gravel and sand deposits in southern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutri, K.-L.

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK have shown that, in Finland, indoor radon concentrations are almost twice as high in houses built on sand or gravel as in houses built on other soil types. The aim of this study was to assess the radon risk on eskers, ice-marginal formations, and other gravel and sand deposits on the basis of factors that can be determined from geological maps. Altogether, 514 houses built on gravel and sand deposits were selected for the study from the indoor radon database of STUK. Several geological parameters were determined. Empirical statistical models were used to assess the significance of factors affecting indoor radon in glaciofluvial deposits and the sand-dominant littoral deposits occurring in association with them. A relationship was found between increased indoor radon concentrations and the location of a house on a steep-sided esker, in the southeastern rapakivi granite area and on the upper slope or top of an esker. The steepness of the slope also increased the radon concentration in houses on steep-sided eskers. The effect of the topographic features is due to subterranean air-flows. As estimated from the very sparse till sampling, the elevated uranium concentration increased the indoor radon concentration only in houses built on littoral deposits around eskers and ice-marginal formations.

  1. Distributions of radon in houses as a basis for radiological protection: Swedish experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.; Maekitalo, A.

    1991-01-01

    As a basis for protection against high radon exposure in houses, three types of sampling are adequate: (1) random sampling, (2) identification of regions with high risk for radon problems in houses, and (3) searching for houses with high levels. The objectives can be achieved in a single study. In Sweden, several types of sampling have been used. The motive for the Swedish choice of strategy and the results of experience are discussed. Examples of reasons for different strategies are political aims and differences in the organisation of the radiation protection in houses. Random sampling was carried out in 80-82 in homes throughout Sweden. The strategy for the local authorities responsible for points 2 and 3 above differs because of local conditions. In general, they select houses for measurement on the basis of radon risk maps, information on high content of radium in houses, previous measurements, and reports from home owners. Comparison with the random sampling study has shown that they have been five times more successful than chance in their selection for measurements in the one-family houses. (Author)

  2. Taking the Evolutionary Road to Developing an In-House Cost Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacintho, David; Esker, Lind; Herman, Frank; Lavaque, Rodolfo; Regardie, Myma

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the process and some of the problems and challenges of developing an In-House Cost Estimate (IHCE). Using as an example the Space Network Ground Segment Sustainment (SGSS) project, the presentation reviews the phases for developing a Cost estimate within the project to estimate government and contractor project costs to support a budget request.

  3. Research Award: Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI) Deadline ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... IDRC's Research Awards are a unique opportunity for master's and doctoral-level students, as well as recent graduates to enhance their research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. This one-year, paid in-house program of training and mentorship in research, research ...

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-06

    May 6, 2014 ... facilitate and support articulation between the ECT mid-level worker qualification and the professional B EMC degree. Methods. The researchers used an exploratory, sequential mixed-method design, which is characterised by a qualitative phase of research followed by a quantitative phase. This design is ...

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    supports medical education and research at institutions in 12 ... (CBE). CapacityPlus, led by IntraHealth International, is the USAID-funded ... acquire public health, clinical, and/or research skills, usually through applied learning in a .... If students were evaluated, indicate the type of student (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, etc.) ...

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-01-24

    Jan 24, 2017 ... and the specific rotavirus VP4 (P-types) and VP7 (G-types) determined. Results: The .... Centre for Virus Research (CVR) of the Kenya Medical Research. Institute (KEMRI) ... rotavirus dsRNA was run on 10% polyacrylamide resolving gels using a large format .... What is known about this topic. •. Rotavirus is ...

  7. Multi-tissue RNA-seq and transcriptome characterisation of the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) provides a molecular tool for biological research and reveals new genes involved in osmoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chana Munoz, Andres; Jendroszek, Agnieszka; Sønnichsen, Malene

    2017-01-01

    The spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) is one of the most commonly used cartilaginous fishes in biological research, especially in the fields of nitrogen metabolism, ion transporters and osmoregulation. Nonetheless, transcriptomic data for this organism is scarce. In the present study, a multi......-tissue RNA-seq experiment and de novo transcriptome assembly was performed in four different spiny dogfish tissues (brain, liver, kidney and ovary), providing an annotated sequence resource. The characterization of the transcriptome greatly increases the scarce sequence information for shark species. Reads...... and provides a new molecular tool to assist biological research in cartilaginous fishes....

  8. Research Award: IDRC Challenge Fund Deadline: 12 September ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    MA/PhD), as well as recent graduates to enhance their research skills and contribute to IDRC's work. This one-year, paid in-house program of training and mentorship in research, research management, and grant ...

  9. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-25

    Oct 25, 2017 ... stigma and superstition are known to lead to frequent presentation .... The limited documented research on challenges to help-seeking behaviour for cancer ..... to touch your breast [16] that breast self-examination may cause.

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-10-02

    Oct 2, 2015 ... thought to prevent infection, but recent research has proven otherwise. In addition ... One patient had ophthalmalgia and was exposed to. Kaiy for one year and ... migraine, ear infections, tuberculosis, bone fractures, epilepsy,.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mini-clinical-evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) is a way of assessing the clinical ... Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Medical Health. Research ..... mini-CEX assessment and feedback session, the greater the likelihood of.

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-04-14

    Apr 14, 2016 ... Qualitative data, content analysis approach was used. Results: Overall 422 .... Study design: A mixed method cross-sectional design using both quantitative and qualitative research methods as described by. Hanson et al [33] ...

  13. Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. December 2017, Vol. 9, No. 4 AJHPE 171. During curriculum development, teachers ... Ideally, examiners need an educational method to determine ..... A major focus of this study was addressing the human resource gap when.

  15. Nanomaterial Containing Wall Paints Can Increase Radon Concentration in Houses Located in Radon Prone Areas Haghani M.2 , Mortazavi S. M. J.1, 2*, Faghihi R.3, Mehdizadeh S.3, Moradgholi J.4, Darvish L.5, Fathi-Pour E.5, Ansari L.5, Ghanbar-pour M. R.3 1The Center for Radiological Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran 2Department of Med

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghani M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, extensive technological advancements have made it possible to use nanopaints which show exciting properties. In IR Iran excessive radon levels (up to 3700 Bq m–3 have been reported in homes located in radon prone areas. Over the past decades, concerns have been raised about the risk posed by residential radon exposure. Objective: This study aims at investigating the effect of using nanomaterial containing wall paints on radon concentration in homes. Methods: Two wooden model houses were used in this study. Soil samples from Ramsar high background radiation areas were used for simulating the situation of a typical house in radon-prone areas. Conventional water-soluble wall paint was used for painting the walls of the 1st house model; while the 2nd house model was painted with the same wall paint with montmorillonite nanoclay. Results: Three days after sealing the house models, radon level was measured by using a portable radon survey meter. The mean radon level inside the 1st house model (conventional paint was 515.3 ± 17.8 Bq/m3 while the mean radon concentration in the 2nd house model (nano-painted house model was 570.8 ± 18.5 Bq/m3. The difference between these means was statistically signifcant (P<0.001. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the frst investigation on the effect of nano-material containing wall paints on indoor radon concentrations. It can be concluded that nano-material-containing wall paints should not be used in houses with wooden walls located in radon prone areas. Although the mechanism of this effect is not clearly known, decreased porosity in nano-paints might be a key factor in increasing the radon concentration in homes.

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-09-11

    Sep 11, 2015 ... were as required by the human resource building block. While, the insurance providers have a responsibility of motivating doctors to improve their services or provide appropriate services by ensuring health services are affordable and accessible. This study was focusing on the service delivery pillar of the ...

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    believe that they provide adequate, timeous and sufficient quality feedback, despite evidence ... consultants with regard to the quality of feedback they provided to registrars employed at an ..... Veloski J, Boex J, Grasberger M, Evans A, Wolfson D. Systematic review of the literature on assessment, feedback and physicians' ...

  18. Poster – 13: Evaluation of an in-house CCD camera film dosimetry imaging system for small field deliveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalonde, Michel; Alexander, Kevin; Olding, Tim; Schreiner, L. John; Kerr, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiochromic film dosimetry is a standard technique used in clinics to verify modern conformal radiation therapy delivery, and sometimes in research to validate other dosimeters. We are using film as a standard for comparison as we improve high-resolution three-dimensional gel systems for small field dosimetry; however, precise film dosimetry can be technically challenging. We report here measurements for fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of film measurements with a novel in-house readout system. We show that radiochromic film can accurately and reproducibly validate FSRT deliveries and also benchmark our gel dosimetry work. Methods: VMAT FSRT plans for metastases alone (PTV MET ) and whole brain plus metastases (WB+PTV MET ) were delivered onto a multi-configurational phantom with a sheet of EBT3 Gafchromic film inserted mid-plane. A dose of 400 cGy was prescribed to 4 small PTV MET structures in the phantom, while a WB structure was prescribed a dose of 200 cGy in the WB+PTV MET iterations. Doses generated from film readout with our in-house system were compared to treatment planned doses. Each delivery was repeated multiple times to assess reproducibility. Results and Conclusions: The reproducibility of film optical density readout was excellent throughout all experiments. Doses measured from the film agreed well with plans for the WB+PTV MET delivery. But, film doses for PTV MET only deliveries were significantly below planned doses. This discrepancy is due to stray/scattered light perturbations in our system during readout. Corrections schemes will be presented.

  19. Poster – 13: Evaluation of an in-house CCD camera film dosimetry imaging system for small field deliveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalonde, Michel; Alexander, Kevin; Olding, Tim; Schreiner, L. John; Kerr, Andrew T. [Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario at KGH, Queen’s University (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Radiochromic film dosimetry is a standard technique used in clinics to verify modern conformal radiation therapy delivery, and sometimes in research to validate other dosimeters. We are using film as a standard for comparison as we improve high-resolution three-dimensional gel systems for small field dosimetry; however, precise film dosimetry can be technically challenging. We report here measurements for fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of film measurements with a novel in-house readout system. We show that radiochromic film can accurately and reproducibly validate FSRT deliveries and also benchmark our gel dosimetry work. Methods: VMAT FSRT plans for metastases alone (PTV{sub MET}) and whole brain plus metastases (WB+PTV{sub MET}) were delivered onto a multi-configurational phantom with a sheet of EBT3 Gafchromic film inserted mid-plane. A dose of 400 cGy was prescribed to 4 small PTV{sub MET} structures in the phantom, while a WB structure was prescribed a dose of 200 cGy in the WB+PTV{sub MET} iterations. Doses generated from film readout with our in-house system were compared to treatment planned doses. Each delivery was repeated multiple times to assess reproducibility. Results and Conclusions: The reproducibility of film optical density readout was excellent throughout all experiments. Doses measured from the film agreed well with plans for the WB+PTV{sub MET} delivery. But, film doses for PTV{sub MET} only deliveries were significantly below planned doses. This discrepancy is due to stray/scattered light perturbations in our system during readout. Corrections schemes will be presented.

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    change behaviour to implement a culture of safe patient care. It is important that ... must be encouraged and accountability ensured, which implies that a learning ..... Space was provided for comments for each specific statement and at the end.

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-01-09

    10).Of the cases of Gliomas, majority(52%) fell under WHO grade II. ... which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the .... Table 1: frequency and percentage distribution of the different.

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-11-06

    communicable diseases (NCDs) among highly active antiretroviral therapy ... programme is to provide comprehensive and quality, continuing care and ... recipients has increased [5,11], thus, like any other aging population ...

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-30

    May 30, 2016 ... development (ZPD) can be applied to the teaching and learning of health science professionals in higher education. ZPD provides a ... [2] The challenge for higher education .... Demographic profile of students in the Faculty of ...

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2012-07-23

    Jul 23, 2012 ... guidelines for initiation of antiretroviral Treatment at CD4 count below ..... therefore, the country falls further downwards to 48% coverage, .... Ministry of health, Kenya National Clinical Manual for ART Providers, 2nd Edition,.

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-02

    May 2, 2014 ... the quality of graduates and providing them with the necessary skills and ... to offer opinions on how the training needs to be adjusted to meet the .... community service programmes for newly qualified professionals, not only.

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-01-30

    Jan 30, 2015 ... initiatives driving Kenya into realizing Millennium Development Goals. (MDGs) number 4 .... The CHWs have done a recommendable job in the ... slowed their productivity hence impeding efficiency of the CHS in providing ...

  7. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    be provided by midwives around the time of childbirth can contribute to a good start for .... were maintained by not using their real names, and they were guaranteed ..... required to commit time, other resources are also needed, such as travel.

  8. SU-E-J-45: Design and Study of An In-House Respiratory Gating Phantom Platform for Gated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, S [Madurai Medical College ' Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to develop an in-house low cost respiratory motion phantom platform for testing the accuracy of the gated radiotherapy system and analyze the dosimetric difference during gated radiotherapy. Methods: An in-house respiratory motion platform(RMP) was designed and constructed for testing the targeting accuracy of respiratory tracking system. The RMP consist of acrylic Chest Wall Platform, 2 DC motors, 4 IR sensors, speed controller circuit, 2 LED and 2 moving rods inside the RMP. The velocity of the movement can be varied from 0 to 30 cycles per minute. The platform mounted to a base using precision linear bearings. The base and platform are made of clear, 15mm thick polycarbonate plastic and the linear ball bearings are oriented to restrict the platform to a movement of approximately 50mm up and down with very little friction. Results: The targeting accuracy of the respiratory tracking system was evaluated using phantom with and without respiratory movement with varied amplitude. We have found the 5% dose difference to the PTV during the movement in comparison with stable PTV. The RMP can perform sinusoidal motion in 1D with fixed peak to peak motion of 5 to 50mm and cycle interval from 2 to 6 seconds. The RMP was designed to be able to simulate the gross anatomical anterior posterior motion attributable to respiration-induced motion of the thoracic region. Conclusion: The unique RMP simulates breathing providing the means to create a comprehensive program for commissioning, training, quality assurance and dose verification of gated radiotherapy treatments. Create the anterior/posterior movement of a target over a 5 to 50 mm distance to replicate tumor movement. The targeting error of the respiratory tracking system is less than 1.0 mm which shows suitable for clinical treatment with highly performance.

  9. SU-E-J-45: Design and Study of An In-House Respiratory Gating Phantom Platform for Gated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to develop an in-house low cost respiratory motion phantom platform for testing the accuracy of the gated radiotherapy system and analyze the dosimetric difference during gated radiotherapy. Methods: An in-house respiratory motion platform(RMP) was designed and constructed for testing the targeting accuracy of respiratory tracking system. The RMP consist of acrylic Chest Wall Platform, 2 DC motors, 4 IR sensors, speed controller circuit, 2 LED and 2 moving rods inside the RMP. The velocity of the movement can be varied from 0 to 30 cycles per minute. The platform mounted to a base using precision linear bearings. The base and platform are made of clear, 15mm thick polycarbonate plastic and the linear ball bearings are oriented to restrict the platform to a movement of approximately 50mm up and down with very little friction. Results: The targeting accuracy of the respiratory tracking system was evaluated using phantom with and without respiratory movement with varied amplitude. We have found the 5% dose difference to the PTV during the movement in comparison with stable PTV. The RMP can perform sinusoidal motion in 1D with fixed peak to peak motion of 5 to 50mm and cycle interval from 2 to 6 seconds. The RMP was designed to be able to simulate the gross anatomical anterior posterior motion attributable to respiration-induced motion of the thoracic region. Conclusion: The unique RMP simulates breathing providing the means to create a comprehensive program for commissioning, training, quality assurance and dose verification of gated radiotherapy treatments. Create the anterior/posterior movement of a target over a 5 to 50 mm distance to replicate tumor movement. The targeting error of the respiratory tracking system is less than 1.0 mm which shows suitable for clinical treatment with highly performance

  10. A field study using an adaptive in-house pricing model for commercial and industrial customers in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Demand response programs provide customers with economic incentives for load reductions at times of high market prices and system reliability constraints. One type of demand response programs, price-based program, induces customers to respond to changes in product rates. However, some large-scale customers find it difficult to change their electricity consumption patterns, even with rate changes, because their electricity demands are commercial and industrial. This study proposes an adaptive in-house pricing model for large-scale customers, particularly those with multiple business facilities, for self-regulating price-based program. The adaptive in-house pricing model charges higher rates to customers with lower load factors by employing a peak-to-off-peak usage ratio in order to reduce usage at times of high prices at each facility. This study analyzes the daily electricity consumption patterns of large-scale customers through a field trial of the proposed pricing model at a telecom company with 447 offices and worksites for one month. The results show that the pricing model corresponds to average reductions of 3.54–28.69% during peak-demand times for four different types of workplaces. However, reductions in electricity consumption during off-peak periods did not show a significant difference. The results of this study prove that this proposed pricing model can be successfully applied to large-scale operations. - Highlights: • The pricing model induces reductions in energy consumption during peak-demand times. • The greatest decrease occurs in commercial buildings with higher POR. • Data centers with flat loads for necessities can do little to reduce usage.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-05-18

    May 18, 2017 ... available to populations of developing countries [2-5]. In 2013, in. Western and Central Europe and ..... initiation among the infected persons in the community. Addressing stigma and educating ... Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research (P30AI042853). Tables. Table 1: Baseline characteristics of ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    15 févr. 2016 ... présentent un Indice de Masse Corporel (IMC) normal, les autres femmes sont soit ..... In The health belief model and personal health behavior, edited by MH ... Evaluation of the Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale. Research in.

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-14

    Mar 14, 2017 ... R Ebrahim,1 MSc (Dent); H Julie,2 MPH, MCur, PhD. 1 Extended ... and research is applied to develop and sustain society.[5]. Methods .... service they want, not the service we want to give whether they want it or. Co math. G.

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-11-24

    Nov 24, 2017 ... Page number not for citation purposes. 1. Prevalence and determinants of common mental ..... illnesses were smoke cigarette in the last 3 months that make prevalence of tobacco use 38.2%. ..... Okasha A, Karam E.Mental health services and research in the. Arab world. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-04-21

    Apr 21, 2014 ... Prospective assessment of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea in ... Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of .... University Teaching Hospital Health Research Ethics Committee ... BANG, Berlin questionnaire and the American Society of .... The epidemiology of adult obstructive sleep.

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark, 3Center for Global Health, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, DK-5000. Odense .... BHP is a Danish-Guinean Demographic Surveillance Site with a study-area .... variables such as age groups, previous military duty, history of.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-06-24

    Jun 24, 2015 ... related immunosuppression, previous history of TB, and pause in treatment [6]. In Brazil, researchers .... treatment, use of traditional medicines or herbs, history of TB drug side effects and treatment delay). ..... therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in Lima Ciudad, Peru. International journal of tuberculosis and ...

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. May 2016, Vol. 8, No. 1 AJHPE 37. Students who enrol in occupational therapy (OT) at the. University of Kwa Zulu-Natal (UKZN), Durban, South Africa ... The latter may include becoming familiar with the disintegrating social systems in primary .... They also lacked the skills needed to adapt sessions and failed to ...

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-06-22

    Jun 22, 2015 ... collaboration with Makerere University, School of Public Health. We acknowledge The Family Health Research and Development Centre. (FHRDC) Uganda. Supported by Bill & Melinda Gates Institute for. Population & Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, ...

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, a focus on competence alone is inadequate to produce graduates who are capable of adapting to the changing needs of health systems. While knowledge and technical ... shared their responses to guided questions. There were three sessions; after each session the researcher aggregated participant responses ...

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... by Hazarika in a population-based study in India. The researcher noted that patients' preference to the private health facilities was due mainly to their dissatisfaction with the services in the public health facilities [11]. Furthermore, the quality of the services in the private health facilities could also be a major ...

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-20

    Mar 20, 2018 ... student health professionals in various institutions, both in South Africa. (SA) and internationally. ... field include dentists, dental therapists and oral hygienists in training, .... The College of Health Sciences at UKZN has four schools: clinical ..... Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy ...

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Abstract. Introduction: Medical and dental students are a high-risk group for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection which is an ... The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. ... Research ... in the College of Health Sciences and clinical students (years four to .... Hepatology International.2017 Jan; 11(1):.

