WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing health care

  1. Types of health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Types of health care providers URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001933.htm Types of health care providers To ...

  2. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  3. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  4. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health care workers are exposed to many job hazards. These can include Infections Needle injuries Back injuries ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ...

  5. Seeing Your Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reduce Font Size 100% Increase Font Size Positive Spin Basics Federal Response Digital Tools Events Blog Home ... that may assist you. Be on time. Most healthcare providers have full appointment schedules—if you are ...

  6. [Collaboration patients-health care providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezet-Bento de Carvalho, Angela; Griesser, Anne-Claude; Hertz, Silvana; Constantin, Michèle; Forni, Michel; Blagojevic, Stina; Bouchardy, Christine; Vlastos, Georges

    2007-10-24

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Daily suffering of patients and their relatives is often ignored or underestimated. Scientific advances focus on medical treatments and survival and very little on the psychosocial impact of the disease. The shared expertise between breast cancer patients and health care providers is an innovative and promising approach aiming to provide better quality of life and care. The participation of patients permits to bring together professionals around common goals and to promote multidisciplinary disease management, networking and global care. Focusing on very concrete problems highlighted from patients' expertise also improves research, medical training, and health policy standards.

  7. [Violent acts against health care providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinyi, Tamás; Németh, Anikó

    2016-07-01

    Violence against health care providers is getting more awareness nowadays. These are usually deliberate actions committed by patients or family members of them resulting in short and long term physical or psychological debilitating harm in the staff members. The causes of the violent acts are usually rooted in patient-related factors, although some characteristics of the professionals and of the workplace may also play some role. The present article presents different definitions of violence and possible reasons for violence against health care providers based on relevant international and national literature. The paper discusses the different forms and frequency of violence, furthermore, details about the effects, consequences and some options for prevention in health care settings are also included. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1105-1109.

  8. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  9. Providing occupational health care in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M

    In all areas of nursing, the concept of caring encompasses the core of our practice and is the outcome of skilled practitioners. In occupational health nursing (OHN) it is no different. 'Caring' has been described by many authors, used in theoretical models of nursing and forms the basis of much research. This paper looks at the provision of care in the OH setting within Northern Ireland, with particular reference to problems which have arisen from the troubles.

  10. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  11. Should Health Care Providers be Accountable for Patients’ Care Experiences?

    OpenAIRE

    Anhang Price, Rebecca; Elliott, Marc N.; Cleary, Paul D.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hays, Ron D.

    2014-01-01

    Measures of patients’ care experiences are increasingly used as quality measures in accountability initiatives. As the prominence and financial impact of patient experience measures have increased, so too have concerns about the relevance and fairness of including them as indicators of health care quality. Using evidence from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) surveys, the most widely used patient experience measures in the United States, we address seven com...

  12. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Fragile X Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose Fragile X syndrome? Health care providers often use a blood sample ... information helps families and providers to prepare for Fragile X syndrome and to intervene as early as possible. Possible ...

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers use a combination of physical symptoms and the results of a genetic blood ...

  14. Impact of Health Care Provider's Training on Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Comprehensive patient's health care provider's (HCP) communication usually increases patients' participation in their health management on childbirth. Objective: This is a quasi interventional study for assessing impact of health care providers (HCP) training on patient- provider's communication during ...

  15. Cost analysis of consolidated federally provided health care

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, Joshua R.; Munoz Aguirre, Carlos R.

    2017-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This study explores specialization of health care as a solution to increase efficiency to the Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs health care. Health care for veterans and eligible beneficiaries continues to pose a significant budgetary constraint to the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs. Without modification to the current services provided at the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, health care service will e...

  16. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided.

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vaginitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Topics Bacterial Vaginosis Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Women's Health NICHD News and Spotlights Getting to Know the New NICHD Director Dr. Lisa Halvorson New Chief of Gynecologic Health and Disease Branch Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, ...

  18. Knowledge and Practices of PMTCT among Health Care Providers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequate knowledge by health care providers of antiretroviral use and other PMTCT strategies will be required to ensure control of vertical transmission of the virus. Objective: To assess the knowledge and practice of PMTCT among health care providers in private health facilities in Ilorin, Nigeria. Method: This is a review of ...

  19. Medical Services: Nonphysician Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-07

    medical supervisors will be dictated by the specialty of the patient population involved (for example, chief, pediatric service for well child physical...of osteopathy ). (2) PAs may write routine orders on inpatients, using DA Form 4256 (Doctor’s Orders). (3) When required, inpatient treatment...which FAP clients may be located. (2) FAP personnel are the primary source of care for clients involved in alleged/substantiated child /spouse abuse

  20. Social media usage among health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Surani, Zoya; Hirani, Rahim; Elias, Anita; Quisenberry, Lauren; Varon, Joseph; Surani, Sara; Surani, Salim

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of social media among healthcare workers in an attempt to identify how it affects the quality of patient care. Results An anonymous survey of 35 questions was conducted in South Texas, on 366 healthcare workers. Of the 97% of people who reported owning electronic devices, 87.9% indicated that they used social media. These healthcare workers indicated that they spent approximately 1 h on social media every day. The healthcare worker...

  1. Social media usage among health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surani, Zoya; Hirani, Rahim; Elias, Anita; Quisenberry, Lauren; Varon, Joseph; Surani, Sara; Surani, Salim

    2017-11-29

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of social media among healthcare workers in an attempt to identify how it affects the quality of patient care. An anonymous survey of 35 questions was conducted in South Texas, on 366 healthcare workers. Of the 97% of people who reported owning electronic devices, 87.9% indicated that they used social media. These healthcare workers indicated that they spent approximately 1 h on social media every day. The healthcare workers below the age of 40 were more involved in social media compared to those above 40 (p media among physicians and nurses was noted to be identical (88% for each group), and both groups encouraged their patients to research their clinical conditions on social media (p media policy in their hospital compared to nurses (p < 0.05). However, a large proportion of healthcare workers (40%) were unaware of their workplace policy, which could potentially cause a privacy breach of confidential medical information. Further studies are required to evaluate specific effects of these findings on the quality of patient care.

  2. Health care providers' knowledge and practice of focused antenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of antenatal care for reducing maternal morbidity and mortality and improving newborn survival and health is widely acknowledged. The study sought to investigate Health Care Providers knowledge and practice of focused antenatal care in a cottage Hospital Okpatu. Qualitative ethnographical research design ...

  3. Factors determining choice of health care provider in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasa, Y; Nandakumar, A K

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines factors influencing a patient's choice of provider for outpatient health care services in Jordan. Factors including demographic, socioeconomic, insurance status, quality of care, household size and cost of health care were studied using a multinomial logit model applied to a sample of 1031 outpatients from the Jordan heathcare utilization and expenditure survey, 2000. The patient's socioeconomic and demographic characteristics affected provider choice. Insurance was not statistically significant in choosing Ministry of Health facilities over other providers. Patients utilizing the public sector were price sensitive, and therefore any attempt to improve accessibility to health care services in Jordan should take this into consideration.

  4. Environmental Management of Pediatric Asthma: Guidelines for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R.; McCurdy, Leyla Erk

    2005-01-01

    These guidelines are the product of a new Pediatric Asthma Initiative aimed at integrating environmental management of asthma into pediatric health care. This document outlines competencies in environmental health relevant to pediatric asthma that should be mastered by primary health care providers, and outlines the environmental interventions…

  5. Using the National Provider Identifier for Health Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The establishment in recent years of a National Provider Identifier (NPI) offers a new method for counting and categorizing physicians and other health care...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? If OI is moderate or severe, health ... Barnes AM, & Marini JC. (2011). New Perspectives on Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Nat Rev Endocrinol, Jun 14;7 (9), 540- ...

  7. Data governance for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronis, Katerina; Moysey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Data governance is characterised from broader definitions of governance. These characteristics are then mapped to a framework that provides a practical representation of the concepts. This representation is further developed with operating models and roles. Several information related scenarios covering both clinical and non-clinical domains are considered in information terms and then related back to the data governance framework. This assists the reader in understanding how data governance would help address the issues or achieve a better outcome. These elements together enable the reader to gain an understanding of the data governance framework and how it applies in practice. Finally, some practical advice is offered for establishing and operating data governance as well as approaches for justifying the investment.

  8. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National Provider...

  9. Immunizations: An Evolving Paradigm for Oral Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Leslie R; Mouton, Charles

    2017-04-01

    Oral health care professionals are at risk for the transmission of bacterial and viral microorganisms. Providers need to be knowledgeable about the exposure/transmission of life-threatening infections and options for prevention. This article is designed to increase the oral health care provider's awareness of the latest assessment of vaccine-preventable diseases that pose a high risk in the dental health care setting. Specific dosing strategies are suggested for the prevention of infections based on available evidence and epidemiologic changes. This information will provide a clear understanding for prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases that pose a public health consequence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hepatitis C virus An overview for dental health care providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R. Monina Klevens; Anne C. Moorman

    2013-01-01

    and Overview. Changes in the science of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and transmission in a private dental practice provide an opportunity to update dental health care providers about this pathogen...

  11. factors influencing the choice of health care providing facility among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chi Square and logistic regression analysis was done. ... utilized public health facilities attributing the choice to the low cost of services. Respondents who are satisfied with their usual care providing facilities are 12.2 times more likely to have used public ... to health care the cost of services and the waiting time are important.

  12. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Spina Bifida?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose spina bifida? Doctors diagnose spina bifida before or after the infant is born. Spina bifida occulta might not be identified until late childhood ...

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose Rett syndrome? Blood Test Genetic evaluation of a blood sample ... would rule out a Rett syndrome diagnosis. Atypical Rett Syndrome Genetic mutations causing some atypical variants of Rett ...

  14. The choice of a health care provider in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtom, GebreMichael Kibreab; Ruys, Pieter

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the factors that affect patients' choice of health care service providers and to analyse the effect of each factor, and to examine the policy implications for future health care provision in Eritrea. The data for this study was collected in a 10-month period from January to October 2003. A total of 1657 households were included in the study. Our findings reveals that education, perceived quality, distance, user fees, severity of illness, socio-economic status and place of residence are statistically significant in the choice of a health care provider. Our study further shows that illness recognition is much lower for poor and less educated individuals. When an illness is recognized by the individual or household, a typical observation is that health care is less likely to be sought when the individual or household is poor and lives far from the facilities, and then only in case of a serious illness. Information on the choice of health care service providers is crucial for planning, organizing and evaluation of health services. The people's perception of disease/illness, their concept of health and the basis for their choice in health care has to be considered in order to respond with appropriate services and information, education and communication programs.

  15. Human trafficking: the role of the health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setting. Definitions, statistics, and common health care problems of trafficking victims are reviewed. The role of the health care provider is outlined through a case study and clinical practice tools are provided. Suggestions for future research are also briefly addressed. (c) 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. South African health care providers' recognition of the links between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This pilot study assessed the extent to which health care providers in HIV care and treatment, substance abuse intervention and employee assistance programmes (EAPs) consider and inform their clients about the role of alcohol use/abuse in HIV transmission, HIV disease progression and adherence to antiretroviral ...

  17. Surrogate pregnancy: a guide for Canadian prenatal health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Dan R

    2007-02-13

    Providing health care for a woman with a surrogate pregnancy involves unique challenges. Although the ethical debate surrounding surrogacy continues, Canada has banned commercial, but not altruistic, surrogacy. In the event of a custody dispute between a surrogate mother and the individual(s) intending to parent the child, it is unclear how Canadian courts would rule. The prenatal health care provider must take extra care to protect the autonomy and privacy rights of the surrogate. There is limited evidence about the medical and psychological risks of surrogacy. Whether theoretical concerns about these risks are clinically relevant remains unknown. In the face of these uncertainties, the prenatal health care provider should have a low threshold for seeking obstetrical, social work, ethical and legal support.

  18. Intimate Partner Violence: What Health Care Providers Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    perpetrators may also be victims of trauma (e.g., childhood abuse, witnessing violence , etc.). Other important points to consider: 89 • He felt I was...Jun 2012 2012 Intimate Partner Violence : What Health Care Providers Need to Know (Webinar) April A. Gerlock Ph.D., ARNP Research Associate, HSRD...NW Center of Excellence VA Puget Sound Health Care System Carole Warshaw, M.D. Director National Center on Domestic Violence , Trauma & Mental

  19. Human Trafficking: The Role of the Health Care Provider

    OpenAIRE

    Dovydaitis, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking is a major public health problem, both domestically and internationally. Health care providers are often the only professionals to interact with trafficking victims who are still in captivity. The expert assessment and interview skills of providers contribute to their readiness to identify victims of trafficking. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with knowledge on trafficking and give specific tools that they may use to assist victims in the clinical setti...

  20. Health care providers' perspective of the gender influences on immigrant women's mental health care experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Joyce M; Donnelly, Tamphd T

    2007-10-01

    The number of immigrants coming to Canada has increased in the last three decades. It is well documented that many immigrant women suffer from serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders. Evidence has shown that immigrant women experience difficulties in accessing and using mental health services. Informed by the post-colonial feminist perspective, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provide mental health services to immigrant women. In-depth interviews were used to obtain information about immigrant women's mental health care experiences. The primary goal was to explore how contextual factors intersect with race, gender, and class to influence the ways in which immigrant women seek help and to increase awareness and understanding of what would be helpful in meeting the mental health care needs of the immigrant women. The study's results reveal that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties accessing mental health care due to insufficient language skills, unfamiliarity/unawareness of services, and low socioeconomic status; (b) participants identified structural barriers and gender roles as barriers to accessing the available mental health services; (c) the health care relationship between health care providers and women had profound effects on whether or not immigrant women seek help for mental health problems.

  1. How health care providers help battered women: the survivor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbert, B; Abercrombie, P; Caspers, N; Love, C; Bronstone, A

    1999-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to describe, from the perspective of domestic violence survivors, what helped victims in health care encounters improve their situation and thus their health, and how disclosure to and identification by health care providers were related to these helpful experiences. Semi-structured, open-ended interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of survivors in the San Francisco Bay Area. Data were analyzed using constant comparative techniques and interpretative processes. Twenty-five women were interviewed, the majority being white and middle-class, with some college education. Two overlapping phenomena related to helpful experiences emerged: (1) the complicated dance of disclosure by victims and identification by health care providers, and (2) the power of receiving validation (acknowledgment of abuse and confirmation of patient worth) from a health care provider. The women described a range of disclosure and identification behaviors from direct to indirect or tacit. They also described how-with or without direct identification or disclosure-validation provided "relief," "comfort," "planted a seed," and "started the wheels turning" toward changing the way they perceived their situations, and moving them toward safety. Our data suggest that if health care providers suspect domestic violence, they should not depend on direct disclosure, but rather assume that the patient is being battered, acknowledge that battering is wrong, and confirm the patient's worth. Participants described how successful validation may take on tacit forms that do not jeopardize patient safety. After validating the patient's situation and worth, we suggest health care providers document the abuse and plan with the patient for safety, while offering ongoing validation, support, and referrals.

  2. Health Care Provider Accommodations for Patients with Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael I.; Baylor, Carolyn; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Starks, Helene; Yorkston, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Health care providers can experience increased diffculty communicating with adult patients during medical interactions when the patients have communication disorders. Meeting the communication needs of these patients can also create unique challenges for providers. The authors explore Communication Accommodation Theory (H. Giles, 1979) as a guide…

  3. Competence of health care providers on care of newborns at birth in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: This is an observational study which was carried out at a level one health facility in Yaoundé from June to July 2009. The aim was to evaluate the competence of health care providers towards newborns' care at birth. Methods: Ten health care providers took care of three hundred and thirty-five pregnant women ...

  4. Health care providers' missed opportunities for preventing femicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, P W; Koziol-McLain, J; Campbell, J; McFarlane, J; Sachs, C; Xu, X

    2001-11-01

    Homicide of women (femicide) by intimate partners is the most serious form of violence against women. The purpose of this analysis of a larger multisite study was to describe health care use in the year prior to murder of women by their intimate partner in order to identify opportunities for intervention to prevent femicide. A sample of femicide cases was identified from police or medical examiner records. Participants (n = 311) were proxy informants (most often female family members) of victims of intimate partner femicide from 11 U.S. cities. Information about prior domestic abuse and use of health care and other helping agencies for victims and perpetrators was obtained during structured telephone interviews. Most victims had been abused by their partners (66%) and had used health care agencies for either injury or physical or mental health problems (41%). Among women who had been pregnant during the relationship, 23% were beaten by partners during pregnancy. Among perpetrators with fair or poor physical health, 53% had contact with physicians and 15% with fair or poor mental health had seen a doctor about their mental health problem. Among perpetrators with substance problems, 5.4% had used alcohol treatment programs and 5.7% had used drug treatment programs. Frequent contacts with helping agencies by victims and perpetrators represent opportunities for the prevention of femicide by health care providers. Copyright 2001 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

  5. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  6. Do health care providers discuss HIV with older female patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether older women could recall receiving HIV-related information from health care providers. ... difference (p = 0.003; odds ratio [OR]: 0.26; 95% CI: 0.09–0.69) between their age stratification of 50 to 59 years and 60 to 80 years with respect to receiving information regarding HIV.

  7. Continuing education in geriatrics for rural health care providers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population trends in developing countries show an increasing population of older adults (OAs), especially in rural areas. The purpose of this study was to explore the geriatrics continuing education needs of health care providers (HCPs) working in rural Uganda. The study employed a descriptive design to collect data from ...

  8. Increasing Access to Health Care Providers with Nurse Practitioner Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Del Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department visits increased from 102.8 million to 136.1 million in 2009, resulting in crowding and increased wait times, affecting U.S. hospitals' ability to provide safe, timely patient care resulting in dangerous delays and serious health problems shown by research. The purpose of this project was to determine if competencies developed…

  9. Attitudes of primary health care providers towards people with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study offers insights into how health care providers regard people with mental illness that may be helpful in designing appropriate training or re-training programs in Zambia and other low-income African countries. Method: Using a pilot tested structured questionnaire, data were collected from a total of 111 respondents ...

  10. Agents for change: nonphysician medical providers and health care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Nathan A; Mcmillen, Marvin A; Gould, James S

    2015-01-01

    Quality medical care is a clinical and public health imperative, but defining quality and achieving improved, measureable outcomes are extremely complex challenges. Adherence to best practice invariably improves outcomes. Nonphysician medical providers (NPMPs), such as physician assistants and advanced practice nurses (eg, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse midwives), may be the first caregivers to encounter the patient and can act as agents for change for an organization's quality-improvement mandate. NPMPs are well positioned to both initiate and ensure optimal adherence to best practices and care processes from the moment of initial contact because they have robust clinical training and are integral to trainee/staff education and the timely delivery of care. The health care quality aspects that the practicing NPMP can affect are objective, appreciative, and perceptive. As bedside practitioners and participants in the administrative and team process, NPMPs can fine-tune care delivery, avoiding the problem areas defined by the Institute of Medicine: misuse, overuse, and underuse of care. This commentary explores how NPMPs can affect quality by 1) supporting best practices through the promotion of guidelines and protocols, and 2) playing active, if not leadership, roles in patient engagement and organizational quality-improvement efforts.

  11. Perceptions of health care providers concerning patient and health care provider strategies to limit out-of-pocket costs for cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, M.; Buehler, S.; West, R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe the perceptions of health care providers concerning patient and health care provider strategies to limit out-of-pocket costs for cancer care. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 21 cancer care providers (nurses, social workers, oncologists, surgeons, pharmacists, and dieticians) in Newfoundland and Labrador. Results Patients try to minimize costs by substituting or rationing medications, choosing radical treatments, lengthening the time between ...

  12. Community Health Centers: Providers, Patients, and Content of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tobacco use and exposure, weight reduction, and other education. 6 Nonmedication treatment includes complementary and alternative medicine, durable medical equipment, home health care, hospice care, physical therapy, radiation therapy, speech and occupational ...

  13. Abortion practice in Mexico: a survey of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayananda, Ila; Walker, Dilys; Atienzo, Erika E; Haider, Sadia

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about abortion practice in Mexico postlegalization of abortion in Mexico City in 2007. In 2009, we anonymously surveyed 418 Mexican health care providers at the Colegio Mexicano de Especialistas en Ginecologia y Obstetricia meeting using audio computer-assisted self-interview technology. The majority of respondents were obstetrician gynecologists (376, 90%), Catholic (341, 82%), 35-60 years old (332, 79%) and male (222, 53%) and worked with trainees (307, 74%). Prior to 2007, 11% (46) and 17% (71) provided medical and surgical abortions; now, 15% (62) and 21% (86) provide these services, respectively. Practitioners from Mexico City were more likely to provide services than those from other areas. Most medical abortion providers (50, 81%) used ineffective protocols. Surgical abortion providers mainly used either manual vacuum aspiration (39, 45%) or sharp curettage (27, 32%). Most abortion providers were trained in residency and wanted more training in medical (54, 87%) and surgical (59, 69%) abortion. Among nonproviders, 49% (175) and 27% (89) expressed interest in learning to perform medical and surgical abortion, respectively. Given the interest in learning to provide safe abortion services and the prevalent use of ineffective medical abortion regimens and sharp curettage, abortion training in Mexico should be strengthened. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Women's Preferred Sources for Primary and Mental Health Care: Implications for Reproductive Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kelli Stidham; Harris, Lisa H; Dalton, Vanessa K

    To describe women's preferences for reproductive health providers as sources of primary and mental health care. This is secondary data analysis of the Women's Health Care Experiences and Preferences Study, an Internet survey conducted in September 2013 of 1,078 women aged 18 to 55 randomly sampled from a U.S. national probability panel. We estimated women's preferred and usual sources of care (reproductive health providers, generalists, other) for various primary care and mental health care services using weighted statistics and multiple logistic regression. Among women using health care in the past 5 years (n = 981), 88% received primary and/or mental health care, including a routine medical checkup (78%), urgent/acute (48%), chronic disease (27%), depression/anxiety (21%), stress (16%), and intimate partner violence (2%) visits. Of those, reproductive health providers were the source of checkup (14%), urgent/acute (3%), chronic disease (6%), depression/anxiety (6%), stress (11%), and intimate partner violence (3%) services. Preference for specific reproductive health-provided primary/mental health care services ranged from 7% to 20%. Among women having used primary/mental health care services (N = 894), more women (1%-17%) preferred than had received primary/mental health care from reproductive health providers. Nearly one-quarter (22%) identified reproductive health providers as their single most preferred source of care. Contraceptive use was the strongest predictor of preference for reproductive health-provided primary/mental health care (odds ratios range, 2.11-3.30). Reproductive health providers are the sole source of health care for a substantial proportion of reproductive-aged women-the same groups at risk for unmet primary and mental health care needs. Findings have implications for reproductive health providers' role in comprehensive women's health care provision and potentially for informing patient-centered, integrated models of care in current

  15. Derivative financial instruments and nonprofit health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Louis J; Owhoso, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the extent of derivative financial instrument use among US nonprofit health systems and the impact of these financial instruments on their cash flows, reported operating results, and financial risks. Our examination is conducted through a case study of New Jersey hospitals and health systems. We review the existing literature on interest rate derivative instruments and US hospitals and health systems. This literature describes the design of these derivative financial instruments and the theoretical benefits of their use by large health care provider organizations. Our contribution to the literature is to provide an empirical evaluation of derivative financial instruments usage among a geographically limited sample of US nonprofit health systems. We reviewed the audited financial statements of the 49 community hospitals and multi-hospital health systems operating in the state of New Jersey. We found that 8 percent of New Jersey's nonprofit health providers utilized interest rate derivatives with an aggregate principle value of $229 million. These derivative users combine interest rate swaps and caps to lower the effective interest costs of their long-term debt while limiting their exposure to future interest rate increases. In addition, while derivative assets and liabilities have an immaterial balance sheet impact, derivative related gains and losses are a material component of their reported operating results. We also found that derivative usage among these four health systems was responsible for generating positive cash flows in the range of 1 percent to 2 percent of their total 2001 cash flows from operations. As a result of our admittedly limited samples we conclude that interest rate swaps and caps are effective risk management tools. However, we also found that while these derivative financial instruments are useful hedges against the risks of issuing long-term financing instruments, they also expose derivative users to credit, contract

  16. Doctors Adjacent to Private Pharmacies: The New Ambulatory Care Provider for Mexican Health Care Seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Manning, Mauricio; García-Díaz, Rocío

    2017-12-01

    In 2010 Mexican health authorities enacted an antibiotic sale, prescription, and dispensation bill that increased the presence of a new kind of ambulatory care provider, the doctors adjacent to private pharmacies (DAPPs). To analyze how DAPPs' presence in the Mexican ambulatory care market has modified health care seekers' behavior following a two-stage health care provider selection decision process. The first stage focuses on individuals' propensity to captivity to the health care system structure before 2010. The second stage analyzes individuals' medical provider selection in a health system including DAPPs. This two-stage process analysis allowed us not only to show the determinants of each part in the decision process but also to understand the overall picture of DAPPs' impact in both the Mexican health care system and health care seekers, taking into account conditions such as the origins, evolution, and context of this new provider. We used data from individuals (N = 97,549) participating in the Mexican National Survey of Health and Nutrition in 2012. We found that DAPPs have become not only a widely accepted but also a preferred option among the Mexican ambulatory care providers that follow no specific income-level population user group (in spite of its original low-income population target). Our results showed DAPPs as an urban and rapidly expanded phenomenon, presumably keeping the growing pace of new communities and adapting to demographic changes. Individuals opt for DAPPs when they look for health care: in a nearby provider, for either the most recent or common ailments, and in an urban setting; regardless of most socioeconomic background. The relevance of location and accessibility variables in our study provides evidence of the role taken by this provider in the Mexican health care system. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presence of an extra chromosome is by a karyotype (pronounced care-EE-oh-type ) test. A health ... a microscope to find the extra chromosome. A karyotype test shows the same results at any time ...

  18. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  19. HIV/AIDS EDUCATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljaljević Agima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine perceptions of service providers in the healthcare on their awareness and knowledge about HIV/AIDS, as well as the relationship of the above parameters and the existence of stigma and discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS. Method: The type of the study was a behavioral cross sectional study. The survey was conducted in 2012, on a representative sample of health workers in Montenegro. The main survey instrument was specifically designed questionnaire that consisted of six parts, out of which one was related to knowledge about HIV and AIDS. Data were analyzed by methods of inferential statistics. Results: More than four out of ten respondents have never attended educational workshops on HIV/AIDS. Research has shown that there is a highly significant statistical correlation between estimates of their own knowledge about HIV / AIDS and previous educations. Almost two-thirds of respondents, who attended some type of education in the field of HIV/AIDS, believe to have a satisfactory level of knowledge in the area. Conclusion: Health care service providers evaluate their knowledge of HIV/AIDS as insufficient.

  20. PROVIDER CHOICE FOR OUTPATIENT HEALTH CARE SERVICES IN INDONESIA: THE ROLE OF HEALTH INSURANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Hidayat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesian's health care system is characterized by underutilized of the health-care infrastructure. One of the ways to improve the demand for formal health care is through health insurance. Responding to this potentially effective policy leads the Government of Indonesia to expand health insurance coverage by enacting the National Social Security Act in 2004. In this particular issue, understanding provider choice is therefore a key to address the broader policy question as to how the current low uptake of health care services could be turned in to an optimal utilization. Objective:To estimate a model of provider choice for outpatient care in Indonesia with specific attention being paid to the role of health insurance. Methods: A total of 16485 individuals were obtained from the second wave of the Indonesian Family Life survey. A multinomial logit regression model was applied to a estimate provider choice for outpatient care in three provider alternative (public, private and self-treatment. A policy simulation is reported as to how expanding insurance benefits could change the patterns of provider choice for outpatient health care services. Results: Individuals who are covered by civil servant insurance (Askes are more likely to use public providers, while the beneficiaries of private employees insurance (Jamsostek are more likely to use private ones compared with the uninsured population. The results also reveal that less healthy, unmarried, wealthier and better educated individuals are more likely to choose private providers than public providers. Conclusions: Any efforts to improve access to health care through health insurance will fail if policy-makers do not accommodate peoples' preferences for choosing health care providers. The likely changes in demand from public providers to private ones need to be considered in the current social health insurance reform process, especially in devising premium policies and benefit packages

  1. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  2. Evaluating Frameworks That Provide Value Measures for Health Care Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Ramsey, Scott D; Lieu, Tracy A; Phelps, Charles E

    2017-02-01

    The recent acceleration of scientific discovery has led to greater choices in health care. New technologies, diagnostic tests, and pharmaceuticals have widely varying impact on patients and populations in terms of benefits, toxicities, and costs, stimulating a resurgence of interest in the creation of frameworks intended to measure value in health. Many of these are offered by providers and/or advocacy organizations with expertise and interest in specific diseases (e.g., cancer and heart disease). To help assess the utility of and the potential biases embedded in these frameworks, we created an evaluation taxonomy with seven basic components: 1) define the purpose; 2) detail the conceptual approach, including perspectives, methods for obtaining preferences of decision makers (e.g., patients), and ability to incorporate multiple dimensions of value; 3) discuss inclusions and exclusions of elements included in the framework, and whether the framework assumes clinical intervention or offers alternatives such as palliative care or watchful waiting; 4) evaluate data sources and their scientific validity; 5) assess the intervention's effect on total costs of treating a defined population; 6) analyze how uncertainty is incorporated; and 7) illuminate possible conflicts of interest among those creating the framework. We apply the taxonomy to four representative value frameworks recently published by professional organizations focused on treatment of cancer and heart disease and on vaccine use. We conclude that each of these efforts has strengths and weaknesses when evaluated using our taxonomy, and suggest pathways to enhance the utility of value-assessing frameworks for policy and clinical decision making. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Barriers to providing maternity care to women with physical disabilities: Perspectives from health care practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Monika; Smith, Lauren D; Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Long-Bellil, Linda M; Sammet Moring, Nechama; Iezzoni, Lisa I

    2017-07-01

    Women with physical disabilities are known to experience disparities in maternity care access and quality, and communication gaps with maternity care providers, however there is little research exploring the maternity care experiences of women with physical disabilities from the perspective of their health care practitioners. This study explored health care practitioners' experiences and needs around providing perinatal care to women with physical disabilities in order to identify potential drivers of these disparities. We conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with 14 health care practitioners in the United States who provide maternity care to women with physical disabilities, as identified by affiliation with disability-related organizations, publications and snowball sampling. Descriptive coding and content analysis techniques were used to develop an iterative code book related to barriers to caring for this population. Public health theory regarding levels of barriers was applied to generate broad barrier categories, which were then analyzed using content analysis. Participant-reported barriers to providing optimal maternity care to women with physical disabilities were grouped into four levels: practitioner level (e.g., unwillingness to provide care), clinical practice level (e.g., accessible office equipment like adjustable exam tables), system level (e.g., time limits, reimbursement policies), and barriers relating to lack of scientific evidence (e.g., lack of disability-specific clinical data). Participants endorsed barriers to providing optimal maternity care to women with physical disabilities. Our findings highlight the needs for maternity care practice guidelines for women with physical disabilities, and for training and education regarding the maternity care needs of this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 372 Profound Lack of Nonclinical Health Care Aptitude Across a Range of Health Care Providers and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Gary R

    2016-08-01

    American health care continues to undergo profound changes at a breakneck speed. Future challenges show no signs of abating. We feel the next generation of health care providers and administrators should be well informed on the many facets of nonclinical health care (regulation, delivery, socioeconomics) to guide health care systems and public servants toward better, more efficient care. We suspect that few possess even rudimentary knowledge in these fields. We constructed a 40-question Nonclinical Health Care Delivery aptitude test covering diverse subjects such as economics, finance, public health, governmental oversight, insurance, coding/billing, study design and interpretation, and more. The test was administered to over 150 medical students, residents, young physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, administrators, and results tallied. There was, across the board, low aptitude in fundamental principles of nonclinical health care subjects. No single group performed particularly better than others. Almost all subjects showed profound gaps in knowledge. We found that aptitude for fundamental nonclinical health care subjects was profoundly lacking across all major groups of health care providers and administrators. We feel this indicates a need for a far more robust curriculum in health care delivery and socioeconomics. Failure to elevate the educational standards in this realm will jeopardize health care providers' seat at the table in changes in health care public policy.

  5. Exploring Health Care Providers' Views About Initiating End-of-Life Care Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjat-Haiem, Frances R; Carrion, Iraida V; Gonzalez, Krystana; Ell, Kathleen; Thompson, Beti; Mishra, Shiraz I

    2017-05-01

    Numerous factors impede effective and timely end-of-life (EOL) care communication. These factors include delays in communication until patients are seriously ill and/or close to death. Gaps in patient-provider communication negatively affect advance care planning and limit referrals to palliative and hospice care. Confusion about the roles of various health care providers also limits communication, especially when providers do not coordinate care with other health care providers in various disciplines. Although providers receive education regarding EOL communication and care coordination, little is known about the roles of all health care providers, including nonphysician support staff working with physicians to discuss the possibility of dying and help patients prepare for death. This study explores the perspectives of physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains on engaging seriously ill patients and families in EOL care communication. Qualitative data were from 79 (medical and nonmedical) providers practicing at 2 medical centers in Central Los Angeles. Three themes that describe providers' perceptions of their roles and responsibility in talking with seriously ill patients emerged: (1) providers' roles for engaging in EOL discussions, (2) responsibility of physicians for initiating and leading discussions, and (3) need for team co-management patient care. Providers highlighted the importance of beginning discussions early by having physicians lead them, specifically due to their medical training and need to clarify medical information regarding patients' prognosis. Although physicians are a vital part of leading EOL communication, and are at the center of communication of medical information, an interdisciplinary approach that involves nurses, social workers, and chaplains could significantly improve patient care.

  6. Financial health and customer satisfaction in private health care providers in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiozer, Rafael Felipe; Saito, Cristiana Checchia; Saito, Richard

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between the financial health and organizational form of private health care providers in Brazil. It also examines the major determinants of customer satisfaction associated with the provider's organizational form. An adjusted Altman's z-score is used as an indicator of financial health. A proxy variable based on customer complaints filed at the Brazilian National Agency for Supplementary Health is used as an indicator for customer satisfaction. The study uses a sample of 270 private health care providers and their operations over the period 2003-2005. Panel data analysis includes control variables related to market, operations, and management. Principal results indicate that: (1) private health care providers benefit from economies of scale; (2) self-funded health plans have better financial health; (3) spending on marketing does not have a significant impact on customer satisfaction in Brazil; (4) weak empirical evidence exists showing that good financial performance enhances customer's satisfaction.

