WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing home visits

  1. Factors associated with end-of-life by home-visit nursing-care providers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Niimura, Junko; Nishida, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Home-visit nursing-care services in Japan are expected to provide home hospice services for older patients with non-cancer diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine factors that contribute to the provision of end-of-life care by home-visit nursing-care providers in Japan. The present retrospective study was carried out using nationally representative cross-sectional data from the 2007, 2010, and 2013 Survey of Institutions and Establishments for Long-Term Care. A total of 138 008 randomly sampled home-visit nursing-care service users were included in this analysis. End-of-life care (study outcome) was defined as the provision of nursing-care within the last month of life. Of the 138 008 patients at home, 2280 (1.7%) received home-based nursing care within the last month of life, and end-of-life care was offered primarily to cancer patients (n = 1651; 72.4%). After accounting for patient characteristics, patients were more likely to receive end-of-life care when they used home-visit nursing-care providers that had a greater number of nursing staff or were located in a region with fewer hospital beds. Among home-visit nursing-care providers, the nursing staff ratio and the availability of hospital beds were related to the provision of end-of-life care. Home-visit nursing-care providers should establish specialist hospice care teams with enhanced staffing ratios to allow for the adequate provision of home-based end-of-life care. A community-based network between home-visit nursing-care providers and hospitals should also be established to attain an integrated end-of-life care system for elderly populations in regions with more hospital beds. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 991-998. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Home Visiting in Two Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorey, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The home visiting component of early childhood education programs provides an important portal through which to observe family interactions as well as gain insights about the ethnotheories of the home visitor. Home visits were videotaped in the United States and in Turkey to analyze training and program effectiveness. One striking feature of this…

  3. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes.

  4. Parent Involvement in Early Childhood Home Visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfmacher, Jon; Green, Beth; Staerkel, Fredi; Peterson, Carla; Cook, Gina; Roggman, Lori; Faldowski, Richard A.; Schiffman, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    This review provides an overview of an important aspect of early childhood home visiting research: understanding how parents are involved in program services and activities. Involvement is defined as the process of the parent connecting with and using the services of a program to the best of the client's and the program's ability. The term…

  5. Home visits by neighborhood Mentor Mothers provide timely recovery from childhood malnutrition in South Africa: results from a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    le Roux, Ingrid M; le Roux, Karl; Comulada, W Scott; Greco, Erin M; Desmond, Katherine A; Mbewu, Nokwanele; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    .... Mentor Mothers were trained to conduct home visits. Mentor Mothers went from house to house in assigned neighborhoods, weighed children age 5 and younger, and recruited mother-child dyads where there was an underweight child...

  6. Digital screen visits in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarakit, Mohamad; Nors Hansen, Louise; Evron, Lotte Orr

    2017-01-01

    The use of digital technology is increasing in home care services in Denmark. In the municipality of Copenhagen digital screens visits are being used as an alternative version of the traditional (physical) home visit to a selected population to increase quality and efficiency in the home care...

  7. A Qualitative Evaluation of Engagement and Attrition in a Nurse Home Visiting Program: From the Participant and Provider Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Lana O; Ridings, Leigh E; Smith, Tyler J; Shields, Jennifer D; Silovsky, Jane F; Beasley, William; Bard, David

    2017-10-11

    Beginning parenting programs in the prenatal and early postnatal periods have a large potential for impact on later child and maternal outcomes. Home-based parenting programs, such as the Nurse Family Partnership (NFP), have been established to help address this need. Program reach and impact is dependent on successful engagement of expecting mothers with significant risks; however, NFP attrition rates remain high. The current study qualitatively examined engagement and attrition from the perspectives of NFP nurses and mothers in order to identify mechanisms that enhance service engagement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in focus groups composed of either engaged (27 total mothers) or unengaged (15 total mothers) mothers from the NFP program. NFP nurses (25 total nurses) were recruited for individual semi-structured interviews. Results suggest that understanding engagement in the NFP program requires addressing both initial and sustained engagement. Themes associated with enhanced initial engagement include nurse characteristics (e.g., flexible, supportive, caring) and establishment of a solid nurse-family relationship founded on these characteristics. Factors impacting sustained engagement include nurse characteristics, provision of educational materials on child development, individualized services for families, and available family support. Identified barriers to completing services include competing demands and lack of support. Findings of this study have direct relevance for workforce planning, including hiring and training through integrating results regarding effective nurse characteristics. Additional program supports to enhance parent engagement may be implemented across home-based parenting programs in light of the current study's findings.

  8. Assessing Quality in Home Visiting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfmacher, Jon; Laszewski, Audrey; Sparr, Mariel; Hammel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Defining quality and designing a quality assessment measure for home visitation programs is a complex and multifaceted undertaking. This article summarizes the process used to create the Home Visitation Program Quality Rating Tool (HVPQRT) and identifies next steps for its development. The HVPQRT measures both structural and dynamic features of…

  9. Medicare Home Visit Program Associated With Fewer Hospital And Nursing Home Admissions, Increased Office Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattke, Soeren; Han, Dan; Wilks, Asa; Sloss, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Clinical home visit programs for Medicare beneficiaries are a promising approach to supporting aging in place and avoiding high-cost institutional care. Such programs combine a comprehensive geriatric assessment by a clinician during a home visit with referrals to community providers and health plan resources to address uncovered issues. We evaluated UnitedHealth Group's HouseCalls program, which has been offered to Medicare Advantage plan members in Arkansas, Georgia, Missouri, South Carolina, and Texas since January 2008. We found that, compared to non-HouseCalls Medicare Advantage plan members and fee-for-service beneficiaries, HouseCalls participants had reductions in admissions to hospitals (1 percent and 14 percent, respectively) and lower risk of nursing home admission (0.67 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively). In addition, participants' numbers of office visits--chiefly to specialists--increased 2-6 percent (depending on the comparison group). The program's effects on emergency department use were mixed. These results indicate that a thorough home-based clinical assessment of a member's health and home environment combined with referral services can support aging in place, promote physician office visits, and preempt costly institutional care. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  10. Digital screen visits in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarakit, Mohamad; Nors Hansen, Louise; Evron, Lotte Orr

    2017-01-01

    services. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate how the intercultural communication is used during digital home visits in a Copenhagen community when caring for older patients with a minority ethnic background. Methods: document analysis teaching material including two video cases combined...... home visits due to expected communication difficulties. Included patients with a minority ethnic background are younger, relative independent from the start point and drop out before completed care plan. In addition, the screen visit seems to appeal to some patients with a minority ethnic background....... Surprisingly, we found that screen visits might help some patients with major language communication difficult ies to care for their health in better ways than they were able to when helped though a traditional home visit. It is our hope that this study will contribute with new knowledge to promote cultural...

  11. Teaching about home visits to university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ribeiro Borges

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the scientific evidence available in the literature on the teaching strategies used in the home visit. Methods: it is an integrative literature review in the Nursing Database, Scientific Electronic Library Online, Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences, and Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature. Results: six articles with evidence strength level VI were included. Different strategies and teaching methods related to the home visit activity were found, such as socio-drama, active methodologies and curricular practices in the health services network. Experiencing social reality was a potentiality, and there was lack of planning of the visit as weaknesses found by the students. Conclusion: the main teaching strategy for university students in the health area is the early insertion for the direct monitoring of families through home visits.

  12. How Home Visits Transformed My Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yaafouri-Kreuzer, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Recalling her year as the "English-speaking unicorn" in a class of refugee and immigrant students representing a myriad of languages, the author tells how visiting students at their homes was the strategy that most helped her help students. From discovering that a betel-nut habit was causing one student's hyperactivity to seeing another…

  13. Preventive home visits to older home-dwelling people in Denmark: are invitational procedures of importance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, A; Vass, M; Avlund, K

    2010-01-01

    Since 1998 all municipalities in Denmark have been required by law to offer two annual preventive home visits to all home-dwelling citizens aged 75 or over. The influence of invitational procedures on acceptance rates has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to describe and investigate...... whether different invitational procedures were associated with first preventive home visit acceptance rates. The study was based on secondary analyses of data from the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits. Data were collected from 1998 to 2002. Of the 4060 participants in the main study......, 3245 reported receiving an offer for an identifiable preventive home visit, of whom 2399 (73.9%) provided complete data for the main analyses in the present study. Invitational procedures were categorised as: (1) a letter with a proposed date and time for the visit, (2) a visitor telephone call, and (3...

  14. Using quality improvement to promote implementation and increase well child visits in home visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Neera K; Ammerman, Robert T; Massie, Julie A; Clark, Margaret; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2016-03-01

    A key goal of home visiting is to connect children with medical homes through anticipatory guidance regarding recommended well child care (WCC). Substantial barriers to WCC among low socioeconomic families can limit achievement of this outcome. Quality improvement strategies have been widely adopted in healthcare but only recently implemented in home visiting to achieve program outcomes. The objective of this initiative was to increase the percentage of infants enrolled in home visiting who completed at least 3 recommended WCC visits in the first 6 months of life within a large, multi-model program comprised of 11 sites. A series of 33 quality improvement cycles were conducted at 3 sites involving 18 home visitors and 139 families with infants in the target age range. These were deployed sequentially, and changes within and across sites were monitored using trend charts over time. Adopted strategies were then implemented program-wide. Initiatives focused on staff training in WCC recommendations, data collection processes, monthly family tracking reports, and enhanced communication with primary care offices. Data were shared in iterative sessions to identify methods for improving adherence. Wide baseline variability across sites was observed, with the percentage of infants with recommended care ranging from 35% to 83%. Over the project timeline, the percentage of infants receiving at least 3 WCC visits in the first 6 months increased from 58% to 86%. Quality improvement within home visiting can be used to improve WCC adherence and provides an example of maximizing implementation of home visiting interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Making home visits: Creativity and the embodied practices of home visiting in social work and child protection

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Although the home is the most common place where social work goes on, research has largely ignored the home visit. Drawing on a participant observation study of child protection work, this article reveals the complex hidden practices of social work on home visits. It is argued that home visits do not simply involve an extension of the social work organisation, policies and procedures into the domestic domain but the home constitutes a distinct sphere of practice and experience in its own righ...

  16. [Urgency of GP Emergency Visits to Nursing Homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckwenn, Markus; Ahrens, Sabrina; Schnakenberg, Rieke; Weckbecker, Klaus

    2017-10-01

     Until now there are no uniform criteria or standards for classification of emergency home visits. Due to demographic changes, especially urgent visits to patients in nursing homes will increase. In the URGENT study, physicians and nurses rated the urgency of emergency visits to nursing home patients before and after the visit. This should help to see how many emergency house calls had been classified as less urgent and how often the assessment of physicians and nurses were in agreement with each other. In a prospective observational study, home visits were analyzed, which were classified as urgent at request by the physicians. After performing home visits, the physicians and the responsible nurse classified again the urgency of the home visit from 0 (not urgent) to 10 (highly urgent). In addition, the times of the home visit requests and the time for carrying out the visits, as well the reasons for the home visits were documented. A total of 75 urgent home visits were documented. The patients were on average 82 years old (65% female). The home visits were done on average 2.5 h after request. In retrospect, the physicians evaluated emergency home visits on average less urgent (5.7±2.7) than the nurses (7.2±2.2). In 20% of emergency home visits (15 cases), physicians and nurses agreed as to their being less urgent (0-5). Our data show that in the absence of a standardized urgent assessment scheme, a significant proportion of home visits is misclassified. In further studies it has to be investigated if a uniform score for urgent assessment could reduce the proportion of incorrect medical response operations so that the efficiency of emergency care for nursing home patients can be improved. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Assessing Home Visit Quality: Dosage, Content, and Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsell, Diane; Boller, Kimberly; Hallgren, Kristin; Mraz Esposito, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Home visiting is a service delivery strategy, but the content and focus of home visiting, as well as the characteristics of home visitors and the targeted outcomes, vary across program models. Understanding what is common, what is unique, and what the targets of change are for a range of models can support identification of key factors that make…

  18. The comparison of the effects of education provided by nurses on the quality of life in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) in usual and home-visit cares in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehralian, Hossein; Salehi, Shahriar; Moghaddasi, Jafar; Amiri, Masoud; Rafiei, Hossin

    2014-04-11

    Quality of life (QOL) can be considered as a quality indicator of health care systems and nurses can play an important role to improve QOL in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of education provided by nurses on the QOL in patients with CHF in home-visit care compared to usual care. In a single-blind randomized controlled trial conducted from September 2011 to June 2012, 110 patients with CHF were randomly assigned into two groups. While patients in group I were received usual education at the time of hospital discharge, patients in Group II, in addition to usual education, were received special education regards to their illness by nurses who visited patients in their homes. The 36-item short-form (SF-36) questionnaire was used to evaluate the patient's QOL at the time of discharge and also six months after hospital discharge. At the time of hospital discharge, mean score of all 8 sub-score of SF-36 questionnaire was 63.4±7.8 in patients of group II and 61.1±6.4 in patients of group I, respectively (P> 0.05). QOL was decreased in group I and increased in group II compared to the time of hospital discharge. After six months, mean score of QOL was higher in group II than in group I. QOL of patients with CHF were decreased after hospital discharge. Education provided by nurses in home-visit care could improve the QOL in patients with CHF, based on the findings of this study.

  19. Optimal procedures for home visits — A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Filipe; Fernandes, Florbela P.; Pereira, Ana I.; Fernandes, Adília

    2017-07-01

    In Portugal the population is ageing. Therefore, the provision of health care at patients' home is becoming an important social and health area; this health service is provided by professional teams (usually composed by nurses) of the Health Centers. Nowadays, the scheduling of the visits is made manually. The proposal of this work is to do the scheduling automatically in order to minimize the overall time spent by the professional teams in the visiting activity. In this work the genetic algorithm was used to solve the optimization problem. Some numerical results are presented.

  20. Home Visiting Family Support Programs: Benefits of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Visiting Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The federally funded, locally administered Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program sponsors family support programs that are often called "home visiting" because they take place in the homes of at-risk families. These families often lack support, experience, and knowledge of basic parenting skills. Because children…

  1. Predictors of Treatment Response in Depressed Mothers Receiving In-Home Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy and Concurrent Home Visiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Peugh, James L.; Putnam, Frank W.; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2012-01-01

    Home visiting is a child abuse prevention strategy that seeks to optimize child development by providing mothers with support, training, and parenting information. Research has consistently found high rates of depression in mothers participating in home visiting programs and low levels of obtaining mental health treatment in the community.…

  2. Home Visiting Processes: Relations with Family Characteristics and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carla A.; Roggman, Lori A.; Green, Beth; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel; Korfmacher, Jon; McKelvey, Lorraine; Zhang, Dong; Atwater, Jane B.

    2013-01-01

    Variations in dosage, content, and family engagement with Early Head Start (EHS) home visiting services were examined for families participating in the EHS Research and Evaluation Project. Families were grouped by characteristics of maternal age, maternal ethnicity, and level of family risk. All home visiting variables were related differentially…

  3. Home Visiting Service Delivery and Outcomes for Depressed Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Elizabeth; Crowne, Sarah Shea; Burrell, Lori; Duggan, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Maternal depression influences home visiting engagement and outcomes. This article describes research which found that depressed mothers may be more likely to enroll in home visiting but are less likely to participate as long or as frequently as intended by programs. The authors found evidence of moderation (i.e., changes in the direction and…

  4. A Review of Best Practice Home Visitation Interventions for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Review of Best Practice Home Visitation Interventions for Childhood Injury Reduction. ... African Safety Promotion: A Journal of Injury and Violence Prevention ... This literature review identifies a selection of good practices associated with recent home visitation interventions reported to reduce childhood injury. This article ...

  5. Health Visiting in the Infant's Home in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mary; Wagner, Marsden G.

    A program of infant home visiting was established in Denmark as a result of concern about the rate of infant mortality. The objectives, problems, and promise of the infant Home Visiting Program are summarized and evaluated in terms of their implications for the United States. Although the results of the program have been overwhelmingly favorable…

  6. Preventive home visits to elderly people in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, C; Vass, M

    2005-01-01

    During the last 20 years several randomised controlled trials have been published about preventive home visits to old people, but the benefit of the visits is still controversial and under debate. Based on a state law from the Ministry of Social Affairs in 1998, the municipalities in Denmark......, manageable and ongoing educational intervention towards professionals working with preventive home visits is feasible and improves older people's functional mobility....

  7. Facilitating Mental Health Intervention in Home Visiting: Learning From Content, Context, Clients, and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sarah Kye; Gray, Lisa A.; El-Khoury, Dalia

    2014-01-01

    Home visiting programs recognize the importance of promoting women's mental health during and around the time of pregnancy. However, the process of planning and integrating mental health promotion and intervention into the home visiting setting can seem daunting. Using examples and lessons learned from research and practice, the authors provide a…

  8. Program home visit Costa Rica's health system: guidelines for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Solís Cordero

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Home visit is the main strategy of primary care by bringing health services to the homes and workplaces of people, which allows knowing the needs of the population firsthand. Thus, home visit by the ATAP represents the first contact of the individual, family and community with the health system, with significant benefits both individually and collectively. This research responds to the need to identify the elements that the home visiting program needs to improve modify or replace in order to maximize the provision of this service.Method. It is a qualitative, observational analytic study. Data were collected through documentary research, key informant interviews and focus group. The analysis was performed from the grounded theory.Results. The main results showed the existence of elements at the level of the health system, home visiting program and the figure of the ATAP that should be reviewed, modified or replaced to the home visit, thus it has bigger and better results for the population and the health system.Conclusion. The Home Visiting Program is strength of the Costa Rican health system to address health inequities. However, it is imperative to make decisions and implementation of actions that promote the improvement and increased results of the home visit at a family and community level.

  9. Collaborative relationship in preventive home visits to older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yukari; Vass, Mikkel; Hvas, Lotte

    2011-01-01

    To describe what characterizes preventive home visits with collaborative relationships among non-disabled home-dwelling older people in Japan. Background. Preventive home visits have the potential to result in improved health outcomes among older people. Collaboration, mutual understanding...... and trust between visitor and the visited person seem to work as a vehicle, but little is known about which part of the encounters contributes to a collaborative relationship. Methods. We performed a retrospective qualitative analysis of visiting records written by preventive home visitors immediately after...... on documented knowledge in health and social domains combined with an overall 'caring approach' and (iii) practical actions which imply an 'immediate concrete response to identified needs or problems' and 'individually tailored advice' to suit the older person's daily life. Conclusions. Preventive home visitor...

  10. Piloting a Statewide Home Visiting Quality Improvement Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Neera K; Rome, Martha G; Massie, Julie A; Mangeot, Colleen; Ammerman, Robert T; Breckenridge, Jye; Lannon, Carole M

    2017-02-01

    Objective To pilot test a statewide quality improvement (QI) collaborative learning network of home visiting agencies. Methods Project timeline was June 2014-May 2015. Overall objectives of this 8-month initiative were to assess the use of collaborative QI to engage local home visiting agencies and to test the use of statewide home visiting data for QI. Outcome measures were mean time from referral to first home visit, percentage of families with at least three home visits per month, mean duration of participation, and exit rate among infants home visit was 16.7 days, and 9.4% of families received ≥3 visits per month. Mean participation was 11.7 months, and the exit rate among infants <6 months old was 6.1%. Agencies tested several strategies, including parent commitment agreements, expedited contact after referral, and Facebook forums. No shift in outcome measures was observed, but agencies tracked intermediate process changes using internal site-specific data. Agencies reported positive experiences from participation including more frequent and structured staff meetings. Conclusions for Practice Within a pilot QI learning network, agencies tested and measured changes using statewide and internal data. Potential next steps are to develop and test new metrics with current pilot sites and a larger collaborative.

  11. Providing Cardiology Care in Rural Areas Through Visiting Consultant Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruca, Thomas S; Pyo, Tae-Hyung; Nelson, Gregory C

    2016-06-30

    Workforce experts predict a future shortage of cardiologists that is expected to impact rural areas more severely than urban areas. However, there is little research on how rural patients are currently served through clinical outreach. This study examines the impact of cardiology outreach in Iowa, a state with a large rural population, on participating cardiologists and on patient access. Outreach clinics are tracked annually in the Office of Statewide Clinical Education Programs Visiting Medical Consultant Database (University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine). Data from 2014 were analyzed. In 2014, an estimated 5460 visiting consultant clinic days were provided in 96 predominantly rural cities by 167 cardiologists from Iowa and adjoining states. Forty-five percent of Iowa cardiologists participated in rural outreach. Visiting cardiologists from Iowa and adjoining states drive an estimated 45 000 miles per month. Because of monthly outreach clinics, the average driving time to the nearest cardiologist falls from 42.2±20.0 to 14.7±11.0 minutes for rural Iowans. Cardiology outreach improves geographic access to office-based cardiology care for more than 1 million Iowans out of a total population of 3 million. Direct travel costs and opportunity costs associated with physician travel are estimated to be more than $2.1 million per year. Cardiologists in Iowa and adjoining states have expanded access to office-based cardiology care from 18 to 89 of the 99 counties in Iowa. In these 71 counties without a full-time cardiologist, visiting consultant clinics can accommodate more than 50% of office visits in the patients' home county. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Making home visits: Creativity and the embodied practices of home visiting in social work and child protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Harry

    2018-01-01

    Although the home is the most common place where social work goes on, research has largely ignored the home visit. Drawing on a participant observation study of child protection work, this article reveals the complex hidden practices of social work on home visits. It is argued that home visits do not simply involve an extension of the social work organisation, policies and procedures into the domestic domain but the home constitutes a distinct sphere of practice and experience in its own right. Home visiting is shown to be a deeply embodied practice in which all the senses and emotions come into play and movement is central. Through the use of creativity, craft and improvisation practitioners 'make' home visits by skilfully enacting a series of transitions from the office to the doorstep, and into the house, where complex interactions with service users and their domestic space and other objects occur. Looking around houses and working with children alone in their bedrooms were common. Drawing upon sensory and mobile methods and a material culture studies approach, the article shows how effective practice was sometimes blocked and also how the home was skilfully negotiated, moved around and creatively used by social workers to ensure parents were engaged with and children seen, held and kept safe.

  13. Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

  14. Nursery Home Visits: Rhetoric and Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The importance of home-school relationships between parents and practitioners in early childhood settings is widely accepted. This article discusses the effects of the level of involvement and the nature of practitioner-parent relationships in early years settings in England on the basis of a two part study that examined parents' experience of…

  15. Gaining information about home visits in primary care: methodological issues from a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Karen; Taché, Stephanie; Klement, Andreas; Fankhaenel, Thomas; Bojanowski, Stefan; Bergmann, Antje

    2014-05-06

    Home visits are part of general practice work in Germany. Within the context of an expanding elderly population and a decreasing number of general practitioner (GPs), open questions regarding the organisation and adequacy of GPs' care in immobile patients remain. To answer these questions, we will conduct a representative primary data collection concerning contents and organisation of GPs' home visits in 2014. Because this study will require considerable efforts for documentation and thus substantial involvement by participating GPs, we conducted a pilot study to see whether such a study design was feasible. We used a mixed methods design with two study arms in a sample of teaching GPs of the University Halle. The quantitative arm evaluates participating GPs and documentation of home visits. The qualitative arm focuses on reasons for non-participation for GPs who declined to take part in the pilot study. Our study confirms previously observed reasons for non-response of GPs in the particular setting of home visits including lack of time and/or interest. In contrast to previous findings, monetary incentives were not crucial for GPs participation. Several factors influenced the documentation rate of home visits and resulted in a discrepancy between the numbers of home visits documented versus those actually conducted. The most frequently reported problem was related to obtaining patient consent, especially when patients were unable to provide informed consent due to cognitive deficits. The results of our feasibility study provide evidence for improvement of the study design and study instruments to effectively conduct a documentation-intensive study of GPs doing home visits. Improvement of instructions and questionnaire regarding time variables and assessment of the need for home visits will be carried out to increase the reliability of future data. One particularly important methodological issue yet to be resolved is how to increase the representativeness of home

  16. Home visits: why do rates vary so much?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stewart, P

    2012-03-01

    Data including information on patient age, gender, who initiated the visit and call classification was collected during office hours from 12 G.P. rural teaching practices with a combined GMS patient population of 24,720, over a 2 month period. There were a total of 603 home visits, giving an annual visiting rate of 143\\/1000. Visiting rates varied between practices from 45 to 305\\/1000 per year. When high visiting practices (>210\\/1000\\/year) were compared to low visiting rate practices (>90\\/1000\\/year), patients tended to be older (79.7 v. 74.5 years) and calls were 12 times more likely to be doctor initiated (16.6% v. 1.4%) or classified as routine( 50.7% v. 44.9%). The variation between practices was related in part to patient age but appears largely due to differences in doctor home visiting behaviour. There are no recent figures on home visiting in Ireland.

  17. Home assessments in geriatrics revisited: an audit of a routine home visiting service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C S; Drewitt, D J; Lewis, S J

    1991-12-01

    Routine home visiting is a luxury not afforded to other medical specialties. The practice of routine home assessment visiting in geriatric medicine was evaluated in a prospective study of 110 consecutive referrals to determine whether; the response to general practitioners referrals could be predicted from the information given at the time of referral and; to identify where home visiting identified additional information of value in directing services more appropriately. Requests for admission were accurately predicted in 86-96% of cases by the visiting and a control doctor respectively. Additional information of value in directing services and patient management was gained from the home visit in 30% of admissions, 58% of day hospital cases and 80% of outpatients. It is possible to predict the outcome of home visits although implementation of such predictions without direct communication with general practitioners would result in a small number of unnecessary admissions and referrals to day hospital services.

  18. An ethical analysis of a home visit case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibernat, Artur Dalfó; Vidal, Jessica Rosell; Pibernat, Enric Dalfó; Rodríguez, Francisco Javier Pelegrina; Colomer, Gerard; Cid, Maria Feijoo

    2017-12-01

    This article will explore a clinical case study of a home visit carried out by the case manager nurse. In this case, we will discuss the dilemma of finding the balance between autonomy and beneficence from the perspective of principlist ethics, virtue ethics and the 'ethics of care'. The main conflict in this case study deals with all proposals are unsuitable and it is not necessary for a nurse to pay him a home visit, whereas for the healthcare system it is considered necessary. We could conclude that, during the home visit, the case manager aspires to achieve excellence, and throughout his clinical relationship with Francesc, searches for a series of virtues, respecting certain fundamental principles. In this way, the case managers ensure that Jaume's care is more humanised. The case has been anonymised and confidentiality maintained.

  19. A clinical trial of in-home CBT for depressed mothers in home visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Putnam, Frank W; Altaye, Mekibib; Stevens, Jack; Teeters, Angelique R; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2013-09-01

    Despite negative outcomes for depressed mothers and their children, no treatment specifically designed to address maternal depression in the context of home visitation has emerged. In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT) is an adapted treatment that is delivered in the home, focuses on the needs of new mothers, and leverages ongoing home visiting to optimize engagement and outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of IH-CBT using a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 93 new mothers in a home visiting program. Mothers with major depressive disorder identified at 3months postpartum were randomized into IH-CBT and ongoing home visitation (n=47) or standard home visitation (SHV; n=46) in which they received home visitation alone and could obtain treatment in the community. Depression was measured at pre- and posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up using interviews, clinician ratings, and self-report. Mothers receiving IH-CBT showed improvements in all indicators of depression relative to the SHV condition and these gains were maintained at follow-up. For example, 70.7% of mothers receiving IH-CBT were no longer depressed at posttreatment in terms of meeting criteria for major depressive disorder compared to 30.2% in the SHV group. These findings suggest that IH-CBT is an efficacious treatment for depressed mothers in home visitation programs. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A Clinical Trial of In-Home CBT for Depressed Mothers in Home Visitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Putnam, Frank W.; Altaye, Mekibib; Stevens, Jack; Teeters, Angelique R.; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite negative outcomes for depressed mothers and their children, no treatment specifically designed to address maternal depression in the context of home visitation has emerged. In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT) is an adapted treatment that is delivered in the home, focuses on the needs of new mothers, and leverages ongoing home visiting to optimize engagement and outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of IH-CBT using a randomized clinical trial. Subjects were 93 new mothers in a home visiting program. Mothers with major depressive disorder identified at 3 months postpartum were randomized into IH-CBT and ongoing home visitation (n=47) or standard home visitation (SHV; n=46) in which they received home visitation alone and could obtain treatment in the community. Depression was measured at pre- and posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up using interviews, clinician ratings, and self-report. Mothers receiving IH-CBT showed improvements in all indicators of depression relative to the SHV condition and these gains were maintained at follow-up. For example, 70.7% of mothers receiving IH-CBT were no longer depressed at posttreatment in terms of meeting criteria for major depressive disorder compared to 30.2% in the SHV group. These findings suggest that IH-CBT is an efficacious treatment for depressed mothers in home visitation programs. PMID:23768664

  1. [Role of Visiting Nursing Care in Japanese Home Healthcare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sang-Ju

    2018-02-01

    Taiwan's rapidly aging society is expected to make it a super-aged society in 2026. By 2060, people aged 65 or older will account for 40% of the population, a ratio that will approximate that in Japan. In Japan, the elderly population was 27.3% in 2016. By 2025, when the baby-boomers become 75 years old in Japan, issues of long-term care and end-of-life care will be more important and challenging. Since 1976, more Japanese have died in hospital settings than in home settings. Although the percentage of people dying at home increased slightly to 12.7% in 2016, after the recent introduction and promotion of home healthcare, Japan will face a significant challenge to deal with the healthcare 'tsunami' of high natural death rates, which is expected to impose a heavy death burdened on society by 2040, when the death rate is expected to reach 1,670,000/year. Therefore, the Japanese authorities have begun to promote the Community-based Integrated Care System, in which home healthcare and visiting nursing play crucial roles. This article summarizes the historical trend and current situation of visiting nursing in Japan. Japan uses a hybrid payment system for visiting nursing that is financially supported both through private medical insurance policies and Kaigo insurance (Japanese long-term care insurance). The total of 8613 visiting nursing stations that were active in community settings in 2016 cooperated with 14,000 support clinics for home healthcare and cared for 570,000 patients in home settings. We believe that visiting nursing will play an important role in home healthcare in Taiwan in the future.

  2. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    . Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. AIM: The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health...... care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. METHOD: Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge...

  3. Perception of premature infants' mothers on home visits before and after hospital discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Cristine dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To understand the meaning of home visits by neonatal nurses for mothers of premature babies. Methodology. A qualitative study was conducted with 21 mothers of families participating in a project that supported families of premature infants, born at a university hospital in the city of Londrina, Brazil. Data collection was conducted through semi-structured individual interviews, using a form with the identification data of mothers and an interview script. Results. Three themes were revealed: the home visit as a support to the family, individualized home care, feeling cared for and supported in performing the baby's care. Conclusion. The home visit from the perspective of longitudinal care was a powerful resource that promoted the link between families and nurses, decreasing doubts, fears and anxieties of the mother. In addition, home care was provided and adherence to care and treatment was encouraged.

  4. Preference for dentist's home visits among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komulainen, Kaija; Ylöstalo, Pekka; Syrjälä, Anna-Maija; Ruoppi, Piia; Knuuttila, Matti; Sulkava, Raimo; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2012-02-01

    To investigate factors associated with older people's preference for a dentist's home visit. This is a report on 321 home-dwelling participants (mean age 81.6) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study, conducted in 2004-2005 in the city of Kuopio in eastern Finland. The information about sociodemographic and general health-related factors and the use of social and health services was collected by two study nurses using a structured interview. Each study subject was given a clinical oral examination and an interview about oral health and the use of dental health care services by one of two dentists. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Of the study subjects, 25.9% preferred a dentist's home visit. The preference for choosing a dentist's home visit was associated with a low score (≤24) in the Mini-Mental State Examination, OR 6.1 (CI: 2.9-13.6), and a low score (Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, OR 8.0 (CI: 3.6-18.6). It was also associated with living alone, OR 5.9 (CI: 2.7-13.0), and high use of home care services, OR 9.3 (CI: 4.6-19.0). The findings of this study emphasize the need to organize dentists' home visits in order to increase equality in the use of dental health care services among the older people with disabilities. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Home Visiting and Use of Infant Health Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, M Rebecca; Cannon, Jill S

    2017-01-01

    Evaluations of home visiting models have shown that they can reduce children's health care use in the first year of life. Models that exclusively use nurses as home visitors may cost more and be infeasible given nursing shortages in some locations. The goal of this study was to test whether a universal home visiting model employing a nurse-parent educator team as home visitors reduces health care use in the first year of life. This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of an intensive home visiting program delivered in homes of primary caregivers and their first-born children in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Intention-to-treat and contamination-adjusted intention-to-treat models were estimated, and 244 primary caregivers participated in the survey. In their first year of life, treatment group children were one-third less likely to visit the emergency department (control group mean, MC = 0.42, treatment group mean, MT = 0.28, P = .02) and were also 41% less likely to have visited a primary care provider ≥9 times (MC = 0.49, MT = 0.29, P educator team can reduce infant health care use. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Evaluating fidelity in home-visiting programs a qualitative analysis of 1058 home visit case notes from 105 families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Saïas

    Full Text Available Implementation fidelity is a key issue in home-visiting programs as it determines a program's effectiveness in accomplishing its original goals. This paper seeks to evaluate fidelity in a 27-month program addressing maternal and child health which took place in France between 2006 and 2011.To evaluate implementation fidelity, home visit case notes were analyzed using thematic qualitative and computer-assisted linguistic analyses.During the prenatal period, home visitors focused on the social components of the program. Visitors discussed the physical changes in pregnancy, and psychological and social environment issues. Discussing immigration, unstable employment and financial related issues, family relationships and dynamics and maternity services, while not expected, were found in case notes. Conversely, health during pregnancy, early child development and postpartum mood changes were not identified as topics within the prenatal case notes. During the postnatal period, most components of the intervention were addressed: home visitors observed the mother's adaptation to the baby; routine themes such as psychological needs and medical-social networks were evaluated; information on the importance of social support and on adapting the home environment was given; home visitors counseled on parental authority, and addressed mothers' self-esteem issues; finally, they helped to find child care, when necessary. Some themes were not addressed or partially addressed: health education, child development, home environment, mother's education plans and personal routine, partner support and play with the child. Other themes were not expected, but found in the case notes: social issues, mother-family relationship, relation with services, couple issues, quality of maternal behavior and child's language development.In this program, home visitors experienced difficulties addressing some of the objectives because they gave precedence to the families' urgent needs

  7. An open trial of in-home CBT for depressed mothers in home visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Putnam, Frank W; Stevens, Jack; Bosse, Nicole R; Short, Jodie A; Bodley, Amy L; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2011-11-01

    Research has demonstrated that low income mothers participating in home visitation programs have high rates of depression. This study used an open trial design to evaluate In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT), an evidence-based treatment for depression that is delivered in the home setting and has been adapted to address the needs of low income mothers participating in home visitation. 64 depressed mothers recruited from a home visitation program and who had completed IH-CBT were compared to 241 mothers from the same setting who met identical screening criteria at enrollment but did not receive the treatment. In addition, pre- and post-treatment measures of depression and related clinical features were contrasted in the 64 mothers receiving IH-CBT. There was a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms in the IH-CBT group relative to their counterparts who did not receive the treatment. Results from pre-post comparisons showed that treated mothers had decreased diagnosis of major depression, lower reported stress, increased coping and social support, and increased positive views of motherhood at post-treatment. Findings suggest that IH-CBT is a promising approach to addressing maternal depression in the context of home visitation and warrants further study. Public health implications for home visiting programs are discussed.

  8. La visita médica al hogar Home visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Díaz Novás

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Se hace un breve resumen de la historia de la visita médica al hogar en Cuba, y se señala su evolución en las diferentes formas organizativas de la atención primaria en la etapa revolucionaria. Se enumeran las ventajas de las visitas médicas al hogar, su necesidad como componente fundamental e insustituible de la atención a los pacientes, y como complemento necesario del trabajo en el consultorio. Se exponen los motivos de la visita al hogar: enfermedades agudas, procesos crónicos, discapacidades, evaluar el entorno familiar e higiénico-epidemiológico del paciente, los ingresos domiciliarios, las altas hospitalarias precoces, y los pacientes con enfermedades terminales o con afecciones dispensarizadas, entre otros Se presenta un grupo de orientaciones para el desarrollo exitoso de la visita médica al hogarA summary of the history of home visit in Cuba is made, stressing its evolution in the different organizative ways of primary care in the revolutionary stage. The advantages of home visits, their need as a fundamental and irreplaceable component of the patients' care and a necessary complement of the work in the office are given. The reasons of the visits are explained: acute diseases, chronic processes, disabilities, evaluation of the family and hygienic-epidemiological setting of the patient, home admissions, early hospital discharges, and patients with end-stage diseases, or with categorized diseases, among others. Some instructions for the success of home visit are exposed.

  9. An analysis of preventive dental visits by provider type, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Harold S; Manski, Marion C; Williams, John N; Manski, Richard J

    2005-02-01

    Understanding preventive dental visit utilization patterns facilitates planning of the dental health services delivery system. The authors examine these patterns by analyzing the receipt of preventive dental services in the United States by type of dental provider. The authors analyzed data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) for the U.S. community-based population. They developed national estimates for the population with preventive dental visits by provider type, including the population with a preventive dental visit and mean number of preventive dental visits per person for socioeconomic and demographic categories. Respondents who are white, are older, are female, have dental insurance, are from higher income and education backgrounds, and reside in small metropolitan areas were more likely (P output of all services rendered in their practices, including preventive services.

  10. Home telemonitoring and remote feedback between clinic visits for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Kayleigh M; Cates, Christopher J

    2016-08-03

    Asthma is a chronic disease that causes reversible narrowing of the airways due to bronchoconstriction, inflammation and mucus production. Asthma continues to be associated with significant avoidable morbidity and mortality. Self management facilitated by a healthcare professional is important to keep symptoms controlled and to prevent exacerbations.Telephone and Internet technologies can now be used by patients to measure lung function and asthma symptoms at home. Patients can then share this information electronically with their healthcare provider, who can provide feedback between clinic visits. Technology can be used in this manner to improve health outcomes and prevent the need for emergency treatment for people with asthma and other long-term health conditions. To assess the efficacy and safety of home telemonitoring with healthcare professional feedback between clinic visits, compared with usual care. We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Review Group Specialised Register (CAGR) up to May 2016. We also searched www.clinicaltrials.gov, the World Health Organization (WHO) trials portal and reference lists of other reviews, and we contacted trial authors to ask for additional information. We included parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults or children with asthma in which any form of technology was used to measure and share asthma monitoring data with a healthcare provider between clinic visits, compared with other monitoring or usual care. We excluded trials in which technologies were used for monitoring with no input from a doctor or nurse. We included studies reported as full-text articles, those published as abstracts only and unpublished data. Two review authors screened the search and independently extracted risk of bias and numerical data, resolving disagreements by consensus.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios (ORs) while using study participants as the unit of analysis, and continuous data as mean differences (MDs) while

  11. The effect of skill mix in non-nursing assistants on work engagements among home visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Taguchi, Atsuko; Kuwahara, Yuki; Nagata, Satoko; Sakai, Mahiro; Watai, Izumi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a skill-mix programme intervention on work engagement in home visiting nurses. A skill-mix programme in which home visiting nurses are assisted by non-nursing workers is assumed to foster home visiting nurses' work engagement. Pre- and post-intervention evaluations of work engagement were conducted using self-administered questionnaires. A skill-mix programme was introduced in the intervention group of home visiting nurses. After 6 months, their pre- and post-intervention work engagement ratings were compared with those of a control group. Baseline questionnaires were returned by 174 home visiting nurses (44 in the intervention group, 130 in the control group). Post-intervention questionnaires were returned by 38 and 97 home visiting nurses from each group. The intervention group's average work engagement scores were 2.2 at baseline and 2.3 at post-intervention; the control group's were 3.3 and 2.6. Generalised linear regression showed significant between-group differences in score changes. The skill-mix programme might foster home visiting nurses' work engagement by improving the quality of care for each client. Future research is needed to explain the exact mechanisms that underlie its effectiveness. In order to improve the efficiency of services provided by home visiting nurses and foster their work engagement, skill-mix programmes might be beneficial. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Preventive home visitation programmes for older people: the role of municipality organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Vass, Mikkel; Holmberg, Rasmus; Fiil-Nielsen, Henrik; Lauridsen, Jørgen; Avlund, Kirsten; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    The organisational influence on benefits of preventive home visitation programmes for older people has escaped scientific evaluation. This study aims to investigate organisational structures and processes in relation to preventive home visits. As part of a randomised controlled trial investigating whether educational intervention towards municipality health care professionals could enhance active life expectancy, information of municipality leadership, home visit approach, strengths and limit...

  13. Listening Visits: An Evaluation of the Effectiveness and Acceptability of a Home-based Depression Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    SEGRE, LISA SHARON; STASIK, SARA M.; O'HARA, MICHAEL W.; ARNDT, STEPHAN

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Maternal depression affects approximately one in five women, is under-treated, and compromises infant development. In the UK, public health nurses provide an empirically supported intervention (Listening Visits or LV), to depressed postpartum women. This study evaluates the effectiveness of LV when delivered by US home visitors. Method Nineteen women with depressive symptoms received LV. Pre, post, and follow-up assessments evaluated depression status, life satisfaction, and treatment acceptability. Results Listening Visits were associated with a statistically and clinically significant reduction in depression, improvement in life satisfaction, and were acceptable to women. Conclusions Listening Visits show considerable promise as an effective and acceptable depression treatment. PMID:21154029

  14. Interdisciplinary Team Care and Hospice Team Provider Visit Patterns during the Last Week of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lee; Clayton, Margaret F; Reblin, Maija; Cloyes, Kristin; Beck, Anna C; Harrold, Joan K; Harris, Pamela; Casarett, David

    2016-05-01

    Hospice provides intensive end-of-life care to patients and their families delivered by an interdisciplinary team of nurses, aides, chaplains, social workers, and physicians. Significant gaps remain about how team members respond to diverse needs of patients and families, especially in the last week of life. The study objective was to describe the frequency of hospice team provider visits in the last week of life, to examine changes in frequency over time, and to identify patient characteristics that were associated with an increase in visit frequency. This was a retrospective cohort study using electronic medical record data. From U.S. not-for-profit hospices, 92,250 records were used of patients who died at home or in a nursing home, with a length of stay of at least seven days. Data included basic demographic variables, diagnoses, clinical markers of illness severity, patient functioning, and number of hospice team member visits in the last seven days of life. On average the total number of hospice team member visits in the last week of life was 1.36 visits/day. Most were nurse visits, followed by aides, social workers, and chaplains. Visits increased over each day on average across the last week of life. Greater increase in visits was associated with patients who were younger, male, Caucasian, had a spouse caregiver, and shorter lengths of stay. This study provides important information to help hospices align the interdisciplinary team configuration with the timing of team member visits, to better meet the needs of the patients and families they serve.

  15. Merging Systems: Integrating Home Visitation and the Family-Centered Medical Home

    OpenAIRE

    Tschudy, Megan M.; Toomey, Sara L.; Cheng, Tina L.

    2013-01-01

    To improve the health of children and bend the health care cost curve we must integrate the individual and population approaches to health and health care delivery. The 2012 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health laid out the continuum for integration of primary care and public health stretching from isolation to merging systems. Integration of the family-centered medical home (FCMH) and home visitation (HV) would ...

  16. Come and Knock on Our Door: Offenders' Perspectives on Home Visits Through Ecological Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Ryan; La Rue, Emily; Caudill, Jonathan W; Thomas, Matthew O; Messer, Sarah

    2018-02-01

    The use of home visits has a long and storied history in the United States from different disciplines, such as nursing, prenatal mothers, young families, health promotion, and community corrections. Ecological theory explains how formal actors play a role in the promotion in the health field through home visits, but does not address community corrections home visits. Through the use of 30 semi-structured interviews, this research seeks to expand the understanding of ecological theory by capturing the perceptions of offenders sentenced to home visits conducted by a sheriff's office. The findings suggest the participants supported the home visits by formal agents and, in general, the home visits created an atmosphere of respect between the participants and sheriff's office personnel. This study creates the context for future research to understand the role of formal agents in recidivism and evaluate the efficacy of home visits by community corrections agencies.

  17. Home visits as a strategy for health promotion by nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelia Salgueiro Nascimento

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the domiciliary visit performed by nurses in the Family Health Strategy as an activity to promote health. Methods: Exploratory/descriptive study with qualitative approach. The subjects were nine nurses of the Primary Health Units from Health Districts in Maceió-AL. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews in the months from April to August 2012 and were analyzed using content analysis and in light of the theoretical framework of Health Promotion. Results: The nurses recognize that the domiciliary visit can be a way to promote the health of individuals, families and community, but, in daily life, action maintains focus on disease, with curative actions of individual character, which do not take into account the social context where the user and his family are inserted. Conclusion: It is considered that the use of home visits by nurses in the family health strategy as a health promotion activity is still incipient because, although the nurses recognize the need for change in the model of care, in practice, it is observed that the focus of this action is directed to the biological model. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p513

  18. Telehealth etiquette in home healthcare: the key to a successful visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Tina; Kott, Karen; Fowler, Christianne

    2015-05-01

    The use of telehealth by home healthcare agencies is growing. It has been shown to reduce rehospitalizations by up to 62%, reduce costs, and increase efficiency. Due to the use of telehealth technology, new and unique rules of etiquette must be followed to make both the patient and clinician comfortable and satisfied with the process. Little literature exists regarding telehealth etiquette. This article explores the techniques and methods that home care clinicians should utilize to assure that the telehealth experience is positive and effective. After providing a less successful scenario, steps for success are outlined and a suggested successful conclusion is provided for the scenario. Home care agencies will benefit greatly from expanding their ability to visit patients in different ways. Simple steps need to be taken to assure successful visits that follow the rules for assuring patient comfort, autonomy, and protection.

  19. The family-oriented home visiting program: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, S W; Ruttle, K

    1980-11-01

    Designed and tested a home-based intervention program for low-income mothers with toddler and at least one other child under five. Sex of toddlers and race (black or white) about equally divided. Nine months of weekly home visits were specifically planned for each mother to enhance her effectiveness as an educational change agent. Treatment was planned to promote skills and understandings applicable over range of ages. Pretests, immediate posttests, and posttests one and two years later were administered to 27 experimental families and to a randomly assigned control group of 20. At .05 level of significance or beyond, experimentals excelled controls on receptive language test (toddler), on the Caldwell HOME (mother was indirectly rated as an educational change agent), and on a measure of teaching style (mother). They were also significantly superior on the Binet (toddler) at second posttest. No differences found with older siblings on Slosson Intelligence Test. Differences at third posttest were at least as great as earlier ones on mother measures. Relationships among child and mother measures are discussed.

  20. Merging systems: integrating home visitation and the family-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschudy, Megan M; Toomey, Sara L; Cheng, Tina L

    2013-11-01

    To improve the health of children and bend the health care cost curve we must integrate the individual and population approaches to health and health care delivery. The 2012 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report Primary Care and Public Health: Exploring Integration to Improve Population Health laid out the continuum for integration of primary care and public health stretching from isolation to merging systems. Integration of the family-centered medical home (FCMH) and home visitation (HV) would promote overall efficiency and effectiveness and help achieve gains in population health through improving the quality of health care delivered, decreasing duplication, reinforcing similar health priorities, decreasing costs, and decreasing health disparities. This paper aims to (1) provide a brief description of the goals and scope of care of the FCMH and HV, (2) outline the need for integration of the FCMH and HV and synergies of integration, (3) apply the IOM's continuum of integration framework to the FCMH and HV and describe barriers to integration, and (4) use child developmental surveillance and screening as an example of the potential impact of HV-FCMH integration.

  1. Social Work Home Visits to Children and Families in the UK: A Foucauldian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Karen; Cree, Viviene E

    2016-07-01

    The home visit is at the heart of social work practice with children and families; it is what children and families' social workers do more than any other single activity (except for recording), and it is through the home visit that assessments are made on a daily basis about risk, protection and welfare of children. And yet it is, more than any other activity, an example of what Pithouse has called an 'invisible trade': it happens behind closed doors, in the most secret and intimate spaces of family life. Drawing on conceptual tools associated with the work of Foucault, this article sets out to provide a critical, chronological review of research, policy and practice on home visiting. We aim to explain how and in what ways changing discourses have shaped the emergence, legitimacy, research and practice of the social work home visit to children and families at significant time periods and in a UK context. We end by highlighting the importance for the social work profession of engagement and critical reflection on the identified themes as part of their daily practice.

  2. Parental involvement in home visiting: Interpersonal predictors and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierau, Susan; Brand, Tilman; Jungmann, Tanja

    2012-09-01

    Parents' commitment to and usage of early intervention are key variables in understanding discrepancies in families' susceptibility to these services. Although the important role of fathers in infant development is widely recognized, early interpersonal predictors of paternal involvement in home-visiting programs have been understudied. This article aims to fill this gap by regressing parents' postnatal involvement on prenatal partnership satisfaction and quality of the helping relationship in a sample of 124 socially and financially disadvantaged families. Paternal program engagement was predicted by partnership satisfaction whereas the perceived quality of the helping relationship best predicted maternal program engagement, with demographical characteristics controlled. Maternal program engagement also mediated the relationship between partnership satisfaction and paternal program engagement. The results are discussed against the theoretical background. Copyright © 2012 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  3. Effect of Home Visiting with Pregnant Teens on Maternal Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samankasikorn, Wilaiporn; Pierce, Brittany; St Ivany, Amanda; Gwon, Seok Hyun; Schminkey, Donna; Bullock, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Determine the extent that participation in Resource Mothers Program (RMP) home visiting improves maternal health at 3 months postpartum. A randomized controlled trial using RMPs in two urban and one rural location in a mid-Atlantic state. Community health workers from these RMPs enrolled teens into the study and the research team assigned participants to either the intervention group or telephone support control group using computerized randomization assignments. Data collection from baseline and 3 months postpartum using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Prenatal Psychosocial Profile (PPP) is reported. The sample included 150 pregnant teens with a mean age of 17 years. Mean self-esteem scores between groups were not significantly different at baseline, but the RMP group self-esteem scores improved significantly at the 3 months postpartum interview (36.40 ± 5.63 for RMP vs. 34.10 ± 4.29 telephone control group, p = 0.049). Neither group was at risk for depression at baseline or 3 months postpartum. Because 60% of the total sample identified as Hispanic, post hoc analysis revealed significantly different baseline stress mean scores between Hispanic and non-Hispanic teens (p = 0.038); however, these differences were no longer significant by 3 months postpartum (p = 0.073). The EPDS scores by ethnicity were not different at baseline (p = 0.875) but were significantly different at 3 months (p = 0.007). The RMP home-visiting intervention can lead to improved self-esteem scores in teens, particularly in Hispanic teens. Improved self-esteem has been shown to lead to better parenting.

  4. From the Classroom to the Living Room: Eroding Academic Inequities through Home Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    This article illustrates the experiences of teachers who conducted home visits as a way to cultivate sustainable avenues of school-home communication with families from an immigrant and/or language-minority background. The data stemming from these experiences are used to outline a sociocultural approach to conducting home visits and strengthening…

  5. Nurse practitioner management of acute in-hours home visit or assessment requests: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Martin; Bobb, Carol; Robinson, Susan I

    2009-01-01

    GPs often perceive home-visit requests as a time-consuming aspect of general practice. The new general medical services contract provides for practices to be relieved of responsibility for home-visits, although there is no model for the transfer of care. One such model could be to employ nurse practitioners to manage such requests. Nurse practitioners can effectively substitute for GPs in managing same-day in-hours emergency care in the surgery, but their role in managing all such requests, including those requiring home visits, has not been assessed. To explore the feasibility and clinical management outcomes of nurse practitioner management of same-day care requests, including those requiring home visits, to inform a proposed randomised controlled trial. Non-randomised comparative trial. One large general practice (14 600 patients) in south London. Nurse practitioner assessment and management of all same-day care requests for 2 days per week was compared with normal GP management on another 2 days, over a 6-month period. Clinical management outcome data were collected from patient records and from data-collection forms completed by a nurse practitioner and GPs. Patient and staff satisfaction was assessed by questionnaire. The nurse practitioner was more likely than GPs to assess patients in person, less likely to give advice alone, and more likely to issue a prescription. There was no significant difference between the nurse practitioner and GPs regarding any other clinical management outcomes or patient satisfaction; however, the response rate of the patient satisfaction questionnaire in this pilot study was poor. Nurse practitioner management of acute in-hours care requests, including home visits, appears feasible in practice and merits further assessment.

  6. Nursing Home Response to Nursing Home Compare: The Provider Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraillon, Marcelo Coca; Brauner, Daniel J; Konetzka, R Tamara

    2017-08-01

    Nursing Home Compare (NHC) publishes composite quality ratings of nursing homes based on a five-star rating system, a system that has been subject to controversy about its validity. Using in-depth interviews, we assess the views of nursing home administrators and staff on NHC and unearth strategies used to improve ratings. Respondents revealed conflicting goals and strategies. Although nursing home managers monitor the ratings and expend effort to improve scores, competing goals of revenue maximization and avoidance of litigation often overshadow desire to score well on NHC. Some of the improvement strategies simply involve coding changes that have no effect on resident outcomes. Many respondents doubted the validity of the self-reported staffing data and stated that lack of risk adjustment biases ratings. Policy makers should consider nursing home incentives when refining the system, aiming to improve the validity of the self-reported domains to provide incentives for broader quality improvement.

  7. Parent education home visitation program: adolescent and nonadolescent mother comparison after six months of intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, A M; Culp, R E; Blankemeyer, M; Passmark, L

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effect of an intervention over a 6-month period to improve first time mothers knowledge about parenting and safety in the home. The sample included 61 mothers who completed a baseline and follow-up survey. Mothers were first time adolescent (38) and nonadolescent (22) mothers recruited from rural county health departments for participation in a voluntary home visitation intervention program. Four hypotheses were tested that associated home visitation with greater parenting skill and child development knowledge and safety. Adolescent mothers were expected to make greater gains but to lag behind nonadolescent mothers in child development knowledge, parenting skills knowledge, household safety, and use of community resources. The sample included 32% with a high school degree and 12% African American. 83% were in school. 85% lived at or below the US federal poverty level. Parent Educators provided weekly in-home education based on a manual and individualized curriculum. Parenting skills knowledge was measured by the Adolescent-Adult Parenting Inventory (Bavolek, 1984). Home safety was measured by Culp's Home Safety Checklist. Educators recorded use of 13 community services. Analysis of variance revealed that infant knowledge increased to the same level among all mothers regardless of adolescents' lesser knowledge at baseline. Parenting skill knowledge of child roles increased for both ages, but older mothers scored higher. Parenting skill knowledge of alternatives to corporal punishment increased similarly for both ages. No age or interactive effects were related to improvement in safety or use of community services.

  8. Home Care Providers to the Rescue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen M; Brøndum, Stig; Thomas, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA......). METHODS: We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched...... providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark. RESULTS: Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases...

  9. Effectiveness of home visiting programs on child outcomes: a systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peacock, Shelley; Konrad, Stephanie; Watson, Erin; Nickel, Darren; Muhajarine, Nazeem

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the effectiveness of paraprofessional home-visiting programs on developmental and health outcomes of young children from disadvantaged families...

  10. Home Visitation Programs for At-risk Young Families: A Systematic Literature Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J.E. Drummond; A.E. Weir; G.M. Kysela

    2002-01-01

    ... home visitation for at-risk young families as the major delivery method. Objectives: To describe the program components, practices, outcomes, and reliability of the evaluation approaches. Methods...

  11. Home visitation programs: An untapped opportunity for the delivery of early childhood obesity prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvy, Sarah-Jeanne; de la Haye, Kayla; Galama, Titus; Goran, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extant obesity efforts have had limited impact among low-income underserved children, in part because of limitations inherent to existing programs: 1) short duration and low intensity; 2) late timing of implementation, when children are already overweight or obese; 3) intervention delivery limiting their accessibility and sustainability; and 4) failure to address barriers such as a lack of culturally competent services, poverty and housing instability, which interfere with healthy lifestyle changes. Objective This concept paper proposes an innovative model of obesity prevention implemented in infancy and sustained throughout early childhood to address the limitations of current obesity prevention efforts. Specifically, we propose to integrate sustained, weekly, in-home obesity prevention as part of the services already delivered by ongoing Home Visitation Programs, which currently do not target obesity prevention. Conclusion The home visiting structure represents an ideal model for impactful obesity prevention as home visitation programs: (1) already provide comprehensive services to diverse low-income infants and families who are most at risk for obesity and poor health due to socio-economic and structural conditions; (2) services are initiated in infancy and sustained throughout critical developmental periods for the formation of healthy/unhealthy behaviors; and (3) have been in place for more than 40 years, with a widespread presence across the United States and nationwide, which is critical for the scalability and sustainability of obesity prevention. PMID:27911984

  12. Nursing Home Regulations Redefined: Implications for Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Ouslander, Joseph G; Saliba, Debra

    2018-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) finalized a comprehensive update to nursing home requirements of participation in October 2016. Nearly 10,000 public comments were received regarding the proposed rule, and CMS made multiple modifications based on comments from providers, advocacy organizations, and others before issuing the final rule. The final rule describing nursing home requirements of participation modernizes nursing home regulation. It is being implemented in three phases-beginning in November 2016, November 2017, and November 2019. There are multiple provisions that have implications for clinicians caring for nursing home residents, particularly in terms of management of infections, medication prescribing and monitoring, and delegation of medical orders. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Occupational Therapy Predischarge Home Visits in Acute Hospital Care: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Lannin, Natasha A; Wales, Kylie; Salkeld, Glenn; Rubenstein, Laurence; Gitlin, Laura; Barris, Sarah; Mackenzie, Lynette; Cameron, Ian D

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether an enhanced occupational therapy discharge planning intervention that involved pre- and postdischarge home visits, goal setting, and follow-up (the HOME program) would be superior to a usual care intervention in which an occupational therapy in-hospital consultation for planning and supporting discharge to home is provided to individuals receiving acute care. Randomized controlled trial. Acute and medical wards. Individuals aged 70 and older (N = 400). Primary outcomes: activities daily living (ADLs; Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living) and participation in life roles and activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI)). Occupational therapist recommendations differed significantly between groups (P occupational therapy recommendations as the in-hospital only consultation, which had a greater emphasis on equipment provision, but HOME did not demonstrate greater benefit in global measures of ADLs or participation in life tasks than in-hospital consultation alone. It is not recommended that home visits be conducted routinely as part of discharge planning for acutely hospitalized medical patients. Further work should develop guidelines for quality in-hospital consultation. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Health education for Somali Bantu refugees via home visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Elizabeth R; Mosher, Elaine C; Lamson, Karen S; Wolf, Helen Ann; Schwartz, Diane G

    2012-06-01

     Somali Bantu refugees, with unique health information needs, created challenges for health and social service providers.  A service innovation was developed (i) to raise awareness, especially among local health and social service providers, about the Bantu refugees' presence in the community, their culture, and their information needs and (ii) to deliver needed health information, emphasizing child health, to the Bantu mothers in their homes.  The project consisted of: (i) a community conference targeting local health and social service providers, describing the refugees' presence in the community, their culture, and information needs. (ii) Focus groups conducted with members of the Bantu population elicited additional information needs. (iii) Curriculum was developed based on identified needs, and (iv) the curriculum was delivered to the refugees in their homes. A clinical informationist and MP3 technology enhanced the project.  Conference attendees' evaluation responses indicated improved understanding of Bantu culture. Focus groups' identification of health information needs provided a framework for the health education curriculum. A project website made educational materials available to other healthcare providers.  The project raised awareness of the Bantus' presence, culture, and information needs. Identification of other unmet needs demonstrated that additional support for refugees is required. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group Health Information and Libraries Journal.