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-01-19

    Jan 19, 2015 ... One research assistant was available to assist the learners and to answer questions while they completed the questionnaires during a classroom period. ..... PubMed | Google Scholar. 4. Hall PA, Holmqvist M, Sherry SB. Risky adolescent sexual behaviour: A psychological perspective for primary care.

  5. Experience gained in running the EPRI MMS code with an in-house simulation language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS) code represents a collection of component models and a steam/water properties package. This code has undergone extensive verification and validation testing. Currently, the code requires a commercially available simulation language to run. The Philadelphia Electric Company (PECO) has been modeling power plant systems for over the past sixteen years. As a result, an extensive number of models have been developed. In addition, an extensive amount of experience has been developed and gained using an in-house simulation language. The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of developing an MMS pre-processor which would allow the use of the MMS package with other simulation languages such as the PECO in-house simulation language

  6. A survey of Canadian medical physicists: software quality assurance of in-house software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Greg J; Kelly, Diane

    2015-01-05

    This paper reports on a survey of medical physicists who write and use in-house written software as part of their professional work. The goal of the survey was to assess the extent of in-house software usage and the desire or need for related software quality guidelines. The survey contained eight multiple-choice questions, a ranking question, and seven free text questions. The survey was sent to medical physicists associated with cancer centers across Canada. The respondents to the survey expressed interest in having guidelines to help them in their software-related work, but also demonstrated extensive skills in the area of testing, safety, and communication. These existing skills form a basis for medical physicists to establish a set of software quality guidelines.

  7. Biochemical characterization of an in-house Coccidioides antigen: perspectives for the immunodiagnosis of coccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Renato Evando Moreira; Bandeira, Silviane Praciano; Brillhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Pereira, Mirella Leite; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Rocha, Francisco Airton Castro; Camargo, Zoilo Pires de; Ramos, Marcio Viana; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2012-06-28

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the reactivity of an in-house antigen, extracted from a strain of C. posadasii isolated in northeastern Brazil, by radial immunodiffusion and Western blotting, as well as to establish its biochemical characterization. The protein antigen was initially extracted with the use of solid ammonium sulfate and characterized by 1-D electrophoresis. Subsequently, it was tested by means of double radial immunodiffusion and Western blotting. A positive reaction was observed against the antigen by both immunodiagnostic techniques tested on sera from patients suffering from coccidioidomycosis. Besides this, two immunoreactive protein bands were observed and were revealed to be a β-glucosidase and a glutamine synthetase after sequencing of the respective N-terminal regions. Our in-house Coccidioides antigen can be promising as a quick and low-cost diagnostic tool without the risk of direct manipulation of the microorganism.

  8. SAD phasing with in-house cu Ka radiation using barium as anomalous scatterer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekaran, V; Velmurugan, D

    2011-12-01

    Phasing of lysozyme crystals using co-crystallized barium ions was performed using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) method using Cu Ka radiation with in-house source of data collection. As the ion binding sites vary with respect to the pH of the buffer during crystallization, the highly isomorphic forms of lysozyme crystals grown at acidic and alkaline pH were used for the study. Intrinsic sulphur anomalous signal was also utilized with anomalous signal from lower occupancy ions for phasing. The study showed that to solve the structure by SAD technique, 2.8-fold data redundancy was sufficient when barium was used as an anomalous marker in the in-house copper X-ray radiation source for data collection. Therefore, co-crystallization of proteins with barium containing salt can be a powerful tool for structure determination using lab source.

  9. Vygotskian Approaches to Second Language Research provides an introduction to the Vygotskianperspective (also called "Socio-cultural Theory"- SCT) on second language (SL) Vygotskian Approaches to Second Language Research provides an introduction to the Vygotskianperspective (also called "Socio-cultural Theory"- SCT) on second language (SL)

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Gil

    2008-01-01

    studies by presenting some studies which adopted this point of view to carry out different types of second language related research. The main tenet of Vygotskian Theory (Vygotsky, 1978, 1986) is that human cognition is socially developed and constructed; thus, this approach offers the possibility of bringing together the cognitive and social domains, traditionally separated in human sciences. The book can be divided into two parts: a theoretical Chapter 1, and nine chapte...

  10. The in-house education of clinical clerks in surgery and the role of housestaff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Sam; Poenaru, Dan

    2002-11-01

    While on surgical rotations, clinical clerks spend more time on the ward and in the emergency department than in any other location. Consequently, their in-house experience is of great importance to their education-yet the teaching processes in these settings have never been fully explored. Unlike the structured pre-clerkship years, the exact breakdown of a clerk's hospital-based education is difficult to elucidate. To effectively evaluate a clerkship curriculum, it is essential to know what clerks are being taught outside of seminars, how that teaching occurs, and by whom. This study proposes a methodology by which a surgical clerkship curriculum can be evaluated. For the purpose of the study, surgery clerks carried written and audio logs of their informal teaching encounters during one on-call period (30 hours). These included who taught them, where, by what methods, for how long, and what prompted the teaching. A survey of similar variables was administered to all clerks who rotated through general surgery over 4 months and to all general surgery residents. Four clerks returned completed logs (100% response rate), and 17 clerks (85% response) and 15 residents (100% response) were surveyed. Audiotaped and written logs were similar, demonstrating good recall. Students recorded an average of 11 teaching encounters (range 3 to 20) per 30 hour period, lasting a total of 73 minutes (range 17 to 178) and each 6.7 +/- 14 minutes long. Both logs and surveys identified most teaching as unsolicited, done mostly by junior and chief residents, focused chiefly on diagnosis and using a Socratic style. Most teaching occurred in the operating room, yet its occurrence was unpredictable; in surveys the emergency room and clinic settings were perceived as more important. Staff surgeons contributed 27% of the logged encounters yet were perceived in surveys as the least contributors. Residents' and clerks' perceptions of teaching were similar except for residents overvaluing the

  11. A simple mathematical method to estimate ammonia emission from in-house windrowing of poultry litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Kyoung S; Szogi, Ariel A; Moore, Philip A

    2018-05-12

    In-house windrowing between flocks is an emerging sanitary management practice to partially disinfect the built-up litter in broiler houses. However, this practice may also increase ammonia (NH 3 ) emission from the litter due to the increase in litter temperature. The objectives of this study were to develop mathematical models to estimate NH 3 emission rates from broiler houses practicing in-house windrowing between flocks. Equations to estimate mass-transfer areas form different shapes windrowed litter (triangular, rectangular, and semi-cylindrical prisms) were developed. Using these equations, the heights of windrows yielding the smallest mass-transfer area were estimated. Smaller mass-transfer area is preferred as it reduces both emission rates and heat loss. The heights yielding the minimum mass-transfer area were 0.8 and 0.5 m for triangular and rectangular windrows, respectively. Only one height (0.6 m) was theoretically possible for semi-cylindrical windrows because the base and the height were not independent. Mass-transfer areas were integrated with published process-based mathematical models to estimate the total house NH 3 emission rates during in-house windrowing of poultry litter. The NH 3 emission rate change calculated from the integrated model compared well with the observed values except for the very high NH 3 initial emission rate from mechanically disturbing the litter to form the windrows. This approach can be used to conveniently estimate broiler house NH 3 emission rates during in-house windrowing between flocks by simply measuring litter temperatures.

  12. Increased efficacy for in-house validation of real-time PCR GMO detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, I M J; Kok, E J; Hougs, L; Molenaar, B; Thissen, J T N M; van der Voet, H

    2010-03-01

    To improve the efficacy of the in-house validation of GMO detection methods (DNA isolation and real-time PCR, polymerase chain reaction), a study was performed to gain insight in the contribution of the different steps of the GMO detection method to the repeatability and in-house reproducibility. In the present study, 19 methods for (GM) soy, maize canola and potato were validated in-house of which 14 on the basis of an 8-day validation scheme using eight different samples and five on the basis of a more concise validation protocol. In this way, data was obtained with respect to the detection limit, accuracy and precision. Also, decision limits were calculated for declaring non-conformance (>0.9%) with 95% reliability. In order to estimate the contribution of the different steps in the GMO analysis to the total variation variance components were estimated using REML (residual maximum likelihood method). From these components, relative standard deviations for repeatability and reproducibility (RSD(r) and RSD(R)) were calculated. The results showed that not only the PCR reaction but also the factors 'DNA isolation' and 'PCR day' are important factors for the total variance and should therefore be included in the in-house validation. It is proposed to use a statistical model to estimate these factors from a large dataset of initial validations so that for similar GMO methods in the future, only the PCR step needs to be validated. The resulting data are discussed in the light of agreed European criteria for qualified GMO detection methods.

  13. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-11-18

    Nov 18, 2015 ... However, more children in the non-implementing LGA (16.1%) had ... A statistically significant difference exist in the MUAC measurement of ... of appropriate behaviours by the caregiver. ... those in comparison communities and that the younger siblings ..... Plain pap provides poor quality food for a child at a.

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The attitudes and behaviours of oral health service providers towards their own oral .... Forty-four respondents (84.6%) perceived their own dental health to be good (n=27 ..... cultural norms that influence students' attitudes and oral health practices, is an important ... of dental students from four Asian countries. Saudi J Dent ...

  15. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-12-16

    Dec 16, 2015 ... ... motivation among health workers (62%), overwhelming workload (89%) and abuse of services by clients ... which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the ..... additional drugs and other supplies [12]. .... disruptive effects of user fee exemption policies on health.

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-01-20

    Jan 20, 2015 ... ... which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any ... unsafe human waste disposal systems, inadequacy and lack of safe ... hence received an interview after providing the stool sample. This makes the response rate to be 100%. .... that prohibits the transmission of intestinal helminths.

  17. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cqq1a

    2010-10-16

    Oct 16, 2010 ... License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original ..... Mechanism of injury. No. of patients. % of trauma admissions. Road traffic accident. 315. 64.2%. Assault. 81. 16.5%. Fall. 33. 6.7%. Snake bites. 18.

  18. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    expectations,[2] but provide little context for students to enable them to negotiate problems ... among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations'. SA's situation is somewhat unique, as most international literature on cultural ... be effective, for example, for an emigrant learning a foreign language, but.

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... Conclusion: the overall perceived service quality was good. The major ... consumer movement organizations in developed countries [12]. It provides a ... The information obtained from the study will be useful in designing interventions .... score for the statement the clinic had an information brochure was.

  20. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-03-28

    Mar 28, 2014 ... 1Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, P. O. Box 2240, Moshi, Tanzania, 2KCMC- Duke. Collaboration, P.O Box .... providing additional food to children taking medication. Of these, ... should be used because they complement each other. Surprisingly ...

  1. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-09-11

    Sep 11, 2015 ... providers in VIA and cryotherapy, with the goal of launching a national cervical cancer screening program for all women between. 30 and 50 years old. In combination with trainings, initial screenings were conducted in several districts to collect baseline information. Having accurate data on cervical cancer ...

  2. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice. ... static pedagogy that produce illequipped graduates; (ii) a mismatch of ... Regarding enablers of IPECP, they provided important input, which could facilitate IPECP in a university faculty. .... of Dentistry, School of Pharmacy and other higher education institutions.

  3. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and technology, universally accessible to all in the community through their full ... experiences in community-based settings provide students with learning opportunities, as they are actively engaged in PHC-associated activities in .... in various learning environments, such as classrooms, communities, PHC facilities and ...

  4. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-05-15

    May 15, 2015 ... in 2003 [6]. To provide a second opportunity for measles vaccination, nationwide measles SIAs started in 2002, using a phased approach intended to cover the country every 3 years [7]. Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) was established in 2000 with aggregate reporting of 18 infectious.

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-05-15

    May 15, 2015 ... Post exposure prophylaxis following occupational exposure to HIV: a survey of health care workers in .... health worker is exposed as stipulated in the National infection .... safety among health service providers in hospitals in Tanzania. .... Lab tech. 6 (33.3). 12 (66.7). 18 (6.2). Dental personnel. 2 (40.0).

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... 1Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Jagdalpur, Bastar, 494001 Chhattisgarh, India ... This study aimed to find the gender equality in terms of illiteracy, child marriages and spousal ... distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the ..... CHILD Protection & Child.

  7. Multicentre validation of IMRT pre-treatment verification: Comparison of in-house and external audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jornet, Núria; Carrasco, Pablo; Beltrán, Mercè; Calvo, Juan Francisco; Escudé, Lluís; Hernández, Victor; Quera, Jaume; Sáez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: We performed a multicentre intercomparison of IMRT optimisation and dose planning and IMRT pre-treatment verification methods and results. The aims were to check consistency between dose plans and to validate whether in-house pre-treatment verification results agreed with those of an external audit. Materials and methods: Participating centres used two mock cases (prostate and head and neck) for the intercomparison and audit. Compliance to dosimetric goals and total number of MU per plan were collected. A simple quality index to compare the different plans was proposed. We compared gamma index pass rates using the centre’s equipment and methodology to those of an external audit. Results: While for the prostate case, all centres fulfilled the dosimetric goals and plan quality was homogeneous, that was not the case for the head and neck case. The number of MU did not correlate with the plan quality index. Pre-treatment verifications results of the external audit did not agree with those of the in-house measurements for two centres: being within tolerance for in-house measurements and unacceptable for the audit or the other way round. Conclusions: Although all plans fulfilled dosimetric constraints, plan quality is highly dependent on the planner expertise. External audits are an excellent tool to detect errors in IMRT implementation and cannot be replaced by intercomparison using results obtained by centres

  8. In-house coordination project for organ and tissue procurement: social responsibility and promising results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vanessa Silva E; Moura, Luciana Carvalho; Martins, Luciana Ribeiro; Santos, Roberta Cristina Cardoso Dos; Schirmer, Janine; Roza, Bartira de Aguiar

    2016-01-01

    to report the results of evaluation regarding changes in the number of potential donor referrals, actual donors, and conversion rates after the implementation of an in-house organ and tissue donation for transplantation coordination project. epidemiological study, both retrospective and transversal, was performed with organ donation data from the Secretariat of Health for the State and the in-house organ donation coordination project of a beneficent hospital. The data was compared using nonparametric statistical Mann-Whitney test, and the Student's t-test, considering a significance level of 5% (p <0.05). there were statistically significant differences (p < 0.05), before and after the implementation of the project on the number of potential donor notification/month (3.05 - 4.7 ), number of actual donor/month (0.78 to 1.60) and rate of conversion ( 24.7 to 34.8 %). The hospitals 1, 2, 7 and 8 had significant results in potential donor, actual donor or conversion rate. the presence of an in-house coordinator is promising and beneficial, the specialist is important to change the indicators of efficiency, which consequently reduces the waiting lists for organ transplants.

  9. In-house preparation of lectin panel and detection of Tn polyagglutination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Sekhar Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyagglutination is a condition in which red cells are agglutinated by ABO-compatible adult human sera, but not by cord blood sera and may be acquired or inherited. Lectins are invaluable reagents in the investigation of red cells polyagglutination. We prepared in-house lectin panel and confirmed Tn polyagglutination in a pregnant lady. The lady was anemic and refused blood transfusion elsewhere due to serological discrepancy. We found ABO discrepancy and an incompatible minor cross-match in the initial investigation and suspected polyagglutination. Confirmation of polyagglutination was done using adult and cord sera. We then used the in-house lectin panels to detect the type of polyagglutination. The agglutination pattern with the various lectins was suggestive of Tn polyagglutination, which was further supported by the enzyme study. Most blood banks in India lack commercial lectin panels because of cost and procurement difficulty. Lectins play an important role in the diagnosis and differentiation of polyagglutination and immunohematological management of patient. The important and basic lectins can be prepared in-house using specific raw seeds following standardized protocol.

  10. In-house preparation of lectin panel and detection of Tn polyagglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Polyagglutination is a condition in which red cells are agglutinated by ABO-compatible adult human sera, but not by cord blood sera and may be acquired or inherited. Lectins are invaluable reagents in the investigation of red cells polyagglutination. We prepared in-house lectin panel and confirmed Tn polyagglutination in a pregnant lady. The lady was anemic and refused blood transfusion elsewhere due to serological discrepancy. We found ABO discrepancy and an incompatible minor cross-match in the initial investigation and suspected polyagglutination. Confirmation of polyagglutination was done using adult and cord sera. We then used the in-house lectin panels to detect the type of polyagglutination. The agglutination pattern with the various lectins was suggestive of Tn polyagglutination, which was further supported by the enzyme study. Most blood banks in India lack commercial lectin panels because of cost and procurement difficulty. Lectins play an important role in the diagnosis and differentiation of polyagglutination and immunohematological management of patient. The important and basic lectins can be prepared in-house using specific raw seeds following standardized protocol.

  11. Organophosphate Flame Retardants in House Dust from South China and Related Human Exposure Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hongli; Peng, Changfeng; Guo, Ying; Wang, Xiaodong; Wu, Yan; Chen, Da

    2017-09-01

    House dust associated with organic pollutants is not only a potential source of pollutants to the outdoor environment, but also a source to human exposure. The present study investigated the occurrence and concentrations of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) in house dust collected from South China dwellings (n = 20). The results revealed a universal presence of most target OPFRs in house dust, with concentrations of ΣOPFRs ranging from 2.06 to 19.95 μg/g. The median concentration of ΣOPFR (9.20 μg/g) was one order of magnitude greater than that of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (0.80 μg/g). The composition of OPFR chemicals in house dust was dominated by chlorinated OPFRs, such as tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) and tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP). This compositional pattern was different from what has been reported in indoor dust from many other countries, where tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP) was generally dominant. The daily intake of OPFRs by adults was estimated to be 1.6 and 4.2 ng/kg body weight/day under average and high exposure scenarios, respectively, and 31.7 and 127 ng/kg body weight/day for toddlers.

  12. The development of an in-house dispensary in a college health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoteri, Jo Ann L

    2016-04-01

    A small college health center discovered that students perceived obtaining prescribed medication was a barrier to adherence to short-term antibiotic therapy. To address this specific barrier, an in-house dispensary was developed and modified over the past several years to meet the needs of students. Partnering with a local pharmacy has made the process of obtaining prescriptions easier for the students. Data were extracted from the electronic health records at Student Health Services for the academic year 2014-2015. A total of 910 prescriptions were filled in-house during that time, compared to 102 prescriptions written for purchase elsewhere. Students are utilizing the in-house dispensary more often than taking a prescription to a pharmacy and generally regard the service as convenient. Despite challenges in changing drug prices and other factors that influence medication adherence, dispensing a small number of drugs in the clinic has been feasible and well received. Nurse practitioners must be aware of specific perceived barriers for their practice population and develop interventions to overcome them. The evaluation of such interventions is imperative for modifications and sustainability. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Methods and means for the in-house training of mining machine operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velikanov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the quality issue of the in-house training process for mining machine operators. The authors prove the urgency of the designated problem. The changes in modern society, as well as the development of science and technology have a direct impact on the vocational education system. This paper describes the main aspects of the in-house training process of mining machine operators; define the essence, structure, contents, and main directions of its revitalization. The following solutions are proposed in order to improve the quality of the in-house training process: to use the original method based on a rating system of the operator knowledge evaluation, active and interactive forms of using modern training technologies. The authors conducted testing techniques in mining enterprises with the aim of confirming the adequacy of the suggested approaches. The results are given in the work. It was proposed that the methods and tools integration has a positive impact on professional training system.

  14. Vygotskian Approaches to Second Language Research provides an introduction to the Vygotskianperspective (also called "Socio-cultural Theory"- SCT on second language (SL Vygotskian Approaches to Second Language Research provides an introduction to the Vygotskianperspective (also called "Socio-cultural Theory"- SCT on second language (SL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Gil

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available studies by presenting some studies which adopted this point of view to carry out different types of second language related research. The main tenet of Vygotskian Theory (Vygotsky, 1978, 1986 is that human cognition is socially developed and constructed; thus, this approach offers the possibility of bringing together the cognitive and social domains, traditionally separated in human sciences. The book can be divided into two parts: a theoretical Chapter 1, and nine chapters that report on empirical studies carried out within the Vygotskian perspective studies by presenting some studies which adopted this point of view to carry out different types of second language related research. The main tenet of Vygotskian Theory (Vygotsky, 1978, 1986 is that human cognition is socially developed and constructed; thus, this approach offers the possibility of bringing together the cognitive and social domains, traditionally separated in human sciences. The book can be divided into two parts: a theoretical Chapter 1, and nine chapters that report on empirical studies carried out within the Vygotskian perspective

  15. Research Award: Climate Change and Water Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... citizens of developing countries pursuing master's or doctoral ... a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. This one-year, paid, in-house program of training and mentorship in research, research management, and ...