  7. What Role Can School Health Providers Play in Health Care Reform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Robin

    2009-01-01

    President Barack Obama is wasting no time in unfolding his plan to provide health coverage for all Americans. He started in February by signing legislation to reinstate the State Children's Health Insurance Program, which expands eligibility criteria to provide 4 million more children access to health care. This first step is one of many needed to…

  8. Patients' and Health Care Providers' Perception of Stressors in the Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuatiq, Alham

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study is first, to investigate intensive care patients' perceptions of stressors; second, to investigate the health care provider's perception of what constitutes a stressor from the patient's perspective; and third, to describe how health care providers manage their patients' stressors. This was a mixed-methods study; the quantitative section replicated Cornock's 1998 study of stress in the intensive care unit (ICU), with difference in sampling to include all health care providers in the ICU, in addition to nurses. The qualitative section added information to the current literature by describing how health care providers manage their patient's stressors. This article reports the quantitative findings of this study, as the qualitative section is presented in a separate article. It is important to describe ICU patients' stressful experiences to assess patient's stressors, provide holistic care to eliminate stressors, and provide feedback to health care providers. There is a need to describe the clinical practice related to stress perception and management of stressors in the critical care environment. A mixed-methods comparative descriptive design was used for the quantitative section, and a phenomenological approach guided the qualitative section. Lazarus and Folkman's theory formed the bases for integrating all variables investigated in this study. The sample included 70 ICU patients and 70 ICU health care providers. After consenting to participate in this study, subjects were given a demographic form and a paper-based tool, the Environmental Stressors graphic data form Questionnaire. Questionnaires were filled out by subjects anonymously in the ICU and returned to the researcher in the same setting. Descriptive statistics were analyzed using SPSS data analysis software. The top 3 most stressful items ranked by the patients included "being in pain," followed by "not being able to sleep" and "financial worries"; on the other hand, health care

  9. Can health care providers recognise a fibromyalgia personality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, José A P; Jacobs, Johannes W G; Branco, Jaime C; Canaipa, Rita; Gaspar, M Filomena; Griep, Ed N; van Helmond, Toon; Oliveira, Paula J; Zijlstra, Theo J; Geenen, Rinie

    2017-01-01

    To determine if experienced health care providers (HCPs) can recognise patients with fibromyalgia (FM) based on a limited set of personality items, exploring the existence of a FM personality. From the 240-item NEO-PI-R personality questionnaire, 8 HCPs from two different countries each selected 20 items they considered most discriminative of FM personality. Then, evaluating the scores on these items of 129 female patients with FM and 127 female controls, each HCP rated the probability of FM for each individual on a 0-10 scale. Personality characteristics (domains and facets) of selected items were determined. Scores of patients with FM and controls on the eight 20-item sets, and HCPs' estimates of each individual's probability of FM were analysed for their discriminative value. The eight 20-item sets discriminated for FM, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve ranging from 0.71-0.81. The estimated probabilities for FM showed, in general, percentages of correct classifications above 50%, with rising correct percentages for higher estimated probabilities. The most often chosen and discriminatory items were predominantly of the domain neuroticism (all with higher scores in FM), followed by some items of the facet trust (lower scores in FM). HCPs can, based on a limited set of items from a personality questionnaire, distinguish patients with FM from controls with a statistically significant probability. The HCPs' expectation that personality in FM patients is associated with higher levels for aspects of neuroticism (proneness to psychological distress) and lower scores for aspects of trust, proved to be correct.

  10. Health Care Marketing: Opinions of Providers. North Dakota Economic Studies, Number 46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald G.; And Others

    The health care industry in the United States has undergone tremendous change. Health care providers must view their health care delivery organizations as businesses and must use the tools of business, including marketing. Most research on health care marketing has focused on the practices of large, urban facilities. Little work has been…

  11. Identification of Causes of the Occupational Stress for Health Providers at Different Levels of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifunovic, Natasa; Jatic, Zaim; Kulenovic, Alma Dzubur

    2017-06-01

    To identify and compare the stressors in the work environment experienced by employees in primary health care and secondary health care, amongphysiciansand nurses. The survey was conducted to identify types of stressors by assessing health care workers employed in the primary and secondary health care services of the Public Institution, the Health Centre of the Sarajevo Canton, using a questionnaire about stress in the workplace. Among all study participants stressors connected to the organization of work, finance and communication were found to affect their mental health most strongly. The results show a significant difference between primary and secondary health care in experience of stressors related to the organization of work, communication, and stressors related to the emotional and physical risks. Primary health care physicians report a significantly higher experience of stress and impact on mental health compared with other physicians related to emotional difficulties when working in the field of palliative care. Our results also indicate a significant difference between primary and secondary health providers in experiencing stressors related to the organization of work, such as: on-call duty shifts, an inadequate working environment and in the assessment of administrative work overload. The survey identified the most intense stressors for doctors and nurses at primary and secondary levels of health care services. The results of the study indicate that doctors and nurses have a different hierarchy of stressors, as well as subjects at Primary and Secondary Health Care. The results of the study indicate that subjects et Primary Health Care perceive more stressful organizational, emotional and communicational problems.

  12. Can we select health professionals who provide safer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth-Cozens, J; Cording, H; Ginsburg, R

    2003-12-01

    In order to improve patient safety, health services are looking to other industries' experiences and as a result are adopting a systems approach to learning from error, rather than simply focusing the blame on the individual. However, in health care the individual will remain an important contributor to safety and this paper looks at other literatures besides health to consider a number of individual characteristics and the role they might play in terms of work practices that affect patient safety. It considers the effects of a variety of personality profiles including sensation seeking, Type A, and those with high self esteem; looks at our ability to select for psychological wellbeing; and discusses the ways that psychometrics have been used in medicine to predict performance. It concludes that although rarely used, psychometrics has been shown to be useful in predicting some aspects of performance in medicine and suggests that this is an area well worth further study for the benefit of patient care. Nevertheless, we are a long way away from being able to select safer staff and should instead be developing this knowledge to enable us to recognise and address potential difficulties.

  13. Multiple-role dilemmas for military mental health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W Brad; Bacho, Roderick; Heim, Mark; Ralph, John

    2006-04-01

    Military psychologists and psychiatrists frequently face ethical quandaries involving boundary crossings, or extratherapy contact, and multiple relationships. A multiple relationship is defined as necessarily engaging psychotherapy patients in nonclinical roles, such as coworker, superior officer, neighbor, or friend. In contrast to their civilian counterparts, military mental health professionals must often engage patients in many different contexts and roles. In this article, we consider the distinctive features of mental health practice in the military and offer military providers several practice guidelines for avoiding harm to patients in military settings. This article is also designed to enhance sensitivity to multiple-role risks among nonpsychiatric providers.

  14. 76 FR 9968 - Regulation for the Enforcement of Federal Health Care Provider Conscience Protection Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... funds from discriminating against certain health care providers based on their refusal to participate in... HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 88 RIN 0991-AB76 Regulation for the Enforcement of Federal Health Care... statutory health care provider conscience protections will be handled by the Department's Office for Civil...

  15. Providing Health Care Service-learning Experiences for IPPE Credit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassandra M. Bartelme, Pharm.D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Service-learning (SL provides an opportunity for students to learn personal and professional skills while providing a useful service to the community. Many pharmacy education programs use SL within their curriculum because of the benefits to the community, the faculty, the learning institution and the student(s. While SL has been used in schools/colleges of pharmacy for many years, SL that also fulfills IPPE requirements is newer. This paper seeks to promote the use of combined SL/IPPE experiences. It provides an example where students volunteered at federally qualified health centers and also reviews the ACPE Standards related to SL. Schools/colleges of pharmacy are encouraged to design mechanisms for students to participate in combined SL/IPPE experiences as part of their IPPE requirements.

  16. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carefully researched health information to teenage boys and young men. All information is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your health care provider. ...

  17. The influence of culture on immigrant women's mental health care experiences from the perspectives of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Joyce Maureen; Donnelly, Tam Truong

    2007-05-01

    It is well documented that serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders exist among immigrant women. Informed by Kleinman's explanatory model, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provided mental health services to immigrant women. Analysis of the data revealed that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties when accessing mental health care services due to cultural differences, social stigma, and unfamiliarity with Western biomedicine, (b) spiritual beliefs and practices that influence immigrant women's mental health care practices, and (c) the health care provider-client relationship, which exerts great influence on how immigrant women seek mental health care. The study also revealed that cultural background exerts both positive and negative influences on how immigrant women seek mental health care. We suggest that although cultural knowledge and practices influence immigrant women's coping choices and strategies, awareness of social and economic differences among diverse groups of immigrant women is necessary to improve the accessibility of mental health care for immigrant women.

  18. End-of-life decisions in perinatal care. A view from health-care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Grether

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the opinions of a perinatal health team regarding decisions related to late termination of pregnancy and severely ill newborns. Materials and Methods. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to physicians, social workers, and nurses in perinatal care. Differences were evaluated using the chi square and Student’s t tests. Results. When considering severely ill fetuses and newborns, 82% and 93% of participants, respectively, opted for providing palliative care, whereas 18% considered feticide as an alter- native. Those who opted for palliative care aimed to diminish suffering and those who opted for intensive care intended to protect life or sanctity of life. There was poor knowledge about the laws that regulate these decisions. Conclusions. Although there is no consensus on what decisions should be taken with severely ill fetuses or neonates, most participants considered palliative care as the first option, but feticide or induced neonatal death was not ruled out.

  19. The acceptability of humor between palliative care patients and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Julia; Dance, Derry; Pare, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Humor frequently occurs in palliative care environments; however, the acceptability of humor, particularly between patients and health care providers has not been previously examined. To explore the importance and acceptability of humor to participants who are patients in a palliative care context, the study determines if demographics are correlated with the degree of acceptability, and examines the acceptance of humor by patients with advanced illness when interacting with nurses or physicians. One hundred participants admitted to a palliative care unit or residential hospice were surveyed. Basic demographic data were collected, as well as responses on a five-point Likert scale to a variety of questions regarding the participants' attitudes about humor before and after their illness and the acceptability of humor in a palliative setting. Participants were also given the opportunity to comment freely on the topic of humor and the palliative experience. A large majority of participants valued humor highly both prior to (77%) and during (76%) their illness experience. Despite this valuation, the frequency of laughter in their daily lives diminished significantly as patients' illness progressed. Most participants remembered laughing with a nurse (87%) and a doctor (67%) in the week prior to the survey, and found humor with their doctors (75%) and nurses appropriate (88%). The vast majority of participants found humorous interactions with their health care providers acceptable and appropriate, and this may indicate a opportunity for enhanced and more effective end-of-life care in the future.

  20. Turning the Lens Inward: Cultural Competence and Providers' Values in Health Care Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettih, Mindy

    2012-01-01

    The population of older adults in the United States is growing in size and diversity, presenting challenges to health care providers and patients in the context of health care decision making (DM), including obtaining informed consent for treatment, advance care planning, and deliberations about end-of-life care options. Although existing…

  1. Providing primary health care through integrated microfinance and health services in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Kimberley H; Leatherman, Sheila

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous burdens of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in middle-income countries. The poor are at particular risk, with lower access to health care and higher rates of avoidable mortality. Integrating health-related services with microfinance has been shown to improve health knowledge, behaviors, and access to appropriate health care. However, limited evidence is available on effects of fully integrating clinical health service delivery alongside microfinance services through large scale and sustained long-term programs. Using a conceptual model of health services access, we examine supply- and demand-side factors in a microfinance client population receiving integrated services. We conduct a case study using data from 2010 to 2012 of the design of a universal screening program and primary care services provided in conjunction with microfinance loans by Pro Mujer, a women's development organization in Latin America. The program operates in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru. We analyze descriptive reports and administrative data for measures related to improving access to primary health services and management of chronic diseases. We find provision of preventive care is substantial, with an average of 13% of Pro Mujer clients being screened for cervical cancer each year, 21% receiving breast exams, 16% having a blood glucose measurement, 39% receiving a blood pressure measurement, and 46% having their body mass index calculated. This population, with more than half of those screened being overweight or obese and 9% of those screened having elevated glucose measures, has major risk factors for diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease without intervention. The components of the Pro Mujer health program address four dimensions of healthcare access: geographic accessibility, availability, affordability, and acceptability. Significant progress has been made to meet basic

  2. Cultural Identities and Perceptions of Health Among Health Care Providers and Older American Indians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Sarkisian, Natalia; Arguelles, Lester; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Differences in provider-patient health perceptions have been associated with poor patient outcomes, but little is known about how patients' cultural identities may be related to discordant perceptions. OBJECTIVE To examine whether health care providers and American-Indian patients disagreed on patient health status ratings, and how differences related to these patients' strength of affiliation with American-Indian and white-American cultural identities. DESIGN Survey of patients and providers following primary care office visits. PARTICIPANTS One hundred and fifteen patients ≥50 years and 7 health care providers at a Cherokee Nation clinic. All patients were of American-Indian race, but varied in strength of affiliation with separate measures of American-Indian and white-American cultural identities. MEASUREMENTS Self-reported sociodemographic and cultural characteristics, and a 5-point rating of patient's health completed by both patients and providers. Fixed-effects regression modeling examined the relationships of patients' cultural identities with differences in provider-patient health rating. RESULTS In 40% of medical visits, providers and patients rated health differently, with providers typically judging patients healthier than patients' self-rating. Provider-patient differences were greater for patients affiliating weakly with white cultural identity than for those affiliating strongly (adjusted mean difference=0.70 vs 0.12, P=.01). Differences in ratings were not associated with the separate measure of affiliation with American-Indian identity. CONCLUSIONS American-Indian patients, especially those who affiliate weakly with white-American cultural identity, often perceive health status differently from their providers. Future research should explore sources of discordant perceptions. PMID:16390503

  3. Ten Things Lesbians Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Home About GLMA Membership Resources Advocacy Lesbian Health Fund Conference Newsroom Support GLMA About GLMA Membership Resources Advocacy Lesbian Health Fund Conference Newsroom Support GLMA Site Search ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A-Z Topics Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Vaginitis Women's Health NICHD News and Spotlights Getting to Know the New NICHD Director Dr. Lisa Halvorson New Chief of Gynecologic Health and Disease Branch Harnessing Research to Combat ...

  5. When Health Care Providers May Communicate About You with Your Family, Friends, or Others Involved in Your Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I have another person pick up my prescription drugs, medical supplies, or X-rays? Yes. HIPAA allows health care providers (such as pharmacists) to give prescription drugs, medical supplies, X-rays, and other health care items ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control speech, understanding and use of grammar and vocabulary, as well as reading and writing. 5 Social ... assessment, combined with other measures, helps determine the type of care necessary, including evacuation for a higher ...

  7. Improving Health Care Provider Availability through Information Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lasell, Jon R

    2005-01-01

    .... This study identifies the need for change in collecting data on patient care time, reviews different methods/systems for gathering data, documents the implementation of the selected system (eUCAPERS...

  8. Native American Death Taboo: Implications for Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colclough, Yoshiko Yamashita

    2017-07-01

    This study was conducted to highlight Native American (NA) perspectives on death taboo in order to examine the cultural appropriateness of hospice services for NA patients, if any. Searching literature that addressed taboo and death from historical, psychological, sociological, and anthropological aspects, a comparison of death perspectives was made between NAs and European Americans. A culturally sensitive transition from palliative care to hospice care was suggested for NA patients and their family.

  9. Human trafficking: Role of oral health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzolese, E

    2014-11-30

    Trafficking in human beings is a modern form of slavery and is a well-known phenomenon throughout the European Union and beyond. After drug dealing and the weapons industry, human trafficking is the second largest criminal activity in the world today and it is a growing crime. The aim of governmental and non-governmental agencies, which are either directly or indirectly involved in combating trafficking in human beings, is the identification and referral of victims of trafficking and also to encourage self-referrals. Identification is the most important step to provide protection and assistance to victims of trafficking. Victims often have a variety of physical and mental health needs, including psychological trauma, injuries from violence, head and neck trauma, sexually transmitted infections and other gynaecological problems, dental/oral problems and have poor nutrition. The author's experience in the field of community dentistry in presented within. Volunteer dental services are offered to non-European Union patients held in a centre for asylum seekers in Bari (Italy). Dental professionals can, in fact, contribute to the identification, assistance and protection of trafficked persons, as well as offering forensic services to assist the police investigation in order to identify crimes and find the criminal organizations behind them. As for domestic violence and child abuse cases, there are ethical concerns involved in the identification and protection of the trafficked persons, as well as the need for interdisciplinary work and awareness. Adequate training in behavioural science and intercultural learning is paramount in order to avoid misunderstandings and increase sensitivity.

  10. Knowledge and attitude of primary health care providers regarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Violence against women is a worldwide problem with extensive repercussions. Primary care physicians frequently are the first in the community to encounter the battered woman. They must be equipped with the necessary knowledge, training and experience. We developed a questionnaire to obtain ...

  11. INFLUENCE OF SOCIOECONOMIC AND DEMOGRAPHIC ENVIRONMENT ON PRIVATE HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Kordić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Health care systems face pressure to increase the quality of health care at the same time with pressure to reduce public spending. The attempt to overcome the gap between needs and opportunities can be resolved through the introduction of public-private partnerships. Goals of this study are to investigate variation of the number, form and efficiency of private providers of general/family medicine services in primary health care and the contribution of socioeconomic and demographic environment on those variations, among counties. Socioeconomic and demographic factors are identified as independent variables that influence the health care need and utilization and consequently the decision of private entities to engage in the provision of health care services. This study extended previous studies because it has introduced socioeconomic and demographic variables. This may shed same new lights on the relationship between private providers of health service and efficiency of providing health service in primary health care.

  12. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Birth Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment to begin before health problems occur. Prenatal Screening During pregnancy, women have routine tests, such as blood and ... Best, R. G., et al. (2016). Noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy, 2016 update: A position statement of the American ...

  14. Educational Needs Assessment of Family Health Providers in Tabriz Health Care Centers in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Ghoreyshyzadeh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study intends to determine the educational needs of family health staff employed in health care centers in Tabriz, the provincial capital of east Azerbaijan, Iran in 2015. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 282 staff were enrolled, together with 22 managers, through census. The data collection tool was a researcher-designed questionnaire whose content validity were confirmed by 5 experts of health care and medical education centers. They self--evaluated their knowledge, skills and attitudes in 6 task processes including "integrated care for pregnant women", "women’s general and reproductive health", "child health care and breastfeeding", "vaccination skills", "teenagers’ and young adults’ health", and "common diseases prevention and control". Cronbach alpha coefficients were over 0.85. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 16 and descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation and one-sample t tests were calculated to compare the mean of scores with midpoint criteria (=3. Results: Generally family health staff self-evaluated their knowledge, skills and attitudes in all task processes in higher than midpoint criteria level, which was consistent with the opinions of the managers, however, educational needs required by personnel in some processes or sub- process including "common diseases prevention and control" ( knowledge on referring thalassemia couples for genetic testing, mental health counseling, "vaccination skills" ( intradermal vaccination skills, "teenagers’ and young adults’ health" (Self-care training and parents education, "women’s general and reproductive health" (principles of family planning counseling and less needs stated in "integrated care for pregnant mothers" (except for diagnosis and management of ectopic pregnancy, placenta previa and abruption and "child health care" as compared to criteria (All P value <0.05. In contrast to self-assessment results, in interorganization evaluations

  15. Recruitment and retention of mental health care providers in rural Nebraska: perceptions of providers and administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Madison, Lynda; Watkins, Katherine L; Nguyen, Anh T; Chen, Li-Wu

    2015-01-01

    The nationwide shortage of mental health professionals is especially severe in rural communities in the USA. Consistent with national workforce statistics, Nebraska's mental health workforce is underrepresented in rural and frontier parts of the state, with 88 of Nebraska's 93 counties being designated as federal mental health professional shortage areas. Seventy-eight counties have no practicing psychiatrists. However, supply statistics alone are inadequate in understanding workforce behavior. The objective of this study was to understand mental health recruitment and retention issues from the perspectives of administrators and mental healthcare professionals in order to identify potential solutions for increasing the mental health workforce in rural communities. The study used semi-structured focus groups to obtain input from administrators and mental health providers. Three separate focus groups were conducted in each of four regions in 2012 and 2013: licensed psychiatrists and licensed psychologists, licensed (independent) mental health practitioners, and administrators (including community, hospital, and private practice administrators and directors) who hire mental health practitioners. The transcripts were independently reviewed by two reviewers to identify themes. A total of 21 themes were identified. Participants reported that low insurance reimbursement negatively affects rural healthcare organizations' ability to attract and retain psychiatrists and continue programs. Participants also suggested that enhanced loan repayment programs would provide an incentive for mental health professionals to practice in rural areas. Longer rural residency programs were advocated to encourage psychiatrists to establish roots in a community. Establishment of rural internship programs was identified as a key factor in attracting and retaining psychologists. To increase the number of psychologists willing to provide supervision to provisionally licensed psychologists and

  16. A Primer on Insulin Pump Therapy for Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Deborah L

    2017-12-01

    An estimated 1 million people use an insulin pump to manage their diabetes. Few medical professionals understand or feel comfortable caring for people who use an insulin pump. This article will help the medical professional understand the reasons why the insulin pump helps the user to achieve better glycemic control, have more flexibility, and enjoy a better quality of life. Additionally, this article discusses the advantages, disadvantages, candidate selection, contraindications, basic functions, and troubleshooting of the insulin pump. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Knowledge, attitudes and opinions of health care providers in Minna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) was launched five years ago in Nigeria. Being a relatively new concept, its success would be determined largely by its wide acceptability, which in itself is subject to the level of awareness and the understanding of the workings of the scheme by all stakeholders.

  18. Do health care providers discuss HIV with older female patients?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... Background: The World Health Organization expressed concern that older people in Africa who are ignored and excluded from HIV-prevention programmes are increasingly being infected with HIV. Studies show an inadequate awareness of the risks of HIV in the older female population. Older women are ...

  19. Attitudes of primary health care providers towards people with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitudes questions involved: stereotypes; separatist and discriminatory attitudes; and restrictiveness. The questions on which this paper is based formed part of the 'attitudes' component of the survey which included questions on attitudes towards people with mental illness. The questionnaire was piloted on fifteen health ...

  20. Cost analysis of consolidated federally provided health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Government Accountability Office JIT just-in time KPO Kaizen promotion offices LT lead time MHS Military Health System MRI magnetic resonance...implementation, the medical center created an infrastructure designed around VMPS operations and Kaizen Promotion Offices (KPOs)” (p. 8). Hospitals of

  1. Applying justice and commitment constructs to patient-health care provider relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmvall, Camilla; Twohig, Peter; Francis, Lori; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2012-03-01

    To examine patients' experiences of fairness and commitment in the health care context with an emphasis on primary care providers. Qualitative, semistructured, individual interviews were used to gather evidence for the justice and commitment frameworks across a variety of settings with an emphasis on primary care relationships. Rural, urban, and semiurban communities in Nova Scotia. Patients (ages ranged from 19 to 80 years) with varying health care needs and views on their health care providers. Participants were recruited through a variety of means, including posters in practice settings and communication with administrative staff in clinics. Individual interviews were conducted and were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A modified grounded theory approach was used to interpret the data. Current conceptualizations of justice (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, informational) and commitment (affective, normative, continuance) capture important elements of patient-health care provider interactions and relationships. Justice and commitment frameworks developed in other contexts encompass important dimensions of the patient-health care provider relationship with some exceptions. For example, commonly understood subcomponents of justice (eg, procedural consistency) might require modification to apply fully to patient-health care provider relationships. Moreover, the results suggest that factors outside the patient-health care provider dyad (eg, familial connections) might also influence the patient's commitment to his or her health care provider.

  2. Health care provider perceptions of a query-based health information exchange: barriers and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Cochran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundHealth information exchange (HIE systems are implemented nationwide to integrate health information and facilitate communication among providers. The Nebraska Health Information Initiative is a state-wide HIE launched in 2009. Objective The purpose of this study was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of health care providers’ perspectives on a query-based HIE, including barriers to adoption and important functionality for continued utilization. MethodsWe surveyed 5618 Nebraska health care providers in 2013. Reminder letters were sent 30 days after the initial mailing. ResultsA total of 615 questionnaires (11% were completed. Of the 100 current users, 63 (63% indicated satisfaction with HIE. The most common reasons for adoption among current or previous users of an HIE (N = 198 were improvement in patient care (N = 111, 56% as well as receiving (N = 95, 48% and sending information (N = 80, 40% in the referral network. Cost (N = 233, 38% and loss of productivity (N = 220, 36% were indicated as the ‘major barriers’ to adoption by all respondents. Accessing a comprehensive patient medication list was identified as the most important feature of the HIE (N = 422, 69%. ConclusionsThe cost of HIE access and workflow integration are significant concerns of health care providers. Additional resources to assist practices plan the integration of the HIE into a sustainable workflow may be required before widespread adoption occurs. The clinical information sought by providers must also be readily available for continued utilization. Query-based HIEs must ensure that medication history, laboratory results and other desired clinical information be present, or long-term utilization of the HIE is unlikely. 

  3. Paternal postpartum depression: what health care providers should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Anna K; Ahmed, Azza H; Foli, Karen J; Coddington, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Paternal postpartum depression (PPD) is a clinically significant problem for families that is currently underscreened, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Maternal PPD is a well-known condition and has been extensively researched. In comparison, PPD in fathers and its potential effects on the family are not widely recognized. Studies have shown the importance of optimal mental health in fathers during the postpartum period. Negative effects of paternal PPD affect marital/partner relationships, infant bonding, and child development. To promote optimal health for parents and children, pediatric nurse practitioners must stay up to date on this topic. This article discusses the relationship of paternal PPD to maternal PPD; the consequences, signs, and symptoms; and the pediatric nurse practitioner's role in assessing and managing paternal PPD. Copyright © 2013 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Purchasing health care services from providers with unknown altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, William

    2005-01-01

    Cost-sharing rules for paying physicians have been advanced as a way of generating incentives for the provision of quality care, while recognizing their potential negative effects on production efficiency. However, the optimal sharing rate typically depends on the degree to which the physician acts in the interest of the patient, what we identify as the physician's altruism. Since the degree of altruism is likely to vary across physicians, and to be private information, the standard rules for setting the cost-sharing rate are unlikely to be optimal. This paper derives conditions for the optimal non-linear cost-sharing mechanism in the presence of asymmetric information about altruism, and shows how it can sometimes be implemented through a menu of linear cost-sharing schemes. The model can be used to rationalize the design of the fund-holder system for general practictioners that operated in the 1990s in the United Kingdom.

  5. Fostering a supportive moral climate for health care providers: Toward cultural safety and equity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel F. Almutairi

    Full Text Available In Western forms of health care delivery around the globe, research tells us that nurses experience excessive workloads as they face increasingly complex needs in the populations they serve, professional conflicts, and alienation from leadership in health care bureaucracies. These problems are practical and ethical as well as cultural. Cultural conflicts can arise when health care providers and the populations they serve come from diverse economic, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds. The purpose in this paper is to draw from Almutairi’s research with health care teams in Saudi Arabia to show the complexity of culturally and morally laden interactions between health care providers and patients and their families. Then, I will argue for interventions that promote social justice and cultural safety for nurses, other health care providers, and the individuals, families, and communities they serve. This will include addressing international implications for nursing practice, leadership, policy and research. Keywords: Moral climate, Social justice, Equity, Cultural diversity

  6. 47 CFR 54.613 - Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitations on supported services for rural health care providers. 54.613 Section 54.613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.613 Limitations on supported...

  7. Public health care providers and market competition: the case of Finnish occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaanpää, Eila; Linnosmaa, Ismo; Valtonen, Hannu

    2011-02-01

    As reforms in publicly funded health systems rely heavily on competition, it is important to know if and how public providers react to competition. In many European countries, it is empirically difficult to study public providers in different markets, but in Finnish occupational health services, both public and private for-profit and non-profit providers co-exist. We studied possible differences in public providers' performance (price, intensity of services, service mix-curative medical services/prevention, productivity and revenues) according to the competitiveness of the market. The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) collected data on clients, services and personnel for 1992, 1995, 1997, 2000 and 2004 from occupational health services (OHS) providers. Employers defray the costs of OHS and apply for reimbursement from the Social Insurance Institution (SII). The SII data was merged with FIOH's questionnaire. The unbalanced panel consisted of about 230 public providers, totalling 1,164 observations. Local markets were constructed from several municipalities based on commuting practices and regional collaboration. Competitiveness of the market was measured by the number of providers and by the Herfindahl index. The effect of competition was studied by ordinary least square regression analysis and panel models. The more competitive the environment was for a public provider the higher were intensity, productivity and the share of medical care. Fixed panel models showed that these differences were not due to differences and changes in the competitiveness of the market. Instead, in more competitive markets public providers had higher unit prices and higher revenues.

  8. Open communication: Recommendations for enhancing communication among primary care and mental health providers, services, and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shale L; Talmi, Ayelet

    2015-06-01

    Comments on the article "Please break the silence: Parents' views on communication between pediatric primary care and mental health providers" by Greene et al. (see record 2015-14521-001). The article highlights the need to improve communication between primary care and mental health care providers to better serve children and families. The report reaffirms that parents understand the value and necessity of collaborative care, as evidenced by the identification of gaps in consistency of bidirectional communication between providers in traditional and separate practice settings and the desire for improved care coordination. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V

    2015-02-01

    Burnout can create problems in every aspect of individual's' human life. It may have an adverse effect on interpersonal and family relations and can lead to a general negative attitude towards life. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether burnout is associated with the mental health status of health care providers. The sample in this study consisted of 240 health care employees. The Greek version of Maslach's Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used for measuring burnout levels and the Greek version of the Symptoms Rating Scale for Depression and Anxiety (SRSDA) questionnaire was used to evaluate health care providers' mental health status. Descriptive statistics were initially generated for sample characteristics. Normality was checked by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and data was processed with parametric tests. General linear models with MBI dimensions as independent variables and SRSDA subscales as dependent variables were used to determine the relation between burnout and mental health status. Statistics were processed with SPSS v. 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical significance was set at p=0.05. The average age of the sample is 40.00±7.95 years. Regarding gender the percentage of men is 21.40% (N=49) and of women is 78.60% (N=180). Overall the professional burnout of health care workers is moderate. The mean score for emotional exhaustion is 26.41, for personal accomplishment 36.70 and for depersonalization 9.81. The mean for each subscale of SRSDA is 8.23±6.79 for Depression Beck-21, 3.96±4.26 for Depression Beck-13, 4.91±4.44 for Melancholia, 6.32±4.35 for Asthenia and 6.36±4.72 for Anxiety. The results of general linear models with the MBI dimensions as independent variables and the SRSDA subscales as dependent variables are shown that emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment are statistically correlated with all subscales of SRSDA, while depersonalization is not correlated with any SRSDA subscale. Burnout appears to implicate

  10. The effect of financial incentives on the quality of health care provided by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Anthony; Sivey, Peter; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Willenberg, Lisa; Naccarella, Lucio; Furler, John; Young, Doris

    2011-09-07

    The use of blended payment schemes in primary care, including the use of financial incentives to directly reward 'performance' and 'quality' is increasing in a number of countries. There are many examples in the US, and the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QoF) for general practitioners (GPs) in the UK is an example of a major system-wide reform. Despite the popularity of these schemes, there is currently little rigorous evidence of their success in improving the quality of primary health care, or of whether such an approach is cost-effective relative to other ways to improve the quality of care. The aim of this review is to examine the effect of changes in the method and level of payment on the quality of care provided by primary care physicians (PCPs) and to identify:i) the different types of financial incentives that have improved quality;ii) the characteristics of patient populations for whom quality of care has been improved by financial incentives; andiii) the characteristics of PCPs who have responded to financial incentives. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, HealthSTAR, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychLIT, and ECONLIT. Searches of Internet-based economics and health economics working paper collections were also conducted. Finally, studies were identified through the reference lists of retrieved articles, websites of key organisations, and from direct contact with key authors in the field. Articles were included if they were published from 2000 to August 2009. Randomised controlled trials (RCT), controlled before and after studies (CBA), and interrupted time series analyses (ITS) evaluating the impact of different financial interventions on the quality of care delivered by primary healthcare physicians (PCPs). Quality of care was defined as patient reported outcome

  11. Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Burnout can create problems in every aspect of individual’s’ human life. It may have an adverse effect on interpersonal and family relations and can lead to a general negative attitude towards life. Aim: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether burnout is associated with the mental health status of health care providers. Material and Methods: The sample in this study consisted of 240 health care employees. The Greek version of Maslach’s Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used for measuring burnout levels and the Greek version of the Symptoms Rating Scale for Depression and Anxiety (SRSDA) questionnaire was used to evaluate health care providers’ mental health status. Descriptive statistics were initially generated for sample characteristics. Normality was checked by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and data was processed with parametric tests. General linear models with MBI dimensions as independent variables and SRSDA subscales as dependent variables were used to determine the relation between burnout and mental health status. Statistics were processed with SPSS v. 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical significance was set at p=0.05. Results: The average age of the sample is 40.00±7.95 years. Regarding gender the percentage of men is 21.40% (N=49) and of women is 78.60% (N=180). Overall the professional burnout of health care workers is moderate. The mean score for emotional exhaustion is 26.41, for personal accomplishment 36.70 and for depersonalization 9.81. The mean for each subscale of SRSDA is 8.23±6.79 for Depression Beck-21, 3.96±4.26 for Depression Beck-13, 4.91±4.44 for Melancholia, 6.32±4.35 for Asthenia and 6.36±4.72 for Anxiety. The results of general linear models with the MBI dimensions as independent variables and the SRSDA subscales as dependent variables are shown that emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment are statistically correlated with all subscales of SRSDA, while depersonalization is not correlated

  12. Trust in health care providers: factors predicting trust among homeless veterans over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berk-Clark, Carissa; McGuire, James

    2014-08-01

    We examined whether a combination of predisposing, enabling, need, and primary care experience variables would predict trust in medical health care providers for homeless veterans over 18 months. Linear mixed model analysis indicated that, among these variables, race, social support, service-connected disability status, and satisfaction and continuity with providers predicted trust in provider over time. Trust in providers improved during the initial stages of the relationship between patient and provider and then declined to slightly below baseline levels over time. Further research is needed to determine generalizability and effects of provider trust on patient health care status over longer periods of time.

  13. Climate change & infectious diseases in India: implications for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, V Ramana; Schramm, Paul J; Luber, George

    2013-12-01

    Climate change has the potential to influence the earth's biological systems, however, its effects on human health are not well defined. Developing nations with limited resources are expected to face a host of health effects due to climate change, including vector-borne and water-borne diseases such as malaria, cholera, and dengue. This article reviews common and prevalent infectious diseases in India, their links to climate change, and how health care providers might discuss preventive health care strategies with their patients.