  15. Evaluation of Early Childhood Home Visiting to Prevent Medically Attended Unintentional Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Alonzo T; Bowers, Katherine A; Dexheimer, Judith W; Sa, Ting; Hall, Eric S; Van Ginkel, Judith B; Ammerman, Robert T

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated the influence of home visiting on the risk for medically attended unintentional injury during home visiting (0 to 3 years) and subsequent to home visiting (3 to 5 years). A retrospective, quasi-experimental study was conducted in a cohort of mother-child pairs in Hamilton County, OH. The birth cohort (2006 to 2012) was linked to administrative home visiting records and data from a population-based injury surveillance system containing records of emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to compare medically attended unintentional injury risk (0 to 2, 0 to 3, and 3 to 5 years) in a home-visited group versus a propensity score-matched comparison group. The study population was composed of 2,729 mother-child pairs who received home visiting and 2,729 matched mother-child pairs in a comparison group. From birth to 2 years, 17.2% of the study population had at least one medically attended unintentional injury. The risk for medically attended unintentional injury from aged 0 to 2 and 0 to 3 years was significantly higher in the home-visited group relative to the comparison group (hazard ratio 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.35; hazard ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.31, respectively). Additional injuries in the home-visited group were superficial, and the increased risk for medically attended unintentional injury was observed for ED visits and not hospitalizations. Home-visited children were more likely to have a medically attended unintentional injury from birth to aged 3 years. This finding may be partially attributed to home visitor surveillance of injuries or greater health care-seeking behavior. Implications and alternative explanations are discussed. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identifying Continuous Quality Improvement Priorities in Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preskitt, Julie; Fifolt, Matthew; Ginter, Peter M; Rucks, Andrew; Wingate, Martha S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a methodology to identify continuous quality improvement (CQI) priorities for one state's Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program from among the 40 required constructs associated with 6 program benchmarks. The authors discuss how the methodology provided consensus on system CQI quality measure priorities and describe variation among the 3 service delivery models used within the state. Q-sort methodology was used by home visiting (HV) service delivery providers (home visitors) to prioritize HV quality measures for the overall state HV system as well as their service delivery model. There was general consensus overall and among the service delivery models on CQI quality measure priorities, although some variation was observed. Measures associated with Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting benchmark 1, Improved Maternal and Newborn Health, and benchmark 3, Improvement in School Readiness and Achievement, were the highest ranked. The Q-sort exercise allowed home visitors an opportunity to examine priorities within their service delivery model as well as for the overall First Teacher HV system. Participants engaged in meaningful discussions regarding how and why they selected specific quality measures and developed a greater awareness and understanding of a systems approach to HV within the state. The Q-sort methodology presented in this article can easily be replicated by other states to identify CQI priorities at the local and state levels and can be used effectively in states that use a single HV service delivery model or those that implement multiple evidence-based models for HV service delivery.

  17. Moving beyond Depression: A Collaborative Approach to Treating Depressed Mothers in Home Visiting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Putnam, Frank W.; Teeters, Angelique R.; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that up to half of mothers in home visiting experience clinically significant levels of depression during their participation in services. Depression alters maternal life course, negatively impacts child development, and contributes to poorer home visiting outcomes. This article describes the Moving Beyond Depression (MBD)…

  18. A Community-Based Home Visitation Program’s Impact on Birth Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqing; Pimentel, Pamela; Lessard, Jared; Rousseau, Julie; Lee, Jung-Ah; Bojorquez, Yvette; Silva, Michele; Olshansky, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Background MOMS Orange County is a coordinated home visitation program in which trained paraprofessional home visitors work under the close supervision of registered nurses. This model was developed to address health disparities in birth outcomes in a Hispanic community in Orange County. Purpose The primary objective was to test the impact of MOMS Orange County on birth outcomes. The second objective was to examine the breadth of prenatal health education topics as a mediator of the relationship between home visits and birth outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort design was used. Paraprofessional home visitors collected prenatal and postnatal data during home visits. Only those whose birth outcomes were obtained were included in the analysis (N = 2,027 participants). Regression models were conducted to test the associations between prenatal home visits and birth outcomes, adjusting for 10 covariates. Results Number of prenatal home visits predicted higher birth weight and greater gestational age at birth. Breath of health education topics partially mediated the associations between home visits and birth weight. The same mediation was revealed with gestational age at birth. Clinical Implications The MOMS Orange County prenatal home visitation program may be a promising approach to decrease adverse births outcomes in disadvantaged communities. Rigorously designed studies are needed to further test this model. PMID:26479848

  19. A Community-Based Home Visitation Program's Impact on Birth Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqing; Pimentel, Pamela; Lessard, Jared; Rousseau, Julie; Lee, Jung-Ah; Bojorquez, Yvette; Silva, Michele; Olshansky, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    MOMS Orange County is a coordinated home visitation program in which trained paraprofessional home visitors work under the close supervision of registered nurses. This model was developed to address health disparities in birth outcomes in a Hispanic community in Orange County, CA. The primary objective was to test the impact of MOMS Orange County on birth outcomes. The second objective was to examine the breadth of prenatal health education topics as a mediator of the relationship between home visits and birth outcomes. A retrospective cohort design was used. Paraprofessional home visitors collected prenatal and postnatal data during home visits. Only those whose birth outcomes were obtained were included in the analysis (N = 2,027 participants). Regression models were conducted to test the associations between prenatal home visits and birth outcomes, adjusting for 10 covariates. Number of prenatal home visits predicted higher birthweight and greater gestational age at birth. Breadth of health education topics partially mediated the associations between home visits and birthweight. The same mediation was revealed with gestational age at birth. The MOMS Orange County prenatal home visitation program may be a promising approach to decrease adverse birth outcomes in disadvantaged communities. Rigorously designed studies are needed to further test this model.

  20. Can early postpartum home visits by trained community health workers improve breastfeeding of newborns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, I; Rahman, S M; Sania, A; Seraji, H R; Arifeen, S E; Winch, P J; Darmstadt, G L; Baqui, A

    2008-09-01

    Whether postpartum visits by trained community health workers (CHWs), reduce newborn breastfeeding problems. Community health workers made antenatal and postpartum home visits promoting newborn care practices including breastfeeding. CHWs assessed neonates for adequacy of breastfeeding and provided hands-on support to mothers to establish breastfeeding. History and observation data of 3495 neonates were analyzed to assess effects of CHW visitation on feeding problems. Inappropriate breastfeeding position and attachment were the predominant problems (12 to 15%). Only 6% of newborns who received home visit by CHWs within 3 days had feeding difficulties, compared to 34% of those who did not (odds ratio: 7.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.03 to 9.71, P=0.00). Latter group was 11.4 times (95% CI: 6.7 to 19.3, P=0.00) more likely to have feeding problems as late as days 6 to 7, than the former. Counseling and hands-on support on breastfeeding techniques by trained workers within first 3 days of birth, should be part of community-based postpartum interventions.

  1. Effects of Pet and/or People Visits on Nursing Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Helen M.

    1987-01-01

    Compared effects of different visiting programs (people, people and pets, pets, no visit) on behaviors of nursing home residents. Found all three visiting programs increased behaviors of smiling and alertness in comparison to control conditions. Close proximity to person-alone visitor was associated with greatest number of positive resident…

  2. Effectiveness of a promotora home visitation program for underserved Hispanic children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Shumyla; Carcel, Consuelo; Morphew, Tricia; Amaro, Silvia; Galant, Stanley

    2015-06-01

    Retention in a mobile asthma clinic, the Breathmobile™, of ≥3 visits has previously been shown to be essential for attaining asthma control in underserved children. The objective of this study in primarily Hispanic-American children was to determine the difference in retention between those seen in the Breathmobile™ compared to those receiving an additional promotora-based home visit (HV). Children with asthma in the Breathmobile™ program were evaluated for asthma status and aeroallergen sensitivity. Indication for HV included poor asthma control, educational and environmental control needs. An initial visit consisted of environmental assessment as well as a 3-h interactive educational session covering asthma basics. A follow-up visit 1 month later assessed implementation. The primary outcome measure of retention was ≥6 months in the Breathmobile™ program. Of the 1007 asthmatic children seen between April 2002 and June of 2005, 136 received HV. These children showed significantly greater retention compared to those without HV with a median number of visits (5 visits versus 2 visits), ≥3 Breathmobile™ visits (86.0% versus 38.8%), median number of days in the program (299 versus 63 days) and percentage of patients in the program ≥6 months (67.8% versus 31.3%) p < 0.001. HV and asthma severity were each independent predictors of retention. The addition of a promotora HV program proved effective in providing greater retention in the Breathmobile™ program essential for asthma control. Randomized clinical trials will be needed to show the impact on health care utilization and asthma control.

  3. Pre-discharge home visits by occupational therapists completed for patients following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Kylee J; Taylor, Nicholas F; Boyd, Jude N; Harding, Katherine E

    2017-02-01

    Home visits by occupational therapists are a routine part of practice, but there remains little understanding about factors that are associated with the decision to complete a home visit. The aim of this study was to investigate the rate of pre-discharge home visits by occupational therapists for patients following hip fracture and explore factors associated with their occurrence. A retrospective cohort study including 293 patients admitted to a metropolitan health service following hip fracture. Multi-variate logistic regression was used to identify significant variables associated with receiving a home visit. Home visits were conducted by occupational therapists for 28% of patients admitted from a private residence, and for less than 5% of patients admitted from low-level residential care facilities. The variables significantly associated with receiving a home visit at a private residence were older age and being admitted to a rehabilitation ward, but the model only explained between 9% and 13% of the variance. Other clinical and socio-demographic variables evaluated were not associated with the provision of a home visit. About one in four people admitted to hospital from a private residence following hip fracture receive a home visit. The results suggest that whether or not a patient receives a home visit has little to do with socio-demographic or clinical factors at the time of admission to hospital. There remains much unexplained variation in whether or not a patient receives a home visit and this study highlights the diversity that exists in clinical practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  4. Treatment of depressed mothers in home visiting: impact on psychological distress and social functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Putnam, Frank W; Altaye, Mekibib; Teeters, Angelique R; Stevens, Jack; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2013-08-01

    Depression is prevalent in mothers receiving home visiting. Little is known about the impact of treatment on associated features of maternal depression in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a novel, adapted treatment for depressed mothers in home visiting on psychological distress and social functioning. In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT) was developed to treat depressed mothers in home visiting. A randomized clinical trial design was used in which subjects were 93 new mothers in a home visiting program. Mothers with major depressive disorder identified at 3 months postpartum were randomized into IH-CBT and ongoing home visiting (n = 47) or standard home visiting (SHV; n = 46) in which they received home visitation alone and could obtain treatment in the community. Measures of psychological distress, social support, and social network were measured at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and three-month follow-up. Clinical features of depression and home visiting parameters were examined as potential moderators. Subjects receiving IH-CBT reported decreased psychological distress at post-treatment (ES = 0.77) and follow-up (ES = 0.73). Examination of types of psychological distress indicated broad improvements at both time points. Those receiving IH-CBT reported increased social support over time relative to those in the SHV condition. Effect sizes were modest at post-treatment (ES = 0.38) but increased at follow-up (ES = 0.65). Improvements were seen in affiliative and belonginess aspects of social support, in contrast to tangible support which was statistically non-significant. Findings were not moderated by clinical features of depression or home visiting parameters. No group differences were found in size of and involvement with social networks. IH-CBT is effective in reducing psychological distress and improving perceived social support in depressed mothers receiving home visiting. To the extent that mothers are better

  5. Treatment of depressed mothers in home visiting: Impact on psychological distress and social functioning☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Putnam, Frank W.; Altaye, Mekibib; Teeters, Angelique R.; Stevens, Jack; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Depression is prevalent in mothers receiving home visiting. Little is known about the impact of treatment on associated features of maternal depression in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a novel, adapted treatment for depressed mothers in home visiting on psychological distress and social functioning. Methods In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT) was developed to treat depressed mothers in home visiting. A randomized clinical trial design was used in which subjects were 93 new mothers in a home visiting program. Mothers with major depressive disorder identified at 3 months postpartum were randomized into IH-CBT and ongoing home visiting (n = 47) or standard home visiting (SHV; n = 46) in which they received home visitation alone and could obtain treatment in the community. Measures of psychological distress, social support, and social network were measured at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and three-month follow-up. Clinical features of depression and home visiting parameters were examined as potential moderators. Results Subjects receiving IH-CBT reported decreased psychological distress at post-treatment (ES = 0.77) and follow-up (ES = 0.73). Examination of types of psychological distress indicated broad improvements at both time points. Those receiving IH-CBT reported increased social support over time relative to those in the SHV condition. Effect sizes were modest at post-treatment (ES = 0.38) but increased at follow-up (ES = 0.65). Improvements were seen in affiliative and belonginess aspects of social support, in contrast to tangible support which was statistically non-significant. Findings were not moderated by clinical features of depression or home visiting parameters. No group differences were found in size of and involvement with social networks. Conclusions IH-CBT is effective in reducing psychological distress and improving perceived social support in depressed mothers receiving home visiting

  6. First-Year Internal Medicine Residents' Reflections on Nonmedical Home Visits to High-Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothelle, Stephanie K; Christmas, Colleen; Hanyok, Laura A

    2018-01-01

    Patients who are high utilizers of care often experience health-related challenges that are not readily visible in an office setting but paramount for residents to learn. A nonmedical home visit performed at the beginning of residency training may help residents better understand social underpinnings related to their patient's health and place subsequent care within the context of the patient's life. First-year internal medicine residents completed a nonmedical home visit to an at-risk patient prior to seeing the patient in the office for his or her first medical visit. We performed a thematic analysis of internal medicine interns' (n = 16) written narratives on their experience of getting to know a complex patient in his or her home prior to seeing the patient for a medical visit. Narratives were written by the residents immediately following the visit and then again at the end of the intern year, to assess for lasting impact of the intervention. Residents were from an urban academic residency program in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. We identified four themes from the submitted narratives. Residents discussed the visit's impact on future practice, the effect of the community and support system on health, the impact on the depth of the relationship, and the visit as a source of professional fulfillment. Whereas the four themes were present at both time points, the narratives completed immediately following the visit focused more on the themes of impact of future practice and the effect of the community and support system on health. The influence of the home visit on the depth of the relationship was a more prevalent theme in the end-of-the-year narratives. Although there is evidence to support the utility of learners completing medical home visits, this exploratory study shows that a nonmedical home visit can be rewarding and formative for early resident physicians. Future studies could examine the patient's perspective on the experience and whether a nonmedical home

  7. A home care visit with Congressman Jim Gerlach: fighting to help chronically ill seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Taking your legislator on a home care visit is one of the best ways to make a lasting connection. The more first-hand knowledge they have, the more informed they will be when they address legislation that affects the industry. They need to understand what home care does and how important home care is to the patients it serves. They also need to realize that home care can cut costs and improve the delivery of health care in the United States. This is what Congressman Jim Gerlach (R-PA) concluded after he made a home care visit last month.

  8. The influence of a mental health home visit service partnership intervention on the caregivers' home visit service satisfaction and care burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jui-Fen; Huang, Xuan-Yi; Lin, Mei-Jue; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yeh, Tzu-Pei

    2017-10-27

    To investigate a community-based and hospital-based home visit partnership intervention in improving caregivers' satisfaction with home service and reducing caregiver burden. The community-oriented mental healthcare model prevails internationally. After patients return to the community, family caregivers are the patients' main support system and they also take the most of the burden of caring for patients. It is important to assist these caregivers by building good community healthcare models. A longitudinal quasi-experimental quantitative design. The experimental group (n = 109) involved "partnership" intervention, and the control group (n = 101) maintained routine home visits. The results were measured before the intervention, 6 and 12 months after the partnership intervention. Six months after the partnership intervention, the satisfaction of the experimental group was higher than the control group for several aspects of care. Although the care burden was reduced in the experimental group, there was no significant difference between the two groups. This study confirms that the partnership intervention can significantly improve caregiver satisfaction with home services, without reducing the care burden. The community-based and hospital-based mental health home visit service partnership programme could improve the main caregiver's satisfaction with the mental health home visit services, while the reduction in care burden may need government policies for the provision of more individual and comprehensive assistance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Preventive home visitation programmes for older people: the role of municipality organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Mikkel; Holmberg, Rasmus; Fiil-Nielsen, Henrik; Lauridsen, Jørgen; Avlund, Kirsten; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2007-09-01

    The organisational influence on benefits of preventive home visitation programmes for older people has escaped scientific evaluation. This study aims to investigate organisational structures and processes in relation to preventive home visits. As part of a randomised controlled trial investigating whether educational intervention towards municipality health care professionals could enhance active life expectancy, information of municipality leadership, home visit approach, strengths and limitations of communication within the organisation were obtained using individual and focus group interviews. Thirty-four municipalities in four counties participated. Data was systematically condensed using a phenomenological approach upon which general patterns were categorised into a theory-based formal typology of the preventive home visitation management in the municipalities. Three distinct strategies for preventive home visitation programmes were identified. Eighteen municipalities were categorised as "Framework Management", 15 as "Management by Rules" and one as "Project Management". Small municipality size was associated with the "Framework Management" type. "Management by Rules" municipalities had higher population densities and their overall expenses for older people were higher. "Framework Management" municipalities used more resources on preventive home visits, communicated better, experienced less staff changing and had higher social capital than "Management by Rules" municipalities. Municipality structures and management processes of preventive home visitation programmes varied considerably in 34 Danish municipalities, but the majority could be categorised as using either a "Framework Management" or a "Management by Rules" strategy. Each strategy is associated with particular advantages and disadvantages, which may explain differences in the overall benefit of the programme between municipalities.

  10. Families' perceived benefits of home visits for managing paediatric obesity outweigh the potential costs and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Nicole D; Ball, Geoff D C; Perez, Arnaldo; Holt, Nicholas L; Neuman, Daniel; Spence, Nicholas; Mercier, Laura; Jetha, Mary

    2018-02-01

    Home visits have successfully been used to deliver various health services, but what role could they play in paediatric weight management? Low treatment initiation and high attrition prompted our multidisciplinary paediatric weight management clinic to investigate how families perceived the benefits and barriers of home visits. We focused on children with obesity aged 2-17 who were enrolled in our tertiary-level clinic in Alberta, Canada. None had received a home visit. The families were interviewed face-to-face from October 2015 to October 2016, and we used a qualitative description methodological framework and manifest content analysis. The parents were the main interviewees. Of the 56 families, 89% were interested in a home visit, 82% wanted support from a dietician and 54% from an exercise specialist. The perceived benefits of home visits included comprehensive assessment (95%), convenience (86%), tailored care (29%) and family involvement (13%), while the costs and barriers included clinicians' potential judgmental attitudes (30%), loss of privacy (19%) and distractions (10%). Some thought clinicians would find home visits inconvenient (25%), with bureaucratic challenges (14%) and sustainability issues (5%). Families felt home visits were a convenient option for managing paediatric obesity and identified important benefits and barriers that could guide such interventions. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effects of a Home Visiting Program on Parenting: Mediating Role of Intimate Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Fauth, Rebecca C; Lamoreau, Renee

    2017-10-01

    Young women aged 18 to 24 years are in the highest risk group for intimate partner violence (IPV), and adolescent mothers are at particularly high risk for IPV and for risky health behaviors. Exposure to IPV may contribute to parenting stress and risky behaviors, and may compromise parenting behavior and healthy child development. The present study examined whether program effects of a statewide home visiting program for adolescent parents on young mothers' parenting stress and risky behaviors measured 2 years post program enrollment were mediated by program effects on their exposure to IPV measured 1 year post enrollment. Using longitudinal data from a subsample of young mothers ( n = 448; 58% program, 42% control) who participated in a randomized controlled trial evaluation of a statewide home visiting program, Healthy Families Massachusetts (HFM), we estimated path analyses to examine whether home visiting program effects observed on IPV mediated home visiting program effects on subsequent assessments of parenting distress and mothers' risky behaviors. Findings indicated that IPV mediated associations between home visiting program effects on mothers' parenting distress and risky behavior. Although most newborn home visiting programs do not have an explicitly stated goal of reducing IPV, helping mothers and their partners to reduce violent behavior can have further-reaching impacts on other key goals of home visiting programs, such as parenting stress and risky behaviors.

  12. Feasibility and results of a randomised pilot-study of pre-discharge occupational therapy home visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chung-Wei

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-discharge home visits aim to maximise independence in the community. These visits involve assessment of a person in their own home prior to discharge from hospital, typically by an occupational therapist. The therapist may provide equipment, adapt the home environment and/or provide education. The aims of this study were to investigate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial in a clinical setting and the effect of pre-discharge home visits on functional performance in older people undergoing rehabilitation. Methods Ten patients participating in an inpatient rehabilitation program were randomly assigned to receive either a pre-discharge home visit (intervention, or standard practice in-hospital assessment and education (control, both conducted by an occupational therapist. The pre-discharge home visit involved assessment of the older person's function and environment, and education, and took an average of 1.5 hours. The hospital-based interview took an average of 40 minutes. Outcome data were collected by a blinded assessor at 0, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Outcomes included performance of activities of daily living, reintegration to community living, quality of life, readmission and fall rates. Results Recruitment of 10 participants was slow and took three months. Observed performance of functional abilities did not differ between groups due to the small sample size. Difference in activities of daily living participation, as recorded by the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living scale, was statistically significant but wide confidence intervals and low statistical power limit interpretation of results. Conclusion Evaluation of pre-discharge home visits by occupational therapists in a rehabilitation setting is feasible, but a more effective recruitment strategy for a main study is favored by application of a multi-centre setting.

  13. Preventive home visits to older people in Denmark: methodology of a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, Mikkel; Avlund, Kirsten; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Preventive home visits were introduced by legislation in Denmark in 1998. This ongoing randomized controlled intervention study introduces a model where preventive home visits to elderly people are carried out in a standardized way, focusing on early signs of disability...... a preventive program completely on their own. RESULTS: Baseline characteristics were similar in the intervention and control communities with regard to size, rural and urban characteristics and geriatric services, and the individual characteristics of participating persons living in these communities were also...... comparable. The intervention was well accepted and feasible. CONCLUSIONS: When results become available, the study should reveal the most important factors for preventive home visits to elderly people....

  14. NEWHINTS cluster randomised trial to evaluate the impact on neonatal mortality in rural Ghana of routine home visits to provide a package of essential newborn care interventions in the third trimester of pregnancy and the first week of life: trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitt Catherine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tackling neonatal mortality is essential for the achievement of the child survival millennium development goal. There are just under 4 million neonatal deaths, accounting for 38% of the 10.8 million deaths among children younger than 5 years of age taking place each year; 99% of these occur in low- and middle-income countries where a large proportion of births take place at home, and where postnatal care for mothers and neonates is either not available or is of poor quality. WHO and UNICEF have issued a joint statement calling for governments to implement "Home visits for the newborn child: a strategy to improve survival", following several studies in South Asia which achieved substantial reductions in neonatal mortality through community-based approaches. However, their feasibility and effectiveness have not yet been evaluated in Africa. The Newhints study aims to do this in Ghana and to develop a feasible and sustainable community-based approach to improve newborn care practices, and by so doing improve neonatal survival. Methods Newhints is an integrated intervention package based on extensive formative research, and developed in close collaboration with seven District Health Management Teams (DHMTs in Brong Ahafo Region. The core component is training the existing community based surveillance volunteers (CBSVs to identify pregnant women and to conduct two home visits during pregnancy and three in the first week of life to address essential care practices, and to assess and refer very low birth weight and sick babies. CBSVs are supported by a set of materials, regular supervisory visits, incentives, sensitisation activities with TBAs, health facility staff and communities, and providing training for essential newborn care in health facilities. Newhints is being evaluated through a cluster randomised controlled trial, and intention to treat analyses. The clusters are 98 supervisory zones; 49 have been randomised for

  15. NEWHINTS cluster randomised trial to evaluate the impact on neonatal mortality in rural Ghana of routine home visits to provide a package of essential newborn care interventions in the third trimester of pregnancy and the first week of life: trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Betty R; Manu, Alexander; Tawiah-Agyemang, Charlotte; ten Asbroek, Guus; Gyan, Thomas; Weobong, Benedict; Lewandowski, R Eric; Soremekun, Seyi; Danso, Samuel; Pitt, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Hill, Zelee

    2010-05-17

    Tackling neonatal mortality is essential for the achievement of the child survival millennium development goal. There are just under 4 million neonatal deaths, accounting for 38% of the 10.8 million deaths among children younger than 5 years of age taking place each year; 99% of these occur in low- and middle-income countries where a large proportion of births take place at home, and where postnatal care for mothers and neonates is either not available or is of poor quality. WHO and UNICEF have issued a joint statement calling for governments to implement "Home visits for the newborn child: a strategy to improve survival", following several studies in South Asia which achieved substantial reductions in neonatal mortality through community-based approaches. However, their feasibility and effectiveness have not yet been evaluated in Africa. The Newhints study aims to do this in Ghana and to develop a feasible and sustainable community-based approach to improve newborn care practices, and by so doing improve neonatal survival. Newhints is an integrated intervention package based on extensive formative research, and developed in close collaboration with seven District Health Management Teams (DHMTs) in Brong Ahafo Region. The core component is training the existing community based surveillance volunteers (CBSVs) to identify pregnant women and to conduct two home visits during pregnancy and three in the first week of life to address essential care practices, and to assess and refer very low birth weight and sick babies. CBSVs are supported by a set of materials, regular supervisory visits, incentives, sensitisation activities with TBAs, health facility staff and communities, and providing training for essential newborn care in health facilities.Newhints is being evaluated through a cluster randomised controlled trial, and intention to treat analyses. The clusters are 98 supervisory zones; 49 have been randomised for implementation of the Newhints intervention, with the

  16. HOME VISIT QUALITY VARIATIONS IN TWO EARLY HEAD START PROGRAMS IN RELATION TO PARENTING AND CHILD VOCABULARY OUTCOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggman, Lori A; Cook, Gina A; Innocenti, Mark S; Jump Norman, Vonda; Boyce, Lisa K; Christiansen, Katie; Peterson, Carla A

    2016-05-01

    Home-visiting programs aiming to improve early child development have demonstrated positive outcomes, but processes within home visits to individual families are rarely documented. We examined family-level variations in the home-visiting process (N = 71) from extant video recordings of home visits in two Early Head Start programs, using an observational measure of research-based quality indicators of home-visiting practices and family engagement, the Home Visit Rating Scales (HOVRS). HOVRS scores, showing good interrater agreement and internal consistency, were significantly associated with parent- and staff-reported positive characteristics of home visiting as well as with parenting and child language outcomes tested at program exit. When home-visiting processes were higher quality during the program, home visit content was more focused on child development, families were more involved in the overall program, and most important, scores on measures of the parenting environment and children's vocabulary were higher at the end of the program. Results showed that home visit quality was indirectly associated with child language outcomes through parenting outcomes. Observation ratings of home visit quality could be useful for guiding program improvement, supporting professional development, and increasing our understanding of the links between home-visiting processes and outcomes. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  17. General practitioners' home visit tendency and readmission-free survival after COPD hospitalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkegaard, Jesper; Larsen, Pia V; Paulsen, Maja S

    2014-01-01

    Background:The tendency of general practitioners (GPs) to conduct home visits is considered an important aspect of practices' accessibility and quality of care.Aims:To investigate whether GPs' tendency to conduct home visits affects 30-day readmission or death after hospitalisation with chronic...... obstructive pulmonary disease.Methods:All Danish patients first-time hospitalised with COPD during the years 2006-2008 were identified. The association between the GP's tendency to conduct home visits and the time from hospital discharge until death or all-cause readmission was analysed by means of Cox...... regression adjusted for multiple patient and practice characteristics.Results:The study included 14,425 patients listed with 1,389 general practices. Approximately 31% of the patients received a home visit during the year preceding their first COPD hospitalisation, and within 30 days after discharge 19% had...

  18. 76 FR 71979 - Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... status, school readiness, and domestic violence); (b) the effectiveness of such programs on different... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Health Resources and Services Administration...) The effect of early childhood home visiting programs on outcomes for parents, children, and...

  19. Paraprofessional home visitation program to prevent childhood unintentional injuries in low-income communities: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, L; van Niekerk, A; Seedat, M; Jordaan, E

    2008-06-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a paraprofessional home visitation program (HVP) to improve home safety and prevent injuries among children living in low-income settings. The HVP was implemented in two low-income communities in South Africa. In each community, approximately 200 households were randomly selected for the trial. Eligible households were those with children aged < or = 10 years. Intervention households received four visits, one every two weeks, by trained paraprofessionals that focused on a specific injury topic and consisted of: information dissemination about specific injury prevention practices; home inspection accompanied by information about home hazards; and the supply of safety devices. The key outcomes to measure the presence of home hazards were scores for burns (safety practices, paraffin, and electrical), poisoning, and falls. Significant reductions were found for injury risks related to burn safety practices. For injury risks related to electrical burns, paraffin burns, and poisoning, a decline was also noted although this was not statistically significant. No decline was noted for fall-related risks. Subject to further replication and evaluation, home visits by paraprofessionals providing safety education, home inspection, and safety devices be considered for integration into a comprehensive child injury prevention strategy in low-income communities.

  20. Maternal relationship security as a moderator of home visiting impacts on maternal psychosocial functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Elizabeth; Burrell, Lori; Crowne, Sarah; Cluxton-Keller, Fallon; Fuddy, Loretta; Leaf, Philip J; Duggan, Anne

    2013-02-01

    There is variability in home visiting program impacts on the outcomes achieved by high risk families. An understanding of how effects vary among families is important for refining service targeting and content. The current study assessed whether and how maternal attributes, including relationship security, moderate short- and long-term home visiting impacts on maternal psychosocial functioning. In this multisite RCT of home visiting in a population-based, ethnically-diverse sample of families at risk for maltreatment of their newborns (n = 643), families were randomly assigned to home visited (HV) and control groups. HV families were to receive intensive services by trained paraprofessionals from birth-3 years. Outcome data were collected when children were 1, 2, and 3 years old and 7, 8, and 9 years old. Overall, short- and long-term outcomes for HV and control mothers did not differ significantly. Demographic attributes, a general measure of overall maternal risk, and partner violence did not moderate program impact on psychosocial functioning outcomes. Maternal relationship security did moderate program impact. Mothers who scored high on relationship anxiety but not on relationship avoidance showed the greatest benefits, particularly at the long-term follow-up. Mothers scoring high for both relationship anxiety and avoidance experienced some adverse consequences of home visiting. Further research is needed to determine mediating pathways and to inform and test ways to improve the targeting of home visiting and the tailoring of home visit service models to extend positive home visiting impacts to targeted families not benefiting from current models.

  1. General practice cooperatives: long waiting times for home visits due to long distances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesen, Paul; van Lin, Nieke; Mokkink, Henk; van den Bosch, Wil; Grol, Richard

    2007-02-12

    The introduction of large-scale out-of-hours GP cooperatives has led to questions about increased distances between the GP cooperatives and the homes of patients and the increasing waiting times for home visits in urgent cases. We studied the relationship between the patient's waiting time for a home visit and the distance to the GP cooperative. Further, we investigated if other factors (traffic intensity, home visit intensity, time of day, and degree of urgency) influenced waiting times. Cross-sectional study at four GP cooperatives. We used variance analysis to calculate waiting times for various categories of traffic intensity, home visit intensity, time of day, and degree of urgency. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to calculate to what degree these factors affected the ability to meet targets in urgent cases. The average waiting time for 5827 consultations was 30.5 min. Traffic intensity, home visit intensity, time of day and urgency of the complaint all seemed to affect waiting times significantly. A total of 88.7% of all patients were seen within 1 hour. In the case of life-threatening complaints (U1), 68.8% of the patients were seen within 15 min, and 95.6% of those with acute complaints (U2) were seen within 1 hour. For patients with life-threatening complaints (U1) the percentage of visits that met the time target of 15 minutes decreased from 86.5% (less than 2.5 km) to 16.7% (equals or more than 20 km). Although home visits waiting times increase with increasing distance from the GP cooperative, it appears that traffic intensity, home visit intensity, and urgency also influence waiting times. For patients with life-threatening complaints waiting times increase sharply with the distance.

  2. Treating Dehydration at Home Avoids Healthcare Costs Associated With Emergency Department Visits and Hospital Readmissions for Adult Patients Receiving Home Parenteral Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Denise; Roberts, Scott; Corrigan, Mandy L; Hamilton, Cindy; Steiger, Ezra; Kirby, Donald F

    2017-06-01

    Administration of home parenteral support (HPS) has proven to be cost-effective over hospital care. Avoiding hospital readmissions became more of a focus for healthcare institutions in 2012 with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. In 2010, our service developed a protocol to treat dehydration at home for HPS patients by ordering additional intravenous fluids to be kept on hand and to focus patient education on the symptoms of dehydration. A retrospective analysis was completed through a clinical management database to identify HPS patients with dehydration. The hospital finance department and homecare pharmacy were utilized to determine potential cost avoidance. In 2009, 64 episodes (77%) of dehydration were successfully treated at home versus 6 emergency department (ED) visits (7.5%) and 13 readmissions (15.5%). In 2010, we successfully treated 170 episodes (84.5%) at home, with 9 episodes (4.5%) requiring ED visits and 22 hospital readmissions (11%). The number of dehydration episodes per patient was significantly higher in 2010 ( P home in 2010 versus 2009. Our protocol helped educate and provide the resources required to resolve dehydration at home when early signs were recognized. By reducing ED visits and hospital readmissions, healthcare costs were avoided by a factor of 29 when home treatment was successful.

  3. Cost Analysis of Physician Assistant Home Visit Program to Reduce Readmissions After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabagiez, John P; Shariff, Masood A; Molloy, William J; Demissie, Seleshi; McGinn, Joseph T

    2016-09-01

    A physician assistant home care (PAHC) program providing house calls was initiated to reduce hospital readmissions after adult cardiac surgery. The purpose of our study was to compare 30-day PAHC and pre-PAHC readmission rate, length of stay, and cost. Patients who underwent adult cardiac surgery in the 48 months from September 2008 through August 2012 were retrospectively reviewed using pre-PAHC patients as the control group. Readmission rate, length of stay, and health care cost, as measured by hospital billing, were compared between groups matched with propensity score. Of the 1,185 patients who were discharged directly home, 155 (13%) were readmitted. Total readmissions for the control group (n = 648) was 101 patients (16%) compared with the PAHC group (n = 537) total readmissions of 54 (10%), a 38% reduction in the rate of readmission (p = 0.0049). Propensity score matched groups showed a rate reduction of 41% with 17% (62 of 363) for the control compared with 10% (37 of 363) for the PAHC group (p = 0.0061). The average hospital bill per readmission was $39,100 for the control group and $56,600 for the PAHC group (p = 0.0547). The cost of providing home visits was $25,300 for 363 propensity score matched patients. The PAHC program reduced the 30-day readmission rate by 41% for propensity score matched patients. Analysis demonstrated a savings of $977,500 at a cost of $25,300 over 2 years, or $39 in health care saved, in terms of hospital billing, for every $1 spent. Therefore, a home visit by a cardiac surgical physician assistant is a cost-effective strategy to reduce readmissions after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Home school student visit and introduction to rail transportation and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This project consisted of hosting local Champaign-Urbana, Illinois home school students for a visit to : the Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (RailTEC) at the University of Illinois at Urbana- : Champaign (UIUC). Beyond visiting RailTEC, st...

  5. A Review of Best Practice Home Visitation Interventions for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The burgeoning injury surveillance and prevention sector has identified child injury in low-income South African communities as a public health priority, ... visits; and (5) the application of a multi-method injury prevention approach, incorporating epidemiological, environmental, enforcement, training as well as technological ...

  6. Outcomes of the Montana Asthma Home Visiting Program: A home-based asthma education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jessie C; Biskupiak, William W; Brokaw, Sarah M; Carpenedo, Dorota; Loveland, Katie M; Tysk, Sonja; Vogl, Shea

    2018-02-09

    Asthma is a common disease in children. Home-based, multi-trigger, multi-component interventions with an environmental focus have been shown to be effective to address asthma in children. The objective of this study was to assess the outcomes and feasibility of implementing a specific asthma home visiting (HV) program in a rural area. Children aged 0-17 years with uncontrolled asthma were enrolled in an asthma HV program that included six contacts over a 12-month period delivered by a registered nurse specifically trained in asthma education and trigger removal in eleven counties in the rural state of Montana. Between June 2010 and December 2016, data on asthma symptoms and asthma self-management skills were collected at baseline and throughout the program. In June 2017, they were analyzed to assess changes in asthma control and quality of life over time among participants completing all six contacts. Since June 2010, 152 of 338 enrolled children completed all six contacts outlined in the program (45%). Participants who completed the program reported significant improvements in asthma control test scores, self-management skills, and self-efficacy related to asthma management. These results improved the longer participants remained in the program. These findings suggest that it is feasible to implement a 12-month HV program using local public health resources in a rural area as outcomes improved over this time period.

  7. A diaper bank and home visiting partnership: Initial exploration of research and policy questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Lois S; Condon, Eileen M; Deng, Shirley Z; Ordway, Monica Roosa; Marchesseault, Crista; Miller, Andrea; Alfano, Janet Stolfi; Weir, Alison M

    2017-12-13

    The cost of diapering an infant can place a significant financial strain on families living in poverty. Partnerships between diaper banks and home visiting programs for young families may offer an innovative solution to expanding the reach and impact of diaper banks in low-income communities. The purpose of this pilot study was to uncover preliminary information about the functions of diaper distribution through home visiting programs, and to inform future research and policy questions regarding diaper distribution to families in need. In this descriptive qualitative pilot study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 6 home visitors from Minding the Baby ® (MTB), a home visiting intervention for young parents. MTB clinicians routinely distribute diapers in partnership with The Diaper Bank in Connecticut. We used directed content analysis to code and analyze interview transcripts. These preliminary findings indicate that partnerships between home visiting programs and diaper banks may benefit families by improving diaper access, reducing stigma, and fostering trusting relationships with home visitors. Home visiting program benefits including engagement or re-engagement with families may need to be balanced with potential effects on clinical and therapeutic relationships. Recommendations for next steps in research and related policy questions are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Postdischarge community pharmacist-provided home services for patients after hospitalization for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalista, Tom; Lemay, Virginia; Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    To establish a community pharmacist-provided home health service to improve medication adherence and reduce 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmissions. Visiting Nurse Services of Newport and Bristol Counties located in Portsmouth, RI, from December 2013 to April 2014. Each patient received one in-home visit provided by a Postgraduate Year 1 community pharmacy resident within 1 week of admission to visiting nurse services followed by two follow-up telephone calls, 1 week and 4 weeks after the visit. The in-home visit consisted of a baseline assessment of medication adherence using the Morisky 8-Item Medication Adherence Questionnaire as well as pharmacist-provided education regarding chronic heart failure management. The follow-up telephone calls were used to reassess patient adherence and to monitor for hospital readmission within 30 days of the initial in-home visit. Community pharmacist-provided in-home medication reconciliation and medication teaching has not been described in the literature previously. In addition, pharmacists are often not included on home health care teams placing patients undergoing transitions in care at risk for potential medication-related errors. Improvement in medication adherence and reduction in 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmission rates. Ten patients were enrolled from December 2013 through April 2014. Following intervention, all patients saw improvements in adherence questionnaire scores during follow-up. Hospital readmission rates for patients seen by the pharmacist were lower compared with agencywide figures over a similar time period. A community pharmacist-provided in-home medication teaching service for patients following recent hospital discharge helps facilitate successful transitions of care from an inpatient to outpatient setting, improves medication adherence and has produced lower observed 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmission rates. Expansion of this or a similar service within the

  9. Exploring home visits in a faith community as a service-learning opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Emmerentia; Koen, Magdalene P; Bester, Petra

    2013-08-01

    Within South Africa the Psychiatric Nursing Science curriculum in undergraduate Baccalaureate nursing education utilizes home visits as a service-learning opportunity. In this context faith communities are currently unexplored with regards to service-learning opportunities. With limited literature available on this topic, the question was raised as to what are these students' and family members' experience of home visits within a faith community. To explore and describe nursing students' and family members' experiences of home visits within a faith community. A qualitative approach was used that was phenomenological, explorative and descriptive and contextual in nature. The research was conducted within a faith community as service learning opportunity for Baccalaureate degree nursing students. This community was situated in a semi-urban area in the North-West Province, South Africa. Eighteen (n=18) final year nursing students from different cultural representations, grouped into seven groups conducted home visits at seven (n=7) families. Comprehensive reflective reporting after the visits, namely that the students participated in a World Café data collection technique and interviews were conducted with family members. Three main themes emerged: students' initial experiences of feeling overwhelmed but later felt more competent; students' awareness of religious and cultural factors; and students' perception of their role. Two main themes from the family members emerged: experiencing caring and growth. There is mutual benefit for nursing students and family members. Students' experiences progress during home visits from feeling overwhelmed and incompetent towards a trusting relationship. Home visits in a faith community seems to be a valuable service learning opportunity, and the emotional competence, as well as spiritual and cultural awareness of nursing students should be facilitated in preparation for such home visits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. The Pew Home Visiting Campaign: Helping States Improve Quality, Evaluation, and Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitt, John

    2010-01-01

    The Pew Home Visiting Campaign was launched in 2009 by the Pew Center on the States to guide state policymakers toward smart investments in quality, voluntary home-based programs for new and expectant families. In light of the federal development and pressing needs of states, the campaign will assist states in several ways, including policy…

  11. First Steps towards Evidence-Based Preventive Home Visits: Experiences Gathered in a Swedish Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Löfqvist

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of preventive home visits is to promote overall health and wellbeing in old age. The aim of this paper was to describe the process of the development of evidence-based preventive home visits, targeting independent community-living older persons. The evidence base was generated from published studies and practical experiences. The results demonstrate that preventive home visits should be directed to persons 80 years old and older and involve various professional competences. The visits should be personalized, lead to concrete interventions, and be followed up. The health areas assessed should derive from a broad perspective and include social, psychological, and medical aspects. Core components in the protocol developed in this study captured physical, medical, psychosocial, and environmental aspects. Results of a pilot study showed that the protocol validly identified health risks among older people with different levels of ADL dependence.

  12. Longitudinal prevalence and correlates of elder mistreatment among older adults receiving home visiting nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bruce; Santos, Elizabeth J; Liebel, Dianne V; Russ, Ann J; Conwell, Yeates

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify elder mistreatment (EM) prevalence among a cohort of older adults receiving visiting nurse care in their homes, determine EM subtypes, and identify factors associated with EM. EM data were collected by nurses during monthly home visits for up to 24 months. It took the nurses a mean of 10.5 visits to discern EM. Fifty-four (7.4%) of 724 patients were identified as mistreated, of which 33 had enough information to subtype the EM. Of these 33, 27 were victims of neglect, 16 of psychological abuse, and 10 of financial exploitation, and 17 suffered more than one type. Among the entire sample, 11 variables were positively correlated with EM presence. Nurses visiting older adults in their homes should be aware that their patients are, as a group, vulnerable to EM, and that the factors identified here may be specific markers of greater risk.

  13. The effect of early postpartum home visits by health visitors: a natural experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Hanne; Væth, Michael; Kristensen, Ingeborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess if the absence of early home visits influenced the mothers’ breastfeeding duration and use of medical services. Design: Data from mothers who had given birth during a strike period were compared to data from a reference period with usual work practice. Sample: The study...... included 3834 newborn and 375 health visitors, 75 of whom worked during the strike period. Intervention: All families were offered non- standardized home visits after discharge in the reference period. During the strike, the service was based on individual risk assessment. Results: Overall, no difference....... The mothers’ needs for postnatal visits differed depending on parity: primiparae underlined uncertainty, multiparae underlined previous breastfeeding experience. Mothers had missed out on guidance on all areas of the health visitors’ service. Conclusion: Non-standardized home visits by health visitors were...

  14. Child Maltreatment History and Response to CBT Treatment in Depressed Mothers Participating in Home Visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Peugh, James L; Teeters, Angelique R; Putnam, Frank W; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2016-03-01

    Child maltreatment contributes to depression in adults. Evidence indicates that such experiences are associated with poorer outcomes in treatment. Mothers in home visiting programs display high rates of depression and child maltreatment histories. In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT) was developed to treat maternal depression in home visiting. The purpose of this study was to examine the moderating effects of child maltreatment history on depression, social functioning, and parenting in mothers participating in a clinical trial of IH-CBT. Ninety-three depressed mothers in home visiting between 2 and 10 months postpartum were randomly assigned to IH-CBT (n = 47) plus home visiting or standard home visiting (SHV; n = 46). Mothers were identified via screening and then confirmation of major depressive disorder diagnosis. Measures of child maltreatment history, depression, social functioning, and parenting were administered at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Results indicated high rates of maltreatment in both conditions relative to the general population. Mixed model analyses found a number of main effects in which experiences of different types of trauma were associated with poorer functioning regardless of treatment condition. Evidence of a moderating effect of maltreatment on treatment outcomes was found for physical abuse and parenting and emotional abuse and social network size. Future research should focus on increasing the effectiveness of IH-CBT with depressed mothers who have experienced child maltreatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. A controlled, longitudinal study of home visits compared to telephone contacts to prevent early childhood caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plonka, Kathryn A; Pukallus, Margaret L; Barnett, Adrian; Holcombe, Trevor F; Walsh, Laurence J; Seow, W Kim

    2013-01-01

    Home visits (HV) provide excellent opportunities for health promotion. This longitudinal study compared the effects of HV and telephone contacts (TC) in preventing early childhood caries (ECC) and colonisation of mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli (LB) from 0 to 24 months. A total of 325 children were recruited from community health centres at mean age of 42 days, and randomly assigned to receive either HV or TC. A total of 188 children completed three, 6 monthly HV, and another 58 had three, 6 monthly TC. An additional 40 age-matched children from childcare facilities served as reference controls (RC). At 24 months, all groups were examined at a community dental clinic. At 24 months, three HV children of 188 (1.5%) had caries, compared to four TC of 58 (6.8%) and nine RC of 40 (22.5%) (P < 0.001 for HV versus RC; P = 0.05 for HV versus TC and P = 0.03 for TC versus RC). There were also more children with MS in the TC (47%) and RC (35%) compared to HV (28%) group (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02). Home visits and telephone contacts conducted 6 monthly from birth are effective in reducing ECC prevalence by 24 months. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2012 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Detection of Undiagnosed Disease in Medicare Beneficiaries After a Clinical Home Visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dan; Wilks, Asa; Mattke, Soeren

    2017-02-01

    Undiagnosed chronic conditions are a common and costly problem in Medicare patients. This study examined whether a clinical home visit program was associated with an increased future detection of undiagnosed diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and atrial fibrillation. Members of Medicare Advantage Plans (MAP), including Chronic Special Needs Plans (C-SNP), were identified who received a comprehensive geriatric home visit under United Health Group's HouseCalls program and those who did not. Members with no medical or prescription drug claim for diabetes, COPD, and atrial fibrillation in the 12 months prior to the visit were selected. New diagnoses were then identified based on claims for office visits and/or prescription drugs in the 6 months after the HouseCalls visit. Members who received a visit had a significantly higher rate of detection of previously undiagnosed diabetes and COPD, but not of atrial fibrillation. The detection rates for diabetes within 6 months of the visit were 2.8% versus 2.3% (P home visit program, such as HouseCalls, is a promising avenue to address the hidden disease burden and unmet care needs in the Medicare population.

  17. Preventive Home Visits for Older People: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourigny, André; Bédard, Annick; Laurin, Danielle; Kröger, Edeltraut; Durand, Pierre; Bonin, Lucie; Sévigny, Andrée; Frappier, Annie; Roussel, Marie Ève; Martin, Mélanie

    2015-12-01

    RÉSUMÉ L'augmentation du nombre de personnes âgées présentant des incapacités et ayant des maladies chroniques entraîne une hausse des besoins en services de santé à domicile. Le nombre d'études et de revues systématiques traitant des approches préventives pour cette clientèle a proliféré, générant un besoin de synthèse des connaissances. Nous avons mené une revue systématique de revues systématiques évaluant l'effet des programmes de visite préventive pour les personnes âgées. Des 5 973 citations identifiées dans plus de 30 bases de données de littérature grise et scientifique, 10 articles répondaient à tous les critères d'inclusion. Les revues systématiques étaient retenues si elles comprenaient des essais randomisés contrôlés comparant des interventions de soins à domicile offerts par un professionnel de la santé et ceux sans professionnels. Les interventions sont souvent des évaluations gériatriques globales et s'accompagnent de visites de suivi. Il ressort que les visites préventives multidimensionnelles à domicile ont le potentiel de diminuer la mortalité, en particulier chez les personnes âgées plus jeunes, et offrent aussi un potentiel d'amélioration de l'autonomie fonctionnelle. Toutefois, ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence vue la diversité des interventions analysées.

  18. Determinants of financial performance of home-visit nursing agencies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sakiko; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Junko; Ikezaki, Sumie

    2014-01-09

    Japan has the highest aging population in the world and promotion of home health services is an urgent policy issue. As home-visit nursing plays a major role in home health services, the Japanese government began promotion of this activity in 1994. However, the scale of home-visit nursing agencies has remained small (the average numbers of nursing staff and other staff were 4.2 and 1.7, respectively, in 2011) and financial performance (profitability) is a concern in such small agencies. Additionally, the factors related to profitability in home-visit nursing agencies in Japan have not been examined multilaterally and in detail. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine the determinants of financial performance of home-visit nursing agencies. We performed a nationwide survey of 2,912 randomly selected home-visit nursing agencies in Japan. Multinomial logistic regression was used to clarify the determinants of profitability of the agency (profitable, stable or unprofitable) based on variables related to management of the agency (operating structure, management by a nurse manager, employment, patient utilization, quality control, regional cooperation, and financial condition). Among the selected home-visit nursing agencies, responses suitable for analysis were obtained from 1,340 (effective response rate, 46.0%). Multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that both profitability and unprofitability were related to multiple variables in management of the agency when compared to agencies with stable financial performance. These variables included the number of nursing staff/rehabilitation staff/patients, being owned by a hospital, the number of cooperative hospitals, home-death rate among terminal patients, controlling staff objectives by nurse managers, and income going to compensation. The results suggest that many variables in management of a home-visit nursing agency, including the operating structure of the agency, regional cooperation, staff

  19. Trying to bridge the worlds of home visitation and child welfare: Lessons learned from a formative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlschmidt, Mary Jo; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Pons, Laura; Constantino, John; Kohl, Patricia L; Drake, Brett; Auslander, Wendy

    2018-02-01

    Young children in families contacting the child welfare system are at high risk of recurrent maltreatment and poor developmental outcomes. Home visitation programs to support parenting may offer hope as a preventive resource but these programs are rarely linked with child welfare. This article describes findings from a formative evaluation of a program designed to connect child welfare-involved families to an existing evidence-supported home visitation program. The program, Early Childhood Connections (ECC), was developed by a field-university partnership including leaders from a public state child welfare system, regional early childhood education systems, and several local agencies providing family support services. Despite extensive and rigorous planning by the workgroup and collaborative refining of the intervention approach as agency needs changed, the continued structural and policy changes within both the home visitation agency and the child welfare agencies created significant ongoing barriers to implementation. On the other hand, child welfare-involved families were receptive to engaging with home visitation. Implications of lessons learned for ongoing program development in this area are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of the need for home visiting nurse: development of a new assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Taguchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a Home Visiting Nursing Service Need Assessment Form (HVNS-NAF to standardize the decision about the need for home visiting nursing service. Methods: The sample consisted of older adults who had received coordinated services by care managers. We defined the need for home visiting nursing service by elderly individuals as the decision of the need by a care manager so that the elderly can continue to live independently. Explanatory variables included demographic factors, medical procedure, severity of illness, and caregiver variables. Multiple logistic regression was carried out after univariate analyses to decide the variables to include and the weight of each variable in the HVNS-NAF. We then calculated the sensitivity and specificity of each cut-off value, and defined the score with the highest sensitivityand specificity as the cut-off value. Results: Nineteen items were included in the final HVNS-NAF. When the cut-off value was 2 points, the sensitivity was 77.0%, specificity 68.5%, and positive predictive value 56.8%. Conclusions: HVNS-NAF is the first validated standard based on characteristics of elderly clients who required home visiting nursing service. Using the HVNS-NAF may result in reducing the unmet need for home visiting nursing service and preventing hospitalization.

  1. Individual and organizational factors related to work engagement among home-visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Sakai, Mahiro; Watai, Izumi; Taguchi, Atsuko; Kuwahara, Yuki; Nagata, Satoko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2013-12-01

    The increasing number of elderly people has caused increased demand for home-visiting nurses. Nursing managers should develop healthy workplaces in order to grow their workforce. This study investigated the work engagement of home-visiting nurses as an index of workplace health. The aim of the present study was to reveal factors contributing to work engagement among Japanese home-visiting nurses. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire was sent to 208 home-visiting nurses from 28 nursing agencies in three districts; 177 (85.1%) returned the questionnaires. The Job Demands-Resources model, which explains the relationship between work environment and employee well-being, was used as a conceptual guide. The authors employed three survey instruments: (i) questions on individual variables; (ii) questions on organizational variables; and (iii) the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (Japanese version). Multiple regression analyses were performed in order to examine the relationships between individual variables, organizational variables, and work engagement. Nurse managers and nurses who felt that there was a positive relationship between work and family had significantly higher work engagement levels than others. The support of a supervisor was significantly associated with work engagement. Nurses in middle-sized but not large agencies had significantly higher work engagement than nurses in small agencies. Supervisor support and an appropriate number of people reporting to each supervisor are important factors in fostering work engagement among home-visiting nurses. © 2013 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2013 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  2. Identification of the need for home visiting nurse: development of a new assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Taguchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a Home Visiting Nursing Service Need Assessment Form (HVNS-NAF to standardize the decision about the need for home visiting nursing service.Methods: The sample consisted of older adults who had received coordinated services by care managers. We defined the need for home visiting nursing service by elderly individuals as the decision of the need by a care manager so that the elderly can continue to live independently. Explanatory variables included demographic factors, medical procedure, severity of illness, and caregiver variables. Multiple logistic regression was carried out after univariate analyses to decide the variables to include and the weight of each variable in the HVNS-NAF. We then calculated the sensitivity and specificity of each cut-off value, and defined the score with the highest sensitivityand specificity as the cut-off value.Results: Nineteen items were included in the final HVNS-NAF. When the cut-off value was 2 points, the sensitivity was 77.0%, specificity 68.5%, and positive predictive value 56.8%.Conclusions: HVNS-NAF is the first validated standard based on characteristics of elderly clients who required home visiting nursing service. Using the HVNS-NAF may result in reducing the unmet need for home visiting nursing service and preventing hospitalization.

  3. Depression improvement and parenting in low-income mothers in home visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Altaye, Mekibib; Putnam, Frank W; Teeters, Angelique R; Zou, Yuanshu; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2015-06-01

    Research on older children and high-resource families demonstrates that maternal improvement in depression often leads to parallel changes in parenting and child adjustment. It is unclear if this association extends to younger children and low-income mothers. This study examined if In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT), a treatment for depressed mothers participating in home visiting programs, contributes to improvements in parenting and child adjustment. Ninety-three depressed mothers in home visiting between 2 and 10 months postpartum were randomly assigned to IH-CBT (n = 47) plus home visiting or standard home visiting (SHV; n = 46). Mothers were identified via screening and subsequent diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Measures of depression, parenting stress, nurturing parenting, and child adjustment were administered at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 3 months follow-up. Results indicated that there were no differences between IH-CBT and controls on parenting and child adjustment. Low levels of depression were associated with decreased parenting stress and increased nurturing parenting. Improvement in depression was related to changes in parenting in low-income mothers participating in home visiting programs. IH-CBT was not independently associated with these improvements, although to the extent that treatment facilitated improvement; there were corresponding benefits to parenting. Child adjustment was not associated with maternal depression, a finding possibly attributed to the benefits of concurrent home visiting or measurement limitations. Future research should focus on longer-term follow-up, implications of relapse, and child adjustment in later years.

  4. Medicare Provider Payment Data - Home Health Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Home Health Agency PUF contains information on utilization, payment (Medicare payment and standard payment), and submitted charges organized by CMS Certification...

  5. [Predictors of interruptions to living at home in elderly people enrolled in a home visit rehabilitation service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuma, Takeshi; Makizako, Hyuma; Abe, Tsutomu; Miura, Hisayuki; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the predictors of interruption to living at home as a result of death, hospitalization, or admission to a long-term care facility in frail elderly people enrolled in a home visit rehabilitation service. A total of 311 patients entered a home visit rehabilitation service within a study period of 1 September, 2005 to 31 March, 2010, 146 of whom met the criteria to be enrolled in this study and gave consent. Of these, 73 received a continuous home visit rehabilitation service (continuous group) of over 2 years and 73 experienced interruption to this service due to death, hospitalization, or admission to a long-term care facility (interruption group). The following physical, social, and medical factors were recorded and analyzed: age, sex, care level, disease diagnoses, gait disability, cognitive impairment, living with another person and cause of the interruption to the home-visit rehabilitation service. We compared each item between the interruption and continuous groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the significant predictors of interruptions to living at home. Patients in the interruption group demonstrated significantly lower functioning in activities of daily living (ADL), gait ability and lower cognitive status, and higher rates of respiratory diseases and cancer compared with the continuous group. On logistic regression analysis, ADL score (odds ratio [OR]=0.97, prespiratory diseases (OR=4.35, p=0.04) and cancer (OR=13.46, prespiratory diseases and cancer were significant predictors of interruption to living at home in frail elderly adults.

  6. Pharmacists' barriers and facilitators on implementing a post-discharge home visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensing, Hendrik T; Koster, Ellen S; Sontoredjo, Timothy A A; van Dooren, Ad A; Bouvy, Marcel L

    Introducing a post-discharge community pharmacist home visit can secure continuity of care and prevent drug-related problems. Currently, this type of pharmaceutical care is not standard practice and implementation is challenging. Mapping the factors influencing the implementation of this new form of care is crucial to ensure successful embedding. To explore which barriers and facilitators influence community pharmacists' adoption of a post-discharge home visit. A mixed methods study was conducted with community pharmacists who had recently participated in a study that evaluated the effectiveness of a post-discharge home visit in identifying drug-related problems. Four focus groups were held guided by a topic guide based on the framework of Greenhalgh et al. After the focus groups, major barriers and facilitators were formulated into statements and presented to all participants in a scoring list to rank for relevance and feasibility in daily practice. Twenty-two of the eligible 26 pharmacists participated in the focus groups. Twenty pharmacists (91%) returned the scoring list containing 21 statements. Most of these statements were perceived as both relevant and feasible by the responding pharmacists. A small number scored high on relevance but low on feasibility, making these potential important barriers to overcome for broad implementation. These were the necessity of dedicated time for performing pharmaceutical care, implementing the home visit in pharmacists' daily routine and an adequate reimbursement fee for the home visit. The key to successful implementation of a post-discharge home visit may lay in two facilitators which are partly interrelated: changing daily routine and reimbursement. Reimbursement will be a strong incentive, but additional efforts will be needed to reprioritize daily routines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of nurse case management home visitation on birth outcomes in African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Natalie; Sbrocco, Tracy; Hsiao, Chiao-Wen; Hill, Lauren D; Vaughn, Nicole A; Lockley, Brenda

    2008-05-01

    The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Department of the Navy, Department of Defense or the U. S. government. Dr. Wells is a military service member (employee of the U.S. government). This work was prepared as a part of her official duties. Title 17, USC Section 101 defines a U.S. government work as a work prepared by a military service member or employee of the U.S. government as part of the person's official duties. Despite substantial reductions in U.S. infant mortality rates, racial disparities persist, with black Americans experiencing 2.4 times the rate of their white counterparts. Low birthweight and preterm delivery contribute to this disparity. To examine the association between antepartum nurse case management home visitation and the occurrence of low birthweight and preterm deliveries in African-American women in Montgomery County, MD, a retrospective cohort study was conducted using existing data from 109 mothers who were enrolled in the Black Babies Start More Infants Living Equally Healthy (SMILE) program. Logistic regression analysis was used. Women who received antepartum home visits were 0.37 (CI 0.15-0.94) times less likely to experience preterm delivery than women who did not receive antepartum home visits. The effect of antepartum home visits on preterm delivery was independent of level of prenatal care, negative life events and number of prior live births. There was no significant association between antepartum home visits and low birthweight. Antepartum home visits appeared to be protective against preterm delivery and could contribute to reducing racial disparities in infant mortality. Further study is needed to understand and replicate specific program components that may contribute to improved birth outcomes in African-American women.