  16. Proposals for the use of reference materials and for the development of in-house quality control materials for food analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihnat, Milan

    2002-01-01

    A summary is presented of factors to be considered in the development of food-based in-house quality control materials to augment available Reference Materials and for frequent, concerted data quality control. Some guidelines are offered regarding approaches to the many considerations required for such an endeavour. Preliminary draft recommendations containing a sequence of steps has been compiled as a starting proposal for a food quality control material development scheme, for a range of natural matrices and measurands. In addition, information on the selection and utilization of Certified Reference Materials and procedures for performance interpretation and corrective action is provided. (author)

  17. Structure of a fatty acid-binding protein from Bacillus subtilis determined by sulfur-SAD phasing using in-house chromium radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nan, Jie; Zhou, Yanfeng; Yang, Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (S-SAD) and halide-soaking methods are increasingly being used for ab initio phasing. With the introduction of in-house Cr X-ray sources, these methods benefit from the enhanced anomalous scattering of S and halide atoms, respectively. Here...... electron-density map was obtained after density modification. The model of BsDegV was built automatically and a palmitate was found tightly bound in the active site. Sequence alignment and comparisons with other known DegV structures provided further insight into the specificity of fatty-acid selection...

  18. Indicative assessment of the sound of heat pumps. Applicability and nuisance in housing conditions; Indicatieve beoordeling geluid warmtepompen. Toepasbaarheid en hinder in woonomgeving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponsteen, J.W. [Cauberg-Huygen Raadgevende Ingenieurs, Maastricht (Netherlands); Eijdems, H.H.E.W. [Stichting Kwaliteitskeur Warmtepompen, p/a Ploos van Amstel Milieu Consulting, Maarheeze (Netherlands)

    2005-09-01

    The Foundation Quality Mark for Heat Pumps provides quality marks for the use of heat pumps in residential buildings. By means of a testing method for noise from heat pumps the level of noise in houses can be estimated. [Dutch] Met warmtepompen kan een aanzienlijke energiebesparing worden bereikt. Bij een opstelling in een woning is aandacht voor geluidhinder echter zeer belangrijk. De Stichting Kwaliteitskeur Warmtepompen verstrekt een kwaliteitskeur voor warmtepompen in de woningbouw. De test-methode voor het brongeluid maakt het mogelijk op basis van formules een inschatting van het geluidniveau in de woning te maken.

  19. 'I am treated well if I adhere to my HIV medication': putting patient-provider interactions in context through insights from qualitative research in five sub-Saharan African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondenge, Ken; Renju, Jenny; Bonnington, Oliver; Moshabela, Mosa; Wamoyi, Joyce; Nyamukapa, Constance; Seeley, Janet; Wringe, Alison; Skovdal, Morten

    2017-07-01

    The nature of patient-provider interactions and communication is widely documented to significantly impact on patient experiences, treatment adherence and health outcomes. Yet little is known about the broader contextual factors and dynamics that shape patient-provider interactions in high HIV prevalence and limited-resource settings. Drawing on qualitative research from five sub-Saharan African countries, we seek to unpack local dynamics that serve to hinder or facilitate productive patient-provider interactions. This qualitative study, conducted in Kisumu (Kenya), Kisesa (Tanzania), Manicaland (Zimbabwe), Karonga (Malawi) and uMkhanyakude (South Africa), draws upon 278 in-depth interviews with purposively sampled people living with HIV with different diagnosis and treatment histories, 29 family members of people who died due to HIV and 38 HIV healthcare workers. Data were collected using topic guides that explored patient testing and antiretroviral therapy treatment journeys. Thematic analysis was conducted, aided by NVivo V.8.0 software. Our analysis revealed an array of inter-related contextual factors and power dynamics shaping patient-provider interactions. These included (1) participants' perceptions of roles and identities of 'self' and 'other'; (2) conformity or resistance to the 'rules of HIV service engagement' and a 'patient-persona'; (3) the influence of significant others' views on service provision; and (4) resources in health services. We observed that these four factors/dynamics were located in the wider context of conceptualisations of power, autonomy and structure. Patient-provider interaction is complex, multidimensional and deeply embedded in wider social dynamics. Multiple contextual domains shape patient-provider interactions in the context of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Interventions to improve patient experiences and treatment adherence through enhanced interactions need to go beyond the existing focus on patient-provider communication

  20. An in-house training program to promote teamwork at Combustion Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, W.R.; Braun, J.C.; Kreps, D.A.; Grasso, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed and are conducting a training program to promote teamwork between individuals and groups at Combustion Engineering. It consists of a series of courses taught as part of the in-house training and personnel development program. Material dealing with transactional analysis, negotiation and problem solving skills is presented in a seminar type format. The courses are generally taught after working hours. Individuals are not paid for the time that they attend, nor is a fee charged. Since its inception in 1978, over 500 people have attended the program

  1. Liquid sodium testing of in-house phased array EMAT transducer for L-wave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bourdais, F.; Le Polles, T. [Non Destructive Testing Department at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX, (France); Baque, F. [Department of Sodium Technology at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance CEDEX, (France)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development of an in-house phased array EMAT transducer for longitudinal wave inspection in liquid sodium. The work presented herein is part of an undergoing project aimed at improving in-service inspection techniques for the ASTRID reactor project. The design process of the phased array EMAT probe is briefly explained and followed by a review of experimental test results. We first present test results obtained in the laboratory while the last part of the paper describes the liquid sodium testing and the produced ultrasound images. (authors)

  2. Liquid sodium testing of in-house phased array EMAT transducer for L-wave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bourdais, F.; Le Polles, T.; Baque, F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in-house phased array EMAT transducer for longitudinal wave inspection in liquid sodium. The work presented herein is part of an undergoing project aimed at improving in-service inspection techniques for the ASTRID reactor project. The design process of the phased array EMAT probe is briefly explained and followed by a review of experimental test results. We first present test results obtained in the laboratory while the last part of the paper describes the liquid sodium testing and the produced ultrasound images. (authors)

  3. A sample holder for in-house X-ray powder diffraction studies of protein powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Harris, Pernille; Ståhl, Kenny

    2011-01-01

    A sample holder for handling samples of protein for in-house X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis has been made and tested on lysozyme. The use of an integrated pinhole reduced the background, and good signal-to-noise ratios were obtained from only 7 l of sample, corresponding to approximatel...... 2-3 mg of dry protein. The sample holder is further adaptable to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Both XRPD and XAS at the Zn K-edge were tested with hexameric Zn insulin....

  4. A qualitative study of users' engagement with real-time feedback from in-house energy consumption displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oltra, Christian; Boso, Alex; Espluga, Josep; Prades, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in feedback technologies and smart meters have advanced the introduction of energy consumption displays in the home. This could facilitate a significant amount of energy saving for the maximum number of homeowners. But empirical studies show that achieved savings in electricity consumption from in-house displays range approximately from 0 to 20%. In order to qualitatively explore the factors underlying such variation in the achieved saving, this paper studies how a small sample of householders interacted with the feedback from an energy consumption display. Following a heuristic model based on prior energy-related behavioral research, we explore the effects of the in-home display on household electricity. Results indicate that saving might be moderated by the level of user's engagement with the display, preceded by user's motivation to save energy, prior attitudes and, importantly, the level of involvement generated by the intervention. - Highlights: • We explore how householders interact with energy consumption displays. • Users' level of engagement with the display influence achieved savings. • User's motivation, level of involvement and prior attitudes are key elements

  5. Effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses. Rept. for Apr 90-Sep 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallo, A.; Gadsby, K.; Reddy, T.A.; Socolow, R.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses the effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses. Contradicting the widely held assumption that ventilation is ineffective in reducing indoor radon concentrations, experiments in a research house have shown that the basement radon level can be reduced by a factor of 5 to 10 using only natural ventilation. Measurement of the outdoor-basement pressure differential and the radon entry rate shows that this unexpectedly large reduction in indoor radon levels is caused by two complementary physical processes: (1) the obvious one, dilution, which lowers radon concentrations by adding uncontaminated outdoor air; and (2) although less evident, introducing a pressure break in the system through an open basement window which, in turn, reduces the outdoor-basement pressure differential and the rate at which radon-laden soil gas is drawn into the house. The radon entry rate was found to be a linear function of basement depressurization up to a differential pressure of about 4 Pa, as would be expected for laminar soil gas flow; opening two basement windows approximately doubled the building air exchange rate and reduced the radon entry rate by up to a factor of 5

  6. Tele-rehabilitation using in-house wearable ankle rehabilitation robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Mir-Nasiri, Nazim; Ghayesh, Mergen H; Xie, Sheng Q

    2018-01-01

    This article explores wide-ranging potential of the wearable ankle robot for in-house rehabilitation. The presented robot has been conceptualized following a brief analysis of the existing technologies, systems, and solutions for in-house physical ankle rehabilitation. Configuration design analysis and component selection for ankle robot have been discussed as part of the conceptual design. The complexities of human robot interaction are closely encountered while maneuvering a rehabilitation robot. We present a fuzzy logic-based controller to perform the required robot-assisted ankle rehabilitation treatment. Designs of visual haptic interfaces have also been discussed, which will make the treatment interesting, and the subject will be motivated to exert more and regain lost functions rapidly. The complex nature of web-based communication between user and remotely sitting physiotherapy staff has also been discussed. A high-level software architecture appended with robot ensures user-friendly operations. This software is made up of three important components: patient-related database, graphical user interface (GUI), and a library of exercises creating virtual reality-specifically developed for ankle rehabilitation.

  7. Analysis of the Difference of Radon Concentration between Water Treatment Plant and Tap water in house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeongil; Yoo, Donghan; Kim, Heereyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    As importance for the health, measurements and analysis about radon is active recently. Especially, radon concentration measurement about underground water which people drink was been carried out by the environment organizations in Korea and has been hot-issued because of the high radon concentration in water source. In present study, the difference of radon concentration among water source, water treatment plant and tap water in house is analyzed. It makes sense that the radon concentration in water treatment plant can represent the radon concentration in the tap water. Through the above experiments, the difference of the radon concentration between water treatment plant and tap water in house is figured out. It contributes to confirm more specific basis for estimating the annual radon exposure for the public. With further experiments and analysis, it is thought that it will be used as tool to assess more qualitatively for the radon concentration in tap water. Finally, this Fundamental approach will help in making new regulations about radon.

  8. Mite fauna and fungal flora in house dust from homes of asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, A; Takaoka, M; Ichinoe, M; Kabasawa, Y; Ouchi, T

    1979-12-01

    Mite fauna and fungal flora in the house dust from homes of asthmatic children with positive and negative skin test to house dust allergen and non-asthmatic controls were examined. There was no conspicuous difference in mite species distribution among the three groups. Pyroglyphid mites dominate the mite fauna in house dust more than half of which being Dermatophagoides: D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae. There was no statistically significant difference in numbers between the two species and either species could dominate depending on the conditions of the individual houses. The average number of acarina in 0.5 g of fine dust did not differ statistically among the three groups; however, mite number per square meter floor differed between patients with positive skin test and negative skin test. The results suggest that house-cleaning might influence the possible sensitization of children. The genetic distribution of mould fungi in house dust was largely similar to that of airborne fungi. The average number of fungal colonies detected in 0.5 g of dust did not differ statistically among the three groups. Wallemia with its minute spores may cause sensitization but has so far been insufficiently investigated.

  9. Factors related to in-house agricultural animal caseloads in US veterinary teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Jeff W; Miller, Robert B; Constable, Peter D; Hostetler, Douglas E; Lakritz, Jeff; Hardin, David K; Angel, Kenneth L; Wolfe, Dwight F

    2002-01-01

    A retrospective observational study was conducted to determine whether agricultural animal caseloads at veterinary teaching hospitals declined between 1995 and 1998. Thereafter, the effect of organizational and demographic factors on 1998 in-house agricultural animal caseloads was examined. Caseload data were obtained from the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges. Demographic and organizational data were obtained by surveys, telephone interviews, and web-based resources. Complete data were available from 25 veterinary colleges, and data from these schools were used in subsequent analyses. In 1998, in-house food animal caseload decreased relative to 1995 in 17 schools and increased relative to 1995 in 8 schools. This trend was not significant (P = .053); however, the power of the test was limited (.50). Mean 1998 caseload was 886 +/- 504. Among schools with a discipline-based organizational structure, annual mean caseload was 464 +/- 220. Among schools with a species-based organizational structure, mean caseload was 1,167 +/- 463. The regression model that best predicted caseload was a forward-stepping model that included only organizational structure as an independent variable. No additional independent variable was significantly associated with caseload.

  10. Analysis of the Difference of Radon Concentration between Water Treatment Plant and Tap water in house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeongil; Yoo, Donghan; Kim, Heereyoung

    2013-01-01

    As importance for the health, measurements and analysis about radon is active recently. Especially, radon concentration measurement about underground water which people drink was been carried out by the environment organizations in Korea and has been hot-issued because of the high radon concentration in water source. In present study, the difference of radon concentration among water source, water treatment plant and tap water in house is analyzed. It makes sense that the radon concentration in water treatment plant can represent the radon concentration in the tap water. Through the above experiments, the difference of the radon concentration between water treatment plant and tap water in house is figured out. It contributes to confirm more specific basis for estimating the annual radon exposure for the public. With further experiments and analysis, it is thought that it will be used as tool to assess more qualitatively for the radon concentration in tap water. Finally, this Fundamental approach will help in making new regulations about radon

  11. Radioactivity in houses built of aerated concrete based on alum shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedjemark, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    The highest activities in commonly used Swedish building materials are found in aerated concrete based on alum shale. The enhanced activity level is due to the high content of radium-226. The average activity concentration of radium-226 varies between different producers of aerated concrete based on alum shale from 700 Bq kg - (20 pCi g - ) to 2 400 Bq kg - (65 pCi g - ). Houses built in the same way with the same amounts of aerated concrete can therefore have very different gamma levels and very different concentrations of radon in the air with the same air exchange rate. Aerated concrete based on alum shale was used as a building material in Sweden from 1930 to 1975. The average concentration of radon daughters found in houses built of aerated concrete based to a major extent on alum shale is about 100 bq/m 3 (2.7 pCi 1 - ). The highest radon concentrations have been found in houses built entirely of aerated concrete based on alum shale. A group of 9 houses with natural draught ventilation systems has been investigated with regard to the concentration of radon, the equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC) and the gamma dose rate. The air exchange rates varied between the houses from 0.21 to 0.43 h - and the radon concentration from 540 Bq m - (15 pCi 1 - ) to 1 160 Bq m - (31 pCi 1 - ). The values given are averages for each house. (author)

  12. Some measurements of the equilibrium factor for radon daughters in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toohey, R.E.; Essling, M.A.; Wang, H.; Rundo, J.

    1982-01-01

    Because the radiation dose to the lung from environmental radon is due almost entirely to the inhalation of the short-lived daughter products, measurements of radon levels alone are not sufficient to determine the dose. Typically the activities of the daughter products in air are not in daughters themselves. The working level (WL) was introduced as a convenient unit to overcome this problem in uranium mines, and it is also applicable to other environments where radiation dosimetry is the principal concern. Since it is easier to determine the radon concentration than the working level, the task of determining lung doses would be simplified if those factors which determine equilibrium could be identified and their effects quantified. In order to do this, simultaneous measurements of radon concentrations and working levels must be made in houses under a variety of conditions. In addition, parameters that may affect the equilibrium factor, such as aerosol concentration and ventilation rate, must also be identified and monitored. Although the effects of such parameters may be best determined under controlled conditions in a laboratory, the results must be validated by measurements in houses. This paper describes these measurements

  13. Dose characteristics of in-house-built collimators for stereotactic radiotherapy with a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norrgaard, F. Stefan E.; Kulmala, Jarmo A.J.; Minn, Heikki R.I.; Sipilae, Petri M.

    1998-01-01

    Dose characteristics of a stereotactic radiotherapy unit based on a standard Varian Clinac 4/100 4 MV linear accelerator, in-house-built Lipowitz collimators and the SMART stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning software have been determined. Beam collimation is constituted from the standard collimators of the linear accelerator and a tertiary collimation consisting of a replaceable divergent Lipowitz collimator. Four collimators with isocentre diameters of 15, 25, 35 and 45 mm, respectively, were constructed. Beam characteristics were measured in air, acrylic or water with ionization chamber, photon diode, electron diode, diamond detector and film. Monte Carlo simulation was also applied. The radiation leakage under the collimators was less than 1% at 50 mm depth in water. Specific beam characteristics for each collimator were imported to SMART and dose planning with five non-coplanar converging 140 deg. arcs separated by 36 deg. angles was performed for treatment of a RANDO phantom. Dose verification was made with TLD and radiochromic film. The in-house-built collimators were found to be suitable for stereotactic radiotherapy and patient treatments with this system are in progress. (author)

  14. Detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in House Finches ( Haemorhous mexicanus) from Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Molly; Bonneaud, Camille; McGraw, Kevin J; Vleck, Carol M; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2018-03-01

    In 1994, an endemic poultry pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), was identified as the causative agent of a novel disease in house finches ( Haemorhous mexicanus). After an initial outbreak in Maryland, MG spread rapidly throughout eastern North American populations of house finches. Subsequently, MG spread slowly through the northern interior of North America and then into the Pacific Northwest, finally reaching California in 2006. Until 2009, there were no reports of MG in the southwestern United States east of California. In August 2011, after reports of house finches displaying conjunctivitis characteristic of MG infection in Arizona, we trapped house finches at bird feeders in central Arizona (Tempe) and southern Arizona (Tucson and Green Valley) to assay for MG infection. Upon capture, we noted whether birds exhibited conjunctivitis, and we collected choanal swabs to test for the presence of MG DNA using PCR. We detected MG in finches captured from Green Valley (in ∼12% of birds captured), but not in finches from Tucson or Tempe. Based on resampling of house finches at these sites in July 2014, we suggest that central Arizona finches likely remain unexposed to MG. We also suggest that low urban connectivity between arid habitats of southern and central Arizona or a reduction in the prevalence of MG after its initial arrival in Arizona may be limiting the spread of MG from south to north in Arizona. In addition, the observed conjunctivitis-like signs in house finches that were negative for MG by PCR may be caused primarily by avian pox virus.

  15. Intrinsic fluorescence for cervical precancer detection using polarized light based in-house fabricated portable device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Bharat Lal; Singh, Pankaj; Sah, Amar Nath; Pandey, Kiran; Agarwal, Asha; Pantola, Chayanika; Pradhan, Asima

    2018-01-01

    An in-house fabricated portable device has been tested to detect cervical precancer through the intrinsic fluorescence from human cervix of the whole uterus in a clinical setting. A previously validated technique based on simultaneously acquired polarized fluorescence and polarized elastic scattering spectra from a turbid medium is used to extract the intrinsic fluorescence. Using a diode laser at 405 nm, intrinsic fluorescence of flavin adenine dinucleotide, which is the dominant fluorophore and other contributing fluorophores in the epithelium of cervical tissue, has been extracted. Different grades of cervical precancer (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia; CIN) have been discriminated using principal component analysis-based Mahalanobis distance and linear discriminant analysis. Normal, CIN I and CIN II samples have been discriminated from one another with high sensitivity and specificity at 95% confidence level. This ex vivo study with cervix of whole uterus samples immediately after hysterectomy in a clinical environment indicates that the in-house fabricated portable device has the potential to be used as a screening tool for in vivo precancer detection using intrinsic fluorescence.