  14. Communication strategies and accommodations utilized by health care providers with hearing loss: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Alanna R; Matt, Susan B; Wojnara, Danuta

    2014-03-01

    Poor communication between health care providers and patients may negatively impact patient outcomes, and enhancing communication is one way to improve outcomes. Effective communication is particularly important for health care providers who have hearing loss. The authors found that a systematic survey of the communication strategies and experiences of health care providers with hearing loss had not yet been conducted. In this pilot study, 32 health care professionals with hearing loss were recruited via the Association of Medical Professionals With Hearing Losses and were asked to complete a 28-question survey. Health care providers with hearing loss already employ strategies that all health care providers are encouraged to use in order to enhance patient–provider communication, and survey participants have found the strategies to be effective. The communication techniques and assistive technologies used by individuals with hearing loss seem to be effective: All participants reported feeling able to communicate effectively with patients at least most of the time. More research is needed to determine if use of these communication techniques has similar results for health care providers without hearing loss.

  15. Research Needs Assessment in the Health Insurance Organization: Level of Health Care Provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadkarim Bahadori

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Setting research priorities in the research management cycle is a key. It is important to set the research priorities to make optimal use of scarce resources. The aim of this research was to determine the research needs of Health Insurance Organization based on its health care centers research needs.Methods: This is a qualitative, descriptive and cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2011. A purposeful sample of 60 participants from 14 hospitals, seven dispensaries, five dental clinics, two rehabilitation centers, four radiology centers, six medical diagnostic laboratories, 12 pharmacies, and 20 medical offices that were contracted with the Health Insurance Organization in Iran was interviewed. The framework analysis method (a qualitative research method was used for analysis of interviews. Atlas-Ti software was used to analyze quantitative data, respectively. The topics were prioritized using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method through Expert Choice software.Results: Based on the problems extracted in our qualitative study, 12 research topics were proposed by the experts. Among these “Design of standard treatment protocols,” “Designing model of ranking the health care centers under contract,” and “Pathology of payment system” took the priority ranks of 1 to 3, earning the scores of 0.44, 0.42, and 0.37, respectively.Conclusion: Considering limited resources and unlimited needs and to prevent research resource wasting, conducting research related to health care providers in the Health Insurance Organization can help it achieve its goals.

  16. Health Care Providers’ Attitudes and Practices Regarding the use of Advance Directives in a Military Health Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-02

    providers’ erroneous beliefs that these documents are mainly for the terminally ill and elderly . Additionally, inadequate health care provider training...expected to die when injured due to lack of HCPs on the battlefield, lack of treatment options available, and death by secondary infection or malnourishment ...Doukas and McCullough (1995) all supported the counseling of healthy patients. Layson et al. (1994) stated that 70 to 92 % of elderly outpatients

  17. Coping of health care providers with the death of a patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Mlinšek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available RQ: With an aging population, health care professionals are often faced with the death of a patient in acute hospitals. The experience of dying patients’ to health care professionals and to the health care system brings many challenges that need to be faced.Purpose: The present study was to determine how health care providers are faced with the death of a patient, what is the care needed for the dying patient and how to participate in interdisciplinary team care of among themselves and family members of dying patients.Method: We conducted a small-scale quantitative survey of nursing care in a Slovenian acute hospital. To analyze the results, we used frequency statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient.Results: Health care providers need additional skills needed to care for a dying patient as well as to the family of the dying patient.They try to control distress of the dying experience reasonably and less with conversation. The effect on the loss of a patient affects work experience, but we did not notice any other effects. Theinvolvement of an interdisciplinary team in the care of the dying patient is satisfactory; family members are under-involved in the care.Organization: Health organizations that are more focused on acute treatment have to become aware of palliative care that needs to be included in nursing care as an integral process of care for the terminally ill. Health care staff need to communicate more with one another and go through additional training.Society: Attitudes to death in a broader cultural environment also affects the attitude of health workers towards death. Involvement of the social environment, especially family members, is very important.Originality: The survey was conducted on the basis of comparing two surveys.Limitations: The survey was conducted on a small sample size.

  18. Advancing adolescent health and health services in Saudi Arabia: exploring health-care providers' training, interest, and perceptions of the health-care needs of young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlBuhairan FS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fadia S AlBuhairan,1–3 Tina M Olsson3,4 1Department of Pediatrics, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4School of Social Work, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Background: Adolescent health is regarded as central to global health goals. Investments made in adolescent health and health services protect the improvements witnessed in child health. Though Saudi Arabia has a large adolescent population, adolescent health-care only began to emerge in recent years, yet widespread uptake has been very limited. Health-care providers are key in addressing and providing the necessary health-care services for adolescents, and so this study was conducted with the aim of identifying opportunities for the advancement of knowledge transfer for adolescent health services in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This Web-based, cross-sectional study was carried out at four hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Physicians and nurses were invited to participate in an online survey addressing their contact with adolescent patients, and training, knowledge, and attitudes towards adolescent health-care. Results: A total of 232 professionals participated. The majority (82.3% reported sometimes or always coming into contact with adolescent patients. Less than half (44%, however, had received any sort of training on adolescent health during their undergraduate or postgraduate education, and only 53.9% reported having adequate knowledge about the health-care needs of adolescents. Nurses perceived themselves as having more knowledge in the health-care needs of adolescents and reported feeling more comfortable in communicating with adolescents as compared with physicians. The majority of participants were interested in gaining further skills and knowledge in adolescent health-care and agreed or strongly agreed that adolescents have

  19. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) proposes to amend its regulation and internal policy documents concerning the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health services and hospice care. The proposed rulemaking would include home health services and hospice care under the VA regulation governing payment for other non-VA health care providers. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA has specifically contracted, this rulemaking will only affect providers who do not have existing negotiated contracts with VA. The proposed rule would also rescind internal guidance documents that could be interpreted as conflicting with the proposed rule.

  20. Impact of asthma education received from health care providers on parental illness representation in childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Sweeney, Kathleen; McMullen, Ann; Yoos, H Lorrie; Kitzmann, Harriet; Halterman, Jill S; Arcoleo, Kimberly Sidora; Anson, Elizabeth

    2007-04-01

    The burden of asthma has increased dramatically despite increased understanding of asthma and new medication regimens. Data reported here are part of a larger study investigating factors that influence parental asthma illness representation and the impact of this representation on treatment outcomes, including the parent/health care provider relationship. We investigated the influence of asthma related education provided by health care providers on these outcomes. After interviewing 228 parents of children with asthma, we found that asthma education received from the child's health care providers positively influenced parental belief systems, especially attitudes towards anti-inflammatory medications and facts about asthma. Parents who reported receiving more education also reported stronger partnerships with their child's health care provider. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Customer-centered strategic diversification: specialty health care provider moves towards primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clugston, M M

    1997-01-01

    A logistic regression model is used to analyze an OB/GYN'S move towards primary care. Current clients' use/no use response of the clinic as a primary care provider is the criterion variable. Predictor variables include new primary care services, expanded OB/GYN services, overall system utilization, and current insurance and physician status. Overall, only 37% of the clinic's current clients indicated they would utilize the clinic for primary care. Having a personal physician is a significant predictor of a client's decision to utilize the clinic's new primary care services. Other significant predictor variables are discussed.

  2. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mehrotra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ware G Kuschner, Sunayana Reddy, Nidhi Mehrotra, Harman S PaintalDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: Primary care providers should be aware of two new developments in nicotine addiction and smoking cessation: 1 the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e- cigarette; and 2 new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as “thirdhand smoke”. The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS. The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room

  3. Sickness presenteeism among health care providers in an academic tertiary care center in Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nuhait, Mohammed; Al Harbi, Khaled; Al Jarboa, Amjad; Bustami, Rami; Alharbi, Shmaylan; Masud, Nazish; Albekairy, Abdulkareem; Almodaimegh, Hind

    The term sickness presenteeism (SP) has been described as the act of going to work despite having a state of health that may be regarded as poor enough to justify sick leave. SP has been observed to be prevalent among three-quarters of health care providers (HCPs). Working while sick not only puts patients at risk but also decreases productivity and increases the probability of medical errors. Moreover, SP has been identified as a risk factor for many negative health outcomes among the HCPs themselves, such as depression, burnout, and serious cardiac events. The aim of this study was to identify the reasons for and prevalence of SP and perceptions of the impact of this practice on patient safety among HCPs. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 279 purposively selected healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, dentists, pharmacists and other health care professionals) working at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs-King Abdulaziz Medical City (MNGHA-KAMC). While nearly all of the participants (91%) believed that working while sick exposed patients to risk, the rate of SP during the past year was reported as 74%, and one fourth of respondents reported working while sick 3-4 times during the past year. More than half of the participants were not aware of the existence of a departmental policy regarding sick leave. The most common reasons reported for working while sick were not wanting to burden co-workers (71%), feelings of duty toward patients (67%), and avoiding an increased future workload caused by absence (59%). A lack of awareness regarding the existing rules and polices related to sick leave was reported by more than half of the participants. Several predisposing and enabling factors were reported as determinants influencing SP, e.g., observation of the practice of SP by peers and feelings of sympathy towards coworkers, including not wanting to overburden them, were reported to be determinants informing the decision of whether to work

  4. [Communication strategies used by health care professionals in providing palliative care to patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovo de Araújo, Monica Martins; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to verify the relevance and utilization of communication strategies in palliative care. This is a multicenter qualitative study using a questionnaire, performed from August of 2008 to July of 2009 with 303 health care professionals who worked with patients receiving palliative care. Data were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis. Most participants (57.7%) were unable to state at least one verbal communication strategy, and only 15.2% were able to describe five signs or non-verbal communication strategies. The verbal strategies most commonly mentioned were those related to answering questions about the disease/treatment. Among the non-verbal strategies used, the most common were affective touch, looking, smiling, physical proximity, and careful listening. Though professionals have assigned a high degree of importance to communication in palliative care, they showed poor knowledge regarding communication strategies. Final considerations include the necessity of training professionals to communicate effectively in palliative care.

  5. Being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout: putting one's life on hold to help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2010-02-01

    Being closely connected to a person experiencing illness may be a trying experience.This study aimed to illuminate meanings of being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout. Ten interviews were conducted with five people closely connected (i.e., family members or supportive friends) to health care providers recovering from burnout. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim, and the resulting text was interpreted using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method. One consequence of being closely connected to health care providers experiencing burnout is putting one's life on hold to help. In facing an almost unmanageable burden, those closely connected revealed their own suffering, emphasizing their need for support. Health care professionals need to be aware that those who are closely connected to a person experiencing burnout may lack knowledge about burnout and its related challenges. It is to be hoped such knowledge would allow significant others to better support the person experiencing burnout and promote their own health.

  6. The Health-Care Provider's Perspective of Education Before Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Paraag; Rosaasen, Nicola; Mansell, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Adequate patient education is essential for preparing potential recipients for kidney transplantation. Health-care providers play a vital role in education and can identify gaps in patient understanding. To identify deficits in patient knowledge from the perspective of a transplant multidisciplinary care team and determine whether their perceptions align with patients who have previously undergone a transplant. An open call was advertised for health-care providers to attend a focus group discussion regarding the educational needs of pretransplant patients in 1 Canadian center. A predetermined, semistructured set of questions was used to collect the views of transplant caregivers. A moderator, assistant moderator, and research assistant facilitated the discussion, which was transcribed verbatim. Paper surveys were distributed to collect opinions of those unable to attend or uncomfortable to voice their opinion in an open forum. Qualitative analysis software was used to identify any emergent themes. Results were compared to a previous study undertaken in transplant recipients. Despite pre- and posttransplant education, specific themes emerged including misconceptions about the assessment process and time on the wait list and the surgery, incongruency between patient expectations and outcome, and confusion regarding medications. Health-care provider perceptions were remarkably consistent with transplant recipients. Health-care providers identified gaps in patient understanding indicating that transplant candidates may not be internalizing what is taught. Innovative educational approaches may be needed to provide more successful patient education. Similarities between health-care provider and patient perceptions suggest that care providers are a valuable source of information.

  7. Does recent contact with a health care provider make a difference in malaria knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, S S; Souares, A; Sié, A; Sauerborn, R

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge and practices with respect to malaria are aspects that need to be considered as part of effective malaria programs. We assessed and compared malaria practices and knowledge among those who had recently visited a health care provider and those who had not. A matched, population-based case-control study was conducted among 338 women between 15 and 45 years of age and caretakers of children ≤ 9 years of age in Nouna, Burkina Faso. Little difference was found in the reported responses between the cases and controls, which indicates that recent visits to health care providers may not have an effect on malaria risk or knowledge. Differences were noted in malaria practices, which could suggest that health care providers are consulted only after home treatments fail. Therefore, programs and policies targeted to health care providers aimed at improving the dissemination of information may be of some benefit.

  8. Elements of patient-health-care provider communication related to cardiovascular rehabilitation referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhabib, Sanam; Chessex, Caroline; Murray, Judy; Grace, Sherry L

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation has been designed to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease. This study described (1) patient-health-care provider interactions regarding cardiovascular rehabilitation and (2) which discussion elements were related to patient referral. This was a prospective study of cardiovascular patients and their health-care providers. Discussion utterances were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Discussion between 26 health-care providers and 50 patients were recorded. Cardiovascular rehabilitation referral was related to greater health-care provider interactivity (odds ratio = 2.82, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-7.86) and less patient concern and worry (odds ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.89). Taking time for reciprocal discussion and allaying patient anxiety may promote greater referral. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Health care provider knowledge and routine management of pre-eclampsia in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sana; Qureshi, Rahat Najam; Khowaja, Asif Raza; Salam, Rehana; Vidler, Marianne; Sawchuck, Diane; von Dadelszen, Peter; Zaidi, Shujat; Bhutta, Zulfiqar

    2016-09-30

    Maternal mortality ratio is 276 per 100,000 live births in Pakistan. Eclampsia is responsible for one in every ten maternal deaths despite the fact that management of this disease is inexpensive and has been available for decades. Many studies have shown that health care providers in low and middle-income countries have limited training to manage patients with eclampsia. Hence, we aimed to explore the knowledge of different cadres of health care providers regarding aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia and current management practices. We conducted a mixed method study in the districts of Hyderabad and Matiari in Sindh province, Pakistan. Focus group discussions and interviews were conducted with community health care providers, which included Lady Health Workers and their supervisors; traditional birth attendants and facility care providers. In total seven focus groups and 26 interviews were conducted. NVivo 10 was used for analysis and emerging themes and sub-themes were drawn. All participants were providing care for pregnant women for more than a decade except one traditional birth attendant and two doctors. The most common cause of pre-eclampsia mentioned by community health care providers was stress of daily life: the burden of care giving, physical workload, short birth spacing and financial constraints. All health care provider groups except traditional birth attendants correctly identified the signs, symptoms, and complications of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia and were referring such women to tertiary health facilities. Only doctors were aware that magnesium sulphate is recommended for eclampsia management and prevention; however, they expressed fears regarding its use at first and secondary level health facilities. This study found several gaps in knowledge regarding aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of pre-eclampsia among health care providers in Sindh. Findings suggest that lesser knowledge regarding management of pre

  10. Impact of comorbidity on the individual's choice of primary health care provider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zielinski, Andrzej; Håkansson, Anders; Beckman, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective. This study examined whether age, gender, and comorbidity were of importance for an individual's choice of listing with either a public or a private primary health care (PHC) practice. Design and setting. The study was a register-based closed cohort study in one private and one...... a public instead of private PHC provider increased with higher age and comorbidity level of the individuals. It is suggested that using a measure of comorbidity can help us understand more about the chronically ill individual's choice of health care provider. This would be of importance when health care...

  11. The experience of primary care providers with an integrated mental health care program in safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Wayne D; Ratzliff, Anna; Harrison, David; Chan, Ya-Fen; Vannoy, Steven; Unützer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Primary care providers participating in a statewide implementation of an integrated mental health care program for "safety-net" patients in primary care clinics were surveyed to elicit their experiences and level of satisfaction. Quantitative analyses were performed to identify respondent characteristics and satisfaction with the program. Qualitative analyses were done to identify common themes in response to the question "How could psychiatric consultation [in the program] be improved?" Primary care providers were generally satisfied with the integrated mental health care program and raised several concerns that suggest important principles for successful future implementations of these types of programs.

  12. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA has specifically contracted, this rulemaking will only affect home health and hospice care providers who do not have existing negotiated contracts with VA. This rule also rescinds internal guidance documents that could be interpreted as conflicting with this final rule.

  13. Community Mental Health Care Providers' Understanding of Recovery Principles and Accounts of Directiveness with Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Stein, Catherine H

    2017-12-01

    The present qualitative study examined community mental health providers' accounts of their therapeutic interactions with adults with serious mental illness in a recovery-oriented model of care. Ten long-time mental health care providers discussed their understanding of recovery principles, their use of directive practices, and factors that shape their work with consumers. Content analysis of mental health providers' accounts suggest that providers had no difficulty articulating basic principles of recovery-oriented care. Providers reported engaging in directive practices with consumers and described using traditional clinical factors such as level of functioning, degree of psychiatric symptoms, safety concerns, and legal status to assess consumers' ability for autonomous decision making. Providers generally did not express tension between their views of mental health recovery and their beliefs about utilizing directive approaches with consumers. Implications of present findings for research and practice are discussed.

  14. A mixed logit model of health care provider choice: analysis of NSS data for rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Bijan J

    2006-09-01

    In order to address the persistent problems of access to and delivery of health care in rural India, a better understanding of the individual provider choice decision is required. This paper is an attempt in this direction as it investigates the determinants of outpatient health care provider choice in rural India in the mixed multinomial logit (MMNL) framework. This is the first application of the mixed logit to the modeling of health care utilization. We also use the multiple imputation technique to impute the missing prices of providers that an individual did not visit when she was ill. Using data from National Sample Survey Organization of India, we find the following: price and distance to a health facility play significant roles in health care provider choice decision; when health status is poor, distance plays a less significant role in an adult's provider choice decision; price elasticity of demand for outpatient care varies with income, with low-income groups being more price-sensitive than high-income ones. Furthermore, outpatient care for children is more price-elastic than that for adults, which reflects the socio-economic structure of a typical household in rural India where an adult's health is more important than that of a child for the household's economic sustenance. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Current practice and knowledge of oral care for cancer patients: a survey of supportive health care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, Gerry J.; Epstein, Joel B.; Williams, Karen B.; Gorsky, Meir; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.

    2005-01-01

    The Oral Care Study Section of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO) conducted a survey on clinical practices of oral/dental management of cancer patients among supportive health care providers. The main purpose was

  16. LGBT Cultural Competence and Interventions to Help Oncology Nurses and Other Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radix, Asa; Maingi, Shail

    2018-02-01

    To define and give an overview of the importance of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) cultural competency and offer some initial steps on how to improve the quality of care provided by oncology nurses and other health care professionals. A review of the existing literature on cultural competency. LGBT patients experience cancer and several other diseases at higher rates than the rest of the population. The reasons for these health care disparities are complex and include minority stress, fear of discrimination, lower rates of insurance, and lack of access to quality, culturally competent care. Addressing the health care disparities experienced by LGBT individuals and families requires attention to the actual needs, language, and support networks used by patients in these communities. Training on how to provide quality care in a welcoming and non-judgmental way is available and can improve health equity. Health care professionals and institutions that acquire cultural competency training can improve the overall health of LGBT patients who currently experience significant health care disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Primary Health Care Providers' Perspectives: Facilitating Older Patients' Access to Community Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Wu, Amina; Lam, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study examined in this article was to understand how non-physician health care professionals working in Canadian primary health care settings facilitate older persons' access to community support services (CSSs). The use of CSSs has positive impacts for clients, yet they are underused from lack of awareness. Using a qualitative description approach, we interviewed 20 health care professionals from various disciplines and primary health care models about the processes they use to link older patients to CSSs. Participants collaborated extensively with interprofessional colleagues within and outside their organizations to find relevant CSSs. They actively engaged patients and families in making these linkages and ensured follow-up. It was troubling to find that they relied on out-of-date resources and inefficient search strategies to find CSSs. Our findings can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support primary health care providers in linking older adults to relevant CSSs.

  18. Little congruence between health care provider and patient perceptions of counselling on gestational weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsiv, Olha; Bracken, Keyna; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Sword, Wendy; Taylor, Valerie H; McDonald, Sarah D

    2012-06-01

    To determine the self-reported counselling practices of health care providers with regard to prenatal weight gain and the risks of inappropriate gain. We conducted a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire at obstetrician, midwifery, and family medicine clinics in Hamilton, Ontario. Health care providers were eligible to participate if they provided prenatal care and could read English sufficiently well to complete the survey. Forty-two health care providers completed the survey; of these, 95% reported counselling women to gain a specific amount of weight, and 81% reported that they recommended values that were in accordance with the 2009 Institute of Medicine/Health Canada guidelines. The risks of excess and inadequate gain were reported as being discussed with their patients by 87% and 76% of health care providers, respectively. In this first study to the best of our knowledge of gestational weight gain counselling since the publication of the 2009 guidelines, most health care providers reported discussing weight gain and the risks of inappropriate gain, which is incongruent with previously published information on their patients' reports of counselling.

  19. The eICU research institute - a collaboration between industry, health-care providers, and academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShea, Michael; Holl, Randy; Badawi, Omar; Riker, Richard R; Silfen, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As the volume of data that is electronically available promliferates, the health-care industry is identifying better ways to use this data for patient care. Ideally, these data are collected in real time, can support point-of-care clinical decisions, and, by providing instantaneous quality metrics, can create the opportunities to improve clinical practice as the patient is being cared for. The business-world technology supporting these activities is referred to as business intelligence, which offers competitive advantage, increased quality, and operational efficiencies. The health-care industry is plagued by many challenges that have made it a latecomer to business intelligence and data-mining technology, including delayed adoption of electronic medical records, poor integration between information systems, a lack of uniform technical standards, poor interoperability between complex devices, and the mandate to rigorously protect patient privacy. Efforts at developing a health care equivalent of business intelligence (which we will refer to as clinical intelligence) remains in its infancy. Until basic technology infrastructure and mature clinical applications are developed and implemented throughout the health-care system, data aggregation and interpretation cannot effectively progress. The need for this approach in health care is undisputed. As regional and national health information networks emerge, we need to develop cost-effective systems that reduce time and effort spent documenting health-care data while increasing the application of knowledge derived from that data.

  20. The Effect of Health Information Technology on Health Care Provider Communication: A Mixed-Method Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Harrod, Molly; Sales, Anne; Hofer, Timothy P; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2015-06-11

    Communication failures between physicians and nurses are one of the most common causes of adverse events for hospitalized patients, as well as a major root cause of all sentinel events. Communication technology (ie, the electronic medical record, computerized provider order entry, email, and pagers), which is a component of health information technology (HIT), may help reduce some communication failures but increase others because of an inadequate understanding of how communication technology is used. Increasing use of health information and communication technologies is likely to affect communication between nurses and physicians. The purpose of this study is to describe, in detail, how health information and communication technologies facilitate or hinder communication between nurses and physicians with the ultimate goal of identifying how we can optimize the use of these technologies to support effective communication. Effective communication is the process of developing shared understanding between communicators by establishing, testing, and maintaining relationships. Our theoretical model, based in communication and sociology theories, describes how health information and communication technologies affect communication through communication practices (ie, use of rich media; the location and availability of computers) and work relationships (ie, hierarchies and team stability). Therefore we seek to (1) identify the range of health information and communication technologies used in a national sample of medical-surgical acute care units, (2) describe communication practices and work relationships that may be influenced by health information and communication technologies in these same settings, and (3) explore how differences in health information and communication technologies, communication practices, and work relationships between physicians and nurses influence communication. This 4-year study uses a sequential mixed-methods design, beginning with a

  1. Hospital-community interface: a qualitative study on patients with cancer and health care providers' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admi, Hanna; Muller, Ella; Ungar, Lea; Reis, Shmuel; Kaffman, Michael; Naveh, Nurit; Shadmi, Efrat

    2013-10-01

    Patients with cancer must deal with complex and fragmented healthcare systems in addition to coping with the burden of their illness. To improve oncology treatment along the care continuum, the barriers and facilitators for streamlined oncologic care need to be better understood. This study sought to gain insight into the hospital-community interface from the point of view of patients with cancer, their families, and health care providers on both sides of the interface i.e., the community and hospital settings. The sample comprised 37 cancer patients, their family members, and 40 multidisciplinary health care providers. Twelve participants were interviewed individually and 65 took part in 10 focus groups. Based on the grounded theory approach, theoretical sampling and constant comparative analyses were used. Two major concepts emerged: "ambivalence and confusion" and "overcoming healthcare system barriers." Ambiguity was expressed regarding the roles of health care providers in the community and in the hospital. We identified three main strategies by which these patients and their families overcame barriers within the system: patients and families became their own case managers; patients and health care providers used informal routes of communication; and nurse specialists played a significant role in managing care. The heavy reliance on informal routes of communication and integration by patients and providers emphasizes the urgent need for change in order to improve coordinating mechanisms for hospital-community oncologic care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ways of Doing: Restorative Practices, Governmentality, and Provider Conduct in Post-Apartheid Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Goudge, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider the conduct of post-apartheid health care in a policy context directed toward entrenching democracy, ensuring treatment-adherent patients, and creating a healthy populace actively responsible for their own health. We ask how tuberculosis treatment, antiretroviral therapy, and maternal services are delivered within South Africa's health system, an institutional site of colonial and apartheid injustice, and democratic reform. Using Foucauldian and post-Foucauldian notions of governmentality, we explore provider ways of doing to, for, and with patients in three health subdistricts. Although restorative provider engagements are expected in policy, older authoritarian and paternalistic norms persist in practice. These challenge and reshape, even 'undo' democratic assertions of citizenship, while producing compliant, self-responsible patients. Alongside the need to address pervasive structural barriers to health care, a restorative approach requires community participation, provider accountability, and a health system that does with providers as much as providers who do with patients.

  3. Please break the silence: Parents' views on communication between pediatric primary care and mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Carolyn A; Ford, Julian D; Ward-Zimmerman, Barbara; Foster, Dana

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of parents' preferences regarding the sharing of information between their children's primary care and mental health providers. Fifty-five parents with a child who was actively engaged in mental health treatment completed an anonymous survey while accompanying their child to either a primary care or mental health clinic appointment. This brief measure elicited parents' experiences with and preferences for treatment coordination across their children's primary care and mental health providers, with a focus on communication practices. Parents consistently described communication among their children's primary care and mental health providers as important, yet frequently reported that such communication was not currently taking place. Further, parents reported that they were often called upon to act as "communication bridges" between professionals caring for their children. Implications for the collaborative pediatric and mental health care of children as well as recommendations for improving communication between mental health and pediatric providers are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Please break the silence: Parents’ views on communication between pediatric primary care and mental health providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Carolyn A.; Ford, Julian D.; Ward-Zimmerman, Barbara; Foster, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of parents’ preferences regarding the sharing of information between their children's primary care and mental health providers. Methods Fifty-five parents with a child who was actively engaged in mental health treatment completed an anonymous survey while accompanying their child to either a primary care or mental health clinic appointment. This brief measure elicited parents’ experiences with and preferences for treatment coordination across their children's primary care and mental health providers, with a focus on communication practices. Results Parents consistently described communication amongst their children's primary care and mental health providers as important, yet frequently reported that such communication was not currently taking place. Further, parents reported that they were often called upon to act as “communication bridges” between professionals caring for their children. Discussion Implications for the collaborative pediatric and mental health care of children as well as recommendations for improving communication between mental health and pediatric providers are discussed. PMID:25844776

  5. An Integrated Program to Train Local Health Care Providers to Meet Post-Disaster Mental Health Needs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kutcher, Stan; Chehil, Sonia; Roberts, Thorne

    2005-01-01

    ... & evidenced-based treatment of mental disorders occurring after a natural disaster. The approach also provided for ongoing, sustainable mental health care delivered in the community setting, as advocated by the World Health Organization...

  6. HIV health-care providers' burnout: can organizational culture make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; Oetzel, John; Hill, Ricky; Avila, Magdalena; Archiopoli, Ashley; Wilcox, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing those working with people living with HIV (PLWH) is the increased potential for burnout, which results in increased turnover and reduces quality of care provided for PLWH. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship among HIV health-care providers' burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and organizational culture including teamwork, involvement in decision-making, and critical appraisal. Health-care providers for PLWH (N = 47) in federally funded clinics in a southwestern state completed a cross-sectional survey questionnaire about their perceptions of organizational culture and burnout. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that positive organizational culture (i.e., teamwork) was negatively related to emotional burnout (p organizational culture (i.e., critical appraisal) was positively related to depersonalization (p organizational communication interventions might protect HIV health-care providers from burnout.

  7. Understanding integrated mental health care in "real-world" primary care settings: What matters to health care providers and clients for evaluation and improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Allyson; Sunderji, Nadiya; Jansz, Gwen; Ghavam-Rassoul, Abbas

    2017-09-01

    The integration of mental health specialists into primary care has been widely advocated to deliver evidence-based mental health care to a defined population while improving access, clinical outcomes, and cost efficiency. Integrated care has been infrequently and inconsistently translated into real-world settings; as a result, the key individual components of effective integrated care remain unclear. This article reports findings from a qualitative study that explored provider and client experiences of integrated care. We conducted in-depth interviews with integrated care providers (n = 13) and clients (n = 9) to understand their perspectives and experiences of integrated care including recommended areas for quality measurement and improvement. The authors used qualitative content and reflexive thematic analytic approaches to synthesize the interview data. Clients and integrated care providers agreed regarding the overarching concepts of the what, how, and why of integrated care including co-location of care; continuity of care; team composition and functioning; client centeredness; and comprehensive care for individuals and populations. Providers and clients proposed a number of dimensions that could be the focus for quality measurement and evaluation, illuminating what is needed for successful context-sensitive spreading and scaling of integrated care interventions. With a mounting gap between the empirical support for integrated care approaches and the implementation of these models, there is a need to clarify the aims of integrated care and the key ingredients required for widespread implementation outside of research settings. This study has important implications for future integrated care research, and health care provider and client engagement in the quality movement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Can naturopathy provide answers to the escalating health care costs in India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Jaya Prasad

    2015-01-01

    There are substantial areas of overlap between naturopathy and public health, which include a focus on health rather than disease, a preventive approach, and an emphasis on health promotion and health education. Public health can look to naturopathy for answers to the emergence of chronic disease through natural therapies, many of which can take the role of primordial and primary prevention of several diseases. Some selected naturopathic therapies include nutrition, hydrotherapy, fasting therapy, yoga, behavioral therapy, and health promotion. We must reorient our focus on prevention and wellness to make a true impact on escalating health care costs. With the National Health Policy in India emphasizing the need for integrating the Indian Systems of Medicines with modern medicine, now is the right time for naturopathy and public health to come together to provide a holistic health care system. PMID:26151012

  9. Can naturopathy provide answers to the escalating health care costs in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prasad Tripathy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There are substantial areas of overlap between naturopathy and public health, which include a focus on health rather than disease, a preventive approach, and an emphasis on health promotion and health education. Public health can look to naturopathy for answers to the emergence of chronic disease through natural therapies, many of which can take the role of primordial and primary prevention of several diseases. Some selected naturopathic therapies include nutrition, hydrotherapy, fasting therapy, yoga, behavioral therapy, and health promotion. We must reorient our focus on prevention and wellness to make a true impact on escalating health care costs. With the National Health Policy in India emphasizing the need for integrating the Indian Systems of Medicines with modern medicine, now is the right time for naturopathy and public health to come together to provide a holistic health care system.

  10. Primary care provider approaches to preventive health delivery: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Hemalatha; Spigner, Clarence; McKinney, Christy M; Wong, Christopher J

    2018-01-08

    Aim The objective of this study was to seek decision-making insights on the provider level to gain understanding of the values that shape how providers deliver preventive health in the primary care setting. The primary care clinic is a core site for preventive health delivery. While many studies have identified barriers to preventive health, less is known regarding how primary care providers (PCPs) make preventive health decisions such as what services to provide, under what circumstances, and why they might choose one over another. Qualitative methods were chosen to deeply explore these issues. We conducted semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with 21 PCPs at clinics affiliated with an academic medical center. Interviews with providers were recorded and transcribed. We conducted a qualitative analysis to identify themes and develop a theoretical framework using Grounded Theory methods. Findings The following themes were revealed: longitudinal care with an established PCP-patient relationship is perceived as integral to preventive health; conflict and doubt accompany non-preventive visits; PCPs defer preventive health for pragmatic reasons; when preventive health is addressed, providers use multiple contextual factors to decide which interventions are discussed; and PCPs desired team-based preventive health delivery, but wish to maintain their role when shared decision-making is required. We present a conceptual framework called Pragmatic Deferral.

  11. Job satisfaction of primary health-care providers (public sector in urban setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job satisfaction is determined by a discrepancy between what one wants in a job and what one has in a job. The core components of information necessary for what satisfies and motivates the health work force in our country are missing at policy level. Therefore present study will help us to know the factors for job satisfaction among primary health care providers in public sector. Materials and Methods: Present study is descriptive in nature conducted in public sector dispensaries/primary urban health centers in Delhi among health care providers. Pretested structured questionnaire was administered to 227 health care providers. Data was analyzed using SPSS and relevant statistical test were applied. Results: Analysis of study reveals that ANMs are more satisfied than MOs, Pharmacist and Lab assistants/Lab technicians; and the difference is significant (P < 0.01. Age and education level of health care providers don′t show any significant difference in job satisfaction. All the health care providers are dissatisfied from the training policies and practices, salaries and opportunities for career growth in the organization. Majority of variables studied for job satisfaction have low scores. Five factor were identified concerned with job satisfaction in factor analysis. Conclusion: Job satisfaction is poor for all the four groups of health care providers in dispensaries/primary urban health centers and it is not possible to assign a single factor as a sole determinant of dissatisfaction in the job. Therefore it is recommended that appropriate changes are required at the policy as well as at the dispensary/PUHC level to keep the health work force motivated under public sector in Delhi.