  8. One visit providing desirable smile by laser application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekrazad, Reza; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Providing desirable smile is one of the main concerns in cosmetic dentistry. Hyperpigmentation is one of the esthetic concerns especially in gummy smile patients. Lasers with different wavelength are used for oral surgery including Carbon Dioxide Laser (CO2), Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG), Erbium family and diode laser. In this case, all esthetic procedures including gingival depigmentation, caries detection and removal were done by laser technology in one session. A 40- year-old male with a chief complaint of black gingiva in upper jaw was referred. The right side of maxillary was anesthetized and depigmentation was done by Erbium, Chromium doped Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er-Cr: YSGG) laser. Due to scores obtained from Diagnodent which indicated caries in dentin, the cavities were prepared by Er-Cr:YSGG laser. The cavities were restored by composite resin. The patient was advised to keep oral hygiene instructions and use mouthwash. The patient reported no pain after surgery and did not use any systemic antibiotic. After 4 weeks, complete healing was observed. Considering acceptable clinical outcome, Er-Cr: YSGG laser can be considered as an effective method for combination of soft and hard tissue treatment.

  9. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PL 111-148): an analysis of maternal-child health home visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Denise K; Clark, Mary Jo; Howland, Lois C; Mueller, Mary-Rose

    2011-08-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, setting in motion a historic and, for many, a long-awaited radical change to the current American health care system. Section 2951 of the PPACA addresses provision and funding of maternal, infant, and early childhood home visiting programs. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with the legislative odyssey of home visitation services to at-risk prenatal and postpartum women and children as delineated in the PPACA and to discuss the nursing practice and research implications of this landmark legislation. Few question the need for more rigorous methodology in all phases of home visitation research. Public health nursing may provide the comprehensive approach to evaluating effective home visitation programs.

  10. The effect of health visitors' postpartum home visit frequency on first-time mothers: cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Janice; Bunting, Brendan

    2011-06-01

    Postpartum home visiting by nurses can benefit higher-risk families. Yet, little is known about the effects of universal services which provide care for all families including those at lowest risk (e.g., provision by health visitors-United Kingdom specialist community public health nurses). It was to determine the effect of frequency of health visitors' home visits on 'low-risk' first-time families' outcomes to 8 weeks postpartum and 7 months follow-up. A cluster randomised controlled trial. Within one health and social care managerial area in Northern Ireland. First-time 'low risk' mothers who had given birth during 2002-2004 and were visited by a health visitor who had agreed to take part in the study, were invited to participate. In total, n=39 health visitors were allocated to 'intervention' and n=41 to 'control'. Of n=295 'low-risk' first-time mothers who agreed to take part, n=136 with intervention health visitors were offered six home visits 2-8 weeks postpartum and n=159 within the control group were offered one planned visit. Self-completed measures of parenting, maternal wellbeing and service use were gathered pre-intervention, 8 weeks and 7 months postpartum. The main outcome was the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). At 8 weeks and 7 months postpartum, n=129 and n=115 intervention mothers, also n=151 and n=141 control mothers completed outcome measures. An intention to treat analysis was performed using multilevel modelling analysis which statistically controlled for pre-home visit outcomes, clinic attendance and antenatal contact. The intervention had no impact on most outcomes, however, it was associated with an increased EPDS score (after adjustment: 0.16, 2.36 95% CI) at 8 weeks (before accounting for outliers) but not at 7 months (-0.62, 1.65 95% CI). Intervention mothers had higher service satisfaction (7.7, 21.28, 95% CI 8 weeks; 4.69, 22.71, 7 months) and were less likely to have used emergency medical services for their infants to 8

  11. Health care and social service professionals' perceptions of a home-visit program for young, first-time mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-A. Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about health care and social service professionals' perspective on the acceptability of long-term home-visit programs serving low-income, first-time mothers. This study describes the experiences and perspectives of these community care providers involved with program referrals or service delivery to mothers who participated in the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP, a targeted nurse home-visit program. Methods: The study included two phases. Phase I was a secondary qualitative data analysis used to analyze a purposeful sample of 24 individual interviews of community care providers. This was part of a larger case study examining adaptations required to increase acceptability of the NFP in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In Phase II (n = 4, themes identified from Phase I were further explored through individual, semi-structured interviews with community health care and social service providers, giving qualitative description. Results: Overall, the NFP was viewed as addressing an important service gap for first-time mothers. Providers suggested that frequent communication between the NFP and community agencies serving these mothers could help improve the referral process, avoid service duplication, and streamline the flow of service access. The findings can help determine key components required to enhance the success of integrating a home-visit program into an existing network of community services. Conclusion: The function of home-visit programs should not be viewed in isolation. Rather, their potential can be maximized when they collaborate and share information with other agencies to provide better services for first-time mothers.

  12. Parental Experiences of the "Time Together" Home Visiting Intervention: An Attachment Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Rebecca L.; Gersch, Irvine S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the results of research into parental experiences of the Somerset (UK) "Time Together" home visiting intervention, with regards to its impact on the parent-child relationship. The research was carried out using an Attachment Theory lens in order to understand the qualitative experiences of seven parents of children in…

  13. The Role of Home-Visiting Programs in Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Kimberly S.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Kimberly Howard and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn examine home visiting, an increasingly popular method for delivering services for families, as a strategy for preventing child abuse and neglect. They focus on early interventions because infants are at greater risk for child abuse and neglect than are older children. In their article, Howard and Brooks-Gunn…

  14. Retention and Attrition in a Home Visiting Programme: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifolt, Matthew; Lanzi, Robin G.; Johns, Elisabeth; Strichik, Tracye; Preskitt, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate retention and attrition in First Teacher, Alabama's Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) programme. Methods: Secondary data analysis was used to identify families that were most likely to leave through attrition; focus groups were conducted to discuss potential reasons…

  15. Preventing Perinatal Depression through Home Visiting: The Mothers and Babies Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Deborah F.; Tandon, S. Darius; Edwards, Karen; Mendelson, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Home visiting (HV) programs serve women at high risk for developing postpartum depression because of factors such as poverty and low social support. Depression poses serious threats not only to mother-child attachment and healthy infant development but also to women's ability to engage with HV services and supports. The Mothers and Babies (MB)…

  16. Effectiveness of home visiting in reducing partner violence for families experiencing abuse: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosman, G.J.; Wong, S.H.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is a major, global societal problem with enormous health consequences both for mother and child. Home visiting interventions in families at risk of abuse seem promising in decreasing IPV. In this systematic review, we aim to assess the

  17. Impact of Depression and Childhood Trauma in Mothers Receiving Home Visitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Shenk, Chad E.; Teeters, Angelique R.; Noll, Jennie G.; Putnam, Frank W.; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2012-01-01

    Research has documented the deleterious effects of maternal depression and childhood trauma on parenting and child development. There are high rates of both depression and childhood trauma in new mothers participating in home visitation programs, a prevention approach designed to optimize mother and child outcomes. Little is known about the…

  18. Implementing Universal Maternal Depression Screening in Home Visiting Programs: A Pragmatic Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Lisa S.; Taylor, Darby

    2014-01-01

    Maternal depression, although prevalent in low-income women, is not an inevitable consequence of poverty. Nevertheless, depression is a double burden for impoverished women: compromising infant development and diminishing mothers' ability to benefit from or effectively use home visiting services. Without universal screening, depression is often…

  19. Interprofessional collaboration in nursing homes (interprof): a grounded theory study of general practitioner experiences and strategies to perform nursing home visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Nina; Tetzlaff, Britta; Werle, Jochen; Geister, Christina; Scherer, Martin; Weyerer, Siegfried; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Mueller, Christiane A

    2016-08-30

    Interprofessionalism, considered as collaboration between medical professionals, has gained prominence over recent decades and evidence for its impact has grown. The steadily increasing number of residents in nursing homes will challenge medical care and the interaction across professions, especially nurses and general practitioners (GPs). The nursing home visit, a key element of medical care, has been underrepresented in research. This study explores GP perspectives on interprofessional collaboration with a focus on their visits to nursing homes in order to understand their experiences and expectations. This research represents an aspect of the interprof study, which explores medical care needs as well as the perceived collaboration and communication by nursing home residents, their families, GPs and nurses. This paper focusses on GPs' views, investigating in particular their visits to nursing homes in order to understand their experiences. Open guideline-interviews covering interprofessional collaboration and the visit process were conducted with 30 GPs in three study centers and analyzed with grounded theory methodology. GPs were recruited via postal request and existing networks of the research partners. Four different types of nursing home visits were found: visits on demand, periodical visits, nursing home rounds and ad-hoc-decision based visits. We identified the core category "productive performance" of home visits in nursing homes which stands for the balance of GPs´ individual efforts and rewards. GPs used different strategies to perform a productive home visit: preparing strategies, on-site strategies and investing strategies. We compiled a theory of GPs home visits in nursing homes in Germany. The findings will be useful for research, and scientific and management purposes to generate a deeper understanding of GP perspectives and thereby improve interprofessional collaboration to ensure a high quality of care.

  20. Early detection of parenting and developmental problems in toddlers : A randomized trial of home visits versus well-baby clinic visits in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, Ingrid I E; van Stel, Henk F.; Hermanns, Jo M A; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The early detection of parenting and developmental problems by preventive child health care (CHC) services in the Netherlands takes place almost exclusively at the well-baby clinic. This study assesses whether, compared to a visit to the well-baby clinic, a home visit improves early

  1. The Relationship Between the Use of a Worksite Medical Home and ED Visits or Hospitalizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marissa Stroo BS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Worksite medical homes may be a good model for improving employee health. The aim of this study was to compare the likelihood of being seen in the emergency department (ED or being hospitalized by level of use (no use, occasional use, or primary care of a worksite medical home, overall and by type of user (employee, adult dependent, or pediatric dependent. This was a retrospective analysis of claims data, using covariate-adjusted logistic regression models for ED visits and inpatient hospitalizations. Secondary data for the years 2006 to 2008 from a company that offers an on-site health care center (HCC were used. Analyses were based on a data set that combines health plan claims and human resources demographic data. Overall, people who did not use the HCC were more likely to be seen in the ED (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.20, 95% confidence interval or CI [1.06, 1.37], P = .005 or to be hospitalized (adjusted OR = 1.58; 95% CI [1.34, 1.86]; P < .0001 compared with those who used the HCC for primary care. Both ED visits and hospitalizations for employees and dependents in this study were lower among those who used the worksite medical home for primary care. Worksite medical homes can improve chronic disease management and thus reduce ED visits and hospitalizations. These findings contribute to growing evidence that worksite medical homes are potentially cost-effective.

  2. Domestic Violence Enhanced Perinatal Home Visits: The DOVE Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, Phyllis W; Bullock, Linda F; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Alhusen, Jeanne L; Ghazarian, Sharon R; Bhandari, Shreya S; Schminkey, Donna L

    2016-11-01

    Perinatal intimate partner violence (IPV) is common and has significant negative health outcomes for mothers and infants. This study evaluated the effectiveness of an IPV intervention in reducing violence among abused women in perinatal home visiting programs. This assessor-blinded multisite randomized control trial of 239 women experiencing perinatal IPV was conducted from 2006 to 2012 in U.S. urban and rural settings. The Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program (DOVE) intervention group (n = 124) received a structured abuse assessment and six home visitor-delivered empowerment sessions integrated into home visits. All participants were screened for IPV and referred appropriately. IPV was measured by the Conflicts Tactics Scale2 at baseline through 24 months postpartum. There was a significant decrease in IPV over time (F = 114.23; p < 0.001) from baseline to 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postpartum (all p < 0.001). Additional models examining change in IPV from baseline indicated a significant treatment effect (F = 6.45; p < 0.01). Women in the DOVE treatment group reported a larger mean decrease in IPV scores from baseline compared to women in the usual care group (mean decline 40.82 vs. 35.87). All models accounted for age and maternal depression as covariates. The DOVE intervention was effective in decreasing IPV and is brief, thereby facilitating its incorporation within well-woman and well-child care visits, as well as home visiting programs, while satisfying recommendations set forth in the Affordable Care Act for IPV screening and brief counseling.

  3. Relative cost-effectiveness of home visits and telephone contacts in preventing early childhood caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Rongzhen; Pukallus, Margaret; Kularatna, Sanjeewa; Gordon, Louisa G; Barnett, Adrian G; Walsh, Laurence J; Seow, Wan Kim

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a home-visit intervention conducted by oral health therapists relative to a telephone-based alternative and no intervention. A Markov model was built to combine data on dental caries incidence, dental treatments, quality of life and costs for a cohort of children from age 6 months to 6 years. The probabilities of developing caries and subsequent treatments were derived primarily from the key intervention study. The outcome measures were costs (US dollars), quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and the number of carious teeth prevented. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were used to test the stability of the model. For every group of 100 children, the model predicted that having the home-visit intervention would save $167 032 and telephone contacts $144 709 over 5½ years relative to no intervention (usual care). The home visits and telephone intervention would prevent 113 and 100 carious teeth (per 100 children) relative to no intervention in a period of 5½ years. Sensitivity analysis showed that a lower rate of caries reduced the intervention's cost-effectiveness primarily through reducing general anaesthesia costs. The home visits and telephone interventions resulted in 7 and 6 QALYs, respectively, gained over the usual care group for the 100 children over 5½ years. Both interventions were 'dominant,' as they saved costs and produced health benefits over usual care. Both the home visits and telephone-based community interventions conducted by oral health therapists were highly cost-effective than no intervention in preventing early childhood caries. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Motivation to take part in integrated care – an assessment of follow-up home visits to elderly persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmar, U; Hendriksen, Carsten; Hansen, K

    2011-01-01

    to implement because of a number of organizational obstacles, including co-ordination between the organizations involved in the process. In this paper we look at the factors that affect motivation to participate in a cross-sectoral programme in Copenhagen, Denmark, implementing follow-up home visits to elderly...... persons. Theory and methods: The analysis is based on inter-organizational network theory in an attempt to explain the role of motivation in network formation between organizational systems. The empirical findings are based on focus groups and in-depth interviews with hospital staff, general practitioners...... understanding of values and learning potentials. Conclusions: The study concludes that we need to focus on specific care fields and actors to reduce complexity in the area and more fully understand what motivates care providers to participate in cross-sectoral activities, such as a follow-up home visit...

  5. Home Visits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cophuser

    newly developed dehydrated potato-soy protein concentrate blend (PSB) to those supplemented with the ... received a newly developed ration, a dehydrated potato granule-soy protein concentrate, (PSB) to children who ...... Lenné JM and AF Ward Improving the efficiency of domestic vegetable marketing systems in east ...

  6. Compliance in CAPD and CCPD patients as measured by supply inventories during home visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, J; Piraino, B

    1998-01-01

    uremia compared with 6% of compliant patients, P = .04, with a mean follow-up time of 1 year per patient. Patient survival did not differ in the two groups. Peritonitis rates were higher in noncompliant than compliant patients (1.03/yr v 0.66/yr, P < 0.03), as were days hospitalized (908 per 100 patient-years v 1,016 per 100 patient-years, P < 0.04). Noncompliance with PD exchanges is significantly common in CAPD and CCPD patients. It occurs in one third of the patients at our center and contributes significantly to technique failure, inadequate dialysis, and an increased risk of both peritonitis and hospitalized days. Home visits to conduct supply inventories provide an excellent method of monitoring compliance.

  7. A Five-Year Follow-Up: Teachers' Perceptions of the Benefits of Home Visits for Early Elementary Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, James A.; Mann, Mary Beth; Becker, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate previous research about teachers' perceived benefits of home visits to determine if they remained stable. Furthermore, the investigation sought to find out whether home visits impacted variables often associated with improved school success (i.e., school attendance, academic performance, parent…

  8. Improving newborn care practices through home visits: lessons from Malawi, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitrin, Deborah; Guenther, Tanya; Waiswa, Peter; Namutamba, Sarah; Namazzi, Gertrude; Sharma, Srijana; Ashish, KC; Rubayet, Sayed; Bhadra, Subrata; Ligowe, Reuben; Chimbalanga, Emmanuel; Sewell, Elizabeth; Kerber, Kate; Moran, Allisyn

    2015-01-01

    Background Nearly all newborn deaths occur in low- or middle-income countries. Many of these deaths could be prevented through promotion and provision of newborn care practices such as thermal care, early and exclusive breastfeeding, and hygienic cord care. Home visit programmes promoting these practices were piloted in Malawi, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Uganda. Objective This study assessed changes in selected newborn care practices over time in pilot programme areas in four countries and evaluated whether women who received home visits during pregnancy were more likely to report use of three key practices. Design Using data from cross-sectional surveys of women with live births at baseline and endline, the Pearson chi-squared test was used to assess changes over time. Generalised linear models were used to assess the relationship between the main independent variable – home visit from a community health worker (CHW) during pregnancy (0, 1–2, 3+) – and use of selected practices while controlling for antenatal care, place of delivery, and maternal age and education. Results There were statistically significant improvements in practices, except applying nothing to the cord in Malawi and early initiation of breastfeeding in Bangladesh. In Malawi, Nepal, and Bangladesh, women who were visited by a CHW three or more times during pregnancy were more likely to report use of selected practices. Women who delivered in a facility were also more likely to report use of selected practices in Malawi, Nepal, and Uganda; association with place of birth was not examined in Bangladesh because only women who delivered outside a facility were asked about these practices. Conclusion Home visits can play a role in improving practices in different settings. Multiple interactions are needed, so programmes need to investigate the most appropriate and efficient ways to reach families and promote newborn care practices. Meanwhile, programmes must take advantage of increasing facility

  9. Therapeutic effects of dog visits in nursing homes for the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Karen; Uhrskov, Lisbeth; Christensen, Janne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that visiting dogs can have positive effects on elderly people in nursing homes. We wanted to study the effects of biweekly dog visits on sleep patterns and the psychiatric wellbeing of elderly people. Methods: A total of 100 residents (median age: 85.......5 years; [79; 90]) from four nursing homes were randomly assigned to receive biweekly visits for 6 weeks from a person accompanied by either a dog, a robot seal (PARO), or a soft toy cat. Sleep patterns were measured using actigraphy technology before, during (the third and sixth week), and after...... by a dog rather than the robot seal or soft toy cat (dog: 610 1 127 min; seal: 498 1 146 min; cat: 540 1 163 min; F2,37 = 4.99; P = 0.01). No effects were found in the sixth week or after the visit period had ended. We found that visit type had no effect on weight (F2,88 = 0.13; P > 0.05), body mass index...

  10. Patient Home Visits: Measuring Outcomes of a Community Model for Palliative Care Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allo, Julio A; Cuello, Deanna; Zhang, Yi; Reddy, Suresh K; Azhar, Ahsan; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Health care professionals may have limited exposure to home-based care. There is no published literature that has described the experiences and satisfaction of participation in patient home visits (PHV). The objective of this article is to describe the characteristics of PHV, our approach, and evaluation by participants over a nine-year period. We conducted a review of surveys completed by participants in PHV from 2005-2013. All participants anonymously completed the evaluation questionnaires at the end of PHVs. Different PHV assessment forms were used for the 2005-2010 and 2011-2013 time periods. A total of 34 PHVs were conducted with 106 patients and approximately 750 participants with a mean of 3 patients and 22 participants per PHV between 2005 and 2013. For 18 PHVs there are 317 surveys completed with 353 participants, making it a 90% response rate. Responding participants were physicians 125/543 (23%) and other professionals 418/543 (77%). In both time periods of 2005-2010 and 2011-2013 a survey with a 1 (completely agree) to 5 (completely disagree) scale was used. Agreeing that PHV was an effective teaching tool during 2005-2010 were 335/341 (98%); during 2011-2013, 191/202 (95%) agreed that PHV provided increased understanding and sharing of best practices in palliative care. PHV was perceived by participants as an effective way of providing interactive community education. A broad range of themes were addressed, and the participants reported high levels of learning in all domains of palliative care. There were no cases of patient or relative expression of distress as a result of PHV.

  11. Visiting nurses' posthospital medication management in home health care: an ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollerup, Mette Geil; Curtis, Tine; Schantz Laursen, Birgitte

    2017-08-03

    Medication management is the most challenging component of a successful transition from hospital to home, a challenge of growing complexity as the number of older persons living with chronic conditions grows, along with increasingly specialised and accelerated hospital treatment plans. Thus, many patients are discharged with complex medication regimen instructions, accentuating the risk of medication errors that may cause readmission, adverse drug events and a need for further health care. The aim of this study was to explore visiting nurses' medication management in home health care after hospital discharge and to identify key elements in patient medication for improved patient safety. Inspired by the ethnographic research cycle, participant observations and informal interviews were conducted at 12 initial visits by a nurse in a patient's home after hospital discharge. Data consisted of field notes and photographs from the patients' homes, medication lists and medical records. Field notes were analysed in four steps. The analysis showed 12 stages in medication management in which nurses strove to adjust medication management to the patients' actual health status by mediating on knowledge of the patient, information to the patient and on rules and regulations and by establishing order in medication lists and medications in the home. The nurse-patient relationship, the integration of care and the context of care challenged patient safety in visiting nurses' medication management in patients' homes after hospital discharge. The implications for practice were the following: to ensure nurses' opportunities to continuously evolve their observation skills and skills in making sound clinical judgements; to establish interprofessional working processes which support the continuous assessment of patients' needs and the adjustment of care and treatment; to clarify expectations to nurses' responsibility and patients' privacy. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. [Home visiting nursing care for a terminal stage cancer patient with bed sore--coordination through exchanging of advice request memo as a useful tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Sachiko; Yamada, Mai; Tayoshi, Mayumi; Kitamikado, Hatsue; Nakajima, Kazuyo; Konno, Hitomi; Akaeda, Kazuko; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Oka, Yoichi

    2010-12-01

    Visiting nursing care service was provided to a 40s female patient, who had a terminal cancer with bed sore around the sacred bones. We started the nursing service when the patient was still cared at hospital. The nursing service we provided was coordinated by the certified nurse specialized in skin and excrement care and home visiting nurse. A smooth home care transition was resulted because of the coordination provided by the two nurses. We started coaching the family while the patient was still at the hospital with a home care instruction manual until the patient was discharged. All in all, the patient and her family were at ease with two nurses' coordinated efforts. Since the patient was cared at home, her bed sore problem got worse due to an absence of caregiver. In order to solve the bed sore problem, the visiting nurse took pictures of peeled adhesive patch and the bed sore around the sacred bones to show and consult with the certified nurse. With the advice from the certified nurse, the home visiting nurse was able to care the bed sore problem manageable in size. From this experience, we learned that a proper communication channel, in this case an advice request memo exchange, between the certified nurse and visiting nurse was a useful tool for both sides in order to properly assess the patient's medical care needs.

  13. Neighborhood Effects on PND Symptom Severity for Women Enrolled in a Home Visiting Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David E; Tang, Mei; Folger, Alonzo; Ammerman, Robert T; Hossain, Md Monir; Short, Jodie; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2017-10-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between postnatal depression (PND) symptoms severity and structural neighborhood characteristics among women enrolled in a home visiting program. The sample included 295 mothers who were at risk for developing PND, observed as 3-month Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) scores ≥ 10. Two neighborhood predictor components (residential stability and social disadvantage) were analyzed as predictors of PND symptom severity using a generalized estimating equation. Residential stability was negatively associated with PND symptom severity. Social disadvantage was not found to be statistically significantly. The findings suggest that residential stability is associated with a reduction in PND symptom severity for women enrolled in home visiting program.

  14. A cluster randomised controlled effectiveness trial evaluating perinatal home visiting among South African mothers/infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus

    Full Text Available Interventions are needed to reduce poor perinatal health. We trained community health workers (CHWs as home visitors to address maternal/infant risks.In a cluster randomised controlled trial in Cape Town townships, neighbourhoods were randomised within matched pairs to 1 the control, healthcare at clinics (n = 12 neighbourhoods; n = 594 women, or 2 a home visiting intervention by CBW trained in cognitive-behavioural strategies to address health risks (by the Philani Maternal, Child Health and Nutrition Programme, in addition to clinic care (n = 12 neighbourhoods; n = 644 women. Participants were assessed during pregnancy (2% refusal and 92% were reassessed at two weeks post-birth, 88% at six months and 84% at 18 months later. We analysed 32 measures of maternal/infant well-being over the 18 month follow-up period using longitudinal random effects regressions. A binomial test for correlated outcomes evaluated overall effectiveness over time. The 18 month post-birth assessment outcomes also were examined alone and as a function of the number of home visits received.Benefits were found on 7 of 32 measures of outcomes, resulting in significant overall benefits for the intervention compared to the control when using the binomial test (p = 0.008; nevertheless, no effects were observed when only the 18 month outcomes were analyzed. Benefits on individual outcomes were related to the number of home visits received. Among women living with HIV, intervention mothers were more likely to implement the PMTCT regimens, use condoms during all sexual episodes (OR = 1.25; p = 0.014, have infants with healthy weight-for-age measurements (OR = 1.42; p = 0.045, height-for-age measurements (OR = 1.13, p<0.001, breastfeed exclusively for six months (OR = 3.59; p<0.001, and breastfeed longer (OR = 3.08; p<0.001. Number of visits was positively associated with infant birth weight ≥2500 grams (OR = 1.07; p = 0

  15. "For the dream of being here, one sacrifices...": voices of immigrant mothers in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Ruth

    2008-04-01

    Fourteen Latina immigrants participating in an innovative home visiting program for mothers of infants and young children at risk of child maltreatment were interviewed about their experiences coming to the United States, conditions they were living in after arriving, and perceptions of the intervention. Findings from the qualitative analyses detail rich, descriptive information regarding the struggles and adaptations of the immigrant mothers and families. Poverty in home countries propelled these women to move to the United States, leaving close family and sometimes children behind. Harrowing journeys to a new country are chronicled as well as the women's isolation and depression, and the strengths they utilized in adapting to new lives. Findings provide insight into the role of the bilingual/bicultural home visitors who were overwhelmingly perceived as helpful in providing emotional support, case management/advocacy, translation, education, and friendship. Implications include the need for mental health and social service providers to (a) appreciate viscerally the histories of immigrant clients, (b) understand the role of the home visitor-client relationship in enhancing client engagement and retention, and (c) recognize the multi-dimensional contribution of paraprofessional home visitors. Copyright 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. [Screening for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning by general practitioners in home visits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocheton, Nicolas; Machet, Ewa; Haouache, Hakim; Houdart, Eric; Huat, Georges; Claverot, José; Fortin, Bruno; Lapostolle, Frédéric

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the interest of carbon monoxide (CO) detector used by general practionners visiting patients at home. CO detector (cost: 200 euros) was attributed to 300 general practionners visiting at least 20 patients at home per week. Alarm was triggered when ambient CO concentration exceeded 80ppm. Measurement of CO in expired breath was also possible. Activity and alarms were prospectively collected. Circumstances of intoxication were recorded. Evaluation was finally performed. The end-poind was to quantify CO-poisoning detected by the use of the device and the cost of this stratégy. From November 2001 to November 2004, 65 scenes of intoxication with 79 victims were prospectively reported by 12 general practionners. Final evaluation revealed that 23 physicians omitted to declare alarms. Alarm incidence was of 1 for 17.527 visits; with a related cost of approximately 858 euros for 24 months. Ambient carbon monoxide concentration exceeded 200ppm in 25% of cases. Hospital admission was required for 91% of the victims. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was performed in two cases. General practionners (n=272) considered that CO detector was useful for safety reasons (91%), they wanted to continue the experience, but did not plan to buy such device (59%). Use of CO detectors by general practionners visiting patients at home allowed to identify 65 scenes of CO intoxication. In most cases, the cause of the visit did not suggested CO poisoning. The cost of the device seems to limits its large use. CO detector is a safety tool for both general prationners and patients. Its large use has to be questioned. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Effectiveness of Home Visits in Pregnancy as a Public Health Measure to Improve Birth Outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayoko Ichikawa

    Full Text Available Birth outcomes, such as preterm birth, low birth weight (LBW, and small for gestational age (SGA, are crucial indicators of child development and health.To evaluate whether home visits from public health nurses for high-risk pregnant women prevent adverse birth outcomes.In this quasi-experimental cohort study in Kyoto city, Japan, high-risk pregnant women were defined as teenage girls (range 14-19 years old, women with a twin pregnancy, women who registered their pregnancy late, had a physical or mental illness, were of single marital status, non-Japanese women who were not fluent in Japanese, or elderly primiparas. We collected data from all high-risk pregnant women at pregnancy registration interviews held at a public health centers between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012, as well as birth outcomes when delivered from the Maternal and Child Health Handbook (N = 964, which is a record of prenatal check-ups, delivery, child development and vaccinations. Of these women, 622 women were selected based on the home-visit program propensity score-matched sample (pair of N = 311 and included in the analysis. Data were analyzed between January and June 2014.In the propensity score-matched sample, women who received the home-visit program had lower odds of preterm birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.98 and showed a 0.55-week difference in gestational age (95% CI: 0.18 to 0.92 compared to the matched controlled sample. Although the program did not prevent LBW and SGA, children born to mothers who received the program showed an increase in birth weight by 107.8 g (95% CI: 27.0 to 188.5.Home visits by public health nurses for high-risk pregnant women in Japan might be effective in preventing preterm birth, but not SGA.

  18. Home Visits and Telephone Contacts for Preventing Early Childhood Caries could be Cost Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Susan O; Griffin, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Relative cost-effectiveness of home visits and telephone contacts in preventing early childhood caries. Koh R, Kularantna S, Gordon LG, Barnett AG, Walsh LJ, Seow WK. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2015;43:560-8. National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (government) and Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation (nonprofit). Markov model and Monte Carlo simulation where parameters are obtained from longitudinal intervention study, program data, and published data. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Patterns of depression among adolescent mothers: Resilience related to father support and home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, M Ann; Kotake, Chie; Raskin, Maryna; Bumgarner, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The negative consequences of maternal depression are a major public health concern, both for mothers and for their children. Despite the high prevalence of depression among adolescent mothers, little is known about the patterns of adolescent mothers' depression in the early parenting years. The present study examined mothers' depression during the first 2 years following childbirth in a sample of 428 young mothers (20 or younger at first childbirth) who were participants in a randomized controlled trial of a home visiting parenting support program. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the self-reported Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Mothers were classified into groups based on whether their depressive symptoms were below or above the cutoff for clinically significant symptomatology. Depression groups (stable nondepressed, stable depressed, remitted depression) were associated with variations in mothers' satisfaction with support from the baby's father and enrollment in the home visiting program. Maternal depression was more likely to remit when mothers were satisfied with father support; assignment to the home visiting program was associated with mothers remaining mentally healthy. Results have clinical and policy implications for prevention and intervention programs. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Is the Families First Home Visiting Program Effective in Reducing Child Maltreatment and Improving Child Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette J; Brownell, Marni D; Isaac, Michael R; Chateau, Dan; Nickel, Nathan C; Katz, Alan; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Hu, Milton; Taylor, Carole

    2017-05-01

    While home visiting programs are among the most widespread interventions to support at-risk families, there is a paucity of research investigating these programs under real-world conditions. The effectiveness of Families First home visiting (FFHV) was examined for decreasing rates of being in care of child welfare, decreasing hospitalizations for maltreatment-related injuries, and improving child development at school entry. Data for 4,562 children from home visiting and 5,184 comparison children were linked to deidentified administrative health, social services, and education data. FFHV was associated with lower rates of being in care by child's first, second, and third birthday (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 0.75, 0.79, and 0.81, respectively) and lower rates of hospitalization for maltreatment-related injuries by third birthday (aRR = 0.59). No differences were found in child development at kindergarten. FFHV should be offered to at-risk families to decrease child maltreatment. Program enhancements are required to improve child development at school entry.

  1. Is the Families First Home Visiting Program Effective in Reducing Child Maltreatment and Improving Child Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Marni D.; Isaac, Michael R.; Chateau, Dan; Nickel, Nathan C.; Katz, Alan; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Hu, Milton; Taylor, Carole

    2017-01-01

    While home visiting programs are among the most widespread interventions to support at-risk families, there is a paucity of research investigating these programs under real-world conditions. The effectiveness of Families First home visiting (FFHV) was examined for decreasing rates of being in care of child welfare, decreasing hospitalizations for maltreatment-related injuries, and improving child development at school entry. Data for 4,562 children from home visiting and 5,184 comparison children were linked to deidentified administrative health, social services, and education data. FFHV was associated with lower rates of being in care by child’s first, second, and third birthday (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] = 0.75, 0.79, and 0.81, respectively) and lower rates of hospitalization for maltreatment-related injuries by third birthday (aRR = 0.59). No differences were found in child development at kindergarten. FFHV should be offered to at-risk families to decrease child maltreatment. Program enhancements are required to improve child development at school entry. PMID:28413917

  2. Characteristics of communication with older people in home care: A qualitative analysis of audio recordings of home care visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Dorte V; Sundler, Annelie J; Eide, Hilde; Hafskjold, Linda; Ruud, Iren; Holmström, Inger K

    2017-12-01

    To describe the characteristics of communication practice in home care visits between older people (over 65 years old) and nurse assistants and to discuss the findings from a person-centered perspective. The older population is increasing worldwide, along with the need for healthcare services in the person's home. To achieve a high-quality care, person-centered communication is crucial. A descriptive design with a qualitative inductive approach was used. Fifteen audio recordings of naturally occurring conversations between 12 nurse assistants and 13 older people in Norway were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Four categories were revealed through analysis: (i) supporting older people's connection to everyday life; (ii) supporting older people's involvement in their own care; (iii) attention to older people's bodily and existential needs; and (iv) the impact of continuity and predictability on older people's well-being. The communication between the older people and the nurse assistants during home care visits was mainly task-oriented, but also related to the person. The older people were involved in the tasks to be carried out and humour was part of the communication. Greater attention was paid to bodily than existential needs. The communication was connected with the older people's everyday life in several ways. Time frames and interruptions concern the older people; hearing and speech impairments were a challenge to communication. To enhance person-centred communication, further studies are needed, especially intervention studies for healthcare professionals and students. Being responsive to older people's subjective experiences is important in meeting their needs in home care. Communication that addresses the need for trust and predictability is important for older people. Responding to existential needs require more attention. The home care setting has an impact on communication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Impact of patient requests on provider-perceived visit difficulty in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Joshua J; Franks, Peter; Feldman, Mitchell D; Jerant, Anthony; Henry, Stephen G; Paterniti, Debora A; Kravitz, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    "Difficult visits" are common in primary care and may contribute to primary care provider (PCP) career dissatisfaction and burnout. Patient requests occur in approximately half of primary care visits and may be a source of clinician-patient miscommunication or conflict, contributing to perceived visit difficulty. We aimed to determine associations between types of patient requests and PCP-perceived visit difficulty. This was an observational study, nested in a multicenter randomized trial of depression engagement interventions. We included 824 patient visits within 135 PCP practices in Northern California occurring from June 2010 to March 2012. PCP-perceived visit difficulty was quantified using a three-item scale (relative visit difficulty, amount of effort required, and amount of time required; Cronbach's α = 0.81). Using linear regression, the difficulty scale (score range 0-2 from least to most difficult) was modeled as a function of: patient requests for diagnostics tests, pain medications, and specialist referrals; PCP perception of likely depression or likely substance abuse; patient sociodemographics, comorbidity, depression; PCP characteristics and practice setting. Patients requested diagnostic tests, pain medications, and specialist referrals in 37.2, 20.0 and 30.0 % of visits, respectively. After adjustment for patient medical and psychiatric complexity, perceived difficulty was significantly higher when patients requested diagnostic tests [parameter estimate (PE) 0.11, (95 % CI: 0.03, 0.20)] but not when patients requested pain medications [PE -0.04 (95 % CI: -0.15, 0.08)] or referrals [PE 0.04 (95 % CI: -0.07, 0.25)]. PCP-perceived visit difficulty is associated with patient requests for diagnostic tests, but not requests for pain medications or specialist referrals. In this era of "choosing wisely," PCPs may be challenged to respond to diagnostic test requests in an evidence-based manner, while maintaining the provider-patient relationship

  4. Five types of home-visit nursing agencies in Japan based on characteristics of service delivery: cluster analysis of three nationwide surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sakiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Fujita, Junko

    2014-12-20

    -centered (2246, 43.5%). This five categorization system of home-visit nursing agencies could ensure appropriate healthcare policies that will allow agencies to provide better home-visit nursing services based on their patient and staff characteristics and regional needs. The findings would be valuable both in Japan as well as in other countries with rapidly growing aging populations.

  5. Variation in Quality of Urgent Health Care Provided During Commercial Virtual Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Adam J; Davies, Jason M; Marafino, Ben J; Dean, Mitzi; DeJong, Colette; Bardach, Naomi S; Kazi, Dhruv S; Boscardin, W John; Lin, Grace A; Duseja, Reena; Mei, Y John; Mehrotra, Ateev; Dudley, R Adams

    2016-05-01

    .4%). No statistically significant variation in guideline adherence by mode of communication (videoconference vs telephone vs webchat) was found. Significant variation in quality was found among companies providing virtual visits for management of common acute illnesses. More variation was found in performance for some conditions than for others, but no variation by mode of communication.

  6. Therapeutic effects of dog visits in nursing homes for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thodberg, Karen; Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Christensen, Janne Winther; Poulsen, Pia Haun; Houbak, Birthe; Damgaard, Vibeke; Keseler, Ingrid; Edwards, David; Videbech, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that visiting dogs can have positive effects on elderly people in nursing homes. We wanted to study the effects of biweekly dog visits on sleep patterns and the psychiatric well-being of elderly people. A total of 100 residents (median age: 85.5 years; [79; 90]) from four nursing homes were randomly assigned to receive biweekly visits for 6 weeks from a person accompanied by either a dog, a robot seal (PARO), or a soft toy cat. Sleep patterns were measured using actigraphy technology before, during (the third and sixth week), and after the series of visits. The participants were weighed and scored on the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Gottfries-Bråne-Steen Scale, and the Mini-Mental State Examination before and after the visit period. We found that sleep duration (min) increased in the third week when visitors were accompanied by a dog rather than the robot seal or soft toy cat (dog: 610 ± 127 min; seal: 498 ± 146 min; cat: 540 ± 163 min; F2,37 = 4.99; P = 0.01). No effects were found in the sixth week or after the visit period had ended. We found that visit type had no effect on weight (F2,88 = 0.13; P > 0.05), body mass index (F2,86 = 0.33; P > 0.05), Geriatric Depression Scale (F2,82 = 0.85; P > 0.05), Gottfries-Bråne-Steen Scale (F2,90 = 0.41; P > 0.05), or Mini-Mental State Examination (F2,91 = 0.35; P > 0.05). Furthermore, we found a decrease in the Geriatric Depression Scale during the experimental period (S = -420; P Mental State Examination score (S = -483; P mental state of the participants. The causal relationship between sleep duration and dog-accompanied visits remains to be explored. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  7. A new pulmonary rehabilitation maintenance strategy through home-visiting and phone contact in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Yi Li,1,2 Jing Feng,3,4 Yuechuan Li,2 Wei Jia,2 Hongyu Qian2 1Graduate School, Tianjin Medical University, 2Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Tianjin Chest Hospital, 3Respiratory Department, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 4Neuropharmacology Section, Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: The benefit of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR for patients with COPD diminishes over time. We investigated a new strategy involving home-visit and phone contact and compared this to usual care in maintenance of PR benefits.Methods: A total of 172 stable COPD patients receiving 8-week PR program were recruited for this prospective study. Patients were allocated into usual care group (UC and PR maintenance group (PRMG randomly. Patients in PRMG participated in maintenance strategy at home under supervision through home-visit and phone contact. The 6-minute walking test (6MWT, COPD assessment test (CAT, and modified Medical Research Council scale (mMRC scores were evaluated every 3 months.Results: Of the total, 151 patients completed 8-week PR program with satisfactory PR results (p<0.001, and 104 patients finished the follow-up. The clinical improvements in 6MWT, CAT, and mMRC scores were maintained (p<0.001 in PRMG. In comparison, the benefit of PR diminished gradually in UC. The differences in 6MWT, CAT, and mMRC scores between groups were observed 6, 9, and 6 months after PR, respectively (p<0.05. Total frequency of exacerbations in PRMG was lower than UC (p=0.021.Conclusion: Maintenance strategy involving home-visit and phone contact is superior to usual care to preserve PR benefits, and reduces the acute COPD exacerbation rate. Keywords: COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, 6-minute walking test, COPD assessment test, maintenance 

  8. [Population density, age distribution and urbanisation as factors influencing the frequency of home visits--an analysis for Mecklenburg-West Pomerania].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, R; Weitmann, K; Weiss, S; Thierfelder, D; Flessa, S; Hoffmann, W

    2009-07-01

    This study examines and compares the frequency of home visits by general practitioners in regions with a lower population density and regions with a higher population density. The discussion centres on the hypothesis whether the number of home visits in rural and remote areas with a low population density is, in fact, higher than in urbanised areas with a higher population density. The average age of the population has been considered in both cases. The communities of Mecklenburg West-Pomerania were aggregated into postal code regions. The analysis is based on these postal code regions. The average frequency of home visits per 100 inhabitants/km2 has been calculated via a bivariate, linear regression model with the population density and the average age for the postal code region as independent variables. The results are based on billing data of the year 2006 as provided by the Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. In a second step a variable which clustered the postal codes of urbanised areas was added to a multivariate model. The hypothesis of a negative correlation between the frequency of home visits and the population density of the areas examined cannot be confirmed for Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. Following the dichotomisation of the postal code regions into sparsely and densely populated areas, only the very sparsely populated postal code regions (less than 100 inhabitants/km2) show a tendency towards a higher frequency of home visits. Overall, the frequency of home visits in sparsely populated postal code regions is 28.9% higher than in the densely populated postal code regions (more than 100 inhabitants/km2), although the number of general practitioners is approximately the same in both groups. In part this association seems to be confirmed by a positive correlation between the average age in the individual postal code regions and the number of home visits carried out in the area. As calculated on the

  9. Negotiating a healthy body in old age: preventive home visits and biopolitics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Otto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The study discussed in this article sheds light on how a specific publichealth policy, the preventive home visit (PHV aimed at senior citizens, is implemented at the local level in Denmark. Empirically the article calls attention to what is actually going on in a preventive practice, based on participant observations, interviews and ten years#&8217; worth of visitation records. Theoretically, the article applies a Foucauldian biopolitical approach that understands the visits as an implementation of the active ageing scheme, as the notion of prevention is practised as a continuous process, which is utilised to train people#&8217;s gazes and sensitivity, and teach them to recognise ‘‘activity’’ as closely linked to future well-being and longevity. An important finding is that the intervention is not normalising in a deterministic way but rather negotiable. Even though the home visitors represent a health regimen where activity is interpreted as bodily exercise, they try to avoid the tendency to prescribe for older people. Rather than prevention in the strict sense, it seems to be a health promotion strategy that encourages older people to articulate their needs. The meeting between the health visitor and the older person is characterised by conversations and negotiations about health, autonomy and bodily experiences.

  10. Replicating Evidence-Based Practices with Flexibility for Perinatal Home Visiting by Paraprofessionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Fuller, Erin J; Swendeman, Dallas; Becker, Kimberly D; Daleiden, Eric; Chorpita, Bruce; Harris, Danielle M; Mercer, Neil T; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2017-12-01

    Introduction Strategies are needed to improve the efficacy of paraprofessional home visitors for pregnant women in the United States. This study evaluates the maternal and child outcomes when evidence-based practices (EBP) are replicated with flexibility, rather than fidelity to a manualized intervention. Methods Pregnant mothers (N = 203) in five clinics were recruited in the waiting rooms and randomized to standard clinic care as the control condition (n = 104) or standard care plus home visiting (n = 99). Home visitors (n = 9) were selected, trained in foundational skills common to EBP and four problem domains (weight control, breastfeeding, daily habits, and depression). Independent interviewers assessed targeted outcomes at birth (82%) and 6 months later (83%). Home visitors, called Mentor Mothers [MM], made an average of 14.9 home visits or telephone contacts (SD = 9; total contacts = 1491) addressing maternal daily habits, breastfeeding, and depression. Intervention and control mothers were similar in weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), depression and social support at baseline and 6 months later. The percentage of low birth weight babies was similar; intervention infants' growth (weight/height Z score) tended to be significantly better compared to the control condition. There are many explanations for the failure to find significant benefits: insufficient statistical power; the benefits of repeated assessments by warm, supportive peers to improve outcomes; or the failure of EBP and the need to maintain replication with fidelity. All study mothers had better outcomes than documented among comparable published samples of low-income, Latina and Korean-American mothers in Los Angeles, CA. ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT01687634.

  11. Exploring patients' reasons for participation in a medical education home visit program: a qualitative study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chai-Eng; Jaffar, Aida; Tohit, Noorlaili; Hamzah, Zuhra; Hashim, Syahnaz Mohd

    2017-06-01

    Direct contact with patients for medical education is essential in healthcare professional training. Patients who were recruited for a medical education home visit program in Malaysia did so on a voluntary basis without remuneration. This paper aims to explore their reasons for participation in this program. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted on patients who had been visited during the 2012/2013 academic session. Purposive sampling was done to select adult participants from varying ethnicities and ages from the list of patients. In-depth interviews were conducted at the participants' homes and were audio recorded. The transcripts of these interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. A total of nine in-depth interviews were conducted. Four main themes were identified from thematic analysis: 1) Perceived meaning of the visit; 2) Perceived benefits and risks; 3) Past healthcare experiences; 4) Availability for visits. The home visits meant different things to different participants, including a teaching-learning encounter, a social visit, a charitable deed or a healthcare check-up. The benefits and risks of accepting unknown students to their homes and sharing their health issues with them had been weighed prior to participation. Prior experience with healthcare services such as gratitude to healthcare providers or having a relative in the healthcare profession increased their receptivity for involvement. Lastly, enabling factors such as availability of time would determine their acceptance for home visits. Patients agree to participate in medical education activities on a voluntary basis for various reasons. Providing good healthcare service and sufficient preparation are crucial to increase patient receptivity for such activities.

  12. Preventive home visits to older people in Denmark--why, how, by whom, and when?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, M; Avlund, K; Hendriksen, C

    2007-01-01

    In Denmark, political decisions improved the implementation of 'preventative thinking' into every-day clinical work. The potential benefits of preventive efforts have been supported by legislative and administrative incentives, and an ongoing effort to remain focused on the benefits of these init......In Denmark, political decisions improved the implementation of 'preventative thinking' into every-day clinical work. The potential benefits of preventive efforts have been supported by legislative and administrative incentives, and an ongoing effort to remain focused on the benefits...... of these initiatives towards older people is politically formulated and underlined as part of the new structured municipality reform. Evidence of beneficial effects of health promotion and prevention of disease in old age is well documented. In-home visits with individualised assessments make it possible to reach...... older persons not normally seen in the health care system. In-home assessment is not just a health check, but also an opportunity to meet individual needs that may be of importance for older people to stay independent. Preventive home visits may be part of an overall culture and strategy to avoid...

  13. Examining Maternal Depression and Attachment Insecurity as Moderators of the Impacts of Home Visiting for At-Risk Mothers and Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne K.; Berlin, Lisa J.; Cassidy, Jude; Burrell, Lori; Tandon, S. Darius

    2009-01-01

    Home visiting programs for at-risk mothers and their infants have proliferated nationally in recent years, yet experimental studies of home visiting have yielded mixed findings. One promising strategy for explicating the effects of early home visiting is to examine moderators of program impacts. This study assessed the roles of maternal depression…

  14. Propensity for paying home visits among general practitioners and the associations with cancer patients' place of care and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Anna K; Hjertholm, Peter; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of associations between home visits by general practitioners and end-of-life care for cancer patients have been subject to confounding. AIM: To analyse associations between general practitioners' propensity to pay home visits and the likelihood of hospitalisation...... and dying out of hospital among their cancer patients. DESIGN: A national register cohort study with an ecological exposure. Standardised incidence rates of general practitioner home visits were calculated as a measure for propensity. Practices were grouped into propensity quartiles. Associations between......-years); of whom 116,677 died from cancer. General practitioners were grouped into quartiles based on the general practitioners' propensity to pay home visits, which varied 6.6-fold between quartiles. Cancer patients in Group 4 (highest propensity) were less hospitalised than patients in Group 1 (lowest propensity...

  15. EFEKTIVITAS HOME VISIT TERHADAP PERUBAHAN PENGETAHUAN, SIKAP, DAN KETERAMPILAN KLIEN TBC DI WILAYAH PUSKESMAS KECAMATAN PASAR MINGGU JAKARTA SELATAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Chairani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Home Visit represent materialization of nurse caring to problems of health faced by client in society, including  the problem of tuberkulosis. DKI Jakarta is one of the province having tuberkulosis prevalensi above national prevalensi that is 1,26%. Through visit home nurse of community get information about growth of health of client of tuberkulosis, running effort off is make-up of health, watching growth of run by medication of client, and also assist tired family and client of its independence level. This research aim to obtain; get picture about visit home efektivitas to make-up of knowledge, attitude, and is skilled of client of tuberkulosis in the effort operation  of failure of medication. Design this research is experiment kuasi with approach of pre-post  test with group control and intervention  group. lntervence in this research is to conduct to visit home counted 4 times visit conducted activity during visit home. Activity during visit home is continuation giving of education of health which have been given by Puskesmas, giving conseling, care direct, family entangling and society. This Research sampel is adult client of Positive BTA or client of BTA negative of positive thorax photo (old and new case which get medication of tuberkulosis during 6-8 months in the year 2009, comparison between group intervence and control 1:1 (33 group people intervence and 33 control group people, so that totalize sampel is 66 people. Result of test of t-paired prove there is difference which is very have a meaning of at knowledge, attitude, and is skilled of client about treatment and medication of tuberkulosis after done with 4 times visit home compared to previously. Result of test of t-pooled prove there is difference  which is very have a meaning  of  at knowledge, attitude, and is skilled of client about treatment and medication of tuberkulosis between group intervence  after conducted four times visit home with control group which do

  16. Are home visits an effective method for diabetes management? A quantitative systematic review and meta?analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Lin; Ma, Yuxia; Wei, Suhong; Tian, Jinhui; Yang, Xiaochun; Shen, Xiping; Zhang, Jun; Shi, Yuexian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction Previous reviews have revealed uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of home visit interventions for managing diabetes. Therefore, we carried out a quantitative systematic review and meta?analysis to evaluate the effects of home visit interventions among patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods We searched various electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, Wanfang and Chinese scientific full?text databases) from their ince...

  17. A retrospective examination of in-home educational visits to reduce childhood lead levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)]|[Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Preventive Medicine; Pawel, D. [QuanTech, Rosslyn, VA (United States); Murphy, A. [Milwaukee Health Dept., WI (United States)

    1999-05-01

    A number of human health effects from lead are well known. However, the means for reducing lead exposure in children has been a subject of uncertainty. This paper presents results of a retrospective study of educational lead reduction interventions in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for children who had elevated blood lead levels between 20 and 24 {micro}g/dl. The study examined Milwaukee Health Department (MHD) records of baseline and follow-up blood lead measurements. A study group of children received an in-home educational visit by an MHD paraprofessional. The educational visits last about an hour and the importance of reducing lead exposure, nutritional suggestions, and dust clean-up practices and behavioral changes that can reduce lead exposure are discussed. After the intervention, the average observed blood lead level declined by 4.2 {micro}g/dl or by about 21%. A decline of 1.2 {micro}g/dl (6%) was also observed in a reference group of 226 children who did not receive an MHD in-home visit. The decline in the reference group may be partially due to education at the clinics taking the blood samples. The study group had a decline in blood lead levels 3.1 {micro}g/dl (15%) greater than the reference group, with the difference between groups being statistically significant with a P value of less than 0.001. Although significant exposures remained in most of the children studied, important lead reductions were observed with this relatively inexpensive and simple intervention. Education in the homes of families at risk for lead poisoning may be an effective component of programs to reduce blood lead levels.

  18. 36 Month Outcomes of a Generalist Paraprofessional Perinatal Home Visiting Intervention in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlinson, Mark; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; le Roux, Ingrid M.; Youssef, Maryann; Nelson, Sandahl H.; Scheffler, Aaron; Weiss, Robert E.; O'connor, Mary; Worthman, Carol M.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all pregnant women (98%) in 24 Cape Town neighborhoods were randomized by neighborhood to: 1) the standard care (SC) condition (n=12 neighborhoods; n=594 pregnant women), or 2) the Philani Intervention Program (PIP) in which home visits by Community Health Workers (CHW) were conducted (n=12 neighborhoods; n=644 pregnant women). At 36 months post-birth (84.6% follow-up) PIP mothers were significantly less depressed at compared to the SC mothers. Children in PIP are significantly less li...

  19. Families First Home Visiting programme reduces population-level child health and social inequities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette; Nickel, Nathan C; Chateau, Dan; Enns, Jennifer E; Isaac, Michael R; Katz, Alan; Sarkar, Joykrishna; Burland, Elaine; Taylor, Carole; Brownell, Marni

    2018-01-01

    Home visiting has been shown to reduce child maltreatment and improve child health outcomes. In this observational study, we explored whether Families First, a home visiting programme in Manitoba, Canada, decreased population-level inequities in children being taken into care of child welfare and receiving complete childhood immunisations. De-identified administrative health and social services data for children born 2003-2009 in Manitoba were linked to home visiting programme data. Programme eligibility was determined by screening for family risk factors. We compared probabilities of being taken into care and receiving immunisations among programme children (n=4575), eligible children who did not receive the programme (n=5186) and the general child population (n=87 897) and tested inequities using differences of risk differences (DRDs) and ratios of risk ratios (RRRs). Programme children were less likely to be taken into care (probability (95% CI) at age 1, programme 7.5 (7.0 to 8.0) vs non-programme 10.0 (10.0 to 10.1)) and more likely to receive complete immunisations (probability at age 1, programme 77.3 (76.5 to 78.0) vs non-programme 73.2 (72.1 to 74.3)). Inequities between programme children and the general population were reduced for both outcomes (being taken into care at age 1, DRD -2.5 (-3.7 to 1.2) and RRR 0.8 (0.7 to 0.9); complete immunisation at age 1, DRD 4.1 (2.2 to 6.0) and RRR 1.1 (1.0 to 1.1)); these inequities were also significantly reduced at age 2. Home visiting programmes should be recognised as effective strategies for improving child outcomes and reducing population-level health and social inequities. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Can typical US home visits affect infant attachment? Preliminary findings from a randomized trial of Healthy Families Durham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Lisa J; Martoccio, Tiffany L; Appleyard Carmody, Karen; Goodman, W Benjamin; O'Donnell, Karen; Williams, Janis; Murphy, Robert A; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2017-12-01

    US government-funded early home visiting services are expanding significantly. The most widely implemented home visiting models target at-risk new mothers and their infants. Such home visiting programs typically aim to support infant-parent relationships; yet, such programs' effects on infant attachment quality per se are as yet untested. Given these programs' aims, and the crucial role of early attachments in human development, it is important to understand attachment processes in home visited families. The current, preliminary study examined 94 high-risk mother-infant dyads participating in a randomized evaluation of the Healthy Families Durham (HFD) home visiting program. We tested (a) infant attachment security and disorganization as predictors of toddler behavior problems and (b) program effects on attachment security and disorganization. We found that (a) infant attachment disorganization (but not security) predicted toddler behavior problems and (b) participation in HFD did not significantly affect infant attachment security or disorganization. Findings are discussed in terms of the potential for attachment-specific interventions to enhance the typical array of home visiting services.

  1. Economic evaluation of the differential benefits of home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only in transitional discharge support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; So, Ching; Chau, June; Law, Antony Kwan Pui; Tam, Stanley Ku Fu; McGhee, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    home visits and telephone calls are two often used approaches in transitional care, but their differential economic effects are unknown. to examine the differential economic benefits of home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only in transitional discharge support. cost-effectiveness analysis conducted alongside a randomised controlled trial (RCT). patients discharged from medical units randomly assigned to control (control, N = 210), home visits with calls (home, N = 196) and calls only (call, N = 204). cost-effectiveness analyses were conducted from the societal perspective comparing monetary benefits and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. the home arm was less costly but less effective at 28 days and was dominating (less costly and more effective) at 84 days. The call arm was dominating at both 28 and 84 days. The incremental QALY for the home arm was -0.0002/0.0008 (28/84 days), and the call arm was 0.0022/0.0104 (28/84 days). When the three groups were compared, the call arm had a higher probability being cost-effective at 84 days but not at 28 days (home: 53%, call: 35% (28 days) versus home: 22%, call: 73% (84 days)) measuring against the NICE threshold of £20,000. the original RCT showed that the bundled intervention involving home visits and calls was more effective than calls only in the reduction of hospital readmissions. This study adds a cost perspective to inform policymakers that both home visits and calls only are cost-effective for transitional care support, but calls only have a higher chance of being cost-effective for a sustained period after intervention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  2. Motivation to take part in integrated care - an assessment of follow-up home visits to elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Hjelmar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of follow-up visits by the general practitioner and district nurse (within a week after discharge from hospital is to reduce hospital readmissions and improve the overall wellbeing of the patient. There is strong evidence that these programmes are effective, but are difficult to implement because of a number of organizational obstacles, including co-ordination between the organizations involved in the process. In this paper we look at the factors that affect motivation to participate in a cross-sectoral programme in Copenhagen, Denmark, implementing follow-up home visits to elderly persons.Theory and methods: The analysis is based on inter-organisational network theory in an attempt to explain the role of motivation in network formation between organizational systems. The empirical findings are based on focus groups and in-depth interviews with hospital staff, general practitioners, and district nurses.Results: Care providers are motivated to collaborate by a number of factors. The focus of collaboration needs to be clearly defined and agreed upon, there needs to be a high degree of equality between the professionals involved, and there has to be a will to co-operate based on a shared understanding of values and learning potentials.Conclusions: The study concludes that we need to focus on specific care fields and actors to reduce complexity in the area and more fully understand what motivates care providers to participate in cross-sectoral activities such as a follow-up home visit programme. One lesson for current policy is that motivational factors need to be addressed in future collaborative programs in order to fully exploit the potential health benefits.

  3. Motivation to take part in integrated care - an assessment of follow-up home visits to elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Hjelmar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of follow-up visits by the general practitioner and district nurse (within a week after discharge from hospital is to reduce hospital readmissions and improve the overall wellbeing of the patient. There is strong evidence that these programmes are effective, but are difficult to implement because of a number of organizational obstacles, including co-ordination between the organizations involved in the process. In this paper we look at the factors that affect motivation to participate in a cross-sectoral programme in Copenhagen, Denmark, implementing follow-up home visits to elderly persons. Theory and methods: The analysis is based on inter-organisational network theory in an attempt to explain the role of motivation in network formation between organizational systems. The empirical findings are based on focus groups and in-depth interviews with hospital staff, general practitioners, and district nurses. Results: Care providers are motivated to collaborate by a number of factors. The focus of collaboration needs to be clearly defined and agreed upon, there needs to be a high degree of equality between the professionals involved, and there has to be a will to co-operate based on a shared understanding of values and learning potentials. Conclusions: The study concludes that we need to focus on specific care fields and actors to reduce complexity in the area and more fully understand what motivates care providers to participate in cross-sectoral activities such as a follow-up home visit programme. One lesson for current policy is that motivational factors need to be addressed in future collaborative programs in order to fully exploit the potential health benefits.