  16. How to get residents/owners in housing cooperatives to agree on sustainable renovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappegard Hauge, A. [SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, P.O. Box 124, Blindern, 0314 Oslo (Norway); Thomsen, J. [SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, 7465 Trondheim (Norway); Loefstroem, E. [SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-05-15

    What factors increase the chance that residents/owners in housing cooperatives agree on sustainable energy efficient renovation? Based on 30 qualitative interviews with professional advisors in cooperative housing associations and chairman/board and residents in three chosen case studies, an analysis of opportunities and barriers for making a common decision on renovation is performed. Success criteria and barriers are found on the societal level as well as on the organizational/individual level. The barriers and success criteria identified on the societal level are: knowledge level on energy-efficient renovation among relevant actors, owner structure of the housing cooperative, and existing regulations and incentives. On the organizational and individual level, the following categories influencing renovation processes were identified: the time frame and organization of the process, understanding the residents' needs, economy, the information given, and the existence of available exemplary projects and role models. Based on the results of the study, ten guidelines that contribute to more successful decision making processes and increase the chances of sustainable energy efficient renovation in housing cooperatives are presented.

  17. Innovativeness in housing construction and the role of the Housing Fund: From residence to an integral living environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravko Mlinar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to contribute to clarification of the conditions and actors impacting innovativeness in housing construction and the management of space. It concentrates on the role of the Slovenian national Housing Fund, which is too restricted and lacks appropriate legal bases and means, and also – according to some evaluations – the aspiration to assert its innovative and developmental role. The Fund is focussed on the financial-economic aspects of providing non-profit housing and housing for the market. Currently attention is primarily directed towards its legal-organizational structure and its transformation into an independent company. This neglects broader consideration of socio-spatial change, developmental directions and values in the context of the information age (Lisbon Strategy, which call for innovative sociological, architectural and urbanistic solutions. Mindsets, legal norms and institutions in Slovenia are lagging behind these changes. Thus, housing is still mainly treated as a discrete segment. In order to perform their task in this new framework, which demands more integral treatment of the everyday living environment and reintegration of living, work and recreation, the mandate of the housing funds must no longer be confined merely to housing. Several examples of innovative design as well as their limitations are presented, together with examples of good international practice.

  18. The doctor(s) in house: an analysis of the evolution of the television doctor-hero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauman, Elena C; Goodier, Bethany C

    2011-03-01

    The medical drama and its central character, the doctor-hero have been a mainstay of popular television. House M.D. offers a new (and problematic) iteration of the doctor-hero. House eschews the generic conventions of the "television doctor" by being neither the idealized television doctor of the past, nor the more recent competent but often fallible physicians in entertainment texts. Instead, his character is a fragmented text which privileges the biomedical over the personal or emotional with the ultimate goal of scientifically uncovering and resolving instances of disease. This article examines the implicit and explicit messages in House M.D. and critically analyzes both the show and its lead character in relation to the traditional medical drama genre that highlights the "doctor-hero" as the central character. While at first House seems to completely violate narrative and generic norms, ultimately the program provides a new form that reinforces the presence of the doctor-hero, but highlights House's character as the central figure who is personally and interpersonally problematic but biomedically effective.

  19. Multifunctional Nanotechnology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    MULTIFUNCTIONAL NANOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH MARCH 2016 INTERIM TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED STINFO COPY AIR...REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JAN 2015 – JAN 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MULTIFUNCTIONAL NANOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE...H. Yoon, and C. S. Hwang, “Electrically configurable electroforming and bipolar resistive switching in Pt/TiO2/Pt structures.,” Nanotechnology , vol

  20. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  1. Evaluation of a cost effective in-house method for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping using plasma samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devidas N Chaturbhuj

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Validation of a cost effective in-house method for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping using plasma samples. DESIGN: The validation includes the establishment of analytical performance characteristics such as accuracy, reproducibility, precision and sensitivity. METHODS: The accuracy was assessed by comparing 26 paired Virological Quality Assessment (VQA proficiency testing panel sequences generated by in-house and ViroSeq Genotyping System 2.0 (Celera Diagnostics, US as a gold standard. The reproducibility and precision were carried out on five samples with five replicates representing multiple HIV-1 subtypes (A, B, C and resistance patterns. The amplification sensitivity was evaluated on HIV-1 positive plasma samples (n = 88 with known viral loads ranges from 1000-1.8 million RNA copies/ml. RESULTS: Comparison of the nucleotide sequences generated by ViroSeq and in-house method showed 99.41±0.46 and 99.68±0.35% mean nucleotide and amino acid identity respectively. Out of 135 Stanford HIVdb listed HIV-1 drug resistance mutations, partial discordance was observed at 15 positions and complete discordance was absent. The reproducibility and precision study showed high nucleotide sequence identities i.e. 99.88±0.10 and 99.82±0.20 respectively. The in-house method showed 100% analytical sensitivity on the samples with HIV-1 viral load >1000 RNA copies/ml. The cost of running the in-house method is only 50% of that for ViroSeq method (112$ vs 300$, thus making it cost effective. CONCLUSIONS: The validated cost effective in-house method may be used to collect surveillance data on the emergence and transmission of HIV-1 drug resistance in resource limited countries. Moreover, the wide applications of a cost effective and validated in-house method for HIV-1 drug resistance testing will facilitate the decision making for the appropriate management of HIV infected patients.

  2. Multi-tissue RNA-seq and transcriptome characterisation of the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias provides a molecular tool for biological research and reveals new genes involved in osmoregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Chana-Munoz

    Full Text Available The spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias is one of the most commonly used cartilaginous fishes in biological research, especially in the fields of nitrogen metabolism, ion transporters and osmoregulation. Nonetheless, transcriptomic data for this organism is scarce. In the present study, a multi-tissue RNA-seq experiment and de novo transcriptome assembly was performed in four different spiny dogfish tissues (brain, liver, kidney and ovary, providing an annotated sequence resource. The characterization of the transcriptome greatly increases the scarce sequence information for shark species. Reads were assembled with the Trinity de novo assembler both within each tissue and across all tissues combined resulting in 362,690 transcripts in the combined assembly which represent 289,515 Trinity genes. BUSCO analysis determined a level of 87% completeness for the combined transcriptome. In total, 123,110 proteins were predicted of which 78,679 and 83,164 had significant hits against the SwissProt and Uniref90 protein databases, respectively. Additionally, 61,215 proteins aligned to known protein domains, 7,208 carried a signal peptide and 15,971 possessed at least one transmembrane region. Based on the annotation, 81,582 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology terms and 42,078 belong to known clusters of orthologous groups (eggNOG. To demonstrate the value of our molecular resource, we show that the improved transcriptome data enhances the current possibilities of osmoregulation research in spiny dogfish by utilizing the novel gene and protein annotations to investigate a set of genes involved in urea synthesis and urea, ammonia and water transport, all of them crucial in osmoregulation. We describe the presence of different gene copies and isoforms of key enzymes involved in this process, including arginases and transporters of urea and ammonia, for which sequence information is currently absent in the databases for this model species. The

  3. Multi-tissue RNA-seq and transcriptome characterisation of the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) provides a molecular tool for biological research and reveals new genes involved in osmoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chana-Munoz, Andres; Jendroszek, Agnieszka; Sønnichsen, Malene; Kristiansen, Rune; Jensen, Jan K; Andreasen, Peter A; Bendixen, Christian; Panitz, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) is one of the most commonly used cartilaginous fishes in biological research, especially in the fields of nitrogen metabolism, ion transporters and osmoregulation. Nonetheless, transcriptomic data for this organism is scarce. In the present study, a multi-tissue RNA-seq experiment and de novo transcriptome assembly was performed in four different spiny dogfish tissues (brain, liver, kidney and ovary), providing an annotated sequence resource. The characterization of the transcriptome greatly increases the scarce sequence information for shark species. Reads were assembled with the Trinity de novo assembler both within each tissue and across all tissues combined resulting in 362,690 transcripts in the combined assembly which represent 289,515 Trinity genes. BUSCO analysis determined a level of 87% completeness for the combined transcriptome. In total, 123,110 proteins were predicted of which 78,679 and 83,164 had significant hits against the SwissProt and Uniref90 protein databases, respectively. Additionally, 61,215 proteins aligned to known protein domains, 7,208 carried a signal peptide and 15,971 possessed at least one transmembrane region. Based on the annotation, 81,582 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology terms and 42,078 belong to known clusters of orthologous groups (eggNOG). To demonstrate the value of our molecular resource, we show that the improved transcriptome data enhances the current possibilities of osmoregulation research in spiny dogfish by utilizing the novel gene and protein annotations to investigate a set of genes involved in urea synthesis and urea, ammonia and water transport, all of them crucial in osmoregulation. We describe the presence of different gene copies and isoforms of key enzymes involved in this process, including arginases and transporters of urea and ammonia, for which sequence information is currently absent in the databases for this model species. The transcriptome

  4. Integrated Assessment of the Policy of Working Capital Management in Housing and Utilities Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Petrovich Poluyanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the approaches to the management of current assets in the enterprises of various industries in economic literature. We discuss theoretical, methodological and applied issues concerning the formation and improvement of the working capital management policy in utility companies, which require further study. The authors propose to assess the policy of working capital management in these enterprises by means of the integrated approach based on the system of reasoned indicators defining the type of working capital management policy. It includes indicators characterizing the policy of working capital management, management of the liquidity of working capital and the policy of financing sources management. The indicators which define the type of the policy of working capital management have been chosen as the most influential for each vector of the improvement of management policy. The range of values is set taking into account the current market conditions for the housing and utilities companies based on theoretical standard values adapted to modern situation. The paper proposes to use an integrated indicator for the evaluation of the policy of working capital management in housing and utilities enterprises. We have substantiated the technique of the integrated assessment of the policy of working capital management in housing and utilities companies. As an example of the application of this indicator, we defined the type of the policy of working capital management in Rostovvodokanal Company. The initial data for the calculation of integrated indicators are the official data on the structure of the balance and financial results of Rostovvodokanal Company during the period from 2012 to 2016. At the Rostovvodokanal Company, it is necessary to bring the type of the policy of working capital management and sources of its financing closer to moderate or conservative type. The authors have substantiated the optimal type of policy of

  5. Development of Geometry Optimization Methodology with In-house CFD code, and Challenge in Applying to Fuel Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J. H.; Lee, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    The wire spacer has important roles to avoid collisions between adjacent rods, to mitigate a vortex induced vibration, and to enhance convective heat transfer by wire spacer induced secondary flow. Many experimental and numerical works has been conducted to understand the thermal-hydraulics of the wire-wrapped fuel bundles. There has been enormous growth in computing capability. Recently, a huge increase of computer power allows to three-dimensional simulation of thermal-hydraulics of wire-wrapped fuel bundles. In this study, the geometry optimization methodology with RANS based in-house CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code has been successfully developed in air condition. In order to apply the developed methodology to fuel assembly, GGI (General Grid Interface) function is developed for in-house CFD code. Furthermore, three-dimensional flow fields calculated with in-house CFD code are compared with those calculated with general purpose commercial CFD solver, CFX. The geometry optimization methodology with RANS based in-house CFD code has been successfully developed in air condition. In order to apply the developed methodology to fuel assembly, GGI function is developed for in-house CFD code as same as CFX. Even though both analyses are conducted with same computational meshes, numerical error due to GGI function locally occurred in only CFX solver around rod surface and boundary region between inner fluid region and outer fluid region.

  6. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) contents in house and car dust of Portugal by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, S C; Kalachova, K; Pulkrabova, J; Fernandes, J O; Oliveira, M B P P; Alves, A; Hajslova, J

    2010-03-01

    Dust is the repository of various compounds including flame retardants. In this study an analytical method based on PLE extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was selected for the analysis of 16 PBDEs congeners in house and car dust samples collected in Portugal. The analytical performance of the method was validated using standard reference material (SRM); values from 90% to 109% and from 2% to 11% were obtained for recovery and precision, respectively. The PBDE congeners distribution in whole and sieved fractions of the dust samples, as well as influence of the source on the levels of these contaminants, were obtained. The wide range of PBDEs contents found in the dust samples indicates heterogeneous levels of contamination in these matrices. The clearest feature of the results obtained was that Deca-BDE was the main PBDE in both house and car dust samples. The total PBDEs measured in house dust (ranging from 34 to 1928 ng g(-1)) was lower than those found in car dust (ranging from 193 to 22955 ng g(-1)). However, house dust provides a major contribution to human exposure due to the time spent there, much higher than in cars. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy consumption of building related energy functions in houses and utility buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Arkel, W.G.; Jeeninga, H.; Menkveld, M.; Ruijg, G.J.

    1999-11-01

    This study investigates the development of the use of electricity and natural gas in houses and buildings until 2010. For the domestic sector it is studied how much energy is used now and will be used in future for heating, for production of hot water, for lighting, for ventilation and for cooling. For different sorts of buildings (shops, hospitals, schools, offices, restaurants) it has been determined how much gas will be used for heating, for hot water production and by humidifiers. It has also been calculated how much electricity will be used for lighting, ventilation, cooling and humidifying. The influence of higher and lower energy prices on the amount of use has been studied. Experts have been asked to give their opinions on trends in the use of buildings and the role of new technologies. The influence of these ideas on the use of energy has been calculated. 44 refs

  8. Concentration levels of radon in air, indoors and outdoors in houses of Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Garcia, P.

    1992-01-01

    Concentration levels of radon in air, indoors and outdoors have been obtained in houses from Mexico City, with the purpose of relating them with the local environment. Measurements were performed both outdoors and indoors in 60 unifamiliar houses. Track detectors, LR-115, Type II, were used in several detection arrangements during four recording periods with times of exposure of three months each, with the purpose of analyzing the fluctuations due to seasonal changes. Data were obtained about the construction materials were the detection systems were located in order to establish a correlation of radon levels with the climatic parameters and the construction materials. The results of radon concentrations both indoors or outdoors were lower than the international recommendations (148 Bq/m 3 ) (Author)

  9. Atlanta Gas Light opts for an in-house AM/FM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    Atlanta Gas Light Co. has completed facilities conversion for the first of nine planned implementations of its automated mapping/facilities management mapping/facilities management system, the Facilities and Land Base Automated Mapping Environment or FLAME. Facilities conversion is generally the most costly and time-consuming phase of an AM/FM project. Many companies decide to rely totally on outside expertise for this phase because of the complexity of the process an the resources required to complete it. Atlanta Gas Light decided to take an alternate approach by performing the facilities conversion process in-house for the first implementation, than having an outside vendor carrying out a future implementation and compare the two

  10. PRIORITIZATION OF CUSTOMER NEEDS IN HOUSE OF QUALITY USING CONJOINT ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.G. Durga Prasad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The priority structure of customer needs in House of Quality (HOQ forms the basis for the company to make the product more attractive to customers. In the traditional Quality Function Deployment (QFD approach, the priority structure of customer needs is developed through assigning different importance weights for customer needs, which are based on QFD team members' direct experience with the customers or on the results of surveys. In this paper Conjoint analysis is adopted to obtain the priority structure of customer needs. The priority ratings of customer needs may be different for different customer segments. k-means cluster method is used to cluster customers according to their main benefits. Prior to adopt the conjoint analysis, Factor analysis is employed to reduce the size of the customer needs portion of HOQ. A case study on domestic refrigerator is presented to illustrate the proposed methodology to establish priority structure of customer needs.al unit, which would significantly improve the business.

  11. Preparation of the in-house neutron detectors and the software needed to process experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Kh.; Haj-Hassan, H.; Helal, W.

    2007-04-01

    In - house neutron activation detectors were prepared in this work using pure commercial gold. The neutron self-shielding factors in the foils for both thermal and epithermal neutrons have been determined experimentally. The work shows good results repeatability and good agreement with certified activation monitors. the software KHW for neutron flux measurements using local and standards gold foils was designed and performed locally. it deals as well with irradiated uranium spectrums to calculate some important fission product ratios for neutron flux measurement. Some experiments were performed to investigate the possibility of using uranium, produced in the pilot plant, as fission neutron detector. The results shows the possibility of using fission product ratios to determine the cooling time of the samples. It shows also the possibility of using fission and activation product ratios as an indicators of neutron fluences ratios.(author)

  12. Radon concentration studies in houses on the territory of the former German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.

    1993-01-01

    In cooperation with the Federal Institute of Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, studies have been made since March 1990 in mining centers in the South of the former GDR territory on radon concentration in as many differently used houses as possible, predominantly in dwelling houses, but also in plant buildings, schools, kindergartens, recreation homes, etc. Under this program, measurements were performed until October 1990 in the cities of Schneeberg, Johanngeorgenstadt and Ronneburg and in the municipality of Schlema. The results obtained from this radon screening covering almost the whole affected area, qualitatively correspond to those obtained from small random samples taken under a regional measuring program performed in the respective muncipalities. A summary presentation is given of the range of radon concentration in houses to be expected in East Germany, relating it to geologically different areas in accordance with the present state of knowledge. (orig./DG) [de

  13. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  14. Health professionals’ perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to providing smoking cessation advice to women in pregnancy and during the post-partum period: a systematic review of qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Flemming

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing smoking in pregnancy is a policy priority in many countries and as a result there has been a rise in the development of services to help pregnant women to quit. A wide range of professionals are involved in providing these services, with midwives playing a particularly pivotal role. Understanding professionals’ experiences of providing smoking cessation support in pregnancy can help to inform the design of interventions as well as to improve routine care. Methods A synthesis of qualitative research of health professionals’ perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to providing smoking cessation advice to women in pregnancy and the post-partum period was conducted using meta-ethnography. Searches were undertaken from 1990 to January 2015 using terms for maternity health professionals and smoking cessation advisors, pregnancy, post-partum, smoking, and qualitative in seven electronic databases. The review was reported in accordance with the ‘Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research’ (ENTREQ statement. Results Eight studies reported in nine papers were included, reporting on the views of 190 health professionals/key informants, including 85 midwives and health visitors. The synthesis identified that both the professional role of participants and the organisational context in which they worked could act as either barriers or facilitators to an individual’s ability to provide smoking cessation support to pregnant or post-partum women. Underpinning these factors was an acknowledgment that the association between maternal smoking and social disadvantage was a considerable barrier to addressing and supporting smoking cessation Conclusions The review identifies a role for professional education, both pre-qualification and in continuing professional development that will enable individuals to provide smoking cessation support to pregnant women. Key to the success of this education

  15. Enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated lignocellulosic materials with Trichoderma atroviride enzymes produced in-house

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macrelli Stefano

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improvement of the process of cellulase production and development of more efficient lignocellulose-degrading enzymes are necessary in order to reduce the cost of enzymes required in the biomass-to-bioethanol process. Results Lignocellulolytic enzyme complexes were produced by the mutant Trichoderma atroviride TUB F-1663 on three different steam-pretreated lignocellulosic substrates, namely spruce, wheat straw and sugarcane bagasse. Filter paper activities of the enzymes produced on the three materials were very similar, while β-glucosidase and hemicellulase activities were more dependent on the nature of the substrate. Hydrolysis of the enzyme preparations investigated produced similar glucose yields. However, the enzymes produced in-house proved to degrade the xylan and the xylose oligomers less efficiently than a commercial mixture of cellulase and β-glucosidase. Furthermore, accumulation of xylose oligomers was observed when the TUB F-1663 supernatants were applied to xylan-containing substrates, probably due to the low β-xylosidase activity of the enzymes. The efficiency of the enzymes produced in-house was enhanced by supplementation with extra commercial β-glucosidase and β-xylosidase. When the hydrolytic capacities of various mixtures of a commercial cellulase and a T. atroviride supernatant produced in the lab were investigated at the same enzyme loading, the glucose yield appeared to be correlated with the β-glucosidase activity, while the xylose yield seemed to be correlated with the β-xylosidase level in the mixtures. Conclusion Enzyme supernatants produced by the mutant T. atroviride TUB F-1663 on various pretreated lignocellulosic substrates have good filter paper activity values combined with high levels of β-glucosidase activities, leading to cellulose conversion in the enzymatic hydrolysis that is as efficient as with a commercial cellulase mixture. On the other hand, in order to achieve good xylan