  12. Association of vaccine-related attitudes and beliefs between parents and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergler, Michelle J; Omer, Saad B; Pan, William K Y; Navar-Boggan, Ann Marie; Orenstein, Walter; Marcuse, Edgar K; Taylor, James; DeHart, M Patricia; Carter, Terrell C; Damico, Anthony; Halsey, Neal; Salmon, Daniel A

    2013-09-23

    Health care providers influence parental vaccination decisions. Over 90% of parents report receiving vaccine information from their child's health care provider. The majority of parents of vaccinated children and children exempt from school immunization requirements report their child's primary provider is a good source for vaccine information. The role of health care providers in influencing parents who refuse vaccines has not been fully explored. The objective of the study was to determine the association between vaccine-related attitudes and beliefs of health care providers and parents. We surveyed parents and primary care providers of vaccinated and unvaccinated school age children in four states in 2002-2003 and 2005. We measured key immunization beliefs including perceived risks and benefits of vaccination. Odds ratios for associations between parental and provider responses were calculated using logistic regression. Surveys were completed by 1367 parents (56.1% response rate) and 551 providers (84.3% response rate). Parents with high confidence in vaccine safety were more likely to have providers with similar beliefs, however viewpoints regarding disease susceptibility and severity and vaccine efficacy were not associated. Parents whose providers believed that children get more immunizations than are good for them had 4.6 higher odds of holding that same belief compared to parents whose providers did not have that belief. The beliefs of children's health care providers and parents, including those regarding vaccine safety, are similar. Provider beliefs may contribute to parental decisions to accept, delay or forgo vaccinations. Parents may selectively choose providers who have similar beliefs to their own. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. "Are you still driving?" Metasynthesis of patient preferences for communication with health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Marian E; Scott, Kenneth; Jones, Jacqueline; Diguiseppi, Carolyn

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this study was to synthesize published qualitative studies to identify older adults' preferences for communication about driving with health care providers. Health care providers play a key role in addressing driving safety and driving retirement with older adults, but conversations about driving can be difficult. Guides exist for family members and providers, but to date less is known about the types of communication and messages older drivers want from their health care providers. A qualitative metasynthesis of studies published on or before October 10, 2014, in databases (PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Web of Science) and grey literature was performed. Twenty-two published studies representing 518 older adult drivers met the following inclusion criteria: the study (1) was about driving; (2) involved older drivers; (3) was qualitative (rather than quantitative or mixed methods); and (4) contained information on older drivers' perspectives about communication with health care providers. We identified 5 major themes regarding older adults' communication preferences: (1) driving discussions are emotionally charged; (2) context matters; (3) providers are trusted and viewed as authority figures; (4) communication should occur over a period of time rather than suddenly; and (5) older adults desire agency in the decision to stop driving. Various stakeholders involved in older driver safety should consider older drivers' perspectives regarding discussions about driving. Health care providers can respect and empower older drivers-and support their family members-through tactful communication about driving safety and mobility transitions during the life course.

  14. The provision of health and social care services for older people by respite providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David

    2013-10-01

    Respite services have been established to support family carers by providing a break from the responsibilities of caregiving. However the literature and anecdotal evidence suggests that respite services offer carers much more than just providing a period of rest. This study was initiated to identify and describe the health and social care services that are offered to family carers and care-recipients by respite services in South Australia. The findings show that respite providers offer a service to both the family carer and care-recipient. Both groups are offered socialisation and engagement opportunities, and care-recipients have access to a diverse range of health care services. The description of respite that emerges from this study is that of a complex service offering much more than just a period of rest from caregiving duties.

  15. Challenges to HIV prevention in psychiatric settings: Perceptions of South African mental health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Pamela Y.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health services in South Africa increasingly feel the brunt of the AIDS epidemic. Despite the high prevalence of infection in the psychiatric setting, HIV risk reduction interventions targeting South Africans with psychiatric illness remain few and far between. The attitudes of mental health care providers about sexual relations and HIV among people with mental illness continue to influence the extent to which these issues are addressed in care settings. This study examines these attit...

  16. [Increased financial risks for health insurers: a challenge for providers of mental health care in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daansen, P J; van Schilt, J

    2014-01-01

    As from 2014 Dutch health insurance companies will bear the full financial risk for their clients in mental health care. Over the next years the existing risk settlement shared between insurance companies will gradually be brought to a close. Municipalities and the Ministry of Justice are already responsible for or will soon become responsible for financing health care for adolescents, patients with severe psychiatric disorders and forensic psychiatric patients. As a result, the health insurance companies are beginning to impose ever stricter conditions regarding the care 'product' they are 'buying'. To study the possible consequences, for mental health care institutions, of the increased risk to be borne by health care insurers. Use was made of relevant marketing literature and literature relating to mental health care. Studies of Dutch mental health care literature indicate that in the future the purchasing procedure will no longer consider the immediate treatment outcome as the sole performance indicator but will also take into account additional factors such as long-term improvements in patients' health, customer satisfaction and degree of patient participation, patient empowerment and autonomy. In formulating the details of their health products and business strategies, health care providers will now have to take into account not only the efficacy of the treatment they provide but also the purchasing policy and strategy of the health insurance companies.

  17. Impact of Provider Incentives on Quality and Value of Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Tim; Maurer, Kristin A; Ryan, Andrew M

    2017-03-20

    The use of financial incentives to improve quality in health care has become widespread. Yet evidence on the effectiveness of incentives suggests that they have generally had limited impact on the value of care and have not led to better patient outcomes. Lessons from social psychology and behavioral economics indicate that incentive programs in health care have not been effectively designed to achieve their intended impact. In the United States, Medicare's Hospital Readmission Reduction Program and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, created under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), provide evidence on how variations in the design of incentive programs correspond with differences in effect. As financial incentives continue to be used as a tool to increase the value and quality of health care, improving the design of programs will be crucial to ensure their success.

  18. care Providers in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and eighty six respondents (77.7%) were aware of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT). Awareness ... Key Words: malaria in pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria control, health care providers. Department of Obstetrics .... Auxiliary nurses do not have formal training prior to employment.

  19. Approaches to health-care provider education and professional development in perinatal depression: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Legere, Laura E.; Wallace, Katherine; Bowen, Angela; McQueen, Karen; Montgomery, Phyllis; Evans, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    Background Perinatal depression is the most common mental illness experienced by pregnant and postpartum women, yet it is often under-detected and under-treated. Some researchers suggest this may be partly influenced by a lack of education and professional development on perinatal depression among health-care providers, which can negatively affect care and contribute to stigmatization of women experiencing altered mood. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of...

  20. Promoting child development and behavioral health: family child care providers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Crowley, Angela A; Curry, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Given the significant proportion of children in nonparental child care and the importance of early life experiences on development, interventions to improve a child care provider's ability to enhance a young child's development and behavior are essential. Such interventions require understanding of and responsiveness to the provider's self-perceived roles, responsibilities, and willingness to engage in such interventions, yet prior research is limited. The purpose of the study was to characterize licensed family child care provider perspectives as a first step toward designing effective provider-based interventions to improve children's development and behavior. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews with licensed family child care providers serving economically disadvantaged children. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and synthesized into common themes using the constant comparative method of qualitative data analysis. The family child care providers described five domains related to their role in child development and behavior: (a) promotion, (b) assessment, (c) advising parents, (d) acknowledging barriers, and (e) their own skill development. The family child care providers we interviewed describe how the developmental and behavioral health of children is an important aspect of their role and identify innovative and feasible ways to enhance their skills. Understanding the self-perceived role, responsibility, and willingness of child care providers is an important foundation to designing effective interventions to achieve high-quality child care.

  1. An Opportunity for Healing and Holistic Care: Exploring the Roles of Health Care Providers Working Within Northern Canadian Aboriginal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Zaida; Holmes, Dave; Chartrand, Larry

    2016-05-22

    The purpose of this qualitative study was exploring what the roles and challenges of health care providers working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities are and what resources can help support or impede their efforts in working toward addressing health inequities within these communities. The qualitative research conducted was influenced by a postcolonial epistemology. The works of theorists Fanon on colonization and racial construction, Kristeva on semiotics and abjection, and Foucault on power/knowledge, governmentality, and biopower were used in providing a theoretical framework. Critical discourse analysis of 25 semistructured interviews with health care providers was used to gain a better understanding of their roles and challenges while working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities. Within this research study, three significant findings emerged from the data. First, the Aboriginal person's identity was constructed in relation to the health care provider's role of delivering essential health services. Second, health care providers were not treating the "ill" patient, but rather treating the patient for being "ill." Third, health care providers were treating the Aboriginal person for being "Aboriginal" by separating the patient from his or her identity. The treatment involved reforming the Aboriginal patient from the condition of being "Aboriginal." © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Training providers on issues of race and racism improve health care equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stephen C; Prasad, Shailendra; Hackman, Heather W

    2015-05-01

    Race is an independent factor in health disparity. We developed a training module to address race, racism, and health care. A group of 19 physicians participated in our training module. Anonymous survey results before and after the training were compared using a two-sample t-test. The awareness of racism and its impact on care increased in all participants. White participants showed a decrease in self-efficacy in caring for patients of color when compared to white patients. This training was successful in deconstructing white providers' previously held beliefs about race and racism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Exploring health care providers' perceptions of the needs of stroke carers: informing development of an optimal health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Casey L; Moore, Gaye; Rolley, John X; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Gonzales, Graeme; Hsueh, Ya-Seng Arthur; Castle, David

    2014-01-01

    Health care provider experiences of the carer have been researched, but little is written about how these can inform development of support programs. This study aimed to (1) explore health care provider perceptions of stroke carer roles and support needs and (2) examine carer needs across the stroke care trajectory to assist with development of an Optimal Health Program (OHP) to support carers. This study is part of a staged program of research that will evaluate and refine the OHP. Four dual-moderated semi-structured focus groups of stroke health care providers across acute, subacute, and community rehabilitation services were conducted. Facilitators used a semi-structured focus group schedule to guide discussion. Sessions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic and content analysis. Three key themes emerged: transition, information, and impact of stroke. A number of subthemes highlighted the distinct roles of health care providers and carers. Specific elements of the OHP were identified as having the potential to advance support for carers across the stroke care trajectory. Findings support the integration of an OHP for carers within existing stroke care services in Australian public hospital and community settings. This study suggests how health care provider experiences could inform a self-management OHP to assist carers in navigating stroke services and to address their health-related concerns.

  4. Health care providers underestimate symptom intensities of cancer patients: A multicenter European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laugsand, E.A.; Sprangers, M.A.G.; Bjordal, K.; Skorpen, F.; Kaasa, S.; Klepstad, P.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many patients with advanced cancer depend upon health care providers for symptom assessment. The extent of agreement between patient and provider symptom assessments and the association of agreement with demographic- and disease-related factors was examined. METHODS: This

  5. Depression and Suicidality in Gay Men: Implications for Health Care Providers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Carrie; Oliffe, John L.; Kelly, Mary T.; Ferlatte, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Gay men are a subgroup vulnerable to depression and suicidality. The prevalence of depression among gay men is three times higher than the general adult population. Because depression is a known risk factor for suicide, gay men are also at high risk for suicidality. Despite the high prevalence of depression and suicidality, health researchers and health care providers have tended to focus on sexual health issues, most often human immunodeficiency virus in gay men. Related to this, gay men’s h...

  6. Power Relations and Health Care Communication in Older Adulthood: Educating Recipients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliassen, A Henry

    2016-12-01

    Unequal power relations lie just below the surface in much of today's discourse on health care communication with older adults. Focusing on pathologies or deficits tends to reinforce stereotypes of frailty and dependency, thus framing elders as a vulnerable group requiring special assistance. Implicit stereotyping frequently colors interactions of health care personnel with older clients and their families-interactions likely to affect elders' perceptions and health outcomes. Health care providers need to be attuned to the vast and growing diversity in today's older population, wherein many older adults are exemplars of what it takes to marshal resources and cope with multifaceted challenges. Thus, elders have the potential to teach medical personnel through narratives of resilience as well as tribulation. This potential can be fully realized, however, only in contexts where communication patterns characterized by paternalism, consumerism, and collaboration are mutually recognized and selectively challenged or implemented. Promising interventions to facilitate health care communication in older adulthood might well be directed toward (a) educating both recipients and providers to become more mindful of cues that evoke stereotypical thinking, (b) promoting an institutional culture that normalizes situationally appropriate assertive responses to stereotyping, and (c) formally ratifying older adults' life experience in the training of health care personnel. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Job satisfaction and retention of health-care providers in Afghanistan and Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Linda; Kim, Young Mi; Juon, Hee-Soon; Tappis, Hannah; Noh, Jin Won; Zainullah, Partamin; Rozario, Aleisha

    2014-02-17

    This study describes job satisfaction and intention to stay on the job among primary health-care providers in countries with distinctly different human resources crises, Afghanistan and Malawi. Using a cross-sectional design, we enrolled 87 health-care providers in 32 primary health-care facilities in Afghanistan and 360 providers in 10 regional hospitals in Malawi. The study questionnaire was used to assess job satisfaction, intention to stay on the job and five features of the workplace environment: resources, performance recognition, financial compensation, training opportunities and safety. Descriptive analyses, exploratory factor analyses for scale development, bivariate correlation analyses and bivariate and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted. The multivariate model for Afghanistan, with demographic, background and work environment variables, explained 23.9% of variance in job satisfaction (F(9,73) = 5.08; P Afghanistan explained 23.6% of variance (F(8,74) = 4.10; P Afghanistan and Malawi reported satisfaction with their jobs, the predictors of satisfaction, and the extent to which those predictors explained variations in job satisfaction and intention to stay on the job, differed substantially. These findings demonstrate the need for more detailed comparative human resources for health-care research, particularly regarding the relative importance of different determinants of job satisfaction and intention to stay in different contexts and the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve health-care worker performance and retention.

  8. Health care provider education as a tool to enhance antibiotic stewardship practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Christopher A; Luther, Vera P

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic stewardship education for health care providers provides a foundation of knowledge and an environment that facilitates and supports optimal antibiotic prescribing. There is a need to extend this education to medical students and health care trainees. Education using passive techniques is modestly effective for increasing prescriber knowledge, whereas education using active techniques is more effective for changing prescribing behavior. Such education has been shown to enhance other antibiotic stewardship interventions. In this review, the need and suggested audience for antibiotic stewardship education are highlighted, and effective education techniques are recommended for increasing knowledge of antibiotics and improving their use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Helping Health Care Providers and Clinical Scientists Understand Apparently Irrational Policy Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeter, Sandor J

    2016-12-21

    Health care providers (HCP) and clinical scientists (CS) are generally most comfortable using evidence-based rational decision-making models. They become very frustrated when policymakers make decisions that, on the surface, seem irrational and unreasonable. However, such decisions usually make sense when analysed properly. The goal of this paper to provide a basic theoretical understanding of major policy models, to illustrate which models are most prevalent in publicly funded health care systems, and to propose a policy analysis framework to better understand the elements that drive policy decision-making. The proposed policy framework will also assist HCP and CS achieve greater success with their own proposals.

  10. Email Between Patient and Provider: Assessing the Attitudes and Perspectives of 624 Primary Health Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Puneet; Abu-Abed, Mohamed Ismail; Kapoor, Vikram; Nicholson, Kathryn; Agarwal, Gina

    2016-12-22

    Email between patients and their health care providers can serve as a continuous and collaborative forum to improve access to care, enhance convenience of communication, reduce administrative costs and missed appointments, and improve satisfaction with the patient-provider relationship. The main objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of patients aged 16 years and older toward receiving email communication for health-related purposes from an academic inner-city family health team in Southern Ontario. In addition to exploring the proportion of patients with a functioning email address and interest in email communication with their health care provider, we also examined patient-level predictors of interest in email communication. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered, 1-page survey of attitudes toward electronic communication for health purposes. Participants were recruited from attending patients at the McMaster Family Practice in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. These patients were aged 16 years and older and were approached consecutively to complete the self-administered survey (N=624). Descriptive analyses were conducted using the Pearson chi-square test to examine correlations between variables. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine statistically significant predictors of interest in email communication (yes or no). The majority of respondents (73.2%, 457/624) reported that they would be willing to have their health care provider (from the McMaster Family Practice) contact them via email to communicate health-related information. Those respondents who checked their personal email more frequently were less likely to want to engage in this electronic communication. Among respondents who check their email less frequently (fewer than every 3 days), 46% (37/81) preferred to communicate with the McMaster Family Practice via email. Online applications, including email, are emerging as a viable avenue for patient

  11. Approaches to health-care provider education and professional development in perinatal depression: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legere, Laura E; Wallace, Katherine; Bowen, Angela; McQueen, Karen; Montgomery, Phyllis; Evans, Marilyn

    2017-07-24

    Perinatal depression is the most common mental illness experienced by pregnant and postpartum women, yet it is often under-detected and under-treated. Some researchers suggest this may be partly influenced by a lack of education and professional development on perinatal depression among health-care providers, which can negatively affect care and contribute to stigmatization of women experiencing altered mood. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of educational and professional development needs and strategies for health-care providers in perinatal depression. A systematic search of the literature was conducted in seven academic health databases using selected keywords. The search was limited to primary studies and reviews published in English between January 2006 and May/June 2015, with a focus on perinatal depression education and professional development for health-care providers. Studies were screened for inclusion by two reviewers and tie-broken by a third. Studies that met inclusion criteria were quality appraised and data extracted. Results from the studies are reported through narrative synthesis. Two thousand one hundred five studies were returned from the search, with 1790 remaining after duplicate removal. Ultimately, 12 studies of moderate and weak quality met inclusion criteria. The studies encompassed quantitative (n = 11) and qualitative (n = 1) designs, none of which were reviews, and addressed educational needs identified by health-care providers (n = 5) and strategies for professional development in perinatal mental health (n = 7). Consistently, providers identified a lack of formal education in perinatal mental health and the need for further professional development. Although the professional development interventions were diverse, the majority focused on promoting identification of perinatal depression and demonstrated modest effectiveness in improving various outcomes. This systematic review reveals a

  12. The Role of Oral Health Care Professionals in Providing Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Michael; Greenberg, Barbara L

    2017-08-01

    Integration of oral health care professionals (OHCPs) into medical care could advance efforts to control increasingly prevalent conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, and hepatitis C infection, each of which is associated with significant morbidity and health care costs. Prevention and early intervention are effective for reducing the incidence and severity of these diseases, while increasing cost of health care may drive the need for nontraditional models of health education and delivery. Studies have suggested that a dental office is a suitable setting for the purpose of screening and referrals for these conditions and may result in medical expenditure savings. Such innovations would challenge the current dental educational model and the education and training of faculty. Implementing this change would require recognizing opportunities and challenges for the profession and the need for new competencies in dental curricula. Challenges and opportunities are described, including reimbursement models and integration of OHCPs into emerging health care delivery models. Ideas for curricular change are presented, including the need for added emphasis on biological sciences and the introduction of new courses to address systems thinking and forces driving preventive behavior. To embrace the evolving health care arena and be a part of the future interprofessional health care delivery dynamic, dental curricula should also include substantive interprofessional education opportunities. Such opportunities would provide the basic skills and training to recognize and appreciate patients' oral health issues in the broader context of their overall health and well-being. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  13. Preconception and prenatal care--useful tools for providers of women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeen, Laurie B; Bogue, Rebecka; Schuneman, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Health care providers have a unique opportunity to change the behaviors of their patients. Preconception and prenatal care allow for interventions to abate risky behaviors that can affect not only the woman but also her developing fetus. If we can assist the reproductive age woman in modifying her high-risk activities, there will be improved birth outcomes and healthier mothers to care for their offspring. Alcohol and tobacco use, sexually transmitted infections and obesity are the top four modifiable risk factors. This article will address the impact that these behaviors have on women and tools to assist the health care provider in changing these bad habits and promoting healthy pregnancies. The theory of "fetal origins of disease" is emerging as one of the most powerful and compelling reasons to engage our patients before and during their pregnancy. Preventive medicine needs to start in the womb if we want to have the highest impact on healthy adulthood.

  14. Knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness of primary health care providers to provide oral health services to children in Niagara, Ontario: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sonica; Figueiredo, Rafael; Dupuis, Sandy; Skellet, Rachel; Wincott, Tara; Dyer, Carolyn; Feller, Andrea; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Most children are exposed to medical, but not dental, care at an early age, making primary health care providers an important player in the reduction of tooth decay. The goal of this research was to understand the feasibility of using primary health care providers in promoting oral health by assessing their knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness in this regard. Using the Dillman method, a mail-in cross-sectional survey was conducted among all family physicians and pediatricians in the Niagara region of Ontario who have primary contact with children. A descriptive analysis was performed. Close to 70% (181/265) of providers responded. More than 90% know that untreated tooth decay could affect the general health of a child. More than 80% examine the oral cavity for more than 50% of their child patients. However, more than 50% are not aware that white spots or lines on the tooth surface are the first signs of tooth decay. Lack of clinical time was the top reason for not performing oral disease prevention measures. Overall, survey responses show a positive attitude and willingness to engage in the oral health of children. To capitalize on this, there is a need to identify mechanisms of providing preventive oral health care services by primary health care providers; including improving their knowledge of oral health and addressing other potential barriers.

  15. Views of mental health care consumers on public reporting of information on provider performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Bradley D; Kogan, Jane N; Essock, Susan; Fudurich, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    This qualitative study examined consumer preferences regarding the content and use of provider performance data and other provider information to aid in consumers' decision making. Focus groups were conducted with 41 adults who were consumers of mental health care, and discussions were transcribed and analyzed with standard qualitative research methods. Consumers supported trends toward enhancing information about providers and its availability. Several key themes emerged, including the need for easily accessible information and the most and least useful types of information. Current efforts to share provider performance information do not meet consumer preferences. Modest changes in the types of information being shared and the manner in which it is shared may substantially enhance use of such information. Such changes may help consumers to be more informed and empowered in making decisions about care, improve the quality of the care delivered, and support the movement toward a more recovery-focused system of care.

  16. Characteristics of Adults Seeking Health Care Provider Support Facilitated by Mobile Technology: Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Kelly; Park, Shin Hye

    2017-12-21

    Mobile health technology is rapidly evolving with the potential to transform health care. Self-management of health facilitated by mobile technology can maximize long-term health trajectories of adults. Little is known about the characteristics of adults seeking Web-based support from health care providers facilitated by mobile technology. This study aimed to examine the following: (1) the characteristics of adults who seek human support from health care providers for health concerns using mobile technology rather than from family members and friends or others with similar health conditions and (2) the use of mobile health technology among adults with chronic health conditions. Findings of this study were interpreted in the context of the Efficiency Model of Support. We first described characteristics of adults seeking Web-based support from health care providers. Using chi-square tests for categorical variables and t test for the continuous variable of age, we compared adults seeking Web-based and conventional support by demographics. The primary aim was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression to examine whether chronic health conditions and demographic factors (eg, sex, income, employment status, race, ethnicity, education, and age) were associated with seeking Web-based support from health care providers. The sample included adults (N=1453), the majority of whom were female 57.60% (837/1453), white 75.02% (1090/1453), and non-Hispanic 89.13% (1295/1453). The age of the participants ranged from 18 to 92 years (mean 48.6, standard deviation [SD] 16.8). The majority 76.05% (1105/1453) of participants reported college or higher level of education. A disparity was found in access to health care providers via mobile technology based on socioeconomic status. Adults with annual income of US $30,000 to US $100,000 were 1.72 times more likely to use Web-based methods to contact a health care provider, and adults with an annual income above US $100,000 were 2.41 to

  17. Refusal to provide health care to people with HIV in France.

    OpenAIRE

    Douay, Caroline; Toullier, Adeline; Benayoun, Sarah; Castro, Daniela Rojas; Chauvin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Refusals to provide care to people with HIV have been reported in the USA, the UK and elsewhere in Europe but their frequency remains poorly documented. In 2015, the French parliament examined a law that includes an article on non-discrimination in access to health care and the possibility of doing tests to determine the extent and nature of the discrimination. During the legislative debates, AIDES did a situation testing survey4 to ascertain the frequency and nature o...

  18. Burnout: interpreting the perception of Iranian primary rural health care providers from working and organizational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2012-03-01

    Health care providers in the rural centers offer the primary health services in the form of proficiencies and professions to the most required target population in the health system. These services are provided in certain condition and population with a verity of limitations. This study aimed to describe and interpret the experiences of the employees from their own working condition in the rural health centers. The present study conducted in a qualitative research approach and content analysis method through individual and group interviews with 26 employed primary health care providers (including 7 family physicians, 7 midwives, and 12 health workers) in the rural health centers in Isfahan in 2009. Sampling was done using purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis as constant comparative basis. During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; "instability and frequent changes", "involved in laws and regulations", "pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower", "helplessness in performing the tasks and duties", "sense of identity threat and low self-concept", and "deprivation of professional development". The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called "burnout". Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community.

  19. Burnout: Interpreting the Perception of Iranian Primary Rural Health Care Providers from Working and Organizational Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Health care providers in the rural centers offer the primary health services in the form of proficiencies and professions to the most required target population in the health system. These services are provided in certain condition and population with a verity of limitations. This study aimed to describe and interpret the experiences of the employees from their own working condition in the rural health centers. Methods: The present study conducted in a qualitative research approach and content analysis method through individual and group interviews with 26 employed primary health care providers (including 7 family physicians, 7 midwives, and 12 health workers) in the rural health centers in Isfahan in 2009. Sampling was done using purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis as constant comparative basis. Results: During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; “instability and frequent changes”, “involved in laws and regulations”, “pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower”, “helplessness in performing the tasks and duties”, “sense of identity threat and low self-concept”, and “deprivation of professional development”. The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called “burnout”. Conclusions: Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community. PMID:22826774

  20. Patient–Provider Rapport in the Health Care of People Who Inject Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginetta Salvalaggio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Little research has described determinants and consequences of patient–provider rapport among people who inject drugs (PWIDs. This mixed-method study (a qualitatively described facilitators, barriers, and consequences to rapport development between PWIDs and their health care providers and (b quantitatively tested the hypothesis that quality of rapport is associated with positive patterns of service use. Two exploratory focus groups with PWIDs and care providers were conducted. Subsequently, 89 PWIDs completed a survey interview; of those, eight completed a follow-up qualitative interview. Qualitative results indicated that rapport is influenced by drug-related behaviors, addiction severity, provider expertise, patient-centered care, and perceived discrimination and that rapport then influences patient compliance, timing of care, and criminal activity. Quantitative results indicated that rapport predicted PWID satisfaction with care as well as frequency and timing of emergency department presentations. Results suggest that PWID–provider rapport has several unique determinants and is associated with positive health care outcomes.

  1. Providing travel health care--the nurses' role: an international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Irmgard; Hall, Sheila; Sato, Nahoko

    2013-01-01

    In many countries, the responsibility for travel health lies with medical practitioners who delegate certain tasks to nursing staff. Elsewhere, nurses have taken a leading role and work independently in private or hospital-based clinics, occupational health departments and general practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the roles and challenges faced by nurses providing travel health care in Australia, Japan and the UK, and to compare educational and professional needs. Nurses involved in travel health care were invited to complete an online questionnaire with multiple choice, open-ended, and Likert Scale questions. SurveyMonkey's statistical facilities analysed quantitative data; thematic content analysis was applied to qualitative responses. Differences and similarities between the three countries were conveyed by 474 participants focusing on current positions, work arrangements, and educational and practical concerns. Clinical practice issues, including vaccination and medication regulations, were highlighted with the differences between countries explained by the respective history of travel health care development and the involvement within their nursing profession. The call for more educational opportunities, including more support from employers, and a refinement of the role as travel health nurse appears to be international. Nurses require support networks within the field, and the development of a specialist "travel health nurse" would give a stronger voice to their concerns and needs for specific education and training in travel health care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Becoming a health literate organization: Formative research results from healthcare organizations providing care for undeserved communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsul, Prajakta; Wray, Ricardo; Gautam, Kanak; Jupka, Keri; Weaver, Nancy; Wilson, Kristin

    2017-11-01

    Background Integrating health literacy into primary care institutional policy and practice is critical to effective, patient centered health care. While attributes of health literate organizations have been proposed, approaches for strengthening them in healthcare systems with limited resources have not been fully detailed. Methods We conducted key informant interviews with individuals from 11 low resourced health care organizations serving uninsured, underinsured, and government-insured patients across Missouri. The qualitative inquiry explored concepts of impetus to transform, leadership commitment, engaging staff, alignment to organization wide goals, and integration of health literacy with current practices. Findings Several health care organizations reported carrying out health literacy related activities including implementing patient portals, selecting easy to read patient materials, offering community education and outreach programs, and improving discharge and medication distribution processes. The need for change presented itself through data or anecdotal staff experience. For any change to be undertaken, administrators and medical directors had to be supportive; most often a champion facilitated these changes in the organization. Staff and providers were often resistant to change and worried they would be saddled with additional work. Lack of time and funding were the most common barriers reported for integration and sustainability. To overcome these barriers, managers supported changes by working one on one with staff, seeking external funding, utilizing existing resources, planning for stepwise implementation, including members from all staff levels and clear communication. Conclusion Even though barriers exist, resource scarce clinical settings can successfully plan, implement, and sustain organizational changes to support health literacy.

  3. The association between trust in health care providers and medication adherence among Black women with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willie M. Abel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Black women have the highest prevalence of hypertension in the world. Reasons for this disparity are poorly understood. The historical legacy of medical maltreatment of Blacks in the U.S. provides some insight into distrust in the medical profession, refusal of treatment, and poor adherence to treatment regimens.Methods: Black women (N=80 who were prescribed antihypertensive medications were recruited from urban communities in North Carolina. Study participants completed the Trust in Physician and Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy questionnaires. An exact discrete-event model was used to examine the relationship between trust and medication adherence.Results: Mean age of study participants was 48 ± 9.2 years. The majority of participants (67% were actively employed and 30% had incomes at or below the federal poverty level. Increasing levels of trust in the health care provider was independently associated with greater medication adherence (PTrend=0.015.Conclusions: Black women with hypertension who trusted their health care providers were more likely to be adherent with their prescribed antihypertensive medications than those who did not trust their health care providers. Findings suggest that trusting relationships between Black women and health care providers are important to decreasing disparate rates of hypertension.

  4. Educational Needs of Health Care Providers Working in Long-Term Care Facilities with Regard to Pain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Tousignant-Laflamme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of chronic pain ranges from 40% to 80% in long-term care facilities (LTCF, with the highest proportion being found among older adults and residents with dementia. Unfortunately, pain in older adults is underdiagnosed, undertreated, inadequately treated or not treated at all. A solution to this problem would be to provide effective and innovative interdisciplinary continuing education to health care providers (HCPs.

  5. Health care providers' and parents' attitudes toward administration of new infant vaccines--a multinational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhache, P; Rodrigo, C; Davie, S; Ahuja, A; Sudovar, B; Crudup, T; Rose, M

    2013-04-01

    The New Vaccinations of Infants in Practice online survey in seven countries evaluated vaccination-related attitudes and concerns of parents of infants and health care providers (HCPs) who provide pediatric medical care. The survey showed that HCPs and parents were open to adding new vaccines to the immunization schedule, even if it requires co-administration with current vaccines or introduction of new office visits. Parental disease awareness campaigns would be helpful to achieve widespread acceptance of changes to vaccination schedules. In addition, HCPs would ideally provide disease education to parents to accompany recommendations for a new vaccine.

  6. Web-Based SBIRT Skills Training for Health Professional Students and Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, T. Bradley; Wilhelm, Susan E.; Rossie, Karen M.; Metcalf, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    The authors have developed and assessed 2 innovative, case-based, interactive training programs on substance abuse, one for health professional students on alcohol and one for primary care providers on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). Both programs build skills in substance abuse SBIRT. Real-world effectiveness…

  7. Recognition by Women's Health Care Providers of Long-Term Cardiovascular Disease Risk After Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Celi, Ann; Thomas, Ann; Frolkis, Joseph; Seely, Ellen W

    2015-06-01

    To assess health care providers' knowledge regarding pregnancy outcome as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and evaluate the variables associated with their responses to questions about routine surveillance for cardiovascular disease. A voluntary, anonymous survey of internal medicine and obstetric and gynecologic health care providers at an academic institution. Responses to a case-based and direct inquiry questionnaire were evaluated. The overall response rate was 65% (173/265). When assessing cardiovascular risk, gynecologists compared with internists significantly more often requested a pregnancy history (44/49 [90%] compared with 56/75 [75%], P=.039) and more often attached importance to a history of preeclampsia (35/48 [73%] compared with 41/75 [55%], P=.028). When a history of preeclampsia was obtained, internists more often obtained a fasting glucose test (25/52 [48%] compared with 9/43 [20.9%], P=.009). A minority of health care providers recognized the importance of fetal growth restriction. Both health care provider groups demonstrated similar knowledge of general cardiovascular risk factors, screening tools, and interventions. Higher general cardiovascular knowledge was significantly associated with identification of pregnancy complications as cardiovascular risk factors (P=.001). When assessing cardiovascular risk, internists were less likely than gynecologists to include a pregnancy history. However, once identified as at risk for cardiovascular disease, gynecologists were less likely than internists to obtain appropriate testing. Education concerning the link between certain pregnancy complications and future cardiovascular disease is needed. Areas of opportunity for education in both medical specialties are identified.

  8. School Mental Health Professionals' Training, Comfort, and Attitudes toward Interprofessional Collaboration with Pediatric Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Connors, Elizabeth H.; Biscardi, Krystin A.; Hill, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-documented need for interprofessional collaboration (IPC) between school mental health (SMH) professionals and pediatric primary care providers (PCPs), research on current collaborative practices of these professionals is limited. Accordingly, using survey methodology, this study investigated SMH professionals' previous training…

  9. United States Air Force Health Care Provider Practices: Skin Testing for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-03

    Infection Control Manager Nurse Manager, Family Practice Clinic Infection Control Assistant Manager Clinical Nurse, Obstetrical Ward Clinical...172 Air Force health care providers at a mid- level medical treatment facility including: medical doctors (MD), doctors of osteopathy (DO...of osteopathy , physician assistants, nurse practitioners and independent duty medical technicians. Knowledge of tuberculosis skin testing: shall be

  10. Institutional abuse toward the elderly: Perceptions of health care providers and older adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guadalupe Ruelas-González

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the health care providers (HCP and elderly patients’ perceptions about abuse of the elderly by health personnel of public health services, in selected cities in Mexico. Materials and methods. A qualitative study and a strategy of data triangulation were performed during 2009 and 2012; 13 HCPs and 12 elders were interviewed, in order to obtain their experience regarding elder abuse. Grounded Theory proceedings were used for the analysis. Results. Elder abuse is a naturalized practice, from HCP and elderly people’s point of view; these perceptions are showed in different ways. Conclusion. Institutionalization, historical professionalization and lack of consciousness about needs of the elderly (sociocultural and economic, require changes in planning, organization and monitoring process in the Health System; training and educational interventions on staff and exchange attitudes and behavior are necessary in order to offer a health care that is comprehensive, decent, human and with respect for the human rights.