  4. Patient- and Clinic Visit-Related Factors Associated with Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use among Older Home Healthcare Service Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chirn-Bin; Lai, Hsiu-Yun; Yang, Shu-Yu; Wu, Ru-Shu; Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Hsu, Hsiu-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Taiwanese National Health Insurance (TNHI) provides home healthcare services to patients with skilled nursing needs who were homebound or lived in nursing homes. Studies on potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) for older home healthcare service recipients (HHSRs) are growing, but comparisons among newer criteria of PIMs have not been applied. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and correlates of PIMs based on three different instruments published after 2010 among older HHSRs. Materials and Methods We performed cross-sectional analysis of the TNHI Research Database. A total of 25,187 HHSRs aged more than 65 years in 2009 were included. Medication lists independent of chronic conditions from the 2012 Beers criteria, PIM-Taiwan criteria, and the PRISCUS (Latin for “old and venerable”) criteria were used. Analysis was performed separately at patient and clinic-visit level. T-tests, chi-square analysis, and multivariate logistic regressions were used where appropriate. Results The prevalence of having at least one PIM at patient and clinic-visit level was highest with the Beers (82.67%, 36.14% respectively), followed by the PRISCUS (68.49%, 25.13%) and PIM-Taiwan (63.04%, 19.21%) criteria. At patient level, polypharmacy (odds ratio (OR) 2.53 to 4.90), higher number of clinic (OR 1.15 to 1.41), hospital (OR 1.24 to 1.64), and physician (OR 1.15 to 1.41) visits were associated with PIM use for all 3 sets of criteria. At clinic-visit level, internist/family physicians (OR 1.26 to 1.72) and neurologists/psychiatrists (OR 1.73 to 5.87) were more likely to prescribe PIMs than others. Psychotropic drugs and first generation antihistamines accounted for most of the top ten PIMs. Conclusion The prevalence of PIMs was high among older Taiwanese HHSRs. Polypharmacy and certain medical specialties were associated with a higher likelihood of PIM prescriptions. Provider education and medication review and reconciliation should be considered. PMID

  5. Patient- and clinic visit-related factors associated with potentially inappropriate medication use among older home healthcare service recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirn-Bin Chang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Taiwanese National Health Insurance (TNHI provides home healthcare services to patients with skilled nursing needs who were homebound or lived in nursing homes. Studies on potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs for older home healthcare service recipients (HHSRs are growing, but comparisons among newer criteria of PIMs have not been applied. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and correlates of PIMs based on three different instruments published after 2010 among older HHSRs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed cross-sectional analysis of the TNHI Research Database. A total of 25,187 HHSRs aged more than 65 years in 2009 were included. Medication lists independent of chronic conditions from the 2012 Beers criteria, PIM-Taiwan criteria, and the PRISCUS (Latin for "old and venerable" criteria were used. Analysis was performed separately at patient and clinic-visit level. T-tests, chi-square analysis, and multivariate logistic regressions were used where appropriate. RESULTS: The prevalence of having at least one PIM at patient and clinic-visit level was highest with the Beers (82.67%, 36.14% respectively, followed by the PRISCUS (68.49%, 25.13% and PIM-Taiwan (63.04%, 19.21% criteria. At patient level, polypharmacy (odds ratio (OR 2.53 to 4.90, higher number of clinic (OR 1.15 to 1.41, hospital (OR 1.24 to 1.64, and physician (OR 1.15 to 1.41 visits were associated with PIM use for all 3 sets of criteria. At clinic-visit level, internist/family physicians (OR 1.26 to 1.72 and neurologists/psychiatrists (OR 1.73 to 5.87 were more likely to prescribe PIMs than others. Psychotropic drugs and first generation antihistamines accounted for most of the top ten PIMs. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of PIMs was high among older Taiwanese HHSRs. Polypharmacy and certain medical specialties were associated with a higher likelihood of PIM prescriptions. Provider education and medication review and reconciliation should be considered.

  6. Home visitation program for detecting, evaluating and treating socially withdrawn youth in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sik; Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Tae Young; Choi, Jin Tae

    2013-05-01

    The problems of youth social withdrawal (or hikikomori) became a hot-button social issue in Japan in the 1990s. Unfortunately, current nosology in the DSM-IV may not adequately capture the concept of socially withdrawn youth (SWY) or hikikomori. This study aimed to investigate core SWY issues, evaluate SWY's psychopathologies, and approach them therapeutically through a home visitation program. Participants were 65 youth referred by community mental health centers and psychiatric clinics around Seoul and Kyongki-Do province. Among them, only 41 participants (31 male, 10 female, mean age 15 ± 3.6 years) fit our SWY criteria. In addition, 248 middle and high school students in Seoul were recruited as a baseline control group. Caseworkers interviewed the SWY participants and their parents in their homes, using our structured interview manual and a number of psychiatric scales. Caseworkers also approached the participants therapeutically. Participants' Depression Inventory, Trait Anxiety Inventory, Social Anxiety Scale, and Internet Addiction Scale scores were significantly higher than those of baseline controls. Participants' mean number of psychotherapeutic sessions was 2.8, and the mean number of parental interview sessions was 3.4. After the therapeutic sessions, Global Assessment Functioning scores and social activities had improved somewhat in 68.3% of participants. These findings suggest that SWY is a complex phenomenon, so an individual psychopathologic process is very important for treatment. The most difficult problem in SWY treatment was therapeutic access. Hence, the home visit approach with a structured manual may be a good gateway for solving this problem. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  7. Association Between Home Visit Programs and Emergency Preparedness Among Elderly Vulnerable People in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, W Kathy; Agho, Kingsley; Williams Tetteh, Vera

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the association between home visit programs and emergency preparedness among elderly vulnerable people in New South Wales, Australia. Method: The study used data acquired from an intervention program run by emergency agencies and consisted of 370 older people. Seven emergency outcome measures were examined by adjusting for key demographic factors, using a generalized estimating equation model, to examine the association between home visit programs and emergency preparedness. Results: The study revealed that knowledge demonstrated by participants during visits and post home visits showed significant improvements in the seven emergency outcome measures. The odds of finding out what emergencies might affect one's area were significantly lower among older participants who were born outside Australia and those who were women. Discussion: The findings suggest that the intervention via home visits and periodic reminders post these visits may be a useful intervention in improving emergency preparedness among older people, especially among men and those who were born outside of Australia. In addition, other reminders such as safety messaging via mobile or landline telephone calls may also be a supplementary and useful intervention to improve emergency preparedness among older people.

  8. Association Between Home Visit Programs and Emergency Preparedness Among Elderly Vulnerable People in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kathy Tannous PhD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the association between home visit programs and emergency preparedness among elderly vulnerable people in New South Wales, Australia. Method: The study used data acquired from an intervention program run by emergency agencies and consisted of 370 older people. Seven emergency outcome measures were examined by adjusting for key demographic factors, using a generalized estimating equation model, to examine the association between home visit programs and emergency preparedness. Results: The study revealed that knowledge demonstrated by participants during visits and post home visits showed significant improvements in the seven emergency outcome measures. The odds of finding out what emergencies might affect one’s area were significantly lower among older participants who were born outside Australia and those who were women. Discussion: The findings suggest that the intervention via home visits and periodic reminders post these visits may be a useful intervention in improving emergency preparedness among older people, especially among men and those who were born outside of Australia. In addition, other reminders such as safety messaging via mobile or landline telephone calls may also be a supplementary and useful intervention to improve emergency preparedness among older people.

  9. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  10. Promoting father involvement in early home visiting services for vulnerable families: Findings from a pilot study of "Dads matter".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Neil B; Bellamy, Jennifer L; Banman, Aaron

    2018-02-01

    Despite mounting evidence on the importance of fathers in children's development, evidence-based perinatal home visitation programs have largely overlooked fathers in the design and delivery of services. This paper describes the design, development, and pilot testing of the "Dads Matter" enhancement to standard home visiting services. Dads Matter is a manualized intervention package designed to fully incorporate fathers into perinatal home visiting services. Twenty-four families were enrolled in a pilot study to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of the intervention. Using a quasi-experimental time-lagged design, 12 families received standard home visiting services and completed baseline and four-month post-tests. Home visitor staff were then trained and supervised to implement the Dads Matter enhancement in addition to standard services. Twelve additional families were then enrolled and completed baseline and four-month post-tests. Implementation data indicated that Dads Matter was implemented as planned. Cohen's d scores on outcome measures indicate positive trends associated with Dads Matter in the quality of the mother-father relationship, perceived stress reported by both parents, fathers' involvement with the child, maltreatment indicators, and fathers' verbalizations toward the infant. Effect sizes generally ranged from moderate to large in magnitude and were larger than overall effect sizes of home visitation services alone reported in prior meta-analyses. Dads Matter appears to be a feasible, acceptable, and promising approach to improving fathers' engagement in home visiting services and promoting family and child well-being. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Disparity in Crohn's disease activity between home and clinics is associated with unscheduled hospital visits due to disease flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Yoo Jin; Jang, Byung Ik; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Hyun Seok; Jeon, Seong Woo; Kwak, Sang Gyu

    2018-01-17

    E-health technologies have been implemented for the management of Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to identify differences between patient activities at home and at routine clinic visits using a web-based self-reporting CD symptom diary (CDSD) and to determine the impact of this disparity on clinical outcomes. Patients with CD from three tertiary hospitals were invited to assess their symptoms at least once a week using CDSD. We identified patients who showed disparities in disease activity (high activity at home but normal at the next hospital visit) and evaluated clinical outcomes of these patients such as unscheduled visits due to flares using Kaplan-Meier analyses. One hundred and forty-three patients recorded their symptoms weekly for at least 3 consecutive months and were included. Forty-eight patients (33.6%) showed disparate disease activities between at home and at the next outpatient clinic visit. The cumulative risk of unscheduled visits was significantly higher in this disparity group than in the concordant group (p = 0.001). Disparity in activity (p = 0.003), and anti-tumor necrosis factor use (p = 0.002) were independent risk factors of unscheduled visits due to disease flares. Disparity in disease activity is considerable in CD patients and is related to the risk of unscheduled hospital visit.

  12. Peer supporter experiences of home visits for people with HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Han Ju Lee,1 Linda Moneyham,2 Hee Sun Kang,3 Kyung Sun Kim41Department of Nursing, Sangmyung University, Cheonan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, South Korea; 2School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; 3Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea; 4Gyeonggi Branch, Korean Alliance to Defeat AIDS, Anyang, Gyeonggi-do, South KoreaPurpose: This study's purpose was to explore the experiences of peer supporters regarding their work in a home visit program for people with HIV infection.Patients and methods: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted using focus groups. Participants were 12 HIV-positive peer supporters conducting home visits with people living with HIV/AIDS in South Korea. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data.Results: Six major themes emerged: feeling a sense of belonging; concern about financial support; facing HIV-related stigma and fear of disclosure; reaching out and acting as a bridge of hope; feeling burnout; and need for quality education. The study findings indicate that although peer supporters experience several positive aspects in the role, such as feelings of belonging, they also experience issues that make it difficult to be successful in the role, including the position's instability, work-related stress, and concerns about the quality of their continuing education.Conclusion: The findings suggest that to maintain a stable and effective peer supporter program, such positions require financial support, training in how to prevent and manage stress associated with the role, and a well-developed program of education and training.Keywords: human immunodeficiency virus, qualitative research, workplace experience

  13. First-Year Analysis of a New, Home-Based Palliative Care Program Offered Jointly by a Community Hospital and Local Visiting Nurse Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Katherine; Weisse, Carol S; Pratt, David S; DiSorbo, Philip

    2017-03-01

    There is a growing need for home-based palliative care services, especially for seriously ill individuals who want to avoid hospitalizations and remain with their regular outside care providers. To evaluate the effectiveness of Care Choices, a new in-home palliative care program provided by the Visiting Nurse Services of Northeastern New York and Ellis Medicine's community hospital serving New York's Capital District. This prospective cohort study assessed patient outcomes over the course of 1 year for 123 patients (49 men and 74 women) with serious illnesses who were new enrollees in the program. Quality of life was assessed at baseline and after 1 month on service. Satisfaction with care was measured after 1 and 3 months on service. The number of emergency department visits and inpatient hospitalizations pre- and postenrollment was measured for all enrollees. Patients were highly satisfied (72.7%-100%) with their initial care and reported greater satisfaction ( P palliative care service. An in-home palliative care program offered jointly through a visiting nurse service and community hospital may be a successful model for providing quality care that satisfies chronically ill patients' desire to remain at home and avoid hospital admissions.

  14. Do public nursing home care providers deliver higher quality than private providers? Evidence from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winblad, Ulrika; Blomqvist, Paula; Karlsson, Andreas

    2017-07-14

    Swedish nursing home care has undergone a transformation, where the previous virtual public monopoly on providing such services has been replaced by a system of mixed provision. This has led to a rapidly growing share of private actors, the majority of which are large, for-profit firms. In the wake of this development, concerns have been voiced regarding the implications for care quality. In this article, we investigate the relationship between ownership and care quality in nursing homes for the elderly by comparing quality levels between public, for-profit, and non-profit nursing home care providers. We also look at a special category of for-profit providers; private equity companies. The source of data is a national survey conducted by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare in 2011 at 2710 nursing homes. Data from 14 quality indicators are analyzed, including structure and process measures such as staff levels, staff competence, resident participation, and screening for pressure ulcers, nutrition status, and risk of falling. The main statistical method employed is multiple OLS regression analysis. We differentiate in the analysis between structural and processual quality measures. The results indicate that public nursing homes have higher quality than privately operated homes with regard to two structural quality measures: staffing levels and individual accommodation. Privately operated nursing homes, on the other hand, tend to score higher on process-based quality indicators such as medication review and screening for falls and malnutrition. No significant differences were found between different ownership categories of privately operated nursing homes. Ownership does appear to be related to quality outcomes in Swedish nursing home care, but the results are mixed and inconclusive. That staffing levels, which has been regarded as a key quality indicator in previous research, are higher in publicly operated homes than private is consistent with earlier

  15. Boston children's hospital community asthma initiative: Five-year cost analyses of a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Urmi; Sommer, Susan J; Giller-Leinwohl, Judith; Norris, Kerri; Tsopelas, Lindsay; Nethersole, Shari; Woods, Elizabeth R

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the costs and benefits of the Boston Children's Hospital Community Asthma Initiative (CAI) through reduction of Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospitalizations for the full pilot-phase program participants. A cost-benefit analyses was conducted using hospital administrative data to determine an adjusted Return on Investment (ROI): on all 268 patients enrolled in the CAI program during the 33-month pilot program phase of CAI intervention between October 1, 2005 and June 30, 2008 using a comparison group of 818 patients from a similar cohort in neighboring ZIP codes without CAI intervention. Cost data through June 30, 2013 were used to examine cost changes and calculate an adjusted ROI over a 5-year post-intervention period. CAI patients had a cost reduction greater than the comparison group of $1,216 in Year 1 (P = 0.001), $1,320 in Year 2 (P management programs can decrease the incidence of costly hospitalizations and ED visits from asthma. An ROI of greater than one, as found in this cost analysis, supports the business case for the provision of community-based asthma services as part of patient-centered medical homes and Accountable Care Organizations.

  16. Home Care Pharmacy Practice in Canada: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Services Provided, Remuneration, Barriers, and Facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Sherilyn; MacKeigan, Linda

    2017-01-01

    As the population ages, and individuals desire to remain in their homes as long as possible, the need for in-home care is expected to increase. However, pharmacists have rarely been included in studies of in-home care, and little is known about the prevalence or effectiveness of pharmacists' home-based services in Canada. To identify pharmacy practices in Canada that regularly provide in-home patient care and to identify specific services provided, remuneration obtained, and barriers and facilitators influencing the provision of home-based care. A link to a web-based survey was posted in e-newsletters of provincial, territorial, and national pharmacy associations in Canada. In addition, pharmacists known to the researchers as providing in-home clinical services were contacted directly. The survey was open from October to December 2015. Practices or organizations that performed at least one home visit per week for clinical purposes, with documentation of the services provided, were eligible to participate. One response per practice or organization was allowed. Seventeen practices meeting the inclusion criteria were identified, representing community, hospital, and clinic settings. Home visits were most commonly performed for individuals with complex medication regimens or nonadherence to medication therapy. The most common services were conducting medication reconciliation and reviews and counselling patients about medication adherence. No practices or organizations billed patients for these services, yet lack of remuneration was an important barrier identified by many respondents. Although 12 (71%) of the respondents collected data for evaluative purposes, collection of clinical or health system outcome data was rare. Few Canadian pharmacy practices that provide in-home patient care at least once a week could be identified. Data collection suitable to establish an evidence base for this service was infrequently performed by practices and organizations providing

  17. Propensity for paying home visits among general practitioners and the associations with cancer patients' place of care and death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthereik, Anna K; Hjertholm, Peter; Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of associations between home visits by general practitioners and end-of-life care for cancer patients have been subject to confounding. AIM: To analyse associations between general practitioners' propensity to pay home visits and the likelihood of hospitalisation...... and dying out of hospital among their cancer patients. DESIGN: A national register cohort study with an ecological exposure. Standardised incidence rates of general practitioner home visits were calculated as a measure for propensity. Practices were grouped into propensity quartiles. Associations between...... propensity groups and end-of-life outcomes for cancer patients aged 40 or above were calculated. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Danish general practitioners and citizens aged 40 or above were included from 2003 to 2012. RESULTS: We included 2670 practices with 2,518,091 listed patients (18,364,679 person...

  18. Effects of relational coordination among colleagues and span of control on work engagement among home-visiting nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Sakai, Mahiro; Nagata, Satoko

    2016-04-01

    Home-visiting nursing agencies are required to foster staff nurse's work engagement; thus, the factors related to work engagement require identification. This study examined relational coordination among colleagues and agency span of control on the work engagement of home-visiting nurses. Cross-sectional data from 93 staff nurses in 31 home-visiting nursing agencies were collected via a survey and analyzed using mixed linear regression. There was no significant main effect of relational coordination among nurse colleagues on work engagement. In large agencies with a large span of control, relational coordination among nursing colleagues predicted work engagement. Nursing managers' relational coordination was found to be positively associated with staff nurse work engagement. Agency span of control is a moderating factor on the positive effect of relational coordination with nursing colleagues on staff nurse work engagement. © 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  19. Enriching preschool classrooms and home visits with evidence-based programming: sustained benefits for low-income children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Karen L; Heinrichs, Brenda S; Welsh, Janet A; Nix, Robert L; Gest, Scott D

    2017-02-01

    Growing up in poverty undermines healthy development, producing disparities in the cognitive and social-emotional skills that support early learning and mental health. Preschool and home-visiting interventions for low-income children have the potential to build early cognitive and social-emotional skills, reducing the disparities in school readiness that perpetuate the cycle of poverty. However, longitudinal research suggests that the gains low-income children make during preschool interventions often fade at school entry and disappear by early elementary school. In an effort to improve the benefits for low-income children, the REDI program enriched Head Start preschool classrooms (study one) and home visits (study two) with evidence-based programming, documenting positive intervention effects in two randomized trials. In this study, REDI participants were followed longitudinally, to evaluate the sustained impact of the classroom and home-visiting enrichments 3 years later, when children were in second grade. The combined sample included 556 children (55% European American, 25% African American, 19% Latino; 49% male): 288 children received the classroom intervention, 105 children received the classroom intervention plus the home-visiting intervention, and 173 children received usual practice Head Start. The classroom intervention led to sustained benefits in social-emotional skills, improving second grade classroom participation, student-teacher relationships, social competence, and peer relations. The coordinated home-visiting intervention produced additional benefits in child mental health (perceived social competence and peer relations) and cognitive skills (reading skills, academic performance). Significant effects ranged from 25% to 48% of a standard deviation, representing important effects of small to moderate magnitude relative to usual practice Head Start. Preschool classroom and home-visiting programs for low-income children can be improved with the use

  20. Emancipatory practices of nurses in primary health care: the home visit as an instrument of health needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Maria Sivalli Campos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Identify nurses’ emancipatory practices in primary care, to contribute to the improvement of health care. Method A case study type social research of qualitative nature, in which nurses of a primary health care service unit in São Paulo were interviewed. Results The home visit was identified as a nursing practice possible to be expanded in order to identify social determinants of health, triggering emancipatory practices in the service. This expansion occurred because the design of health care labour intended by the service team changed its focus from the traditional object of health services, the disease. Conclusion First, it is advocated that social policies lead projects with the purpose of improving health needs. On the other hand, the daily labour needs to provide opportunities for reflection and discussion of healthcare projects, leading workers to propose labour-processes targeted to both the social determinants of health and people’s illness.

  1. Home visits in general practice – most often for elderly patients: A report from the Møre & Romsdal Prescription Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørund Straand

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  Objectives:  Methods:  Results:  Conclusions:  Home visiting policy should be more selective. While most children could be adequatelytaken care of by telephone consultations or consultations in the surgery, home visits should be encouragedfor the chronically ill and the housebound.5.074 home visits were recorded (9.2% of all face-to-face contacts. Home visiting rates werehighest for the elderly and for children. Most home visits were for new diagnoses, and 28% took placeduring weekends. Infections in the respiratory tract comprised the majority of the diagnoses for visitingchildren, whereas coronary heart disease and heart failure were the most frequent diagnoses for visitingthe elderly. Drugs were prescribed during 48.9% of the home visits. General systemic antiinfectives andrespiratory drugs comprised 53% of all prescriptions, whereas CNS-drugs comprised another 20%. Doctors'characteristics associated with doing home visits were male gender, young age, GP specialisation,fixed salary, and rural location.A cross-sectional descriptive study in the Norwegian county of Møre & Romsdal. All encounters(90,458 and prescriptions (74,079 issued during two months were recorded.Although home health care has been the fastest growing segment of the health care systemduring the last decades, general practitioners' (GPs' home visiting rates have declined. The aim of thisstudy was to analyse home visits in relation to characteristics of both patients and GPs, the diagnoses,and the drugs prescribed.ABSTRACT

  2. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women) had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102), and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308), performance status of 3-4 (n = 261), and dementia (n = 121). At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712). 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109), change of attending physicians (n = 8), and others (n = 5). The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03), the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02), women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02), and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02). Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing. PMID:22044683

  3. Age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing care are critical factors in home care for malignant diseases; a retrospective study involving 346 patients in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodama Yuko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to clarify the factors affecting outcomes of home care for patients with malignant diseases. Methods Of 607 patients who were treated in 10 clinics specialized in home care between January and December 2007 at Chiba, Fukuoka, Iwate, Kagoshima, Tochigi and Tokyo prefectures across Japan, 346 (57%; 145 men and 201 women had malignant diseases. We collected information on medical and social backgrounds, details of home care, and its outcomes based on their medical records. Results Median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 11-102, and 335 patients were economically self-sufficient. Their general condition was poor; advanced cancer (n = 308, performance status of 3-4 (n = 261, and dementia (n = 121. At the beginning of home care, 143 patients and 174 family members expressed their wish to die at home. All the patients received supportive treatments including fluid replacement and oxygenation. Median duration of home care was 47 days (range, 0-2,712. 224 patients died at home. For the remaining 122, home care was terminated due to complications (n = 109, change of attending physicians (n = 8, and others (n = 5. The factors which inhibited the continuity of home care were the non-use of home-visit nursing care (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.00, p = 0.03, the fact that the patients themselves do not wish to die at home (HR = 1.83, CI: 1.09-3.07, p = 0.02, women (HR = 1.81, CI: 1.11-2.94, p = 0.02, and age (HR = 0.98, CI: 0.97-1.00, p = 0.02. Conclusions Continuation of home care is influenced by patients' age, gender, will, and use of home-visit nursing.

  4. Assisting Frail Seniors With Toileting in a Home Bathroom: Approaches Used by Home Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Emily C; Boscart, Veronique M; Weiss, Brett M; Dutta, Tilak; Callaghan, Jack P; Fernie, Geoff R

    2017-04-01

    Home care providers experience high occupational injury rates. Improving safety is becoming increasingly urgent as this sector expands to support the aging population. Caregivers identify assisting with toileting as a particularly frequent and difficult activity. This mixed-methods observational study identified and analyzed the toileting subactivities that place care providers at the greatest risk of musculoskeletal injury. Eight personal support workers (home care aides) assisted a frail older adult (actor) in a simulated home bathroom. Overall technique and body postures were analyzed. Exposure to musculoskeletal injury risk factors (low back loads and time in extreme trunk postures) was greatest when removing/replacing clothing and providing posterior perineal care; high loads were also possible during transfers. Exposures can be reduced by lowering the pants only to knee level or squatting to raise them. A bidet seat or attachment can perform perineal cleaning, which accounted for 32% of time in severe trunk flexion.

  5. Effects of nurse home visitation on cigarette smoking, pregnancy outcomes and breastfeeding: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejdoubi, Jamila; van den Heijkant, Silvia C C M; van Leerdam, Frank J M; Crone, Matty; Crijnen, Alfons; HiraSing, Remy A

    2014-06-01

    antenatal smoking is more prevalent among young women with low socio-economic status. The aim of our study is to assess whether the VoorZorg programme, compared to usual care, is effective in reducing cigarette smoking among young high risk pregnant women. Furthermore, the effect of VoorZorg on pregnancy outcomes and on breast feeding will be described. a randomised controlled trial of VoorZorg, a nurse home visitation intervention, was undertaken over a 2½ year period from 2007 to 2009. Data were collected between 16 and 28 weeks gestation, 32 weeks gestation and at two months post partum on cigarette smoking status plus six months post partum for breastfeeding prevalence. Neonatal birth weight and gestation at birth were also collected. participants living in 20 municipalities in the Netherlands. 460 pregnant women were recruited by different professionals. Inclusion criteria were age intervention group received, in addition to usual care, the VoorZorg programme which consisted of 40-60 home visits by specialised nurses from pregnancy until two years after birth. the percentage of smokers was significantly lower in the intervention group (40%) compared to the control group (48%) during pregnancy (p=0.03) and at two months post birth (49% and 62%; p=0.02). During pregnancy the number of daily cigarettes smoked was reduced in both groups. After birth, the intervention group smoked 50% less cigarettes compared to the control group (C: 8±10; I: 4±7 (mean±standard deviation (SD)), p=0.01). Furthermore, women in the intervention group did not smoke near the baby (C: 2±5; I: 0±0 (mean±SD) p=0.03). Birth weight and gestational age were similar in both groups (C: 3147g, 40 weeks; I: 3144g, 39 weeks (p=0.94, p=0.17)). Significantly more women in the intervention group were still breast feeding their baby at six months post -birth (C: 6%; I: 13%, p=0.04). VoorZorg seemed to be effective in reducing cigarette smoking and in increasing breastfeeding duration. No effect

  6. Enriching Preschool Classrooms and Home Visits with Evidence-Based Programming: Sustained Benefits for Low-Income Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Karen L.; Heinrichs, Brenda S.; Welsh, Janet A.; Nix, Robert L.; Gest, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Growing up in poverty undermines healthy development, producing disparities in the cognitive and social-emotional skills that support early learning and mental health. Preschool and home-visiting interventions for low-income children have the potential to build early cognitive and social-emotional skills, reducing the disparities in…

  7. The Effect of Alaska's Home Visitation Program for High-Risk Families on Trends in Abuse and Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: At 6 sites serving 21 communities, Alaska implemented Healthy Families Alaska, a home visitation program using paraprofessionals designed to decrease child abuse and neglect. The primary study objective was to compare changes over time in Child Protective Services outcomes by Healthy Families Alaska enrollment status. Methods:…

  8. A feasibility study of UMTS mobile phones for supporting nurses doing home visits to patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo; Clemensen, Jane; Ejskjær, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We tested the feasibility of Universal Mobile Telephone System (UMTS) mobile phones for video consultations in the home. Five patients with diabetic foot ulcers were included in the study. Each of them was offered three video consultations instead of visits to the hospital outpatient clinic...

  9. Universal Home Visiting: A Recommendation from the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    In 1991, the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect recommended the federal government begin phasing in a national, universal home visiting program for children during the neonatal period to help prevent child abuse and neglect. This article discusses the political and social factors affecting this recommendation, as well as the response…

  10. Healthy Start Programa Madrina: A Promotora Home Visiting Outreach and Education Program to Improve Perinatal Health among Latina Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Debra E.; Hock-Long, Linda; Mesure, Maryann; Bryer, Pamela; Zambrano, Neydary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of Healthy Start Programa Madrina (HSPM), a home visiting promotora outreach and education program for Latina pregnant women and to present the 10-year findings of the program (1996-2005). Perinatal health disparities continue to persist among low-income…

  11. Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program in the Affordable Care Act: Supplemental Instruction Request-February 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    The latest Evidence-Based Home Visiting Supplemental Information Request (SIR) has recently been released by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) with collaboration from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) as outlined in the first Funding Opportunity…

  12. A scale for home visiting nurses to identify risks of physical abuse and neglect among mothers with newborn infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grietens, H; Geeraert, L; Hellinckx, W

    Objective: The aim was to construct and test the reliability (utility, internal consistency, interrater agreement) and the validity (internal validity, concurrent validity) of a scale for home visiting social nurses to identify risks of physical abuse and neglect in mothers with a newborn child.

  13. Development of project wings home visits, a mental health intervention for Latino families using community-based participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolyn; Hermann, Denise; Bartels, Anna; Matamoros, Pablo; Dick-Olson, Linda; Guerra de Patino, Janeth

    2012-11-01

    As the Latino population in the United States experiences rapid growth, the well-being of Latino adolescents is a growing concern because of their high rates of mental health problems. Latino adolescents have higher rates of mental health problems than their peers, including depressive symptoms, suicide attempts, and violence. Sophisticated, realistic health promotion efforts are needed to reduce these risk behaviors and enhance protective factors. Parents and schools can be key protective factors, or assets, in adolescents' lives. This article details the steps undertaken to develop Project Wings Home Visits, a collaborative school-based, community-linked mental health promotion intervention for Latino adolescents and their families. Core to the intervention is the use of a community health worker model to provide home-based outreach and education to parents of Latino adolescents. The intervention was developed using a community-based participatory research approach that involved the cooperation of a community health care system, a public high school, and a university. Our process demonstrates the benefits, strengths, and challenges of using community-based participatory research in creating and implementing health promotion interventions.

  14. Challenges and Strategies in Providing Home Based Primary Care for Refugees in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febles, C; Nies, M A; Fanning, K; Tavernier, S S

    2017-12-01

    The recent crisis in the Middle East has prompted the exodus of millions of refugees from the region who are at present seeking shelter across Europe and in the United States. Among the most immediate needs of refugees upon arrival in a host country is health care, and it is one of the most sustained interactions they experience. Home visits are a common form of primary care for refugees. The authors review the literature to identify themes related to challenges and strategies for providing home based primary care to refugees. The literature review was performed by searching cross-disciplinary databases utilizing Onesearch, but focusing primarily on results produced through CINAHL, EBSCOHOST, and Pub Med databases. To maximize the number of studies included, there was no time frame placed upon publication dates of articles within the search. A total of 55 articles were included in this paper.

  15. Effectiveness of home visit falls prevention strategy for Taiwanese community-dwelling elders: randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Ting; Acton, Gayle J

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of a multifactorial intervention to prevent falls by increasing self-efficacy to prevent falls, improving the knowledge of medication safety, and decreasing the number of environmental risks in older persons dwelling in the community. A sample of 120 cognitively intact residents of this community who were 65 years of age and older were recruited into a two-group pretest-post-test experimental design and randomly assigned to an experimental group and a comparison group (60 in each group). The intervention was delivered, and data were collected during three home visits in a 4-month period. (1) Experimental subjects improved their fall self-efficacy, environmental safety, and knowledge of medication safety significantly (p falls was reduced at post-test in both groups compared to pretest scores, and the falling was more serious in the comparison group at post-test compared to that in the experimental group. The results can help community health professionals to individualize their interventions to the specific needs of the elderly, thus helping to prevent falls among community-dwelling elders.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of home visits in the outpatient treatment of patients with alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Edilaine; Campos, Geraldo M; Figlie, Neliana B; Laranjeira, Ronaldo; Ferraz, Marcos B

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of conventional outpatient treatment for alcoholic patients (CT) with this same conventional treatment plus home visits (HV), a new proposal for intervention within the Brazilian outpatient treatment system. A cost-effectiveness evaluation alongside a 12-week randomized clinical trial was performed. We identified the resources utilized by each intervention, as well as the cost according to National Health System (SUS), Brazilian Medical Association (AMB) tables of fees, and others based on 2005 data. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated as the main outcome measure - abstinent cases at the end of treatment. There were 51.8% abstinent cases for HV and 43.1% for CT, a clinically relevant finding. Other outcome measures, such as quality of life, also showed significant improvements that favored HV. The baseline scenario presented an ICER of USD 1,852. Sensitivity analysis showed an ICER of USD 689 (scenario favoring HV) and USD 2,334 (scenario favoring CT). The HV treatment was found to be cost-effective according to the WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. [Violent experiences and coping among home visiting health care workers in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Kwang Ok; Kang, Hee Sun; Park, Yeon-Hwan

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore violent experiences of home visiting health care workers in Korea. This study was a cross-sectional survey. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires from 1,640 health care workers. Data collection was done between September 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010. Of the respondents, 70.6% had experienced work-related violence. Shouting (51.9%) was the most common verbal violence, followed by verbalizing sexual remarks to the health care workers (19.0%) and touching the hands (16.5%), the most common acts relating to sexual harassment. Of the respondents who had experienced violence, 50.9% told their peers about the incidents. However, the major reasons why they did not report these incidents was due to the fact that they felt it was useless to file reports and that they expected such incidents to occur as part of their job. The majority of the respondents (86.4%) wanted education on how to deal with such violence at work. The results of this study indicate that efforts should be made to increase awareness and to minimize violence in the workplace. Also, educational programs should be designed to improve knowledge and to prevent workplace violence.

  18. 'right@home': a randomised controlled trial of sustained nurse home visiting from pregnancy to child age 2 years, versus usual care, to improve parent care, parent responsivity and the home learning environment at 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Sharon; Price, Anna; Bryson, Hannah; Bruce, Tracey; Mensah, Fiona; Orsini, Francesca; Gold, Lisa; Hiscock, Harriet; Smith, Charlene; Bishop, Lara; Jackson, Dianne; Kemp, Lynn

    2017-03-20

    By the time children start school, inequities in learning, development and health outcomes are already evident. Sustained nurse home visiting (SNHV) offers a potential platform for families experiencing adversity, who often have limited access to services. While SNHV programmes have been growing in popularity in Australia and internationally, it is not known whether they can improve children's learning and development when offered via the Australian service system. The right@home trial aims to investigate the effectiveness of an SNHV programme, offered to women from pregnancy to child age 2 years, in improving parent care of and responsivity to the child, and the home learning environment. Pregnant Australian women (n=722) are identified after completing a screening survey of 10 factors known to predict children's learning and development (eg, young pregnancy, poor mental or physical health, lack of support). Consenting women-surveyed while attending clinics at 10 hospitals in Victoria and Tasmania-are enrolled if they report having 2 or more risk factors. The intervention comprises 25 home visits from pregnancy to 2 years, focusing on parent care of the child, responsivity to the child and providing a good quality home learning environment. The standard, universal, Australian child and family health service provides the comparator (control). Primary outcome measures include a combination of parent-reported and objective assessments of children's sleep, safety, nutrition, parenting styles and the home learning environment, including the Home Observation of the Environment Inventory and items adapted from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. This study is approved by the Royal Children's Hospital Human Research Ethics Committees (HREC 32296) and site-specific HRECs. The investigators and sponsor will communicate the trial results to stakeholders, participants, healthcare professionals, the public and other relevant groups via presentations and

  19. Infusing Technology Into Perinatal Home Visitation in the United States for Women Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence: Exploring the Interpretive Flexibility of an mHealth Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, Loraine J; Bullock, Linda; Sharps, Phyllis; Burnett, Camille; Schminkey, Donna L; Buller, Ana Maria; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2016-11-17

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is common during pregnancy and the postpartum. Perinatal home visitation provides favorable conditions in which to identify and support women affected by IPV. However, the use of mHealth for delivering IPV interventions in perinatal home visiting has not been explored. Our objective was to conduct a nested qualitative interpretive study to explore perinatal home visitors' and women's perceptions and experiences of the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program (DOVE) using mHealth technology (ie, a computer tablet) or a home visitor-administered, paper-based method. We used purposive sampling, using maximum variation, to select women enrolled in a US-based randomized controlled trial of the DOVE intervention for semistructured interviews. Selection criteria were discussed with the trial research team and 32 women were invited to participate. We invited 45 home visitors at the 8 study sites to participate in an interview, along with the 2 DOVE program designers. Nonparticipant observations of home visits with trial participants who chose not to participate in semistructured interviews were undertaken. We conducted 51 interviews with 26 women, 23 home visiting staff at rural and urban sites, and the 2 DOVE program designers. We conducted 4 nonparticipant observations. Among 18 IPV-positive women, 7 used the computer tablet and 11 used the home visitor method. Among 8 IPV-negative women, 7 used the home visitor method. The computer tablet was viewed as a safe and confidential way for abused women to disclose their experiences without fear of being judged. The meanings that the DOVE technology held for home visitors and women led to its construction as either an impersonal artifact that was an impediment to discussion of IPV or a conduit through which interpersonal connection could be deepened, thereby facilitating discussion about IPV. Women's and home visitors' comfort with either method of screening was positively influenced

  20. The SKI*HI Model: Programming for Hearing Impaired Infants through Home Intervention, Home Visit Curriculum. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Thomas C.; Watkins, Susan

    The manual describes the SKI*HI Model, a comprehensive approach to identification and home intervention treatment of hearing impaired children and their families. The model features home programing in four basic areas: the home hearing aid program (nine lessons which facilitate the proper fit and acceptance of amplification by the child), home…

  1. Useful tool for general practitioners, home health care nurses and social workers in assessing determinants of the health status and treatment of patients visited in their homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Brodziak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The necessity is emphasized to distinguish between the traditional model of data acquisition reported by a patient in doctor’s office and the more valuable and desired model to become acquainted with the core of the problem by going to a patient’s domicile. In the desired model it is possible to come across various determinants of health during home visits. Family members can be approached and there is a possibility to evaluate the relationships between the patient and his loved ones. One can visually assess one’s living conditions and predictable environmental hazard. For several years, the desired model has been put into practice by general practitioners and home health care nurses. Recently this model is also promoted by “health care therapists” who are members of “teams of home health care”. The authors, being convinced of the merits of “home and environmental model” of practical medicine, have developed a method of recording and illustrating data collected during visits in patient’s home. The elaborated tool helps to communicate and exchange information among general practitioners, home health care nurses, social workers of primary health care centers and specialists. The method improves the formulation of the plan of further therapeutic steps and remedial interventions in psycho-social relations and living conditions of patients.

  2. Effects on health care use and associated cost of a home visiting program for older people with poor health status: a randomized clinical trial in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, A.; Rossum, E. van; Evers, S.; Ambergen, T.; Kempen, G.; Knipschild, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Home visiting programs have been developed to improve the functional abilities of older people and subsequently to reduce the use of institutional care services. The results of trials have been inconsistent and their cost-effectiveness uncertain. Home visits for a high-risk population

  3. Depression Treatment by Non-Mental-Health Providers: Incremental Evidence for the Effectiveness of Listening Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W; Segre, Lisa S

    2017-03-01

    Maternal depression is a prevalent public health problem, particularly for low-income mothers of young children. Intervention development efforts, which often focus on surmounting instrumental barriers to care, have not successfully engaged and retained women in treatment. Task-sharing approaches like Listening Visits (LV) could overcome key instrumental and psychological barriers by leveraging the access of trusted, community caregivers to deliver treatment. A recent randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated the efficacy of LV delivered by non-mental-health providers as compared to usual care. The present report presents results from a follow-up phase of that RCT during which participants who had completed LV were followed for an additional 8 weeks and completed measures of depression and quality of life. In addition, participants who were initially randomized to the wait-list control group received LV and were assessed. Treatment gains previously observed in participants completing LV were enhanced during the 8-week follow-up period. Participants receiving LV during the follow-up period experienced significant improvement in depressive symptoms. Results demonstrate the sustainability of LV delivered by non-mental-health providers, and provide preliminary evidence for the replicability of this approach in a sample of predominately low-income pregnant women and mothers of young children. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  4. Development of a nurse home visitation intervention for intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Susan M; Ford-Gilboe, Marilyn; Wathen, C Nadine; Davidov, Danielle M; McNaughton, Diane B; Coben, Jeffrey H; Olds, David L; Macmillan, Harriet L

    2012-02-29

    Despite an increase in knowledge about the epidemiology of intimate partner violence (IPV), much less is known about interventions to reduce IPV and its associated impairment. One program that holds promise in preventing IPV and improving outcomes for women exposed to violence is the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), an evidence-based nurse home visitation program for socially disadvantaged first-time mothers. The present study developed an intervention model and modification process to address IPV within the context of the NFP. This included determining the extent to which the NFP curriculum addressed the needs of women at risk for IPV or its recurrence, along with client, nurse and broader stakeholder perspectives on how best to help NFP clients cope with abusive relationships. Following a preliminary needs assessment, an exploratory multiple case study was conducted to identify the core components of the proposed IPV intervention. This included qualitative interviews with purposeful samples of NFP clients and community stakeholders, and focus groups with nurse home visitors recruited from four NFP sites. Conventional content analysis and constant comparison guided data coding and synthesis. A process for developing complex interventions was then implemented. Based on data from 69 respondents, an IPV intervention was developed that focused on identifying and responding to IPV; assessing a client's level of safety risk associated with IPV; understanding the process of leaving and resolving an abusive relationship and system navigation. A need was identified for the intervention to include both universal elements of healthy relationships and those tailored to a woman's specific level of readiness to promote change within her life. A clinical pathway guides nurses through the intervention, with a set of facilitators and corresponding instructions for each component. NFP clients, nurses and stakeholders identified the need for modifications to the existing NFP program

  5. Development of a nurse home visitation intervention for intimate partner violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Susan M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite an increase in knowledge about the epidemiology of intimate partner violence (IPV, much less is known about interventions to reduce IPV and its associated impairment. One program that holds promise in preventing IPV and improving outcomes for women exposed to violence is the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP, an evidence-based nurse home visitation program for socially disadvantaged first-time mothers. The present study developed an intervention model and modification process to address IPV within the context of the NFP. This included determining the extent to which the NFP curriculum addressed the needs of women at risk for IPV or its recurrence, along with client, nurse and broader stakeholder perspectives on how best to help NFP clients cope with abusive relationships. Methods Following a preliminary needs assessment, an exploratory multiple case study was conducted to identify the core components of the proposed IPV intervention. This included qualitative interviews with purposeful samples of NFP clients and community stakeholders, and focus groups with nurse home visitors recruited from four NFP sites. Conventional content analysis and constant comparison guided data coding and synthesis. A process for developing complex interventions was then implemented. Results Based on data from 69 respondents, an IPV intervention was developed that focused on identifying and responding to IPV; assessing a client's level of safety risk associated with IPV; understanding the process of leaving and resolving an abusive relationship and system navigation. A need was identified for the intervention to include both universal elements of healthy relationships and those tailored to a woman's specific level of readiness to promote change within her life. A clinical pathway guides nurses through the intervention, with a set of facilitators and corresponding instructions for each component. Conclusions NFP clients, nurses and stakeholders

  6. Predictors of Study Attrition in a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating a Perinatal Home-Visiting Program with Mothers with Psychosocial Vulnerabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulon, Stéphanie; Greacen, Tim; Pasquet, Blandine; Dugravier, Romain; Saïas, Thomas; Guedeney, Nicole; Guedeney, Antoine; Tubach, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Objective Randomised controlled trials evaluating perinatal home-visiting programs are frequently confronted with the problem of high attrition rates. The aim of the present study is to identify predictors of study attrition in a trial evaluating a perinatal home-visiting program in France. Materials and Methods CAPEDP is a French randomized trial comparing a perinatal home-visiting program using psychologists versus usual care (N = 440). The first assessment was at inclusion into the trial at the 27th week of pregnancy and the final assessment when the child reached the age of two. Attrition rates were calculated at 3 and 24 months postpartum. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify predictors of early (between inclusion and 3 months postpartum) and later (between 3 and 24 months postpartum) attrition among social, psychological and parenting factors. Results Attrition rates were 17% and 63% at 3 and 24 months respectively. At 24 months, there was significantly more attrition in the control arm (70.6%) compared to the intervention arm (55.2%). Five independent predictors of early attrition were identified: having already had an abortion; having greater attachment insecurity as measured with the Vulnerable Attachment Style Questionnaire (VASQ); having lower global severity of psychiatric symptoms as assessed with the Symptom Check-List (SCL-90) at inclusion, being neither currently employed nor studying; and declaring no tobacco consumption during pregnancy. Being randomized into the control arm, having undergone early parental loss before age 11 and having lower global severity of psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90) at 3 months postpartum were the only variables associated with later attrition. Conclusion This study provides key information for identifying mothers who may require specific support to avoid study attrition in trials evaluating a home-visiting program. PMID:26554839

  7. Predictors of Study Attrition in a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating a Perinatal Home-Visiting Program with Mothers with Psychosocial Vulnerabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Foulon

    Full Text Available Randomised controlled trials evaluating perinatal home-visiting programs are frequently confronted with the problem of high attrition rates. The aim of the present study is to identify predictors of study attrition in a trial evaluating a perinatal home-visiting program in France.CAPEDP is a French randomized trial comparing a perinatal home-visiting program using psychologists versus usual care (N = 440. The first assessment was at inclusion into the trial at the 27th week of pregnancy and the final assessment when the child reached the age of two. Attrition rates were calculated at 3 and 24 months postpartum. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify predictors of early (between inclusion and 3 months postpartum and later (between 3 and 24 months postpartum attrition among social, psychological and parenting factors.Attrition rates were 17% and 63% at 3 and 24 months respectively. At 24 months, there was significantly more attrition in the control arm (70.6% compared to the intervention arm (55.2%. Five independent predictors of early attrition were identified: having already had an abortion; having greater attachment insecurity as measured with the Vulnerable Attachment Style Questionnaire (VASQ; having lower global severity of psychiatric symptoms as assessed with the Symptom Check-List (SCL-90 at inclusion, being neither currently employed nor studying; and declaring no tobacco consumption during pregnancy. Being randomized into the control arm, having undergone early parental loss before age 11 and having lower global severity of psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90 at 3 months postpartum were the only variables associated with later attrition.This study provides key information for identifying mothers who may require specific support to avoid study attrition in trials evaluating a home-visiting program.

  8. Growing old at home – A randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits to reduce nursing home admissions: study protocol [NCT00644826

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedel-Heller Steffi G

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regarding demographic changes in Germany it can be assumed that the number of elderly and the resulting need for long term care is increasing in the near future. It is not only an individual's interest but also of public concern to avoid a nursing home admission. Current evidence indicates that preventive home visits can be an effective way to reduce the admission rate in this way making it possible for elderly people to stay longer at home than without home visits. As the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits strongly depends on existing services in the social and health system existing international results cannot be merely transferred to Germany. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of such an intervention in Germany by a randomized controlled trial. Methods The trial is designed as a prospective multi-center randomized controlled trial in the cities of Halle and Leipzig. The trial includes an intervention and a control group. The control group receives usual care. The intervention group receives three additional home visits by non-physician health professionals (1 geriatric assessment, (2 consultation, (3 booster session. The nursing home admission rate after 18 months will be defined as the primary outcome. An absolute risk reduction from a 20% in the control-group to a 7% admission rate in the intervention group including an assumed drop out rate of 30% resulted in a required sample size of N = 320 (n = 160 vs. n = 160. Parallel to the clinical outcome measurement the intervention will be evaluated economically. The economic evaluation will be performed from a society perspective. Discussion To the authors' knowledge for the first time a trial will investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive home visits for people aged 80 and over in Germany using the design of a randomized controlled trial. Thus, the trial will contribute to

  9. A Home Visiting Parenting Program and Child Obesity: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Monica Roosa; Sadler, Lois S; Holland, Margaret L; Slade, Arietta; Close, Nancy; Mayes, Linda C

    2018-01-16

    Young children living in historically marginalized families are at risk for becoming adolescents with obesity and subsequently adults with increased obesity-related morbidities. These risks are particularly acute for Hispanic children. We hypothesized that the prevention-focused, socioecological approach of the "Minding the Baby" (MTB) home visiting program might decrease the rate of childhood overweight and obesity early in life. This study is a prospective longitudinal cohort study in which we include data collected during 2 phases of the MTB randomized controlled trial. First-time, young mothers who lived in medically underserved communities were invited to participate in the MTB program. Data were collected on demographics, maternal mental health, and anthropometrics of 158 children from birth to 2 years. More children in the intervention group had a healthy BMI at 2 years. The rate of obesity was significantly higher (P < .01) in the control group (19.7%) compared with the intervention group (3.3%) at this age. Among Hispanic families, children in the MTB intervention were less likely to have overweight or obesity (odds ratio = 0.32; 95% confidence interval: 0.13-0.78). Using the MTB program, we significantly lowered the rate of obesity among 2-year-old children living in low-socioeconomic-status communities. In addition, children of Hispanic mothers were less likely to have overweight or obesity at 2 years. Given the high and disproportionate national prevalence of Hispanic young children with overweight and obesity and the increased costs of obesity-related morbidities, these findings have important clinical, research, and policy implications. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Associations between visit-to-visit variability in blood pressure measured in the office and antihypertensive drugs: the J-HOME-Morning study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Taku; Kikuya, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yuka; Ishikura, Kazuki; Ikeda, Urara; Ishikuro, Mami; Metoki, Hirohito; Mano, Nariyasu; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The factors associated with visit-to-visit variability in blood pressure (BP) measured in the office between the two visits were identified in 1379 treated hypertensive patients (mean age, 66.1 ± 11.0 y; women, 53.8%). Multivariate regression analysis showed that office BP and visit-to-visit heart rate variability were positively associated with visit-to-visit BP variability, whereas body mass index, duration of antihypertensive medication, and taking amlodipine were negatively associated with visit-to-visit BP variability. Further prospective studies are required to clarify the causal relationships between these factors and visit-to-visit BP variability among treated hypertensive patients.

  11. Study protocol: follow-up home visits with nutrition: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Anne Marie

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geriatric patients are at high risk of re-admission after discharge. Pre-existing nutritional risk amongst these patients is of primary concern, with former nutritional intervention studies being largely ineffective. None of these studies has included individual dietary counselling by a registered dietician or has considered competing medical conditions in the participants. A former randomised study has shown that comprehensive discharge follow-up in geriatric patients homes by general practitioners and district nurses was effective in reducing the re-admission risk in the intervention group compared to the control group. That study did not include a nutritional intervention. The purpose of this study is to assess the combined benefits of an intervention consisting of discharge follow-up in geriatric patients' home by a general practitioner and a registered dietician. Methods/design This single-blind randomised controlled study, will recruit 160 hospitalised geriatric medical patients (65+ y at nutritional risk. Participants will be randomly allocated to receive in their homes, either 12 weeks individualised nutritional counselling by a registered dietician complemented with follow-up by general practitioners or a 12 weeks follow-up by general practitioners alone. Discussion This trial is the first of its kind to provide individual nutritional intervention combined with follow-up by general practitioner as an intervention to reduce risk of re-admission after discharge among geriatric medical patients. The results will hopefully help to guide the development of more effective rehabilitation programs following hospital admissions, which may ultimately lead to reduced health care costs, and improvement in mobility, independence and quality of life for geriatric patients at nutritional risk. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov 2010 NCT01249716

  12. Home visits by family physicians during the end-of-life: Does patient income or residence play a role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Grace

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a growing trend for those with advanced cancer to die at home, there is a corresponding increase in need for primary medical care in that setting. Yet those with lower incomes and in rural regions are often challenged to have their health care needs met. This study examined the association between patient income and residence and the receipt of Family Physician (FP home visits during the end-of-life among patients with cancer. Methods Data Sources/Study Setting. Secondary analysis of linked population-based data. Information pertaining to all patients who died due to lung, colorectal, breast or prostate cancer between 1992 and 1997 (N = 7,212 in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia (NS was extracted from three administrative health databases and from Statistics Canada census records. Study Design. An ecological measure of income ('neighbourhood' median household income was developed using census information. Multivariate logistic regression was then used to assess the association of income with the receipt of at least one home visit from a FP among all subjects and by region of residency during the end-of-life. Covariates in the initial multivariate model included patient demographics and alternative health services information such as total days spent as a hospital inpatient. Data Extraction Methods. Encrypted patient health card numbers were used to link all administrative health databases whereas the postal code was the link to Statistics Canada census information. Results Over 45% of all subjects received at least one home visit (n = 3265. Compared to those from low income areas, the log odds of receiving at least one home visit was significantly greater among subjects who reside in middle to high income neighbourhoods (for the highest income quintile, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.15, 1.64; for upper-middle income, adjusted OR = 1.19, 95%CI = 1.02, 1.39; for middle income

  13. Effect of home visit training program on growth and development of preterm infants: a double blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edraki, Mitra; Moravej, Hossian; Rambod, Masoume

    2015-01-01

    Home visit program can be effective in infants' growth and development. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of home visit program on preterm infants' growth and development within 6 months. It was a double-blind clinical trial study. The study was conducted in Hafez, Hazrat-e-Zeinab, and Namazee Hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from 2010 to 2011. Preterm infants were divided into intervention (n=30) and control groups (n=30) through blocked randomization. The intervention group received home visit training program for 6 months, while the control group only received the hospital's routine care. Then, the infants' growth indexes, including weight, height, and head circumference, and development criteria were compared on the first day of admission in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and then first, second, third, and sixth months. The data were analyzed using Chi-square, independent t-test, and repeated measures ANCOVA. The mean weight of the intervention and control group infants was 7207.3±1129.74 and 6366.7±922.26 gr in the sixth month. Besides, the intervention group infants' mean weight was higher compared to the control group after six months (t=-3.05, P=0.03). Also, a significant difference was found between the two groups regarding development indexes, such as following moving objects with the head, keeping the head stable when changing the position from lying to sitting,  producing "Agha" sound, and taking objects by hand (Ppreterm infants' weight gain and some development indexes at the sixth month. Considering the importance of infants' growth and development, healthcare staff is recommended to incorporate home visit training into their programs, so that steps can be taken towards improvement of preterm infants' health. IRCT2014082013690N3 

  14. Associations of stress and burnout among Australian-based doctors involved in after-hours home visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifediora, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The after-hours house call (AHHC) service in Australia is growing, but studies have never explored the doctor variables associated with burnout and stress within the service. This study fills this knowledge gap. To determine the doctor variables associated with burnout and stress among doctors involved in AHHC. A quantitative, questionnaire-based survey of all 300 doctors engaged in AHHC through the National Home Doctor Service (NHDS), Australia's largest home visiting doctor-service provider. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used to assess burnout over a 12-month period from October 2013 to September 2014. Ordinal logistics regression was used to identify significant associations. There were 168 valid responses received, giving a 56 per cent response rate. The most significant factor associated with reduced stress and burnout is the adoption of self-protection measures while on the job. Such measures include the use of chaperones, the use of panic alarms or buttons, adopting de-escalation techniques, and reliance on relevant surgery policies. Other associations with reduced stress include the attainment of postgraduate fellowships (vocational registration), working less than 24 hours per week, being in legally recognised partnerships, and being male. Conversely, having general practice as a career, being under 40 years of age, and obtaining primary medical degrees from Australia (as opposed to overseas) are all associated with increased burnout for doctors involved in AHHC. A number of doctor variables have been found to significantly reduce burnout in AHHC Among these, the adoption of self-protective measures and the attainment postgraduate fellowships, where possible, should be encouraged among practitioners involved in the service.

  15. Exploring Local and Community Capacity to Reduce Fuel Poverty: The Case of Home Energy Advice Visits in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Reeves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Local delivery of support to householders to reduce the exposure to, and impacts of, fuel poverty is attracting increasing policymaker interest, but there is a dearth of empirical research that describes and evaluates local support schemes. Community organisations are viewed as having great potential to aid this delivery, but research on how this could be achieved is scarce. The research presented in this paper responds to these needs through an exploratory study of the delivery of home energy advice visits in the UK. Data were collected through interviews and supporting documents from twelve projects and analysis examined the inter-relationships between the process, delivered outputs and impacts of each project. The research findings suggest that long-term local professional initiatives appear to be most effective at reaching and providing support to fuel poor households across a local area. Community organisations appear to have some potential to fill gaps in local provision and can assist professional initiatives, particularly through signposting, but a lack of volunteer capacity ultimately constrains their impact. Issues identified for further study include: how local support services can be resourced and delivered nationwide; trade-offs between pursuing climate change and fuel poverty agendas; a need for more robust evidence of impacts.

  16. History of Maltreatment in Childhood and Subsequent Parenting Stress in At-Risk, First-Time Mothers: Identifying Points of Intervention During Home Visiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Chad E; Ammerman, Robert T; Teeters, Angelique R; Bensman, Heather E; Allen, Elizabeth K; Putnam, Frank W; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2017-04-01

    Home visiting is an effective preventive intervention that can improve parenting outcomes for at-risk, new mothers, thereby optimizing subsequent child development. A history of maltreatment in childhood is common in mothers participating in home visiting, yet the extent to which such a history is related to parenting outcomes during home visiting is unknown. The current study evaluated whether mothers with a history of maltreatment in childhood respond less favorably to home visiting by examining the direct and indirect pathways to subsequent parenting stress, a key parenting outcome affecting child development. First-time mothers (N = 220; age range = 16-42) participating in one of two home visiting programs, Healthy Families America or Nurse Family Partnership, were evaluated at enrollment and again at 9-and 18-month post-enrollment assessments. Researchers administered measures of maternal history of maltreatment in childhood, depressive symptoms, social support, and parenting stress. Maternal history of maltreatment in childhood predicted worsening parenting stress at the 18-month assessment. Mediation modeling identified two indirect pathways, one involving social support at enrollment and one involving persistent depressive symptoms during home visiting, that explained the relation between a history of maltreatment in childhood and parenting stress at the 18-month assessment. Ways to improve the preventive effects of home visiting for mothers with a history of maltreatment in childhood through the identification of relevant intervention targets and their ideal time of administration are discussed.

  17. Home visits reduce the number of hazards for childhood home injuries in Karachi, Pakistan: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rehmani, Rifat; LeBlanc, John C

    2010-01-01

    Background Although unintentional injuries are major causes of morbidity and mortality in less developed countries, they have received scant attention, and injury prevention policies and programs have just begun to be addressed systemically. Aims To reduce hazards associated with home injuries due to falls and ingestions through an injury prevention program administered by home visitors. Methods Non-blinded randomized controlled trial design of two interventions where one branch of the study ...