  16. Establishment of a panel of in-house polyclonal antibodies for the diagnosis of enterovirus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Osamu; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Nakajima, Noriko; Koike, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Takuya; Sata, Tetsutaro; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Taguchi, Fumihiro; Hasegawa, Hideki; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Noriyo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a reliable method of virus detection for the diagnosis of critical enterovirus infections such as acute infective encephalitis, encephalomyelitis and myocarditis. Because histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of paraffin-embedded tissues play an important role in recognizing infectious agents in tissue samples, six in-house polyclonal antibodies raised against three representative enteroviruses using an indirect immunofluorescence assay and immunohistochemistry were examined. This panel of polyclonal antibodies recognized three serotypes of enterovirus. Two of the polyclonal antibodies were raised against denatured virus particles from enterovirus A71, one was raised against the recombinant VP1 protein of coxsackievirus B3, and the other for poliovirus type 1 were raised against denatured virus particles, the recombinant VP1 protein and peptide 2C. Western blot analysis revealed that each of these antibodies recognized the corresponding viral antigen and none cross-reacted with non-enteroviruses within the family Picornaviridae. However, all cross-reacted to some extent with the antigens derived from other serotypes of enterovirus. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and immunohistochemistry revealed that the virus capsid and non-structural proteins were localized in the cytoplasm of affected culture cells, and skeletal muscles and neurons in neonatal mice experimentally-infected with human enterovirus. The antibodies also recognized antigens derived from recent clinical isolates of enterovirus A71, coxsackievirus B3 and poliovirus. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed that representative antibodies tested showed the same recognition pattern according to each serotype. Thus, the panel of in-house anti-enterovirus polyclonal antibodies described herein will be an important tool for the screening and pathological diagnosis for enterovirus infections, and may be useful for the classification of different

  17. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Paula I.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; Meeker, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octa- and deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. - Highlights: ► Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including PBDEs and alternates were measured. ► Exposure to BFRs is characterized from concentrations in participant vacuum bag dust. ► Exposure to PBDEs and

  18. Measurement of the flame retardants polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD) in house dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapleton, H.; Dodder, N.; Schantz, M.; Wise, S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Current monitoring of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has shown that concentrations are increasing in the environment very rapidly with doubling times as short as three to five years. North America consumes a large percentage of the global market demand for PBDEs, and as a result, concentrations of PBDEs in human milk and serum are an order of magnitude higher in women from North America relative to Europe. Within sampled populations, PBDE levels in human serum have been shown to range over an order of magnitude, and high levels cannot always be attributed to occupational exposure, age or diet. One source that may be responsible for these observations is exposure in the home. These compounds are liberally applied to many common household items such as furniture, mattresses, computers and TVs to retard or hinder the outbreak of fire. Over time, these flame retardants may leach out into the home environment, where they may be inhaled or ingested, resulting in elevated levels in human serum. Very few studies have examined PBDE levels within the home and only one study has measured the concentrations of two PBDE congeners in house dust. The present study was undertaken to measure a suite PBDE congeners in house dust from a variety of homes and to assess the contribution of the three commercial PBDE mixtures (penta-, octa- and decaBDE) to the house dust composition. In addition, we also measured the concentrations of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), another flame retardant. Correlations with properties of the houses such as year of construction, square footage, carpeting coverage and number of computers in the house were also examined for any positive influences.

  19. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paula I. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stapleton, Heather M. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Mukherjee, Bhramar [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hauser, Russ [Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Meeker, John D., E-mail: meekerj@umich.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octa- and deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. - Highlights: ► Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including PBDEs and alternates were measured. ► Exposure to BFRs is characterized from concentrations in participant vacuum bag dust. ► Exposure to PBDEs and

  20. Determinants, reproducibility, and seasonal variation of ergosterol levels in house dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, H K; Nevalainen, A; Vepsäläinen, A; Roponen, M; Täubel, M; Laine, O; Rantakokko, P; von Mutius, E; Pekkanen, J; Hyvärinen, A

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the determinants that affect the concentrations of ergosterol and viable fungi in house dust and to examine the seasonal variation and reproducibility of ergosterol concentrations indoors. In studying the determinants, dust samples from living room floors and vacuum cleaner dust bags were collected from 107 farming and 105 non-farming homes. Ergosterol levels were determined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry,and the dust bag dust was cultivated for enumeration of fungal genera. Lifestyle and environmental factors, for example using of the fireplace, and visible mold observations in homes, explained 20–26% of the variation of fungal concentrations. For the reproducibility study, samples were collected from five urban homes in four different seasons. The reproducibility of ergosterol determinations within a sample was excellent (ICC = 89.8) for floor dust and moderate (ICC = 63.8) for dust bag dust, but poor when sampling the same home throughout a year (ICC = 31.3 and 12.6, respectively) due to large temporal variation in ergosterol concentrations. In conclusion, environmental characteristics only partially predicted the variation of fungal concentrations. Based on these studies, we recommend repeated sampling of dust over time if one seeks to adequately describe overall fungal levels and exposure in a home. This study shows that levels of ergosterol and viable fungi in house dust are related to visible mold observations. Only 20% of the variation in fungal levels can be explained with questionnaires, and therefore, environmental samples need to be taken in addition. Reproducibility of ergosterol determination was excellent for floor dust, and thus, ergosterol measurements from floor dust samples could be suitable for assessing the fungal load in building investigations. The temporal variation needs to be taken into account when describing the ergosterol concentration of urban homes.

  1. Crystallization of the pneumococcal autolysin LytC: in-house phasing using novel lanthanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Sanles, Reyes; González, Ana; García, Pedro; García, José L.; Martínez-Ripoll, Martín; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    The complete pneumococcal autolysin LytC has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. A SAD data set has been collected in-house from a Gd derivative up to 2.6 Å resolution. LytC, one of the major autolysins from the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, has been crystallized as needles by the hanging-drop technique using 10%(w/v) PEG 3350 as precipitant and 10 mM HEPES pH 7.5. LytC crystals were quickly soaked in mother liquor containing 2 mM of the complex Gd-HPDO3A to produce derivatized crystals (LytC Gd-HPDO3A ). Both native LytC and isomorphous LytC Gd-HPDO3A crystals were flash-cooled in a nitrogen flow at 120 K prior to X-ray data collection using an in-house Enraf–Nonius rotating-anode generator (λ = 1.5418 Å) and a MAR345 imaging-plate detector. In both cases, good-quality diffraction patterns were obtained at high resolution. LytC Gd-HPDO3A crystals allowed the collection of a SAD X-ray data set to 2.6 Å resolution indexed in terms of a P2 1 monoclinic unit cell with parameters a = 59.37, b = 67.16, c = 78.85 Å, β = 105.69°. The anomalous Patterson map allowed the identification of one heavy-atom binding site, which was sufficient for the calculation of an interpretable anomalous map at 2.6 Å resolution

  2. Medical service provider networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougeot, Michel; Naegelen, Florence

    2018-05-17

    In many countries, health insurers or health plans choose to contract either with any willing providers or with preferred providers. We compare these mechanisms when two medical services are imperfect substitutes in demand and are supplied by two different firms. In both cases, the reimbursement is higher when patients select the in-network provider(s). We show that these mechanisms yield lower prices, lower providers' and insurer's profits, and lower expense than in the uniform-reimbursement case. Whatever the degree of product differentiation, a not-for-profit insurer should prefer selective contracting and select a reimbursement such that the out-of-pocket expense is null. Although all providers join the network under any-willing-provider contracting in the absence of third-party payment, an asymmetric equilibrium may exist when this billing arrangement is implemented. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The structure and extent of data files for research management and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, L.

    1981-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the structure and extent of the data files which are necessary for the efficient planning and management of a research institute. An analysis is made of the interrelations between decision-making and the amount of information, its content and structure, including consequences to be drawn for planning an in-house data bank for an institute. Special emphasis is placed on the type and structure of data files. The interrelations of the individual data with each other, the frequency of access and the necessity of involving individual agencies and services providing research guidance. (author)

  4. First record of Pteridium caudatum (Dennstaedtiaceae) in Old Providence Island, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobar Vargas, Alexandra; Gavio, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    We report for the first time the presence of the invasive fern Pteridium caudatum (L.) Maxon Old Providence Island, Colombia. The species was found as an ornamental plant in house backyard, as well as in the wild in the locality the peak, the best preserved area of the island. We discuss the ecological implications associated to the presence of this species.

  5. Preparation of in-house calibration source for the use in radioactivity analysis of the environmental samples. Consideration of homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aba, A.; Ismaeel, A.

    2013-01-01

    An in-house reference material has been prepared in Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research radioecology laboratory, for quality control purposes of gamma spectrometer systems. The material contains a known amount of uranium ore reference material (prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency and coded as IAEA-RGU-1) which is mixed with marine sediment collected from Kuwait bay. The IAEA-RGU-1 has been certified that it is in equilibrium state with the decay daughters, and stable to be used for quality control purposes. Nevertheless, the homogeneous distribution of the doped material with the prepared source should be verified. This has been examined using gamma spectrometry measurements in conjunction with analysis of variance statistical tools, Dixon, box plots and Grubbs tests. The calculated total uncertainty has been utilized to establish the recommended specific activity ranges of 226 Ra, 224 Th, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 210 Pb radioisotopes in the prepared source. The obtained results showed that the estimated uncertainty arising from the sample inhomogeneity has a significant contribution in the total uncertainty. The stability control charts of the ultra-low background gamma spectrometry system demonstrated the suitability of the prepared material for the purpose of quality control. However, the emitted gamma-rays from the prepared source covers the required energy range for determination of natural and artificial radionuclides in different species of environmental samples such as marine sediment, soil samples, and samples contaminated by naturally occurring radioactive material produced by oil industry. In addition, the material might be used for system calibration in case its traceability is proven. The experimental data revealed the significance of the homogeneity in preparing environmental samples for radioactivity measurements; in particular when small sample quantities of environmental samples are required to be analyzed. (author)

  6. The influence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme ratio on preparation virgin coconut oil for candidate in-house reference materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohyami, Yuli; Anjani, Rafika Debby; Purwanti, Napthalina Putri

    2017-03-01

    Virgin coconut oil is an excellent product which has result of oil processing business opportunities in the international market. Standardization of virgin coconut oil necessary to satisfy the requirements industry needs. This research is expected as procedure preparation of reference materials. Preparation of virgin coconut oil by Sacharomycescerevisiaeenzyme. Based on the results of this study concluded that the ratio of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can affect the yield of virgin coconut oil produced. The preparation of virgin coconut oil enzymatically using a variety of mass ratio of 0.001 to 0.006% is obtained yield average of 12.40%. The optimum separation of virgin coconut oil on the use of enzymes with a mass ratio of 0.002%. The average water content at a ratio of 0.002% is 0.04 % with a value of uncertainty is 0.005%. The average iodine number in virgin coconut oil produced is 2.4403 ± 0,1974 grams of iodine per 100 grams of oil and optimum iodine number is obtained from the manufacturing process virgin coconut oil with a ratio of 0.006% Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sacharomycescerevisiae with a ratio of 0.002% results virgin coconut oil with acid number 0.3068 ± 0.1098%. The peroxide value of virgin coconut oil between 0.0108 ± 0.009 to 0.0114 ± 0015milli-equivalent per kilograms. Organoleptic test results and test chemical parameters can be used as the test data that can be developed in prototype preparation of candidate in-house reference material in the testing standards of quality virgin coconut oil.

  7. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  8. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to Identify Barriers and Facilitators for the Implementation of an Internet-Based Patient-Provider Communication Service in Five Settings: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsi, Cecilie; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Gammon, Deede; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2015-11-18

    Although there is growing evidence of the positive effects of Internet-based patient-provider communication (IPPC) services for both patients and health care providers, their implementation into clinical practice continues to be a challenge. The 3 aims of this study were to (1) identify and compare barriers and facilitators influencing the implementation of an IPPC service in 5 hospital units using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), (2) assess the ability of the different constructs of CFIR to distinguish between high and low implementation success, and (3) compare our findings with those from other studies that used the CFIR to discriminate between high and low implementation success. This study was based on individual interviews with 10 nurses, 6 physicians, and 1 nutritionist who had used the IPPC to answer messages from patients. Of the 36 CFIR constructs, 28 were addressed in the interviews, of which 12 distinguished between high and low implementation units. Most of the distinguishing constructs were related to the inner setting domain of CFIR, indicating that institutional factors were particularly important for successful implementation. Health care providers' beliefs in the intervention as useful for themselves and their patients as well as the implementation process itself were also important. A comparison of constructs across ours and 2 other studies that also used the CFIR to discriminate between high and low implementation success showed that 24 CFIR constructs distinguished between high and low implementation units in at least 1 study; 11 constructs distinguished in 2 studies. However, only 2 constructs (patient need and resources and available resources) distinguished consistently between high and low implementation units in all 3 studies. The CFIR is a helpful framework for illuminating barriers and facilitators influencing IPPC implementation. However, CFIR's strength of being broad and comprehensive also limits its

  9. Credential Service Provider (CSP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Provides a VA operated Level 1 and Level 2 credential for individuals who require access to VA applications, yet cannot obtain a credential from another VA accepted...

  10. MAX Provider Characteristics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MAX Provider Characteristics (PC) File Implementation Report describes the design, implementation, and results of the MAXPC prototype, which was based on three...

  11. Researching research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pais, Alexandre; Valero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    We discuss contemporary theories in mathematics education in order to do research on research. Our strategy consists of analysing discursively and ideologically recent key publications addressing the role of theory in mathematics education research. We examine how the field fabricates its object...... of research by deploying Foucault’s notion of bio-politics - mainly to address the object “learning” - and Žižek’s ideology critique - to address the object “mathematics”. These theories, which have already been used in the field to research teaching and learning, have a great potential to contribute...... to a reflexivity of research on its discourses and effects. Furthermore, they enable us to present a clear distinction between what has been called the sociopolitical turn in mathematics education research and what we call a positioning of mathematics education (research) practices in the Political....

  12. Visual Storyboarding Provides a Conceptual Bridge from Research to Development: Students Can Imagine the Results of Their Decision Making, and Their Prioritization of the Many Facets of the Design Problem Will Facilitate the Development of a Strong Final Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    In order to facilitate the selection/prioritization process and bridge the gap of design research to design conceptualization, students need to visualize the big picture that describes how the research categories such as "user," "marketing," "functional/mechanical research" are related. This is achieved through the use of a visual storyboard. The…

  13. Protocol Implementation for Radon Concentration Measurements in Houses in Croatia - Baranja Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radolic, V.; Miklavcic, I.; Poje, M.; Stanic, D.; Varga Pajtler, M.; Vukovic, B.

    2011-01-01

    The newly established protocol for radon measurements in homes was implemented on the radon survey in houses of Baranja region which was carried out from July 2009 until July 2010. The radon measurements were performed with passive track etched detectors. The method consists of cylindrical plastic vessel and two strippable LR-115 films type II (Kodak-Path, France). This method with two detector films enables the estimation of equilibrium factor as well.Croatian territory is divided in 10 x 10 km 2 cells which were part of a reference grid map which is used in a preparation of European radon concentration map. Detector locations were randomly chosen inside each grid and their number was determined by the number of inhabitants inside (one locations per 350 inhabitants). Radon detectors were exposed for a year in a living room or a bedroom away from strong ventilation and 30 cm from side walls (usually on closet at height of 2 m). After the exposure, detectors were collected and etched in 10 % NaOH aqueous solution at 50 degrees of C for 180 minutes. The tracks were automatically counted using spark counter AIST-2V. The obtained results were in the range from 6 to 355 Bq m -3 with arithmetic mean of 88 Bq m -3 and standard deviation of 69.0 Bq m -3 . The geometric mean was 67.2 Bq m -3 while the geometric standard deviation was 2.1 Bq m -3 . The statistical χ2 -test showed that the empirical frequency distribution for radon in houses of Baranja region belonged to the log-normal distribution. The percentage of houses with radon concentrations between 200 and 400 Bq m -3 was 6.7% and 1.0% of houses have radon concentration above 400 Bq m -3 . The annual effective dose from the indoor radon and its short-lived progenies for the inhabitants of Baranja region (for the average equilibrium factor of 0.53 and occupancy factor of 0.6) was 1.5 mSv. (author)

  14. "Only your blood can tell the story"--a qualitative research study using semi-structured interviews to explore the hepatitis B related knowledge, perceptions and experiences of remote dwelling Indigenous Australians and their health care providers in northern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jane; Bukulatjpi, Sarah; Sharma, Suresh; Davis, Joshua; Johnston, Vanessa

    2014-11-28

    Hepatitis B is endemic in the Indigenous communities of the Northern Territory of Australia and significantly contributes to liver-related morbidity and mortality. It is recognised that low health literacy levels, different worldviews and English as a second language all contribute to the difficulties health workers often have in explaining biomedical health concepts, relevant to hepatitis B infection, to patients. The aim of this research project was to explore the knowledge, perceptions and experiences of remote dwelling Indigenous adults and their health care providers relating to hepatitis B infection with a view to using this as the evidence base to develop a culturally appropriate educational tool. The impetus for this project came from health clinic staff at a remote community in Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory, in partnership with a visiting specialist liver clinic from the Royal Darwin Hospital. Participants were clinic patients with hepatitis B (n = 12), community members (n = 9) and key informants (n = 13); 25 were Indigenous individuals.A participatory action research project design was used with purposive sampling to identify participants. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken to explore: current understanding of hepatitis B, desire for knowledge, and perspectives on how people could acquire the information needed. All individuals were offered the use of an interpreter. The data were examined using deductive and inductive thematic analysis. Low levels of biomedical knowledge about Hepatitis B, negative perceptions of Hepatitis B, communication (particularly language) and culture were the major themes that emerged from the data. Accurate concepts grounded in Indigenous culture such as "only your blood can tell the story" were present but accompanied by a feeling of disempowerment due to perceived lack of "medical" understanding, and informed partnerships between caregiver and patient. Culturally appropriate discussions in a

  15. Are in-house and outsourcing innovation strategies interlinked? Evidence from the European agri-food sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Materia, V.C.; Pascucci, S.; Dries, L.K.E.

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates the determinants of innovation strategies in the agri-food sector and
    the potential complementarity of these strategies. Innovation strategies are distinguished as
    in-house and outsourcing. The choice between strategies is motivated by transaction

  16. Identification of genus Acinetobacter: Standardization of in-house PCR and its comparison with conventional phenotypic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sughosh S; Madalgi, Radhika; Ajantha, Ganavalli S; Kulkarni, Raghavendra D

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter is grouped under nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli. It is increasingly isolated from pathological samples. The ability of this genus to acquire drug resistance and spread in the hospital settings is posing a grave problem in healthcare. Specific treatment protocols are advocated for Acinetobacter infections. Hence, rapid identification and drug susceptibility profiling are critical in the management of these infections. To standardize an in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for identification of genus Acinetobacter and to compare PCR with two protocols for its phenotypic identification. A total of 96 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter were included in the study. An in-house PCR for genus level identification of Acinetobacter was standardized. All the isolates were phenotypically identified by two protocols. The results of PCR and phenotypic identification protocols were compared. The in-house PCR standardized was highly sensitive and specific for the genus Acinetobacter . There was 100% agreement between the phenotypic and molecular identification of the genus. The preliminary identification tests routinely used in clinical laboratories were also in complete agreement with phenotypic and molecular identification. The in-house PCR for genus level identification is specific and sensitive. However, it may not be essential for routine identification as the preliminary phenotypic identification tests used in the clinical laboratory reliably identify the genus Acinetobacter .

  17. Accurate ranging/localization technique using IR-UWB for smart fiber-wireless-in-house networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraha, S.T.; Tangdiongga, E.; Crivellaro, A.; Gaudino, R.; Koonen, A.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a RoF scheme for localization purposes of mobile stations for in-house networks is presented. Using impulse radio UWB over SMF and time-of-arrival localization method, mobile stations can be localized within centimeters accuracy.