  11. A model program: neonatal nurse practitioners providing community health care for high-risk infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Elias Provencio; Pitts, Kathleen; Mejia, Nilson Enrique

    2008-01-01

    Perinatal drug exposure costs our communities millions of dollars each year in hospital fees and in services such as foster care, child protection, and drug treatment. Infants and their families in this group require substantial long-term health care and community resources. Neonatal health care providers should take an active role in developing and implementing home visitation programs to support early hospital discharge and continuity of care for these high-risk infants and their families. Neonatal nurse practitioners should prepare in the future to practice not only in secondary-- and tertiary--level neonatal centers, but also in follow-up clinics, long-term developmental centers, and the community This article describes a home intervention program delivered by neonatal nurse practitioners for high-risk infants and their mothers. The target population is infants exposed prenatally to drugs and/or alcohol.

  12. Online social network use by health care providers in a high traffic patient care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Erik; Light, Jennifer; Paradise Black, Nicole; Thompson, Lindsay

    2013-05-17

    The majority of workers, regardless of age or occupational status, report engaging in personal Internet use in the workplace. There is little understanding of the impact that personal Internet use may have on patient care in acute clinical settings. The objective of this study was to investigate the volume of one form of personal Internet use-online social networking (Facebook)-generated by workstations in the emergency department (ED) in contrast to measures of clinical volume and severity. The research team analyzed anonymous network utilization records for 68 workstations located in the emergency medicine department within one academic medical center for 15 consecutive days (12/29/2009 to 1/12/2010). This data was compared to ED work index (EDWIN) data derived by the hospital information systems. Health care workers spent an accumulated 4349 minutes (72.5 hours) browsing Facebook, staff cumulatively visited Facebook 9369 times and spent, on average, 12.0 minutes per hour browsing Facebook. There was a statistically significant difference in the time spent on Facebook according to time of day (19.8 minutes per hour versus 4.3 minutes per hour, P<.001). There was a significant, positive correlation between EDWIN scores and time spent on Facebook (r=.266, P<.001). Facebook use constituted a substantive percentage of staff time during the 15-day observation period. Facebook use increased with increased patient volume and severity within the ED.

  13. Health care services provided to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. Al-Rubeaan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess health care services provided to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and diabetes health care expenditure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Methods: This study was part of a nationwide, household, population based cross-sectional survey conducted at the University Diabetes Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2007 and December 2009 covering 13 administrative regions of the Kingdom. Using patients’ interview questionnaires, health care services data were collected by trained staff. Results: A total of 5,983 diabetic patients were chosen to assess health care services and expenditure. Approximately 92.2% of health services were governmental and the remaining 7.8% were in private services. The mean annual number of visits to physicians was 6.5±3.9 and laboratories was 5.1±3.9. Diabetic patients required one admission every 3 years with a mean admission duration of 13.3±28.3 days. General practitioners managed 85.9% of diabetic cases alone, or shared with internists and/or endocrinologists. Health care expenditure was governmental in 90% of cases, while it was personal in 7.7% or based on insurance payment in 2.3%. Conclusion: Health services and its expenditure provided to diabetic citizens in Saudi Arabia are mainly governmental. Empowerment of the role of both the private sector and health insurance system is badly needed, aside from implementing proper management guidelines to deliver good services at different levels.

  14. Burnout and its Influencing Factors among Primary Health Care Providers in the North East of Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amiri

    Full Text Available Burnout is a popular research topics in service providing jobs, including the health care field. This study aimed at assessing the level of job burnout and to consider the important antecedents which might be related to job burnout among primary health care providers in Iran.The participants in this applied cross-sectional study which was conducted in 2013 were 548 primary health care providers who were randomly selected from among those working in Shahroud, Sabzevar, Neishabour, Bojnord (provinces located in the north east of Iran. Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI was administered to the participants and the collected data were analyzed using SPSS through chi-square test and ordinal logistic regression model.The burnout mean score among the participants was 54.1 ± 27.2 and the mean scores of burnout components i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were 15.5 ± 13.6, 3.7 ± 5.4 and 35.5 ± 13.5 respectively. In terms of levels of burnout, 64.2% of the participants showed low levels (n = 352, 18.4% average levels (n = 101 and 17.3% high levels (n = 95. A significant relationship was observed between burnout, job resources and interest in job (p ≤ 0.05. However, no significant relationship was observed between burnout and the place (university of working, age, satisfaction with income, experience, gender, level of education, marital status, housing status, having a second job and place of residence (p ≥0.05.Lack of personal accomplishment was highly prevalent among the participating primary health care providers. Lack of career advancement and job transfer opportunities may play a role in the burnout of primary health care providers. Therefore, paying attention to this aspect may help to reduce burnout and even increase job engagement.

  15. Burnout and its Influencing Factors among Primary Health Care Providers in the North East of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad; Khosravi, Ahmad; Eghtesadi, Ahmad Reza; Sadeghi, Zakieh; Abedi, Ghasem; Ranjbar, Mansour; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Burnout is a popular research topics in service providing jobs, including the health care field. This study aimed at assessing the level of job burnout and to consider the important antecedents which might be related to job burnout among primary health care providers in Iran. The participants in this applied cross-sectional study which was conducted in 2013 were 548 primary health care providers who were randomly selected from among those working in Shahroud, Sabzevar, Neishabour, Bojnord (provinces located in the north east of Iran). Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was administered to the participants and the collected data were analyzed using SPSS through chi-square test and ordinal logistic regression model. The burnout mean score among the participants was 54.1 ± 27.2 and the mean scores of burnout components i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were 15.5 ± 13.6, 3.7 ± 5.4 and 35.5 ± 13.5 respectively. In terms of levels of burnout, 64.2% of the participants showed low levels (n = 352), 18.4% average levels (n = 101) and 17.3% high levels (n = 95). A significant relationship was observed between burnout, job resources and interest in job (p ≤ 0.05). However, no significant relationship was observed between burnout and the place (university) of working, age, satisfaction with income, experience, gender, level of education, marital status, housing status, having a second job and place of residence (p ≥0.05). Lack of personal accomplishment was highly prevalent among the participating primary health care providers. Lack of career advancement and job transfer opportunities may play a role in the burnout of primary health care providers. Therefore, paying attention to this aspect may help to reduce burnout and even increase job engagement.

  16. Combat health care providers and resiliency: adaptive coping mechanisms during and after deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Shafer, Michaela; Aramanda, Larry; Hickling, Edward J; Benedek, David M

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to understand the varied health care provider responses to traumas by identifying perceptions of control and self-efficacy, appraisal styles, and postevent coping strategies in active duty military nurses and physicians deployed to combat/terrorist regions. Twenty purposively sampled military health care providers completed a descriptive questionnaire, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and a recorded semistructured interview that was later transcribed and content analyzed. Cognitive-behavioral determinants of healthy response to trauma were used to frame this descriptive interpretive study and to assist with developing a model for healthy adaptation in trauma-exposed health care providers. Participants felt they had the greatest control over their health care provider role in theater, and most expressed a belief that a sense of control and a sense of purpose were important to their coping. All used some form of social support to cope and many found calming activities that allowed for self-reflection to be helpful. Results from this analysis can be used to inform interventions and promote postevent coping behaviors that increase social support, strengthen important bonds, and enhance involvement in activities that elicit positive emotions. Health care providers experienced positive outcomes despite considerable traumatic exposure by using coping strategies that map closely to several principles of psychological first aid. This suggests a need to train all medical personnel in these concepts as they appear helpful in mitigating responses to the stress of combat-related exposures. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. The effect of interprofessional education on interprofessional performance and diabetes care knowledge of health care teams at the level one of health service providing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoo Yamani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: It seems that inter-professional education can improve the quality of health care to some extent through influencing knowledge and collaborative performance of health care teams. It also can make the health-related messages provided to the covered population more consistent in addition to enhancing self-confidence of the personnel.

  18. Medical care providers' perspectives on dental information needs in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Amit; Shimpi, Neel; Mahnke, Andrea; Mathias, Richard; Ye, Zhan

    2017-05-01

    The authors conducted this study to identify the most relevant patient dental information in a medical-dental integrated electronic health record (iEHR) necessary for medical care providers to inform holistic treatment. The authors collected input from a diverse sample of 65 participants from a large, regional health system representing 13 medical specialties and administrative units. The authors collected feedback from participants through 11 focus group sessions. Two independent reviewers analyzed focus group transcripts to identify major and minor themes. The authors identified 336 of 385 annotations that most medical care providers coded as relevant. Annotations strongly supporting relevancy to clinical practice aligned with 18 major thematic categories, with the top 6 categories being communication, appointments, system design, medications, treatment plan, and dental alerts. Study participants identified dental data of highest relevance to medical care providers and recommended implementation of user-friendly access to dental data in iEHRs as crucial to holistic care delivery. Identification of the patients' dental information most relevant to medical care providers will inform strategies for improving the integration of that information into the medical-dental iEHR. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. AIDS: responding to the crisis. Legal implications for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadzielski, M A

    1986-05-01

    In the future, health care providers will not be able to avoid the legal problems that the AIDS epidemic presents. They can find guidance in the long-standing legal principles of privacy and confidentiality and of fair employment. Many laws contain confidentiality principles that focus on the right of patients to determine who has access to their confidential health care information. Dissemination of such information to those who have no legal or rational requirement to know it may result in the provider's criminal and/or civil liability. The HTLV-III blood test brings additional pressures to bear on patients' and employees' confidentiality rights. Since the test indicates only that the subject has been infected by the virus--not whether the person has or will develop AIDS--widespread mandatory screening is inadvisable because it could lead to unjustified discrimination. Under principles of handicap-discrimination law, health care providers may not terminate or discriminate against an employee with HTLV-III infection unless the employee cannot perform the job or poses a danger to the health and safety of himself or others. An employee who refuses to treat AIDS patients may be lawfully disciplined. Under health and safety laws, however, employers who discipline employees for wearing extra protective gear risk liability.

  20. Provider Attitudes and Practices toward Sexual and Reproductive Health Care for Young Women with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, Traci M; Borrero, Sonya; Sawicki, Gregory S; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Jones, Kelley A; Tuchman, Lisa K; Weiner, Daniel J; Pilewski, Joseph M; Orenstein, David M; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the attitudes and practices of cystic fibrosis (CF) providers toward sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care in young women with CF. Adult and pediatric US CF providers were sent an online survey exploring their attitudes toward SRH importance, SRH care practices, and barriers/facilitators to SRH care in adolescent and/or young adult women. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyze results. Attitudes toward the importance of SRH care in patients with CF and self-report of practice patterns of SRH discussion. Respondents (n = 196) were 57% pediatric (111/196) and 24% adult physicians (48/196) and 19% nurse practitioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs) (37/196). Ninety-four percent of respondents believed SRH was important for female patients with CF (184/196). More than 75% believed SRH care should be standardized within the CF care model (147/196) and 41% believed the CF team should have the primary role in SRH discussion and care (80/196). For many CF-specific SRH topics, discrepancies emerged between how important respondents believed these were to address and how often they reported discussing these topics in practice. Significant differences in SRH attitudes and practices were present between adult and pediatric physicians. The most significant barriers to SRH care identified were lack of time (70%, 137/196) and the presence of family in clinic room (54%, 106/196). Potential facilitators included training materials for providers (68%, 133/196) and written (71%, 139/196) or online (76%, 149/196) educational resources for patients. CF providers perceive SRH topics as important to discuss, but identify barriers to routine discussion in current practice. Providers endorsed provider training and patient educational resources as means to improve SRH delivery. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. From "retailers" to health care providers: Transforming the role of community pharmacists in chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossialos, Elias; Courtin, Emilie; Naci, Huseyin; Benrimoj, Shalom; Bouvy, Marcel; Farris, Karen; Noyce, Peter; Sketris, Ingrid

    2015-05-01

    Community pharmacists are the third largest healthcare professional group in the world after physicians and nurses. Despite their considerable training, community pharmacists are the only health professionals who are not primarily rewarded for delivering health care and hence are under-utilized as public health professionals. An emerging consensus among academics, professional organizations, and policymakers is that community pharmacists, who work outside of hospital settings, should adopt an expanded role in order to contribute to the safe, effective, and efficient use of drugs-particularly when caring for people with multiple chronic conditions. Community pharmacists could help to improve health by reducing drug-related adverse events and promoting better medication adherence, which in turn may help in reducing unnecessary provider visits, hospitalizations, and readmissions while strengthening integrated primary care delivery across the health system. This paper reviews recent strategies to expand the role of community pharmacists in Australia, Canada, England, the Netherlands, Scotland, and the United States. The developments achieved or under way in these countries carry lessons for policymakers world-wide, where progress thus far in expanding the role of community pharmacists has been more limited. Future policies should focus on effectively integrating community pharmacists into primary care; developing a shared vision for different levels of pharmacist services; and devising new incentive mechanisms for improving quality and outcomes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Beyond vulnerability: how the dual role of patient-health care provider can inform health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Paula; Kuper, Ayelet

    2017-04-29

    In order to prepare fully competent health care professionals, health professions education must be concerned with the relational space between patients and providers. Compassion and compassionate care are fundamental elements of this relational space. Traditionally, health professions educators and leaders have gone to two narrative sources when attempting to better under constructs of compassion: patients or providers. Rarely have there been explorations of the perspectives of those who consider themselves as both patients and providers. In this study, we interviewed nineteen health care providers who self-disclosed as having had a substantive patient experience in the health care system. We engaged with these participants to better understand their experience of having these dual roles. Anchored in Foucault's concepts of subjectivity and Goffman's symbolic interactionism, the interviews in this study reveal practices of moving between the two roles of patient and provider. Through this exploration, we consider how it is that providers who have been patients understand themselves to be more compassionate whilst in their provider roles. Rather than describing compassion as a learnable behaviour or an innate virtue, we theoretically engage with one proposed mechanism of how compassion is produced. In particular, we highlight the role of critical reflexivity as an underexplored construct in the enactment of compassion. We discuss these findings in light of their implications for health professions education.

  3. Tuberculosis treatment managed by providers outside the Public Health Department: lessons for the Affordable Care Act.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ehman

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tuberculosis (TB requires at least six months of multidrug treatment and necessitates monitoring for response to treatment. Historically, public health departments (HDs have cared for most TB patients in the United States. The Affordable Care Act (ACA provides coverage for uninsured persons and may increase the proportion of TB patients cared for by private medical providers and other providers outside HDs (PMPs. We sought to determine whether there were differences in care provided by HDs and PMPs to inform public health planning under the ACA. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of California TB registry data. We included adult TB patients with culture-positive, pulmonary TB reported in California during 2007-2011. We examined trends, described case characteristics, and created multivariate models measuring two standards of TB care in PMP- and HD-managed patients: documented culture conversion within 60 days, and use of directly observed therapy (DOT. RESULTS: The proportion of PMP-managed TB patients increased during 2007-2011 (p = 0.002. On univariable analysis (N = 4,606, older age, white, black or Asian/Pacific Islander race, and birth in the United States were significantly associated with PMP care (p<0.05. Younger age, Hispanic ethnicity, homelessness, drug or alcohol use, and cavitary and/or smear-positive TB disease, were associated with HD care. Multivariable analysis showed PMP care was associated with lack of documented culture conversion (adjusted relative risk [aRR] = 1.37, confidence interval [CI] 1.25-1.51 and lack of DOT (aRR = 8.56, CI 6.59-11.1. CONCLUSION: While HDs cared for TB cases with more social and clinical complexities, patients under PMP care were less likely to receive DOT and have documented culture conversion. This indicates a need for close collaboration between PMPs and HDs to ensure that optimal care is provided to all TB patients and TB transmission is

  4. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Religious Nonmedical Health Care...

  5. Health Professionals Special Pays Study: Report to Congress on Armed Forces Health Professionals Special Pays -- Other Health Care Providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, James F; Ogloblin, Peter; Mirick, Steven C; Buxton, Richard; Sevier, David M; McKelvy, Marcia; Rubino, Frank

    1988-01-01

    ... within the military health care system: dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, pharmacy, clinical psychology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, speech pathology, podiatry, social work, dietetics, and physician assistant...

  6. The influence of system quality characteristics on health care providers' performance: Empirical evidence from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Salleh, Mohd Idzwan; Zakaria, Nasriah; Abdullah, Rosni

    The Ministry of Health Malaysia initiated the total hospital information system (THIS) as the first national electronic health record system for use in selected public hospitals across the country. Since its implementation 15 years ago, there has been the critical requirement for a systematic evaluation to assess its effectiveness in coping with the current system, task complexity, and rapid technological changes. The study aims to assess system quality factors to predict the performance of electronic health in a single public hospital in Malaysia. Non-probability sampling was employed for data collection among selected providers in a single hospital for two months. Data cleaning and bias checking were performed before final analysis in partial least squares-structural equation modeling. Convergent and discriminant validity assessments were satisfied the required criterions in the reflective measurement model. The structural model output revealed that the proposed adequate infrastructure, system interoperability, security control, and system compatibility were the significant predictors, where system compatibility became the most critical characteristic to influence an individual health care provider's performance. The previous DeLone and McLean information system success models should be extended to incorporate these technological factors in the medical system research domain to examine the effectiveness of modern electronic health record systems. In this study, care providers' performance was expected when the system usage fits with patients' needs that eventually increased their productivity. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Conceptualizations of postpartum depression by public-sector health care providers in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Jean Marie S; Billings, Deborah L; Blake, Christine E; Frongillo, Edward A; Mann, Joshua R; deCastro, Filipa

    2015-04-01

    In this article we describe the knowledge frameworks that 61 physicians, nurses, social workers, and psychologists from five public-sector health care facilities in Mexico used to conceptualize postpartum depression. We also demonstrate how providers applied social and behavioral antecedents in their conceptualizations of postpartum depression. Using grounded theory, we identify two frameworks that providers used to conceptualize postpartum depression: biochemical and adjustment. We highlight an emerging model of the function of social and behavioral antecedents within the frameworks, as well as the representation of postpartum depression by symptoms of distress and the perception among providers that these symptoms affected responsibilities associated with motherhood. The results provide a foundation for future study of how providers' conceptualizations of postpartum depression might affect detection and treatment practices and might be useful in the development of training materials to enhance the quality of care for women who experience any form of distress in the postpartum period. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. A report card on provider report cards: current status of the health care transparency movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Jon B; Volmar, Karen M; Alexander, Jeffrey; Scanlon, Dennis P

    2010-11-01

    Public reporting of provider performance can assist consumers in their choice of providers and stimulate providers to improve quality. Reporting of quality measures is supported by advocates of health care reform across the political spectrum. To assess the availability, credibility and applicability of existing public reports of hospital and physician quality, with comparisons across geographic areas. Information pertaining to 263 public reports in 21 geographic areas was collected through reviews of websites and telephone and in-person interviews, and used to construct indicators of public reporting status. Interview data collected in 14 of these areas were used to assess recent changes in reporting and their implications. Interviewees included staff of state and local associations, health plan representatives and leaders of local health care alliances. There were more reports of hospital performance (161) than of physician performance (103) in the study areas. More reports included measures derived from claims data (mean, 7.2 hospital reports and 3.3 physician reports per area) than from medical records data. Typically, reports on physician performance contained measures of chronic illness treatment constructed at the medical group level, with diabetes measures the most common (mean number per non-health plan report, 2.3). Patient experience measures were available in more hospital reports (mean number of reports, 1.2) than physician reports (mean, 0.7). Despite the availability of national hospital reports and reports sponsored by national health plans, from a consumer standpoint the status of public reporting depended greatly on where one lived and health plan membership. Current public reports, and especially reports of physician quality of care, have significant limitations from both consumer and provider perspectives. The present approach to reporting is being challenged by the development of new information sources for consumers, and consumer and provider

  9. Coping and compromise: a qualitative study of how primary health care providers respond to health reform in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingji; Wang, Wei; Millar, Ross; Li, Guohong; Yan, Fei

    2017-08-04

    Health reform in China since 2009 has emphasized basic public health services to enhance the function of Community Health Services as a primary health care facility. A variety of studies have documented these efforts, and the challenges these have faced, yet up to now the experience of primary health care (PHC) providers in terms of how they have coped with these changes remains underdeveloped. Despite the abundant literature on psychological coping processes and mechanisms, the application of coping research within the context of human resources for health remains yet to be explored. This research aims to understand how PHC providers coped with the new primary health care model and the job characteristics brought about by these changes. Semi-structured interviews with primary health care workers were conducted in Jinan city of Shandong province in China. A maximum variation sampling method selected 30 PHC providers from different specialties. Thematic analysis was used drawing on a synthesis of theories related to the Job Demands-Resources model, work adjustment, and the model of exit, voice, loyalty and neglect to understand PHC providers' coping strategies. Our interviews identified that the new model of primary health care significantly affected the nature of primary health work and triggered a range of PHC providers' coping processes. The results found that health workers perceived their job as less intensive than hospital medical work but often more trivial, characterized by heavy workload, blurred job description, unsatisfactory income, and a lack of professional development. However, close relationship with community and low work pressure were satisfactory. PHC providers' processing of job demands and resources displayed two ways of interaction: aggravation and alleviation. Processing of job demands and resources led to three coping strategies: exit, passive loyalty, and compromise with new roles and functions. Primary health care providers employed coping

  10. Health care providers' adherence to tobacco treatment for waterpipe, cigarette and dual users in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Donna; Kumar, Pritika; Lee, Lawrence; Nguyen, LinhThi; Nguyen, Trang Thi; VanDevanter, Nancy; Cleland, Charles M; Nguyen, Nam Truong

    2017-01-01

    Almost half of adult men in Vietnam are current cigarette smokers. Recent surveys also suggest a high prevalence of water pipe use, particularly in rural areas. Yet services to treat tobacco dependence are not readily available. The purpose of this study was to characterize current tobacco use treatment patterns among Vietnamese health care providers and factors influencing adherence to recommended guidelines for tobacco use screening and cessation interventions for water pipe, cigarette and dual users. We conducted cross sectional surveys of 929 male current tobacco users immediately after they completed a primary care visit at one of 18 community health centers. Thirty-four percent of smokers used cigarettes only, 24% water pipe only, and 42% were dual users. Overall 12% of patients reported that a provider asked them if they used tobacco products during the visit. Providers were significantly more likely to screen cigarette smokers compared with water pipe or dual users (16%, 9% and 11% respectively). Similarly, 9% of current cigarette smokers received advice to quit compared to 6% of water pipe and 5% of dual users. No patients reported that their health care provider offered them assistance to quit (e.g., self-help materials, referral). Despite ratifying the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Vietnam has not made progress in implementing policies and systems to ensure smokers are receiving evidence-based treatment. High rates of water pipe and dual use indicate a need for health care provider training and policy changes to facilitate treatment for both cigarette and water pipe use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Herbal and dietary supplement disclosure to health care providers by individuals with chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Darshan H; Gardiner, Paula M; Phillips, Russell S; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2008-12-01

    Very little is known about herbal and dietary supplement disclosure in adults with chronic medical conditions, especially on a national level. To examine herbal and dietary supplement disclosure to conventional health care providers by adults with chronic medical conditions. Data on herbal and dietary supplement use (N = 5456 users) in the previous year were used from the 2002 National Health Interview Survey. Bi-variable analyses compared characteristics between herbal and dietary supplement disclosers and nondisclosers. Multivariable logistic regression identified independent correlates of herbal and dietary supplement disclosure. Overall, only 33% of herbal and dietary supplement users reported disclosing use of herbal and dietary supplements to their conventional health care provider. Among herbal and dietary supplement users with chronic conditions, less than 51% disclosed use to their conventional health care provider. Hispanic (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 0.70 [0.52, 0.94]) and Asian American (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 0.54 [0.33, 0.89]) adults were much less likely than non-Hispanic white Americans to disclose herbal and dietary supplement use. Having less than a high school education (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 0.61 [0.45, 0.82]) and not having insurance (adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval = 0.77 [0.59, 1.00]) were associated with being less likely to disclose herbal and dietary supplement use. Herbal and dietary supplement disclosure rates are low, even among adults with chronic conditions. These findings raise concerns about the safety of herbal and dietary supplements in combination with allopathic care. Future studies should focus on educating physicians about crosscultural care as well as eliciting information about herbal and dietary supplement use.

  12. [Implementation of nurse demand managment in primary health care service providers in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugués Brugués, Alba; Cubells Asensio, Irene; Flores Mateo, Gemma

    2017-11-01

    To describe and analyse the implementaction of nurse demand managment (NDM) among health care providers in Catalonia from 2005 to 2014. Cross sectional survey. Participants All service providers in Catalonia (n=37). Main measurements Interviews with nurse manager of each health care provides about ht barriers and facilitators concerning NDM. Facilitators and barriers were classified into 3 types: (i)health professional (competence, attitudes, motivation for change and individual characteristics); (ii)social context (patients and companions), and (iii)system related factors (organization and structure, economic incentives). Of the 37 providers, 26 (70.3%) have implemented the Demand Management Nurse (NDM). The main barriers identified are the nurse prescriptin regulation, lack of knowledge and skills of nurses, and the lack of protocols at the start of implantation. Among the facilitators are the specific training of professionals, a higher ratio of nurses to doctors, consensus circuits with all professionals and linking the implementation of NDM to economic incentives. NDM is consolidated in Catalonia. However, the NDM should be included in the curricula of nursing degree and continuing education programs in primary care teams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. [Health care providers' knowledge and abilities to use inhalation devices and spacers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, S; Carsin, A; Baravalle, M; Dubus, J-C

    2017-05-01

    Inhaled therapy is the mainstay of asthma treatment due to its local and rapid action. However, its efficiency relies on the teaching of a good inhalation technique by health care providers. We assessed health care providers' knowledge and practical skills in the use of inhalation devices. An observational multicenter study was conducted in the pulmonology and paediatric wards in Marseille. The departments' common practices, theoretical knowledge and practical skills were assessed through a questionnaire and a demonstration using a spacer device. Forty health care providers were interviewed (9 attending physicians, 14 residents, 16 nurses and 1 physiotherapist), in 8 different pulmonology and paediatric wards. A total of 42.5% reported previous training in inhalation device technique. When evaluating theoretical knowledge, we found a mean of 54% correct answers. Attending physicians did significantly better than residents and nurses. With regard to practical skills, we found a mean of 1.12 failed steps out of 7. Here again attending physicians did significantly better than residents and nurses. Based on the results of our study, we recommend that attending physicians provide training of inhalation technique to nurses and residents, as they did significantly better theoretically and practically. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementing Georeferencing in the Decision-Making Process of a Health Care Provider in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Layes, Elizabeth; Morales, Fernando; Leivas, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Proper management of information is not only essential but also critical in any organization's decision making process. Data integration and spacial visualization are the key features of georeferencial systems, which bring support to decision making in epidemiology as well as sanitary planning.This paper shows the development of a georeferential system that interacts with the data provided by the Health Care System.Thereby allowing creation of viable methods which will help to improve patient care, treatments, and interventions through building space-time relationships.

  15. Switching basal insulins in type 2 diabetes: practical recommendations for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah L; Trujillo, Jennifer M; Anderson, John E; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2017-12-27

    Basal insulin remains the mainstay of treatment of type 2 diabetes when diet changes and exercise in combination with oral drugs and other injectable agents are not sufficient to control hyperglycemia. Insulin therapy should be individualized, and several factors influence the choice of basal insulin; these include pharmacological properties, patient preferences, and lifestyle, as well as health insurance plan formularies. The recent availability of basal insulin formulations with longer durations of action has provided further dosing flexibility; however, patients may need to switch agents throughout therapy for a variety of personal, clinical, or economic reasons. Although a unit-to-unit switching approach is usually recommended, this conversion strategy may not be appropriate for all patients and types of insulin. Glycemic control and risk of hypoglycemia must be closely monitored by health care providers during the switching process. In addition, individual changes in care and formulary coverage need to be adequately addressed in order to enable a smooth transition with optimal outcomes.

  16. Improving Deployment-Related Primary Care Provider Assessments of PTSD and Mental Health Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    medicine--a review with quality grading of articles. Medical Teacher , 21(6), 563-570. Back, A. L., Arnold, R. M., Baile, W. F., Fryer-Edwards, K. A...domain of expertise), intermediates (individuals with skills at an intermediate-stage between expert and novice such as intern or resident health care...providers), and novices (individuals with limited experience and content knowledge). Interestingly, research has demonstrated that intermediates

  17. Mental health service responses to human trafficking: a qualitative study of professionals' experiences of providing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domoney, Jill; Howard, Louise M; Abas, Melanie; Broadbent, Matthew; Oram, Sian

    2015-11-17

    Human trafficking is a global crime and human rights violation. Although research has demonstrated a high prevalence of mental disorder among trafficked people and that trafficked people are in contact with mental health services, little is known about mental health professionals' experiences of identifying and providing care for trafficked people. This study aimed to understand how people are identified as trafficked within mental health services and the challenges professionals experience in responding to trafficked people's mental health needs. Qualitative study of electronic health records of trafficked people in contact with secondary mental health services in South East London, England. Comprehensive clinical electronic health records for over 200,000 patients in contact with secondary mental health services in South London were searched and retrieved to identify trafficked patients. Content analysis was used to establish how people were identified as trafficked, and thematic analysis was used to explore the challenges experienced in responding to mental health needs. The sample included 130 trafficked patients, 95 adults and 35 children. In 43 % (41/95) of adult cases and 63 % (22/35) child cases, mental health professionals were informed that their patient was a potential victim of trafficking by another service involved in their patient's care. Cases were also identified through patients disclosing their experiences of exploitation and abuse. Key challenges faced by staff included social and legal instability, difficulties ascertaining history, patients' lack of engagement, availability of services, and inter-agency working. Training to increase awareness, encourage helpful responses, and inform staff about the available support options would help to ensure the mental health needs of trafficked people are met. Further research is needed to establish if these challenges are similar in other health settings.

  18. Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bibhav; Tenpa, Jasmine; Thapa, Poshan; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Ekstrand, Maria

    2016-09-19

    Globally, access to mental healthcare is often lacking in rural, low-resource settings. Mental healthcare services integration in primary care settings is a key intervention to address this gap. A common strategy includes embedding mental healthcare workers on-site, and receiving consultation from an off-site psychiatrist. Primary care provider perspectives are important for successful program implementation. We conducted three focus groups with all 24 primary care providers at a district-level hospital in rural Nepal. We asked participants about their concerns and recommendations for an integrated mental healthcare delivery program. They were also asked about current practices in seeking referral for patients with mental illness. We collected data using structured notes and analyzed the data by template coding to develop themes around concerns and recommendations for an integrated program. Participants noted that the current referral system included sending patients to the nearest psychiatrist who is 14 h away. Participants did not think this was effective, and stated that integrating mental health into the existing primary care setting would be ideal. Their major concerns about a proposed program included workplace hierarchies between mental healthcare workers and other clinicians, impact of staff turnover on patients, reliability of an off-site consultant psychiatrist, and ability of on-site primary care providers to screen patients and follow recommendations from an off-site psychiatrist. Their suggestions included training a few existing primary care providers as dedicated mental healthcare workers, recruiting both senior and junior mental healthcare workers to ensure retention, recruiting academic psychiatrists for reliability, and training all primary care providers to appropriately screen for mental illness and follow recommendations from the psychiatrist. Primary care providers in rural Nepal reported the failure of the current system of referral, which

  19. Health care provider targeted interventions to improve medication adherence: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, V. S.; Ruppar, T. M.; Enriquez, M.; Cooper, P. S.; Chan, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This systematic review applied meta-analytic procedures to synthesize medication adherence (also termed compliance) interventions that focus on health care providers. Design Comprehensive searching located studies testing interventions that targeted health care providers and reported patient medication adherence behavior outcomes. Search strategies included 13 computerized databases, hand searches of 57 journals, and both author and ancestry searches. Study sample, intervention characteristics, design, and outcomes were reliably coded. Standardized mean difference effect sizes were calculated using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was examined with Q and I2 statistics. Exploratory moderator analyses used meta-analytic analog of ANOVA and regression. Results Codable data were extracted from 218 reports of 151,182 subjects. The mean difference effect size was 0.233. Effect sizes for individual interventions varied from .088 to 0.301. Interventions were more effective when they included multiple strategies. Risk of bias assessment documented larger effect sizes in studies with larger samples, studies that used true control groups (as compared to attention control), and studies without intention-to-treat analyses. Conclusion Overall, this meta-analysis documented that interventions targeted to health care providers significantly improved patient medication adherence. The modest overall effect size suggests that interventions addressing multiple levels of influence on medication adherence may be necessary to achieve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25728214

  20. Perspectives of expectant women and health care providers on birth plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Melissa; Chhoa, Erica; Dayan, Riki; Kluftinger, Amy; Lohn, Zoe; Buhler, Karen

    2013-11-01

    A birth plan is a document detailing a woman's preferences and expectations related to labour and delivery. Empirical research exploring the value of birth plans has shown conflicting findings about whether birth plans have a positive or negative effect on labour and delivery, suggesting a need for further study. This study aimed to understand the perspectives of women, health care providers, and support persons regarding the use of birth plans. A cross-sectional questionnaire was distributed to a convenience sample of expectant or postpartum women, health care providers, and support persons from January 2012 to March 2012 in British Columbia. In total, 122 women and 110 health care providers and support persons completed the questionnaire. Both women and their attendants viewed the birth plan as being valuable for acting as both a communication and education tool. However, the respondents noted that women may be disappointed or dissatisfied if a birth plan cannot be implemented. The most important elements of a birth plan identified included pain management, comfort measures (e.g., mobility during labour), postpartum preferences (e.g., breastfeeding), atmosphere (e.g., privacy), and birthing beliefs (e.g., cultural views). This is the first study to identify advantages and disadvantages of using a birth plan as well as the most important aspects of a birth plan from the perspectives of both women and their attendants in Canada. The findings could be applied to optimize the efficacy of birth plans in Canada and potentially internationally as well.