  18. Occupational therapists' views on using a virtual reality interior design application within the pre-discharge home visit process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Anita; Money, Arthur; Harvey, Michele

    2014-12-18

    A key role of Occupational Therapists (OTs) is to carry out pre-discharge home visits (PHV) and propose appropriate adaptations to the home environment in order to enable patients to function independently after hospital discharge. However, research shows that more than 50% of specialist equipment installed as part of home adaptations is not used by patients. A key reason for this is that decisions about home adaptations are often made without adequate collaboration and consultation with the patient. Consequently, there is an urgent need to seek out new and innovative uses of technology to facilitate patient/practitioner collaboration, engagement, and shared decision making in the PHV process. Virtual reality interior design applications (VRIDAs) primarily allow users to simulate the home environment and visualize changes prior to implementing them. Customized VRIDAs, which also model specialist occupational therapy equipment, could become a valuable tool to facilitate improved patient/practitioner collaboration, if developed effectively and integrated into the PHV process. The intent of the study was to explore the perceptions of OTs with regard to using VRIDAs as an assistive tool within the PHV process. Task-oriented interactive usability sessions, utilizing the think-aloud protocol and subsequent semi-structured interviews were carried out with seven OTs who possessed significant experience across a range of clinical settings. Template analysis was carried out on the think-aloud and interview data. Analysis was both inductive and driven by theory, centering around the parameters that impact upon the acceptance, adoption, and use of this technology in practice as indicated by the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). OTs' perceptions were identified relating to three core themes: (1) perceived usefulness (PU), (2) perceived ease of use (PEoU), and (3) actual use (AU). Regarding PU, OTs believed VRIDAs had promising potential to increase understanding, enrich

  19. Occupational Therapists’ Views on Using a Virtual Reality Interior Design Application Within the Pre-Discharge Home Visit Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Background A key role of Occupational Therapists (OTs) is to carry out pre-discharge home visits (PHV) and propose appropriate adaptations to the home environment in order to enable patients to function independently after hospital discharge. However, research shows that more than 50% of specialist equipment installed as part of home adaptations is not used by patients. A key reason for this is that decisions about home adaptations are often made without adequate collaboration and consultation with the patient. Consequently, there is an urgent need to seek out new and innovative uses of technology to facilitate patient/practitioner collaboration, engagement, and shared decision making in the PHV process. Virtual reality interior design applications (VRIDAs) primarily allow users to simulate the home environment and visualize changes prior to implementing them. Customized VRIDAs, which also model specialist occupational therapy equipment, could become a valuable tool to facilitate improved patient/practitioner collaboration, if developed effectively and integrated into the PHV process. Objective The intent of the study was to explore the perceptions of OTs with regard to using VRIDAs as an assistive tool within the PHV process. Methods Task-oriented interactive usability sessions, utilizing the think-aloud protocol and subsequent semi-structured interviews were carried out with seven OTs who possessed significant experience across a range of clinical settings. Template analysis was carried out on the think-aloud and interview data. Analysis was both inductive and driven by theory, centering around the parameters that impact upon the acceptance, adoption, and use of this technology in practice as indicated by the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Results OTs’ perceptions were identified relating to three core themes: (1) perceived usefulness (PU), (2) perceived ease of use (PEoU), and (3) actual use (AU). Regarding PU, OTs believed VRIDAs had promising potential

  20. The effect of homecare team visits in terminal cancer patients: Role of health teams reaching patients homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Banerjee

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: The eagerness of patients wanting the teams to reach their residence may be judged by the given figures. The total number of patients visited by the homecare teams of Cansupport in the year 2008-2009 was 1025. Out of them, there were about 104 patients who were discharged. The term discharge means that the patients were not interested in our visit or were not available in our subsequent visit. It has to be mentioned here that the service is a definite demand by society provided that the cost may be catered too.

  1. Feasibility and effects of preventive home visits for at-risk older people: Design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catellier Diane

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for preventive methods to mitigate functional decline and unwanted relocation by older adults living in the community is important. Preventive home visit (PHV models use infrequent but regular visits to older adults by trained practitioners with the goal of maintaining function and quality of life. Evidence about PHV efficacy is mixed but generally supportive. Yet interventions have rarely combined a comprehensive (biopsychosocial occupational therapy intervention protocol with a home visit to older adults. There is a particular need in the USA to create and examine such a protocol. Methods/Design The study is a single-blind randomized controlled pilot trial designed to assess the feasibility, and to obtain preliminary efficacy estimates, of an intervention consisting of preventive home visits to community-dwelling older adults. An occupational therapy-based preventive home visit (PHV intervention was developed and is being implemented and evaluated using a repeated measures design. We recruited a sample of 110 from a population of older adults (75+ who were screened and found to be at-risk for functional decline. Participants are currently living in the community (not in assisted living or a skilled nursing facility in one of three central North Carolina counties. After consent, participants were randomly assigned into experimental and comparison groups. The experimental group receives the intervention 4 times over a 12 month follow-up period while the comparison group receives a minimal intervention of mailed printed materials. Pre- and post-intervention measures are being gathered by questionnaires administered face-to-face by a treatment-blinded research associate. Key outcome measures include functional ability, participation, life satisfaction, self-rated health, and depression. Additional information is collected from participants in the experimental group during the intervention to assess the feasibility of

  2. 'I am stronger, I'm no longer afraid…', an evaluation of a home-visiting mentor mother support programme for abused women in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosman, Gert-Jan; Lo Fo Wong, Sylvie H; Römkens, Renée; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L M

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to investigate which factors make a mentor mother support programme for abused women successful. We used semi-structured interviews with abused women and focus group discussions with the mentor mothers to evaluate their experiences and needs within a mentor support programme (MeMoSA). Fourteen abused women were interviewed 6 months after the support programme ended. Mentor mothers participated in two focus group discussions. Abused women emphasised that nonjudgmental listening, equivalence, involvement and bonding are important factors for successful support. Mentor mothers described that empathy, availability, persistence and advocacy fitted the needs of women best to empower them and help them to cope with their violent situation at home. A safe place to meet each other was also an important factor. A good relationship, tailored support provided by home visiting, advocacy and safety are required to effectively help abused women. MeMoSA, a home-visiting support programme, is a promising valuable new support programme in primary care for abused women. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. The Association Between Immigration Status and Office-based Medical Provider Visits for Cancer Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wilson, Fernando A; Chen, Li-Wu

    2017-06-01

    We examined differences in cancer-related office-based provider visits associated with immigration status in the United States. Data from the 2007-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and National Health Interview Survey included adult patients diagnosed with cancer. Univariate analyses described distributions of cancer-related office-based provider visits received, expenditures, visit characteristics, as well as demographic, socioeconomic, and health covariates, across immigration groups. We measured the relationships of immigrant status to number of visits and associated expenditure within the past 12 months, adjusting for age, sex, educational attainment, race/ethnicity, self-reported health status, time since cancer diagnosis, cancer remission status, marital status, poverty status, insurance status, and usual source of care. We finally performed sensitivity analyses for regression results by using the propensity score matching method to adjust for potential selection bias. Noncitizens had about 2 fewer visits in a 12-month period in comparison to US-born citizens (4.0 vs. 5.9). Total expenditure per patient was higher for US-born citizens than immigrants (not statistically significant). Noncitizens (88.3%) were more likely than US-born citizens (76.6%) to be seen by a medical doctor during a visit. Multivariate regression results showed that noncitizens had 42% lower number of visiting medical providers at office-based settings for cancer care than US-born citizens, after adjusting for all the other covariates. There were no significant differences in expenditures across immigration groups. The propensity score matching results were largely consistent with those in multivariate-adjusted regressions. Results suggest targeted interventions are needed to reduce disparities in utilization between immigrants and US-born citizen cancer patients.

  4. An investigation into which individual instrumental activities of daily living are affected by a home visiting nurse intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanen; Liebel, Dianne Veronica; Friedman, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Background: to our knowledge no research has investigated the effect of home visiting nurse (HVN) interventions on individual instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Objective: to investigate the effects of an HVN intervention on the difficulty or dependence in six individual IADLs. Design: a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled study comparing an HVN intervention (n = 237) with usual care (n = 262) at 22 months after study entry. Setting: home care linked to primary care. Subjects: a total of 499 Medicare patients needing or receiving help with at least three IADLs or two ADLs, who had recent significant health-care use. Methods: the intervention consisted of monthly home visits by trained nursing staff. Unadjusted and adjusted (binary and multinomial logistic regression) analyses were performed. Results: unadjusted analyses found less difficulty or dependence for the HVN group for meal preparation, telephone use, shopping and ordinary housework, and more difficulty or dependence for medication management. After adjustment, in addition to an effect through health-care services use, the HVN group had less difficulty or dependence for meal preparation and shopping and more difficulty or dependence for medication management. Conclusions: an HVN intervention had mixed results for individual IADLs. The negative effect on medication management questions the validity of a total IADL score as an outcome measure, and implies that other medication management measures should be considered for outcome evaluation. Future research is needed to confirm and better understand these findings. PMID:23034558

  5. Effect of a Paraprofessional Home-Visiting Intervention on American Indian Teen Mothers’ and Infants’ Behavioral Risks: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barlow, Allison; Mullany, Britta; Neault, Nicole; Compton, Scott; Carter, Alice; Hastings, Ranelda; Billy, Trudy; Coho-Mescal, Valerie; Lorenzo, Sherilynn; Walkup, John T

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveThe authors sought to examine the effectiveness of Family Spirit, a paraprofessional-delivered, home-visiting pregnancy and early childhood intervention, in improving American Indian teen mothers...

  6. A comparison of estimated drug costs of potentially inappropriate medications between older patients receiving nurse home visit services and patients receiving pharmacist home visit services: a cross-sectional and propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Jun; Ozone, Sachiko; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2015-02-21

    There have been no multicenter studies that estimated the relations of either nurse or pharmacist home visit program to drug costs of potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs). This study aimed to establish whether patients who used nurse or pharmacist home visit programs (nurse or pharmacist program) had lower drug costs of PIMs than those who did not use nurse or pharmacist programs for older patients living at home. This cross-sectional study was conducted in home care settings in Japan, involving 430 patients aged 65 or older, of whom 276 were female. All received regular home visits from five clinics between May and December 2013. After the PIMs were identified with the Screening Tool of Older Persons' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) criteria, we estimated the drug costs based on actual pharmaceutical prices and measured against who using nurse or pharmacist programs after a propensity score weighted adjustment. Patients who used nurse programs had lower drug cost of PIMs than those who did not use, but it was not significantly different (5.9 ± 13.1 vs 7.1 ± 13.9 USD per month, P = 0.199). The cost of PIMs for patients who used pharmacist programs also had no difference. (7.2 ± 14.5 vs 5.5 ± 11.5 USD per month, P = 0.06). In the patient groups who used nurse programs, patients who also used pharmacist programs had significantly higher costs of PIMs than those who used only nurse programs (5.5 ± 13.9 vs 2.5 ± 6.0 USD per month, P = 0.006). In patients group who did not use pharmacist programs, patients who only used nurse programs had significantly lower costs of PIMs than those who did not use nurse programs (3.6 ± 7.7 vs 5.8 ± 12.7 USD per month, P = 0.022). Patients who used nurse program have a trend towards lower drug costs of PIMs than those who used nurse and pharmacist program or pharmacist program alone. Although this study tried to adjust the potential confounders as possible as we could by using propensity score analysis

  7. Community health workers' experiences of using video teaching tools during home visits-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Bronwyné; Kohrman, Hannah; Tomlinson, Mark; Mbewu, Nokwanele; Le Roux, Ingrid; Adam, Maya

    2017-09-05

    Innovations in health, such as the use of tablet computers, show promise in broadening the scope of work of community health workers (CHWs), and play an important role in keeping CHWs and their clients up to date with advancements in health. While the use of mobile phones and tablets is innovative, the applicability of these technologies in different contexts remains poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known about the acceptability and feasibility of the use of video teaching tools on such devices across diverse contexts. In this study, we aimed to explore the acceptability and feasibility of using tablets with teaching videos (about HIV, alcohol, nutrition and breastfeeding) to support the health promotion efforts of 24 CHWs who work with pregnant mothers and mothers of young children in an urban township in South Africa. Between November 2015 and May 2016, we conducted focus groups and identified four key themes (with several sub-themes) that demonstrated factors related to the acceptability and feasibility of these devices and their content. Focus group transcripts were analysed thematically using qualitative data analysis software. The findings indicated that while the devices contained several supportive features (such as lightening the workload, and stimulating interest in their work), they also contained several restrictive features (safety and confidentiality). CHWs considered the video content an important tool to engage not only their clients but also family members and the community at large. Issues surrounding safety, privacy and confidentiality of using these devices require careful consideration prior to implementation in large-scale studies. Furthermore, stigma associated with household visits by CHWs and the nature of their work also need to be addressed by researchers and programme implementers. Overall, CHWs deemed the devices and the video content an acceptable and feasible means with which to provide health promotion and education among

  8. Characterizing providers' immunization communication practices during health supervision visits with vaccine-hesitant parents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Douglas J; Robinson, Jeffrey D; Heritage, John; Korfiatis, Carolyn; Taylor, James A; Mangione-Smith, Rita

    2012-02-08

    To determine the feasibility of using direct observation of provider-parent immunization discussions and to characterize provider communication practices with vaccine-hesitant parents. Over a 6 month period in 2010, we videotaped immunization discussions between pediatric providers and vaccine-hesitant parents during health supervision visits involving children 2-15 months old (N=24) in the Seattle area, Washington, USA. Videotapes were analyzed using the qualitative method of conversation analysis. We approached 96 parents seen by 9 different providers. Of those who were eligible (N=56), we enrolled 43% (N=24). Four videotaped visits were excluded from analysis for failure to obtain parental HIPAA authorization. Of the remaining 20 visits, there were ≥2 visits each that involved children aged 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 15 months, and all videotaped visits contained at least a brief immunization discussion. We identified 6 communication practices and several behavior types within each practice relevant to immunization: Practice 1, providers' initiations of the topic of vaccination; Types: participatory or presumptive format; Practice 2, parents' responses to providers' topic initiations; Types: strong or weak acceptance or resistance; Practice 3, providers' follow-ups to parent's responses; Types: no, immediate, or delayed pursuit; Practice 4, parents' vaccine-related questions or statements; Types: fact- or concern-based; Practice 5, providers' explicit solicitations of parent's questions/concerns; Types: designed to discourage or encourage discussion; and Practice 6, parents' responses to providers' solicitations of questions/concerns; Types: no question or fact- or concern-based inquiry. Direct observation of immunization discussions in the primary care pediatric setting is feasible and yields insight into several provider-parent immunization communication practices that are worthy of further study to determine which are effective at improving parental acceptance of

  9. The Home Care Crew Scheduling Problem: Preference-based visit clustering and temporal dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Matias Sevel; Justesen, Tor Fog; Dohn, Anders Høeg

    2012-01-01

    branch-and-price solution algorithm, as this method has previously given solid results for classical vehicle routing problems. Temporal dependencies are modelled as generalised precedence constraints and enforced through the branching. We introduce a novel visit clustering approach based on the soft...... preference constraints. The algorithm is tested both on real-life problem instances and on generated test instances inspired by realistic settings. The use of the specialised branching scheme on real-life problems is novel. The visit clustering decreases run times significantly, and only gives a loss...... of quality for few instances. Furthermore, the visit clustering allows us to find solutions to larger problem instances, which cannot be solved to optimality....

  10. Home Therapy to Reduce Office Visits for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Monica V; Vess, Joy; Dumas, Bonnie Pleasants

    2017-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a predictor of increased mortality. This project integrated erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) with CKD care under one practice setting, co-managing anemia with CKD while reducing frequency of office visits in a rural setting. Patients self-administered their weekly dosage of erythropoietin with monthly follow-ups. As a result, office visits decreased by 56% for patients with CKD Stage 4 and by 54% for patients with CKD Stage 5. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  11. What does it mean when we screen? A closer examination of perinatal depression and psychosocial risk screening within one MCH home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sarah Kye; Masho, Saba W

    2014-05-01

    Perinatal depression screening has become an imperative for maternal and child health (MCH) home visitation programs. However, contextual life experiences and situational life stress may be equally important in determining program response. As one component of a larger research study with an urban MCH home visitation program, we examined the results from multiple measures of depression and anxiety symptoms, social support and stressful life events in a sample of 30 newly enrolled program participants. We compared commonly used tools in identifying women who were "at risk" for perinatal depression. The analysis used published and agency practice cut-off scores, examined correlations between measures, and reflected on the role of stressful life events in this assessment. In this low-income, predominantly African-American sample, the assessed tools were inconsistent in identifying "at risk" women for perinatal depression, ranging from 22 % (Edinburgh Perinatal Depression Scale) to 75 % (Center for Epidemiological Studies, Depression Scale) depending on the instrument. Depression and anxiety were correlated across most measures, although provider-collected data did not correlate as anticipated with other measures. The combination of screening for perinatal depression and stressful life events offered an additional perspective on possible symptom alleviation and psychosocial intervention that could occur within the home visiting program. Our experience suggests that introducing a brief inventory of stressful life events accompanying perinatal depression screening allowed for a more comprehensive understanding of women's experiences than perinatal depression screening alone. We encourage psychosocial risk screening which integrates assessment of social support, stressful life events and perinatal depression symptoms.

  12. Can symptom relief be provided in the home to palliative care cancer patients by the primary caregivers? An Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappan, Sheeba; Ezhilarasu, Punitha; Gnanadurai, Angela; George, Reena; Christopher, Solomon

    2014-01-01

    A large proportion of cancer deaths occur in the developing world, with limited resources for palliative care. Many patients dying at home experience difficult symptoms. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of a structured training program on symptom management along with an acute symptom management kit for primary caregivers of cancer patients receiving home care. Descriptive design was used. Thirty primary caregivers of cancer patients attending the palliative care clinic in Vellore, South India, were provided training on the administration of drugs for acute symptoms. A plastic box with partitions for drugs specific to symptom was provided. On follow-up visits, the usage of the kit, drugs used, and routes of administration were noted. A structured questionnaire with a 4-point scale was used to assess primary caregiver views and satisfaction. Of primary caregivers, 96.7% used a kit. The common medications used were morphine, metoclopramide, dexamethasone, and benzodiazepines. Seventy-three percent of primary caregivers administered subcutaneous injections at home. Hospital visits for acute symptoms reduced by 80%; 90% were satisfied with the training received; 73% stated it was not a burden to treat the patient at home. The training program and acute symptom management kit were favorably received and appropriately used by caregivers of diverse backgrounds. Rural backgrounds and illiteracy were not barriers to acceptance. Healthcare professionals should train caregivers during hospital visits, empowering them to manage acute symptoms and provide simple nursing care. This is doubly important in countries where resources are limited and palliative care facilities scarce.

  13. Health behaviour information provided to clients during midwife-led prenatal booking visits: findings from video analyses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, R.; Martin, L.; Gitsels-van der Wal, J.T.; Noordman, J.; Heymans, M.W.; Spelten, E.; Brug, J.; Hutton, E.K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: to quantify to what extent evidence-based health behaviour topics relevant for pregnancy are discussed with clients during midwife-led prenatal booking visits and to assess the association of client characteristics with the extent of information provided. Design: quantitative video

  14. Electric heating provides a high level of home comfort - economically

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haapakoski, M.

    1997-11-01

    Research and development at IVO in the area of electric heating boasts a tradition going back almost thirty years. Research aimed at further progress is continuing. IVO and power companies launched the `Electrically heated houses of the century` project four years ago. The first results show that electric heating continues to be very competitive with other heating systems. It is an economical way of heating the home and it also increases the comfort of those living there

  15. Safety Risks Among Home Infusion Nurses and Other Home Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Catherine; Quinn, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, home health care (HHC) is a rapidly growing industry and home infusion therapy is a rapidly growing market. HHC can present substantial occupational safety and health (OSH) risks. This article summarizes major OSH risks relevant to home infusion therapy by illustrating them through real-life scenarios collected systematically using qualitative research methods by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-funded research projects at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. The need for home infusion therapy will continue to grow in the future, and safety interventions to prevent or minimize OSH risks are essential. PMID:28683000

  16. Relationship types among adolescent parents participating in a home-visiting program: A latent-transition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Maryna; Fosse, Nathan E; Fauth, Rebecca C; Bumgarner, Erin; Easterbrooks, M Ann

    2016-04-01

    Young parents (less than 25 years of age) have been shown to have especially low rates of father involvement and union stability. However, research has also shown that parenting experiences of young fathers may not be uniform. There is a need for more research that assesses both the multidimensionality of relationship typologies and their temporality. Using a large longitudinal sample of low-income, young mothers enrolled in a randomized control study of a home-visitation program (n = 704; 61% program, 39% control), we evaluated how mother-father relationship dynamics changed over time. Ten mother-reported indicators of relationships (e.g., coresidence, marital status, types of father support) were used to conduct a latent-class analysis of relationship types. A 4-class solution was identified at each time point: Single Parent, Supportive Nonresident Partner, Supportive Resident Partner, and Questioning/Ambivalent Coupling. Latent-transition analyses were used to evaluate stability of relationships across 2 years. At each transition, a large proportion of women moved from one relationship class to another, indicating heterogeneity in relationship dynamics of adolescent parents. Results revealed the potential of a home-visiting program targeted at young parents to favorably promote more stable and supportive mother-father relationships and coparenting arrangements. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Home visitation program effectiveness and the influence of community behavioral norms: a propensity score matched analysis of prenatal smoking cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matone Meredith

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of community context on the effectiveness of evidence-based maternal and child home visitation programs following implementation is poorly understood. This study compared prenatal smoking cessation between home visitation program recipients and local-area comparison women across 24 implementation sites within one state, while also estimating the independent effect of community smoking norms on smoking cessation behavior. Methods Retrospective cohort design using propensity score matching of Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP clients and local-area matched comparison women who smoked cigarettes in the first trimester of pregnancy. Birth certificate data were used to classify smoking status. The main outcome measure was smoking cessation in the third trimester of pregnancy. Multivariable logistic regression analysis examined, over two time periods, the association of NFP exposure and the association of baseline county prenatal smoking rate on prenatal smoking cessation. Results The association of NFP participation and prenatal smoking cessation was stronger in a later implementation period (35.5% for NFP clients vs. 27.5% for comparison women, p  Conclusions Following a statewide implementation, program recipients of NFP demonstrated increased smoking cessation compared to comparison women, with a stronger program effect in later years. The significant association of county smoking rate with cessation suggests that community behavioral norms may present a challenge for evidence-based programs as models are translated into diverse communities.

  18. The Feasibility of Virtual Home Visits to Provide Early Intervention: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Ginger L.; Fiechtl, Barbara J.; Olsen, Susan T.; Rule, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Although videoconferencing has been used to deliver distance education, tutoring for children, and telemedicine observations, there is limited information on the efficacy of its use in delivering part C early intervention services. Four families receiving early intervention services in a rural program participated in a pilot study to test the…

  19. Association between underweight and hospitalization, emergency room visits, and mortality among patients in community medical homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi PY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paul Y Takahashi.1 Jennifer L St Sauver,2 Timothy C Olson,1 Jill M Huber,1 Stephen S Cha,2 Jon O Ebbert11Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, 2Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USABackground: In older adults, underweight (body mass index [BMI] < 18.5 has been associated with increased mortality. This increased mortality risk may be associated with increased health care utilization. We evaluated the relationship between underweight and hospitalization, emergency room visits, and mortality.Methods: An analysis of a retrospective cohort study was conducted at a multisite academic primary care medical practice in Minnesota. The patients were ≥60 years of age, impaneled within primary care on January 1, 2011, and had a BMI measurement recorded between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011. Individuals were excluded if they refused review of their medical record. The primary measurement was BMI, which was categorized as underweight (BMI < 18.5 or normal and obese (BMI ≥ 18.5. The outcomes were hospitalization, emergency room visits, and mortality in the 2011 calendar year. Associations between underweight and each outcome were calculated using logistic regression. Interactions between underweight and gender were assessed in the logistic regression models. The final results were adjusted for age, gender, comorbid health conditions, and single living status.Results: The final cohort included 21,019 patients, of whom 220 (1% were underweight. Underweight patients had a higher likelihood of hospitalization compared with patients with higher BMI (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21–2.22. Underweight patients were also more likely to visit the emergency room (adjusted OR 1.70; 95% CI 1.28–2.25 or to die (adjusted OR 3.64; 95% CI 2.33–5.69. Men with a BMI < 18.5 compared with those having a BMI ≥ 18.5 had the highest odds of hospitalization (OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.59–7

  20. Comparison of effects between home visits with telephone calls and telephone calls only for transitional discharge support: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Frances Kam Yuet; Chow, Susan Ka Yee; Chan, Tony Moon Fai; Tam, Stanley Kui Fu

    2014-01-01

    home visits and telephone calls are two often used approaches in transitional care but their differential effects are unknown. to examine the overall effects of a transitional care programme for discharged medical patients and the differential effects of telephone calls only. randomised controlled trial. a regional hospital in Hong Kong. patients discharged from medical units fitting the inclusion criteria (n = 610) were randomly assigned to: control ('control', n = 210), home visits with calls ('home', n = 196) and calls only ('call', n = 204). the home groups received alternative home visits and calls and the call groups calls only for 4 weeks. The control group received two placebo calls. The nurse case manager was supported by nursing students in delivering the interventions. the home visit group (after 4 weeks 10.7%, after 12 weeks 21.4%) and the call group (11.8, 20.6%) had lower readmission rates than the control group (17.6, 25.7%). Significance differences were detected in intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis for the home and intervention group (home and call combined) at 4 weeks. In the per-protocol analysis (PPA) results, significant differences were found in all groups at 4 weeks. There was significant improvement in quality of life, self-efficacy and satisfaction in both ITT and PPA for the study groups. this study has found that bundled interventions involving both home visits and calls are more effective in reducing readmissions. Many of the transitional care programmes use all-qualified nurses, and this study reveals that a mixed skills model seems to bring about positive effects as well.

  1. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  2. A group randomized controlled trial integrating obesity prevention and control for postpartum adolescents in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire-Joshu, Debra L; Schwarz, Cynthia D; Peskoe, Sarah B; Budd, Elizabeth L; Brownson, Ross C; Joshu, Corinne E

    2015-06-26

    Adolescence represents a critical period for the development of overweight that tracks into adulthood. This risk is significantly heightened for adolescents that become pregnant, many of whom experience postpartum weight retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate Balance Adolescent Lifestyle Activities and Nutrition Choices for Energy (BALANCE), a multicomponent obesity prevention intervention targeting postpartum adolescents participating in a national home visiting child development-parent education program. A group randomized, nested cohort design was used with 1325 adolescents, 694 intervention and 490 control, (mean age = 17.8 years, 52 % underrepresented minorities) located across 30 states. Participatory methods were used to integrate lifestyle behavior change strategies within standard parent education practice. Content targeted replacement of high-risk obesogenic patterns (e.g. sweetened drink and high fat snack consumption, sedentary activity) with positive behaviors (e.g. water intake, fruit and vegetables, increased walking). Parent educators delivered BALANCE through home visits, school based classroom-group meetings, and website activities. Control adolescents received standard child development information. Phase I included baseline to posttest (12 months); Phase II included baseline to follow-up (24 months). When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents who were ≥12 weeks postpartum were 89 % more likely (p = 0.02) to maintain a normal BMI or improve an overweight/obese BMI by 12 months; this change was not sustained at 24 months. When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents significantly improved fruit and vegetable intake (p = .03). In stratified analyses, water intake improved among younger BALANCE teens (p = .001) and overweight/obese BALANCE teens (p = .05) when compared to control counterparts. There were no significant differences between groups in sweetened drink and snack consumption

  3. Early intervention of multiple home visits to prevent childhood obesity in a disadvantaged population: a home-based randomised controlled trial (Healthy Beginnings Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alperstein Garth

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that a proportion of children as young as two years are already overweight. This indicates that obesity prevention programs that commence as early as possible and are family-focused are needed. This Healthy Beginnings Trial aims to determine the efficacy of a community-based randomized controlled trial (RCT of a home visiting intervention in preventing the early onset of childhood overweight and obesity. The intervention will be conducted over the first two years of life to increase healthy feeding behaviours and physical activity, decrease physical inactivity, enhance parent-child interaction, and hence reduce overweight and obesity among children at 2 and 5 years of age in the most socially and economically disadvantaged areas of Sydney, Australia. Methods/design This RCT will be conducted with a consecutive sample of 782 first time mothers with their newborn children. Pregnant women who are expecting their first child, and who are between weeks 24 and 34 of their pregnancy, will be invited to participate in the trial at the antenatal clinic. Informed consent will be obtained and participants will then be randomly allocated to the intervention or the control group. The allocation will be concealed by sequentially numbered, sealed opaque envelopes containing a computer generated random number. The intervention comprises eight home visits from a specially trained community nurse over two years and pro-active telephone support between the visits. Main outcomes include a duration of breastfeeding measured at 6 and 12 months, b introduction of solids measured at 4 and 6 months, c nutrition, physical activity and television viewing measured at 24 months, and d overweight/obesity status at age 2 and 5 years. Discussion The results of this trial will ascertain whether the home based early intervention is effective in preventing the early onset of childhood overweight and obesity. If proved to be effective, it

  4. The effects of a home-visiting discharge education on maternal self-esteem, maternal attachment, postpartum depression and family function in the mothers of NICU infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Young-Mee; Kim, Mi-Ran

    2004-12-01

    A quasi-experimental study was performed to investigate the effects of a home visiting discharge education program on the maternal self-esteem, attachment, postpartum depression and family function in 35 mothers of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infants. Twenty-three mothers in the intervention group received the home visiting discharge education while 12 mothers in the control group received the routine, hospital discharge education. Baseline data was collected in both groups one day after delivery. The intervention group received the home visiting discharge education while the control group did the routine hospital-based discharge education. The questionnaire including the data on maternal self-esteem, attachment, postpartum depression and family function were collected within 1 week after the discharge by mail. The scores of maternal self-esteem, and attachment were significantly increased, and the postpartum depression and the family function score were decreased after the home visiting discharge education in intervention group. There were no changes in these variables before and after the routine hospital-based discharge education in control group. These results support the beneficial effects of home visiting discharge education on the maternal role adaptation and family function of the mothers of NICU infants.

  5. Family child care home providers as role models for children: Cause for concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Tovar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Health behaviors associated with chronic disease, particularly healthy eating and regular physical activity, are important role modeling opportunities for individuals working in child care programs. Prior studies have not explored these risk factors in family child care home (FCCH providers which care for vulnerable and at-risk populations. To address this gap, we describe the socio-demographic and health risk behavior profiles in a sample of providers (n = 166 FCCH taken from baseline data of an ongoing cluster-randomized controlled intervention (2011–2016 in North Carolina. Data were collected during on-site visits where providers completed self-administered questionnaires (socio-demographics, physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, number of hours of sleep per night and perceived stress and had their height and weight measured. A risk score (range: 0–6; 0 no risk to 6 high risk was calculated based on how many of the following were present: not having health insurance, being overweight/obese, not meeting physical activity, fruit and vegetable, and sleep recommendations, and having high stress. Mean and frequency distributions of participant and FCCH characteristics were calculated. Close to one third (29.3% of providers reported not having health insurance. Almost all providers (89.8% were overweight or obese with approximately half not meeting guidelines for physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sleep. Over half reported a “high” stress score. The mean risk score was 3.39 (±1.2, with close to half of the providers having a risk score of 4, 5 or 6 (45.7%. These results stress the need to promote the health of these important care providers.

  6. Health behaviour information provided to clients during midwife-led prenatal booking visits: Findings from video analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ruth; Martin, Linda; Gitsels-van der Wal, Janneke T; Noordman, Janneke; Heymans, Martijn W; Spelten, Evelien R; Brug, Johannes; Hutton, Eileen K

    2017-11-01

    to quantify to what extent evidence-based health behaviour topics relevant for pregnancy are discussed with clients during midwife-led prenatal booking visits and to assess the association of client characteristics with the extent of information provided. quantitative video analyses. 173 video recordings of prenatal booking visits with primary care midwives and clients in the Netherlands taking place between August 2010 and April 2011. thirteen topics regarding toxic substances, nutrition, maternal weight, supplements, and health promoting activities were categorized as either 'never mentioned', 'briefly mentioned', 'basically explained' or 'extensively explained'. Rates on the extent of information provided were calculated for each topic and relationships between client characteristics and dichotomous outcomes of the extent of information provided were assessed using Generalized Linear Mixed Modelling. our findings showed that women who did not take folic acid supplementation, who smoked, or had a partner who smoked, were usually provided basic and occasionally extensive explanations about these topics. The majority of clients were provided with no information on recommended weight gain (91.9%), fish promotion (90.8%), caffeine limitation (89.6%), vitamin D supplementation (87.3%), physical activity promotion (81.5%) and antenatal class attendance (75.7%) and only brief mention of alcohol (91.3%), smoking (81.5%), folic acid (58.4) and weight at the start of pregnancy (52.0%). The importance of a nutritious diet was generally either never mentioned (38.2%) or briefly mentioned (45.1%). Nulliparous women were typically given more information on most topics than multiparous women. although additional information was generally provided about folic acid and smoking, when relevant for their clients, the majority of women were provided with little or no information about the other health behaviours examined in this study. Midwives may be able to improve prenatal health

  7. Smoking status, dental visits and receipt of tobacco counseling in dental office among mobile and trailer home adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoopathi, Vinodh; Zhao, Huaqing; Virtue, Shannon Myers

    2016-11-11

    Mobile and trailer home (MTHs) residents are an understudied group. In this study we determined the cigarette smoking status, dental visits in the past 12 months, and receipt of tobacco counseling in adolescents living in MTHs compared to adolescents living in other types of housing. For this secondary data analysis study, we used data of adolescents aged 10 to 19 years (n = 74,890) from the 2012 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (FYTS). Weighted multiple logistic regression model was conducted to understand the differences between adolescents living in MTHs compared to those living in other types of housing. Approximately 6 % of the sample reported living in MTHs. The regression model showed that older (p office (p office but not received any tobacco counseling (p office were more likely to be MTH adolescents. Adolescents reporting to have received tobacco counseling in a dental office were more likely to be living in MTHs.

  8. An exploratory typology of provider responses that encourage and discourage conversation about complementary and integrative medicine during routine oncology visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Christopher J; Ho, Evelyn Y; Trupin, Laura; Dohan, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    To characterize how providers respond to patient mentions of complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) during routine oncology visits. Ethnographic methods were used over a two and a half year period with 82 advanced cancer patients and their providers across four oncology clinics. Participant observation fieldnotes were analyzed using Discourse Analysis. CIM was mentioned in 78/229 (34%) of the total observed visits. Patients initiated talk about CIM (76%) more than providers (24%). Patients mentioning CIM may indicate a preference for or interest in non-pharmacological adjunctive treatment options. Providers' responses inhibited further talk in 44% of observations and promoted talk in 56% of observations. How providers respond may indicate their willingness to discuss a range of treatment options and to collaboratively engage in treatment decision-making. Provider responses that inhibited CIM conversation passed on the opportunity to discuss patient preferences, and responses that promoted further conversation helped counsel patients about appropriate CIM use. Promoting discussion did not require additional time or extensive knowledge about CIM. Providers can facilitate high quality communication without endorsing CIM to help patients make treatment decisions and to evaluate CIM appropriateness in response to patient values and preferences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. The impact of a home visitation programme on household hazards associated with unintentional childhood injuries: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odendaal, Willem; van Niekerk, Ashley; Jordaan, Esme; Seedat, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    The continued high mortality and morbidity rates for unintentional childhood injuries remain a public health concern. This article reports on the influence of a home visitation programme (HVP) on household hazards associated with unintentional childhood injuries in a South African low-income setting. A randomised controlled trial (n=211 households) was conducted in a South African informal settlement. Community members were recruited and trained as paraprofessional visitors. Four intervention visits were conducted over 3 months, focusing on child development, and the prevention of burn, poison, and fall injuries. The HVP, a multi-component intervention, included educational inputs, provision of safety devices, and an implicit enforcement strategy. The intervention effect (IE) was measured with a standardised risk assessment index that compared post-intervention scores for intervention and control households. A significant reduction was observed in the hazards associated with electrical and paraffin appliances, as well as in hazards related to poisoning. Non-significant changes were observed for burn safety household practices and fall injury hazards. This study confirmed that a multi-component HVP effectively reduced household hazards associated with electrical and paraffin appliances and poisoning among children in a low-income South African setting.

  10. Measurement of special access to home visit nursing services among Japanese disabled elderly people: using GIS and claim data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Takashi; Matsumoto, Hiroshige; Fujisaki-Sakai, Mahiro; Nagata, Satoko

    2017-05-30

    Home care service demands are increasing in Japan; this necessitates improved service allocation. This study examined the relationship between home visit nursing (HVN) service use and the proportion of elderly people living within 10 min' travel of HVN agencies. The population of elderly people living within reach of HVN agencies for each of 17 municipalities in one low-density prefecture was calculated using public data and geographic information systems. Multilevel logistic analysis for 2641 elderly people was conducted using medical and long-term care insurance claims data from October 2010 to examine the association between the proportion of elderly people reachable by HVNs and service usage in 13 municipalities. Municipality variables included HVN agency allocation appropriateness. Individual variables included HVN usage and demographic variables. The reachable proportion of the elderly population ranged from 0.0 to 90.2% in the examined municipalities. The reachable proportion of the elderly population was significantly positively correlated with HVN use (odds ratio: 1.938; confidence interval: 1.265-2.967). Residents living in municipalities with a lower reachable proportion of the elderly population are less likely to use HVN services. Public health interventions should increase the reachable proportion of the elderly population in order to improve HVN service use.

  11. Focus on Dementia Care: Continuing Education Preferences, Challenges, and Catalysts among Rural Home Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; O'Connell, Megan E.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Stewart, Norma J.

    2016-01-01

    Home care staff who provide housekeeping and personal care to individuals with dementia generally have lower levels of dementia care training compared with other health care providers. The study's purposes were to determine whether the professional role of home care staff in a predominantly rural region was associated with preferences for delivery…

  12. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  13. The Key to Me: Seniors' Perceptions of Relationship-Building with In-Home Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantert, Thomas W.; McWilliam, Carol L.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Allen, Natalie J.

    2008-01-01

    Changing demographics and hospital downsizing have placed increasing demands on the home care sector. Many of those receiving in-home care are seniors whose chronic conditions require a collaborative approach. Both providers' paternalistic orientations toward senior clients and seniors' passivity within provider-client interactions have the…

  14. Design and implementation of an integrated, continuous evaluation, and quality improvement system for a state-based home-visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Bridget K; Potash, Dru; Omohundro, Ellen; Taylor, Cathy R

    2012-10-01

    To describe the design and implementation of an evaluation system to facilitate continuous quality improvement (CQI) and scientific evaluation in a statewide home visiting program, and to provide a summary of the system's progress in meeting intended outputs and short-term outcomes. Help Us Grow Successfully (HUGS) is a statewide home visiting program that provides services to at-risk pregnant/post-partum women, children (0-5 years), and their families. The program goals are to improve parenting skills and connect families to needed services and thus improve the health of the service population. The evaluation system is designed to: (1) integrate evaluation into daily workflow; (2) utilize standardized screening and evaluation tools; (3) facilitate a culture of CQI in program management; and, (4) facilitate scientifically rigorous evaluations. The review of the system's design and implementation occurred through a formative evaluation process (reach, dose, and fidelity). Data was collected through electronic and paper surveys, administrative data, and notes from management meetings, and medical chart review. In the design phase, four process and forty outcome measures were selected and are tracked using standardized screening and monitoring tools. During implementation, the reach and dose of training were adequate to successfully launch the evaluation/CQI system. All staff (n = 165) use the system for management of families; the supervisors (n = 18) use the system to track routine program activities. Data quality and availability is sufficient to support periodic program reviews at the region and state level. In the first 7 months, the HUGS evaluation system tracked 3,794 families (7,937 individuals). System use and acceptance is high. A successful implementation of a structured evaluation system with a strong CQI component is feasible in an existing, large statewide program. The evaluation/CQI system is an effective mechanism to drive modest change in management

  15. Effect of Village Health Team Home Visits and Mobile Phone Consultations on Maternal and Newborn Care Practices in Masindi and Kiryandongo, Uganda: A Community-Intervention Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mangwi Ayiasi

    Full Text Available The World Health Organisation recommends home visits conducted by Community Health Workers (in Uganda known as Village Health Teams--VHTs in order to improve maternal and newborn health. This study measured the effect of home visits combined with mobile phone consultations on maternal and newborn care practices.In a community intervention trial design 16 health centres in Masindi and Kiryandongo districts, Uganda were randomly and equally allocated to one of two arms: control and intervention arms. Eight control health centres received the usual maternal and newborn educational messages offered by professional health workers and eight intervention health centres that received an intervention package for maternal care and essential newborn care practices. In the intervention arm VHTs made two prenatal and one postnatal home visit to households. VHTs were provided with mobile phones to enable them make regular telephone consultations with health workers at the health centre serving the catchment area. The primary outcome was health facility delivery. Other outcomes included antenatal attendances, birth preparedness, cord and thermal care and breastfeeding practices. Analysis was by intention-to-treat.A total of 1385 pregnant women were analysed: 758 and 627 in the control and intervention arms respectively. Significant post-intervention differences were: delivery place [adjusted Odds Ratio aOR: 17.94(95%CI: 6.26-51.37; p<0.001], cord care [aOR: 3.05(95%CI: 1.81-5.12; p<0.001] thermal care [aOR: 7.58(95%CI: 2.52-22.82; p<0.001], and timely care-seeking for newborn illness [aOR: 4.93(95%CI: 1.59-15.31; p = 0.006].VHTs can have an effect in promoting proper cord and thermal care for the newborn and improve timely care-seeking for health facility delivery and newborn illness, because they could answer questions and refer patients correctly. However, VHTs should be supported by professional health workers through the use of mobile phones

  16. Nurse home visits with or without alert buttons versus usual care in the frail elderly: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favela J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jesús Favela,1 Luis A Castro,2 Francisco Franco-Marina,3 Sergio Sánchez-García,4 Teresa Juárez-Cedillo,4 Claudia Espinel Bermudez,4 Julia Mora-Altamirano,4 Marcela D Rodriguez,5 Carmen García-Peña41Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education of Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico; 2Sonora Institute of Technology, Ciudad Obregon, Mexico; 3National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, Mexican Ministry of Health, Mexico City, Mexico; 4Epidemiologic and Health Service Research Unit, Aging Area, XXI Century National Medical Center, Mexican Institute of Social Security, Mexico City, Mexico; 5School of Engineering, MyDCI, Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexicali, MexicoObjective: To assess whether an intervention based on nurse home visits including alert buttons (NV+AB is effective in reducing frailty compared to nurse home visits alone (NV-only and usual care (control group for older adults.Design: Unblinded, randomized, controlled trial.Setting: Insured population covered by the Mexican Social Security Institute living in the city of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico.Participants: Patients were aged over 60 years with a frailty index score higher than 0.14.Intervention: After screening and informed consent, participants were allocated randomly to the control, NV+AB, or NV-only groups.Measurements: The primary outcome was the frailty score 9 months later. Quality of life, depression, comorbidities, health status, and health service utilization were also considered.Results: The framing sample included 819 patients. Of those, 591 were not located because they did not have a landline/telephone (341 patients, they had died (107, they were ill (50, or they were not currently living in the city (28. A screening interview was applied to 228 participants, and 57 had a score ≤0.14, 171 had ≥0.14, and 16 refused to complete the baseline questionnaire. A home visit was scheduled for 155 patients. However, 22 did not complete

  17. Mapping a Research Agenda for Home Care Safety: Perspectives from Researchers, Providers, and Decision Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella; MacDonald, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive design was to explore the perspectives of researchers, health care providers, policy makers, and decision makers on key risks, concerns, and emerging issues related to home care safety that would inform a line of research inquiry. Defining safety specifically in this home care context has yet to be…

  18. Practising proportionate universalism - a study protocol of an extended postnatal home visiting programme in a disadvantaged area in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Bo; Marttila, Anneli; Kulane, Asli; Lindberg, Lene; Burström, Kristina

    2017-01-28

    In spite of a well-developed welfare system in Sweden, there are important health divides between residential areas in Stockholm county, with shorter life expectancy in disadvantaged areas. These socioeconomic and health divides also affect children. Extra efforts and organized collaboration by different authorities are required to meet the greater needs of children growing up in these areas. This article reports on the programme logic and evaluation design of an extended postnatal home visiting programme in collaboration between child health services and social services in the Rinkeby area, Stockholm, Sweden, where a large proportion are recent immigrants and more than 50% are at-risk of poverty. The intervention consists of five extra home visits when the child is aged between 2-15 months, jointly by a child health nurse and a social service parental advisor, offered to all parents of first-born children attending Rinkeby child health centre. Parents of first-born children attending child health centres in neighboring areas serve as controls. The evaluation will use a mixed methods approach, including participant observation, in-depth interviews, interviews using structured questionnaires, review and analysis of child health records and records of health care utilization. The intervention has so far been very positively received by the parents (95% participation rate), who seem to perceive that they actually benefit from participating, and also from staff in child health services and social services who find this approach to be in line with their professional intentions. The staff members interviewed also appreciate the inter-professional collaboration. The intervention has sparked activities also in other sectors (the local library, the open child day care centre) of the local area. The timing of the intervention, at the start of the child's life, may be well suited to support parents in reorienting themselves and finding a positive parenting role, to the

  19. Effectiveness and experiences of families and support workers participating in peer-led parenting support programs delivered as home visiting programs: a comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, Ailsa; Watts, Robin; Hegney, Desley; Walker, Roz

    2016-10-01

    Designing child and family health services to meet the diverse needs of contemporary families is intended to minimize impacts of early disadvantage and subsequent lifelong health and social issues. Innovative programs to engage families with child and family support services have led to interest in the potential value of peer-led home visiting from parents in local communities. There is a range of benefits and challenges identified in a limited number of studies associated with home visiting peer support. The objective of the review is to identify: INCLUSION CRITERIA PARTICIPANTS: Families/parents with one or more children aged zero to four years, peer support workers and their supervisors. Peer-led home visiting parenting support programs that use volunteer or paraprofessional home visitors from the local community compared to standard community maternal-child care. The phenomenon of interest will be the relationships between participants in the program. Quantitative studies: randomized control trials (RCTs). Qualitative studies: grounded theory and qualitative descriptive studies. Parental attitudes and beliefs, coping skills and confidence in parenting, parental stress, compliance with child health checks/links with primary healthcare services, satisfaction with peer support and services and the nature of the relationship between parents and home visitors. The search strategy will include both published and unpublished studies. Seven journal databases and five other sources will be searched. Only studies published in the English language from 2000 to 2015 will be considered. Studies were assessed by two independent reviewers using standardized critical appraisal tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) and the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI) as appropriate. Both quantitative and qualitative data were independently extracted by two reviewers

  20. Effect of Nurse Home Visits vs. Usual Care on Reducing Intimate Partner Violence in Young High-Risk Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mejdoubi, J.; van den Heijkant, S.C.C.M.; van Leerdam, F.J.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Hirasing, R.A.; Crijnen, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background:Expectant mothers and mothers of young children are especially vulnerable to intimate partner violence (IPV). The nurse-family partnership (NFP) is a home visitation program in the United States effective for the prevention of adverse child health outcomes. Evidence regarding the effect

  1. Development of a home visitation programme for the early detection of health problems in potentially frail community-dwelling older people by general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijnen, M.M.N.; Jansen, M.W.J.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Duimel-Peeters, I.G.P.

    2013-01-01

    The integration within existing health care systems of preventive initiatives to maintain independent living among older people is increasingly emphasized. This article describes the development and refinement of the [G]OLD home visitation programme: an eight-step programme, including a

  2. Cost and cost-effectiveness of newborn home visits: findings from the Newhints cluster-randomised controlled trial in rural Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitt, Catherine; Tawiah, Theresa; Soremekun, Seyi; ten Asbroek, Augustinus H. A.; Manu, Alexander; Tawiah-Agyemang, Charlotte; Hill, Zelee; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Kirkwood, Betty R.; Hanson, Kara

    2016-01-01

    Every year, 2·9 million newborn babies die worldwide. A meta-analysis of four cluster-randomised controlled trials estimated that home visits by trained community members in programme settings in Ghana and south Asia reduced neonatal mortality by 12% (95% CI 5-18). We aimed to estimate the costs and

  3. Comparison of equipment prescriptions in the toilet/bathroom by occupational therapists using home visits and digital photos, for patients in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sharon; Barr, Christopher J; George, Stacey

    2015-04-01

    Home visits, used by occupational therapists to facilitate independence and enhance safety, are effective but costly and time consuming. This research aims to establish the level of agreement in equipment prescribed by occupational therapists using: digital photographs only, and using home visits and digital photographs, respectively. Quasi-experimental methodological design conducted in private dwellings in the community in Adelaide with rehabilitation patients and their family members. The equipment recommended by occupational therapists for the toilet and bathroom using similar methods (both digital photographs from previous data; n = 5) was compared with equipment recommended using different methods (conventional home visits vs. digital photographs; n = 14). Percent agreement for equipment prescribed between groups, that is digital only and home visit/photography, respectively, were: 72.5/83.9% for toilet; 87.4/88.3% for bathroom and 83/87% for toilet and bathroom. Variability of agreement in the equipment prescribed showed that some items of equipment were incongruently prescribed, by both methods for toilet and bathroom areas. Using digital photographs taken by family members, patient information, and an equipment list is a reliable method of making accurate equipment prescriptions in the toilet and bathroom areas. To enhance accuracy, in-depth patient information via face-to-face interview and measurements of physical environment should be included. © 2014 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  4. Are acceptance rates of a national preventive home visit programme for older people socially imbalanced?: a cross sectional study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, Yukari; Ekmann, Anette Addy; Nilsson, Charlotte Juul

    2012-01-01

    Preventive home visits are offered to community dwelling older people in Denmark aimed at maintaining their functional ability for as long as possible, but only two thirds of older people accept the offer from the municipalities. The purpose of this study is to investigate 1) whether socioeconomi...

  5. Chronic kidney disease and support provided by home care services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydede, Sema K; Komenda, Paul; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Levin, Adeera

    2014-07-18

    Chronic diseases, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), are growing in incidence and prevalence, in part due to an aging population. Support provided through home care services may be useful in attaining a more efficient and higher quality care for CKD patients. A systematic review was performed to identify studies examining home care interventions among adult CKD patients incorporating all outcomes. Studies examining home care services as an alternative to acute, post-acute or hospice care and those for long-term maintenance in patients' homes were included. Studies with only a home training intervention and those without an applied research component were excluded. Seventeen studies (10 cohort, 4 non-comparative, 2 cross-sectional, 1 randomized) examined the support provided by home care services in 15,058 CKD patients. Fourteen studies included peritoneal dialysis (PD), two incorporated hemodialysis (HD) and one included both PD and HD patients in their treatment groups. Sixteen studies focused on the dialysis phase of care in their study samples and one study included information from both the dialysis and pre-dialysis phases of care. Study settings included nine single hospital/dialysis centers and three regional/metropolitan areas and five were at the national level. Studies primarily focused on nurse assisted home care patients and mostly examined PD related clinical outcomes. In PD studies with comparators, peritonitis risks and technique survival rates were similar across home care assisted patients and comparators. The risk of mortality, however, was higher for home care assisted PD patients. While most studies adjusted for age and comorbidities, information about multidimensional prognostic indices that take into account physical, psychological, cognitive, functional and social factors among CKD patients was not easily available. Most studies focused on nurse assisted home care patients on dialysis. The majority were single site studies incorporating

  6. Dying at home: a qualitative study of family carers' views of support provided by GPs community staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamark, David; Blake, Susan; Brearley, Sarah G; Milligan, Christine; Thomas, Carol; Turner, Mary; Wang, Xu; Payne, Sheila

    2014-12-01

    Dying at home is the preference of many patients with life-limiting illness. This is often not achieved and a key factor is the availability of willing and able family carers. To elicit family carers' views about the community support that made death at home possible. Qualitative study in East Devon, North Lancashire, and Cumbria. Participants were bereaved family carers who had provided care at the end of life for patients dying at home. Semi-structured interviews were conducted 6-24 months after the death. Fifty-nine bereaved family carers were interviewed (54% response rate; 69% female). Two-thirds of the patients died from cancer with median time of home care being 5 months and for non-cancer patients the median time for home care was 30 months. An overarching theme was of continuity of care that divided into personal, organisational, and informational continuity. Large numbers and changes in care staff diluted personal continuity and failure of the GPs to visit was viewed negatively. Family carers had low expectations of informational continuity, finding information often did not transfer between secondary and primary care and other care agencies. Organisational continuity when present provided comfort and reassurance, and a sense of control. The requirement for continuity in delivering complex end-of-life care has long been acknowledged. Family carers in this study suggested that minimising the number of carers involved in care, increasing or ensuring personal continuity, and maximising the informational and organisational aspects of care could lead to a more positive experience. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  7. Home Care Providers to the Rescue: A Novel First-Responder Programme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen M Hansen

    Full Text Available To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA.We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark.Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases and shock was delivered in one case. For 26 of the 28 cases, the cardiac arrest occurred in a private home. Ninety-five per cent of the providers who had been dispatched to a cardiac arrest reported feeling prepared for managing the initial resuscitation, including use of AED.Home care providers are suited to act as first-responders in predominantly rural and residential districts. Future follow-up will allow further evaluation of home care provider arrivals and patient survival.

  8. Development and implementation of a screen-and-refer approach to addressing maternal depression, substance use, and intimate partner violence in home visiting clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauber, Sarah; John, Tiffany; Hogue, Aaron; Nugent, Jessica; Hernandez, Gina

    2017-10-01

    Perinatal maternal depression (MD), substance use (SU), and intimate partner violence (IPV) are critical public health concerns with significant negative impacts on child development. Bolstering the capacity of home visiting (HV) programs to address these significant risk factors has potential to improve child and family outcomes. This study presents a description and mixed-methods feasibility evaluation of the "Home Visitation Enhancing Linkages Project (HELP)," a screen-and-refer approach to addressing MD, SU, and IPV within HV aimed at improving risk identification and linkage to treatment among HV clients. HELP was a three-phase intervention that included three evidence-based interventions: screening, motivational interviewing (MI), and case management (CM). This study presents quantitative fidelity data from 21 home visitors reporting on 116 clients in 4 HV programs, as well as qualitative data from structured interviews with 14 home visitors. Nearly all clients were screened and 22% screened positive on at least one risk domain. Rates of MI and CM implementation were lower than expected, however home visitors implemented general supportive interventions at high rates. Home visitor interviews revealed the following factors that may have impacted HELP implementation: client disclosure of risk, barriers to treatment access, systems integration, home visitor role perception, and integration of HELP into the broader HV curriculum. Implications of study findings for the design of future attempts to address maternal risk within HV are discussed.

  9. The association between visiting a primary care provider and uptake of periodic mammograms as women get older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, R; Gu, S; Glazier, R H; Paszat, L F

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether visits to a primary care provider (PCP) are associated with the uptake of periodic mammograms as women get older. The cohort consisted of 2,389,889 women resident in Ontario, Canada, aged 50 to 79 at any point from 2001 to 2010, who were cancer-free and eligible for the Ontario Health Insurance Plan prior to study entry. Non-parametric estimation was used to describe the mean cumulative number of periodic mammograms for women with and without recent exposure to a PCP, as a function of age. Using age as the time scale, a recurrent event regression model was also implemented to examine the association between exposure to a PCP and rate of periodic mammograms, adjusted for income quintile and comorbidity. The mean observation window was 7.0 years. Uptake of periodic mammograms was significantly higher for women with recent exposure to a PCP compared with those without. This trend remained consistent as women aged, and the magnitude of the association increased for women aged 65 or older. The relative rate of periodic mammograms was lower than 1 and consistently decreased as women from lower income quintiles were compared with women from the wealthiest quintile. Visits to a PCP play an important role in uptake of periodic mammograms, and this association increases as women age. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Behavioral Responses of Nursing Home Residents to Visits From a Person with a Dog,a Robot Seal or a Toy Cat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Karen; Sørensen, Lisbeth U; Videbech, Poul B

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that contact with dogs can positively affect the wellbeing of elderly people in nursing homes, but there is a lack of research investigating the causal pathways of these effects. One such path- way may relate to the behavioral responses of the elderly when interacting...... with a dog. The present study compared the immediate behavioral responses of nursing home residents to bi-weekly visits from a person accompanied by either a dog, a robot seal (PARO®), or a soft toy cat, using a randomized controlled design. A total of 100 nursing home residents com- pleted the study. Each......, and gender were collected. We found that the immediate responses to, and interaction with, the visiting animal depended on the type of animal that was brought along. The dog and the interactive robot seal triggered the most interaction, in the form of physical contact (F(2,103) = 7.50, p

  11. Family carers providing support to a person dying in the home setting: A narrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Sara M; King, Claire; Turner, Mary; Payne, Sheila

    2015-06-01

    This study is based on people dying at home relying on the care of unpaid family carers. There is growing recognition of the central role that family carers play and the burdens that they bear, but knowledge gaps remain around how to best support them. The aim of this study is to review the literature relating to the perspectives of family carers providing support to a person dying at home. A narrative literature review was chosen to provide an overview and synthesis of findings. The following search terms were used: caregiver, carer, 'terminal care', 'supportive care', 'end of life care', 'palliative care', 'domiciliary care' AND home AND death OR dying. During April-May 2013, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Pubmed, Cochrane Reviews and Citation Indexes were searched. Inclusion criteria were as follows: English language, empirical studies and literature reviews, adult carers, perspectives of family carers, articles focusing on family carers providing end-of-life care in the home and those published between 2000 and 2013. A total of 28 studies were included. The overarching themes were family carers' views on the impact of the home as a setting for end-of-life care, support that made a home death possible, family carer's views on deficits and gaps in support and transformations to the social and emotional space of the home. Many studies focus on the support needs of people caring for a dying family member at home, but few studies have considered how the home space is affected. Given the increasing tendency for home deaths, greater understanding of the interplay of factors affecting family carers may help improve community services. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA has specifically contracted, this rulemaking will only affect home health and hospice care providers who do not have existing negotiated contracts with VA. This rule also rescinds internal guidance documents that could be interpreted as conflicting with this final rule.

  13. Teacher Home Visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronholz, June

    2016-01-01

    Volumes of research suggest that one key to a child's academic success is having "engaged" parents, but parents know that, to teachers, engagement means a fairly circumscribed round of activities--back-to-school nights, parent-teacher conferences, potlucks, and interactive homework. Making the connection between schools and families is…

  14. Development and validation of scales for attitudes, self-reported practices, difficulties and knowledge among home care nurses providing palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Megumi; Nishimura, Misako; Ishii, Yoko; Kuramochi, Masayo; Kakuta, Naoe; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2016-06-01

    Although educational programs for nurses are required to ensure high-quality home care, there is currently no scale to appropriately evaluate such programs for home care nurses providing palliative care. We developed and validated four scales to evaluate home care nurses' attitude, self-reported practices, difficulties, and knowledge regarding home palliative cancer care, and identified factors associated with home care nurses' attitude, self-reported practices, and difficulties. The scale items were generated based on literature review and a cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted. Experienced home care nurses from visiting nurse stations who enrolled in a home palliative care educational program were recruited for this survey. Of the 125 questionnaires delivered to home care nurses, 122 were returned (response rate, 98%). After factor analysis, the scale for attitude comprised four domains with 12 items, the scale for self-reported practices comprised six domains with 26 items, and the scale for difficulties comprised five domains with 18 items. Cronbach's alphas for these scales were 0.61-0.70. After using the Item Response Theory model, the scale for knowledge was found to comprise 26 items. The multiple logistic regression model showed that experience in caring for terminal patients at home or in hospitals were associated with having more positive attitude, higher self-reported practices and lower difficulties. We developed valid and reliable scales to evaluate home care nurses' attitude, self-reported practices, difficulties, and knowledge regarding home palliative cancer care. These scales potentially useful for evaluating a home palliative cancer care education program for nurses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... payment system), does not permit rate negotiation. In this manner, provider agreements are not contractual... rest of 38 CFR part 51, unless part 51 conflicts with paragraph (c). It also states that the term ``per... (or State Medicaid payment system), which does not permit rate negotiation. In this manner, provider...