  18. Low cost Polymer Optical Fibre based transmission system for feeding integrated broadband wireless in-house LANs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng'Oma, A.; Koonen, A.M.J.; Tafur Monroy, I.; Boom, van den H.P.A.; Smulders, P.F.M.; Khoe, G.D.; Visser, D. Taco; Lenstra, Daan; Schouten, F. Hugo

    2002-01-01

    A bi-directional transmission system using low cost Polymer Optical Fibre (POF) to feed the required large number of radio access points in next-generation integrated broadband wireless in-house LANs is proposed. Results from simulations and experiments show that, by tuning system parameters, a

  19. Development & standardization of an in-house IgM indirect ELISA for the detection of parvovirus B19 infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Vadivel

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The in-house IgM indirect ELISA was found to be simple with high sensitivity and specificity when compared with nPCR and could be used as an alternative to expensive commercial kits in resource-poor settings.

  20. Quantitative comparison of in house irma/ria methods using reagents supplied in bulk with assays based on commercial kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, K.M.; Jafri, S.R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Due to high cost of commercial kit assays, local trials were started to establish low cost immunoassay techniques at MINAR, Multan. First available alternate of commercial kits was the use of matched reagents supplied in bulk by NETRIA through INMOL, Lahore under IAEA assistance. As quality is crucial in RIA estimations this laboratory collected passive quality control data of 50, 51 and 52 in-house assay batches of T3,T4 and TSH to compare with the same number of last Amerlex RIAs(successive lots). A qualitative comparison based on computerized data analysis shows linear correlation between the results of two assay systems with low and acceptable precision in T3 and T4 assays. In TSH assays both systems show high imprecision although Amerlex RIA system is relatively more precise than in-house TSH- IRMA. T3 and T4 assays in both the systems show wide working ranges covering all clinical regions. In TSH, working ranges of both the techniques do not cover all clinical regions. In-house TSH assay excludes below 5.5 mulU/ml, whereas Amerlex excludes levels below 4.5 mulL/ml. This may reduce the clinical efficacy of these tests. Amerlex-M T3 and T4 assays show high negative drift with relatively less between variation, whereas in-house assays show low positive drift with high between batch variation. (author)

  1. A Proposal for User Fees for In-House Video-Cassette Dubbing of Commercial Educational Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Jim

    1973-01-01

    A proposal for one possible route to determining an equitable basis for school districts and other end-users of educational films to produce in-house video copies of those films, while not violating the rights of the holders of copyrights on the films. (Author)

  2. Determination of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol fatty acid esters in Brazilian vegetable oils and fats by an in-house validated method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisseto, A P; Marcolino, P F C; Vicente, E

    2014-01-01

    An in-house validated GC-MS method preceded by acid-catalysed methanolysis was applied to 97 samples of vegetable oils and fats marketed in Brazil. The levels of the compounds ranged from not detected (limit of detection = 0.05 mg kg(-1)) to 5.09 mg kg(-1), and the highest concentrations were observed in samples containing olive pomace oil and in products used for industrial applications, such as palm oil and its fractions (olein and stearin). The content of diesters and monoesters was also investigated by employing solid-phase extraction on silica cartridges, indicating that the majority of the compounds were present as diesters. This study provides the first occurrence data on these contaminants in Brazil and the results are comparable with those reported in other countries.

  3. Proceedings of the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center In-House Laboratory Independent Research and Surface Science Initiative Programs FY12

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    toxic chemicals, biological pathogens and fatigue , which can significantly compromise their health and cognitive abilities to perform complex...using piezoelectric material ( PZT ) so that it would be self-actuated and output read as a function of frequency shift. Theoretical analyses were...each design and compare real results with computer-generated, theoretical models. We designed our cantilever using piezoelectric material ( PZT ) so that

  4. Provider software buyer's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    To help long term care providers find new ways to improve quality of care and efficiency, Provider magazine presents the fourth annual listing of software firms marketing computer programs for all areas of nursing facility operations. On the following five pages, more than 80 software firms display their wares, with programs such as minimum data set and care planning, dietary, accounting and financials, case mix, and medication administration records. The guide also charts compatible hardware, integration ability, telephone numbers, company contacts, and easy-to-use reader service numbers.

  5. Criterion of independence applied to personnel responsible for in-house verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavaux, F.

    1982-01-01

    Framatome's experience has shown that one of the most difficult criteria to interpret in applying quality assurance programmes is that of ''organization''. In particular, this requires that personnel responsible for in-house verification should have ''sufficient independence''. The author examines how Framatome interprets the criterion of sufficient independence. It may seem easy to deal with this problem on paper, by redistributing the boxes of the organizational chart, but to do so is both unrealistic and deceptive; the development of reference models runs into difficulties when it comes to practical application and these difficulties alone justify trying another approach to the problem. The method advocated here consists in analysing each situation as it arises, taking into account the criterion in question, and disregarding any pre-defined model or reference situation. The analysis should involve all quality assurance functions and not, as is too often the case, only the independence of the quality assurance service. The analysis should also examine organizational freedom and independence from direct pressures of cost and schedule considerations. To support this recommendation, three standard cases are described (manufacturing control, design verification, on-site inspection team) which demonstrate how these criteria can give rise to different difficulties in different cases. The author concludes that, in contrast to other criteria so often applied by successive approximations, organizational changes should only be decided upon when absolutely necessary and after a detailed analysis of the particular case in question has been performed. (author)

  6. Reduction of CO2 Emissions in Houses of Historic and Visual Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Dulski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the ‘Climate Programme’ the municipality of Amsterdam has the ambition to reduce the CO2 emissions within the city limits by 40% in the year 2025 compared to the year 1990. To realize this ambition substantial CO2 savings have to be realized at the 375,000 current houses in the city. A special challenge is formed by the houses of historic and visual importance, as the implementation of standard energy saving measures may conflict with the ambition to protect their cultural and historic values. Nyenrode Business University was asked to study the possibilities for a successful combination of ambitions in both fields. This article shows an overview of suggestions that focus on the combination of technical and process orientated innovations which can contribute to the acceleration of the reduction of CO2 emissions in houses of historic and visual importance. The article therefore addresses political and technical as well as financial and process related aspects in implementing energy saving measures in this category of buildings.

  7. In-house SIRAS phasing of the polyunsaturated fatty-acid isomerase from Propionibacterium acnes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liavonchanka, Alena; Hornung, Ellen; Feussner, Ivo; Rudolph, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Low iodide concentrations were sufficient to allow SAD and SIRAS phasing of cubic crystals of a novel fatty acid isomerase using Cu Kα radiation. The polyenoic fatty-acid isomerase from Propionibacterium acnes (PAI) catalyzes the double-bond isomerization of linoleic acid to conjugated linoleic acid, which is a dairy- or meat-derived fatty acid in the human diet. PAI was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity as a yellow-coloured protein. The nature of the bound cofactor was analyzed by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Single crystals of PAI were obtained in two crystal forms. Cubic shaped crystals belong to space group I2 1 3, with a unit-cell parameter of 160.4 Å, and plate-like crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 133.7, b = 60.8, c = 72.2 Å, β = 115.8°. Both crystal forms contain one molecule per asymmetric unit and diffract to a resolution of better than 2.0 Å. Initial phases were obtained by SIRAS from in-house data from a cubic crystal that was soaked with an unusually low KI concentration of 0.25 M

  8. No Evidence that Infection Alters Global Recombination Rate in House Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L Dumont

    Full Text Available Recombination rate is a complex trait, with genetic and environmental factors shaping observed patterns of variation. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the genetic basis of recombination rate differences between organisms, less attention has focused on the environmental determinants of crossover rates. Here, we test the effect of one ubiquitous environmental pressure-bacterial infection-on global recombination frequency in mammals. We applied MLH1 mapping to assay global crossover rates in male mice infected with the pathogenic bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, and uninfected control animals. Despite ample statistical power to identify biologically relevant differences between infected and uninfected animals, we find no evidence for a global recombination rate response to bacterial infection. Moreover, broad-scale patterns of crossover distribution, including the number of achiasmate bivalents, are not affected by infection status. Although pathogen exposure can plastically increase recombination in some species, our findings suggest that recombination rates in house mice may be resilient to at least some forms of infection stress. This negative result motivates future experiments with alternative house mouse pathogens to evaluate the generality of this conclusion.

  9. Using in-house expertise in negotiating power sales contracts for industrial cogeneration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yott, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Energy has always been a strategic component of Air Products and Chemicals production costs. In fact, Air Products is among the top consumers of electricity and natural gas in the U.S. Consequently, Air Products has developed a multifaceted Corporate Energy Department. The advent of PURPA in 1978 and the success enjoyed by Air Products in selling industrial gases over the fence to industrial customers as a integral part of their manufacturing system led Air Products into the industrial cogeneration business. This paper briefly summarizes Air Products entry into the industrial cogeneration market and the role that Air Products Energy Department has played in making this new business focus a success. It highlights how Air Products has been able to transfer its in-house expertise in purchasing power to the marketing, bidding, contract negotiation and avoided cost forecasting functions so critical in the successful development of industrial cogeneration opportunities. At Air Products we believe our long association with the utility industry first as a cost-conscious customer and more recently as an electric energy supplier has enhanced our competitive position. The same success story could be repeated at your company if you know what to look for and are not afraid to expand the horizons and responsibilities of your energy department

  10. Radon concentrations in houses around the Plomin coal-fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokobauer, N.; Franic, Z.; Sencar, J.; Bauman, A.; Sokolovic, E.

    1997-01-01

    Investigation of radon activity concentration in houses around the Plomin coal-fired power plant (Istrian Peninsula) started in the winter of 1990 upon the assumption that certain old houses in this region were built using mortar and plaster prepared from slag and ash. This paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation carried out in the winter of 1990 and spring of 1991, when the difference between radon levels in old and newly built houses was first noted, and the subsequent data obtained by radon measurements in 40 selected houses in the period from 1992 to 1994. The average annual radon activity concentrations in the old houses ranged from 55 Bqm -3 to 426 Bqm -3 (mean value 146 ± 91 Bqm -3 ) and in more recently built houses from 16 Bqm -3 to 67 Bqm -3 (mean value 36 ± 13 Bqm -3 ). The average annual effective doses from inhalation of radon progeny for the inhabitants living in the old and newly built houses were estimated to be 2.7 mSv and 0.7 mSv, respectively. (Author)

  11. Variations of airborne and waterborne Rn-222 in houses in Maine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, C.T.; Weiffenbach, C.V.; Norton, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    Concentrations of airborne radon ranging from 0.05 to 135 pCi/L were found in houses in Maine. To investigate the association between elevated radon concentrations in well water and the indoor airborne radon concentrations, the radon in the water supplies of these houses was measured by liquid scintillation. Monitors of airborne radon were used for dynamic studies in 18 houses, determining the component of airborne radon associated with showers, laundry and dishwashing, which liberate radon in bursts. The component of airborne radon associated with water sources was found to vary inversely with ventilation rate and directly with waterborne radon concentration, with 0.8 +- 0.2 pCi Rn/L air per nCi Rn/L water at a ventilation rate of 1.0 air change per hour. The data are pertinent to a study which has revealed significant correlations between county averages, from the National Cancer Institute, or age-adjusted cancer mortality rates in Maine and average values of radon concentrations in water for the counties. (author)

  12. Safety and Mission Assurance for In-House Design Lessons Learned from Ares I Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joel M.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation identifies lessons learned in the course of the Ares I Upper Stage design and in-house development effort. The contents include: 1) Constellation Organization; 2) Upper Stage Organization; 3) Presentation Structure; 4) Lesson-Importance of Systems Engineering/Integration; 5) Lesson-Importance of Early S&MA Involvement; 6) Lesson-Importance of Appropriate Staffing Levels; 7) Lesson-Importance S&MA Team Deployment; 8) Lesson-Understanding of S&MA In-Line Engineering versus Assurance; 9) Lesson-Importance of Close Coordination between Supportability and Reliability/Maintainability; 10) Lesson-Importance of Engineering Data Systems; 11) Lesson-Importance of Early Development of Supporting Databases; 12) Lesson-Importance of Coordination with Safety Assessment/Review Panels; 13) Lesson-Implementation of Software Reliability; 14) Lesson-Implementation of S&MA Technical Authority/Chief S&MA Officer; 15) Lesson-Importance of S&MA Evaluation of Project Risks; 16) Lesson-Implementation of Critical Items List and Government Mandatory Inspections; 17) Lesson-Implementation of Critical Items List Mandatory Inspections; 18) Lesson-Implementation of Test Article Safety Analysis; and 19) Lesson-Importance of Procurement Quality.

  13. Variations of airborne and waterborne Rn-222 in houses in Maine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, C.T.; Weiffenbach, C.V.; Norton, S.A. (Maine Univ., Orono (USA))

    1982-01-01

    Concentrations of airborne radon ranging from 0.05 to 135 pCi/L were found in houses in Maine. To investigate the association between elevated radon concentrations in well water and the indoor airborne radon concentrations, the radon in the water supplies of these houses was measured by liquid scintillation. Monitors of airborne radon were used for dynamic studies in 18 houses, determining the component of airborne radon associated with showers, laundry and dishwashing, which liberate radon in bursts. The component of airborne radon associated with water sources was found to vary inversely with ventilation rate and directly with waterborne radon concentration, with 0.8 +- 0.2 pCi Rn/L air per nCi Rn/L water at a ventilation rate of 1.0 air change per hour. The data are pertinent to a study which has revealed significant correlations between county averages, from the National Cancer Institute, or age-adjusted cancer mortality rates in Maine and average values of radon concentrations in water for the counties.

  14. The contribution of the Y chromosome to hybrid male sterility in house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Polly; Good, Jeffrey M; Dean, Matthew D; Tucker, Priscilla K; Nachman, Michael W

    2012-08-01

    Hybrid sterility in the heterogametic sex is a common feature of speciation in animals. In house mice, the contribution of the Mus musculus musculus X chromosome to hybrid male sterility is large. It is not known, however, whether F1 male sterility is caused by X-Y or X-autosome incompatibilities or a combination of both. We investigated the contribution of the M. musculus domesticus Y chromosome to hybrid male sterility in a cross between wild-derived strains in which males with a M. m. musculus X chromosome and M. m. domesticus Y chromosome are partially sterile, while males from the reciprocal cross are reproductively normal. We used eight X introgression lines to combine different X chromosome genotypes with different Y chromosomes on an F1 autosomal background, and we measured a suite of male reproductive traits. Reproductive deficits were observed in most F1 males, regardless of Y chromosome genotype. Nonetheless, we found evidence for a negative interaction between the M. m. domesticus Y and an interval on the M. m. musculus X that resulted in abnormal sperm morphology. Therefore, although F1 male sterility appears to be caused mainly by X-autosome incompatibilities, X-Y incompatibilities contribute to some aspects of sterility.

  15. Asymmetry and polymorphism of hybrid male sterility during the early stages of speciation in house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Jeffrey M; Handel, Mary Ann; Nachman, Michael W

    2008-01-01

    House mice offer a powerful system for dissecting the genetic basis of phenotypes that isolate species in the early stages of speciation. We used a series of reciprocal crosses between wild-derived strains of Mus musculus and M. domesticus to examine F(1) hybrid male sterility, one of the primary phenotypes thought to isolate these species. We report four main results. First, we found significantly smaller testes and fewer sperm in hybrid male progeny of most crosses. Second, in some crosses hybrid male sterility was asymmetric and depended on the species origin of the X chromosome. These observations confirm and extend previous findings, underscoring the central role that the M. musculus X chromosome plays in reproductive isolation. Third, comparisons among reciprocal crosses revealed polymorphism at one or more hybrid incompatibilities within M. musculus. Fourth, the spermatogenic phenotype of this polymorphic interaction appears distinct from previously described hybrid incompatibilities between these species. These data build on previous studies of speciation in house mice and show that the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility is fairly complex, even at this early stage of divergence.

  16. Project Selection and Transparency Factors in Housing Public-Private Partnerships in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eziyi Offia Ibem

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of Public-Private Partners (PPPs in housing provisioning is on the increase across the world. However, there is a paucity of empirical studies on the specific factors considered at the initiation, and measures taken to ensure transparency at the procurement stages, of PPP housing projects. This study examined project selection factors and transparency measures in PPP housing projects using data sourced from oral interviews with 27 experts in nine PPP housing schemes in Nigeria. Results of the content analysis revealed that the top two selection factors considered by both the public and private sector operators of PPP housing projects in Nigeria are the availability of land and viability of the funding arrangements. Whereas the public-sector partners also consider the availability of competent private sector to deliver the projects, the private developers are concerned with the location of proposed projects. It was also found that the two key measures taken to ensure transparency at the procurement stage of the projects are transparent and competitive bidding and open advertisements of tender opportunities. These imply that before embarking on PPP housing projects, operators should ensure that there is available land in good locations, sound funding arrangements, and measures for achieving transparency in the schemes.

  17. SU-F-T-518: Development and Characterization of a Gated Treatment System Implemented with An In-House Optical Tracking System and the Elekta Response Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barraclough, B; Park, J; Li, F; Lu, B; Li, J; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the development and characterization of the first in-house gating system implemented with an optical tracking system (OTS) and the Elekta Response™ interface. Methods: The Response™ connects a patient tracking system with a linac, enabling the tracking system to control radiation delivery. The developed system uses an in-house OTS to monitor patient breathing. The OTS consists of two infrared-based cameras, tracking markers affixed on patient. It achieves gated or breath-held (BH) treatment by calling beam ON/OFF functions in the Response™ dynamic-link library (DLL). A 4D motion phantom was used to evaluate its dosimetric and time delay characteristics. Two FF- and two FFF-IMRT beams were delivered in non-gated, BH and gated mode. The sinusoidal gating signal had a 6 sec period and 15 mm amplitude. The duty cycle included 10%, 20%, 30% and 50%. The BH signal was adapted from the sinusoidal wave by inserting 15 sec BHs. Each delivery was measured with a 2D diode array (MapCHECK™) and compared with the non-gated delivery using gamma analysis (3%). The beam ON/OFF time was captured using the service graphing utility of the linac. Results: The gated treatments were successfully delivered except the 10% duty cycle. The BH delivery had perfect agreement (100%) with non-gated delivery; the agreement of gated delivery decreased from 99% to 88% as duty cycle reduced from 50% to 20%. The beam on/off delay was on average 0.25/0.06 sec. The delivery time for the 50%, 30% and 20% duty cycle increased by 29%, 71% and 139%, respectively. No dosimetric or time delay difference was noticed between FF- and FFF-IMRT beams. Conclusion: The in-house gating system was successfully developed with dosimetric and time delay characteristics in line with published results for commercial systems. It will be an important platform for further research and clinical development of gated treatment.

  18. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  19. What HERA may provide?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hannes; De Roeck, Albert; Bartles, Jochen

    2008-09-01

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  20. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  1. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...... process. We find that clients influence the development of human capital capabilities and management capabilities in reciprocally produced services. While in sequential produced services clients influence the development of organizational capital capabilities and management capital capabilities....... of the services, such as sequential or reciprocal task activities, influence the development of different types of capabilities. We study five cases of offshore-outsourced knowledge-intensive business services that are distinguished according to their reciprocal or sequential task activities in their production...