  1. The behaviour of health care providers in managing diarrheal disease in Palembang City, south Sumatera, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R; Bakri, A; Nazir, M; Pardede, N

    1991-01-01

    A study on knowledge, attitude and practice of health care providers in Palembang had been conducted at the end of 1989 and beginning of 1990. Four approaches were carried out: (1) by recording the help obtained by cases who consulted researchers for further help for the same diarrheal diseases (DD) episode, (2) by studying the medical records of DD cases admitted to three hospitals, (3) by studying prescriptions dispensed by three pharmacies and (4) by focus group discussions. The findings were analysed to evaluate the achievement of the Indonesian Diarrheal Diseases Control Program (CDD). ORT, avoiding antimotility drugs and appropriated feeding have been accepted and practiced by the providers in Palembang. The target of promotion now is to support the acquisition of these behaviours to be implemented as a routine habit of the providers and as a part of the ongoing system of health care delivery system. Specifically the danger of loperamide promotion to the policy on antimotility must be stressed. Rapid iv rehydration and avoiding surface precipitating agents have been accepted, but are not practiced consistently yet due to practical considerations. It seems that there is no impact at all of CDD towards the rate of antibiotic therapy in DD. Besides intensifying the campaign, enforcing group pressure, may be we have to elaborate more the perception of health care provider as a practitioner, and conforming the strategy of the CDD campaign towards the findings. Health education had not been practiced effectively yet. Morale and value system of the providers are important for the success of this program. In general the medical-technic aspect of the CDD has been accepted by the providers, but there is still a lot to do in communicating them to be adopted as an effective behaviour.

  2. Herpes labialis and Nigerian dental health care providers: knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and refusal to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, Clement Chinedu; Umoh, Agnes O

    2015-09-15

    The few existing studies on herpes labialis among health care workers have been predominantly among non-dental health care workers. The purpose of this study was to determine Nigerian dental health care providers' knowledge of, attitudes toward, preventive behaviors for, and refusal to treat patients with herpes labialis. This cross-sectional study was conducted among final-year dental students at the University of Benin, dental house officers, and residents at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Data collection was via a self-administered questionnaire. Bivariate statistics and logistic regression were used to relate the dependent and independent variables. Of the 120 questionnaires distributed, 110 were completed and returned, giving a 91.7% retrieval rate. However, 15 of the returned questionnaires were discarded because they were improperly completed, leaving a total of 95 questionnaires for final analysis in this study. The majority of participants were over 28 years old (54.7%), male (67.4%), unmarried (66.3%), and postgraduate dental health care providers (51.6%). Less than half (43.2%) of participants demonstrated adequate overall knowledge of herpes labialis. About one-tenth (10.5%) and more than three-quarters (87.4%) of participants reported a positive attitude and performance of adequate preventive behaviors, respectively. A total of 16.8% of participants reported a high tendency to refuse treatment to patients with herpes labialis. Although not statistically significant, young, unmarried, male undergraduate participants reported a greater likelihood to refuse treatment to herpes labialis patients. We found a statistically significant positive correlation between attitude and refusal to treat patients with herpes labialis. However, marital status and the attitude of participants toward these patients emerged as the determinants for refusal to treat patients with herpes labialis. Data from this study revealed a high level of

  3. Health care provider advice for adolescent tobacco use: results from the 2011 National Youth Tobacco Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Gillian L; Agaku, Israel T; King, Brian A; Malarcher, Ann M

    2014-09-01

    Health care providers play an important role in promoting tobacco use abstinence among adolescents. This study aimed to provide nationally representative data on the prevalence of provider tobacco use screening and advice delivered to adolescents. Cessation behaviors and correlates of past year quit attempts among current smokers are also explored. Data came from the 2011 National Youth Tobacco Survey, a nationally representative school-based survey of adolescents in grades 6 through 12 (n = 18385). Provider screening and advice were assessed by smoking status and demographic characteristics. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between advice and past year quit attempt. The overall prevalence of current tobacco use was 16.6%; 10.8% were current cigarette smokers (3.6% were established smokers, 7.2% were nonestablished smokers); 17.3% were former smokers; and 71.9% were never smokers (22.6% high susceptibility, 77.4% low susceptibility). Among all respondents, the prevalence of being asked about tobacco use by a health care provider was 32.2%; the prevalence of being advised to quit or avoid tobacco was 31.4%. Established smokers were more likely than other groups to report provider assessment of tobacco use and advice. Receipt of advice was associated with a higher adjusted odds of having made a past year quit attempt (odds ratio: 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.82). Less than one-third of adolescents report being asked about tobacco use or being advised not to use tobacco. Increased tobacco use intervention by health care providers is needed to prevent initiation and increase cessation. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Linking communities to formal health care providers through village health teams in rural Uganda: lessons from linking social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musinguzi, Laban Kashaija; Turinawe, Emmanueil Benon; Rwemisisi, Jude T; de Vries, Daniel H; Mafigiri, David K; Muhangi, Denis; de Groot, Marije; Katamba, Achilles; Pool, Robert

    2017-01-11

    Community-based programmes, particularly community health workers (CHWs), have been portrayed as a cost-effective alternative to the shortage of health workers in low-income countries. Usually, literature emphasises how easily CHWs link and connect communities to formal health care services. There is little evidence in Uganda to support or dispute such claims. Drawing from linking social capital framework, this paper examines the claim that village health teams (VHTs), as an example of CHWs, link and connect communities with formal health care services. Data were collected through ethnographic fieldwork undertaken as part of a larger research program in Luwero District, Uganda, between 2012 and 2014. The main methods of data collection were participant observation in events organised by VHTs. In addition, a total of 91 in-depth interviews and 42 focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with adult community members as part of the larger project. After preliminary analysis of the data, we conducted an additional six in-depth interviews and three FGD with VHTs and four FGD with community members on the role of VHTs. Key informant interviews were conducted with local government staff, health workers, local leaders, and NGO staff with health programs in Luwero. Thematic analysis was used during data analysis. The ability of VHTs to link communities with formal health care was affected by the stakeholders' perception of their roles. Community members perceive VHTs as working for and under instructions of "others", which makes them powerless in the formal health care system. One of the challenges associated with VHTs' linking roles is support from the government and formal health care providers. Formal health care providers perceived VHTs as interested in special recognition for their services yet they are not "experts". For some health workers, the introduction of VHTs is seen as a ploy by the government to control people and hide its inability to provide health

  5. Simulation model for tracheotomy education for primary health-care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorton, LeighAnne H; Lintzenich, Catherine Rees; Evans, Adele K

    2014-01-01

    We performed this study to evaluate the competency of health-care providers managing patients with tracheotomies, and assess the need for, and efficacy of, a multidisciplinary educational program incorporating patient simulation. The prospective observational study included 87 subjects who manage patients with tracheotomies within a tertiary-care hospital. The subjects completed self-assessment questionnaires and objective multiple-choice tests before and after attending a comprehensive educational course using patient simulation. The outcome measurements included pre-course and post-course questionnaire and test scores, as well as observational data collected during recorded patient simulation sessions. Before the education and simulation, the subjects reported an average comfort level of 3.3 on a 5-point Likert scale across 10 categories in the questionnaire, which improved to 4.4 after the training (p tracheotomy tube types, misunderstanding of speaking valve physiology, and delayed recognition and treatment of a plugged or dislodged tracheotomy tube. There is a significant need for improved tracheotomy education among primary health-care providers. Incorporating patient simulation into a comprehensive tracheotomy educational program was effective in improving provider confidence, increasing provider knowledge, and teaching the skills necessary for managing patients with a tracheotomy.

  6. "I understand just a little…" Perspectives of HIV/AIDS service providers in South Africa of providing mental health care for people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Sumaya; Sorsdahl, Katherine; Swartz, Leslie; Joska, John

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted in South Africa and other parts of the world has revealed that people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are more at risk of developing a mental disorder than the general population. It makes sense to explore means of integrating HIV/AIDS and mental health care thereby facilitating access of PLWHA to prompt mental health care. We conducted qualitative interviews with 22 HIV/AIDS service providers of three occupational categories (10 nurses, six adherence counsellors and six patient advocates) at three primary health care clinics in the Western Cape, South Africa. We explored the issues of knowledge and practice in mental health care as well as the role of nurses and lay health workers in providing mental health care to PLWHA thereby attempting to integrate mental health and HIV/AIDS care. Although the majority of participants were in favour of mental health screening for PLWHA, they lacked confidence to conduct the screening themselves. Most participants displayed poor knowledge of mental disorders and reported that they referred to colleagues or to an external mental health service if they suspected a possible mental disorder in a patient. Integration of mental health and HIV/AIDS care has potential benefit to the public HIV/AIDS care system. Mental health training should be provided to HIV/AIDS service providers in this regard.

  7. Patient and referring health care provider satisfaction with a physiotherapy spinal triage assessment service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Brenna; Janzen, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate participant and referring care provider satisfaction associated with a spinal triage assessment service delivered by physiotherapists in collaboration with orthopedic surgeons. People with low back-related complaints were recruited from those referred to a spinal triage assessment program delivered by physiotherapists. Measures of patient and provider satisfaction were completed at approximately 4 weeks after the assessment. The satisfaction surveys were analyzed quantitatively with descriptive statistics and qualitatively with an inductive thematic approach of open and axial coding. A total of 108/115 participants completed the posttest satisfaction survey. Sixty-six percent of participants were "very satisfied" with the service and 55% were "very satisfied" with the recommendations that were made. Only 18% of referring care providers completed the satisfaction survey and 90.5% of those were "very satisfied" with the recommendations. Sixty-one participants and 14 care providers provided comments which revealed a diverse range of themes which were coded into positive (ie, understanding the problem, communication, customer service, efficiency, and management direction), negative (ie, lack of detail, time to follow-up, cost) and neutral related to the triage service, and an "other" category unrelated to the service (ie, chronic symptoms, comorbidities, and limited access to health care.) The quantitative results of the participant survey demonstrated very high levels of satisfaction with the service and slightly less satisfaction with the recommendations that were made. Satisfaction of referring care providers with the recommendations and report was also high, but given the low response rate, these results should be interpreted with caution. Qualitative analysis of participant and provider comments revealed a diverse range of themes. These other issues may be important contextual factors that have the potential to impact patient relevant outcomes.

  8. Communication between Asian American Adolescents and Health Care Providers about Sexual Activity, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and Pregnancy Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jessie; Lau, May; Vermette, David; Liang, David; Flores, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Asian American adolescents have been reported to have the lowest amount of communication with health care providers regarding sexual health topics (sexual activity, contraception, sexually transmitted infections, and pregnancy prevention). This study identified Asian American adolescents' attitudes/beliefs regarding how health care providers can…

  9. An Integrated Curriculum of Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs for Health Care Providers of the Elderly (Project NNED).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit-Portage Area Health Education Network, Akron, OH.

    This document is intended to give health care providers interdisciplinary information concerning drugs, nutrition, and exercise to help them enhance health maintenance of the elderly. Prepared as part of Project NNED, (Nursing, Nutrition, Exercise, and Drugs), an integrated curriculum for health care providers of the elderly, the document includes…

  10. Cultural Competence in Pediatrics: Health Care Provider Knowledge, Awareness, and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Kirk; McClarin, Lavisha; Romano, Emily; Fitzgerald, Diane; Bayne, Lynn; Oceanic, Patricia; Nettles, Arie L; Holmes, Laurens

    2015-12-22

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of a cultural competence training (CCT) program on pediatric health care providers' self-reported ability to provide culturally competent care to a diverse pediatric patient population. This quantitative, nested ecologic level study design used a repeated measure in the form of pre-test and post-test data to assess percent change in providers' cultural awareness, experience working or learning about different cultures, and preparedness and skills in working with different cultures before and after CCT. The study was conducted between 2011 and 2012 in a pediatric hospital and associated outpatient offices. The sample consisted of pediatric health care providers from various departments, mainly physicians and nurses (n = 69). Participants completed a pre-intervention cultural competence assessment and then were subjected to a cultural competence-training program, after which they completed the assessment a second time. The baseline and post-intervention data were collected in the form of Likert scales and transformed into a quintile or quartile scale as appropriate. Data were assessed using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon's signed-rank tests. Providers indicated a 13% increase in knowledge (53.9% vs. 66.7%, t = 3.4, p = 0.001), 8.7% increase in awareness (46.7% vs. 55.4%, t = 3.0, p = 0.002), and 8% statistically marginal increase in skills (66.4% vs. 74.5%, z = 1.8, p = 0.06). Culturally competent training in a pediatric environment significantly enhances knowledge, awareness and to some extent skills in providing care to culturally diverse patient population.

  11. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction in the female health care providers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzi, Abdulrahim A.; Sahly, Nora; Sawan, Dana; Kafy, Souzan; Alzaban, Faten

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in Saudi and non-Saudi female health care providers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. One -hundred twenty (60 Saudi and 60 non-Saudi) sexually active female health care professionals in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were anonymously surveyed using the English version of the female sexual function index questionnaire. The individual domain scores for pain, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, pain, and overall score for the Saudi and non-Saudi women were calculated and compared. The two groups were comparable in demographic characteristics. No statistically significant differences were found between Saudi and non-Saudi women in desire (P = .22) and arousal scores (P = .47). However, non-Saudi women had significantly higher lubrication (P orgasm (P = .015), satisfaction (P = .004), and pain scores (P = .015). The overall scores in Saudi and non-Saudi women were low (23.40 ± 4.50 compared with 26.18 ± 5.97), but non-Saudi women had a significantly higher overall score (P = .005). Taken together, sexual dysfunction is prevalent among Saudi and non-Saudi female health care providers, with Saudi women demonstrating lower scores in four sexual function domains and the overall score. PMID:25601160

  12. Nurse, physician, and consumer role responsibility perceived by health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, K; Bandak, A; Williams, M

    1999-01-01

    The article describes a study that addressed perceptions of unilateral and egalitarian role functions for nurses, physicians, and consumers in a long-term, 345-bed psychiatric facility in the western United States. Findings indicated that physicians desired to retain authority for health care decisions and that nurses, social workers, and hospital administrators preferred collaborative practice. Support for shared responsibility increased among psychiatric technicians with years of experience. Experience did not alter the attitudes of physicians, occupational therapists, and recreational therapists for physician dominance. With experience, nurses increased their belief in nurse responsibility. Despite evidence for collaborative decision making, results of this study indicate that attitudes of health care providers may prevent this tenet from being actualized.

  13. Health Care Providers Attitudes and Practices Regarding the Purpose and Use of Advance Directives in a Military Health Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    advance directives to health care providers’ erroneous beliefs that these documents are mainly for the terminally ill and elderly . Additionally...by secondary infection or malnourishment . Today’s soldiers can be treated more successfully on the front line with sophisticated and portable medical...of elderly outpatients thought the discussion should occur when they are healthy. Some of the statements elicited mixed responses. Mixed responses

  14. Advantages and Challenges: The Experience of Geriatrics Health Care Providers as Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth, Clare M; Auerbach, Heidi P; Parker, Victoria A

    2015-08-01

    Very little is known about family caregivers who are also geriatrics health care professionals. This exploratory study examines the dual roles of such professionals, the impact of their geriatrics expertise on the care of family members, and the influence of those caregiver experiences on their clinical practice. The research team recruited 16 geriatrics health care professionals who participated in 60- to 90-min individual interviews, based on a semistructured guide. Questions explored participants' dual experiences as geriatrics professionals and as family caregivers. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Using a thematic analysis approach, the authors identified recurring themes, coding responses into both major themes and subthemes. The authors found 3 major themes: (a) dual role advantages and disadvantages, (b) emotional impact of dual roles, and (c) professional impact of family caregiving. Participants reported their own geriatrics expertise provided both advantages and disadvantages in caring for their older family members. Although their expertise introduced a significant emotional intensity to their personal caregiving experiences, those experiences positively influenced their professional insight, empathy, and advocacy for the caregivers of their own patients. In addition to the well-known burdens of caregiving, a further set of complex stressors is imposed on geriatrics health care professionals serving as family caregivers. The challenges they face despite their expertise also highlight critical challenges facing all caregivers. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination among health-care providers in a tertiary health facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Justin S Doka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed at assessing dispositions, attitudes, and behavioral tendencies for HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination among health-care providers in Specialist Hospital Gombe, Northern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Out of a total of 397 health personnel of the hospital, a sample of 201 health-care providers of various professional backgrounds was drawn using quota sampling technique. A descriptive exploratory survey method was adopted. Using a structured questionnaire, relevant data were collected from the subjects. Reliability test on key segments of the instrument yielded alpha Cronbach's internal consistency test values of not 0.05. If given the choice, 34 (16.9% of the personnel would not treat a patient with HIV. Conclusion: A prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS-related stigma of 15.4% among the health personnel is quite worrisome. Stigma reduction seminars and workshops would go a long way toward mitigating this trend.

  16. Intercultural communication between patients and health care providers: an exploration of intercultural communication effectiveness, cultural sensitivity, stress, and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrey, K L; Amason, P

    2001-01-01

    Cultural diversity is becoming increasingly more important in the workplace. This is particularly true in health care organizations facing demographic shifts in the patients served and their families. This study serves to aid the development of intercultural communication training programs for health care providers by examining how cultural sensitivity and effective intercultural communication, besides helping patients, personally benefit health care providers by reducing their stress. Effective intercultural communication and cultural sensitivity were found to be related. Health care providers' levels of intercultural anxiety also were found to correlate with effective intercultural communication.

  17. Computerized Childbirth Monitoring Tools for Health Care Providers Managing Labor: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balikuddembe, Michael S; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M; Wakholi, Peter K; Tylleskär, Thorkild

    2017-06-15

    Proper monitoring of labor and childbirth prevents many pregnancy-related complications. However, monitoring is still poor in many places partly due to the usability concerns of support tools such as the partograph. In 2011, the World Health Organization (WHO) called for the development and evaluation of context-adaptable electronic health solutions to health challenges. Computerized tools have penetrated many areas of health care, but their influence in supporting health staff with childbirth seems limited. The objective of this scoping review was to determine the scope and trends of research on computerized labor monitoring tools that could be used by health care providers in childbirth management. We used key terms to search the Web for eligible peer-reviewed and gray literature. Eligibility criteria were a computerized labor monitoring tool for maternity service providers and dated 2006 to mid-2016. Retrieved papers were screened to eliminate ineligible papers, and consensus was reached on the papers included in the final analysis. We started with about 380,000 papers, of which 14 papers qualified for the final analysis. Most tools were at the design and implementation stages of development. Three papers addressed post-implementation evaluations of two tools. No documentation on clinical outcome studies was retrieved. The parameters targeted with the tools varied, but they included fetal heart (10 of 11 tools), labor progress (8 of 11), and maternal status (7 of 11). Most tools were designed for use in personal computers in low-resource settings and could be customized for different user needs. Research on computerized labor monitoring tools is inadequate. Compared with other labor parameters, there was preponderance to fetal heart monitoring and hardly any summative evaluation of the available tools. More research, including clinical outcomes evaluation of computerized childbirth monitoring tools, is needed.

  18. Low income parents' reports of communication problems with health care providers: effects of language and insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Kenney, Genevieve

    2007-01-01

    This study examines how parental reports of communication problems with health providers vary over a wider range of characteristics of low income children than considered in previous studies. Data were drawn from the 1999 and 2002 National Survey of America's Families. Communication problems, insurance type, socioeconomic characteristics, health factors, and provider type were examined. Data were analyzed using bivariate and multivariate techniques. Bivariate analysis identified that the parents of 24.4% of low income children and 36.4% of publicly covered low income children with a Spanish interview reported poor communication with health providers. Coefficients from regression analysis suggest that, controlling for covariates, foreign-born parents with a Spanish interview were 11.8 percentage points (pcommunication problems than U.S.-born parents with an English interview. Among low income publicly covered children with a Spanish interview, regression analysis suggests that parents of children who used clinics or hospital outpatient departments as their usual source of care were 9.5 percentage points (pcommunication problems compared with those whose usual source of care was a doctor's or HMO office. Implementing policies to improve communication barriers for low income children, particularly those with foreign-born parents whose native language is not English, may be necessary to reduce health disparities relative to higher income children across a variety of health domains including utilization, satisfaction, and outcomes. Focusing attention on the availability of professional translation services in clinics or hospital outpatient departments may be a cost-effective strategy for reducing communication problems for publicly insured children.

  19. Medicinal Cannabis: A Survey Among Health Care Providers in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Beatriz H; Garrett, Sharon B; Carter, Gregory T

    2017-02-01

    Washington State allows marijuana use for medical (since 1998) and recreational (since 2012) purposes. The benefits of medicinal cannabis (MC) can be maximized if clinicians educate patients about dosing, routes of administration, side effects, and plant composition. However, little is known about clinicians' knowledge and practices in Washington State. An anonymous online survey assessed providers' MC knowledge, beliefs, clinical practices, and training needs. The survey was disseminated through health care providers' professional organizations in Washington State. Descriptive analysis compared providers who had and had not authorized MC for patients. Survey results informed the approach and content of an online training on best clinical practices of MC. Four hundred ninety-four health care providers responded to the survey. Approximately two-third were women, aged 30 to 60 years, and working in family or internal medicine. More than half of the respondents were legally allowed to write MC authorizations per Washington State law, and 27% of those had issued written MC authorizations. Overall, respondents reported low knowledge and comfort level related to recommending MC. Respondents rated MC knowledge as important and supported inclusion of MC training in medical/health provider curriculum. Most Washington State providers have not received education on scientific basis of MC or training on best clinical practices of MC. Clinicians who had issued MC authorizations were more likely to have received MC training than those who had not issued MC authorization. The potential of MCs to benefit some patients is hindered by the lack of comfort of clinicians to recommend it. Training opportunities are badly needed to address these issues.

  20. Suffering in Silence: Medical Error and its Impact on Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jennifer J; Long, Brit

    2018-01-20

    All humans are fallible. Because physicians are human, unintentional errors unfortunately occur. While unintentional medical errors have an impact on patients and their families, they may also contribute to adverse mental and emotional effects on the involved provider(s). These may include burnout, lack of concentration, poor work performance, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and even suicidality. The objectives of this article are to 1) discuss the impact medical error has on involved provider(s), 2) provide potential reasons why medical error can have a negative impact on provider mental health, and 3) suggest solutions for providers and health care organizations to recognize and mitigate the adverse effects medical error has on providers. Physicians and other providers may feel a variety of adverse emotions after medical error, including guilt, shame, anxiety, fear, and depression. It is thought that the pervasive culture of perfectionism and individual blame in medicine plays a considerable role toward these negative effects. In addition, studies have found that despite physicians' desire for support after medical error, many physicians feel a lack of personal and administrative support. This may further contribute to poor emotional well-being. Potential solutions in the literature are proposed, including provider counseling, learning from mistakes without fear of punishment, discussing mistakes with others, focusing on the system versus the individual, and emphasizing provider wellness. Much of the reviewed literature is limited in terms of an emergency medicine focus or even regarding physicians in general. In addition, most studies are survey- or interview-based, which limits objectivity. While additional, more objective research is needed in terms of mitigating the effects of error on physicians, this review may help provide insight and support for those who feel alone in their attempt to heal after being involved in an adverse medical event

  1. Characteristics of US Health Care Providers Who Counsel Adolescents on Sports and Energy Drink Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the proportion of health care providers who counsel adolescent patients on sports and energy drink (SED consumption and the association with provider characteristics. Methods. This is a cross-sectional analysis of a survey of providers who see patients ≤17 years old. The proportion providing regular counseling on sports drinks (SDs, energy drinks (EDs, or both was assessed. Chi-square analyses examined differences in counseling based on provider characteristics. Multivariate logistic regression calculated adjusted odds ratios (aOR for characteristics independently associated with SED counseling. Results. Overall, 34% of health care providers regularly counseled on both SEDs, with 41% regularly counseling on SDs and 55% regularly counseling on EDs. On adjusted modeling regular SED counseling was associated with the female sex (aOR: 1.44 [95% CI: 1.07–1.93], high fruit/vegetable intake (aOR: 2.05 [95% CI: 1.54–2.73], family/general practitioners (aOR: 0.58 [95% CI: 0.41–0.82] and internists (aOR: 0.37 [95% CI: 0.20–0.70] versus pediatricians, and group versus individual practices (aOR: 0.59 [95% CI: 0.42–0.84]. Modeling for SD- and ED-specific counseling found similar associations with provider characteristics. Conclusion. The prevalence of regular SED counseling is low overall and varies. Provider education on the significance of SED counseling and consumption is important.

  2. Race/Ethnicity and Health Care Communication: Does Patient-Provider Concordance Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Casey F; Zinner, Darren; Rust, George; Fryer, George E

    2016-11-01

    Although many minority patients would prefer a provider of their own race/ethnicity, the influence of this relationship on patient-provider communication remains unknown. This analysis examined the effect of patient-provider race/ethnicity concordance on patient-reported provider communication quality using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey years 2002-2012. Ordinary least squares regressions were executed on communication rating, measured by the Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems. Only 13.8% of black, non-Hispanic patients reported their usual source of care provider matched their race/ethnicity, compared with 94.4% of white, non-Hispanic patients and 43.8% of Hispanic patients. Differences in communication ratings were driven by patient race, rather than provider race. Although black, non-Hispanic patients rate their communication significantly higher than their counterparts overall, there was no significant influence of patient-provider racial concordance on ratings of communication when controlling for other sociodemographic variables. Minorities may seek the services of minority providers, but they are not more satisfied with patient-provider communication experience than when in race-discordant provider arrangements.

  3. Primary Care Tasks Associated with Provider Burnout: Findings from a Veterans Health Administration Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Linda Y; Rose, Danielle E; Soban, Lynn M; Stockdale, Susan E; Meredith, Lisa S; Edwards, Samuel T; Helfrich, Christian D; Rubenstein, Lisa V

    2017-09-25

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is a primary care delivery model predicated on shared responsibility for patient care among members of an interprofessional team. Effective task sharing may reduce burnout among primary care providers (PCPs). However, little is known about the extent to which PCPs share these responsibilities, and which, if any, of the primary care tasks performed independently by the PCPs (vs. shared with the team) are particularly associated with PCP burnout. A better understanding of the relationship between these tasks and their effects on PCP burnout may help guide focused efforts aimed at reducing burnout. To investigate (1) the extent to which PCPs share responsibility for 14 discrete primary care tasks with other team members, and (2) which, if any, of the primary care tasks performed by the PCPs (without reliance on team members) are associated with PCP burnout. Secondary data analysis of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) survey data from two time periods. 327 providers from 23 VA primary care practices within one VHA regional network. The dependent variable was PCP report of burnout. Independent variables included PCP report of the extent to which they performed 14 discrete primary care tasks without reliance on team members; team functioning; and PCP-, clinic-, and system-level variables. In adjusted models, PCP reports of intervening on patient lifestyle factors and educating patients about disease-specific self-care activities, without reliance on their teams, were significantly associated with burnout (intervening on lifestyle: b = 4.11, 95% CI = 0.39, 7.83, p = 0.03; educating patients: b = 3.83, 95% CI = 0.33, 7.32, p = 0.03). Performing behavioral counseling and self-management education tasks without relying on other team members for assistance was associated with PCP burnout. Expanding the roles of nurses and other healthcare professionals to assume responsibility for these tasks may ease PCP burden and

  4. Training pediatric health care providers in prevention of dental decay: results from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeldin Leslie P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians report willingness to provide preventive dental care, but optimal methods for their training and support in such procedures are not known. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of three forms of continuing medical education (CME on provision of preventive dental services to Medicaid-enrolled children by medical personnel in primary care physician offices. Methods Practice-based, randomized controlled trial. Setting: 1,400 pediatric and family physician practices in North Carolina providing care to an estimated 240,000 Medicaid-eligible children aged 0–3 years. Interventions: Group A practices (n = 39 received didactic training and course materials in oral health screening, referral, counseling and application of fluoride varnish. Group B practices (n = 41 received the same as Group A and were offered weekly conference calls providing advice and support. Group C practices (n = 41 received the same as Group B and were offered in-office visit providing hands-on advice and support. In all groups, physicians were reimbursed $38–$43 per preventive dental visit. Outcome measures were computed from reimbursement claims submitted to NC Division of Medical Assistance. Primary outcome measure: rate of preventive dental services provision per 100 well-child visits. Secondary outcome measure: % of practices providing 20 or more preventive dental visits. Results 121 practices were randomized, and 107 provided data for analysis. Only one half of Group B and C practices took part in conference calls or in-office visits. Using intention-to-treat analysis, rates of preventive dental visits did not differ significantly among CME groups: GroupA = 9.4, GroupB = 12.9 and GroupC = 8.5 (P = 0.32. Twenty or more preventive dental visits were provided by 38–49% of practices in the three study groups (P = 0.64. Conclusion A relatively high proportion of medical practices appear capable of adopting these preventive dental services

  5. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitshokile Dintle Mogobe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs, and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs. SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV.

  6. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Shaibu, Sheila; Matshediso, Ellah; Sabone, Motshedisi; Ntsayagae, Esther; Nicholas, Patrice K; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rose, Carol Dawson; Johnson, Mallory O; Webel, Allison; Cuca, Yvette; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Solís Báez, Solymar S; Nokes, Kathleen; Reyes, Darcel; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reid, Paula; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Lindgren, Teri; Holzemer, William L; Wantland, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs), and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs). SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV.

  7. Genetics and Common Disorders: Implications for Primary Care and Public Health Providers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, Joseph D.; Greendale, Karen; Peay, Holly L.

    2005-06-01

    We developed this program for primary care providers (PCPs) and public health professionals (PHPs) who are interested in increasing their understanding of the genetics of common chronic diseases and of the implications of genetics and genomics for their fields. The program differs from virtually all previous educational efforts in genetics for health professionals in that it focuses on the genetics of common chronic disease and on the broad principles that emerge when one views disease from the perspectives of variation and individuality, which are at the heart of thinking genetically. The CD-ROM introduces users to content that will improve their understanding of topics such as: • A framework for genetics and common disease; • Basic information on genetics, genomics, genetic medicine, and public health genetics, all in the context of common chronic disease; • The status of research on genetic contributions to specific common diseases, including a review of research methods; • Genetic/environmental interaction as the new “central dogma” of public health genetics; • The importance of taking and analyzing a family history; • The likely impact of potential gene discovery and genetic testing on genetic counseling and risk assessment and on the practices of PCPs and PHPs; • Stratification of populations into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories; • The potential role of PCPs and PHPs in identifying high-risk individuals and families, in providing limited genetics services, and in referring to clinical genetics specialists; the potential for standard referral algorithms; • Implications of genetic insights for diagnosis and treatment; • Ethical, legal, and social issues that arise from genetic testing for common chronic diseases; and • Specific prevention strategies based on understanding of genetics and genetic/ environmental interactions. The interactive content – developed by experts in genetics, primary care, and public health – is

  8. 47 CFR 54.625 - Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Support for services beyond the maximum supported distance for rural health care providers. 54.625 Section 54.625 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Universal Service Support for Health Care Providers § 54.625...

  9. Family participation during intensive care unit rounds: goals and expectations of parents and health care providers in a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickney, Carolyn A; Ziniel, Sonja I; Brett, Molly S; Truog, Robert D

    2014-12-01

    To compare perceptions, goals, and expectations of health care providers and parents regarding parental participation in morning rounds and target specific areas of opportunity for educational interventions. Semistructured interviews of parents and focus groups of health care providers to learn about their experiences in, goals for, and perceived barriers to successful parental participation in morning rounds. Qualitative methods were used to analyze interview and focus group transcripts. Parents (n = 21) and health care providers (n = 24) participated in interviews and focus groups, respectively. Analyses revealed key areas of agreement between providers and parents regarding goals for rounds when parents are present, including helping parents achieve an understanding of the child's current status and plan of care. Providers and parents disagreed, however, about the nature of opportunities to ask questions. Parents additionally reported a strong desire to provide expert advice about their children and expected transparency from their care team, while providers stated that parental presence sometimes hindered frank discussions and education. Some agreement in goals for parent participation in morning rounds exists, although there are opportunities to calibrate expectations for both parents and health care providers. Solutions may involve a protocol for orienting parents to morning rounds, focusing on improving communication with parents outside of morning rounds, and the preservation of a forum for providers to have private discussions as a team. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of comorbidity on the individual's choice of primary health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Andrzej; Håkansson, Anders; Beckman, Anders; Halling, Anders

    2011-06-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examined whether age, gender, and comorbidity were of importance for an individual's choice of listing with either a public or a private primary health care (PHC) practice. DESIGN AND SETTING. The study was a register-based closed cohort study in one private and one public PHC practice in Blekinge County in southern Sweden. Subjects. A cohort (12 696 individuals) was studied comprising all those listed with the public or private PHC practice on 1 October 2005 who were also listed with the public PHC practice on 1 October 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The listing/re-listing behaviour of the population in this cohort was studied at two points in time, 1 October 2005 and 1 October 2006, with respect to age, gender, and comorbidity level as measured by the ACG Case-Mix system. RESULTS. Individuals listed with the public practice both on 1 October 2005 and one year later were significantly older, were more often females, and had a higher comorbidity level than individuals listed with the private practice. Individuals with a higher comorbidity level were more likely to re-list or to stay listed with the public practice. CONCLUSIONS. This study shows that the probability of choosing a public instead of private PHC provider increased with higher age and comorbidity level of the individuals. It is suggested that using a measure of comorbidity can help us understand more about the chronically ill individual's choice of health care provider. This would be of importance when health care policy-makers decide on reimbursement system or organization of PHC.

  11. Surmounting difficulties to provide home based neonatal care - reflections of community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhughate, Abhijit Shrinivas; Tiwari, Pearl; Sohoni, Shubhangi; Morgaonkar, Vallaree Anant; Phatak, Ajay Gajanan; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar Marutirao; Mahajani, Anagha Anand

    2018-01-15

    In India, community health workers' (CHW) effectiveness in providing home-based neonatal care (HBNC) has been well documented. The nature of challenges faced and strategies adopted while providing HBNC services need to be studied in-depth. A qualitative study to understand the challenges faced and strategies used by Sakhis (women CHW) while providing services as part of a HBNC program implemented by a non-profit organization. Data consisted of 20 in-depth interviews and three focus group discussions (FGD) with Sakhis. Sakhis negotiated with the community to start working as a CHW. They faced challenges while changing behaviors at individual level and also while bringing about a change in harmful normative practices that increased chances of maternal and neonatal mortality. Managing crises at the time of deliveries and facilitating a safe delivery was the most critical challenge faced by many Sakhis. The key strategies used by Sakhis included: proactively and persistently providing services even when they faced resistance from the woman or her family; evolving contextually suitable counseling techniques and tactics to bring about behavioral change; balancing compliance to traditional practices and promoting HBNC; defying traditional practices and assisting the woman in times of an emergency to save lives. Having on-call support from supervisors and cultivating a good working relationship with health providers facilitated effective service provision by Sakhis. CHWs having a strong sense of commitment can develop strategies to address challenges and provide HBNC services effectively if they also have strong supervisory support.