  16. Access to Difficult-to-reach Population Subgroups: A Family Midwife Based Home Visiting Service for Implementing Nutrition-related Preventive Activities - A Mixed Methods Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Walz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Health and social inequality are tightly linked and still pose an important public health problem. However, vulnerable and disadvantaged populations are difficult to reach for health-related interventions. Given the long-lasting effects of an adverse, particular nutrition-related, intrauterine and neonatal environment on health development (perinatal programming, an early and easy access is essential for sustainable interventions. The goal of this explorative study was therefore to elucidate whether an existing access of family midwives (FMs to families in need of support could be an option to implement effective public health and nutrition interventions. To that end three research objectives were formulated: (1 to determine whether a discernible impact of home visits by FMs can be described; (2 to identify subgroups among these families in need of more specific interventions; (3 to determine how relevant nutrition-related topics are for both FMs and the supported families. For addressing these objectives a mixed methods design was used: Routine documentation data from 295 families visited by a family midwife (FM were analyzed (secondary analysis, and structured expert interviews with FMs were conducted and analyzed. Study reporting followed the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology statement. Based on the FMs reports, a significant improvement (p < 0.001 regarding psycho-social variables could be determined after the home visits. Single mothers, however, seemed to benefit less from the FMs service compared to their counterparts (p = 0.015. Nutritional counseling was demanded by 89% of the families during the home visits. In addition, nutrition-related topics were reported in the interviews to be of high interest to both families and the FMs. Based on the obtained results it is concluded that FMs home visits offer a promising access to vulnerable and disadvantaged families for implementing nutrition

  17. Development of a clinical pharmacy model within an Australian home nursing service using co-creation and participatory action research: the Visiting Pharmacist (ViP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Rohan A; Lee, Cik Yin; Beanland, Christine; Goeman, Dianne P; Petrie, Neil; Petrie, Barbara; Vise, Felicity; Gray, June

    2017-11-03

    To develop a collaborative, person-centred model of clinical pharmacy support for community nurses and their medication management clients. Co-creation and participatory action research, based on reflection, data collection, interaction and feedback from participants and other stakeholders. A large, non-profit home nursing service in Melbourne, Australia. Older people referred to the home nursing service for medication management, their carers, community nurses, general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists, a multidisciplinary stakeholder reference group (including consumer representation) and the project team. Feedback and reflections from minutes, notes and transcripts from: project team meetings, clinical pharmacists' reflective diaries and interviews, meetings with community nurses, reference group meetings and interviews and focus groups with 27 older people, 18 carers, 53 nurses, 15 GPs and seven community pharmacists. The model was based on best practice medication management standards and designed to address key medication management issues raised by stakeholders. Pharmacist roles included direct client care and indirect care. Direct care included home visits, medication reconciliation, medication review, medication regimen simplification, preparation of medication lists for clients and nurses, liaison and information sharing with prescribers and pharmacies and patient/carer education. Indirect care included providing medicines information and education for nurses and assisting with review and implementation of organisational medication policies and procedures. The model allowed nurses to refer directly to the pharmacist, enabling timely resolution of medication issues. Direct care was provided to 84 older people over a 15-month implementation period. Ongoing feedback and consultation, in line with participatory action research principles, informed the development and refinement of the model and identification of enablers and challenges. A collaborative

  18. BEST PRACTICE IN INDIVIDUAL SUPERVISION OF PSYCHOLOGISTS WORKING IN THE FRENCH CAPEDP PREVENTIVE PERINATAL HOME-VISITING PROGRAM: RESULTS OF A DELPHI CONSENSUS PROCESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greacen, Tim; Welniarz, Bertrand; Purper-Ouakil, Diane; Wendland, Jaqueline; Dugravier, Romain; Saïas, Thomas; Tereno, Susana; Tubach, Florence; Haddad, Alain; Guedeney, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    Individual supervision of home-visiting professionals has proved to be a key element for perinatal home-visiting programs. Although studies have been published concerning quality criteria for supervision in North American contexts, little is known about this subject in other national settings. In the context of the CAPEDP program (Compétences parentales et Attachement dans la Petite Enfance: Diminution des risques liés aux troubles de santé mentale et Promotion de la résilience; Parental Skills and Attachment in Early Childhood: Reducing Mental Health Risks and Promoting Resilience), the first randomized controlled perinatal mental health promotion research program to take place in France, this article describes the results of a study using the Delphi consensus method to identify the program supervisors' points of view concerning best practice for the individual supervision of home visitors involved in such programs. The final 18 recommendations could be grouped into four general themes: the organization and setting of supervision sessions; supervisor competencies; relationship between supervisor and supervisee; and supervisor intervention strategies within the supervision process. The quality criteria identified in this perinatal home-visiting program in the French cultural context underline the importance of clinical supervision and not just reflective supervision when working with families with multiple, highly complex needs. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  19. Atopic dermatitis in children in the United States, 1997-2004: visit trends, patient and provider characteristics, and prescribing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Kimberly A; Simon, Stephen D; Liu, Deede Y; Sharma, Vidya

    2007-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease of childhood and is increasing in prevalence throughout the world. Morbidity and resource use for atopic dermatitis are comparable to other chronic diseases. Topical corticosteroids are first-line therapeutic agents for atopic dermatitis; topical calcineurin inhibitors are considered second-line agents for patients who are older than 2 years. The aims of this study were to examine trends in visits for atopic dermatitis in children in the United States between 1997 and 2004, identify factors that were associated with a pediatric visit for atopic dermatitis, and assess changes in the treatment of atopic dermatitis over time. Visits for atopic dermatitis by children (0-18 years) to office-based physicians and hospital outpatient departments using 1997-2004 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey databases were analyzed. Medication prescribing rates during 2 time periods (1997-2000 and 2001-2004) were also analyzed. There were an estimated 7.4 million visits for atopic dermatitis. Statistically significant differences in patients with atopic dermatitis included age 2 to 5 years, black race, Asian race, and specialist or hospital outpatient clinic evaluation. The increase in atopic dermatitis visits per year was statistically significant. No statistical differences in prescribing rates were identified between the 2 time periods. Between 1997 and 2000, topical corticosteroids were prescribed in 34% of visits, decreasing to 25% between 2001 and 2004. Between 2001 and 2004, topical calcineurin inhibitors were prescribed in 23% of visits. In the same period, topical corticosteroids were prescribed in 24% of visits by children who were younger than 2 years; topical calcineurin inhibitors were prescribed in 22% of visits. Visits for atopic dermatitis in children are increasing. A recommended first-line treatment was prescribed in a minority of the visits.

  20. "Provide it... but will they come?" a look at African American and Hispanic visits to Federal recreation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassandra Y. Johnson; J. Michael Bowker; Gary Green; H. Kenneth Cordell

    2007-01-01

    Recent data from the US Forest Service’s onsite National Visitor Use Monitoring Survey (National Visitor Use Monitoring Survey, 2004. Unpublished demographic results for 2002–2003. Data on file with Donald English, Program Manager, Visitor Use Monitoring Project, Washington, DC) shows that visits made by African Americans account for very low percentages of visits to...

  1. Analysis of team types based on collaborative relationships among doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers for effective support of patients in end-of-life home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Junko; Fukui, Sakiko; Ikezaki, Sumie; Otoguro, Chizuru; Tsujimura, Mayuko

    2017-11-01

    To define the team types consisting of doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers for end-of-life care by measuring the collaboration relationship, and to identify the factors related to the team types. A questionnaire survey of 43 teams including doctors, home-visiting nurses and care managers was carried out. The team types were classified based on mutual evaluations of the collaborative relationships among the professionals. To clarify the factors between team types with the patient characteristics, team characteristics and collaboration competency, univariate analysis was carried out with the Fisher's exact test or one-way analysis and multiple comparison analysis. Three team types were classified: the team where the collaborative relationships among all healthcare professionals were good; the team where the collaborative relationships between the doctors and care managers were poor; and the team where the collaborative relationships among all of the professionals were poor. There was a statistically significant association between the team types and the following variables: patient's dementia level, communication tool, professionals' experience of working with other team members, home-visiting nurses' experience of caring for dying patients, care managers' background qualifications, doctor's face-to-face cooperation with other members and home-visiting nurses' collaborative practice. It is suggested that a collaborative relationship would be fostered by more experience of working together, using communication tools and enhancing each professional's collaboration competency. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1943-1950. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Follow-up home visits with registered dietitians have a positive effect on the functional and nutritional status of geriatric medical patients after discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Anne Marie; Kjær, Stine; Hansen, Birthe Stenbæk

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To assess the additional benefits of individualized nutritional counselling by a registered dietitian in geriatric patients' home after discharge from hospital, in relation to risk of re-admissions, functional status, nutritional status, use of social services and mortality.......Design:Twelve-week single-blind randomized controlled study.Setting and subjects:Geriatric medical patients (65+ years) at nutritional risk.Interventions:Participants were randomly allocated to receive a visit in their homes, either three individualized nutritional counselling by a registered dietitian complemented...... a positive effect on the functional and nutritional status of geriatric medical patients after discharge....

  3. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) proposes to amend its regulation and internal policy documents concerning the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health services and hospice care. The proposed rulemaking would include home health services and hospice care under the VA regulation governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA has specifically contracted, this rulemaking will only affect providers who do not have existing negotiated contracts with VA. The proposed rule would also rescind internal guidance documents that could be interpreted as conflicting with the proposed rule.

  4. Maximizing federal Medicaid dollars: nursing home provider tax adoption, 2000-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Alan; Wang, Lili

    2009-12-01

    Since Medicaid is jointly financed by the federal and state governments, state officials have sought to offset state expenditures by maximizing federal contributions. One such strategy is to adopt a provider tax, which enables states to collect revenues from providers; those revenues are then used to pay for services rendered to Medicaid recipients, thereby leveraging federal matching dollars without concomitant increases in state expenditures. The number of states adopting a nursing home tax increased from thirteen to thirty-one between 2000 and 2004. This study seeks to identify the factors that spurred the rapid increase in nursing home provider taxes following implementation of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Results indicate that states with more powerful nursing home lobbies, lower proportions of private pay nursing home residents, worse fiscal health, weaker fiscal capacity, broader Medicaid eligibility, and nursing home supply restrictions were more likely to adopt. This implies that state officials react rationally to prevailing fiscal and programmatic circumstances when formulating policy under Medicaid and that providers seek relief, in part, from the adverse fiscal consequences of federal policy changes by promoting policy change at the state level.

  5. The key to me: seniors' perceptions of relationship-building with in-home service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantert, Thomas W; McWilliam, Carol L; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Allen, Natalie J

    2008-01-01

    Changing demographics and hospital downsizing have placed increasing demands on the home care sector. Many of those receiving in-home care are seniors whose chronic conditions require a collaborative approach. Both providers' paternalistic orientations toward senior clients and seniors' passivity within provider-client interactions have the potential to undermine relationship building. While the former has been documented, how seniors perceive relationship building within the home has received little attention. The purpose of this study was to explore seniors' perspectives on relationship building with in-home providers, focusing particularly on the facilitators of and barriers to this experience. Applying interpretive phenomenology, in-depth interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of senior clients and an immersion/crystallization analysis strategy was used to elicit the findings. Findings revealed that seniors perceived relationship building as a dynamic process that encompassed facilitators and barriers at both individual and contextual levels. The interpretive findings afford several insights into building provider-client relationships within the in-home context.

  6. The SMILE Program: Does Timing and Dosing of Nurse Home Visits Matter in Reducing Adverse Birth Outcomes for African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    p=.840), preeclampsia (LBW: χ 2 = .034, df= 1, p=.967; Premature: χ 2 =.087, df= 1, p=.920), placenta previa (LBW: χ 2 = .173, df= 1, p=.845...Butler, A. e. (2007). Preterm Birth: Causes, Consequences, and Prevention . Washington D.C.: National Academies Press. Behrman, R. B., A. (Ed...2007). Preterm birth: Causes, consequences, and prevention . Washington D.C.: The National Academies Press. HOME VISITATION & BIRTH OUTCOMES 26

  7. Evaluating the impact of palliative or hospice care provided in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Nina M; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Palliative and hospice care are increasingly being provided in nursing home settings. The current article reviews the existing evidence relevant to nursing homes to provide practitioners with a greater understanding of the impact of palliative and hospice care on clinical care outcomes (e.g., pain, symptom management), processes of care outcomes (e.g., hospitalizations, cost of care), and family member or health care proxy perceptions of care. Overall, the provision of hospice or palliative care in nursing facilities can improve the clinical care residents receive, reduce hospitalizations, and improve family members' perception of care. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. A pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of adding a structured home visiting intervention to improve outcomes for high-risk families attending the Incredible Years Parent Programme: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Dianne G; Fergusson, David M; Frampton, Christopher M; Merry, Sally N

    2014-02-25

    Antisocial behaviour and adult criminality often have their origins in childhood and are best addressed early in the child's life using evidence-based treatments such as the 'Incredible Years Parent Programme'. However, families with additional risk factors who are at highest risk for poor outcomes do not always make sufficient change while attending such programmes. Additional support to address barriers and improve implementation of positive parenting strategies while these families attend the Incredible Years Programme may improve overall outcomes.The study aims to evaluate the efficacy of adding a structured home visiting intervention (Home Parent Support) to improve outcomes in families most at risk of poor treatment response from the Incredible Years intervention. This study will inform the design of a larger prospective randomised controlled trial. A pilot single-blind, parallel, superiority, randomised controlled trial. Randomisation will be undertaken using a computer-generated sequence in a 1:1 ratio to the two treatments arranged in permuted blocks with stratification by age, sex, and ethnicity. One hundred and twenty six participants enrolled in the Incredible Years Parent Programme who meet the high-risk criteria will be randomly allocated to receive either Incredible Years Parent Programme and Home Parent Support, or the Incredible Years Parent Programme alone. The Home Parent Support is a 10-session structured home visiting intervention provided by a trained therapist, alongside the usual Incredible Years Parent Programme, to enhance the adoption of key parenting skills. The primary outcome is the change in child behaviour from baseline to post-intervention in parent reported Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory Problem Scale. This is the first formal evaluation of adding Home Parent Support alongside Incredible Years Parent Programme for families with risk factors who typically have poorer treatment outcomes. We anticipate that the intervention will help

  9. 'That would have been beneficial': LGBTQ education for home-care service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Andrea; MacDonnell, Judith A

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports qualitative findings from a pilot study that explored the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) education needs of home-care service providers working in one large, urban Canadian city. The pilot study builds upon research that has documented barriers to health services for diversely situated LGBTQ people, which function to limit access to good-quality healthcare. LGBTQ activists, organisations and allies have underscored the need for health provider education related to the unique health and service experiences of sexual and gender minority communities. However, the home-care sector is generally overlooked in this important body of research literature. We used purposeful convenience sampling to conduct four focus groups and two individual interviews with a total of 15 professionally diverse home-care service providers. Data collection was carried out from January 2011 to July 2012 and data were analysed using grounded theory methods towards the identification of the overarching theme, 'provider education' and it had two sub-themes: (i) experiences of LGBTQ education; and (ii) recommendations for LGBTQ education. The study findings raise important questions about limited and uneven access to adequate LGBTQ education for home-care service providers, suggest important policy implications for the education and health sectors, and point to the need for anti-oppression principles in the development of education initiatives. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Quality in Australian after-hours doctor home visits: exploring the clinical, professional and security supports available to involved practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifediora, Chris Onyebuchi

    2017-04-01

    The after-hours house call (AHHC) services in Australia has gained huge popularity in recent years, but it is not clear how well supported the involved doctors feel regarding the clinical, professional and security aspects of their work. It is important that this knowledge gap is filled given that appropriate support helps engender quality in health service delivery. This is a questionnaire-based electronic survey involving a sample frame of all 300 doctors participating in AHHC through the National Home Doctor Service. National Home Doctor Service is Australia's largest AHHC service provider. A total of 168 valid responses (56.0%) were received. Overall, the mean support levels were mild to moderate, ranging from 2.4 to 2.8 out of 4.0 for all three parameters. Specifically, 65.3% of the respondents felt well-supported on clinical issues, 64.7% on professional issues and 43.2% on security issues. Australian-trained doctors were less likely to feel well supported on all aspects [Clinical: odds ratio (OR) 0.38, confidence interval (CI) 0.16 to 0.90; Professional: OR 0.30, CI 0.13 to 0.72; and Security: OR 0.22; CI 0.09 to 0.53] compared with overseas-trained ones. Unsurprisingly, doctors who adopted protective measures felt significantly better supported regarding security (OR 2.75; CI 1.31 to 5.78). There is room for improvement regarding support on AHHC in Australia, and concerned Surgeries should ensure that where available these supports are appropriately utilized. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Caring for Children in Your Home: A Business Guide for Unregulated Providers. Redleaf Business Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Tom

    Addressed to individuals providing unregulated child care in their homes, this booklet presents basic recordkeeping and tax rules. The booklet discusses the following topics: (1) child care regulations, focusing on the benefits of being regulated; (2) the business of child care, listing possible tax deductions; (3) the tax consequences of caring…

  12. Effects of an Updated Preventive Home Visit Program Based on a Systematic Structured Assessment of Care Needs for Ambulatory Frail Older Adults in Japan: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Ayumi; Izumi, Kyoko; Yoshiyuki, Noriko; Kanaya, Yukiko; Rubenstein, Laurence Z

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects on functional parameters of an updated preventive home visit program for frail older adults in the Japanese Long-term Care Insurance (LTCI) system. The program included home visits by nurses or care managers every 3 months for 24 months, with a systematic assessment of care needs to prevent functional decline. Eligible participants (N = 360) were randomly assigned to the visit (VG: n = 179) or control group (CG: n = 181). Functional parameters were gathered via mail questionnaires at baseline and at 12- and 24-month follow-ups. Care-need levels in the LTCI were obtained at 12-, 24-, and 36-month follow-ups and the utilization of the LTCI service through 36 months. Participants in VG were significantly more likely to maintain their activities of daily living (ADL) functioning (p = .0113) and less likely to increase care-needs level, compared with CG participants, over 24 months. A generalized linear model showed that the estimate of the effect on increase in care-needs level (ie, functional decline) was -0.53 (p = .042) over 36 months. These results suggest that the updated preventive home visit program could be effective for the prevention of ADL and care-needs deterioration, and these effects could continue up to 1 year after program completion. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The epidemiology of skin care provided by nurses at home: a multicentre prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Boronat, Xavier; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Lahmann, Nils; Suhr, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the frequencies and patterns of skin care and applied skin care products in the home care nursing setting in Germany. Skin care belongs to the core activities of nursing practice. Especially in aged and long-term care settings, clients are vulnerable to various skin conditions. Dry skin is one of the most prevalent problems. Using mild skin cleansers and the regular application of moisturizing leave-on products is recommended. Until today, there are no quantitative empirical data about nursing skin care practice at home in the community. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in July 2012. Home care clients from the German home care nursing setting were randomly selected. Instructed nurse raters performed the data collection using standardized forms. Variables included demographics, skin care needs and skin caring activities. Approximately 60% of home care clients received skin care interventions. The majority were washed and two-thirds received a leave-on product once daily. There was large heterogeneity in cleansing and skin care product use. Most often the product labels were unknown or product types were selected haphazardly. Skin care interventions play a significant role in home care and nurses have a considerable responsibility for skin health. Skin care provided does not meet recent recommendations. The importance of targeted skin cleansing and care might be underestimated. There are a confusing variety of skin care products available and often the labels provide little information regarding the ingredients or guidance about how they affect skin health. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. ‘right@home’: a randomised controlled trial of sustained nurse home visiting from pregnancy to child age 2 years, versus usual care, to improve parent care, parent responsivity and the home learning environment at 2 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Sharon; Price, Anna; Bryson, Hannah; Bruce, Tracey; Mensah, Fiona; Orsini, Francesca; Gold, Lisa; Hiscock, Harriet; Smith, Charlene; Bishop, Lara; Jackson, Dianne; Kemp, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Introduction By the time children start school, inequities in learning, development and health outcomes are already evident. Sustained nurse home visiting (SNHV) offers a potential platform for families experiencing adversity, who often have limited access to services. While SNHV programmes have been growing in popularity in Australia and internationally, it is not known whether they can improve children's learning and development when offered via the Australian service system. The right@home trial aims to investigate the effectiveness of an SNHV programme, offered to women from pregnancy to child age 2 years, in improving parent care of and responsivity to the child, and the home learning environment. Methods and analysis Pregnant Australian women (n=722) are identified after completing a screening survey of 10 factors known to predict children's learning and development (eg, young pregnancy, poor mental or physical health, lack of support). Consenting women—surveyed while attending clinics at 10 hospitals in Victoria and Tasmania—are enrolled if they report having 2 or more risk factors. The intervention comprises 25 home visits from pregnancy to 2 years, focusing on parent care of the child, responsivity to the child and providing a good quality home learning environment. The standard, universal, Australian child and family health service provides the comparator (control). Primary outcome measures include a combination of parent-reported and objective assessments of children's sleep, safety, nutrition, parenting styles and the home learning environment, including the Home Observation of the Environment Inventory and items adapted from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Ethics and dissemination This study is approved by the Royal Children's Hospital Human Research Ethics Committees (HREC 32296) and site-specific HRECs. The investigators and sponsor will communicate the trial results to stakeholders, participants, healthcare professionals, the

  15. Does Increasing Home Care Nursing Reduce Emergency Department Visits at the End of Life? A Population-Based Cohort Study of Cancer Decedents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Hsien; Barbera, Lisa; Pataky, Reka; Lawson, Beverley; O'Leary, Erin; Fassbender, Konrad; McGrail, Kim; Burge, Fred; Brouwers, Melissa; Sutradhar, Rinku

    2016-02-01

    Despite being commonplace in health care systems, little research has described home care nursing's effectiveness to reduce acute care use at the end of life. To examine the temporal association between home care nursing rate on emergency department (ED) visit rate in the subsequent week during the last six months of life. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of end-of-life cancer decedents in Ontario, Canada, from 2004 to 2009 by linking administrative databases. We examined the association between home care nursing rate of one week with the ED rate in the subsequent week closer to death, controlling for covariates and repeated measures among decedents. Nursing was dichotomized into standard and end-of-life care intent. Our cohort included 54,576 decedents who used home care nursing services in the last six months before death, where 85% had an ED visit and 68% received end-of-life home care nursing. Patients receiving end-of-life nursing at any week had a significantly reduced ED rate in the subsequent week of 31% (relative rate [RR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68, 0.71) compared with standard nursing. In the last month of life, receiving end-of-life nursing and standard nursing rate of more than five hours/week was associated with a decreased ED rate of 41% (RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.58, 0.61) and 32% (RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.66, 0.70), respectively, compared with standard nursing of one hour/week. Our study showed a temporal association between receiving end-of-life nursing in a given week during the last six months of life, and of more standard nursing in the last month of life, with a reduced ED rate in the subsequent week. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Addressing the needs of new mothers in a multi-cultural setting: an evaluation of home visiting support for new mothers - Mom to Mom (Negev).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikel, Julie; Segal-Engelchin, Dorit; Niego, Limor

    2017-08-04

    This study evaluated the Mom to Mom (M2M) program operating in the Negev region of Israel, an area with a high proportion of immigrants. M2M helps women cope with the first year of parenting through home visits of volunteer mothers. Specific objectives were to evaluate (1) Participants' motivations for joining M2M; (2) Gains from participation; and (3) The effect of participation on post-partum depression (PPD). Three stages included (1) Analysis of demographics of all 440 mothers in M2M; (2) A telephone survey of 51 mothers to assess gains from participation; and (3) 137 mothers filled out the Edinburgh Post-Natal Depression Scale (EPDS) and were followed for one year. Most mothers in M2M were first time mothers, with a high rate of perinatal complications (54.4%) and positive EPDS scores (38.7%). Two major reasons for participation were being an immigrant and having low income. The greatest gains from home visits were increased self-confidence, improved parenting skills and communication with the partner. Seventy-nine percent of mothers with PPD symptoms were functioning at work and at home after a year from joining the program. Our findings suggest that M2M has the capacity to address challenges in the post-natal period among women from diverse cultures.

  17. The Status of Home Intravenous Therapy Instruction Provided by U.S. Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Mary R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 74 pharmacy schools found under half offered home intravenous (IV) therapy instruction. About 13 percent offered a course primarily devoted to home IV therapy; only two schools required it. Clinical departments were the primary providers, and various instructional resources were used. Additional home health care coursework is…

  18. Cost of physician-led home visit care (Zaitaku care) compared with hospital care at the end of life in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Kentaro; Sairenji, Tomoko; Koga, Hidenobu; Osugi, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shin; Ichinose, Hidefumi; Nagai, Yasunori; Imura, Hiroshi; South-Paul, Jeannette E; Meyer, Mark; Honda, Yoshihisa

    2017-01-17

    Physician-led home visit care with medical teams (Zaitaku care) has been developed on a national scale to support those who wish to stay at home at the end of life, and promote a system of community-based integrated care in Japan. Medical care at the end of life can be expensive, and is an urgent socioeconomic issue for aging societies. However medical costs of physician-led home visits care have not been well studied. We compared the medical costs of Zaitaku care and hospital care at the end of life in a rapidly aging community in a rural area in Japan. A cross-sectional study was performed to compare the total medical costs during patients' final days of life (30 days or less) between Zaitaku care and hospital care from September 2012 to August 2013 in Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. Thirty four patients died at home under Zaitaku care, and 72 patients died in the hospital during this period. The average daily cost of care during the last 30 days did not differ significantly between the two groups. Although Zaitaku care costs were higher than hospital care costs in the short-term (≦10 days, Zaitaku care $371.2 vs. Hospital care $202.0, p = 0.492), medical costs for Zaitaku care in the long-term care (≧30 days) were less than that of hospital care ($155.8 vs. $187.4, p = 0.055). Medical costs of Zaitaku care were less compared with hospital care if incorporated early for long term care, but it was high if incorporated late for short term care. For long term care, medical costs for Zaitaku care was 16.7% less than for hospitalization at the end of life. This physician-led home visit care model should be an available option for patients who wish to die at home, and may be beneficial financially over time.

  19. The effect of community health nurse home visit on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly living in selected Falavarjan villages in Iran in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Habibollah; Torkani, Sara; Tavakol, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy is a strong predictor for behavior. Considering the importance of health-promoting self-care behaviors in increasing quality of life in the elderly, this study was aimed at defining the effect of nurse home visits on self-care self-efficacy of the elderly in rural areas. This is a pre and post quasi-experimental study conducted on 33 older adults randomly selected from five villages in Falavarjan province in Iran. Intervention program was in the direction of self-care self-efficacy in four domains including nutrition, health practice, physical activity, and well-being in the form of five home visit programs and one group session by a nurse during 6 weeks, and included two different sections of education and nursing interventions administered based on needs assessment and determination of the tasks for the clients and their families. Theoretical framework of this study was supported by Bandura's self-efficacy, Orem's self-care theory, and Pender's revised health promotion model. The data were collected by self-care self-efficacy and demographic information questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and paired t-test. The mean elderly score in the four aforementioned domains increased after the home visit program. A significant difference was seen in the mean total scores of self-care self-efficacy and its subscales by paired t-test before and after intervention (P theories, had a positive influence on improving self-care self-efficacy of the elderly, and was supported by Bandura's theory of self-efficacy suggesting four sources of performance accomplishment, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal. With regard to the importance of self-care behavior in health promotion of the elderly, multifaceted low-cost interventions with the highest effect seem essential.

  20. Effectiveness of a nurse-led intensive home-visitation programme for first-time teenage mothers (Building Blocks): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robling, Michael; Bekkers, Marie-Jet; Bell, Kerry; Butler, Christopher C; Cannings-John, Rebecca; Channon, Sue; Martin, Belen Corbacho; Gregory, John W; Hood, Kerry; Kemp, Alison; Kenkre, Joyce; Montgomery, Alan A; Moody, Gwenllian; Owen-Jones, Eleri; Pickett, Kate; Richardson, Gerry; Roberts, Zoë E S; Ronaldson, Sarah; Sanders, Julia; Stamuli, Eugena; Torgerson, David

    2016-01-09

    Many countries now offer support to teenage mothers to help them to achieve long-term socioeconomic stability and to give a successful start to their children. The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) is a licensed intensive home-visiting intervention developed in the USA and introduced into practice in England that involves up to 64 structured home visits from early pregnancy until the child's second birthday by specially recruited and trained family nurses. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of giving the programme to teenage first-time mothers on infant and maternal outcomes up to 24 months after birth. We did a pragmatic, non-blinded, randomised controlled, parallel-group trial in community midwifery settings at 18 partnerships between local authorities and primary and secondary care organisations in England. Eligible participants were nulliparous and aged 19 years or younger, and were recruited at less than 25 weeks' gestation. Field-based researchers randomly allocated mothers (1:1) via remote randomisation (telephone and web) to FNP plus usual care (publicly funded health and social care) or to usual care alone. Allocation was stratified by site and minimised by gestation (FNP and 822 to usual care. All follow-up data were retrieved by April 25, 2014. 304 (56%) of 547 women assigned to FNP and 306 (56%) of 545 assigned to usual care smoked at late pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0·90, 97·5% CI 0·64-1·28). Mean birthweight of 742 babies with mothers assigned to FNP was 3217·4 g (SD 618·0), whereas birthweight of 768 babies assigned to usual care was 3197·5 g (SD 581·5; adjusted mean difference 20·75 g, 97·5% CI -47·73 to 89·23. 587 (81%) of 725 assessed children with mothers assigned to FNP and 577 (77%) of 753 assessed children assigned to usual care attended an emergency department or were admitted to hospital at least once before their second birthday (AOR 1·32, 97·5% CI 0·99-1·76). 426 (66%) of 643 assessed women assigned to FNP and 427

  1. A home-visiting intervention targeting determinants of infant mental health: the study protocol for the CAPEDP randomized controlled trial in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubach Florence

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies suggest that the number of risk factors rather than their nature is key to mental health disorders in childhood. Method and design The objective of this multicentre randomized controlled parallel trial (PROBE methodology is to assess the impact in a multi-risk French urban sample of a home-visiting program targeting child mental health and its major determinants. This paper describes the protocol of this study. In the study, pregnant women were eligible if they were: living in the intervention area; able to speak French, less than 26 years old; having their first child; less than 27 weeks of amenorrhea; and if at least one of the following criteria were true: less than twelve years of education, intending to bring up their child without the presence of the child’s father, and 3 low income. Participants were randomized into either the intervention or the control group. All had access to usual care in mother-child centres and community mental health services free of charge in every neighbourhood. Psychologists conducted all home visits, which were planned on a weekly basis from the 7th month of pregnancy and progressively decreasing in frequency until the child’s second birthday. Principle outcome measures included child mental health at 24 months and two major mediating variables for infant mental health: postnatal maternal depression and the quality of the caring environment. A total of 440 families were recruited, of which a subsample of 120 families received specific attachment and caregiver behaviour assessment. Assessment was conducted by an independent assessment team during home visits and, for the attachment study, in a specifically created Attachment Assessment laboratory. Discussion The CAPEDP study is the first large-scale randomised, controlled infant mental health promotion programme to take place in France. A major specificity of the program was that all home visits were conducted by

  2. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings: teacher guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    A teacher guide to the basic manual, providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings, is presented. Three parts to the manual are: understanding and practicing energy conservation in buildings; determining amount of energy lost or gained in a building; and determining which practices are most efficient and installing materials. The guide gives answers to questions in the student workbook and directions for special exercises and problems related to the subject.

  3. [Palliative rehabilitation of two patients with terminal stage cancer: a visit to patient's home and the provision of advice by a nurse and rehabilitation staff members before discharge--from physical therapist's perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhara, Satoshi; Kakou, Hiroaki; Tokuo, Mika; Nogami, Michiko; Takemura, Jin; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2009-12-01

    We report two patients with terminal stage cancer who spent some days at their home after a physical therapist, occupational therapist, nurse, and medical social worker all visited the patients' homes and advised the patients' family in regard to the appropriate care before the patients were discharged as a strategy for palliative rehabilitation. Case 1: A patient suffering from terminal stage cancer was bed-ridden because of a pathological fracture of the femur. After palliative rehabilitation, the patient was able to get out of the bed and improved her daily living activity level through physical therapy. She spent some days at home according to the results of the pre-discharge home visit guidance to her family. Case 2: A patient suffering from terminal stage cancer manifested symptoms of fatigue and generalized muscular weakness. After palliative rehabilitation, her muscle strength and physical endurance were improved by physical therapy and adjustment of the bed height. Because she was eager to go home, we took her to her home before being discharged, and she was able to spend a few hours at home. Pre-discharge home visit guidance by a nurse and rehabilitation staff members to the patient' s family in regard to appropriate home care may therefore be a good means of satisfying such patients' desire to see their home once more and thereby improve their quality of life.

  4. Transforming Teacher-Family Relationships: Shifting Roles and Perceptions of Home Visits through the Funds of Knowledge Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Kristin Lyn; Karabon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Education has embraced the idea of an "asset approach" to working with families and children, creating a focus on developing collaborative relationships with families by building on what they bring to the table. In this paper we explore what happened when early childhood teachers entered homes to learn from families and identify their…

  5. Effectiveness of educational nursing home visits on quality of life, functional status and care dependency in older adults with mobility impairments: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Arne; Wolf-Ostermann, Karin; Dassen, Theo; Lahmann, Nils; Strupeit, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Facilitating and maintaining functional status (FS) and quality of life (QoL) and avoiding care dependency (CD) are and will increasingly become major tasks of nursing. Educational nursing home visits may have positive effects on FS and QoL in older adults. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of educational home visits on FS, QoL and CD in older adults with mobility impairments. We performed a randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in the living environments of 123 participants with functional impairments living in Hamburg, Germany. The intervention group received an additional nursing education intervention on mobility and QoL; the control group received care as usual. Data were collected from August 2011 to December 2012 at baseline, 6 months and 12 months of follow-up. The main outcomes were FS (Barthel Index), QoL (WHOQOL-BREF) and CD (Care Dependency Scale). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and generalized linear models. In total, 113 participants (57 in the intervention and 56 in the control group) were included in the study. The intervention had no statistical significant effect on FS, QoL and CD. The intervention did not show the benefits that we assumed. Further studies on the effects of educational nursing interventions should be performed using different concepts and rigorous research methods. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Replacing ambulatory surgical follow-up visits with mobile app home monitoring: modeling cost-effective scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kathleen A; Semple, John L; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-09-22

    Women's College Hospital (WCH) offers specialized surgical procedures, including ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have low rates of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. Increasingly, mobile monitoring and follow-up care is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care at a reduced cost to society. WCH has completed a feasibility study using a mobile app (QoC Health Inc, Toronto) that suggests high patient satisfaction and adequate detection of postoperative complications. The proposed cost-effectiveness study models the replacement of conventional, in-person postoperative follow-up care with mobile app follow-up care following ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. This is a societal perspective cost-effectiveness analysis, wherein all costs are assessed irrespective of the payer. The patient/caregiver, health care system, and externally borne costs are calculated within the first postoperative month based on cost information provided by WCH and QoC Health Inc. The effectiveness of telemedicine and conventional follow-up care is measured as successful surgical outcomes at 30-days postoperative, and is modeled based on previous clinical trials containing similar patient populations and surgical risks. This costing assumes that 1000 patients are enrolled in bring-your-own-device (BYOD) mobile app follow-up per year and that 1.64 in-person follow-ups are attended in the conventional arm within the first month postoperatively. The total cost difference between mobile app and in-person follow-up care is $245 CAD ($223 USD based on the current exchange rate), with in-person follow-up being more expensive ($381 CAD) than mobile app follow-up care ($136 CAD). This takes into account the total of health care system, patient, and external borne costs. If we examine health care system costs alone, in

  7. Replacing Ambulatory Surgical Follow-Up Visits With Mobile App Home Monitoring: Modeling Cost-Effective Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, John L; Coyte, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Background Women’s College Hospital (WCH) offers specialized surgical procedures, including ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Most patients receiving ambulatory surgery have low rates of postoperative events necessitating clinic visits. Increasingly, mobile monitoring and follow-up care is used to overcome the distance patients must travel to receive specialized care at a reduced cost to society. WCH has completed a feasibility study using a mobile app (QoC Health Inc, Toronto) that suggests high patient satisfaction and adequate detection of postoperative complications. Objective The proposed cost-effectiveness study models the replacement of conventional, in-person postoperative follow-up care with mobile app follow-up care following ambulatory breast reconstruction in post-mastectomy breast cancer patients. Methods This is a societal perspective cost-effectiveness analysis, wherein all costs are assessed irrespective of the payer. The patient/caregiver, health care system, and externally borne costs are calculated within the first postoperative month based on cost information provided by WCH and QoC Health Inc. The effectiveness of telemedicine and conventional follow-up care is measured as successful surgical outcomes at 30-days postoperative, and is modeled based on previous clinical trials containing similar patient populations and surgical risks. Results This costing assumes that 1000 patients are enrolled in bring-your-own-device (BYOD) mobile app follow-up per year and that 1.64 in-person follow-ups are attended in the conventional arm within the first month postoperatively. The total cost difference between mobile app and in-person follow-up care is $245 CAD ($223 USD based on the current exchange rate), with in-person follow-up being more expensive ($381 CAD) than mobile app follow-up care ($136 CAD). This takes into account the total of health care system, patient, and external borne costs. If we examine

  8. Experiences with provider and parental attitudes and practices regarding the administration of multiple injections during infant vaccination visits: lessons for vaccine introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Aaron S; Mantel, Carsten; Mayers, Gill; Mansoor, Osman; Gindler, Jacqueline S; Hyde, Terri B

    2014-09-15

    An increasing proportion of childhood immunization visits include administration of multiple injections. Future introduction of vaccines to protect against multiple diseases will further increase the number of injections at routine immunization childhood visits, particularly in developing countries that are still scaling up introductions. Parental and healthcare provider attitudes toward multiple injections may affect acceptance of recommended vaccines, and understanding these attitudes may help to inform critical decisions about vaccine introduction. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to examine factors underlying reported parental and healthcare provider concerns and practices related to administration of multiple injections during childhood vaccination visits. Forty-four articles were identified; 42 (95%) were from high income countries, including 27 (61%) from the USA. Providers and parents report concerns about multiple injections, which tend to increase with increasing numbers of injections. Common parental and provider concerns included apprehension about the pain experienced by the child, worry about potential side effects, and uncertainty about vaccine effectiveness. Multiple studies reported that a positive provider recommendation to the parent and a high level of concern about the severity of the target disease were significantly associated with parental acceptance of all injections. Providers often significantly overestimated parental concerns about multiple injections. Providers may play a critical role in the decision for a child to receive all recommended injections. Their overestimation of parental concerns may lead them to postpone recommended vaccinations, which may result in extra visits and delayed vaccination. More research is needed on interventions to overcome provider and parental concern about multiple injections, particularly in developing countries. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Antenatal depressed mood and child cognitive and physical growth at 18-months in South Africa: a cluster randomised controlled trial of home visiting by community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, M; Rotheram-Borus, M J; Scheffler, A; le Roux, I

    2017-06-13

    To examine the child outcomes at 18-months post-birth of a population cohort of women with antenatal depressed mood, half of whom were randomly chosen to receive perinatal home visits from community health workers during pregnancy. Pregnant women in 24 neighbourhoods (98% participation) were randomised by neighbourhood to: (1) standard clinic care (SC; 12 neighbourhoods; n = 594) or (2) the Philani Intervention Program, a home visiting intervention plus standard care (12 neighbourhoods; n = 644). The physical and cognitive outcomes of children of mothers with antenatally depressed mood (Edinburg Perinatal Depression Scale >13) in the intervention condition were compared at 18-months post-birth to children of mothers without depressed mood in pregnancy in both conditions. More than a third of mothers had heightened levels of antenatal depressed mood (35%), similar across conditions. Antenatal depressed mood was significantly associated with being a mother living with HIV, using alcohol and food insecurity. At 18-months, the overall cognitive and motor scale scores on the Bayley Scales of Development were similar. However, 10.3% fewer children of mothers with antenatal depressed mood in the intervention condition had cognitive scores on the Bayley Scales that were less than 85 (i.e., s.d. = 2 lower than normal) compared with children of mothers with antenatal depressed mood in the SC condition. Intervention children of mothers with antenatal depressed mood were also significantly less likely to be undernourished (Weight-for-Age Z-scores mothers with antenatal depressed mood can be improved by mentor mother home visitors, probably resulting from better parenting and care received early in life.

  10. Family Home Childcare Providers: A Comparison of Subsidized and Non-Subsidized Working Environments and Employee Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriner, Michael; Schlee, Bethanne M.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Cornille, Thomas A.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Federal and State Governments provide childcare subsidies for low-income working families. This study compares the encountered issues and working environments of family home providers of subsidized and non-subsidized childcare. Questionnaires were distributed throughout a southeastern state in the United States to 548 family home childcare…

  11. 76 FR 55570 - Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans Evacuated From a State Home as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... veteran receiving nursing home care, domiciliary care, and adult day health care in State home facilities... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Parts 17 and 51 RIN 2900-AN63 Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans... for providing a specified level of care to eligible veterans in a facility that is officially...

  12. Structured home visits to older people. Are they only of benefit for women? A randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, Mikkel; Avlund, Kirsten; Kvist, Kajsa

    2004-01-01

    level and outcomes measured at individual level. Intervention municipality visitors received regular education and GPs were introduced to a short assessment programme. Control municipalities received no education but conducted the preventive programme in their own way. SETTING: Primary care, 34......OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether education of primary care professionals improved functional ability in home-dwelling older people, with special focus on gender differences. DESIGN: A prospective controlled three-year follow-up study (1999-2001) with randomisation and intervention at municipality...... municipalities. SUBJECTS: 5788 home-dwelling 75- and 80-year-olds were invited. 4060 (70.1%) participated: 2104 in 17 intervention- and 1956 in 17 matched control-municipalities. The main outcome measure was obtained from 3383 (95.6%) of 3540 surviving participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Functional ability...

  13. Implementing person-environment approaches to prevent falls: a qualitative inquiry in applying the Westmead approach to occupational therapy home visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Donaldson, Alex; Hill, Keith; Day, Lesley

    2014-10-01

    Despite evidence of the effectiveness of home safety interventions for preventing falls, there is limited uptake of such interventions within community services. Therefore, as part of a broader translational project, we explored issues underlying the implementation of an evidence-based home safety fall prevention intervention. We conducted in-depth interviews with eight occupational therapists and two programme coordinators engaged to deliver a home safety fall prevention intervention. Six community health centres within two metropolitan regions of Melbourne, Australia participated. The RE-AIM framework and Diffusion of Innovations theory underpinned the interviews which examine the enablers and barriers to implementing a home safety fall prevention intervention and integrating it into routine community preventive practice. Analysis involved thematic and content analysis. Investment in the home safety for fall prevention intervention was supported and valued by coordinators and therapists alike, and a number of themes emerged which influenced implementation of this intervention. These included issues of: compatibility with organisational processes, individual practitioner practices and skills, a prevention approach, and client expectations; relative advantage in terms of flexibility of the process, client engagement and regional capacity building; complexity of implementing the intervention; and observability related to the invisible nature of fall prevention outcomes. Implementation of this home safety fall prevention intervention was influenced by a range of interrelated organisational, practitioner and client related factors. The findings from this project provide insights into, and opportunities to increase the sustainable implementation of the home safety fall prevention intervention into practice. © 2014 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  14. Understanding Factors Associated with Postpartum Visit Attendance and Contraception Choices: Listening to Low-Income Postpartum Women and Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Vida; Stumbras, Katrina; Caskey, Rachel; Haider, Sadia; Rankin, Kristin; Handler, Arden

    2016-11-01

    Background While there is considerable variability with respect to attendance at the postpartum visit, not much is known about women's preferences with respect to postpartum care. Likewise, there is also limited information on providers' practices regarding the postpartum visit and care including the delivery of contraception. To understand and address deficits in the delivery and utilization of postpartum care, we examined the perceptions of low-income postpartum women with respect to barriers to and preferences for the timing and location of the postpartum visit and receipt of contraception. We also examined providers' current prenatal and postnatal care practices for promoting the use of postpartum care and their attitudes toward alternative approaches for delivering contraceptive services in the postpartum period. Methods Qualitative face-to-face interviews were completed with 20 postpartum women and in-depth qualitative phone interviews were completed with 12 health care providers who had regular contact with postpartum women. Interviews were coded using Atlas.ti software and themes were identified. Results Women believed that receiving care during the postpartum period was an important resource for monitoring physical and mental health and also strongly supported the provision of contraception earlier than the 6-week postpartum visit. Providers reported barriers to women's use of postpartum care on the patient, provider, and system levels. However, providers were receptive to exploring new clinical practices that may widen the reach of postpartum care and increase access to postpartum contraception. Conclusion Approaches that increase the flexibility and convenience of postpartum care and the delivery of postpartum contraception may increase the likelihood that women will take advantage of essential postpartum services.

  15. Effect of nurse home visits vs. usual care on reducing intimate partner violence in young high-risk pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Mejdoubi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expectant mothers and mothers of young children are especially vulnerable to intimate partner violence (IPV. The nurse-family partnership (NFP is a home visitation program in the United States effective for the prevention of adverse child health outcomes. Evidence regarding the effect of nurse home visiting on IPV is inconsistent. This study aims to study the effect of VoorZorg, the Dutch NFP, on IPV. METHODS: A random sample of 460 eligible disadvantaged women <26 years, with no previous live births, was randomized. Women in the control group (C; n=223 received usual care; women in the intervention group (I; n=237 received usual care plus nurse home visits periodically during pregnancy and until the child's second birthday. RESULTS: At 32 weeks of pregnancy, women in the intervention group self-reported significantly less IPV victimization than women in the control group in: level 2 psychological aggression (C: 56% vs. I: 39%, physical assault level 1 (C: 58% vs. I: 40% and level 2 (C: 31% vs. I: 20%, and level 1 sexual coercion (C: 16% vs. I: 8%. Furthermore, women in the intervention group reported significantly less IPV perpetration in: level 2 psychological aggression (C: 60% vs. I: 46%, level 1 physical assault (C: 65% vs. I: 52%, and level 1 injury (C: 27% vs. I: 17%. At 24 months after birth, IPV victimization was significantly lower in the intervention group for level 1 physical assault (C: 44% vs. I: 26%, and IPV perpetration was significantly lower for level 1 sexual assault (C: 18% vs. I: 3%. Multilevel analyses showed a significant improvement in IPV victimization and perpetration among women in the intervention group at 24 months after birth. CONCLUSION: VoorZorg, compared with the usual care, is effective in reducing IPV during pregnancy and in the two years after birth among young high-risk women. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Dutch Trial Register NTR854 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=854.

  16. Effect of participatory women's groups and counselling through home visits on children's linear growth in rural eastern India (CARING trial): a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nirmala; Tripathy, Prasanta; Sachdev, H S; Pradhan, Hemanta; Bhattacharyya, Sanghita; Gope, Rajkumar; Gagrai, Sumitra; Rath, Shibanand; Rath, Suchitra; Sinha, Rajesh; Roy, Swati Sarbani; Shewale, Suhas; Singh, Vijay; Srivastava, Aradhana; Costello, Anthony; Copas, Andrew; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Haghparast-Bidgoli, Hassan; Saville, Naomi; Prost, Audrey

    2017-10-01

    Around 30% of the world's stunted children live in India. The Government of India has proposed a new cadre of community-based workers to improve nutrition in 200 districts. We aimed to find out the effect of such a worker carrying out home visits and participatory group meetings on children's linear growth. We did a cluster-randomised controlled trial in two adjoining districts of Jharkhand and Odisha, India. 120 clusters (around 1000 people each) were randomly allocated to intervention or control using a lottery. Randomisation took place in July, 2013, and was stratified by district and number of hamlets per cluster (0, 1-2, or ≥3), resulting in six strata. In each intervention cluster, a worker carried out one home visit in the third trimester of pregnancy, monthly visits to children younger than 2 years to support feeding, hygiene, care, and stimulation, as well as monthly women's group meetings to promote individual and community action for nutrition. Participants were pregnant women identified and recruited in the study clusters and their children. We excluded stillbirths and neonatal deaths, infants whose mothers died, those with congenital abnormalities, multiple births, and mother and infant pairs who migrated out of the study area permanently during the trial period. Data collectors visited each woman in pregnancy, within 72 h of her baby's birth, and at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after birth. The primary outcome was children's length-for-age Z score at 18 months of age. Analyses were by intention to treat. Due to the nature of the intervention, participants and the intervention team were not masked to allocation. Data collectors and the data manager were masked to allocation. The trial is registered as ISCRTN (51505201) and with the Clinical Trials Registry of India (number 2014/06/004664). Between Oct 1, 2013, and Dec 31, 2015, we recruited 5781 pregnant women. 3001 infants were born to pregnant women recruited between Oct 1, 2013, and Feb 10, 2015

  17. Providing Sources of Self-Efficacy Through Technology Enhanced Post-Stroke Rehabilitation in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jack; Mawson, Susan

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the impact of receiving feedback through a Personalised Self-Managed Rehabilitation System (PSMrS) for home-based post-stroke rehabilitation on the users' self-efficacy; more specifically, mastery experiences and the interpretation of biomechanical data. Embedded within a realistic evaluation methodological approach, exploring the promotion of self-efficacy from the utilisation of computer-based technology to facilitate post-stroke upper-limb rehabilitation in the home included; semi-structured interviews, quantitative user data (activity and usage), observations and field notes. Data revealed that self-efficacy was linked with obtaining positive knowledge of results feedback. Encouragingly, this also transferred to functional activities such as, confidence to carry out kitchen tasks and bathroom personal activities. Findings suggest the PSMrS was able to provide key sources of self-efficacy by providing feedback which translated key biomechanical data to the users. Users could interpret and understand their performance, gain a sense of mastery and build their confidence which in some instances led to increased confidence to carry out functional activities. However, outcome expectations and socio-structural factors impacted on the self-efficacy associated with the use of the system. Increasing the understanding of how these factors promote or inhibit self-management and self-efficacy is therefore crucial to the successful adoption of technology solutions and promotion of self-efficacy.

  18. Hand hygiene practices of home visiting community nurses: perceptions, compliance, techniques, and contextual factors of practice using the World Health Organization's "five moments for hand hygiene".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felembam, Ohood; John, Winsome St; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2012-03-01

    In this observational study, the perceptions, compliance, techniques, and contextual issues of hand hygiene practices among community clinicians (nurses) during 103 hand hygiene opportunities (based on the World Health Organization "Five Moments for Hand Hygiene") in 40 patient care episodes were examined. Compliance with standard hand hygiene practices was generally poor, with many contextual influences making compliance difficult. Clinician preferences and convenience are important considerations in hand hygiene compliance. Improving home-visiting community clinicians' hand hygiene practices requires addressing contextual issues related to the availability of hand hygiene equipment, such as alcohol-based hand rubs, as well as hand hygiene in-service education to update knowledge on hand hygiene for everyday practice in community settings.

  19. 'right@home': a randomised controlled trial of sustained nurse home visiting from pregnancy to child age 2 years, versus usual care, to improve parent care, parent responsivity and the home learning environment at 2 years

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharon Goldfeld; Anna Price; Hannah Bryson; Tracey Bruce; Fiona Mensah; Francesca Orsini; Lisa Gold; Harriet Hiscock; Charlene Smith; Lara Bishop; Dianne Jackson; Lynn Kemp

    2017-01-01

    ...@home trial aims to investigate the effectiveness of an SNHV programme, offered to women from pregnancy to child age 2 years, in improving parent care of and responsivity to the child, and the home learning environment...

  20. Surmounting difficulties to provide home based neonatal care - reflections of community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhughate, Abhijit Shrinivas; Tiwari, Pearl; Sohoni, Shubhangi; Morgaonkar, Vallaree Anant; Phatak, Ajay Gajanan; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar Marutirao; Mahajani, Anagha Anand

    2018-01-15

    In India, community health workers' (CHW) effectiveness in providing home-based neonatal care (HBNC) has been well documented. The nature of challenges faced and strategies adopted while providing HBNC services need to be studied in-depth. A qualitative study to understand the challenges faced and strategies used by Sakhis (women CHW) while providing services as part of a HBNC program implemented by a non-profit organization. Data consisted of 20 in-depth interviews and three focus group discussions (FGD) with Sakhis. Sakhis negotiated with the community to start working as a CHW. They faced challenges while changing behaviors at individual level and also while bringing about a change in harmful normative practices that increased chances of maternal and neonatal mortality. Managing crises at the time of deliveries and facilitating a safe delivery was the most critical challenge faced by many Sakhis. The key strategies used by Sakhis included: proactively and persistently providing services even when they faced resistance from the woman or her family; evolving contextually suitable counseling techniques and tactics to bring about behavioral change; balancing compliance to traditional practices and promoting HBNC; defying traditional practices and assisting the woman in times of an emergency to save lives. Having on-call support from supervisors and cultivating a good working relationship with health providers facilitated effective service provision by Sakhis. CHWs having a strong sense of commitment can develop strategies to address challenges and provide HBNC services effectively if they also have strong supervisory support.

  1. Provider category and quality of care in the Norwegian nursing home industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astri Drange Hole

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines empirically if there is a link between quality of care in the Norwegian nursing home industry and exposure of the industry to competition. Exposing public care to competition implies that the responsibility for providing care services is shared between public authorities and private actors. In Norway, exposure to competition means tender competition. Suppliers bid for a contract issued by the Norwegian authorities for a limited number of years. Quality of care in an institution is the major competitive factor. The provider categories of elderly care are: 1 care provided by institutions run by municipalities, 2 care provided by institutions run by private companies, which have won a tender competition, 3 care provided by institutions run by private companies owned by private families, voluntary religious or idealistic organizations. Nurse-to-patient ratio is used as a proxy for quality of care. The regression analysis indicates a relationship between quality of care and exposure to competition. The quality of care in provider category 2 is significantly lower than in provider category 1, but there are more variations in the quality of care in provider category 1 than in provider category 2. We find the lowest quality of care in provider category 1. There is also a relationship between the quality of care in an institution and the educational level of the staff, the location, the workforce, and the size of an institution. Finally, there is a relationship between the quality of care in an institution and the real and the required capacity, and the financial status in a region.

  2. Quality and use of consumer information provided with home test kits: room for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grispen, Janaica E J; Ickenroth, Martine H P; de Vries, Nanne K; van der Weijden, Trudy; Ronda, Gaby

    2014-10-01

    Diagnostic self-tests (tests on body materials that are initiated by consumers with the aim of diagnosing a disorder or risk factor) are becoming increasingly available. Although the pros and cons of self-testing are currently not clear, it is an existing phenomenon that is likely to gain further popularity. To examine consumers' use of and needs for information about self-testing, and to assess the quality of consumer information provided with home test kits, as perceived by consumers and as assessed using a checklist of quality criteria. A cross-sectional Internet survey among 305 self-testers assessed their use of and needs for information and their perception of the quality of consumer information provided with self-test kits. A meta-search engine was used to identify Dutch and English consumer information for home diagnostic tests available online at the time of the study. The quality of this consumer information was evaluated using a checklist of quality criteria. The consumers' information needs were in line with the most frequently used information, and the information was perceived as being of moderate to good quality. The information was mostly in agreement with clinical practice guidelines, although information on reliability and follow-up behaviour was limited. Approximately half of the instruction leaflets did not include information on the target group of the test. Although generally of moderate to good quality, some aspects of the information provided were in many cases insufficient. European legislation concerning self-tests and accompanying information needs to be adapted and adhered to more closely. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Canadian birth place study: examining maternity care provider attitudes and interprofessional conflict around planned home birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam, Saraswathi; Stoll, Kathrin; Schummers, Laura; Fairbrother, Nichole; Klein, Michael C; Thordarson, Dana; Kornelsen, Jude; Dharamsi, Shafik; Rogers, Judy; Liston, Robert; Kaczorowski, Janusz

    2014-10-28

    Available birth settings have diversified in Canada since the integration of regulated midwifery. Midwives are required to offer eligible women choice of birth place; and 25-30% of midwifery clients plan home births. Canadian provincial health ministries have instituted reimbursement schema and regulatory guidelines to ensure access to midwives in all settings. Evidence from well-designed Canadian cohort studies demonstrate the safety and efficacy of midwife-attended home birth. However, national rates of planned home birth remain low, and many maternity providers do not support choice of birth place. In this national, mixed-methods study, our team administered a cross-sectional survey, and developed a 17 item Provider Attitudes to Planned Home Birth Scale (PAPHB-m) to assess attitudes towards home birth among maternity providers. We entered care provider type into a linear regression model, with the PAPHB-m score as the outcome variable. Using Students' t tests and ANOVA for categorical variables and correlational analysis (Pearson's r) for continuous variables, we conducted provider-specific bivariate analyses of all socio-demographic, education, and practice variables (n=90) that were in both the midwife and physician surveys. Median favourability scores on the PAPHB-m scale were very low among obstetricians (33.0), moderately low for family physicians (38.0) and very high for midwives (80.0), and 84% of the variance in attitudes could be accounted for by care provider type. Amount of exposure to planned home birth during midwifery or medical education and practice was significantly associated with favourability scores. Concerns about perinatal loss and lawsuits, discomfort with inter-professional consultations, and preference for the familiarity of the hospital correlated with less favourable attitudes to home birth. Among all providers, favourability scores were linked to beliefs about the evidence on safety of home birth, and confidence in their own ability

  4. Does the use of a university lecturer as a visiting tutor support learning and assessment during physiotherapy students' clinical placements? A survey of higher education institution providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, M; Levis, A

    2016-12-01

    To establish the rationale for using a lecturer as a visiting tutor, and to identify the activities undertaken during clinical placements to support student learning and assessment in practice. A secure electronic survey was used to incorporate qualitative and quantitative data collection procedures. Thirty-three higher education institution (HEI) providers of physiotherapy education in the UK, registered with the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. UK HEI physiotherapy placement coordinators. A questionnaire was used to examine HEI perceptions. A pilot focus group consultation informed the questionnaire content. Surveys were analysed based on the proportion of responses to closed questions on an adapted Likert scale, with further thematic analysis of open questions. All 25 respondents (25/33, 76%) indicated their provision of support for students and clinical educators throughout their clinical placements. 'Face-to-face' engagement during the placement visit was viewed as essential to guide the clinical educator to provide a consistent approach to learning and assessment strategies; ensuring cohesion between theoretical and clinical components of the curriculum was viewed as a core objective by visiting academic tutors. However, the emergent themes highlighted key differences between HEIs' perspectives of what this support for clinical placement learning should entail. The majority of HEIs endorse the use of a lecturer as a visiting tutor to inform and maintain the standard of learning and assessment within the clinical placement. However, the value of this interaction requires confirmation via other stakeholders, and exploration of other forms of non-face-to-face support processes warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is there a difference between center and home care providers' training, perceptions, and practices related to obesity prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhee; Shim, Jae Eun; Wiley, Angela R; Kim, Keunsei; McBride, Brent A

    2012-11-01

    To compare the obesity related training, practices, and perceptions of home child care providers and center care providers. A self-administered survey was collected from child care providers who attended local child care training workshops in east central Illinois from March 2009 to August 2010. Study results were based on responses from 88 home care providers and 94 center providers. The survey questions addressed child care providers' training in the prior year, their obesity prevention practices including written policies, their perceptions of influences on children's health, and factors determining food menu selection. Paired t tests and Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference by child care type. 81.9% of home care providers and 58.6% of center care providers received nutrition training, while 66.7 and 43.0% of these providers received physical activity training, respectively. Nutrition content, guidelines or state regulations, and food availability were the most important factors that influenced both types of care providers' food service menus. Both care provider types perceived they have less influence on children's food preferences, eating habits, and weight status compared to the home environment. However, home care providers perceived a smaller discrepancy between the influences of child care and home environments compared to center care providers. Compared to center providers, home care providers were more likely to have had training, be involved with health promotion activities, and rate their influence higher on children's health behaviors. Findings underscore the need for obesity prevention efforts in both types of child care settings.