  2. Providing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides an apparatus for providing x-rays to an object that may be in an ordinary environment such as air at approximately atmospheric pressure. The apparatus comprises: means (typically a laser beam) for directing energy onto a target to produce x-rays of a selected spectrum and intensity at the target; a fluid-tight enclosure around the target; means for maintaining the pressure in the first enclosure substantially below atmospheric pressure; a fluid-tight second enclosure adjoining the first enclosure, the common wall portion having an opening large enough to permit x-rays to pass through but small enough to allow the pressure reducing means to evacuate gas from the first enclosure at least as fast as it enters through the opening; the second enclosure filled with a gas that is highly transparent to x-rays; the wall of the second enclosure to which the x-rays travel having a portion that is highly transparent to x-rays (usually a beryllium or plastic foil), so that the object to which the x-rays are to be provided may be located outside the second enclosure and adjacent thereto and thus receive the x-rays substantially unimpeded by air or other intervening matter. The apparatus is particularly suited to obtaining EXAFS (extended x-ray fine structure spectroscopy) data on a material

  3. Why healthcare providers merge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Jeroen; Roos, Anne-Fleur

    2016-04-01

    In many OECD countries, healthcare sectors have become increasingly concentrated as a result of mergers. However, detailed empirical insight into why healthcare providers merge is lacking. Also, we know little about the influence of national healthcare policies on mergers. We fill this gap in the literature by conducting a survey study on mergers among 848 Dutch healthcare executives, of which 35% responded (resulting in a study sample of 239 executives). A total of 65% of the respondents was involved in at least one merger between 2005 and 2012. During this period, Dutch healthcare providers faced a number of policy changes, including increasing competition, more pressure from purchasers, growing financial risks, de-institutionalisation of long-term care and decentralisation of healthcare services to municipalities. Our empirical study shows that healthcare providers predominantly merge to improve the provision of healthcare services and to strengthen their market position. Also efficiency and financial reasons are important drivers of merger activity in healthcare. We find that motives for merger are related to changes in health policies, in particular to the increasing pressure from competitors, insurers and municipalities.

  4. PROVIDING WOMEN, KEPT MEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojola, Sanyu A

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on ethnographic and interview based fieldwork to explore accounts of intimate relationships between widowed women and poor young men that emerged in the wake of economic crisis and a devastating HIV epidemic among the Luo ethnic group in Western Kenya. I show how the cooptation of widow inheritance practices in the wake of an overwhelming number of widows as well as economic crisis resulted in widows becoming providing women and poor young men becoming kept men. I illustrate how widows in this setting, by performing a set of practices central to what it meant to be a man in this society – pursuing and providing for their partners - were effectively doing masculinity. I will also show how young men, rather than being feminized by being kept, deployed other sets of practices to prove their masculinity and live in a manner congruent with cultural ideals. I argue that ultimately, women’s practice of masculinity in large part seemed to serve patriarchal ends. It not only facilitated the fulfillment of patriarchal expectations of femininity – to being inherited – but also served, in the end, to provide a material base for young men’s deployment of legitimizing and culturally valued sets of masculine practice. PMID:25489121

  5. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  6. Survey and research on the effects of technological development. Annex (Tables of technology-related data); Gijutsu kaihatsu no koka ni kansuru chosa kenkyu. Bessatsu (gijutsu kanren data list)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-03-01

    Compiled into a report are the data about trends in Japan's research and development efforts broken down by industry covering a period of 1960-1980. The data items are quite versatile, including the number of companies engaged in researches and their rates, number of employees, total sales volume, profits through business, number of employees related to researches, number of dedicated researchers, number of dedicated researchers per 10,000 employees, disbursement of in-house research expenses, rate of personnel expenses to in-house research expenses, rate of disbursement of in-house research expenses to total sales volume, rate of disbursement of in-house research expenses to profits through business, disbursement of in-house research expenses per company, disbursement of in-house research expenses per dedicated researcher, in-house research expenses broken down by purpose (basic research, applied research, research for development), component ratio (basic research, applied research, research for development), number of dedicated researchers per speciality (total number, mathematics and physics, chemistry, biology, geology, engineering, civil engineering and construction, machinery and ship and aviation, electricity and communication, mining and metallurgy, textile, agriculture and forestry, fishery, stock-breeding and veterinarian, medicine and dentistry, pharmacy), number of technologies exported, total sum of export, etc. (NEDO)

  7. Geometric information provider platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisam Yousefzadeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Renovation of existing buildings is known as an essential stage in reduction of the energy loss. Considerable part of renovation process depends on geometric reconstruction of building based on semantic parameters. Following many research projects which were focused on parameterizing the energy usage, various energy modelling methods were developed during the last decade. On the other hand, by developing accurate measuring tools such as laser scanners, the interests of having accurate 3D building models are rapidly growing. But the automation of 3D building generation from laser point cloud or detection of specific objects in that is still a challenge.  The goal is designing a platform through which required geometric information can be efficiently produced to support energy simulation software. Developing a reliable procedure which extracts required information from measured data and delivers them to a standard energy modelling system is the main purpose of the project.

  8. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Avipoxvirus in House Sparrows in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ruiz-Martínez

    Full Text Available Avipoxvirus (APV is a fairly common virus affecting birds that causes morbidity and mortality in wild and captive birds. We studied the prevalence of pox-like lesions and genetic diversity of APV in house sparrows (Passer domesticus in natural, agricultural and urban areas in southern Spain in 2013 and 2014 and in central Spain for 8 months (2012-2013. Overall, 3.2% of 2,341 house sparrows visually examined in southern Spain had cutaneous lesions consistent with avian pox. A similar prevalence (3% was found in 338 birds from central Spain. Prevalence was higher in hatch-year birds than in adults. We did not detect any clear spatial or temporal patterns of APV distribution. Molecular analyses of poxvirus-like lesions revealed that 63% of the samples were positive. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of 29 DNA sequences from the fpv167 gene, detected two strains belonging to the canarypox clade (subclades B1 and B2 previously found in Spain. One of them appears predominant in Iberia and North Africa and shares 70% similarity to fowlpox and canarypox virus. This APV strain has been identified in a limited number of species in the Iberian Peninsula, Morocco and Hungary. The second one has a global distribution and has been found in numerous wild bird species around the world. To our knowledge, this represents the largest study of avian poxvirus disease in the broadly distributed house sparrow and strongly supports the findings that Avipox prevalence in this species in South and central Spain is moderate and the genetic diversity low.

  9. Nocturnal thoracoabdominal asynchrony in house dust mite-sensitive nonhuman primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiaoJia Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available XiaoJia Wang, Shaun Reece, Stephen Olmstead, Robert L Wardle, Michael R Van ScottDepartment of Physiology, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USAAbstract: Nocturnal bronchoconstriction is a common symptom of asthma in humans, but is poorly documented in animal models. Thoracoabdominal asynchrony (TAA is a noninvasive clinical indication of airway obstruction. In this study, respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP was used to document nocturnal TAA in house dust mite (HDM-sensitive Cynomolgus macaques. Dynamic compliance (Cdyn and lung resistance (RL measured in anesthetized ­animals at rest and following exposure to HDM allergen, methacholine, and albuterol were highly ­correlated with three RIP parameters associated with TAA, ie, phase angle of the rib cage and abdomen waveforms (PhAng, baseline effort phase relation (eBPRL and effort phase relation (ePhRL. Twenty-one allergic subjects were challenged with HDM early in the morning, and eBPRL and ePhRL were monitored for 20 hours after provocation. Fifteen of the allergic subjects exhibited gradual increases in eBPRL and ePhRL between midnight and 6 am, with peak activity at 4 am. However, as in humans, this nocturnal response was highly variable both between subjects and within subjects over time. The results document that TAA in this nonhuman primate model of asthma is highly correlated with Cdyn and RL, and demonstrate that animals exhibiting acute responses to allergen exposure during the day also exhibit nocturnal TAA.Keywords: nocturnal asthma, late phase asthmatic response, respiratory inductive plethysmography

  10. Evaluation of In-House and Commercial Serological Tests for Diagnosis of Human Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanes, Hadjila; Hennebique, Aurélie; Pelloux, Isabelle; Boisset, Sandrine; Bicout, Dominique J.; Caspar, Yvan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. Its specific diagnosis remains based on serological methods, while F. tularensis is rarely detected in clinical samples by culture or PCR. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of the Serion enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) classic Francisella tularensis IgG and IgM tests (Virion/Serion GmbH Institute, Würzburg, Germany) and the VIRapid tularemia immunochromatographic test (ICT) (Vircell, Granada, Spain) compared to that of the in-house microagglutination test (MAT) and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) currently used at the French National Reference Center for Francisella. We evaluated 256 consecutive sera from 208 patients, including 51 confirmed and 23 probable tularemia cases, and 134 control patients not infected with F. tularensis. The IFA tests displayed 72.5% sensitivity for IgM (cutoff titer ≥80) and 74.5% for IgG (cutoff titer ≥160), and 99.3% specificity for both IgM and IgG. Using cutoffs advocated by the manufacturer, the Serion ELISAs displayed 88.2% sensitivity for IgM and 86.3% for IgG antibodies; specificity was 94.8% for IgM and 95.5% for IgG. Compared to MAT and IFA tests, the Serion ELISAs allowed earlier detection of specific antibodies (1 to 2 weeks versus 2 to 3 weeks after the onset of symptoms). The ICT sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 83.6%, respectively, when considering the cutoff advocated by the manufacturer. In conclusion, the Serion ELISAs are useful as screening tests for tularemia diagnosis, but additional confirmatory tests (such as MAT and IFA) are needed, especially in areas of low endemicity. PMID:29118164

  11. Steroids in house sparrows (Passer domesticus): Effects of POPs and male quality signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nossen, Ida; Ciesielski, Tomasz M; Dimmen, Malene V; Jensen, Henrik; Ringsby, Thor Harald; Polder, Anuschka; Rønning, Bernt; Jenssen, Bjørn M; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2016-03-15

    At high trophic levels, environmental contaminants have been found to affect endocrinological processes. Less attention has been paid to species at lower trophic levels. The house sparrow (Passer domesticus) may be a useful model for investigating effects of POPs in mid-range trophic level species. In male house sparrows, ornamental traits involved in male quality signalling are important for female selection. These traits are governed by endocrinological systems, and POPs may therefore interfere with male quality signalling. The aim of the present study was to use the house sparrow as a mid-range trophic level model species to study the effects of environmental contaminants on endocrinology and male quality signalling. We analysed the levels of selected PCBs, PBDEs and OCPs and investigated the possible effects of these contaminants on circulating levels of steroid hormones (4 progestagens, 4 androgens and 3 estrogens) in male and female adult house sparrows from a population on the island Leka, Norway. Plasma samples were analysed for steroid hormones by GC-MS and liver samples were analysed for environmental contaminants by GC-ECD and GC-MS. In males, we also quantified ornament traits. It was hypothesised that POPs may have endocrine disrupting effects on the local house sparrow population and can thus interfere with the steroid hormone homeostasis. Among female house sparrows, bivariate correlations revealed negative relationships between POPs and estrogens. Among male sparrows, positive relationships between dihydrotestosterone levels and PCBs were observed. In males, positive relationships were also found between steroids and beak length, and between steroids and ornamental traits such as total badge size. This was confirmed by a significant OPLS model between beak length and steroids. Although sparrows are in the mid-range trophic levels, the present study indicates that POPs may affect steroid homeostasis in house sparrows, in particular for females. For

  12. Within-female plasticity in sex allocation is associated with a behavioural polyphenism in house wrens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, E K; Thompson, C F; Sakaluk, S K

    2016-03-01

    Sex allocation theory assumes individual plasticity in maternal strategies, but few studies have investigated within-individual changes across environments. In house wrens, differences between nests in the degree of hatching synchrony of eggs represent a behavioural polyphenism in females, and its expression varies with seasonal changes in the environment. Between-nest differences in hatching asynchrony also create different environments for offspring, and sons are more strongly affected than daughters by sibling competition when hatching occurs asynchronously over several days. Here, we examined variation in hatching asynchrony and sex allocation, and its consequences for offspring fitness. The number and condition of fledglings declined seasonally, and the frequency of asynchronous hatching increased. In broods hatched asynchronously, sons, which are over-represented in the earlier-laid eggs, were in better condition than daughters, which are over-represented in the later-laid eggs. Nonetheless, asynchronous broods were more productive later within seasons. The proportion of sons in asynchronous broods increased seasonally, whereas there was a seasonal increase in the production of daughters by mothers hatching their eggs synchronously, which was characterized by within-female changes in offspring sex and not by sex-biased mortality. As adults, sons from asynchronous broods were in better condition and produced more broods of their own than males from synchronous broods, and both males and females from asynchronous broods had higher lifetime reproductive success than those from synchronous broods. In conclusion, hatching patterns are under maternal control, representing distinct strategies for allocating offspring within broods, and are associated with offspring sex ratios and differences in offspring reproductive success. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Avipoxvirus in House Sparrows in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Martínez, Jorge; Ferraguti, Martina; Figuerola, Jordi; Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Williams, Richard Alexander John; Herrera-Dueñas, Amparo; Aguirre, José Ignacio; Soriguer, Ramón; Escudero, Clara; Moens, Michaël André Jean; Pérez-Tris, Javier; Benítez, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Avipoxvirus (APV) is a fairly common virus affecting birds that causes morbidity and mortality in wild and captive birds. We studied the prevalence of pox-like lesions and genetic diversity of APV in house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in natural, agricultural and urban areas in southern Spain in 2013 and 2014 and in central Spain for 8 months (2012-2013). Overall, 3.2% of 2,341 house sparrows visually examined in southern Spain had cutaneous lesions consistent with avian pox. A similar prevalence (3%) was found in 338 birds from central Spain. Prevalence was higher in hatch-year birds than in adults. We did not detect any clear spatial or temporal patterns of APV distribution. Molecular analyses of poxvirus-like lesions revealed that 63% of the samples were positive. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses of 29 DNA sequences from the fpv167 gene, detected two strains belonging to the canarypox clade (subclades B1 and B2) previously found in Spain. One of them appears predominant in Iberia and North Africa and shares 70% similarity to fowlpox and canarypox virus. This APV strain has been identified in a limited number of species in the Iberian Peninsula, Morocco and Hungary. The second one has a global distribution and has been found in numerous wild bird species around the world. To our knowledge, this represents the largest study of avian poxvirus disease in the broadly distributed house sparrow and strongly supports the findings that Avipox prevalence in this species in South and central Spain is moderate and the genetic diversity low.

  14. Value determination of ZrO2 in-house reference material (RM) candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanna Tuning Sunanti; Samin; Supriyanto C

    2013-01-01

    The value determination of zirconium oxide in-house reference materials (RM) candidate has been done by referring to ISO:35-2006 standard. The raw material of RM was 4 kg of ZrO 2 , Merck, that was dried at 90°C for 2×6 hours in a closed room. The samples were crushed with stainless steel (SS) pestle to pass ≤ 200 mesh sieve, homogenized in a homogenizer for 3×6 hours to obtain the powdered, dried and homogenous samples. The gravimetric method was performed to test the moisture content, while XRF and AAS methods were used to test the homogeneity and stability of samples candidates. Reference material (RM) candidates of ZrO 2 powder were put into polyethylene bottles, each weighing 100 g. Samples were distributed to 10 testing laboratories that have been accredited for testing the composition of the oxide contents and loss of ignition (LOI) using variety of analytical methods that have been validated such as AAS, XRF, NAA, and UV-Vis. The testing results of oxide content and loss of ignition parameters from various laboratories were analyzed using statistical methods. The testing data of oxide concentration in zirconium oxide RM candidates obtained from various laboratories were ZrO 2 : 97.7334 ± 0.0016%, HfO 2 : 1.7329 ± 0.0024%, SiO 2 : 30.1224 ± 0.0053%, Al 2 O 3 : 0.0245 ± 0.0015%, TiO 2 : 0.0153 ± 0.0006%, Fe 2 O 3 : 0.0068 ± 0.0005%, CdO: 3.1798 ± 0.00006 ppm, and the LOI results was = 0.0217 ± 0.00022%. (author)

  15. A Cost-Effective, In-House, Positioning and Cutting Guide System for Orthognathic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Peter; Watson, Melanie; Burke, Ezra

    2018-03-01

    Technological advances in 3D printing can dramatically improve orthognathic surgical planning workflow. Custom positioning and cutting guides enable intraoperative reproduction of pre-planned osteotomy cuts and can result in greater surgical accuracy and patient safety. This short paper describes the use of freeware (some with open-source) combined with in-house 3D printing facilities to produce reliable, affordable osteotomy cutting guides. Open-source software (3D Slicer) is used to visualise and segment three-dimensional planning models from imported conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. Freeware (Autodesk Meshmixer ©) allows digital manipulation of maxillary and mandibular components to plan precise osteotomy cuts. Bespoke cutting guides allow exact intraoperative positioning. These are printed in polylactic acid (PLA) using a fused-filament fabrication 3D printer. Fixation of the osteotomised segments is achieved using plating templates and four pre-adapted plates with planned screw holes over the thickest bone. We print maxilla/ mandible models with desired movements incorporated to use as a plating template. A 3D printer capable of reproducing a complete skull can be procured for £1000, with material costs in the region of £10 per case. Our production of models and guides typically takes less than 24 hours of total print time. The entire production process is frequently less than three days. Externally sourced models and guides cost significantly more, frequently encountering costs totalling £1500-£2000 for models and guides for a bimaxillary osteotomy. Three-dimensional guided surgical planning utilising custom cutting guides enables the surgeon to determine optimal orientation of osteotomy cuts and better predict the skeletal maxilla/mandible relationship following surgery. The learning curve to develop proficiency using planning software and printer settings is offset by increased surgical predictability and reduced theatre time, making this

  16. Dangertalk: Voices of abortion providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa A; Hassinger, Jane A; Debbink, Michelle; Harris, Lisa H

    2017-07-01

    Researchers have described the difficulties of doing abortion work, including the psychosocial costs to individual providers. Some have discussed the self-censorship in which providers engage in to protect themselves and the pro-choice movement. However, few have examined the costs of this self-censorship to public discourse and social movements in the US. Using qualitative data collected during abortion providers' discussions of their work, we explore the tensions between their narratives and pro-choice discourse, and examine the types of stories that are routinely silenced - narratives we name "dangertalk". Using these data, we theorize about the ways in which giving voice to these tensions might transform current abortion discourse by disrupting false dichotomies and better reflecting the complex realities of abortion. We present a conceptual model for dangertalk in abortion discourse, connecting it to functions of dangertalk in social movements more broadly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Energy providers: customer expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pridham, N.F.

    1997-01-01

    The deregulation of the gas and electric power industries, and how it will impact on customer service and pricing rates was discussed. This paper described the present situation, reviewed core competencies, and outlined future expectations. The bottom line is that major energy consumers are very conscious of energy costs and go to great lengths to keep them under control. At the same time, solutions proposed to reduce energy costs must benefit all classes of consumers, be they industrial, commercial, institutional or residential. Deregulation and competition at an accelerated pace is the most likely answer. This may be forced by external forces such as foreign energy providers who are eager to enter the Canadian energy market. It is also likely that the competition and convergence between gas and electricity is just the beginning, and may well be overshadowed by other deregulated industries as they determine their core competencies

  18. Distriubted terminal support in a data acquisition system for nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, R.R.; Capel, A.C.; Pensom, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive and flexible terminal support facility is being designed to provide the necessary interactive man-machine interface for REDNET, a distriubted data aquisition system for nuclear research reactors. Host processors and a large number of terminals are linked via three physically independent but interconnected terminal support subsystems, which use in-house developed equipment based on cable TV technology. The CCITT X-25 protocol is supported, and virtual circuits are used for communications between terminals and software functions in host processors. This paper presents the requirements and conceptual design of the major terminal support components. (auth)

  19. Role of the chemical engineering technician in applied research related to tritium separation from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    Applied research and development activities related to the removal of tritium from aqueous effluent streams have presented broad opportunities to the chemical engineering technician for professional growth. Technician job activities involve operating complex analytical instrumentation and constructing, maintaining, and operating experimental electrolysis apparatus. The technician is a member of a professional team including scientific, engineering, and other technical personnel and as such is expected to exercise creative thought. Proximity of a large university and availability of formalized ''in house'' training courses provide incentives for technicians to broaden their academic base concurrent with their work involvement

  20. Biochemical Characterization of an In-House Coccidioides Antigen: Perspectives for the Immunodiagnosis of Coccidioidomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Evando Moreira Filho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the reactivity of an in-house antigen, extracted from a strain of C. posadasii isolated in northeastern Brazil, by radial immunodiffusion and Western blotting, as well as to establish its biochemical characterization. The protein antigen was initially extracted with the use of solid ammonium sulfate and characterized by 1-D electrophoresis. Subsequently, it was tested by means of double radial immunodiffusion and Western blotting. A positive reaction was observed against the antigen by both immunodiagnostic techniques tested on sera from patients suffering from coccidioidomycosis. Besides this, two immunoreactive protein bands were observed and were revealed to be a β-glucosidase and a glutamine synthetase after sequencing of the respective N-terminal regions. Our in-house Coccidioides antigen can be promising as a quick and low-cost diagnostic tool without the risk of direct manipulation of the microorganism.