  12. A first aid training course for primary health care providers in Nagorno Karabagh: assessing knowledge retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael E; Harutyunyan, Tsovinar L; Dorian, Alina H

    2012-12-01

    Conflict in the South Caucasus' Nagorno Karabagh region has damaged health facilities and disrupted the delivery of services and supplies as well as led to depletion of human and fixed capital and weakened the de facto government's ability to provide training for health care providers. In response to documented medical training deficits, the American University of Armenia organized a first aid training course (FATC) for primary health care providers within the scope of the USAID-funded Humanitarian Assistance Project in Nagorno Karabagh. This paper reports the follow-up assessments conducted to inform policy makers regarding FATC knowledge and skill retention and the potential need for periodic refresher training. Follow-up assessments were conducted six months and 18 months following the FATC to assess the retention of knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported practices. Eighty-four providers participated in the first follow-up and 210 in the second. The assessment tool contained items addressing the use and quality of the first aid skills, trainee's evaluation of the course, and randomly selected test questions to assess knowledge retention. At both follow-up points, the participants' assessment of the course was positive. More than 85% of the trainees self-assessed their skills as "excellent" or "good" and noted that skills were frequently practiced. Scores of approximately 58% on knowledge tests at both the first and second follow-ups indicated no knowledge decay between the first and second survey waves, but substantial decline from the immediate post-test assessment in the classroom. The trainees assessed the FATC as effective, and the skills covered as important and well utilized. Knowledge retention was modest, but stable. Refresher courses are necessary to reverse the decay of technical knowledge and to ensure proper application in the field.

  13. Health information technology to facilitate communication involving health care providers, caregivers, and pediatric patients: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentles, Stephen James; Lokker, Cynthia; McKibbon, K Ann

    2010-06-18

    Pediatric patients with health conditions requiring follow-up typically depend on a caregiver to mediate at least part of the necessary two-way communication with health care providers on their behalf. Health information technology (HIT) and its subset, information communication technology (ICT), are increasingly being applied to facilitate communication between health care provider and caregiver in these situations. Awareness of the extent and nature of published research involving HIT interventions used in this way is currently lacking. This scoping review was designed to map the health literature about HIT used to facilitate communication involving health care providers and caregivers (who are usually family members) of pediatric patients with health conditions requiring follow-up. Terms relating to care delivery, information technology, and pediatrics were combined to search MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL for the years 1996 to 2008. Eligible studies were selected after three rounds of duplicate screening in which all authors participated. Data regarding patient, caregiver, health care provider, HIT intervention, outcomes studied, and study design were extracted and maintained in a Microsoft Access database. Stage of research was categorized using the UK's Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions. Quantitative and qualitative descriptive summaries are presented. We included 104 eligible studies (112 articles) conducted in 17 different countries and representing 30 different health conditions. The most common conditions were asthma, type 1 diabetes, special needs, and psychiatric disorder. Most studies (88, 85%) included children 2 to 12 years of age, and 73 (71%) involved home care settings. Health care providers operated in hospital settings in 96 (92%) of the studies. Interventions featured 12 modes of communication (eg, Internet, intranets, telephone, video conferencing, email, short message service [SMS], and

  14. Health care provider confidence and exercise prescription practices of Exercise is Medicine Canada workshop attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Myles W; Shields, Christopher A; Oh, Paul I; Fowles, Jonathon R

    2017-04-01

    The Exercise is Medicine Canada (EIMC) initiative promotes physical activity counselling and exercise prescription within health care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions and practices around physical activity counselling and exercise prescription in health care professionals before and after EIMC training. Prior to and directly following EIMC workshops, 209 participants (physicians (n = 113); allied health professionals (AHPs) (n = 54), including primarily nurses (n = 36) and others; and exercise professionals (EPs) (n = 23), including kinesiologists (n = 16), physiotherapists (n = 5), and personal trainers (n = 2)) from 7 provinces completed self-reflection questionnaires. Compared with AHPs, physicians saw more patients (78% > 15 patients/day vs 93% exercise counselling during routine client encounters (48% vs 72% in most sessions; p exercise counselling into sessions (2.74 ± 0.71, out of 5) compared with AHPs (2.17 ± 0.94; p = 0.001) and EPs (1.43 ± 0.66; p exercise prescription as lack of patient interest (2.77 ± 0.85 out of 4), resources (2.65 ± 0.82 out of 4), and time (2.62 ± 0.71 out of 4). The majority of physicians (85%) provided a written prescription for exercise in exercise routinely, and 33% planned on increasing physical activity and exercise counselling, measured through open-ended responses.

  15. Vaccination for Group B Streptococcus during pregnancy: attitudes and concerns of women and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, San; Vollman, Ardene Robinson; Manning, Shannon D; Mucenski, Melissa; Vidakovich, Jeanne; Davies, H Dele

    2006-07-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading infectious cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) strategies are effective in preventing GBS transmission from mothers to newborns, there are growing concerns about adverse effects, and the development of antibiotic resistance. GBS vaccines targeting the most virulent neonatal disease serotypes are currently under development and may be used during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to explore the key issues and concerns that would be associated with GBS vaccination during pregnancy from the perspectives of pregnant women and health care providers. Twenty-two women and 25 health care professionals in Alberta, Canada participated in 10 focus groups, each group ranging from 2 to 20 participants. Valuable information emerged from the focus groups about the factors that would affect acceptance of a maternal GBS vaccine. This information will be essential for health systems to consider in the introduction, promotion and delivery of such a vaccine. The data may help optimize education about GBS and a putative vaccine to pregnant women.

  16. Hispanic women's health care provider control expectations: the influence of fatalism and acculturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncancio, Angelica M; Ward, Kristy K; Berenson, Abbey B

    2011-05-01

    In order to understand how culture influences Hispanic women's views about their health care provider (HCP), we examined the relationship between acculturation and fatalism in the HCP control expectations of Hispanic women. (A HCP control expectation is the extent to which an individual believes that her HCP has control over her health.) We predicted that acculturation would be negatively associated with HCP control expectations, and fatalism would be positively associated with HCP control expectations. A group of 1,027 young Hispanic women (mean age 21.24 years; SD=2.46) who were University of Texas Medical Branch clinic patients completed a comprehensive survey. Structural equation modeling was employed and, as predicted, acculturation was negatively associated with HCP control expectations (pfatalism was positively associated (pfatalism, acculturation, and their influence on HCP control expectations will help us understand this population's perceptions of their HCPs. This knowledge will assist HCPs in providing culturally competent care which will increase adherence to medical treatment and screening guidelines.

  17. Attitude about mental illness of health care providers and community leaders in rural Haryana, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Ramesh Salve

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attitude about mental illness determines health seeking of the people. Success of National Mental Health Programme (NMHP is dependent on attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders in the programme. Material & Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was carried out in Ballabgarh block of Faridabad district in Haryana. We aimed to study attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders of health care providers (HCP, community leaders in rural area of Haryana, north India. Study area consisting of five Primary Health Centers (PHCs serving 2,12,000 rural population. All HCP working at PHCs, Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and community leaders in study area were approached for participation. Hindi version of Opinion about Mental illness Scale for Chinese Community (OMICC was used to study attitude. Results: In total, 467 participants were participated in the study. Of which, HCP, ASHAs and community leaders were 81 (17.4%, 145 (31.0% and 241 (51.6% respectively. Community members reported socially restrictive, pessimistic and stereotyping attitude towards mentally ill person. ASHA and HCP reported stereotyping attitude about person with mental illness. None of the stakeholders reported stigmatizing attitude. Conclusion: Training programme focusing on spectrum of mental illness for HCP and ASHA working in rural area under NMHP programme is needed. Awareness generation of community leaders about bio-medical concept of mental illness is cornerstone of NMHP success in India.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices among health care providers regarding complementary and alternative medicine in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahall, Mandreker; Legall, George

    2017-03-08

    Health care providers are often ill prepared to interact about or make acceptable conclusions on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) despite its widespread use. We explored the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of health care providers regarding CAM. This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 1 and July 31, 2015 among health care providers working mainly in the public sector in Trinidad and Tobago. A 34-item questionnaire was distributed and used for data collection. Questionnaire data were analysed using inferential and binary logistic regression models. Response rate was 60.3% (362/600). Responders were 172 nurses, 77 doctors, 30 pharmacists, and 83 other health care providers of unnamed categories (mainly nursing assistants). Responders were predominantly female (69.1%), Indo-Trinidadian (55.8%), Christian (47.5%), self-claimed "very religious" (48.3%), and had alternative, and physical types of CAM, but had no knowledge of energy therapy and therapeutic methods. Sex, ethnicity, and type of health care provider were associated with both personal use and recommendation for the use of CAM. Predictors of CAM use were sex, religion, and type of health care provider; predictors of recommendation for the use of CAM were sex and type of health care provider. About half of health care providers (51.4%) and doctors (52%) were likely to ask their patients about CAM and medicine alone. Less than 10% said conventional medicine should be used alone. Knowledge about CAM is low among health care providers. The majority engages in using CAM but is reluctant to recommend it. Predictors of CAM use were sex, religion, and profession; predictors of recommendation for the use of CAM were sex and profession. Health care providers feel the future lies in integrative medicine.

  19. Factors affecting the performance of maternal health care providers in Armenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltero Lauren

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last five years, international development organizations began to modify and adapt the conventional Performance Improvement Model for use in low-resource settings. This model outlines the five key factors believed to influence performance outcomes: job expectations, performance feedback, environment and tools, motivation and incentives, and knowledge and skills. Each of these factors should be supplied by the organization in which the provider works, and thus, organizational support is considered as an overarching element for analysis. Little research, domestically or internationally, has been conducted on the actual effects of each of the factors on performance outcomes and most PI practitioners assume that all the factors are needed in order for performance to improve. This study presents a unique exploration of how the factors, individually as well as in combination, affect the performance of primary reproductive health providers (nurse-midwives in two regions of Armenia. Methods Two hundred and eighty-five nurses and midwives were observed conducting real or simulated antenatal and postpartum/neonatal care services and interviewed about the presence or absence of the performance factors within their work environment. Results were analyzed to compare average performance with the existence or absence of the factors; then, multiple regression analysis was conducted with the merged datasets to obtain the best models of "predictors" of performance within each clinical service. Results Baseline results revealed that performance was sub-standard in several areas and several performance factors were deficient or nonexistent. The multivariate analysis showed that (a training in the use of the clinic tools; and (b receiving recognition from the employer or the client/community, are factors strongly associated with performance, followed by (c receiving performance feedback in postpartum care. Other – extraneous

  20. Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acharya, Bibhav; Tenpa, Jasmine; Thapa, Poshan; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Ekstrand, Maria

    2016-01-01

    .... Primary care provider perspectives are important for successful program implementation. We conducted three focus groups with all 24 primary care providers at a district-level hospital in rural Nepal...

  1. Migrant beer promoters' experiences accessing reproductive health care in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam: lessons for planners and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Gail C; Spitzer, Denise L; Somrongthong, Ratana; Dat, Truong Cong; Kounnavongsa, Somphone

    2015-03-01

    Migrant beer promoters in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam were surveyed to determine their experiences in accessing reproductive health care services in the cities of Phnom Penh, Vientiane, Bangkok, and Hanoi. A total of 7 health care institutions were chosen as popular with migrant beer promoters. Staff at these institutions provided information on the institution, and 390 beer promoters were surveyed about their experiences while accessing services. There were discrepancies between findings from the staff interviews and the experiences of the beer promoters. In general, the migrant women were satisfied with the cost, location, friendliness of the health care providers, and knowledge and skills of the providers. They were less positive about confidentiality and waiting times, though many still agreed that these were not an issue. Health care planners and providers should take note of the issues affecting access to reproductive health care services for migrant women when they design and implement services. © 2012 APJPH.

  2. Development of the Moffitt Cancer Network as a Telemedicine and Teleconferencing Educational Tool for Health Care Providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krischer, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    The Moffitt Cancer Network's (MCN) goal is to provide up-to-date oncology related information, resources, and education to oncology health care providers and researchers for the prevention and cure of cancer...

  3. Development of the Moffitt Cancer Network as a Telemedicine and Teleconferencing Educational Tool for Health Care Providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krischer, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    The Moffitt Cancer Network's (MCN) goal is to provide up-to-date oncology related information, resources, and education to oncology health care providers and researchers for the prevention and cure of cancer...

  4. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Background Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to...

  5. Are primary health care providers prepared to implement an anti-smoking program in Syria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfar, Taghrid; Al-Ali, Radwan; Ward, Kenneth D; Vander Weg, Mark W; Maziak, Wasim

    2011-11-01

    To document primary health care (PHC) providers' tobacco use, and how this influences their smoking cessation practices and attitudes towards tobacco-control policies. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed to PHC providers in 7 randomly selected PHC centers in Aleppo, Syria. All PHC providers completed the questionnaires (100% response rate). A quarter of these providers smoke cigarettes and more than 10% smoke waterpipes. Physicians who smoke were less likely to advise patients to quit (OR=0.29; 95% CI, 0.09-0.95), assess their motivation to quit (OR=0.13, 95% CI=0.02-0.72), or assist them in quitting (OR=0.24, 95% CI=0.06-0.99). PHC providers who smoke were less likely to support a ban on smoking in PHC settings (68.2% vs. 89.1%) and in enclosed public places (68.2% vs. 86.1%) or increases in the price of tobacco products (43.2% vs. 77.4%) (PSyria and will negatively influence implementation of anti-smoking program in PHC settings. Smoking awareness and cessation interventions targeted to PHC providers, and training programs to build providers' competency in addressing their patients' smoking is crucial in Syria. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Caregiver and health care provider preferences of nutritional support in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Hooker, Ruth; Adams, Marissa; Havrilla, David A; Leung, Wing; Roach, Robin R; Mosby, Terezie T

    2015-08-01

    Many pediatric oncology patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) require nutritional support (NS) because of their inability to consume adequate caloric intake enough calories orally. Although NS can be provided either enteraly (EN) or parenteraly (PN), EN is the preferred method of NS as long as if the gastrointestinal tract is functioning. In this qualitative study, we determined the type of NS preferences and the reservations of caregivers of pediatric HSCT patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as well as those of health care (HC) providers working on the HSCT unit. A survey was developed and completed anonymously by HC providers and caregivers. The hypothesis was that HC providers and caregivers would prefer PN because it is convenient to use in patients who already have a central line in place. Most caregivers preferred PN to EN, while most HC providers preferred EN to PN. The barrier between EN initiation and caregivers' approval was the caregivers' perception that EN was invasive and painful, most common obstacle for initiation of EN among caregivers was that it hurts/is invasive, while the barrier with HC providers was vomiting and/abdominal pain associated with EN. If caregivers were better educated about NS and the advantages/disadvantages of the different forms of NS, their preferences may change. There have been policy changes at St. Jude have been implemented since this study, and an outpatient dietitian now provides education to caregivers about NS during the pre-evaluation for HSCT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Factors associated with provision of long-acting reversible contraception among adolescent health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Katherine Blumoff; Makino, Kevin K; Coles, Mandy S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify provider and practice characteristics associated with long-acting reversible contraception (LARC – progesterone contraceptive implants or IUDs [intrauterine devices]) provision among adolescent health care providers. Methods We analyzed physician characteristics and self-reported provision of LARC using chi-square analyses. Multivariate logistic regressions identified factors predicting provision of any form of LARC, as well as progesterone contraceptive implants or IUDs specifically. Results In logistic regressions, residency training in obstetrics/gynecology or family medicine (rather than internal medicine/pediatrics) was the strongest predictor of LARC provision, particularly for IUDs. Practicing in suburban (rather than urban) and hospital-based (rather than private) settings was associated with lower and higher likelihoods of providing LARC respectively. Conclusions Exposure to procedural women’s health training was the strongest predictor LARC provision. Increasing the number of providers offering this type of contraception may have broad reaching consequences for adolescent pregnancy prevention, and may be most easily accomplished via contraceptive implants. PMID:23427785

  8. Coordination of primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, D L; McAlister, W H

    1988-02-01

    Surveys were sent to family physicians in Illinois to determine knowledge and attitude concerning optometry. The respondents were knowledgeable in certain aspects of optometry. However, many need to become more aware of the optometrist as a health care provider.

  9. Consumer-providers of care for adult clients of statutory mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Veronica; Lowe, Dianne; Hill, Sophie; Prictor, Megan; Hetrick, Sarah E; Ryan, Rebecca; Berends, Lynda

    2013-03-28

    the same outcome to provide a summary estimate of the effect across studies. We describe findings for each outcome in the text of the review with considerations of the potential impact of bias and the clinical importance of results, with input from a clinical expert. We included 11 randomised controlled trials involving 2796 people. The quality of these studies was moderate to low, with most of the studies at unclear risk of bias in terms of random sequence generation and allocation concealment, and high risk of bias for blinded outcome assessment and selective outcome reporting.Five trials involving 581 people compared consumer-providers to professionals in similar roles within mental health services (case management roles (4 trials), facilitating group therapy (1 trial)). There were no significant differences in client quality of life (mean difference (MD) -0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.80 to 0.20); depression (data not pooled), general mental health symptoms (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.24, 95% CI -0.52 to 0.05); client satisfaction with treatment (SMD -0.22, 95% CI -0.69 to 0.25), client or professional ratings of client-manager relationship; use of mental health services, hospital admissions and length of stay; or attrition (risk ratio 0.80, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.09) between mental health teams involving consumer-providers or professional staff in similar roles.There was a small reduction in crisis and emergency service use for clients receiving care involving consumer-providers (SMD -0.34 (95%CI -0.60 to -0.07). Past or present consumers who provided mental health services did so differently than professionals; they spent more time face-to-face with clients, and less time in the office, on the telephone, with clients' friends and family, or at provider agencies.Six trials involving 2215 people compared mental health services with or without the addition of consumer-providers. There were no significant differences in psychosocial outcomes (quality of

  10. Health care provider social network analysis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Heui; Nikolaev, Alexander; Seo, Jin Young; Castner, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in understanding networks, their structure, and their development, little has been known about their effectiveness in the health care setting and their contributions to quality of care and patient safety.The purpose of this study was to examine studies using social network analysis (SNA) in the health care workforce and assess factors contributing to social network and their relationships with care processes and patient outcomes. We identified all published peer-reviewed SNA articles in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, JSTOR, Medline (OVID), and Web of Science databases up to April 2013. Twenty-nine published articles met the inclusion criteria. Current evidence of the health care workforce's social networks reveals the nature of social ties are related to personal characteristics, practice setting, and types of patients. A few studies also revealed the social network effects adoption and the use of a health information system, patient outcomes, and coordination. Current studies on the social ties of health care workforce professionals include several assessments of inefficiencies. The level of technical sophistication in these studies tended to be low. Future study using enhanced sophistication in study design, analysis, and patient outcome testing are warranted to fully leverage the potential of SNA in health care studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Organization Complexity and Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of Quality Improvement Culture Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korom-Djakovic, Danijela; Canamucio, Anne; Lempa, Michele; Yano, Elizabeth M; Long, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how aspects of quality improvement (QI) culture changed during the introduction of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patient-centered medical home initiative and how they were influenced by existing organizational factors, including VHA facility complexity and practice location. A voluntary survey, measuring primary care providers' (PCPs') perspectives on QI culture at their primary care clinics, was administered in 2010 and 2012. Participants were 320 PCPs from hospital- and community-based primary care practices in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio. PCPs in community-based outpatient clinics reported an improvement in established processes for QI, and communication and cooperation from 2010 to 2012. However, their peers in hospital-based clinics did not report any significant improvements in QI culture. In both years, compared with high-complexity facilities, medium- and low-complexity facilities had better scores on the scales assessing established processes for QI, and communication and cooperation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Endocrine check-up in adolescents and indications for referral: A guide for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Soliman, Ashraf T; Fiscina, Bernadette; Elsedfy, Heba; Elalaily, Rania; Yassin, Mohamed; Skordis, Nicos; Di Maio, Salvatore; Piacentini, Giorgio; Kholy, Mohamed El

    2014-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that young people between the ages of 11 and 21 years should be seen annually by their pediatricians, since annual checkups can be an important opportunity for health evaluation and anticipatory guidance. Parents of infants and young children are accustomed to regularly visiting a pediatrician for their child's checkups. Unfortunately, when children reach the teen years, these annual checkups may decrease in frequency. In routine check-ups and medical office visits, particular attention should be paid to the possibility of a developmental or endocrine disorder. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent medical complications in adulthood and foster age-appropriate development. Our purpose is to acquaint readers with the concept, based on current scientific understanding, that some endocrine disorders may be associated with a wide range of deleterious health consequences including an increased risk of hypertension and hyperlipidemia, increased risk of coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, significant anxiety and lack of self-esteem. Understanding the milestones and developmental stages of adolescence is essential for pediatricians and all other health providers who care for adolescents. Treating adolescents involves knowledge of a variety of medical, social and legal information; in addition, close working relationships must be established within the adolescent's network to create an effective care system. In summary, we underline the importance of a periodic endocrine checkup in adolescents in order to identify endocrine problems early and develop an approach to treatment for those patients who need help during this time. Indications for endocrine referral for professional and other healthcare providers are also included. These lists are clearly not intended to be comprehensive, but will hopefully serve as a guide for specific clinical circumstances.

  13. Endocrine check-up in adolescents and indications for referral: A guide for health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Sanctis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that young people between the ages of 11 and 21 years should be seen annually by their pediatricians, since annual checkups can be an important opportunity for health evaluation and anticipatory guidance. Parents of infants and young children are accustomed to regularly visiting a pediatrician for their child′s checkups. Unfortunately, when children reach the teen years, these annual checkups may decrease in frequency. In routine check-ups and medical office visits, particular attention should be paid to the possibility of a developmental or endocrine disorder. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent medical complications in adulthood and foster age-appropriate development. Our purpose is to acquaint readers with the concept, based on current scientific understanding, that some endocrine disorders may be associated with a wide range of deleterious health consequences including an increased risk of hypertension and hyperlipidemia, increased risk of coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, significant anxiety and lack of self-esteem. Understanding the milestones and developmental stages of adolescence is essential for pediatricians and all other health providers who care for adolescents. Treating adolescents involves knowledge of a variety of medical, social and legal information; in addition, close working relationships must be established within the adolescent′s network to create an effective care system. In summary, we underline the importance of a periodic endocrine checkup in adolescents in order to identify endocrine problems early and develop an approach to treatment for those patients who need help during this time. Indications for endocrine referral for professional and other healthcare providers are also included. These lists are clearly not intended to be comprehensive, but will hopefully serve as a guide for specific clinical circumstances.

  14. The Effect of Health Information Technology on Health Care Provider Communication: A Mixed-Method Protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manojlovich, Milisa; Adler-Milstein, Julia; Harrod, Molly; Sales, Anne; Hofer, Timothy P; Saint, Sanjay; Krein, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    ...), which is a component of health information technology (HIT), may help reduce some communication failures but increase others because of an inadequate understanding of how communication technology is used...

  15. Electronic Health Record Vendors Reported by Health Care Providers Participating in Federal EHR Incentive Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This public use file combines registration data compiled from two federal programs that are on-going since February 2009 – the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...

  16. Organizational commitment and intrinsic motivation of regular and contractual primary health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Mehra, Anu; Inder, Deep; Sharma, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Motivated and committed employees deliver better health care, which results in better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction. To assess the Organizational Commitment and Intrinsic Motivation of Primary Health Care Providers (HCPs) in New Delhi, India. Study was conducted in 2013 on a sample of 333 HCPs who were selected using multistage stage random sampling technique. The sample includes medical officers, auxiliary nurses and midwives, and pharmacists and laboratory technicians/assistants among regular and contractual staff. Data were collected using the pretested structured questionnaire for organization commitment (OC), job satisfiers, and intrinsic job motivation. Analysis was done by using SPSS version 18 and appropriate statistical tests were applied. The mean score for OC for entire regular staff is 1.6 ± 0.39 and contractual staff is 1.3 ± 0.45 which has statistically significant difference (t = 5.57; P = 0.00). In both regular and contractual staff, none of them show high emotional attachment with the organization and does not feel part of the family in the organization. Contractual staff does not feel proud to work in a present organization for rest of their career. Intrinsic motivation is high in both regular and contractual groups but intergroup difference is significant (t = 2.38; P intrinsic motivation of contractual staff are lesser than the permanent staff. Appropriate changes are required in the predictors of organizational commitment and factors responsible for satisfaction in the organization to keep the contractual human resource motivated and committed to the organization.

  17. Electronic Health Record Alert-Related Workload as a Predictor of Burnout in Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Megan E; Russo, Elise; Singh, Hardeep

    2017-07-05

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have been shown to increase physician workload. One EHR feature that contributes to increased workload is asynchronous alerts (also known as inbox notifications) related to test results, referral responses, medication refill requests, and messages from physicians and other health care professionals. This alert-related workload results in negative cognitive outcomes, but its effect on affective outcomes, such as burnout, has been understudied. To examine EHR alert-related workload (both objective and subjective) as a predictor of burnout in primary care providers (PCPs), in order to ultimately inform interventions aimed at reducing burnout due to alert workload. A cross-sectional questionnaire and focus group of 16 PCPs at a large medical center in the southern United States. Subjective, but not objective, alert workload was related to two of the three dimensions of burnout, including physical fatigue (p = 0.02) and cognitive weariness (p = 0.04), when controlling for organizational tenure. To reduce alert workload and subsequent burnout, participants indicated a desire to have protected time for alert management, fewer unnecessary alerts, and improvements to the EHR system. Burnout associated with alert workload may be in part due to subjective differences at an individual level, and not solely a function of the objective work environment. This suggests the need for both individual and organizational-level interventions to improve alert workload and subsequent burnout. Additional research should confirm these findings in larger, more representative samples.

  18. The Health Care Provider's Experience With Fathers of Overweight and Obese Children: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anti, Eliza; Laurent, Jennifer S; Tompkins, Connie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of health care providers (HCPs) in the outpatient setting as they work with fathers of children who are overweight and obese. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used for data collection and analysis. Seven HCPs were interviewed about their experiences. Two major themes emerged from the experiences of these HCPs: "dad in the back seat" and "paternal resistance." The theme of "dad in the back seat" captured the HCPs' experiences and perceptions of parental roles and related stereotypes with respect to fathers' lack of presence in the health-care setting, family roles that relegate fathers to the back seat in dealing with this issue, and the tendency of fathers to take a passive role and defer to mothers in the management of their child's weight. "Paternal resistance" reflected the perceived tendency of the father to resist the acceptance of his child's weight as a problem and to resist change and even undermine family efforts to make healthier choices. HCPs' experiences of fathers as having a minimal role in the management of their child's overweight and obesity may lead them to neglect fathers as agents of change with regard to this important issue. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy of acute care health care providers in cardiopulmonary resuscitation compressions in normal and obese adult simulation manikins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Huanying; Erwin, Kristin; Houston, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Annually, over 350,000 persons require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), either in or outside of the hospital. With obesity a rising health issue in the United States, concerns exist regarding the efficacy of quality compressions for CPR in obese patients. The aims of this study were to determine if the compressions for three adult simulation manikins (normal, obese, and morbidly obese) met quality guidelines; to examine any differences in quality of chest compressions performed by health care providers between the three manikins; and to examine the effect of participant characteristics on the quality of chest compressions in obese and morbidly obese manikins. A randomized controlled design was used. Sixty-one health care providers performed chest compressions on the three simulation manikins. Results showed that performance on the normal-sized manikin was significantly better than that on both obese and morbidly obese manikins. Participant characteristics were significantly associated with quality of chest compressions. The effectiveness of compressions in obese and morbidly obese CPR recipients has yet to be determined. PMID:28966448

  20. The Aggregate Risk Index: An intuitive tool providing the health risks of air pollution to health care community and public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Pierre; Talbot, Charles; Lesne, Olivia; Mangin, Antoine; Alexandre, Nicolas; Collomp, Rémy

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the European project PASODOBLE (FP7), we set up downstream information services by combining environmental and health data with a view to support the health care community and to improve vulnerable people welfare. Indeed there is a profound relationship between human health, well-being and air pollution levels. The main objectives are to establish correlations between air quality, exposure of populations and their reactivity, to develop and validate air quality indexes and to construct a prediction model of this sanitary index. This index will be implemented on 3 European sites: Greece (Athens and Thessaloniki), the Netherlands and "Provence Alpes Côte d'Azur" (South East of France). The selected region and cities are among the most affected by the atmospheric pollution in Europe and leads to serious sanitary concerns. The service aims to provide up-to-date, detailed information on air quality discomfort. The Aggregate Risk Index is based on the Cairncross's concept, obtained from the Relative Risk associated with short-term exposure to common air pollutants and takes into account the possible effects of a mixture of pollutants. This communication tool, easy to use and intuitive, about the levels of air pollution and the associated health risks, will be used to communicate information to the general population, authorities and to the health care community and will provide advanced warning of potentially health-damaging air pollution events.

  1. Provider Perspectives on Advance Care Planning Documentation in the Electronic Health Record: The Experience of Primary Care Providers and Specialists Using Advance Health-Care Directives and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Ellis; Chuang, Judith; Gupta, Atul; Tapper, Sharon; Lai, Steve; Yu, Peter; Ritchie, Christine; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2017-12-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is valued by patients and clinicians, yet documenting ACP in an accessible manner is problematic. In order to understand how providers incorporate electronic health record (EHR) ACP documentation into clinical practice, we interviewed providers in primary care and specialty departments about ACP practices (n = 13) and analyzed EHR data on 358 primary care providers (PCPs) and 79 specialists at a large multispecialty group practice. Structured interviews were conducted with 13 providers with high and low rates of ACP documentation in primary care, oncology, pulmonology, and cardiology departments. The EHR problem list data on Advance Health Care Directives (AHCDs) and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) were used to calculate ACP documentation rates. Examining seriously ill patients ≥65 years with no preexisting ACP documentation seen by providers during 2013 to 2014, 88.6% (AHCD) and 91.1% (POLST) of 79 specialists had zero ACP documentations. Of 358 PCPs, 29.1% (AHCD) and 62.3% (POLST) had zero ACP documentations. Interviewed PCPs often believed ACP documentation was beneficial and accessible, while specialists more often did not. Specialists expressed more confusion about documenting ACP, whereas PCPs reported standard clinic workflows. Problems with interoperability between outpatient and inpatient EHR systems and lack of consensus about who should document ACP were sources of variations in practices. Results suggest that providers desire standardized workflows for ACP discussion and documentation. New Medicare reimbursement for ACP and an increasing number of quality metrics for ACP are incentives for health-care systems to address barriers to ACP documentation.

  2. Preparing a Health Care White Paper: Providing Structure to the Writing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotarius, Timothy; Rotarius, Velmarie

    2016-01-01

    Health care leaders operate in a very complex and turbulent business environment. Both government regulations and market forces are very active in the industry. Thus, health care managers have many multifaceted and, sometimes, contradictory expectations placed upon them and their organizations. To ensure professional accountability, health care executives often join professional associations and strive for licenses and certifications that are intended to place the professional above the rest. One important avenue to achieve various licensing and certification accomplishments involves writing a white paper about a specific topic of interest to the industry and organization. Presented herein are structural processes that facilitate the creation and preparation of a health care white paper. Both conceptual and empirical structures of white papers are presented, with the similarities and the differences between conceptual and empirical papers highlighted.

  3. Simulation-based Education to Ensure Provider Competency Within the Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Sharon; Fralliccardi, Alise; Boulet, John; Moadel, Tiffany; Franzen, Douglas; Auerbach, Marc; Hart, Danielle; Goswami, Varsha; Hui, Joshua; Gordon, James A

    2017-09-30

    The acquisition and maintenance of individual competency is a critical component of effective emergency care systems. This article summarizes consensus working group deliberations and recommendations focusing on the topic "Simulation-based education to ensure provider competency within the healthcare system." The authors presented this work for discussion and feedback at the 2017 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference on "Catalyzing System Change Through Healthcare Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcomes," held on May 16, 2017, in Orlando, Florida. Although simulation-based training is a quality and safety imperative in other high-reliability professions such as aviation, nuclear power, and the military, health care professions still lag behind in applying simulation more broadly. This is likely a result of a number of factors, including cost, assessment challenges, and resistance to change. This consensus subgroup focused on identifying current gaps in knowledge and process related to the use of simulation for developing, enhancing, and maintaining individual provider competency. The resulting product is a research agenda informed by expert consensus and literature review. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. Association of mandated language access programming and quality of care provided by mental health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Sean R; Snowden, Lonnie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the association between language access programming and quality of psychiatric care received by persons with limited English proficiency (LEP). In 1999, the California Department of Mental Health required county Medicaid agencies to implement a "threshold language access policy" to meet the state's Title VI obligations. This policy required Medi-Cal agencies to provide language access programming, including access to interpreters and translated written material, to speakers of languages other than English if the language was spoken by at least 3,000, or 5%, of the county's Medicaid population. Using a longitudinal study design with a nonequivalent control group, this study examined the quality of care provided to Spanish speakers with LEP and a severe mental illness before and after implementation of mandatory language access programming. Quality was measured by receipt of at least two follow-up medication visits within 90 days or three visits within 180 days of an initial medication visit over a period of 38 quarter-years. On average, only 40% of Spanish-speaking clients received at least three medication follow-up visits within 180 days. In multivariate analyses, language access programming was not associated with receipt of at least two medication follow-up visits within 90 days or at least three visits within 180 days. This study found no evidence that language access programming led to increased rates of follow-up medication visits for clients with LEP.

  5. Can branding by health care provider organizations drive the delivery of higher technical and service quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snihurowych, Roman R; Cornelius, Felix; Amelung, Volker Eric

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of branding in nearly all other major industries, most health care service delivery organizations have not fully embraced the practices and processes of branding. Facilitating the increased and appropriate use of branding among health care delivery organizations may improve service and technical quality for patients. This article introduces the concepts of branding, as well as making the case that the use of branding may improve the quality and financial performance of organizations. The concepts of branding are reviewed, with examples from the literature used to demonstrate their potential application within health care service delivery. The role of branding for individual organizations is framed by broader implications for health care markets. Branding strategies may have a number of positive effects on health care service delivery, including improved technical and service quality. This may be achieved through more transparent and efficient consumer choice, reduced costs related to improved patient retention, and improved communication and appropriateness of care. Patient satisfaction may be directly increased as a result of branding. More research into branding could result in significant quality improvements for individual organizations, while benefiting patients and the health system as a whole.