  6. Factors predicting a home death among home palliative care recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ming-Chung; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Chen, Chu-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Ping; Lien, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Jia-Yi; Woung, Lin-Chung; Chan, Shang-Yih

    2017-10-01

    Awareness of factors affecting the place of death could improve communication between healthcare providers and patients and their families regarding patient preferences and the feasibility of dying in the preferred place.This study aimed to evaluate factors predicting home death among home palliative care recipients.This is a population-based study using a national representative sample retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Subjects receiving home palliative care, from 2010 to 2012, were analyzed to evaluate the association between a home death and various characteristics related to illness, individual, and health care utilization. A multiple-logistic regression model was used to assess the independent effect of various characteristics on the likelihood of a home death.The overall rate of a home death for home palliative care recipients was 43.6%. Age; gender; urbanization of the area where the patients lived; illness; the total number of home visits by all health care professionals; the number of home visits by nurses; utilization of nasogastric tube, endotracheal tube, or indwelling urinary catheter; the number of emergency department visits; and admission to intensive care unit in previous 1 year were not significantly associated with the risk of a home death. Physician home visits increased the likelihood of a home death. Compared with subjects without physician home visits (31.4%) those with 1 physician home visit (53.0%, adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.23, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.93-5.42) and those with ≥2 physician home visits (43.9%, AOR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.06-4.70) had higher likelihood of a home death. Compared with subjects with hospitalization 0 to 6 times in previous 1 year, those with hospitalization ≥7 times in previous 1 year (AOR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.34-0.95) had lower likelihood of a home death.Among home palliative care recipients, physician home visits increased the likelihood of a home death. Hospitalizations ≥7

  7. The influence of parents and the home environment on preschoolers' physical activity behaviours: a qualitative investigation of childcare providers' perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tucker, Patricia; van Zandvoort, Melissa M; Burke, Shauna M; Irwin, Jennifer D

    2011-01-01

    .... This study sought to examine childcare providers' perspectives of the importance of parents and the home environment for supporting the physical activity behaviours of preschool-aged children (aged 2.5-5 years...

  8. The role of the home-based provider in disaster preparedness of a vulnerable population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyte-Lake, Tamar; Claver, Maria; Griffin, Anne; Dobalian, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Veterans receiving home-based primary care (HBPC) are an especially vulnerable population served by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) due to high rates of physical, functional, and psychological limitations. These vulnerabilities may prevent these persons from being adequately prepared for disasters. HBPC providers connect the community-dwelling population with their regional health care system and thus are appropriate partners for assessing preparedness. The limited literature on this topic suggests that there are issues with the development and implementation of emergency management plans, dissemination to staff, and inconsistencies with preparedness strategies across agencies. To further explore identified issues regarding emergency management planning for patients receiving medical care in their home, including ways in which policy and procedures support the routine assessment of disaster preparedness for patients. This exploratory pilot project, carried out in a single VHA HBPC program located in an urban area, involved seven 15- to 25-min semistructured interviews with practitioners and leadership. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using content analysis techniques to develop themes to describe information obtained through the interviews. Six themes emerged from the data: (1) a national policy regarding the inclusion of disaster preparedness assessment in routine HBPC assessment exists in only a skeletal manner and individual HBPC programs are tasked with developing their own policies; (2) the tools used at the initial assessment were rudimentary and, in some cases, individually developed by providers; (3) the comprehension of criteria for assigning risk categories (i.e. acuity levels) varied among providers; (4) the primary challenges identified by respondents to patient engagement in emergency preparedness activities included cognitive impairments, patients' willingness to invest in preparedness activities, and limited resources; (5

  9. Provider Perception of Pharmacy Services in the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Nicole P; Pignato, Alyssa M; Monte, Scott V

    2017-12-01

    Despite the positive data on clinical outcomes, cost savings, and provider experience, no study has surveyed providers to evaluate what pharmacy services they find to be worthwhile. To determine what clinical, cost/access, and educational pharmacy services providers in a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) consider worthwhile and the perceived barriers to successful pharmacist incorporation. A cross-sectional online survey was distributed to primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in a PCMH physician group. The survey response rate was 78%. Top-tier clinical services were identified as medication counseling, reconciliation, adherence assessment, polypharmacy assessment, and drug information. Formulary review was the only top-tier cost- or access-related service. Top-tier educational services included new black-boxed warnings, drug market withdrawals, and new drug reviews. Ninety-one percent of providers were comfortable referring to a pharmacist for diabetes medication selection and dose titration, but no other disease state eclipsed 75%. More than twice as many providers found the pharmacy service to be very or extremely valuable when the pharmacist is physically located in the office versus virtual interactions (70% vs 34%). Top-tier clinical, cost/access, and educational services considered worthwhile by providers in a PCMH have been identified. In addition to these services, when developing or evaluating a pharmacy service, special attention should be paid to provider preference for physical location in the office and perceived barriers to the pharmacist availability, concern over complex disease management competency and patient confusion as to the role of the pharmacist.

  10. Effect of preceding home-visit nursing on time to discharge in hospitalization for the treatment of behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia among patients with limited familial care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Tatsuru; Shiota, Shigehito; Jinkawa, Shigetoshi; Kitamura, Maki; Hino, Shoryoku

    2018-01-01

    During hospitalization for behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), it is imperative to build a support system for each patient in the community for after they obtain symptom remission. To this end, patients lacking adequate family support are less likely to be discharged to their own homes and need stronger support systems to be established. This study therefore investigated the effects of home-visit nursing before admission on time to home discharge among patients with limited familial care who were hospitalized for treatment of BPSD. A single-centre chart review study was conducted on consecutive patients admitted from home between April 2013 and September 2015 for treatment of BPSD and who had lived alone or with a working family member. Time to home discharge was compared between patients who had home-visit nursing before their admission and those who did not. In total, 58 patients were enrolled in the study, of whom 12 had preceding home-visit nursing (PHN group) and 46 did not (non-PHN group). Patients in the PHN group were younger (77.7 ± 4.9 vs. 84.1 ± 6.1 years, P = 0.0011) and had higher Mini-Mental State Examination scores (16.8 ± 7.2 vs 11.8 ± 7.3, P = 0.0287). A multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis adjusted for age and Mini-Mental State Examination scores showed a higher likelihood of discharge to home in the PHN group (hazard ratio: 3.85; 95% confidence interval: 1.27-11.6;, P = 0.017) than in the non-PHN group. Home-visit nursing before admission of BPSD patients for treatment could improve the rate of discharge to home among patients with limited familial care after subsequent hospitalization. Home-visit nursing could also enhance collaborative relationships between social and hospital-based care systems, and early implementation could improve the likelihood of vulnerable patient types remaining in their own homes for as long as possible. © 2018 Japanese Psychogeriatric

  11. Caregiver-Provided Physical Therapy Home Programs for Children with Motor Delay: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgon, Edward James R

    2018-01-17

    Caregiver-provided physical therapy home programs (PTHP) play an important role in enhancing motor outcomes in pediatric patient populations. This scoping review systematically mapped clinical trials of caregiver-provided PTHP that were aimed at enhancing motor outcomes in children who have or who are at risk for motor delay, with the purpose of (1) describing trial characteristics; (2) assessing methodologic quality, and (3) examining the reporting of caregiver-related components. Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Cochrane CENTRAL, PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, ProQuest Central, CINAHL, LILACS, and OTseeker were searched up to July 31, 2017. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials on PTHP administered by parents, other family members, friends, or informal caregivers to children who had or who were at risk for motor delay were included. Two reviewers independently appraised trial quality on the PEDro scale and extracted data. Twenty-four articles representing 17 individual trials were identified. Populations and interventions investigated were heterogeneous. Most of the trials had important research design limitations and methodological issues that could limit usefulness in ascertaining the effectiveness of caregiver-provided PTHP. Few (4 of 17) trials indicated involvement of caregivers in the PTHP planning, assessed how the caregivers learned from the training or instructions provided, or carried out both. Included studies were heterogeneous, and unpublished data were excluded. Although caregiver-provided PTHP are important in addressing motor outcomes in this population, there is a lack of evidence at the level of clinical trials to guide practice. More research is urgently needed to determine the effectiveness of caregiver-provided PTHP. Future studies should address the many important issues identified in this scoping review to improve the usefulness of the trial results.

  12. TeleWound care – providing remote wound assessment and treatment in the home care setting: current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaria N

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nick Santamaria,1 Suzanne Kapp2 1University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Royal District Nursing Service Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: The use of wound telemedicine systems in the home care environment has been expanding for the last decade. These systems can generally be grouped into two main types: store and forward systems and video conference type systems; additionally, there are also hybrid systems available that include elements of both. Evidence to date suggests that these systems provide significant benefits to patients, clinicians, and to the health care system generally. Reductions in resource use, visit substitution, costs, and high patient and clinician satisfaction have been reported; however, there is a lack of integration with existing health care technology and no clearly defined technical or clinical standards as yet. Similarly, the legalities associated with wound telemedicine and remote consultation remain unclear. As wound telemedicine systems continue to evolve and be deployed in different locations, there remains significant potential to harness their power to benefit patients being treated at home. Keywords: telemedicine, home care, e-health

  13. SERVICE EVALUATION OF A CYSTIC FIBROSIS HOME INTRAVENOUS ANTIBIOTIC SERVICE PROVIDED BY A NHS FOUNDATION TRUST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Lynn

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate carers' satisfaction with the current service for home reconstitution and administration of intravenous (IV) antibiotics to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and identify ways of improving this service to reduce treatment burden. A formative evaluation was conducted of all 17 carers who reconstituted and administered the IV antibiotics at home. This was carried out using a cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire of open and closed questions was sent first class with a pre-paid return envelope to the carers. This was followed by a reminder letter after the set return date. Thirteen carers responded giving a response rate of 76.5%. The carers had a mean of 2 children in the household with all having 1 child under the care of the paediatric CF team. They had been receiving IV antibiotics for a mean of 8 years and 7 months and had been administering them at home for a mean of 6 years and 1 month. The majority had administered the antibiotics in the last 3 months.Over half received their drugs from the hospital pharmacy, but one carer highlighted that they did not always receive a full supply of the treatment.Removing the reconstitution step by providing pre-prepared syringes could reduce treatment time by around 18 minutes. Overall this could mean a daily reduction in treatment time of almost two hours for a patient who is on two antibiotics three times a day. The majority of respondents stated that they would prefer pre-filled syringes.The carers felt that they received enough training and felt confident in reconstituting and administering the antibiotics. The majority felt that they should receive regular updates to their training and it was highlighted that they are reassessed at the start of each course. Most of the carers felt that they had an opportunity to discuss the IV antibiotics in the out-patient clinic with the doctors and the nurses but none of them would contact the pharmacist. They felt that they were appropriately contacted in advance to

  14. Safe and Encouraging Home Providing the Countdown to Leadership? Finnish Female Leaders' Childhood Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, Sanna; Uusiautti, Satu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to dissect the connection between childhood homes and leadership. The study forms a part of a larger study on Finnish female leaders and their life paths. The following research question was set for this study: how did Finnish female leaders describe their childhood and home environment? It was studied through two…

  15. Incorporating a pharmacist into an interprofessional team providing transgender care under a medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Cheyenne; Colip, Leslie; Sharon, Nathaniel; Conklin, Jessica

    2017-02-01

    A pharmacist's role in providing care to transgender and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) patients within a medical home model of care is described. A comprehensive transgender services clinic was established in February 2015 in New Mexico. Clinic services are provided under an "informed consent" model of care, as opposed to the traditional "gatekeeper" approach. The clinic's interprofessional team consists of a clinical pharmacist, a psychiatrist, a nurse practitioner, an endocrinologist, a diabetes educator, a massage therapist, a nurse, a nutritionist, and medical assistants. The clinical pharmacist has served in the following roles: (1) assessing health literacy and tailoring the consent process to the patient's literacy level, (2) initiating in-depth discussion of the medical risks and benefits of cross-sex hormone therapy (HT), as well as HT alternatives, (3) discussing typical timelines for physical outcomes of HT, (4) discussing a patient's expectations and goals for csHT, (5) discussing the different HT formulations and helping to determine which formulation is best suited to meeting patient's goals, (6) helping the team obtain prior authorizations for csHT, and (7) managing risk reduction strategies such as smoking cessation and weight loss. Involvement of a pharmacist in the clinic has improved care access and quality for TGNC patients in the southwestern United States. A pharmacist in an interprofessional team staffing a clinic for TGNC people has assumed multiple responsibilities and helped improve patient care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Healthcare and daily needs of expectant Brazilian women residing in Japan. Analysis of fieldwork conducted during prenatal examinations and home visits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Naoko; Martinez, Makiko; Hatashita, Hiroyo

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the everyday lives and public healthcare needs of Brazilian nursing mothers and pregnant women residing in Japan, during the pregnancy and postpartum period, and the difficulties experienced in using or accessing the Japanese public healthcare system. The participants included 10 Brazilian expectant mothers who were residing in Prefecture A, but did not understand Japanese well, and those who were delivering for the first time in Japan. From August 2007 to July 2009, the researcher and interpreter conducted fieldwork by accompanying participants to medical examinations and making home visits. Analysis of the findings of this field study was carried out by labeling the relevant field note descriptions of each participant's thoughts and feelings concerning pregnancy and childbirth, the state of their everyday lives, and any additional public health-related difficulties encountered during this time. Additionally, individuals with common occurrences were again grouped and categorized for performing the analysis. Among the 10 participants, 8 were in their twenties and 2 were in their thirties; 8 participants had lived in Japan for less than 3 years and 2 of them for less than 10 years. Eight participants had had no prior experience with childbirth, whereas 2 had experienced childbirth. All 10 had resigned from work before entering into the late pregnancy stage, rendering their economic conditions solely dependent upon their husbands' income. In fact, many participants were in a difficult financial state. 6 women lived with their husbands, 2 others lived with husbands and had children, and 2 others were living with their husbands and parents in the same house. Six participants had families nearby that could provide support. However, none of the 10 participants maintained interactions with friends after having resigned from work. Participants were organized into the following 4 major categories based on the state of their everyday lives and the difficulties

  17. Design and pilot results of a single blind randomized controlled trial of systematic demand-led home visits by nurses to frail elderly persons in primary care [ISRCTN05358495

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, van H.P.J.; Nijpels, M.G.A.A.M.; Marwijk, van H.W.J.; Jansen, A.P.D.; Veer, van 't P.J.; Tybout, W.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this article is to describe the design of an evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of systematic home visits by nurses to frail elderly primary care patients. Pilot objectives were: 1. To determine the feasibility of postal multidimensional frailty screening instruments;

  18. Home visits as part of a new care pathway (iAID) to improve quality of care and quality of life in ostomy patients: a cluster-randomized stepped-wedge trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sier, M. F.; Oostenbroek, R. J.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Veldink, G. J.; Bemelman, W. A.; Pronk, A.; Spillenaar-Bilgen, E. J.; Kelder, W.; Hoff, C.; Ubbink, D. T.; Havenga, K.; Veltkamp, S. C.; T Dekker, J. W.; Boerma, D.; Eijsbouts, Q. A. J.; Lamme, B.; Vuylsteke, R. J. C. L. M.; Tobon Morales, R. E.; van Tets, W. F.

    2017-01-01

    Aim Morbidity in patients with an ostomy is high. A new care pathway, including perioperative home visits by enterostomal therapists, was studied to assess whether more elaborate education and closer guidance could reduce stoma-related complications and improve quality of life (QoL), at acceptable

  19. MDS 3.0 for Nursing Homes and Swing Bed Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS is a powerful tool for implementing standardized assessment and for facilitating care management in nursing homes (NHs) and non-critical access hospital...

  20. Analysis and proposed model of family caregivers' relationships with home health providers and perceptions of the quality of formal services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Laura; Stajduhar, Kelli

    2013-03-01

    Relationships between families and home health nurses promote effective care and service access for those at end of life, positive caregiver experiences, and satisfaction with care. This study explores family caregivers' accounts of relationships with home care nurses; findings inform a model of relationships and satisfaction with home health services. Ethnographic, qualitative interviews were conducted with 26 bereaved caregivers in one Western Canadian regional health agency. Data analysis was informed by symbolic interactionism. Participants described their relationships with home care nurses and spoke about their assessments of the care provided. Findings highlighted the importance of the length, frequency, and continuity of contact, conversation, socializing, and sharing information. Participants were cognizant of their own and care recipients' roles in building relationship. Nurse behaviors demonstrating affection, acknowledgment, commitment, and understanding were appreciated. A model links relationship preconditions, relational demonstrations, and perceived care quality and may be used to identify points of intervention.

  1. Visita domiciliária: um olhar da enfermagem psiquiátrica La visita a domicilio: una mirada de la enfermería psiquiátrica Home visit: the perspective of the psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Curi Labate

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A visita domiciliária é tema de interesse em diversas áreas da enfermagem. Em psiquiatria, com a implantação de serviços psiquiátricos na comunidade, a necessidade de realizar visita domiciliaria tornou-se evidente. Por um período de um ano estivemos envolvidos com esta atividade, solicitando-a ou realizando-a para pacientes atendidos no Núcleo de Saúde Mental. O objetivo deste trabalho é relatar esta experiência, destacando os seguintes aspectos: O Espaço Público e o Privado da família e a articulação entre visitadores e os recursos da comunidade. A visita domiciliaria aproxima a equipe do contexto do doente e favorece a articulação entre o doente, sua família, o serviço de saúde e os recursos da comunidade.La visita domiciliaria es tema de interés en diversas áreas de enfermería. En psiquiatría, con la implantación de servicios psiquiátricos en la comunidad, la necesidad para las visitas ha llegado a ser evidente. Durante un año hemos estado involucrados en esta actividad, realizándola o solicitándola para pacientes atendidos en el Núcleo de Salud Mental. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir nuestra experiencia, detallando los siguientes aspectos: La Vida Pública y Privada de la Familia y la colaboración entre los profesionales y los recursos en la comunidad. Las visitas domiciliarias reúnen al equipo desde el contexto del enfermo y favorece la articulación entre el enfermo, su familia, el servicio de salud y los recursos de la comunidad.The home visit is a matter of concern in diverse areas of nursing. With the implementation of psychiatric services in the community, the need for visits has become evident. For one year, we were involved with this activity, requesting it or providing it for patients assisted in the Núcleo de Saúde Mental (Mental Health Center. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience, detailing the following aspects: the public and private life of the family and the

  2. Teaching home care to family medicine residents.

    OpenAIRE

    Boillat, M.; Boulet, S.; Poulin de Courval, L.

    1996-01-01

    A growing elderly population suffering from chronic and debilitating diseases, the rising cost of institutional care, and increasing demand from patients for home visits indicate that home care will become a more important part of family physicians' practice in the future. We describe a model for teaching family medicine residents how to provide home services.

  3. Design and pilot results of a single blind randomized controlled trial of systematic demand-led home visits by nurses to frail elderly persons in primary care [ISRCTN05358495

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tybout Willemijn

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this article is to describe the design of an evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of systematic home visits by nurses to frail elderly primary care patients. Pilot objectives were: 1. To determine the feasibility of postal multidimensional frailty screening instruments; 2. to identify the need for home visits to elderly. Methods Main study: The main study concerns a randomized controlled in primary care practices (PCP with 18 months follow-up and blinded PCPs. Frail persons aged 75 years or older and living at home but neither terminally ill nor demented from 33 PCPs were eligible. Trained community nurses (1 visit patients at home and assess the care needs with the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care, a multidimensional computerized geriatric assessment instrument, enabling direct identification of problem areas; (2 determine the care priorities together with the patient; (3 design and execute interventions according to protocols; (4 and visit patients at least five times during a year in order to execute and monitor the care-plan. Controls receive usual care. Outcome measures are Quality of life, and Quality Adjusted Life Years; time to nursing home admission; mortality; hospital admissions; health care utilization. Pilot 1: Three brief postal multidimensional screening measures to identify frail health among elderly persons were tested on percentage complete item response (selected after a literature search: 1 Vulnerable Elders Screen, 2 Strawbridge's frailty screen, and 3 COOP-WONCA charts. Pilot 2: Three nurses visited elderly frail patients as identified by PCPs in a health center of 5400 patients and used an assessment protocol to identify psychosocial and medical problems. The needs and experiences of all participants were gathered by semi-structured interviews. Discussion The design holds several unique elements such as early identification of frail persons combined with case-management by

  4. Perceived needs for support among care home staff providing end of life care for people with dementia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrevala, T; Samsi, K; Rose, C; Adenrele, C; Barnes, C; Manthorpe, J

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current exploratory study was to investigate the impact on care home staff when working with people with dementia at the end of life and to explore how they cope with this aspect of their work. With UK policy encouraging death in the place of residence, rather than hospital, more people with dementia are dying in care homes. A qualitative approach was employed; 20 care home staff working in five English care homes were interviewed. Thematic Analysis was used to analyse the data. Care home staff found the external demands on them and difficulties associated with interacting with people with dementia sometimes challenging, stressful and anxiety-provoking, particularly as residents approached end of life. Emotional aspects of caring for dying residents were sometimes heightened by close attachments with residents and their families. Staff were able to recognise these unmet needs and identified a need for further training and emotional support to manage these stressors. This study revealed rich and complex understandings of the practice dimensions of caring for people with dementia at the end of life and the impact these have on staff. There is a need to develop effective psychosocial interventions that focus on emotional support for care home staff. There will be challenges in providing this in employment settings that are generally low paid, low status, have high turnover and are reliant on temporary or migrant staff, where training is not rewarded, mandatory or culturally valued. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Visit safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Experiment areas, offices, workshops: it is possible to have co-workers or friends visit these places.     You already know about the official visits service, the VIP office, and professional visits. But do you know about the safety instruction GSI-OHS1, “Visits on the CERN site”? This is a mandatory General Safety Instruction that was created to assist you in ensuring safety for all your visits, whatever their nature—especially those that are non-official. Questions? The HSE Unit will be happy to answer them. Write to safety-general@cern.ch.   The HSE Unit

  6. 45 CFR 1356.30 - Safety requirements for foster care and adoptive home providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... against a child or children (including child pornography); or, (4) A crime involving violence, including... ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND... made on behalf of a child placed in a foster home operated under the auspices of a child placing agency...

  7. The Relationship of Repeated Technical Assistance Support Visits to the Delivery of Positive Health, Dignity, and Prevention (PHDP) Messages by Healthcare Providers in Mozambique: A Longitudinal Multilevel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutin, Sarah A; Amico, K Rivet; Hunguana, Elsa; Munguambe, António Orlando; Rose, Carol Dawson

    Positive health, dignity, and prevention (PHDP) is Mozambique's strategy to engage clinicians in the delivery of prevention messages to their HIV-positive clients. This national implementation strategy uses provider trainings on offering key messages and focuses on intervening on 9 evidence-based risk reduction areas. We investigated the impact of longitudinal technical assistance (TA) as an addition to this basic training. We followed 153 healthcare providers in 5 Mozambican provinces over 6 months to evaluate the impact of on-site, observation-based TA on PHDP implementation. Longitudinal multilevel models were estimated to model change in PHDP message delivery over time among individual providers. With each additional TA visit, providers delivered about 1 additional PHDP message ( P < .001); clinicians and nonclinicians started at about the same baseline level, but clinicians improved more quickly ( P = .004). Message delivery varied by practice sector; maternal and child health sectors outperformed other sectors. Longitudinal TA helped reach the programmatic goals of the PHDP program in Mozambique.

  8. Providing Opportunities to Learn in Home-Based Child Care Settings: Observations of Learning Contexts and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, Julie C.; Crowley, Ryann; Jones, Laura B.; Smolkowski, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: This observation study investigated the prevalence and correlates of learning contexts provided to preschool-age children in 133 registered child care homes in below-average-income neighborhoods in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. On average, 30% of the observed proportion of time was spent in structured teacher-led activities, 51%…

  9. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Religious Nonmedical Health Care...

  10. 78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) published in the Federal Register on May 6, 2013 (78 FR 26250) a final rule to change the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health services and hospice care. The preamble of that final rule stated the effective date was November 15, 2013. This document delays that effective date to April 1, 2014.

  11. Visit ISOLDE!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    CERN Internal Communication is organising a visit to ISOLDE – an opportunity for you to see the CERN set-up that can produce over 1000 different isotopes!   If you wish to participate, you can sign up for a visit by sending us an e-mail. Note that the visits will take place between 18 and 22 February, and will be open only to CERN access-card holders.   The visit will include an introduction by experts and a tour of the ISOLDE set-up. NB: For security reason, pregnant women and kids under the age of 16 can not take the tour.  

  12. What Happens during Prenatal Visits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you have confirmed your pregnancy with a home pregnancy test. Early and regular prenatal visits help your health ... Gynecologists. (2014). Frequently asked questions. FAQ133. Pregnancy: Routine tests in pregnancy. Retrieved January 5, 2016, from http://www.acog. ...

  13. Evaluation of quality of life in caregivers who are providing home care to cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Mahcube

    2017-11-21

    The author aimed to evaluate the quality of life and the factors affecting the caregivers of cancer patients receiving home care. This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed in 48 cancer patients who were served from home care unit and 48 caregivers between 01 and 28 February 2014. Patients' functional status was evaluated with Katz Index for Activities of Daily Living and the Lawton Scale for Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The levels of quality of life of caregivers of patients with cancer were determined with Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer (CQOLC). The mean age of forty-eight patients was 69.79 ± 16.09 years; 62.5% of them were female. The mean duration of home care was 5.99 ± 5.26 years; 25% of patients were fully dependent on the bed. 83.3% of caregivers were female, mean age of caregivers was 50.75 ± 14.89 years, and 77.1% of them were family members. The mean CQOLC score was 74.43 ± 24.45. The highest score was detected in the financial distress and the lowest score was detected in the positive adaptation. The quality of life is increasing as the length of care is reduced and income status increased. The quality of life of caregivers is very low. Each characteristic of the caregiver will affect the care he/she gives. From this point of view, it is important to consider the characteristics of caregivers in improving the care given to cancer patients. In this respect, there is a need to support caregivers both materially and spiritually.

  14. A randomized trial of single home nursing visits vs office-based care after nursery/maternity discharge: the Nurses for Infants Through Teaching and Assessment After the Nursery (NITTANY) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ian M; Beiler, Jessica S; Schaefer, Eric W; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Alleman, Nancy; Sturgis, Sarah A; Yu, Stella M; Camacho, Fabian T; Weisman, Carol S

    2012-03-01

    To compare office-based care (OBC) with a care model using a home nursing visit (HNV) as the initial postdischarge encounter for "well" breastfeeding newborns and mothers. Randomized controlled trial. A single academic hospital. A total of 1154 postpartum mothers intending to breastfeed and their 1169 newborns of at least 34 weeks' gestation. Home nursing visits were scheduled no later than 2 days after discharge; OBC timing was physician determined. Mothers completed telephone surveys at 2 weeks, 2 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome was unplanned health care utilization for mothers and newborns within 2 weeks of delivery. Other newborn outcomes were proportion seen within 2 days after discharge and breastfeeding duration. Maternal mental health, parenting competence, and satisfaction with care outcomes were assessed. Analyses followed an intent-to-treat paradigm. At 2 weeks, hospital readmissions and emergency department visits were uncommon, and there were no study group differences in these outcomes or with unplanned outpatient visit frequency. Newborns in the HNV group were seen no more than 2 days after discharge more commonly than those in the OBC group (85.9% vs 78.8%) (P = .002) and were more likely to be breastfeeding at 2 weeks (92.3% vs 88.6%) (P = .04) and 2 months (72.1% vs 66.4%) (P = .05) but not 6 months. No group differences were detected for maternal mental health or satisfaction with care, but HNV group mothers had a greater parenting sense of competence (P Home nursing visits are a safe and effective alternative to OBC for the initial outpatient encounter after maternity/nursery discharge with similar patterns of unplanned health care utilization and modest breastfeeding and parenting benefits.

  15. Use of Robotic Pets in Providing Stimulation for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, M; Ohkubo, E; Kato, N

    2015-01-01

    Trial experiments utilized robotic pets to facilitate self-reliance in nursing home residents. A remote-control robot modeled clear and meaningful behaviors to elderly residents. Special attention was paid to its effects on mental and social domains. Employing the robot as a gaze target and center of attention created a cue to initiate a communication channel between residents who normally show no interest in each other. The Sony AIBO robot in this study uses commercially available wireless equipment, and all its components are easily accessible to any medical or welfare institution interested in additional practice of these activities.

  16. Weathering the storm: challenges to nurses providing care to nursing home residents during hurricanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Kathryn; Brown, Lisa M; Christensen, Janelle J; Thomas, Kali S

    2009-11-01

    This article documents the experience of 291 Florida nursing homes during the 2004 hurricane season. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, the authors described and compared the challenges nurses encountered when evacuating residents with their experiences assisting residents of facilities that sheltered in place. The primary concerns for evacuating facilities were accessing appropriate evacuation sites for residents and having ambulance transportation contracts honored. The main issue for facilities that sheltered in place was the length of time it took for power to be restored. Barriers to maintaining resident health during disasters for those who evacuated or sheltered in place are identified.

  17. Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A fiery feminist piece that argues that Indian women are all homeless; animals have homes but Indian women have none, because they have to depend on the mercy of their "keepers"; therefore, Indian women live a life worse than animals.

  18. Continuity in the provider of home-based physical therapy services and its implications for outcomes of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Rosati, Robert J; Andreopoulos, Evie

    2012-02-01

    A growing body of research suggests that greater continuity of health care is positively associated with improved outcomes of patients. However, few studies have examined this issue in the context of physical therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the level of continuity in the provider (provider continuity) of physical therapy services was related to outcomes in a population of patients receiving home health care. This was a retrospective observational study. Clinical and administrative records were retrieved for a population of adult patients receiving physical therapy services from a large, urban, not-for-profit certified home health care agency in 2009. Descriptive and multivariable analyses were used to examine how the level of provider continuity, calculated by use of a formula that models dispersion in contact between the patient and the providers of physical therapy services, varied across characteristics and outcomes of patients. Logistic regression analyses indicated that patients with lower levels of provider continuity had significantly higher odds of hospitalization (odds ratio [OR]=2.06, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.90-2.23) and lower odds of improvements in the number of activity limitations (OR=0.85, 95% CI=0.80-0.92) and in the severity of activity limitations (OR=0.85, 95% CI=0.78-0.93) between the beginning and the end of the home health care episode. Baseline clinical characteristics associated with continuity of care suggest some level of indication bias. Outcome measures for activities of daily living were limited to patients who were not hospitalized during their home health stay. These findings build upon research suggesting that continuity in the patient-provider relationship is an important determinant of outcomes of patients.

  19. Long-term home care scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst, Mette; Jensen, Thomas Sejr

    In several countries, home care is provided for certain citizens living at home. The long-term home care scheduling problem is to generate work plans spanning several days such that a high quality of service is maintained and the overall cost is kept as low as possible. A solution to the problem...... provides detailed information on visits and visit times for each employee on each of the covered days. We propose a branch-and-price algorithm for the long-term home care scheduling problem. The pricing problem generates one-day plans for an employee, and the master problem merges the plans with respect...

  20. The effect of mobile app home monitoring on number of in-person visits following ambulatory surgery: protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kathleen A; Coyte, Peter C; Bhatia, R Sacha; Semple, John L

    2015-06-03

    postoperative. The secondary outcomes include (1) the total number of phone calls and emails to a health care professional related to surgery, (2) complication rate, (3) societal and health care system costs, and (4) patient satisfaction over the first 30 days postoperative. Permutated-block randomization will be conducted by blocks of 4-6 using the program ralloc in Stata. This is an open study due to the nature of the intervention. A sample of 72 (36 patients per group) will provide an E-test for count data with a power of 95% (P=.05) to detect a difference of 1 visit between groups, assuming a 10% drop out rate. Count variables will be analyzed using Poisson regression. Categorical variables will be tested using a chi-square test. Cost-effectiveness will be analyzed using net benefit regression. Outcomes will be assessed over the first 30 days following surgery. We hope to show that the use of a mobile app in follow-up care minimizes the need for in-person visits for postoperative patients. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02318953; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02318953 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Yifzdjph).

  1. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-09-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted. First, interviews were performed with nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 9) and rheumatologists (n = 13). Subsequently, collected responses were quantified, using a questionnaire among the interviewees. The following advantages of patient home access to the EMR were reported: (1) enhancement of patient participation in treatment, (2) increased knowledge and self-management, (3) improved patient-provider interaction, (4) increased patient safety, and (5) better communication with others. Foreseen disadvantages of the service included: (1) problems with interpretation of data, (2) extra workload, (3) a change in consultation content, and (4) disturbing the patient-provider interaction. Also, the following preconditions emerged from the data: (1) optimal security, (2) no extra record, but a patient-accessible section, (3) no access to clinical notes, and (4) a lag time on the release of lab data. Most respondents reported that data on diagnosis, medication, treatment plan and consultations could be released to patients. On releasing more complex data, such as bodily examinations, lab results and radiological images the opinions differed considerably. Providing patients home access to their medical record might be a valuable next step into patient empowerment and in service towards the patient, provided that security is optimal and content and presentation of data are carefully considered.

  2. Enhancing provider knowledge and patient screening for palliative care needs in chronic multimorbid patients receiving home-based primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Tracy; Manu, Erika; Vitale, Caroline A

    2015-02-01

    This article describes a pilot model to increase palliative care (PC) knowledge and collaboration among providers and to systematically identify chronic multimorbid home care patients who would benefit from focused discussion of potential PC needs. Thirty health care providers from a home-based primary care team attended interdisciplinary trainings. The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) tool was used to trigger discussions of potential palliative needs at team rounds for patients who scored below a cutoff point on the tool. Palliative Performance Scale implementation added little burden on nurses and triggered a discussion in 51 flagged patients. The tool successfully identified 75% of patients who died or were discharged. Screening was systematic and consistent and resulted in targeted discussions about PC needs without generating additional burden on our PC consult service. This model shows promise for enhancing collaborative patient care and access to PC. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Caring for underserved patients through neighborhood health screening: outcomes of a longitudinal, interprofessional, student-run home visit program in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang En, Wee; Koh, Gerald Choon-Huat; Lim, Vivien Kim Geok

    2011-07-01

    Service learning, an effective vehicle for teaching undergraduate public health while providing underserved communities with medical care, is not well established in Asia. The authors evaluated a service learning program, Neighborhood Health Screening (NHS), in Singapore. Medical and nursing undergraduate students provided in-home medical services to patients in a low-income neighborhood (January-June 2010). The authors assessed student-reported pedagogical effectiveness in nine domains, asked students for qualitative feedback on their experiences, assessed patients' satisfaction with NHS, and tracked clinical outcomes. Of the 240 medical and 34 nursing students who participated, 222 (93%) and 34 (100%), respectively, completed the questionnaire; 136 of the medical students (57%) also provided qualitative feedback. Most students felt NHS was beneficial across all domains. Male medical students were less likely to report increased understanding of deficiencies in the health care system and long-term management of chronic disease; preclinical students were more likely to report improvements in comprehending ethical issues, critical thinking and action skills, and gaining and applying knowledge. Qualitative feedback supported quantitative findings. Patients were satisfied with NHS: 266 (75%) agreed that NHS improved their health, and 301 (85%) felt NHS provided sufficient time to address their issues. After a single year, amongst patients with known hypertension, treatment increased from 63% to 93% (P pressure control amongst those who were on treatment improved from 42% to 79% (P < .001). Service learning can make an important contribution to medical teaching and patient care in Asia.

  4. The influence of parents and the home environment on preschoolers' physical activity behaviours: A qualitative investigation of childcare providers' perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Jennifer D

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity offers numerous physiological and psychological benefits for young children; however, many preschool-aged children are not engaging in sufficient activity. The home environment, inclusive of parent role modeling, has been identified as influencing preschoolers' physical activity. This study sought to examine childcare providers' perspectives of the importance of parents and the home environment for supporting the physical activity behaviours of preschool-aged children (aged 2.5-5 years attending childcare. Methods A heterogeneous sample of childcare providers (n = 84; response rate 39% working at childcare facilities in London, Ontario participated. Thirteen semi-structured focus groups were conducted in London centres between February 2009 and February 2010. Focus groups were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and inductive content analysis was used to code and classify themes. A number of strategies were used to verify the trustworthiness of the data. Results Childcare providers acknowledged their reliance on parents/guardians to create a home environment that complements the positive physical activity messaging children may receive in childcare. Moreover, childcare staff highlighted the need for positive parent role modeling and parent support to encourage active healthy lifestyles among young children. Conclusion This study's findings highlight the need for increased parent-caregiver partnering in terms of communication and cooperation in service of promoting appropriate amounts of physical activity among London preschoolers.

  5. Unplanned Hospital Visits - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  6. Providing Palliative Care in a Swedish Support Home for People Who Are Homeless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Sandberg, Jonas; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth; Christiansen, Mats; Öhlén, Joakim

    2016-07-01

    Despite high frequencies of multiple, life-limiting conditions relating to palliative care needs, people who are homeless are one of the most underserved and rarely encountered groups in palliative care settings. Instead, they often die in care places where palliative competence is not available. In this qualitative single-case study, we explored the conditions and practices of palliative care from the perspective of staff at a Swedish support home for homeless people. Interpretive description guided the research process, and data were generated from repeated reflective conversations with staff in groups, individually, and in pairs. The findings disclose a person-centered approach to palliative care, grounded in the understanding of the person's health/illness and health literacy, and how this is related to and determinant on life as a homeless individual. Four patterns shape this approach: building trustful and family-like relationships, re-dignifying the person, re-considering communication about illness and dying, and re-defining flexible and pragmatic care solutions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. The Israeli Long-Term Care Insurance Law: selected issues in providing home care services to the frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Hillel

    2005-05-01

    The paper describes and analyses selected issues related to the provision of home care services to frail elderly people following the Israeli Long-Term Care Insurance Law (1988). The goals and principles of the Law, which mandates the provision of home care services to frail elderly people, are presented. The paper also evaluates its contribution toward enhancing the well-being of elderly clients. Several major dilemmas that arose following implementation of the Law are analysed and evaluated in comparison with other countries that have enacted and implemented similar laws. These dilemmas are community vs institutional care; services in kind vs monetary allowances; service provision through contracting out with nongovernmental agencies; unstable and unskilled labour force; and service quality. Finally, policy implications are discussed, mainly in the following areas: investment in human resources as a condition for achieving high service quality, and the need for coordination between the agencies that provide long-term care services to elderly people.

  8. [Do nursing homes with higher quality ratings provide a better quality of care? : Empirical study based on administrative data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przylog, Adam; Stroka, Magdalena A; Engel, Susanne; Linder, Roland

    2016-06-01

    In 2009 a new system for the objective evaluation of nursing homes was introduced in Germany. The so-called nursing transparency agreement (Pflege-Transparenzvereinbarungen) was introduced to provide a reliable tool for an objective comparison of inpatient (PTVS) and outpatient (PTVA) care; however, the new regulations have been the subject of a broad discussion regarding reliability, efficiency and objectivity. To overcome the lack of objective health outcomes, this study used administrative data from Germany's largest health insurance fund, the Techniker Krankenkasse, in order to analyze the association between the quality ratings and objective quality measures on an individual level. This is the first study that provides empirical evidence on this topic using administrative data. The administrative dataset contained information on several individual characteristics as well as data on injuries, poisoning and other extrinsic effects on care-dependent individuals over the age of 64 years who were living in a nursing home in 2009. Based on these data an objective measure was constructed to test whether higher quality ratings of nursing homes led to a better quality of care of the respective patients using non-linear regression models. The results of the estimated models showed no significant evidence of such a relationship, neither considering the probability nor the number of injuries, poisoning and other extrinsic effects. Significant effects were only observed for gender and specific diseases. The results of this study support the argument that the current rating procedure for nursing homes has to be refined. Using quality indicators in combination with the administrative data could possibly contribute to such an enhancement.

  9. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Home Diabetes Telemedicine Care in the IDEATel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudiver, Fred; Wolff, L. Thomas; Morin, Philip C.; Teresi, Jeanne; Palmas, Walter; Starren, Justin; Shea, Steven; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Few telemedicine projects have systematically examined provider satisfaction and attitudes. Purpose: To determine the acceptability and perceived impact on primary care providers' (PCP) practices of a randomized clinical trial of the use of telemedicine to electronically deliver health care services to Medicare patients with diabetes in…

  10. Austrian visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hans Hoffmann, Director for Technology Transfer and Scientific Computing, and Maria Rauch-Kallat, Minister of Health and Women's Issues, Austria, signing the visitors' book.Maria Rauch-Kallat, Minister of Health and Women's Issues, Austria, was welcomed by Hans Hoffmann, Director for Technology Transfer and Scientific Computing, on her visit to CERN on 19 May 2003. The theme of the visit was Technology Transfer and spin-offs from CERN for medical applications. Maria Rauch-Kallat toured also the installations of ATLAS.

  11. Croatian visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 11 December, President Stjepan Mesic of the Republic of Croatia visited CERN. He was welcomed by Director General, Robert Aymar, and the President of CERN Council, Maurice Bourquin. Afterwards he met, among others, the Directors of CERN and Croatian scientists working here. He finished his tour by visiting the underground cavern for the ATLAS experiment. The arrival at CERN of the President of the Republic of Croatia, Stjepan Mesic. In the first row, from left to right: Maurice Bourquin, President of CERN Council, Stjepan Mesic, President of the Republic of Croatia and Robert Aymar, Director General of CERN.

  12. Assessment of status of patients receiving palliative home care and services provided in a rural area-kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayyil, Jayakrishnan; Cherumanalil, Jeeja Mathummal

    2012-09-01

    For the first time in India, a Pain and Palliative Care policy to guide the community-based home care initiatives was declared by the Government of Kerala state. In Kerala, majority of the panchayats (local self-governments) are now conducting home-based palliative care as part of primary health care. National focus domain areas in palliative care research are structure and process, the physical aspects, and also the social aspects of care. The study was conducted to assess the patient's status and the services provided by palliative home care. The descriptive study was conducted at Mavoor panchayat-Kozhikode district of Kerala, India by collecting information from the case records, nurses diary notes of all enrolled patients. Collecting information from the case records, nurses diary notes of all enrolled patients. The data were entered using Microsoft excel for Windows XP and analyzed using SPSS 16.0 (Statistical Package for Social Sciences; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Totally, 104 patients were enrolled. Diagnosis wise major category was degenerative diseases. There were 27% persons suffering from cerebrovascular accidents, 15.3% with malignancies, 8.7% with coronary artery disease, 5.8% with complications of diabetes, and 8.7% were with fracture of bones. The major complaints were weakness (41.3%), tiredness (31.7%), and pain (27%). Twenty-five percent persons complained of urinary incontinence, 12.5% complained of ulcer, 10.6% of edema, and 9.6% of mental/emotional agony. The activity of daily living status was as follows. Twenty-five percent subjects were completely bed ridden. 5.8% were feeding through Ryles tube, 16.3% had urinary incontinence, 9.6% were having no bowel control. The service could address most of the medical, psychosocial, and supportive needs of the patients and reduce their pain and symptoms. The interface between institutional-based care and home care needs more exploration and prospective studies.

  13. Can We Help Care Providers Communicate More Effectively With Persons Having Dementia Living in Long-Term Care Homes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Elizabeth; Sidani, Souraya; Shaw, Alexander; Ben-David, Boaz M.; Saragosa, Marianne; Boscart, Veronique M.; Wilson, Rozanne; Galimidi-Epstein, Karmit K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective communication between residents with dementia and care providers in long-term care homes (LTCHs) is essential to resident-centered care. Purpose: To determine the effects of a communication intervention on residents’ quality of life (QOL) and care, as well as care providers’ perceived knowledge, mood, and burden. Method: The intervention included (1) individualized communication plans, (2) a dementia care workshop, and (3) a care provider support system. Pre- and postintervention scores were compared to evaluate the effects of the intervention. A total of 12 residents and 20 care providers in an LTCH participated in the feasibility study. Results: The rate of care providers’ adherence to the communication plans was 91%. Postintervention, residents experienced a significant increase in overall QOL. Care providers had significant improvement in mood and perceived reduced burden. Conclusion: The results suggest that the communication intervention demonstrates preliminary evidence of positive effects on residents’ QOL and care providers’ mood and burden. PMID:27899433

  14. Home, School Partnerships in Family Child Care: Providers' Relationships within Their Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ramona

    2011-01-01

    Professional family child care providers' work with children from birth through age five can be exemplary, particularly with regard to building stable and substantive relational ties. Such long-term engagements with client children and their families offer potential for strong partnership with families and local contexts over time. This paper…

  15. European visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, (on the right) visited the CMS assembly hall accompanied by Jim Virdee, Deputy Spokesman of CMS (on the left), and Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN. The European Commissioner for Science and Research, Janez Potočnik, visited CERN on Tuesday 31 January. He was welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, who described the missions and current activities of CERN to him, in particular the realisation of the LHC with its three components: accelerator, detectors, storage and processing of data. The European Commissioner then visited the CMS assembly hall, then the hall for testing the LHC magnets and the ATLAS cavern. During this first visit since his appointment at the end of 2004, Janez Potočnik appeared very interested by the operation of CERN, an example of successful scientific co-operation on a European scale. The many projects (30 on average) that CERN and the European Commission carry out jointly for the benefit of res...

  16. Providing Palliative Care for a dying teen at home: Perspectives and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malathi Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents and young adults with cancer are a heterogeneous group. Management of this special group requires a broad-based interdisciplinary clinical team, which should include palliative care (PC, psychology, social work, oncology, and nursing representatives. The function of PC is to provide impeccable pain and other symptom control and to coordinate care as the disease progresses. The cure rate of cancer in adolescents is high but between 10% and 40% of them will develop incurable disease depending on tumor type and prognostic factors. PC in adolescents should also take care of the specific physical and psychosocial developmental changes in this age group. A 16-year old boy suffered with incurable disease and team has provided the PC at the door step taken as a case study.

  17. A randomized, controlled study to evaluate the role of an in-home asthma disease management program provided by respiratory therapists in improving outcomes and reducing the cost of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelledy, David C; Legrand, Terry S; Gardner, Donna D; Peters, Jay I

    2009-03-01

    Asthma management programs (AMP) may reduce costs and improve outcomes in patients with moderate to severe asthma. However, it is not known which personnel are best able to deliver such interventions and what settings are most effective. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an in-home AMP provided by respiratory therapists (RTs) to an AMP provided by nurses (RNs) and to usual care (UC) provided in physician offices or clinics. Subjects (age 18-64) who had been admitted to the emergency department (ED) or hospital for acute asthma exacerbation were randomized to three groups: AMP-RT, AMP-RN or UC. The AMP groups received five (5) weekly home visits to provide assessment and instruction; the UC group was instructed to return to their physician for routine follow-up. Outcomes assessed at 6 months included hospitalizations, in patient days, hospitalization cost, ED visits and cost, clinic visits, pulmonary function, symptoms, health related quality of life (HRQOL), asthma episode self-management score (AESM), environmental assessment, and patient satisfaction (PS). Variables were compared using ANOVA with a Neuman-Keuls follow-up for multiple comparisons using an intent-to-treat approach. Upon enrollment, (n = 159) there were no differences (p > .05) between groups for age, gender, pulmonary function or HRQOL (SF-36 and St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire - SGRQ). At 6 months, both AMP groups (AMP-RN n = 54; AMP-RT n = 46) had significantly fewer (p management program can be effectively delivered by respiratory therapists and may reduce hospitalizations, in-patient days, cost and improve measures of HRQOL and PS in a population prone to asthma exacerbation.

  18. Do physicians address other medical problems during preventive gynecologic visits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Donna; Coco, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home model may be a strategic approach to improve delivery of women's health care and consistently provide women with accessible and comprehensive care. We examined whether primary care physicians (family medicine, internal medicine, and hospital general medicine clinics) and obstetrician-gynecologists differ in scope and the number of medical issues addressed during preventive gynecologic visits. We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to characterize visits with a primary diagnosis of gynecological examination or routine cervical Papanicolaou test between 1999 and 2008. We compared the number and type of concurrent nongynecologic diagnoses addressed by primary care physicians and obstetrician-gynecologists during visits. A total of 7882 visits were included, representing 271 million primary visits for Papanicolaou tests. Primary care physicians were 2.41 times more likely to include one or more concurrent medical diagnoses during the preventive gynecologic visit compared with obstetrician-gynecologists (odds ratio, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.63-3.57). Primary care physicians are significantly more likely to address concurrent medical problems during preventive gynecologic visits compared with obstetrician-gynecologists. These findings demonstrate the vital role of primary care physicians in providing comprehensive health care to women, consistent with principles of the patient-centered medical home model.

  19. NOTE FROM VISITS SERVICE

    CERN Multimedia

    ETT Division; Division ETT; Service des visites

    2000-01-01

    The Visit Service noticed that for many years countries such as Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands and the Scandinavian countries visit CERN less than other member countries and that is due to the high price of the trip for the students. To improve the situation the Visit Service plans to create a network of 'Family-Accommodation' ('Famille-Accueil') in Geneva and in France nearbywith the aim to facilitate the trip to foreign students especially from the more distant member countries and to encourage them to visit our unique laboratory. We expect this exchange to be an interesting experience for both the students and the welcoming family ('famille d'accueil'). If you are interested in participating in this family network, please fill in the questionnaire below. The questionnaire is to be returned to the Visit Service, Mrs Christine Fromm, e-mail Christine.Fromm@cern.ch.Name: First name: CERN address: E-mail: Portable phone number: Home address...

  20. Understanding the state variation in Medicare home health care. The impact of Medicaid program characteristics, state policy, and provider attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M A; Tumlinson, A

    1997-06-01

    During the past 7 years there has been a significant increase in the use of the Medicare home health benefit. In this article, the authors document trends in the use of the benefit and develop multivariate models to identify the factors that explain state variation in its use. To develop quantitative models, the authors collected state information on all variables for each of 3 years: 1991, 1992, and 1993. The authors chose to focus on those variables that had been found to be significant in other research as well as those that we posited would likely influence utilization. The authors tested similar sets of explanatory variables for each year of the analysis. The unit of analysis is the "state" and depending on data availability, the number of states included in the analyses range from between 46 to 49. (Arizona does not have a state Medicaid program.) The authors' analysis shows that interaction exists between state policies and use of the benefit. Utilization is higher in states that face greater fiscal pressure concerning their Medicaid budgets; the lack of state personal care programs increases Medicare use, and, when Medicaid home health expenditures decline, the number of Medicare home health care users increases. There is also an inverse relationship between the number of long-term care and skilled nursing facilities in a state and the use of the benefit. Thus, for some, the benefit serves as a substitute for long-term care needs and, for others, for postacute care needs. The overlap between the population served and the services provided by state programs and Medicare has given states and providers an opportunity to leverage Federal dollars in lieu of state program dollars. As the Federal government attempts to control expenditure growth, policy-makers must be mindful of how state actions can influence the level and type of Federal expenditure.

  1. Effect of Home Monitoring via Mobile App on the Number of In-Person Visits Following Ambulatory Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kathleen A; Coyte, Peter C; Brown, Mitchell; Beber, Brett; Semple, John L

    2017-07-01

    In the age of information and patient-centered care, new methods of delivering postoperative care must be developed and evaluated. To determine whether follow-up care delivered via a mobile app can be used to avert in-person follow-up care visits compared with conventional, in-person follow-up care in the first 30 days following ambulatory surgery. A randomized clinical trial was conducted from February 1 to August 31, 2015, among ambulatory patients undergoing breast reconstruction at an academic ambulatory care hospital. Patients were randomly assigned to receive follow-up care via a mobile app or at an in-person visit during the first 30 days after the operation. Analysis was intention-to-treat. The primary end point was the number of in-person follow-up visits during the first 30 days after the operation. Secondary end points were the number of telephone calls and emails to health care professionals, patient-reported convenience and satisfaction scores, and rates of complications. Of the 65 women in the study (mean [SD] age, 47.7 [13.4] years), 32 (49%) were in the mobile app group, and 33 (51%) were in the in-person follow-up care group. Those in the mobile app group attended a mean of 0.66 in-person visits, vs 1.64 in-person visits in the in-person follow-up care group, for a difference of 0.40 times fewer in-person visits (95% CI, 0.24-0.66; P mobile app group reported higher convenience scores than the in-person follow-up care group (incidence rate ratio, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.09-1.77; P = .008). There was no difference between groups in the number of telephone communications, satisfaction scores, or complication rates. Patients undergoing ambulatory breast reconstruction can use follow-up care via a mobile app to avert in-person follow-up visits during the first 30 days after the operation. Mobile app follow-up care affects neither complication rates nor patient-reported satisfaction scores, but it improves patient-reported convenience scores

  2. Cosmic visits

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    On Saturday, 19 September, ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano and Amalia Ercoli Finzi, Principal Investigator of the SD2 experiment on board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft, visited the AMS Control Centre and other CERN installations.   From left to right: Sergio Bertolucci (CERN Director of Research and Computing), Amalia Ercoli Finzi (Emeritus Professor in the Aerospace department of the Polytechnic University of Milan and Principal Investigator of the SD2 experiment on board the ESA Rosetta spacecraft), Maurice Bourquin (AMS-02 Senior Scientist and Honorary Professor in the Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics department of the University of Geneva) and Luca Parmitano (Major in the Italian Air Force and European Space Agency astronaut) in the AMS Payload and Operation Control Centre. They were welcomed in the early morning by Sergio Bertolucci and then headed to the Prévessin site to visit the CERN Control Centre and the Payload and Operation Control Centre (POCC) of the Alpha Magnetic Sp...

  3. Armenian visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    During his visit to CERN on 4 July 2003, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, toured the ATLAS experimental cavern and assembly hall. From left to right: Aram Kotzinian, from the international organization JINR from Dubna, Marzio Nessi from ATLAS, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, Zohrab Mnatsakanian, Ambassador at the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Armenia to the United Nations in Geneva, Alexandre Sissakian, Vice-Director of JINR and Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesman.

  4. Provider Opinions and Experiences Regarding Development of a Social Support Assessment to Inform Hospital Discharge: The Going Home Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrea; Papke, Todd; Davisson, Erica; Spooner, Kara; Gassman, Laura

    Despite over three decades of research linking social support and optimal health outcomes, social support is not systematically assessed or addressed during clinical care. This study sought input from health care providers to inform the design of an intervention intended to facilitate assessment of social support in a way that could aid in anticipatory planning during the process of hospital discharge. Using a purposive sampling strategy, data were collected from providers in two acute care settings serving rural patients, one academic and one community based. Opinions about what an assessment of social support would seek to accomplish, what is currently done and by whom, and the preferred format for delivery were elicited during a series of individual and group interviews. During phase two, feasibility was assessed with three inpatient nurses over 3 clinical days. Field notes were analyzed throughout the project using rapid data analysis techniques. Health care providers endorsed the creation of an assessment and stated that target users would include all members of the discharge team (e.g., clinical nurses, case managers, discharge coordinators, hospitalists, and specialty care). They identified the need for a patient-family resource (vs. a traditional provider-facing assessment). Participants stated that, although both the information collected and the interview process would meet a need to increase patient engagement in inpatient settings, competing clinical demands would require a tool that was easily completed by patients and family and seen as directly informing clinical activities. To this end, although focusing on the eventual development of an electronic tool seemed valuable, a hard-copy resource was considered more feasible for patient use at the present time. The preliminary test of the resulting hard-copy "Going Home Toolkit" demonstrated potential feasibility and usefulness during clinical practice. There is need for not only assessing patients

  5. Randomized intervention trial on preventive home visits to older people: baseline and follow-up characteristics of participants and non-participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vass, Mikkel; Avlund, Kirsten; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    a significantly higher mortality rate and risk of admission to nursing home than participants, whereas the subgroups of non-participants describing themselves as "too healthy" and having "another reason for refusal" did not differ from the participants. There was no difference in mortality rates between non...

  6. [Legal Analysis of the Implementation Rules of Delegation of Home Visits by Family Doctors to Non-Physician Health Professionals: Is the Implementation in Accordance with the Intention of the Law?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, T; van den Berg, N; Hoffmann, W

    2016-10-01

    Objective: Triggered by the AGnES model project of the University Medicine Greifswald, the Code of Social Law V was changed by the German Lower and Upper House of Parliament (Bundestag and Bundesrat) in 2008 so that the delegation of GP's activities to non-physician colleagues was allowed under highly restricted preconditions. Delegated home visits should become an integral part of the standard care in Germany. In this study, the implementation of § 87 para 2b clause 5 SGB V, established in Annex 8 of the Federal Collective Agreement, was checked for its legality in terms of qualification. Methods: The problem was checked with the legal methods of interpretation in pursuance of the norm and the methods of systematic, historic and teleologic interpretation. Results: Even though the Parliament clearly required orientation to the AGnES model project (in order to assure safety and effective care of delegated home visits), self-management in the implementation of the law remained far behind these guidelines. The main outcome of the legal analysis was that the implementation arrangements of the Code of Social Law V are predominantly illegal. Conclusions: The parties of the Federal Collective Agreement have to change the arrangements to meet the requirements of the Parliament and to avoid risks of liability for delegating GPs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Mobile phone messages to provide support to women during the home phase of medical abortion in South Africa: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, Deborah; de Tolly, Katherine; Harries, Jane; Myer, Landon

    2014-09-01

    Home use of misoprostol for medical abortion is more convenient for many women than in-clinic use but requires management of abortion symptoms at home without provider backup. This study evaluated whether automated text messages to women undergoing medical abortion can reduce anxiety and emotional discomfort, and whether the messages can better prepare women for symptoms they experience. A multisite randomized controlled trial was conducted in which women undergoing early medical abortion were allocated to receive standard of care (SOC) only (n=235) or SOC+a messaging intervention (n=234). Consenting women were interviewed at the clinic after taking mifepristone and again at their follow-up clinic visit 2-3 weeks later; the intervention group received text messages over the duration of this period. Emotional outcomes were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Adler's 12-item emotional scale and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Preparedness for the abortion symptoms and overall satisfaction with the procedure were assessed using 4-point Likert-type scales. Between baseline and follow-up, anxiety decreased more (p=0.013), and less emotional stress was experienced (adjusted for baseline anxiety, p=0.015), in the intervention compared to the SOC group. Participants in the intervention group were also more likely to report that they felt very well prepared for the bleeding (peffects (p=0.027) they experienced. Acceptability and other negative emotions relating to the abortion did not differ between study groups. Ninety-nine percent of the intervention group stated that they would recommend the messages to a friend having the same procedure. Text messages to women following mifepristone administration for early medical abortion may assist them in managing symptoms and appear highly acceptable to recipients. This randomized controlled trial provides evidence for the effectiveness of text messages following mifepristone administration in

  8. All hospice patients are not equal: development of a visit-based acuity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Joan; Byhoff, Elena; Harris, Pamela; Szolarova, Robertina; Bender, Laura; Craig, Teresa; Casarett, David

    2014-02-01

    Although hospices need to be able to anticipate patient acuity, there are currently no published models that predict the frequency of visits that a new hospice patient is likely to receive. To identify patient characteristics that are associated with the frequency of health care provider visits in the first 8 days of hospice care. An electronic health record (EHR)-based retrospective cohort study was conducted in seven hospice programs in the United States. Participants were 35,232 patients who were admitted between October 1, 2008 and May 31, 2011 and received hospice care at home on the day of enrollment. The main outcome measure was the average number of visits per day by nurses, social workers, chaplains, and home health aides in the first 8 days of home hospice care (day of admission plus up to 7 subsequent days). In a mixed effects regression model, 14 independent predictors of visit frequency were identified. For instance, several demographic characteristics were associated with more frequent visits, as were lower Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) scores (60: 1.41 visits/day, 95% CI 1.36-1.47; p<0.001), the presence of pain (pain: 1.77 visits/day; 95% CI 1.72-1.82 versus no pain: 1.44 visits/day, 95% CI .39-1.59; p<0.001). Patients admitted to home hospice from a hospital also received more frequent visits compared with other patients (hospital: 1.73 visits/day, 95% CI 1.67-1.79 versus home: 1.42 visits/day, 95% CI 1.40-1.44; p<0.001). An acuity index based on these variables could help hospices to better anticipate patient needs and staff workload, and could be used to guide strategic planning as hospices take part in accountable care organizations (ACOs).