  1. What HERA May Provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  2. The concept of in-house management of the formation of the cost of production in the agricultural enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrova Elena Aleksandrovna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with modern methods of intra-formation control the cost of agricultural production, the composition of the costs of agricultural firms, the order of their control and optimization. A structural model, which is a technique of internal control and audit at the macro and micro level hierarchical control agricultural enterprise. The composition of the information required to implement a methodology in-house control, accounting and analytical procedures used to assess the cost items and management decisions.

  3. The design paradox: the contribution of in-house and external design activities on product market performance

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Thorwarth, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the contribution of design activities on product market performance of Belgian companies. While there is mounting evidence that design can be seen as a strategic tool to successfully spur sales of new product developments at the firm level, the topic of design innovation has not been linked to the open innovation concept yet. In this paper we empirically test whether design activities conducted in-house differ in their contribution to new product sales from externally acqu...

  4. Biochemical Characterization of an In-House Coccidioides Antigen: Perspectives for the Immunodiagnosis of Coccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Evando Moreira Filho; Silviane Praciano Bandeira; Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira Brillhante; Marcos Fábio Gadelha Rocha; Ilka Maria Vasconcelos; Mirella Leite Pereira; Débora de Souza Collares Maia Castelo-Branco; Francisco Airton Castro Rocha; Zoilo Pires de Camargo; Marcio Viana Ramos; Rossana de Aguiar Cordeiro; José Júlio Costa Sidrim

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the reactivity of an in-house antigen, extracted from a strain of C. posadasii isolated in northeastern Brazil, by radial immunodiffusion and Western blotting, as well as to establish its biochemical characterization. The protein antigen was initially extracted with the use of solid ammonium sulfate and characterized by 1-D electrophoresis. Subsequently, it was tested by means of double radial immunodiffusion and Western blottin...

  5. Use of Monte Carlo analysis in a risk-based prioritization of toxic constituents in house dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary L; Belleggia, Giuliana

    2017-12-01

    Many chemicals have been detected in house dust with exposures to the general public and particularly young children of potential health concern. House dust is also an indicator of chemicals present in consumer products and the built environment that may constitute a health risk. The current analysis compiles a database of recent house dust concentrations from the United States and Canada, focusing upon semi-volatile constituents. Seven constituents from the phthalate and flame retardant categories were selected for risk-based screening and prioritization: diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), a pentabrominated diphenyl ether congener (BDE-99), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP). Monte Carlo analysis was used to represent the variability in house dust concentration as well as the uncertainty in the toxicology database in the estimation of children's exposure and risk. Constituents were prioritized based upon the percentage of the distribution of risk results for cancer and non-cancer endpoints that exceeded a hazard quotient (HQ) of 1. The greatest percent HQ exceedances were for DEHP (cancer and non-cancer), BDE-99 (non-cancer) and TDCIPP (cancer). Current uses and the potential for reducing levels of these constituents in house dust are discussed. Exposure and risk for other phthalates and flame retardants in house dust may increase if they are used to substitute for these prioritized constituents. Therefore, alternative assessment and green chemistry solutions are important elements in decreasing children's exposure to chemicals of concern in the indoor environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Applied research and service activities at the University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alger, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The University Of Missouri operates MURR to provide an intense source of neutron and gamma radiation for research and applications by experimenters from its four campuses and by experimenters from other universities, government and industry. The 10 MW reactor, which has been operating an average of 155 hours per week for the past eight years, produces thermal neutron fluxes up to 6-7x10 14 n/cm 2 -s in the central flux trap and beamport source fluxes of up to 1.2x10 14 n/cm 2 -s. The mission of the reactor facility, to promote research, education and service, is the same as the overall mission of the university and therefore, applied research and service supported by industrial firms have been welcomed. The university recognized after a few years of reactor operation that in order to build utilization, it would be necessary to develop in-house research programs including people, equipment and activity so that potential users could more easily and quickly obtain the results needed. Nine research areas have been developed to create a broadly based program to support the level of activity needed to justify the cost of operating the facility. Applied research and service generate financial support for about one-half of the annual budget. The applied and service programs provide strong motivation for university/industry association in addition to the income generated. (author)

  7. Ecosystem services provided by waterbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andy J; Elmberg, Johan

    2014-02-01

    Ecosystem services are ecosystem processes that directly or indirectly benefit human well-being. There has been much recent literature identifying different services and the communities and species that provide them. This is a vital first step towards management and maintenance of these services. In this review, we specifically address the waterbirds, which play key functional roles in many aquatic ecosystems, including as predators, herbivores and vectors of seeds, invertebrates and nutrients, although these roles have often been overlooked. Waterbirds can maintain the diversity of other organisms, control pests, be effective bioindicators of ecological conditions, and act as sentinels of potential disease outbreaks. They also provide important provisioning (meat, feathers, eggs, etc.) and cultural services to both indigenous and westernized societies. We identify key gaps in the understanding of ecosystem services provided by waterbirds and areas for future research required to clarify their functional role in ecosystems and the services they provide. We consider how the economic value of these services could be calculated, giving some examples. Such valuation will provide powerful arguments for waterbird conservation. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  8. Comparison of in-house IgM and IgG ELISAs for the serodiagnosis of melioidosis in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hii, Shirley Yi Fen; Ali, Noor Azila; Ahmad, Norazah; Amran, Fairuz

    2017-11-01

    Melioidosis is an endemic infectious disease in Southeast Asia and northern Australia, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. However, the incidence rate in Malaysia is not well documented. The high mortality rate and broad range of clinical presentations require rapid and accurate diagnosis for appropriate treatment. This study compared the efficacy of in-house IgM and IgG ELISA methods using a local B. pseudomallei strain. The diagnostic accuracy of the in-house IgG ELISA was better than that of the IgM ELISA: sensitivity (IgG: 84.71 %, IgM: 76.14 %) and specificity (IgG: 93.64 %, IgM: 90.17 %); positive predictive value (IgG: 86.75 %, IgM: 79.76 %) and negative predictive value (IgG: 92.57 %, IgM: 89.66 %); likelihood ratio (LR) [IgG: 13.32, IgM: 7.75 (LR+); IgG: 0.16, IgM: 0.26 (LR-)], and was supported by the observation of the absorbance value in comparisons between culture and serology sampling. In-house IgG ELISA was shown to be useful as an early diagnostic tool for melioidosis.

  9. HIV drug resistance testing among patients failing second line antiretroviral therapy. Comparison of in-house and commercial sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimukangara, Benjamin; Varyani, Bhavini; Shamu, Tinei; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Manasa, Justen; White, Elizabeth; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Luethy, Ruedi; Katzenstein, David

    2017-05-01

    HIV genotyping is often unavailable in low and middle-income countries due to infrastructure requirements and cost. We compared genotype resistance testing in patients with virologic failure, by amplification of HIV pol gene, followed by "in-house" sequencing and commercial sequencing. Remnant plasma samples from adults and children failing second-line ART were amplified and sequenced using in-house and commercial di-deoxysequencing, and analyzed in Harare, Zimbabwe and at Stanford, U.S.A, respectively. HIV drug resistance mutations were determined using the Stanford HIV drug resistance database. Twenty-six of 28 samples were amplified and 25 were successfully genotyped. Comparison of average percent nucleotide and amino acid identities between 23 pairs sequenced in both laboratories were 99.51 (±0.56) and 99.11 (±0.95), respectively. All pairs clustered together in phylogenetic analysis. Sequencing analysis identified 6/23 pairs with mutation discordances resulting in differences in phenotype, but these did not impact future regimens. The results demonstrate our ability to produce good quality drug resistance data in-house. Despite discordant mutations in some sequence pairs, the phenotypic predictions were not clinically significant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Breaking out of the biomed box: an audit assessment and recommendations for an in-house biomedical engineering program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, David M; Jagiela, Steven; Fetters, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    In order to assess the current performance and to identify future growth opportunities of an in-house biomedical engineering (BME) program, senior management of Lehigh Valley Hospital (Allentown, Penn) engaged (in July 2001) the services of a clinical engineering consultant. Although the current in-house program was both functionally and financially sound, an independent audit had not been performed in over 4 years, and there were growing concerns by the BME staff related to the department's future leadership and long-term support from senior management. After an initial 2-month audit of the existing program, the consultant presented 41 separate recommendations for management's consideration. In order to refine and implement these recommendations, 5 separate committees were established to further evaluate a consolidated version of them, with the consultant acting as the facilitator for each group. Outcomes from each of the committees were used in the development of a formal business plan, which, upon full implementation, would not only strengthen and refine the current in-house service model but could also result in a substantial 3-year cost savings for the organization ($1,100,000 from existing operations, $500,000 in cost avoidance by in-sourcing postwarranty support of future capital equipment acquisitions). Another key outcome of the project was related to the development of a new master policy, titled the "Medical Equipment Management Program," complete with a newly defined state-of-the-art equipment scheduled inspection frequency model.

  11. DOE-HUD initiative on energy efficiency in housing: A federal partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinch, J. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Ternes, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Myers, M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-07-01

    A five-year initiative between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) demonstrated the feasibility of improving the energy efficiency of publicly-assisted housing. Twenty-seven projects and activities undertaken during 1990--95 involved research and field demonstrations, institutional and administrative changes to HUD policies and procedures, innovative financing and leveraging of federal dollars with non-federal money, and education, training, and technical assistance. With most of the 27 projects and activities completed, the two departments have initiated a five-year deployment effort, the DOE-Energy Partnerships for Affordable Homes, to achieve energy and water savings in public and assisted housing on a large scale throughout the country. A Clearinghouse for Energy Efficiency in Public and Assisted Housing managed by the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT), will offer hands-on energy assistance to housing providers to complement DOE`s assistance. This paper presents the findings of the DOE-HUD Initiative, with primary attention paid to those projects which successfully integrated energy efficiency into private and public single and multifamily housing. The paper includes examples of the publications, case-study reports, exhibits and videotapes developed during the course of the Initiative. Information on the new DOE Energy Partnerships and on the NCAT Clearinghouse is also presented. New Partnership projects with the Atlanta and Chicago Housing Authorities describe the technical assistance envisioned under the Partnership.

  12. Pesticides in house dust from urban and farmworker households in California: an observational measurement study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKone Thomas E

    2011-03-01

    the same home were strongly correlated for the majority of the frequently detected analytes (Spearman ρ = 0.70-1.00, p Conclusion Low-income children are potentially exposed to a mixture of pesticides as a result of poorer housing quality. Historical or current pesticide use indoors is likely to contribute to ongoing exposures. Agricultural pesticide use may also contribute to additional exposures to some pesticides in rural areas. Although children's non-dietary intake did not exceed U.S. EPA RfDs for select pesticides, this does not ensure that children are free of any health risks as RfDs have their own limitations, and the children may be exposed indoors via other pathways. The frequent pesticide use reported and high detection of several home-use pesticides in house dust suggests that families would benefit from integrated pest management strategies to control pests and minimize current and future exposures.

  13. Mammography dosimetry using an in-house developed polymethyl methacrylate phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.; Sharma, S. D.; Mayya, Y. S.; Chourasiya, G.

    2012-01-01

    Phantom-based measurements in mammography are well-established for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures involving equipment performance and comparisons of X-ray machines. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is among the best suitable materials for simulation of the breast. For carrying out QA/QC exercises in India, a mammographic PMMA phantom with engraved slots for keeping thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) has been developed. The radiation transmission property of the developed phantom was compared with the commercially available phantoms for verifying its suitability for mammography dosimetry. The breast entrance exposure (BEE), mean glandular dose (MGD), percentage depth dose (PDD), percentage surface dose distribution (PSDD), calibration testing of automatic exposure control (AEC) and density control function of a mammography machine were measured using this phantom. MGD was derived from the measured BEE following two different methodologies and the results were compared. The PDD and PSDD measurements were carried out using LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips. The in-house phantom was found comparable with the commercially available phantoms. The difference in the MGD values derived using two different methods were found in the range of 17.5-32.6 %. Measured depth ranges in the phantom lie between 0.32 and 0.40 cm for 75 % depth dose, 0.73 and 0.92 cm for 50 % depth dose, and 1.54 and 1.78 cm for 25 % depth dose. Higher PSDD value was observed towards chest wall edge side of the phantom, which is due to the orientation of cathode-anode axis along the chest wall to the nipple direction. Results obtained for AEC configuration testing shows that the observed mean optical density (O.D) of the phantom image was 1.59 and O.D difference for every successive increase in thickness of the phantom was within ±0.15 O.D. Under density control function testing, at -2 and -1 density settings, the variation in film image O.D was within ±0.15 O.D of the normal density

  14. eHealth provides a novel opportunity to exploit the advantages of the Nordic countries in psychiatric genetic research, building on the public health care system, biobanks, and registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-07-07

    Nordic countries have played an important role in the recent progress in psychiatric genetics, both with large well-characterized samples and expertise. The Nordic countries have research advantages due to the organization of their societies, including system of personal identifiers, national health registries with information about diseases, treatment and prescriptions, and a public health system with geographical catchment areas. For psychiatric genetic research, the large biobanks and population surveys are a unique added value. Further, the population is motivated to participate in research, and there is a trust in the institutions of the society. These factors have been important for Nordic contributions to biomedical research, and particularly psychiatric genetics. In the era of eHealth, the situation seems even more advantageous for Nordic countries. The system with public health care makes it easy to implement national measures, and most of the Nordic health care sector is already based on electronic information. The potential advantages regarding informed consent, large scale recruitment and follow-up, and longitudinal cohort studies are tremendous. New precision medicine approaches can be tested within the health care system, with an integrated approach, using large hospitals or regions of the country as a test beds. However, data protection and legal framework have to be clarified. In order to succeed, it is important to keep the people's trust, and maintain the high ethical standards and systems for secure data management. Then the full potential of the Nordic countries can be leveraged in the new era of precision medicine including psychiatric genetics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Applications of UAV imagery for agricultural and environmental research at the USDA Southeast Watershed Research Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ARS is the USDA's in-house scientific research agency, whose mission is to conduct research to "develop and transfer solutions to agricultural problems of high national priority..." This includes enhancing the natural resource base and the environment, a dimension of particular relevance to the ...

  16. Statistics Canada's Definition and Classification of Postsecondary and Adult Education Providers in Canada. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 071

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Larry

    2009-01-01

    This document outlines the definitions and the typology now used by Statistics Canada's Centre for Education Statistics to identify, classify and delineate the universities, colleges and other providers of postsecondary and adult education in Canada for which basic enrollments, graduates, professors and finance statistics are produced. These new…

  17. Users of Virtual Reference Are More Satisfied with the Service They Receive than the Providers of that Service Think They Are. A Review of: Hansen, D., Johnson, M., Norton, E., & McDonough, A. (2009. Virtual provider pessimism: Analysing instant messaging reference encounters with the pair perception comparison method. Information Research, 14(4. Retrieved from http://informationr.net/ir/14-4/ paper416.html

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol D. Howe

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To examine provider pessimism by comparing user and provider perception of the same instant messaging reference transaction.Design – Instant messaging users and providers completed post-reference transaction surveys which were analyzed using the pair perception comparison method.Setting – A large research university in the United States.Subjects – Two hundred undergraduate journalism students (users of the instant messaging service and 51 Master of Library Science (MLS students enrolled in a reference services class (providers of the instant messaging service.Methods – The authors created a research help webpage from which users could access the instant messaging service. Prior to service availability, providers received reference instruction and demonstrated reference aptitude through in-class activities. The authors briefed providers on the project and provided a wiki containing resources they might need during reference transactions. Providers worked in two-hour shifts, and two providers were available during each shift. The service was available for one week while potential users completed a journalism assignment. The authors asked both users and providers of the service to complete an online survey at the conclusion of the reference transaction. Users and providers completed different surveys, but both types included the following four elements: questions to aid in matching a user to a provider; questions about satisfaction with the service based on guidelines put forth by the Reference and User Services Association (RUSA; open-ended questions about the reference transaction; and questions regarding demographics, prior reference service usage, and knowledge of instant messaging. There were 55 valid reference transactions, and from those, the authors matched 26 pairs of user and provider surveys. The authors analyzed paired surveys to (a compare the user’s perception of the reference transaction with the provider

  18. Project Quality Assurance Plan for research and development services provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of the Westinghouse Materials Company of Ohio Operable Unit 1 Stabilization Development and Treatability Studies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M.

    1991-05-01

    This Project Quality Assurance Plan (PQAP) sets forth the quality assurance (QA) requirements that are applied to those elements of the Westinghouse Materials Company of Ohio (WMCO) Operable Unit 1 support at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) project that involve research and development (R D) performed at ORNL. This is in compliance with the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B, ANSI/ASME NQA-1, as specified by Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Order 5700.6B. For this application, NQA-1 is the core QA Program requirements document. QA policy, normally found in the requirements document, is contained herein. The requirements of this PQAP apply to project activities that affect the quality and reliability/credibility of research, development, and investigative data and documentation. These activities include the functions of attaining quality objectives and assuring that an appropriate QA program scope is established. The scope of activities affecting quality includes organization; personnel training and qualifications; design control; procurement; material handling and storage; operating procedures; testing, surveillance, and auditing; R D investigative activities and documentation; deficiencies; corrective actions; and QA record keeping. 12 figs.

  19. Ecosystem services provided by bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Thomas H; Braun de Torrez, Elizabeth; Bauer, Dana; Lobova, Tatyana; Fleming, Theodore H

    2011-03-01

    Ecosystem services are the benefits obtained from the environment that increase human well-being. Economic valuation is conducted by measuring the human welfare gains or losses that result from changes in the provision of ecosystem services. Bats have long been postulated to play important roles in arthropod suppression, seed dispersal, and pollination; however, only recently have these ecosystem services begun to be thoroughly evaluated. Here, we review the available literature on the ecological and economic impact of ecosystem services provided by bats. We describe dietary preferences, foraging behaviors, adaptations, and phylogenetic histories of insectivorous, frugivorous, and nectarivorous bats worldwide in the context of their respective ecosystem services. For each trophic ensemble, we discuss the consequences of these ecological interactions on both natural and agricultural systems. Throughout this review, we highlight the research needed to fully determine the ecosystem services in question. Finally, we provide a comprehensive overview of economic valuation of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, few studies estimating the economic value of ecosystem services provided by bats have been conducted to date; however, we outline a framework that could be used in future studies to more fully address this question. Consumptive goods provided by bats, such as food and guano, are often exchanged in markets where the market price indicates an economic value. Nonmarket valuation methods can be used to estimate the economic value of nonconsumptive services, including inputs to agricultural production and recreational activities. Information on the ecological and economic value of ecosystem services provided by bats can be used to inform decisions regarding where and when to protect or restore bat populations and associated habitats, as well as to improve public perception of bats. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. New techniques in television to provide research in three-dimensional real-time or near real-time imagery and reduced cost systems for teleconferencing and educational uses, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, Y. H.; Claspy, P.; Allen, J. E.; Merat, F.

    1979-01-01

    The results are presented of a continuing research and development program the objective of which is to develop a reduced bandwidth television system and a technique for television transmission of holograms. The result of the former is a variable frame rate television system, the operation of which was demonstrated for both black-and-white and color signals. This system employs a novel combination of the inexpensive mass storage capacity of a magnetic disc with the reliability of a digital system for time expansion and compression. Also reported are the results of a theoretical analysis and preliminary feasibility experiment of an innovative system for television transmission of holograms using relatively conventional TV equipment along with a phase modulated reference wave for production of the original interference pattern.