  9. Current Practices in Home Management of Nasogastric Tube Placement in Pediatric Patients: A Survey of Parents and Homecare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northington, LaDonna; Lyman, Beth; Guenter, Peggi; Irving, Sharon Y; Duesing, Lori

    Enteral feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients to deliver nutrition, fluids or medications. The literature related to short-term feeding tube (nasogastric [NG], hereafter known as NGT, or orogastric [OGT],) use in pediatric homecare patients is sparse. This descriptive study sought to gather baseline information about these children and how their feeding tubes are managed at home. Specifically, we sought to better understand how the tubes are placed and the method(s) used for tube placement verification. Two surveys were distributed: one to parents and one to homecare providers who have direct patient contact. Responses were obtained from 144 parents and 66 homecare providers. Over half of the children were 12months of age or younger and had a 6 Fr feeding tube. Over 75% (108) had an NGT for 1year or less. Predominantly parents replaced the NGT but a few children self-inserted their tubes. Feeding tube placement was verified by auscultation (44%) or measurement of gastric pH (25%) in the parent's survey. Twenty-six percent of parents indicated they had misplaced an NGT at least once and 35 parents described symptoms of pulmonary misplacement. The homecare provider data indicated auscultation (39%) and pH measurement of gastric contents (28%) to verify NG tube placement location. Study results confirms a need for consistency of practice among health care professionals and in parent education for those children who require NGTs at home. It is troubling that auscultation is still widely used for NGT location confirmation despite practice alerts that warn against its use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterizing Primary Care Visit Activities at Veterans Health Administration Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jennifer C; Terwiesch, Christian; Pelak, Mary; Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Medical home models seek to increase efficiency and maximize the use of resources by ensuring that all care team members work at the top of their licenses. We sought to break down primary care office visits into measurable activities to better under stand how primary care providers (PCPs) currently spend visit time and to provide insight into potential opportunities for revision or redistribution of healthcare tasks. We videotaped 27 PCPs during office visits with 121 patients at four Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Based on patterns emerging from the data, we identified a taxonomy of 12 provider activity categories that enabled us to quantify the frequency and duration of activities occurring during routine primary care visits. We conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses to examine associations between visit characteristics and provider and clinic characteristics. We found that PCPs spent the greatest percentage of their visit time discussing existing conditions (20%), discussing new conditions (18%), record keeping (13%), and examining patients (13%). Providers spent the smallest percentage of time on preventive care and coordination of care. Mean visit length was 22.9 minutes (range 7.9-58.0 minutes). Site-level ratings of medical home implementation were not associated with differences in how visit time was spent. These data provide a window into how PCPs are spending face-to-face time with patients. The methodology and taxonomy presented here may prove useful for future quality improvement and research endeavors, particularly those focused on opportunities to increase nonappointment care and to ensure that team members work at the top of their skill level.

  11. Procedures to Assist Health Care Providers to Determine When Home Assessments for Potential Mold Exposure Are Warranted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Ginger L; Horner, W Elliott; Kennedy, Kevin; Grimes, Carl; Barnes, Charles S; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Miller, J David

    2016-01-01

    Drawing evidence from epidemiology and exposure assessment studies and recommendations from expert practice, we describe a process to guide health care providers helping their patients who present with symptoms that might be associated with living in damp housing. We present the procedures in the form of a guided 2-part interview. The first part has 5 questions that triage the patient toward a more detailed questionnaire that reflects features of housing conditions known to be reliably associated with exposures to mold and dampness contaminants. We chose the questions based on the conditions associated with moisture problems in homes across the United States and Canada. The goal is to facilitate the clinician's effort to help patients reduce exposure to environmental triggers that elicit symptoms to better manage their disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Spanish Visit

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 23 January, CERN welcomed a visit by Pedro Morenés Eulate, Spanish Secretary of State for Scientific and Technological Policy. He was taken on a tour of the LHC Superconducting test facility, the CMS magnet assembly hall and the civil engineering works at Point 5. After a brief presentation on the AMS (Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer) experiment, delivered by Sam Ting, and lunch hosted by Director General Robert Aymar, he continued his tour of the ATLAS assembly hall and the ISOLDE experimental hall. Pedro Morenés finished his visit by meeting with the Spanish scientific community working at CERN. From left to right: Juan-Antonio Rubio, CERN, Responsible for the Education & Communication, Technology transfer and Scientific Information groups; Gonzalo León, General Secretary of the Spanish Ministry; Joaquín Pérez-Villanueva y Tovar, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations Office; Robert Aymar, CERN Director General; Maria-José Garcia-Borge, ISOLDE and NTOF, CSIC Madrid Tea...

  13. Realist evaluation of an enhanced health visiting programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Lawrence; Jepson, Ruth; Hardie, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    The health visitors' role in many countries is changing. In Scotland, the role has undergone substantial changes through the introduction of an enhanced health visiting programme, which includes increased, structured home visits. This evaluation was conducted within NHS Ayrshire and Arran, one of the 14 Scottish Health Boards. Our aim was to understand and explain how, and why, the programme could contribute to improving health and wellbeing outcomes for children and families. We used a realist evaluation approach, conducted in three phases. In phase one, eight managerial staff involved in developing and implementing the programme provided data, which were used to develop initial programme theories. In phase two, the programme theories were tested using qualitative data from 25 health visitors and 22 parents. The programme theories were refined through analyses and interpretation of data in phase three. The home visiting context provided by the programme interacted with the mechanisms of the programme and produced outcomes such as early identification of health and wellbeing issues amongst families who needed more support, leading to referral and engagement with sources of additional help. The home visits facilitated development of parent-health visitor relationships, and parents considered health visitors as their first point of contact on children's wellbeing and developmental-related issues. Moreover, the programme provided more clarity to health visitors' role, which in turn enhanced partnership working. However, there were aspects of the programme that may require further development. For instance, both parents and health visitors were concerned about the wide gaps between some home visits. The enhanced health visiting programme increased opportunities for monitoring and early identification of health and wellbeing concerns. It created structures for a more efficient partnership working and ensured that the needs of children and families were supported. These

  14. Teaching Home-Based Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; Ornstein, Katherine A; Wajnberg, Ania; Kopke, M Victoria; DeCherrie, Linda V

    Despite the growing homebound population and the development of innovative models of care that work to bring care to people in their homes, home visits are not a routine part of education for many healthcare providers. This manuscript describes the experience of Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors teaching home-based primary care to learners of various disciplines and reports the results of a survey performed to assess trainee experience. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors is the largest academic home-based primary care program in the country and trainees of various disciplines have nearly 1,700 contact days annually of directly supervised clinical teaching. In order to improve trainee education and meet our practice needs, trainees: 1) independently conduct urgent visits, 2) carry longitudinal panels of homebound patients, and 3) perform subspecialist consultations. Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors has exposed thousands of trainees to home-based primary care in the past 20 years and trainees report positive reviews of their experiences. As the need to train future providers in home-based primary care grows, we will be challenged to provide trainees with adequate exposure to multidisciplinary teams and to teach about the importance of continuity of care.

  15. Nutrition and Physical Activity Environments of Home-Based Child Care: What Hispanic Providers Have to Say.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Alison; Mena, Noereem Z; Risica, Patricia; Gorham, Gemma; Gans, Kim M

    2015-10-01

    It is important to understand the perceptions and beliefs of family child care providers (FCCPs) regarding which factors influence children's physical activity (PA), screen-time (ST), and dietary behaviors in order to develop and implement appropriate obesity prevention interventions. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the aforementioned perceptions and beliefs of FCCPs in Rhode Island. Four focus groups (n = 30) were held with FCCPs. Providers were female, Hispanic, and Spanish speaking. Providers were asked about different aspects of feeding, PA, and ST behaviors. Themes were coded using NVivo10 (QSR International Pty Ltd, Doncaster, Victoria, Australia). Content analysis was used to analyze final themes. Providers understood the importance of providing opportunities for healthy eating and PA for the children they cared for, but there was room for improvement, especially with regard to certain feeding and ST practices. Several barriers were evident, including the lack of physical infrastructure for PA, cultural beliefs and practices related to child feeding, and difficulties working with parents to provide consistent messages across environments. Given that FCCPs are aware of the importance of healthy eating and PA, there is a need to address the specific barriers they face, and operationalize some of their knowledge into practical everyday actions. This formative work will inform the development of a culturally relevant, multicomponent intervention for ethnically diverse FCCPs to improve the food and PA environments of their homes, which should, in turn, improve the dietary, PA, and ST behaviors of the 2- to 5-year-old children they care for.

  16. 76 FR 16354 - Per Diem Payments for the Care Provided to Eligible Veterans Evacuated From a State Home as a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... veteran receiving nursing home care, domiciliary care, and adult day health care in State home facilities... governing domiciliary care. We have carefully crafted proposed Sec. 51.59 to fit within such a possible... proposed rule would apply for per diem payments for veterans receiving domiciliary care as well as nursing...

  17. Study on the factors determining home death of patients during home care: a historical cohort study at a home care support clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Seiji; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Associations between markedly low activities of daily living (ADL) at the start of home visit care and patient home death were analyzed using data from a home care support clinic in Japan that has a low rate of home deaths. The study was a historical cohort study. It involved patients who began to receive home visit care from a home visit care support clinic between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2011. Using home death as a dependent variable and presence/absence of markedly low ADL and other parameters (cancer, the patient's desire for home death, etc.) as independent variables, the adjusted hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Markedly low ADL were associated with home death even after adjustment for factors that influence home death (adjusted hazard ratio 4.40; 95% CI 2.37-8.16). Cancer and the patient's desire for home death were statistically significant factors involved in home death. In a subgroup analysis according to the presence/absence of cancer, the association between markedly low ADL and home death was stronger in the cancer-free group (adjusted hazard ratio 10.78; 95% CI 2.89-40.26) than in the cancer group (adjusted hazard ratio 5.58; 95% CI2.39-13.05). Patients' desire for home death could be fulfilled if home care support clinics provide home visit services to not only terminal-stage cancer patients, but also bedridden cancer-free patients. We must establish systems for older adults to remain at home during the terminal period of their lives. © 2012 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Visits to Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Emese C.; Kong, Kevin; Watts, Leslie A.; Schwarz, Eleanor B.; Darney, Philip D.; Thiel de Bocanegra, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2013, California passed Assembly Bill (A.B.) 2348, approving registered nurses (RNs) to dispense patient self-administered hormonal contraceptives and administer injections of hormonal contraceptives. The Family Planning, Access, Care and Treatment (Family PACT) program, which came into effect in 1997 to expand low-income, uninsured California resident access to contraceptives at no cost, is one program in which qualified RNs can dispense and administer contraceptives. Aims The aims of this study were to (a) describe utilization of RN visits within California's Family PACT program and (b) evaluate the impact of RN visits on client birth control acquisition during the first 18 months after implementation of A.B. 2348 (January 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014). Methods A descriptive observational design using administrative databases was used. Family PACT claims were retrieved for RN visits and contraception. Paid claims for contraceptive dispensing and/or administration visits by physicians, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants were compared before and after the implementation of A.B. 2348 at practice sites where RN visits were and were not utilized. Contraceptive methods and administration procedures were identified using Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System codes, National Drug Codes, and Common Procedural Terminology codes. Claims data for healthcare facilities were abstracted by site location based on a unique combination of National Provider Identifier (NPI), NPI Owner, and NPI location number. Results RN visits were found mainly in Northern California and the Central Valley (73%). Sixty-eight percent of RN visits resulted in same-day dispensing and/or administration of hormonal (and/or barrier) methods. Since benefit implementation, RN visits resulted in a 10% increase in access to birth control dispensing and/or administration visits. RN visits were also associated with future birth control acquisition and other

  19. Meeting psychosocial needs for persons with dementia in home care services - a qualitative study of different perceptions and practices among health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anette; Hauge, Solveig; Bergland, Ådel

    2017-09-11

    The majority of persons with dementia are home-dwelling. To enable these persons to stay in their own homes as long as possible, a holistic, individual and flexible care is recommended. Despite a requirement for meeting psychological, social and physical needs, home care services seem to focus on patients' physical needs. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to explore how the psychosocial needs of home-dwelling, older persons with dementia were perceived, emphasized and met by home care services. A descriptive, qualitative approach was used. Data were collected through semi-structured focus group interviews with 24 health care providers in home care services from four municipalities. Data were analysed using systematic text condensation. This study showed major differences in how health care providers perceived the psychosocial needs of older home-dwelling persons with dementia and how they perceived their responsibilities for meeting those psychosocial needs. The differences in the health care providers' perceptions seemed to significantly influence the provided care. Three co-existing logics of care were identified: the physical need-oriented logic, the renouncement logic and the integrated logic. The differences in how health care providers perceived the psychosocial needs of persons with dementia and their responsibilities for meeting those needs, influenced how the psychosocial needs were met. These differences indicates a need for a clarification of how psychosocial needs should be conceptualized and who should be responsible for meeting these needs. Further, increased competence and increased consciousness of psychosocial needs and how those needs can be met, are essential for delivering high-quality holistic care that enables persons with dementia to live in their own home for as long as possible.

  20. Assessment of status of patients receiving palliative home care and services provided in a rural area-Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakrishnan Thayyil

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The service could address most of the medical, psychosocial, and supportive needs of the patients and reduce their pain and symptoms. The interface between institutional-based care and home care needs more exploration and prospective studies.

  1. The Canadian birth place study: examining maternity care provider attitudes and interprofessional conflict around planned home birth

    OpenAIRE

    Vedam, Saraswathi; Stoll, Kathrin; Schummers, Laura; Fairbrother, Nichole; Klein, Michael C; Thordarson, Dana; Kornelsen, Jude; Dharamsi, Shafik; Rogers, Judy; Liston, Robert; Kaczorowski, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Available birth settings have diversified in Canada since the integration of regulated midwifery. Midwives are required to offer eligible women choice of birth place; and 25-30% of midwifery clients plan home births. Canadian provincial health ministries have instituted reimbursement schema and regulatory guidelines to ensure access to midwives in all settings. Evidence from well-designed Canadian cohort studies demonstrate the safety and efficacy of midwife-attended home birth. H...

  2. The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Jessica L; Nothelle, Stephanie

    2018-02-01

    The Medicare Annual Wellness Visit is an annual preventive health benefit, which was created in 2011 as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The visit provides an opportunity for clinicians to review preventive health recommendations and screen for geriatric syndromes. In this article, the authors review the requirements of the Annual Wellness Visit, discuss ways to use the Annual Wellness Visit to improve the care of geriatric patients, and provide suggestions for how to incorporate this benefit into a busy clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Communicative challenges in the home care of older persons - a qualitative exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sundler, A.J.; Eide, H.; Dulmen, S. van; Holmstrom, I.K.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore communicative challenges in encounters between nurse assistants and older persons during home care visits. BACKGROUND: The older population is increasing worldwide. Currently, there is a shift in care for older people from institutional care to home care. Providing home care in a

  4. Providing informal home care for pressure ulcer patients: how it affects carers' quality of life and burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Alexandre M; Ferreira, Pedro L; Ferré-Grau, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the quality of life of informal caregivers of patients with pressure ulcer; to assess their levels of burden; to analyse the variables influencing both their quality of life and burden. Informal caregivers of pressure ulcer patients, besides coping with the natural dependency of these patients, deal with the specificity of caring these types of wounds. This situation has an impact on not only the quality of life and burden felt by informal caregivers but also on individual and familiar dynamics. Descriptive and correlational study. This study focused on 145 informal caregivers providing home care. Measurement instruments were: SF-36v2 and the Burden Interview Scale. Descriptive analysis of the quantitative variables was carried out according to measures of central tendency, and the qualitative variables were described using absolute and relative frequencies. The relationships or associations between variables were explored through correlational analysis and, whenever the data allowed, multivariate techniques were used. Informal caregivers showed low levels of quality of life and, most of them, significant burden. Quality of life decreased with overload, with the increasing number of pressure ulcer and with less experience of informal caregivers, with lack of financial remuneration, with unemployment, with patient positioning and with the direct care of the wound. The burden increased with the number of pressure ulcer in each patient and with the lack of financial remuneration. These informal caregivers have low quality of life and are overburdened. Both situations are positively and negatively influenced by factors related to the pressure ulcer and to the patients' sociodemographic data. The results of this study allow more effective monitoring by health professionals of levels of burden and quality of life encountered in pressure ulcer informal caregivers, as well as direct interventions to inhibit the factors inducing burden and enhance those that

  5. Concepções da equipe de saúde da família sobre as visitas domiciliares Concepciones del equipo de salud de la familia sobre das visitas domiciliarias Conceptions of the family health team about home visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Namie Sakata

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Entendendo as visitas domiciliares enquanto tecnologia de interação no cuidado à saúde da família, o objetivo foi compreender as concepções da equipe de Saúde da Família sobre as visitas. Utilizou-se abordagem qualitativa e a entrevista semi-estruturada foi o instrumento de coleta de dados. Foram entrevistados dezenove profissionais de duas equipes de Saúde de Família de um município do interior paulista. Os resultados mostraram que as visitas são atividades potenciais para o cuidado à família, mais humano e acolhedor, permitindo o vínculo, laços de confiança e conhecer o usuário no seu ambiente familiar. Apreende-se que as visitas ora são compreendidas como acompanhamento da saúde, ora como fiscalização. Dificuldades existiram como pouco tempo disponível e impotência da equipe frente aos problemas.Entendiendo las visitas domiciliarias como tecnología de interacción en el cuidado a la salud de la familia, la finalidad fue comprender las concepciones del equipo de Salud de la Familia sobre las visitas. Se utilizó una aproximación cualitativa y la entrevista semiestructurada fue el instrumento de recolecta de datos. Se entrevistaron a diecinueve profesionales de dos equipos de Salud de la Familia de un municipio del interior paulista. Los resultados mostraron que las visitas son actividades potenciales para el cuidado a la familia, más humano y acogedor, permitiendo el vínculo, lazos de confianza y conocer al usuario en su ambiente familiar. Se aprehende que las visitas ora son comprendidas como acompañamiento de la salud, ora como fiscalización. Dificultades existieron, tales como poco tiempo disponible e impotencia del equipo ante los problemas.Connsidering home visits as a technology for interaction in family health care, this study aimed to understand how the Family Health team conceives these visits. A qualitative approach was used and data were collected through semistructured interviews. We interviewed

  6. Identifying Challenges Associated With the Care Transition Workflow From Hospital to Skilled Home Health Care: Perspectives of Home Health Care Agency Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasarwanji, Mahiyar; Werner, Nicole E; Carl, Kimberly; Hohl, Dawn; Leff, Bruce; Gurses, Ayse P; Arbaje, Alicia I

    2015-01-01

    Older adults discharged from the hospital to skilled home health care (SHHC) are at high risk for experiencing suboptimal transitions. Using the human factors approach of shadowing and contextual inquiry, we studied the workflow for transitioning older adults from the hospital to SHHC. We created a representative diagram of the hospital to SHHC transition workflow, we examined potential workflow variations, we categorized workflow challenges, and we identified artifacts developed to manage variations and challenges. We identified three overarching challenges to optimal care transitions-information access, coordination, and communication/teamwork. Future investigations could test whether redesigning the transition from hospital to SHHC, based on our findings, improves workflow and care quality.

  7. Assessment of status of patients receiving palliative home care and services provided in a rural area-Kerala, India

    OpenAIRE

    Jayakrishnan Thayyil; Jeeja Mathummal Cherumanalil

    2012-01-01

    Context: For the first time in India, a Pain and Palliative Care policy to guide the community-based home care initiatives was declared by the Government of Kerala state. In Kerala, majority of the panchayats (local self-governments) are now conducting home-based palliative care as part of primary health care. National focus domain areas in palliative care research are structure and process, the physical aspects, and also the social aspects of care. Aims: The study was conducted to assess the...

  8. Communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working within patients' homes: an analysis of process data from CAPABLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick D; Boyd, Cynthia; Bellantoni, Julia; Roth, Jill; Becker, Kathleen L; Savage, Jessica; Nkimbeng, Manka; Szanton, Sarah L

    2016-02-01

    To examine themes of communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working in private residences; to assess which methods of communication elicit fruitful responses to nurses' concerns. Lack of effective communication between home health care nurses and primary care providers contributes to clinical errors, inefficient care delivery and decreased patient safety. Few studies have described best practices related to frequency, methods and reasons for communication between community-based nurses and primary care providers. Secondary analysis of process data from 'Community Aging in Place: Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE)'. Independent reviewers analysed nurse documentation of communication (phone calls, letters and client coaching) initiated for 70 patients and analysed 45 letters to primary care providers to identify common concerns and recommendations raised by CAPABLE nurses. Primary care providers responded to 86% of phone calls, 56% of letters and 50% of client coaching efforts. Primary care providers addressed 86% of concerns communicated by phone, 34% of concerns communicated by letter and 41% of client-raised concerns. Nurses' letters addressed five key concerns: medication safety, pain, change in activities of daily living, fall safety and mental health. In letters, CAPABLE nurses recommended 58 interventions: medication change; referral to a specialist; patient education; and further diagnostic evaluation. Effective communication between home-based nurses and primary care providers enhances care coordination and improves outcomes for home-dwelling elders. Various methods of contact show promise for addressing specific communication needs. Nurses practicing within patients' homes can improve care coordination by using phone calls to address minor matters and written letters for detailed communication. Future research should explore implementation of Situation, Background, Assessment and Recommendation in home care to promote

  9. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, R.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-01-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted.

  10. Crystal Structure of the Homing Endonuclease I-CvuI Provides a New Template for Genome Modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Redondo, Pilar; López-Méndez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Homing endonucleases recognize and generate a DNA double-strand break, which has been used to promote gene targeting. These enzymes recognize long DNA stretches; they are highly sequence-specific enzymes and display a very low frequency of cleavage even in complete genomes. Although a large numbe...

  11. Providing High-Quality Support Services to Home-Based Child Care: A Conceptual Model and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromer, Juliet; Korfmacher, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: Home-based child care accounts for a significant proportion of nonparental child care arrangements for young children in the United States. Yet the early care and education field lacks clear models or pathways for how to improve quality in these settings. The conceptual model presented here articulates the components of…

  12. Inspection of the Armed Forces Retirement Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    medications. Records reviewed included podiatry visits. Coumadin Clinic Armed Forces Retirement Home – Washington, D.C. The anti-coagulation clinic...rehabilitation services, podiatry , clinical pharmacy, and dentistry. Pharmacy services were provided through WRNMMC. The AFRH-W providers had access only...Staff The outpatient services included primary care, optometry, Coumadin clinic, psychology, podiatry , dental care, and rehabilitation services. Many of

  13. Home-Based Child Care Provider Education and Specialized Training: Associations with Caregiving Quality and Toddler Social-Emotional and Cognitive Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaack, Diana D.; Le, Vi Nhuan; Messan Setodji, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: Although there has been considerable research on the associations between the qualifications of teachers in center-based settings and preschool-age children's developmental outcomes, very little is known about the relationships between home provider qualifications and the developmental outcomes of toddlers who attend licensed…

  14. The Impact of Home-Based Child Care Provider Unionization on the Cost, Type, and Availability of Subsidized Child Care in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindal, Todd; West, Martin R.; Willett, John B.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    In February 2005, Illinois became the first U.S. state to grant home-based child care providers (HBCPs) the right to form a labor union in order to bargain collectively with the state government. This policy inspired similar efforts across the country and represents a potentially important direction for child care policy. To date, the implications…

  15. Teaching home environmental health to resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickafoose, Joseph S; Greenberg, Stuart; Dearborn, Dorr G

    2011-01-01

    Healthy Homes programs seek to integrate the evaluation and management of a multitude of health and safety risks in households. The education of physicians in the identification, evaluation, and management of these home health and safety issues continues to be deficient. Healthy Homes programs represent a unique opportunity to educate physicians in the home environment and stimulate ongoing, specific patient-physician discussions and more general learning about home environmental health. The Case Healthy Homes and Patients Program addresses these deficiencies in physician training while providing direct services to high-risk households. Pediatric and family practice resident physicians participate in healthy home inspections and interventions for their primary care patients and follow up on identified risks during health maintenance and acute illness visits.

  16. The Development of a Home-stay Village for Providing the Environmental Conservation Tourism Services in Nongbua-Lamphu Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintana Kongpet

    2014-06-01

               In  conclusion,  the  developed  home-stay  village  for   environmental  conservation tourism services  could   develop  knowledge,  attitude,  and  behaviors  in  an  environmental conservation of  the people  with  home-stay service experiences. These  people  had  awareness  and  responsibility  in  sustainably  environmental conservation  in the  future.

  17. Back home after an acquired brain injury: building a "low-cost" team to provide theory-driven cognitive rehabilitation after routine interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierini, Davide; Hoerold, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) could benefit from further cognitive rehabilitation, after they have returned home. However, a lack of specialist services to provide such rehabilitation often prevents this. This leads to reduced reintegration of patients, increased social disadvantages and ultimately, higher economic costs. 10 months post-stroke, a 69 year-old woman was discharged from an inpatient rehabilitation program and returned home with severe cognitive impairments. We describe a pilot project which provided an individualised, low cost rehabilitation program, supervised and trained by a neuropsychologist. Progress was monitored every 3 months in order to decide on continuation of the program, based on the achieved results and predicted costs. Post intervention, despite severe initial impairment, cognitive and most notably daily functioning had improved. Although the financial investment was moderately high for the family, the intervention was still considered cost-effective when compared with the required costs of care in a local non-specialist care home. Moreover, the pilot experience was used to build a "local expert team" available for other individuals requiring rehabilitation. These results encourage the development of similar local "low cost" teams in the community, to provide scientifically-grounded cognitive rehabilitation for ABI patients returning home.

  18. Increased Classroom Consumption of Home-Provided Fruits and Vegetables for Normal and Overweight Children: Results of the Food Dudes Program in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Giovambattista; Cau, Silvia; Oppo, Annalisa; Moderato, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    To increase classroom consumption of home-provided fruits (F) and vegetables (V) in obese, overweight, and normal weight children. Consumption evaluated within and across the baseline phase and the end of the intervention and maintenance phases. Three Italian primary schools. The study involved 672 children (321 male and 329 female) aged 5-11 years. Body mass index measures were available for 461 children. Intervention schools received the Food Dudes (FD) program: 16 days of repeated taste exposure (40 g of F and 40 g of V), video modeling, and rewards-based techniques. The comparison school was only repeatedly exposed to FV. Grams of FV brought from home and eaten. Chi-square, independent t test, repeated-measures ANOVA, and generalized estimating equation model. Intervention schools show a significant increase in home-provided F (P home-provided FV intake was similar in overweight and non-overweight children in the FD intervention schools compared with the comparison school. The effect of the FD program was higher at the end of the intervention phase than the end of the maintenance phase. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of Symptoms and Care Practices on Nursing Home Residents at the End of Life: A Rating by Front-line Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Chamberlain, Stephanie A; Knopp-Sihota, Jennifer A; Poss, Jeffrey W; Thompson, Genevieve N; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2016-02-01

    Burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices are common at the end of life for nursing home residents. Appropriately managing symptoms and limiting aggressive care practices is key to high-quality end-of-life care. Little research is available, however, on the opinions of nursing home care providers about the impact of symptoms and practices for both residents and care facilities. Our objectives were to (1) identify common burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate practices at the end of life for nursing home residents, (2) develop and assess the feasibility of a procedure to have various groups of nursing home care providers rate impact of symptoms and practices, and (3) generate recommendations for action and further research, with key policy and decision makers. Proof-of-concept study. Partnered research by researchers, health professionals, and decision makers to identify and explore the impact of burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices for nursing home residents at the end of life. Thirty-six nursing homes from Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. A total of 6007 residents (prevalence rating); 4 medical directors, 5 directors of care, 4 nurse practitioners, 4 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 5 care aides (impact rating); and 13 key policy or decision makers from Alberta, British Columbia, and Manitoba (expert panel). Based on a literature search and data in the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS) 2.0, we generated lists of burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices for nursing home residents at the end of life. We rated prevalence of those symptoms and practices in the last quarter before death as high, medium, or low. Care providers rated the burden of symptoms and inappropriateness of practices as high, medium, or low. Directors of care rated the unnecessary cost of those symptoms and practices to a nursing home as high, medium, or low. We ranked

  20. Palliative care team visits. Qualitative study through participant observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Pernias, Maria José; Hueso Montoro, César; Guardia Mancilla, Plácido; Montoya Juárez, Rafael; García Caro, Maria Paz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical encounters that occur when a palliative care team provides patient care and the features that influence these encounters and indicate whether they are favorable or unfavorable depending on the expectations and feelings of the various participants. Methods: A qualitative case study conducted via participant observation. A total of 12 observations of the meetings of palliative care teams with patients and families in different settings (home, hospital and consultation room) were performed. The visits were follow-up or first visits, either scheduled or on demand. Content analysis of the observation was performed. Results: The analysis showed the normal follow-up activity of the palliative care unit that was focused on controlling symptoms, sharing information and providing advice on therapeutic regimens and care. The environment appeared to condition the patients' expressions and the type of patient relationship. Favorable clinical encounter conditions included kindness and gratitude. Unfavorable conditions were deterioration caused by approaching death, unrealistic family objectives and limited resources. Conclusion: Home visits from basic palliative care teams play an important role in patient and family well-being. The visits seem to focus on controlling symptoms and are conditioned by available resources. PMID:27226663

  1. Prototype house provides test case for energy-efficient systems: Mitchell Homes, Pensacola, Florida; Building America Project summary fact sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, B.

    2000-01-10

    The Carbelle prototype house is a new design produced under the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program. Working with other members of the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Mitchell Homes developed the Carbelle as an energy-efficient upgrade to one of their standard models. By treating all design aspects of the house as a system and involving all stakeholders in the process, Mitchell expects to decrease on-site energy use for space heating and cooling by as much as 40% compared to their typical construction.

  2. Office Home Care Workers' Occupational Health: Associations with Workplace Flexibility and Worker Insecurity

    OpenAIRE

    Zeytinoglu, Isik U.; Denton, Margaret; Davies, Sharon; Plenderleith, Jennifer Millen

    2009-01-01

    Office home care workers provide support to visiting staff, although their work tends to be invisible in many respects. This paper focuses on managers, supervisors, coor dinators, case managers and office administrative staff in home care. We examine the effects of workplace flexibility and worker insecurity on office home care workers' occupational health, particularly their self-reported stress and musculoskeletal disorders. Data come from our survey of 300 home care office staff in a mid-s...

  3. EuroEco (European Health Economic Trial on Home Monitoring in ICD Patients): a provider perspective in five European countries on costs and net financial impact of follow-up with or without remote monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Hindricks, Gerd; Broadhurst, Paul; Van Erven, Lieselot; Fernandez-Lozano, Ignacio; Rivero-Ayerza, Maximo; Malinowski, Klaus; Marek, Andrea; Romero Garrido, Rafael F; Löscher, Steffen; Beeton, Ian; Garcia, Enrique; Cross, Stephen; Vijgen, Johan; Koivisto, Ulla-Maija; Peinado, Rafael; Smala, Antje; Annemans, Lieven

    2015-01-14

    Remote follow-up (FU) of implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) allows for fewer in-office visits in combination with earlier detection of relevant findings. Its implementation requires investment and reorganization of care. Providers (physicians or hospitals) are unsure about the financial impact. The primary end-point of this randomized prospective multicentre health economic trial was the total FU-related cost for providers, comparing Home Monitoring facilitated FU (HM ON) to regular in-office FU (HM OFF) during the first 2 years after ICD implantation. Also the net financial impact on providers (taking national reimbursement into account) and costs from a healthcare payer perspective were evaluated. A total of 312 patients with VVI- or DDD-ICD implants from 17 centres in six EU countries were randomised to HM ON or OFF, of which 303 were eligible for data analysis. For all contacts (in-office, calendar- or alert-triggered web-based review, discussions, calls) time-expenditure was tracked. Country-specific cost parameters were used to convert resource use into monetary values. Remote FU equipment itself was not included in the cost calculations. Given only two patients from Finland (one in each group) a monetary valuation analysis was not performed for Finland. Average age was 62.4 ± 13.1 years, 81% were male, 39% received a DDD system, and 51% had a prophylactic ICD. Resource use with HM ON was clearly different: less FU visits (3.79 ± 1.67 vs. 5.53 ± 2.32; P financial impact on providers [profit of €408 (327-489) vs. €400 (345-455); range for difference (€-104 to 88), NS], but there was heterogeneity among countries, with less profit for providers in the absence of specific remote FU reimbursement (Belgium, Spain, and the Netherlands) and maintained or increased profit in cases where such reimbursement exists (Germany and UK). Quality of life (SF-36) was not different. For all the patients as a whole, FU-related costs for providers are not

  4. Incentivizing primary care providers to innovate: building medical homes in the post-Katrina New Orleans safety net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Diane R; Schmidt, Laura A; Wu, Kevin J; Wiley, James

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate safety-net clinics' responses to a novel community-wide Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) financial incentive program in post-Katrina New Orleans. Between June 2008 and June 2010, we studied 50 primary care clinics in New Orleans receiving federal funds to expand services and improve care delivery. Multiwave, longitudinal, observational study of a local safety-net primary care system. Clinic-level data from a semiannual survey of clinic leaders (89.3 percent response rate), augmented by administrative records. Overall, 62 percent of the clinics responded to financial incentives by achieving PCMH recognition from the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA). Higher patient volume, higher baseline PCMH scores, and type of ownership were significant predictors of achieving NCQA recognition. The steepest increase in adoption of PCMH processes occurred among clinics achieving the highest, Level 3, NCQA recognition. Following NCQA recognition, 88.9 percent stabilized or increased their use of PCMH processes, although several specific PCMH processes had very low rates of adoption overall. Findings demonstrate that widespread PCMH implementation is possible in a safety-net environment when external financial incentives are aligned with the goal of practice innovation. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  5. Emergency department visits for pediatric trampoline-related injuries: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linakis, James G; Mello, Michael J; Machan, Jason; Amanullah, Siraj; Palmisciano, Lynne M

    2007-06-01

    To describe the epidemiology of emergency department (ED) visits for trampoline-related injuries among U.S. children from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2005, using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) and to compare recent trampoline injury demographics and injury characteristics with those previously published for 1990-1995 using the same data source. A stratified probability sample of U.S. hospitals providing emergency services in NEISS was utilized for 2000-2005. Nonfatal trampoline-related injury visits to the ED were analyzed for patients from 0 to 18 years of age. In 2000-2005, there was a mean of 88,563 ED visits per year for trampoline-related injuries among 0-18-year-olds, 95% of which occurred at home. This represents a significantly increased number of visits compared with 1990-1995, when there was an average of 41,600 visits per year. Primary diagnosis and principal body part affected remained similar between the two study periods. ED visits for trampoline-related injuries in 2000-2005 increased in frequency by 113% over the number of visits for 1990-1995. Trampoline use at home continues to be a significant source of childhood injury morbidity.

  6. Spaceflight participant visits CERN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kathryn Coldham

    2016-01-01

    On 15 July, CERN welcomed spaceflight participant Anousheh Ansari.   Anousheh Ansari’s grin stretches from ear to ear, during an intriguing conversation with Nobel laureate Samuel C.C. Ting at AMS POCC. (Image: Maximilien Brice/CERN) Iranian-American Anousheh Ansari was the first-ever female spaceflight participant, spending eight days on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2006. She now has a new addition to her list of extraordinary sights ­– the home of the world’s largest particle accelerator: CERN.   On 15 July, Anousheh Ansari came to CERN and, unsurprisingly, visited the control room of the experiment attached to the ISS: the AMS. At the AMS Payload Operations Control Centre (AMS POCC) on CERN’s Prévessin site, she met the Nobel laureate Samuel Ting, spokesperson of the AMS experiment. Ansari and her accompanying guests were thrilled to expand their knowledge about CERN, its research and its...

  7. Influenza vaccination and decisional conflict among regulated and unregulated direct nursing care providers in long-term-care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shannon M; Pierrynowski-Gallant, Donna; Chambers, Larry; O'Connor, Annette; Bowman, Sherry; McNeil, Shelly; Strang, Robert; Knoefel, Frank

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether direct nursing care providers have decisional conflict about receiving influenza vaccinations and characteristics associated with decisional conflict. The researchers used a self-administered questionnaire mailed to direct nursing care providers in two long-term-care organizations. Most direct nursing care providers in both organizations (80% and 93%, respectively) intended to get the influenza vaccine. Unregulated direct nursing care providers had more decisional conflict than regulated providers, especially related to feeling uninformed about the pros and cons of influenza vaccination. Unclear valuing of the pros and cons of influenza vaccination was related to the age of the direct care providers in both organizations. Decisional conflict and influenza vaccination practices may be determined, in part, by age and by the culture of a health care organization. A decision aid to improve knowledge and clarify values may improve decision quality and increase influenza vaccination rates.

  8. The Effect of Cognitive Appraisal on Quality of Life of Providers of Home Care for Patients With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Hsiang-Chu; Tsai, Yi-Chen

    2016-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of long-term disability. Most stroke survivors return to their own home and need to be cared for by family members, most of whom are informal caregivers. The aim of this study was to identify whether cognitive appraisal influences health-related quality of life. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational design was used. Participants included 77 primary support persons, mean age = 59.47 years, who were younger than stroke survivors (mean age = 78.13 years). Data were collected between March-November 2012 and obtained through face-to-face interviews, using the Short-Form-36 Health Survey, Caregiver Burden Inventory, and five cognitive appraisal questions. In addition, the Barthel Index, Modified Rankin Scale, and Glasgow Coma Scale were used to assess patient disease severity. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to identify predictors of health-related quality of life. The results indicated that 61% of participants rated their health as poor or fair. Patient severity, gender of primary support person, age, employment, burden, and cognitive appraisal impact accounted for 45.8% of the variance in primary support persons' physical component summary of health-related quality of life, with age, burden, and appraisal impact being the strongest of six predictors. In addition, burden and appraisal impact were the strongest of six predictors, explaining 18.1% of the variance in primary support persons' mental component summary of health-related quality of life. The results of the current study further highlight the importance of cognitive appraisal on the stroke survivor's primary support person's health-related quality of life.

  9. Role of informal care providers in home based long term care in diabetes mellitus at Kaiwara Primary Health Center area, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjunan Isaac

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find the prevalence of diabetics, identify informal care providers for them in Kaiwara Primary Health Center (PHC area, assess the level of knowledge and skills of an informal care provider in home based long term care and improve the level of knowledge and skill of the informal care provider through a structured training capsule. Methods: A cross sectional and an interventional study was conducted on diabetics and their informal care providers in Kaiwara PHC area. Data were collected using pre-tested, structured questionnaire by an interview method. A structured training capsule was developed and implemented. Evaluation of the knowledge and skills was assessed at the beginning and at the end of the training. Student ’s paired/unpaired ‘t ’ tests and correlation analysis were done. Results: Improvement scores were calculated by subtracting the pre-evaluation scores from the post-evaluation scores. The mean improvement scores was (2.66暲0.32 and was statistically significant (P<0.001. No significant difference in mean values was found in the knowledge and skills scores in relation to the socio-demographic variables in the study. Conclusions: Knowledge and skills component of the informal care provider in home based care of diabetes could be perceived as a “felt need ”.

  10. Visits to Cultural Learning Places in the Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudiappa, Michael; Kluczniok, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Studies show the important role of the home learning environment in early childhood for later school success. This article focuses on a particular aspect of the home learning environment: visits to cultural learning places (e.g. museums) as a component of the quality of the home learning environment. Therefore the educational concept of…

  11. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  12. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  13. Examining Variation in Hospice Visits by Professional Staff in the Last 2 Days of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Plotzke, Mike; Christian, Thomas; Gozalo, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In the final days of life, symptoms are exacerbated and often families need both education and emotional support from hospice professional staff. The Medicare Hospice Benefit provides a per-diem payment with no requirements on the frequency of patient visits. To examine individual characteristics, hospice program, and geographic variation in hospice visits by professional staff during the last 2 days of life. This retrospective cohort study of 661 557 Medicare hospice beneficiaries included all patients who died in federal fiscal year 2014 (October 1, 2013-September 30, 2014) in hospice services while receiving routine home care in the last 2 days of life. Data analysis was conducted from March 9 to August 25, 2015. Medicare regulations require that hospice care centers report daily the frequency and duration of patient visits by professional staff, as well as the type of hospice staff who conduct these visits. We examined visit variation by hospice professional staff (physician, nursing staff, and social worker) during the last 2 days of life using a multivariable logistic model adjusting for decedent and hospice program characteristics. Of the 661 557 patients in the study, 81 478 (12.3%) received no professional staff visits in the last 2 days of life. State variation ranged from 590 of 15 399 patients (3.8%) in Wisconsin to 97 of 492 patients (19.7%) in Alaska, and hospice program interquartile variation ranged from 3.2% (25th percentile) to 19.5% (75th percentile). Black patients were less likely to have any visits than were white patients (7352 of 48 221 [15.2%] vs 70 365 of 585 377 [12.0%]; adjusted odds ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.24-1.37). Those dying in a nursing home were 1.74 times less likely to have any visits than those dying at home (30 880 of 186 649 [16.5%] vs 40 973 of 386 654 [10.6%]; 95% CI, 1.62-1.88). Those dying on a Sunday were 3.35 times less likely to have a visit compared with persons dying on a Tuesday (19 519 of 95 979 [20.3%] vs 6784 of 92

  14. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part I. Understanding and practicing energy conservation in buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parady, W. Harold; Turner, J. Howard

    1980-06-01

    This is a training program to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic guide, which contains three parts. Part I considers the following: understanding the importance of energy; developing a concern for conserving energy; understanding the use of energy in buildings; care and maintenance of energy-efficient buildings; and developing energy-saving habits. A bibliography is presented.

  15. Barriers and facilitators in providing oral health care to nursing home residents, from the perspective of care aides-a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Hu, Huimin; Xiong, Tianyuan; Kent, Angelle; Kobagi, Nadia; Yoon, Minn N

    2016-04-07

    Unregulated care aides provide up to 80 % of direct resident care in nursing homes. They have little formal training, manage high workloads, frequently experience responsive behaviours from residents, and are at high risk for burnout. This affects quality of resident care, including quality of oral health care. Poor quality of oral health care in nursing homes has severe consequences for residents and the health care system. Improving quality of oral health care requires tailoring interventions to identified barriers and facilitators if these interventions are to be effective. Identifying barriers and facilitators from the care aide's perspective is crucial. We will systematically search the databases MEDLINE, Embase, Evidence Based Reviews-Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, and Web of Science. We will include qualitative and quantitative research studies and systematic reviews published in English that assess barriers and facilitators, as perceived by care aides, to providing oral health care to nursing home residents. Two reviewers will independently screen studies for eligibility. We will also search by hand the contents of key journals, publications of key authors, and reference lists of all the studies included. Two reviewers will independently assess the methodological quality of the studies included using four validated checklists appropriate for different research designs. Discrepancies at any stage of review will be resolved by consensus. We will conduct a thematic analysis of barriers and facilitators using all studies included. If quantitative studies are sufficiently homogeneous, we will conduct random-effects meta-analyses of the associations of barriers and facilitators with each other, with care aide practices in resident oral health care, and with residents' oral health. If quantitative study results cannot be pooled, we will present a narrative synthesis of the results. Finally, we will compare quantitative findings to

  16. An interprofessional team approach to fall prevention for older home care clients ‘at risk’ of falling: health care providers share their experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Baxter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Providing care for older home care clients ‘at risk’ of falling requires the services of many health care providers due to predisposing chronic, complex conditions. One strategy to ensure that quality care is delivered is described in the integrated care literature; interprofessional collaboration. Engaging in an interprofessional team approach to fall prevention for this group of clients seems to make sense. However, whether or not this approach is feasible and realistic is not well described in the literature. As well, little is known about how teams function in the community when an interprofessional approach is engaged in. The barriers and facilitators of such an approach are also not known. Purpose: The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of five different health care professionals as they participated in an interprofessional team approach to care for the frail older adult living at home and at risk of falling. Methodology: This study took place in Hamilton, ON, Canada and was part of a randomized controlled trial, the aim of which was to determine the effects and costs of a multifactorial and interdisciplinary team approach to fall prevention for older home care clients ‘at risk’ of falling. The current study utilized an exploratory descriptive design to answer the following research questions: how do interprofessional teams describe their experiences when involved in a research intervention requiring collaboration for a 9-month period of time? What are the barriers and facilitators to teamwork? Four focus groups were conducted with the care-provider teams (n=9 6 and 9 months following group formation. Results: This study revealed several themes which included, team capacity, practitioner competencies, perceived outcomes, support and time. Overall, care providers were positive about their experiences and felt that through an interprofessional approach benefits could be experienced by both

  17. Serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 polymorphism and susceptibility to a home-visiting maternal-infant attachment intervention delivered by community health workers in South Africa: Reanalysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barak Morgan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Clear recognition of the damaging effects of poverty on early childhood development has fueled an interest in interventions aimed at mitigating these harmful consequences. Psychosocial interventions aimed at alleviating the negative impacts of poverty on children are frequently shown to be of benefit, but effect sizes are typically small to moderate. However, averaging outcomes over an entire sample, as is typically done, could underestimate efficacy because weaker effects on less susceptible individuals would dilute estimation of effects on those more disposed to respond. This study investigates whether a genetic polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene moderates susceptibility to a psychosocial intervention.We reanalyzed data from a randomized controlled trial of a home-visiting program delivered by community health workers in a black, isiXhosa-speaking population in Khayelitsha, South Africa. The intervention, designed to enhance maternal-infant attachment, began in the third trimester and continued until 6 mo postpartum. Implemented between April 1999 and February 2003, the intervention comprised 16 home visits delivered to 220 mother-infant dyads by specially trained community health workers. A control group of 229 mother-infant dyads did not receive the intervention. Security of maternal-infant attachment was the main outcome measured at infant age 18 mo. Compared to controls, infants in the intervention group were significantly more likely to be securely attached to their primary caregiver (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, p = 0.029, 95% CI [1.06, 2.76], d = 0.29. After the trial, 162 intervention and 172 control group children were reenrolled in a follow-up study at 13 y of age (December 2012-June 2014. At this time, DNA collected from 279 children (134 intervention and 145 control was genotyped for a common serotonin transporter polymorphism. There were both genetic data and attachment security data for 220 children (110 intervention and

  18. Hospice Visit Patterns in the Last Seven Days of Life and the Service Intensity Add-On Payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalo, Pedro L; Teno, Joan M; Spence, Carol

    2017-12-01

    Hospice in-person visits in the last week of life are critical to ensure quality of care. In 2016, The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) introduced a Service Intensity Add-on (SIA) payment for in-person routine home care (RHC) visits by a registered nurse or social worker in the last 7 days of life. The aim of the study was to examine visit patterns in the last week of life and provide SIA payment impact estimates. Hospice data from 42 volunteer hospice programs for the 6-year period of 2005-2010 were examined. The data included information on the type and duration of visits/other care, the staff discipline, and patient demographics, diagnoses, date of death, and care setting (home, assisted living, nursing home). In their last week of life, 251,407 decedents received 2,818,695 visits during 1,352,638 RHC days. Forty-four percent of the decedents had at least one SIA-eligible visit (in-person direct care visit by a registered nurse (RN) or social worker (SW)); 6.6% had only phone contact, and 30.4% had no hospice contact. Rates of RHC days with SIA-eligible days varied considerably across hospices (31% to 60.9%). For the 86.3% decedents with any SIA-eligible visits, average SIA payment would have been $202.5 (Median = $177.2, inter quartile range [IQR] = $108.3-$275.6), which represents a 21.6% increase over the average regular RHC payments received during the last week of life. The relative size of the new SIA payment introduced by CMS has the potential to increase RN/SW visits and reduce disparities in visit patterns in the last week of life.

  19. Patient- and Community-Level Sociodemographic Characteristics Associated with Emergency Department Visits for Childhood Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Michelle L; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Cook, Lawrence J; Funai, Tomohiko; Goldstick, Jason; Stanley, Rachel M; Chamberlain, James M; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Lipton, Robert; Alpern, Elizabeth R

    2015-09-01

    To examine pediatric emergency department (ED) visits over 5 years, trends in injury severity, and associations between injury-related ED visit outcome and patient and community-level sociodemographic characteristics. Retrospective analysis of administrative data provided to the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Core Data Project, 2004-2008. Home addresses were geocoded to determine census block group and associated sociodemographic characteristics. Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale severity and Severity Classification System scores were calculated. Generalized estimating equations were used to test for associations between sociodemographic characteristics and admission or transfer among injury-related ED visits. Overall ED visits and injury-related visits increased from 2004 to 2008 at study sites. Of 2,833676 successfully geocoded visits, 700,821 (24.7%) were injury-related. The proportion of higher severity injury-related visits remained consistent. Nearly 10% of injury-related visits resulted in admission or transfer each year. After adjusting for age, sex, payer, and injury severity, odds of admission or transfer were lower among minority children and children from areas with moderate and high prevalence of poverty. Pediatric injury-related ED visits to included sites increased over the study period while injury severity, anticipated resource utilization, and visit outcomes remained stable, with low rates of admission or transfer. Sociodemographic differences in injury-related visits and ED disposition were apparent. ED-based injury surveillance is essential to understand disparities, inform targets for prevention programs, and reduce the overall burden of childhood injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. National integration of mental health providers in VA home-based primary care: an innovative model for mental health care delivery with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E; Karel, Michele J

    2014-10-01

    To promote mental health (MH) service access and quality for veterans with complex and chronic medical, social, and behavioral conditions, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has integrated a full-time MH provider into each VA home-based primary care (HBPC) team. The goal of the current evaluation is to examine the nature and extent to which MH care processes and practices have been integrated into HBPC nationally. Separate surveys assessing the integration of a wide range of MH care practices and HBPC team processes were sent to MH providers and program directors in each HBPC program in 2010. A total of 132 MH providers representing 119 HBPC programs, and 112 program directors completed the surveys. The most common clinical issues addressed by MH providers were depression, coping with illness and disability, anxiety, caregiver/family stress, and cognitive evaluation. Other team members typically conducted initial MH screenings, with MH providers' time focusing on cases with identified needs. Approximately 40% of MH providers' time was devoted to direct clinical care. Significant time was also spent on team activities, driving, and charting. Integration of MH services into HBPC is feasible and facilitates service access for a vulnerable population. Mental health care delivery in HPBC generally involves a high degree of interdisciplinary practice. Mental health integration into HBPC may serve as a model for other systems interested in promoting MH care delivery among homebound and other older individuals. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2013.

  1. Too Soon to Fly the Coop? Online Journaling to Support Students' Learning during Their Erasmus Study Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaudan, Odette

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate students whose programme includes a full academic year on an Erasmus study visit require a range of support before, during and after their year abroad. This study focuses on the support provided by the home academic coordinator during the students' period of study abroad. The research is based on a case-study which explores how the…

  2. Measuring recreational visitation at U.S. National Parks with crowd-sourced photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Carrie; Wood, Spencer A; Rabotyagov, Sergey; Fisher, David M

    2016-12-01

    Land managers rely on visitation data to inform policy and management decisions. However, visitation data is often costly and burdensome to obtain, and provides a limited depth of information. In this paper, we assess the validity of using crowd-sourced, online photographs to infer information about the habits and preferences of recreational visitors by comparing empirical data from the National Park Service to photograph data from the online platform Flickr for 38 National Parks in the western United States. Using multiple regression analysis, we find that the number of photos posted monthly in a park can reliably indicate the number of visitors to a park in a given month. Through additional statistical testing we also find that the home locations of photo-takers, provided voluntarily on an online profile, accurately show the home origins of park visitors. Together, these findings validate a new method for measuring recreational visitation, opening an opportunity for land managers worldwide to track and understand visitation by augmenting current data collection methods with crowd-sourced, online data that is easy and inexpensive to obtain. In addition, it enables future research on how visitation rates change with changes in access, management or infrastructure, weather events, or ecosystem health, and facilitates valuation research, such as travel cost studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Berliner Philarmoniker ATLAS visit

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Berliner Philarmoniker in on tour through Europe. They stopped on June 27th in Geneva, for a concert at the Victoria Hall. An ATLAS visit was organised the morning after, lead by the ATLAS spokesperson Karl Jakobs (welcome and overview talk) and two ATLAS guides (AVC visit and 3D movie).

  4. Exercise at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  5. HOME Grantee Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) is authorized under Title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act. HOME provides formula grants to...

  6. The Impact of Hospital Visiting Hour Policies on Pediatric and Adult Patients and their Visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lisa; Medves, Jennifer; Harrison, Margaret B; Tranmer, Joan; Waytuck, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Policies concerning restricted or open visiting hours are being challenged in health care institutions internationally, with no apparent consensus on the appropriateness of the visiting hour policies for pediatric and adult patients. The rules that govern practice are often based on the institutional precedent and assumptions of staff, and may have little or no evidence to support them. Policy and practice related to visiting hours is of pressing concern in Canada, and in Ontario specifically, following the reaction to the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak in 2003 and subsequent changes in visiting policies in most health care settings. A systematic investigation of the impact of hospital visiting hours on visitors (including patients, families, and significant others) would inform decision-makers who are responsible for hospital policies about the best available evidence. The objective of this review was to appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the impact of hospital visiting hours on patients and their visitors. Types of participants This review considered studies that included both pediatric and adult hospital patients and their visitors. Participants were either patients, visitors, or health care providers in the following hospital settings: medical/surgical units, critical care (ICU, CCU, NICU), pediatrics, maternity, or general hospital wards.Articles were excluded if participants came from the following settings: post-operative and post-anaesthesia care units (PACU), dementia wards, long-term care settings or retirement homes, or delivery rooms. PACUs were excluded because there are aspects of the presence of visitors to these units that are very specific, and differ from the general visits to patients who are not in the immediate post-operative stage. Dementia wards, long-term care settings and retirement homes were excluded because these were considered to be their "home", so visiting would be quite different from that on

  7. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... homes have nursing aides and skilled nurses on hand 24 hours a day. Some nursing homes are set up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. There might be a nurses' station on each ...

  8. Do nursing homes for older people have the support they need to provide end-of-life care? A mixed methods enquiry in England

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Jane E; Kumar, Arun; Froggatt, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Nursing homes are a common site of death, but older residents receive variable quality of end-of-life care. We used a mixed methods design to identify external influences on the quality of end-of-life care in nursing homes. Two qualitative case studies were conducted and a postal survey of 180 nursing homes surrounding the case study sites. In the case studies, qualitative interviews were held with seven members of nursing home staff and 10 external staff. Problems in accessing support for en...

  9. Paediatric palliative care at home: a single centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Lee Ai; Khalid, Farah

    2016-02-01

    There is increased awareness of paediatric palliative care in Malaysia, but no local published data on home care services. We aimed to describe the paediatric experience at Hospis Malaysia, a community-based palliative care provider in Malaysia. We conducted a retrospective case note review of patients aged up to 21 years who were referred to Hospis Malaysia from 2009 to 2013. A total of 137 patients (92 male, 45 female) with a median age of 140 (3-250) months were included in this study. The majority (71.5%) had malignancies. At referral, 62 patients were still in hospital and 17 died prior to discharge. A total of 108 patients received home visits. At the first home visit, 89.8% of patients had at least one physical symptom. Pain was the most common (52.5%) symptom. Patients had various supportive devices: 39 were on feeding tubes, ten had tracheostomies, five were on bilevel positive airway pressure and ten had urinary catheters. 66 families discussed the preferred location of care at end-of-life. Among those who died, 78.9% died at home, as they preferred (p home death and age, diagnosis and number of home visits. Bereavement follow-up occurred for 93.3% of families. Community care referrals tend to occur late, with 25.5% of patients dying within two weeks of referral. At referral, patients often had untreated physical symptoms. The majority of families preferred and had a home death. Copyright © Singapore Medical Association.

  10. "I Can't Do This Alone": a study on foreign domestic workers providing long-term care for frail seniors at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Wai Jia; Koh, Gerald Choon-Huat; Legido-Quigley, Helena; Ha, Ngoc Huong Lien; Yap, Philip Lin Kiat

    2017-11-20

    Foreign domestic workers (FDWs) play an important role in long-term caregiving of seniors at home. However, how FDWs cope with the caregiving demands, the dynamic interaction between familial and FDW caregivers and its impact on care recipients remain largely un-explored. Existing caregiver interventions mainly target familial caregivers; little assistance is available for FDW caregivers. This study explores FDWs' challenges, coping strategies, and the support they need in caring for seniors. FDWs were recruited from a geriatric ward and outpatient clinic of a tertiary hospital in Singapore. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 FDWs caring for frail seniors and five healthcare staff. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. FDWs were from Indonesia, Philippines, and Myanmar. Nineteen cared for seniors with dementia (SWDs). We derived six subthemes, clustered into three salient themes: two described social support to FDWs by the senior's family members, two described their coping strategies, and two described their job satisfaction. Those who cared for SWDs faced more difficulties. We derived two family models of care: FDW-centered family dynamics, where family members rely on FDWs to perform most duties, causing poor impact on seniors' well-being and team-based family dynamics, where family members and FDWs share the caregiving burden, resulting in better impact on seniors' well-being. FDWs face significant challenges in eldercare. Improving FDWs' access to training courses in eldercare, providing them with more emotional support, engaging employers to create healthy caregiving spaces at home, and improving access to senior care services can be helpful.

  11. Summary of: A study of factors that influence the number of visits following traumatic dental injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melvyn

    2013-06-01

    To investigate in children the factors that influence the number of visits per tooth following traumatic dental injuries (TDI) to the permanent dentition. A retrospective convenient sample of 100 children who had been treated for TDI at Leeds Dental Institute was identified. A multilevel negative binomial regression model was developed to identify factors influencing the number of visits per tooth. Data including age, gender, postcode, number of visits, treatment provided, number of teeth injured, type of periodontal and hard tissue diagnoses, healing modality, root maturity, pulp and tooth survival, and any history of previous or subsequent trauma to same tooth were analysed using SPSS 18.0 and MLWIN. 186 teeth were affected by trauma in 100 patients. Median total number of visits per tooth was six visits with a range of 1-22 visits. The factors that were found to influence number of visits included: distance travelled, hard tissue diagnosis, periodontal injury diagnosis and pulp survival (P tissue injury was associated with 44% increase (0.362; SE 0.105) compared to no hard tissue injury, a diagnosis of a complicated periodontal injury compared to no periodontal injury was associated with a 30% increase (0.260; SE 0.124), a diagnosis of a uncomplicated periodontal injury compared to no periodontal injury was associated with a 31% increase (0.271; SE 0.124) and a diagnosis and treatment for a non-vital tooth in comparison to a vital tooth led to a 26% increase (0.230; SE 0.080) in the number of visits. There was a significant variation in the number of treatment visits at patient level (0.260; SE 0.048). CONCLUSION Complicated hard tissue injuries, complicated and uncomplicated periodontal injuries, diagnosis and treatment for pulp necrosis and the distance between clinic and patient's home all significantly influenced the number of visits needed to treat TDI.