  6. National integration of mental health providers in VA home-based primary care: an innovative model for mental health care delivery with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E; Karel, Michele J

    2014-10-01

    To promote mental health (MH) service access and quality for veterans with complex and chronic medical, social, and behavioral conditions, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has integrated a full-time MH provider into each VA home-based primary care (HBPC) team. The goal of the current evaluation is to examine the nature and extent to which MH care processes and practices have been integrated into HBPC nationally. Separate surveys assessing the integration of a wide range of MH care practices and HBPC team processes were sent to MH providers and program directors in each HBPC program in 2010. A total of 132 MH providers representing 119 HBPC programs, and 112 program directors completed the surveys. The most common clinical issues addressed by MH providers were depression, coping with illness and disability, anxiety, caregiver/family stress, and cognitive evaluation. Other team members typically conducted initial MH screenings, with MH providers' time focusing on cases with identified needs. Approximately 40% of MH providers' time was devoted to direct clinical care. Significant time was also spent on team activities, driving, and charting. Integration of MH services into HBPC is feasible and facilitates service access for a vulnerable population. Mental health care delivery in HPBC generally involves a high degree of interdisciplinary practice. Mental health integration into HBPC may serve as a model for other systems interested in promoting MH care delivery among homebound and other older individuals. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2013.

  7. Use of technology with health care providers: perspectives from urban youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom Johnson, Sarah; Tandon, S Darius; Trent, Maria; Jones, Vanya; Cheng, Tina L

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate urban youths' use of and access to technology and solicit their opinions about using technology with healthcare providers. Urban youth (aged 14-24 years) were invited to participate in focus groups in which a trained focus group facilitator used a survey and a structured guide to elicit responses regarding the foregoing objective. All sessions were audiotaped and transcribed. Emergent themes were determined with the assistance of Atlas TI. Survey data were analyzed in SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago, Illinois). Eight focus groups including 82 primarily low-income urban African-American adolescents and young adults (mean age, 18.5 years) were completed. The participants reported fairly high access to and use of technology. However, they expressed some concerns regarding the use of technology with healthcare providers. Many worried about the confidentiality of conversations conducted using technology. Face-to-face meetings with a healthcare provider were preferred by most participants, who felt that the information provided would be better tailored to their individual needs and more credible. Although urban youth were high users of technology, they expressed reservations about using technology with health care providers. When developing new technology communication and information dissemination strategies, it is critical to understand and address these concerns while involving young people in the research and development process. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Opportunities of mHealth in Preconception Care: Preferences and Experiences of Patients and Health Care Providers and Other Involved Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Matthijs R; Koster, Maria Ph; Rosman, Ageeth N; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine Pm

    2017-08-17

    The importance of the preconception period and preconception care (PCC) are broadly acknowledged and the potential benefits regarding health promotion have been studied extensively. PCC provides the opportunity to identify, prevent, and treat modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors to optimize the health of couples trying to become pregnant. The prevalence of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors in these couples is high, but the uptake of PCC remains low. The aim of this study is to identify the preferences and experiences of women and men (patients) trying to become pregnant and of health care providers and other involved professionals regarding mobile health (mHealth), in particular the coaching platform Smarter Pregnancy, and its potential role in PCC. Patients who participated in the Smarter Pregnancy randomized controlled trial (RCT) and health care providers and professionals also involved in PCC were invited to participate in a qualitative study. The barriers, benefits, and opportunities of big data collection by mHealth were discussed in focus group sessions, prompted with statements regarding PCC. We composed five focus groups, consisting of 27 patients in total (23 women and 4 men), who participated in the RCT, and nine health care providers and other professionals. Of the patients, 67% (18/27) were familiar with the concept of PCC, but only 15% (4/27) received any form of PCC. A majority of 56% (combined percentages of statements 1 [n=18], 2 [n=11], and 3 [n=16]) of the patients believed in the benefit of receiving PCC, and all agreed that men should be involved in PCC as well. Patients did not have a problem using anonymized data obtained from mHealth tools for scientific purposes. Patients and health care providers and other professionals both acknowledged the lack of awareness regarding the importance of PCC and stated that mHealth provides several opportunities to support clinical PCC. Our findings substantiate previous studies addressing the

  9. Preventing obesity and eating disorders in adolescents: what can health care providers do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2009-03-01

    This article describes five research-based recommendations for health care providers to help prevent both obesity and eating disorders among adolescents that they see within clinical, school, or other settings. The recommendations are based primarily upon findings from Project EAT, a large, population-based study of eating and weight-related issues in adolescents. Recommendations include the following: 1) discourage unhealthy dieting; instead encourage and support the use of eating and physical activity behaviors that can be maintained on an ongoing basis; 2) promote a positive body image; 3) encourage more frequent, and more enjoyable, family meals; 4) Encourage families to talk less about weight and do more at home to facilitate healthy eating and physical activity; and 5) assume that overweight teens have experienced weight mistreatment and address this issue with teens and their families. These recommendations stress the importance of helping adolescents and their families focus less on weight and more on sustained behavioral change.

  10. The regulation of health care providers' payments when horizontal and vertical differentiation matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardey, David; Canta, Chiara; Lozachmeur, Jean-Marie

    2012-09-01

    This paper analyzes the regulation of payment schemes for health care providers competing in both quality and product differentiation of their services. The regulator uses two instruments: a prospective payment per patient and a cost reimbursement rate. When the regulator can only use a prospective payment, the optimal price involves a trade-off between the level of quality provision and the level of horizontal differentiation. If this pure prospective payment leads to underprovision of quality and overdifferentiation, a mixed reimbursement scheme allows the regulator to improve the allocation efficiency. This is true for a relatively low level of patients' transportation costs. We also show that if the regulator cannot commit to the level of the cost reimbursement rate, the resulting allocation can dominate the one with full commitment. This occurs when the transportation cost is low or high enough, and the full commitment solution either implies full or zero cost reimbursement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. African American Women's Preparation for Childbirth From the Perspective of African American Health-Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbyad, Christine; Robertson, Trina Reed

    2011-01-01

    Preparation for birthing has focused primarily on Caucasian women. No studies have explored African American women's birth preparation. From the perceptions of 12 African American maternity health-care providers, this study elicited perceptions of the ways in which pregnant African American women prepare for childbirth. Focus group participants answered seven semistructured questions. Four themes emerged: connecting with nurturers, traversing an unresponsive system, the need to be strong, and childbirth classes not a priority. Recommendations for nurses and childbirth educators include: (a) self-awareness of attitudes toward African Americans, (b) empowering of clients for birthing, (c) recognition of the role that pregnant women's mothers play, (d) tailoring of childbirth classes for African American women, and (e) research on how racism influences pregnant African American women's preparation for birthing.

  12. Communicating about eating behaviors. A qualitative study of Chilean women and their health-care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Patricia; Valencia, Alejandra; Palomino, Ana M.; Cataldo, Marjorie; Schwingel, Andiara

    2015-01-01

    Good communication between health care providers (HCPs) and patients is critical in achieving positive health outcomes. The purpose of this article was to compare the perceptions of Chilean woman and their HCPs with respect to determinants of eating behaviors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women (n=15) visiting a public health care center in Chile and with their HCPs (n=8) who were in charge of promoting healthy eating behaviors among women. Data from the interviews indicated similarities and inconsistencies in determinants of eating behaviors between the groups. Both mentioned many important factors that influence women's eating behaviors, including food preferences, dietary knowledge, self-control and self-efficacy, family, food cost, and food availability. HCPs appeared to be less aware of the role that personality traits and past experiences play as potential determinants which women mentioned. In contrast, women were less aware of the influence of anxiety and low self-esteem on eating choices, which HCPs noted as key factors. Although it was encouraging to see agreement between women and their HCPs in some areas, it is important to work on increasing understanding among the groups with respect to the important role psychological factors play in influencing eating behavior. We suggest that HCPs should focus on the importance of women's personality traits and past eating behaviors, as well as work on improving women's self-esteem and helping to decrease their anxiety levels. HCPs should be encouraged to develop good communication with each person in order to help them understand the roles that external and internal factors play in eating behaviors. PMID:25661846

  13. Relationship between low back pain, disability, MR imaging findings and health care provider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Molla, Enrique; Costa, Salvador; Montijano, Ruben [Clinica Quiron, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Clinica Quiron, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Vega, Maria [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Bautista, Daniel [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Preventive Medicine, Valencia (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the association between the self-report of pain and disability and findings on lumbar MR images, and to compare two different health care providers in Spanish patients with low back pain (LBP). Cross-sectional A total of 278 patients, 137 men and 141 women aged 44{+-}14 years submitted with low back pain (LBP) were studied. One hundred and nine patients were from the National Health System (NHS) and 169 from private practice. Patients with previous discitis, surgery, neoplasm or traumatic episodes were excluded. Every patient completed a disability questionnaire with six core items, providing a score of disability from 2 to 28. All patients had sagittal spin-echo T1 and turbo spin-echo T2, axial proton-density and MR myelography weighted images. MR images of the two most affected disc levels were read, offering an MR imaging score from 0 to 30. Patients with a combination of LBP and sciatica showed the highest levels of disability (p=0.002). MR imaging scores only correlated with pain interference with normal work (p=0.04), but not with other disability questions. Patients from the NHS showed greater disability scores than private ones (p=0.001) and higher MR imaging scores (p=0.01). In patients with LBP, MR imaging only correlates with pain interference with work but not with other disability questions. Differences are found between private and NHS patients, the latter being more physically affected. (orig.)

  14. Perceptions on diabetes care provision among health providers in rural Tanzania : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mwangome, M.N.; Geubbels, Eveline; Klatser, P.R.; Dieleman, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes prevalence in Tanzania was estimated at 9.1% in 2012 among adults aged 24–65 years — higher than the HIV prevalence in the general population at that time. Health systems in lower- and middle-income countries are not designed for chronic health care, yet the rising burden of

  15. Health care reform and the scope of independence in decision making by environmental/family nurses. III. New concept of health care and currently provided scope of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksykiewicz-Dorota, Anna; Kamińska, Beata

    2003-01-01

    Until recently, corrective medicine and narrowly-understood prophylaxis have remained the focus of attention of health care staff. Various factors influenced the modification of current health activities. Providers of medical services, especially those engaged in PHC should react to the change in the concept of health care by expanding the present services offered. According to the WHO concept, dealing with healthy people is not a waste of time. Therefore, an attempt was undertaken to discover whether in the practice of environmental/family nurses, tasks were proposed to patients in the area of health promotion and prophylaxis. The studies covered 110 environmental/family nurses from the Bialystok Region. The material obtained in two groups of health care units--public and non-public--was then compared. Significant statistical differences with respect to 'very frequent' realization of health promotion programmes were observed between nurses employed in public health care units and those from non-public units. These programmes most often concerned breast feeding, and care of mother and child. In the area of prophylaxis, however, both groups undertook a 'very small' scope of actions on behalf of environment protection and prevention of three of the health problems recognized: prevention of faulty posture, dental caries and counteracting accidents, injuries and poisonings. Prophylactic tasks concerning cardiovascular system diseases, cancer, addictions and contagious diseases were more often realized.

  16. Experiences of health care providers with integrated HIV and reproductive health services in Kenya: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutemwa, Richard; Mayhew, Susannah; Colombini, Manuela; Busza, Joanna; Kivunaga, Jackline; Ndwiga, Charity

    2013-01-11

    There is broad consensus on the value of integration of HIV services and reproductive health services in regions of the world with generalised HIV/AIDS epidemics and high reproductive morbidity. Integration is thought to increase access to and uptake of health services; and improves their efficiency and cost-effectiveness through better use of available resources. However, there is still very limited empirical literature on health service providers and how they experience and operationalize integration. This qualitative study was conducted among frontline health workers to explore provider experiences with integration in order to ascertain their significance to the performance of integrated health facilities. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 frontline clinical officers, registered nurses, and enrolled nurses in Kitui district (Eastern province) and Thika and Nyeri districts (Central province) in Kenya. The study was conducted in health facilities providing integrated HIV and reproductive health services (post-natal care and family planning). All interviews were conducted in English, transcribed and analysed using Nvivo 8 qualitative data analysis software. Providers reported delivering services in provider-level and unit-level integration, as well as a combination of both. Provider experiences of actual integration were mixed. At personal level, providers valued skills enhancement, more variety and challenge in their work, better job satisfaction through increased client-satisfaction. However, they also felt that their salaries were poor, they faced increased occupational stress from: increased workload, treating very sick/poor clients, and less quality time with clients. At operational level, providers reported increased service uptake, increased willingness among clients to take an HIV test, and reduced loss of clients. But the majority also reported infrastructural and logistic deficiencies (insufficient physical room space, equipment

  17. Perceptions and abilities related to patient engagement in diabetes care among primary health care providers in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre-Christensen, Ulla; Kragelund Nielsen, Karoline; Calopietro, Michael

    and nurses in Malaysia’s primary health care system. Summary of Work: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine non-specialist doctors and ten nurses working in primary health care clinics. Further, 12 key informants with specialist knowledge about diabetes care in Malaysia were interviewed......Background: Malaysia seeks to transform its public health sector to manage the growing number of people with diabetes. Patient engagement is a critical clinical competency for HCPs treating people with diabetes. We investigated perceptions of and ability to practice patient engagement among doctors....... The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Summary of Results: Three main themes emerged: 1) limitations in understanding barriers to self-care and treatment especially from a psychosocial perspective, 2) substantial variation in health care providers’ skills within patient engagement...

  18. Variation in Quality of Urgent Health Care Provided During Commercial Virtual Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Adam J; Davies, Jason M; Marafino, Ben J; Dean, Mitzi; DeJong, Colette; Bardach, Naomi S; Kazi, Dhruv S; Boscardin, W John; Lin, Grace A; Duseja, Reena; Mei, Y John; Mehrotra, Ateev; Dudley, R Adams

    2016-05-01

    Commercial virtual visits are an increasingly popular model of health care for the management of common acute illnesses. In commercial virtual visits, patients access a website to be connected synchronously-via videoconference, telephone, or webchat-to a physician with whom they have no prior relationship. To date, whether the care delivered through those websites is similar or quality varies among the sites has not been assessed. To assess the variation in the quality of urgent health care among virtual visit companies. This audit study used 67 trained standardized patients who presented to commercial virtual visit companies with the following 6 common acute illnesses: ankle pain, streptococcal pharyngitis, viral pharyngitis, acute rhinosinusitis, low back pain, and recurrent female urinary tract infection. The 8 commercial virtual visit websites with the highest web traffic were selected for audit, for a total of 599 visits. Data were collected from May 1, 2013, to July 30, 2014, and analyzed from July 1, 2014, to September 1, 2015. Completeness of histories and physical examinations, the correct diagnosis (vs an incorrect or no diagnosis), and adherence to guidelines of key management decisions. Sixty-seven standardized patients completed 599 commercial virtual visits during the study period. Histories and physical examinations were complete in 417 visits (69.6%; 95% CI, 67.7%-71.6%); diagnoses were correctly named in 458 visits (76.5%; 95% CI, 72.9%-79.9%), and key management decisions were adherent to guidelines in 325 visits (54.3%; 95% CI, 50.2%-58.3%). Rates of guideline-adherent care ranged from 206 visits (34.4%) to 396 visits (66.1%) across the 8 websites. Variation across websites was significantly greater for viral pharyngitis and acute rhinosinusitis (adjusted rates, 12.8% to 82.1%) than for streptococcal pharyngitis and low back pain (adjusted rates, 74.6% to 96.5%) or ankle pain and recurrent urinary tract infection (adjusted rates, 3.4% to 40

  19. Treating exposure to chemical warfare agents: Implications for health care providers and community emergency planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munro, N.B.; Watson, A.P.; Ambrose, K.R.; Griffin, G.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Current treatment protocols for exposure to nerve and vesicant agents found in the US stockpile of unitary chemical weapons are summarized, and the toxicities of available antidotes are evaluated. The status of the most promising of the new nerve agent antidotes is reviewed. In the US, atropine and pralidoxime compose the only approved antidote regimen for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning. Diazepam may also be used if necessary to control convulsions. To avoid death, administration must occur within minutes of substantial exposure together with immediate decontamination. Continuous observation and repeated administration of antidotes are necessary as symptoms warrant. Available antidotes do not necessarily prevent respiratory failure or incapacitation. The toxicity of the antidotes themselves and the individualized nature of medical care preclude recommending that autoinjectors be distributed to the general public. In addition, precautionary administration of protective drugs to the general population would not be feasible or desirable. No antidote exists for poisoning by the vesicant sulfur mustard (H, HD, HT); effective intervention can only be accomplished by rapid decontamination followed by palliative treatment of symptoms. British anti-Lewisite (BAL) (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol) is the antidote of choice for treatment of exposure to Lewisite, another potent vesicant. Experimental water-soluble BAL analogues have been developed that are less toxic than BAL. Treatment protocols for each antidote are summarized in tabular form for use by health care providers.

  20. Professional e-mail communication among health care providers: proposing evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malka, S Terez; Kessler, Chad S; Abraham, John; Emmet, Thomas W; Wilbur, Lee

    2015-01-01

    E-mail is now a primary method of correspondence in health care, and proficiency with professional e-mail use is a vital skill for physicians. Fundamentals of e-mail courtesy can be derived from lay literature, but there is a dearth of scientific literature that addresses the use of e-mail between physicians. E-mail communication between providers is generally more familiar and casual than other professional interactions, which can promote unprofessional behavior or misunderstanding. Not only e-mail content but also wording, format, and tone may influence clinical recommendations and perceptions of the e-mail sender. In addition, there are serious legal and ethical implications when unprofessional or unsecured e-mails related to patient-identifying information are exchanged or included within an electronic medical record. The authors believe that the appropriate use of e-mail is a vital skill for physicians, with serious legal and ethical ramifications and the potential to affect professional development and patient care. In this article, the authors analyze a comprehensive literature search, explore several facets of e-mail use between physicians, and offer specific recommendations for professional e-mail use.

  1. Determinants of satisfaction with health care provider interactions at health centres in central Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhanu, Zewdie; Assefa, Tsion; Woldie, Mirkuzie; Morankar, Sudhakar

    2010-03-24

    In primary health care, provider-patient interaction is fundamental platform and critically affects service delivery. Nevertheless, it is often ignored in medical research and practice and it is infrequently subjected to scientific inquiry, particularly in Ethiopia. This study aimed to assess patient satisfaction with health care provider interactions and its influencing factors among out-patients at health centers in West Shoa, Central Ethiopia. A cross sectional facility based study was conducted on 768 out-patients of six health centers in West Shoa Zone, Central Ethiopia. The total sample size was allocated to each of the six health centers based on patient flow during the ten days prior to the start of data collection. Pre-tested instruments were used for data collection and the data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 statistical software. Factor score was computed for the items identified to represent the satisfaction scale by varimax rotation method. Using this regression factor score, multivariate linear regression analysis was performed and the effect of independent variables on the regression factor score was quantified. Seventy three percent of the respondents perceived that provider's empathy was good and 35% complained that providers were not technically competent enough. In addition, 82% of the respondents rated non-verbal communication by the providers to be good, very good or excellent on a five-point ordinal scale. Regardless of the process, only 34.1% of the patients implied that the consultations made a difference in understanding their illness and coping with it. Generally speaking, 62.6% of the patients reported that they have been satisfied with their visit. Perceived empathy, perceived technical competency, non-verbal communication, patient enablement, being told the name of once illness, type and frequency of visit, knowing the providers and educational status were main independent predictors of patient satisfaction in this study

  2. Perioperative Care of Prisoners: Providing Safe Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-03-01

    Correctional nurses are trained to care for prisoners in a controlled security environment; however, when a convict is transferred to a noncorrectional health care facility, the nurses there are often unfamiliar with custody requirements or how to safely care for these patients. The care of prisoners outside of prison has not been adequately investigated, and a gap exists between research and nursing education and practice. Nurses rarely have to consider how providing care for a prisoner in custody affects their practice, the potential dissonance between routine nursing care and the requirements to maintain security, or that care of prisoners in unsecured clinical areas places the nurse and other personnel at risk for physical assault or prisoner escape. Educating perioperative nurses in the care of prisoners in a public hospital environment is important for the provision of safe care and prevention of physical and emotional repercussions to personnel. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk factors for family time burdens providing and arranging health care for children with special health care needs: Lessons from nonproportional odds models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jane E; Nugent, Colleen N; Russell, Louise B

    2015-07-01

    We identify need, enabling, and predisposing factors for high family time burdens associated with the health care of chronically-ill children, using data from the U.S. 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN), a population-based survey of 40,242 children with special health care needs (CSHCN). We estimate generalized ordered logistic multivariable regressions of time spent (1) providing health care for the child at home, (2) arranging/coordinating health care, and (3) combined time. Factors associated with higher time burdens included child's functional limitations, severe or unstable health conditions, public health insurance, lack of a medical home, low family income, low adult education, and non-white race. Nonproportional odds models revealed associations between risk factors and time burden that were obscured by binary and standard ordered logistic models. Clinicians and policymakers can use this information to design interventions to alleviate this important family stressor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer education and training in primary health care--a national audit of training providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Brian Ramsay; Fletcher, Jane M; Elwood, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Primary care professionals play a critical role in cancer care but relatively little is known about their education and training. This article presents the results of a national audit of education and training providers in relation to primary care and cancer. A semistructured telephone questionnaire. The response rate was very high (96%) with 210 organisations participating. Forty-two percent provided cancer education and training. Evidence of good adult education practice was demonstrated, and 95% of organisations ran accredited programs. Although pharmaceutical industry support was not favoured, the majority (78%) described this as their main source of funding. There is optimism and strong commitment among primary care cancer education and training providers. Their content seems appropriate and their approach is consistent with good adult learning principles and multidisciplinary care, but this could be enhanced with increased funding and improved collaboration and communication between organisations.

  5. Developing a framework of service convenience in health care: An exploratory study for a primary care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzovic, Sven; Kuppelwieser, Volker

    2016-01-01

    From retail health clinics and online appointment scheduling to (mobile) kiosks that enable patient check-in and automate the collection of copays and open balances, convenience has become an important topic in the health care sector over the last few years. While service convenience has also gained much interest in academia, one common limitation is that authors have adopted a "goods-centered" perspective focusing primarily on retail settings. Results of this exploratory study reveal that health care service convenience encompasses seven different dimensions: decision, access, scheduling, registration and check-in, transaction, care delivery, and postconsultation convenience. Implications and future research suggestions are discussed.

  6. A pilot study examining the impact of care provider support program on resiliency, coping, and compassion fatigue in military health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Christopher P; Ugarriza, Doris N

    2015-03-01

    The Care Provider Support Program (CPSP) was created as a way to improve the resiliency of military health care providers. The purpose of this pilot study was to update what is currently known about the resiliency, coping, and compassion fatigue of military and civilian registered nurses, licensed practical nurses (LPNs), and medics who treat wounded Soldiers and whether these factors can be improved over a sustained period of time. A prospective cohort pilot study was implemented to investigate the long-term effects of CPSP training on military and civilian nurses, LPNs, and medics (n = 93) at an Army Medical Center utilizing the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, the Ways of Coping Questionnaire, and Professional Quality of Life Questionnaire. Twenty-eight participants returned follow-up questionnaires. CPSP was significant in reducing burnout as measured by the Professional Quality of Life questionnaire, leading to decreased compassion fatigue. CPSP training did not affect resiliency scores on the Connor-Davidson resilience scale or coping scores as measured by the Ways of Coping Questionnaire. on the basis of the results of this study, CPSP training was effective in reducing burnout, which often leads to decreased compassion fatigue in a group of military and civilian registered nurses, LPNs, and medics. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of multiple sclerosis: implications for the oral health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Q; Meng, Y

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Symptoms of orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. The oral health care team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health. This review highlights the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, oral and craniofacial manifestations and their management, and oral health care considerations in patients with MS.

  8. The impact of the economic downturn and health care reform on treatment decisions for haemophilia A: patient, caregiver and health care provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, M D; Ye, X; Bergstrom, F; Skorija, K; Luo, M P

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of the recent US economic downturn and health care reform on patient, caregiver and health care provider (HCP) decision-making for haemophilia A. To explore the impact of the recent economic downturn and perceived impact of health care reform on haemophilia A treatment decisions from patient, caregiver and HCP perspectives. Patients/caregivers and HCPs completed a self-administered survey in 2011. Survey participants were asked about demographics, the impact of the recent economic downturn and health care reform provisions on their treatment decisions. Seventy three of the 134 (54%) patients/caregivers and 39 of 48 (81%) HCPs indicated that the economic downturn negatively impacted haemophilia care. Seventy of the 73 negatively impacted patients made financially related treatment modifications, including delaying/cancelling routine health care visit, skipping doses and/or skipping filling prescription. Treatment modifications made by HCPs included delaying elective surgery, switching from higher to lower priced product, switching from recombinant to plasma-derived products and delaying prophylaxis. Health care reform was generally perceived as positive. Due to the elimination of lifetime caps, 30 of 134 patients (22%) and 28 of 48 HCPs (58%) indicated that they will make treatment modifications by initiating prophylaxis or scheduling routine appointment/surgery sooner. Both patients/caregivers and HCPs reported that the economic downturn had a negative impact on haemophilia A treatment. Suboptimal treatment modifications were made due to the economic downturn. Health care reform, especially the elimination of lifetime caps, was perceived as positive for haemophilia A treatment and as a potential avenue for contributing to more optimal treatment behaviours. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Family stress and posttraumatic stress: the impact of military operations on military health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Barnett, Scott D; Hickling, Edward J

    2012-08-01

    This study uses data from the 2005 Department of Defense Survey of Health-Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel to examine relationships between family stress and posttraumatic stress symptoms across 4 subgroups of Operation Iraqi Freedom-deployed (i.e., war in Iraq) or Operation Enduring Freedom-deployed (i.e., war in Afghanistan) active-duty military service members. Results suggest the following: (a) the greatest positive correlation of family stressors with posttraumatic stress symptoms was found within the military health care officer group, and (b) these military health care officers differed in family stressors mediating posttraumatic stress with divorce and financial problems accounting for significant and unique portions of the variance. Implications for care of service members and their families are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Discovery of a patient with strongly suspected bullous pemphigoid in a ward by oral health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Kanda, N; SOGA, Y; Meguro, M.; Tanabe, A; Yagi, Y; Himuro, Y; Fujiwara, Y.; Takashiba, S; Kobayashi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Oral health care providers may discover systemic diseases incidentally from signs observed in the oral cavity. Here, we report a case in which oral health care providers in a hospital discovered a patient with strongly suspected bullous pemphigoid (BP), which is a relatively rare but important disease, in a ward. Methods: The patient was a 78-year-old Japanese woman admitted to our hospital because of severe Alzheimer's disease. We discovered recurrent ulcers in the oral mucosa an...

  11. Physicians' assessments of their ability to provide high-quality care in a changing health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschovsky, J; Reed, M; Blumenthal, D; Landon, B

    2001-03-01

    With the growth of managed care, there are increasing concerns but inconclusive evidence regarding deterioration in the quality of medical care. To assess physicians' perceptions of their ability to provide high-quality care and explore what factors, including managed care, affect these perceptions. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of the Community Tracking Study Physician Survey, a cross-sectional, nationally representative telephone survey of 12,385 patient-care physicians conducted in 1996/1997. The response rate was 65%. Physicians who provide direct patient care for > or =20 h/wk, excluding federal employees and those in selected specialties. Level of agreement with 4 statements: 1 regarding overall ability to provide high-quality care and 3 regarding aspects of care delivery associated with quality. Between 21% and 31% of physicians disagreed with the quality statements. Specialists were generally 50% more likely than primary care physicians to express concerns about their ability to provide quality care. Generally, the number of managed care contracts, but not the percent of practice revenue from managed care, was negatively associated with perceived quality. Market-level managed care penetration independently affected physicians' perceptions. Practice setting affected perceptions of quality, with physicians in group settings less likely to express concerns than physicians in solo and 2-physician practices. Specific financial incentives and care management tools had limited positive or negative associations with perceived quality. Managed care involvement is only modestly associated with reduced perceptions of quality among physicians, with some specific tools enhancing perceived quality. Physicians may be able to moderate some negative effects of managed care by altering their practice arrangements.

  12. Nursing care provided to young people in two health centers compared with Watson Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra Pichardo Meza

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article has as objective to present the analysis of the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital, related to Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal. The study corresponds to a joint research of parallel type with concurrent triangulation. The study populations were made up by twenty-six young adult people (who face morbid process health or chronic pain condition and four nursing professionals who worked in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital. A self-executed questionnaire and a semi-structured interview were used to collect the information, which was analyzed using the “SPSS” program and the qualitative categories, respectively. Results: The ten elements of the “Human Care Theory” can be included in the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population who faces morbid process health or chronic pain condition. The nursing care mainly focuses on the young adult population quality of life throughout education and pain management. The young adult population perceives a warm, pleasant and human nursing care. Conclusion: Nursing personnel put into practice elements of the Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal even when they do not know it.

  13. The role of health care providers and significant others in evaluating the quality of life of patients with chronic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneeuw, Kommer C. A.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Aaronson, Neil K.

    2002-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) studies sometimes rely, in part, on proxy information obtained from patients' significant others (spouse or close companion) or health care providers. This review: (1) provides a quantitative analysis of the results that have been reported in recent studies

  14. The Experiences of U.S. Army Primary Care Providers Meeting Sexual Health Care Needs During Post-Vietnam Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    unit and surrounding community. The issues surrounding sexual health care during deployments are significant to advanced practice nurses ( APNs ...As the Army has sought to add the role of APNs to deployments, Army APNs will potentially find themselves faced with the issues of sexual health care...women there, and the men who were talking with the women were assumed to be sleeping with them… There was a lot of pressure on those few women who were

  15. Perceptions of vaginal microbicides as an HIV prevention method among health care providers in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantell Joanne E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The promise of microbicides as an HIV prevention method will not be realized if not supported by health care providers. They are the primary source of sexual health information for potential users, in both the public and private health sectors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine perceptions of vaginal microbicides as a potential HIV prevention method among health care providers in Durban and Hlabisa, South Africa, using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods. Results During 2004, semi structured interviews with 149 health care providers were conducted. Fifty seven percent of hospital managers, 40% of pharmacists and 35% of nurses possessed some basic knowledge of microbicides, such as the product being used intra-vaginally before sex to prevent HIV infection. The majority of them were positive about microbicides and were willing to counsel users regarding potential use. Providers from both public and private sectors felt that an effective microbicide should be available to all people, regardless of HIV status. Providers felt that the product should be accessed over-the-counter in pharmacies and in retail stores. They also felt a need for potential microbicides to be available free of charge, and packaged with clear instructions. The media was seen by health care providers as being an effective strategy for promoting microbicides. Conclusion Overall, health care providers were very positive about the possible introduction of an effective microbicide for HIV prevention. The findings generated by this study illustrated the need for training health care providers prior to making the product accessible, as well as the importance of addressing the potential barriers to use of the product by women. These are important concerns in the health care community, and this study also served to educate them for the day when research becomes reality.

  16. Are there socioeconomic disparities in women having discussions on human papillomavirus vaccine with health care providers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Ker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine recommendation by a health care provider (HCP is an important predictor of vaccine receipt. We examined whether being of a minority race/ethnicity, having lower income and education, and the lack of health insurance and a regular HCP are each associated with a lower likelihood of a discussion on HPV vaccine occurring between a woman and her HCP. Methods A sample of 1,631 women aged 18 years and older was drawn from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey. Given that only a subgroup of women who were aware of the HPV vaccine were asked if they had a discussion with their HCPs, we estimated a probit model correcting for sample selection. Results Among those aware of the HPV vaccine, 17.3% of respondents reported having discussions on the vaccine with their HCPs. Compared with Whites, African Americans were less likely to be aware of the HPV vaccine but more likely to have discussions with their HCPs concerning the vaccine. A statistically significant association between lower income and education levels and a lower likelihood of HPV vaccine awareness was observed, but low levels of income and education did not appear to affect the probability of having HPV vaccine discussions with HCPs. Conclusions Socioeconomically disadvantaged women did not show a lower propensity to have vaccine discussions with their HCPs, suggesting that HCPs can be a major catalyst in increasing vaccine receipt among the higher risk group. The results of the study suggest a two-pronged approach that seeks to raise vaccine awareness among socioeconomically disadvantaged women at the population level and encourages HCPs to intensify discussions about the HPV vaccine with patients.

  17. The development and psychometric properties of a new scale to measure mental illness related stigma by health care providers: The opening minds scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on the attitudes of health care providers towards people with mental illness has repeatedly shown that they may be stigmatizing. Many scales used to measure attitudes towards people with mental illness that exist today are not adequate because they do not have items that relate specifically to the role of the health care provider. Methods We developed and tested a new scale called the Opening Minds Scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC). After item-pool generation, stakeholder consultations and content validation, focus groups were held with 64 health care providers/trainees and six people with lived experience of mental illness to develop the scale. The OMS-HC was then tested with 787 health care providers/trainees across Canada to determine its psychometric properties. Results The initial testing OMS-HC scale showed good internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha = 0.82 and satisfactory test-retest reliability, intraclass correlation = 0.66 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.75). The OMC-HC was only weakly correlated with social desirability, indicating that the social desirability bias was not likely to be a major determinant of OMS-HC scores. A factor analysis favoured a two-factor structure which accounted for 45% of the variance using 12 of the 20 items tested. Conclusions The OMS–HC provides a good starting point for further validation as well as a tool that could be used in the evaluation of programs aimed at reducing mental illness related stigma by health care providers. The OMS-HC incorporates various dimensions of stigma with a modest number of items that can be used with busy health care providers. PMID:22694771

  18. The development and psychometric properties of a new scale to measure mental illness related stigma by health care providers: The opening minds scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam Aliya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the attitudes of health care providers towards people with mental illness has repeatedly shown that they may be stigmatizing. Many scales used to measure attitudes towards people with mental illness that exist today are not adequate because they do not have items that relate specifically to the role of the health care provider. Methods We developed and tested a new scale called the Opening Minds Scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC. After item-pool generation, stakeholder consultations and content validation, focus groups were held with 64 health care providers/trainees and six people with lived experience of mental illness to develop the scale. The OMS-HC was then tested with 787 health care providers/trainees across Canada to determine its psychometric properties. Results The initial testing OMS-HC scale showed good internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha = 0.82 and satisfactory test-retest reliability, intraclass correlation = 0.66 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.75. The OMC-HC was only weakly correlated with social desirability, indicating that the social desirability bias was not likely to be a major determinant of OMS-HC scores. A factor analysis favoured a two-factor structure which accounted for 45% of the variance using 12 of the 20 items tested. Conclusions The OMS–HC provides a good starting point for further validation as well as a tool that could be used in the evaluation of programs aimed at reducing mental illness related stigma by health care providers. The OMS-HC incorporates various dimensions of stigma with a modest number of items that can be used with busy health care providers.

  19. Interventions by Health Care Professionals Who Provide Routine Child Health Care to Reduce Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Children: A Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Justine B; Mackenzie, Lisa J; Freund, Megan; Wolfenden, Luke; Roseby, Robert; Wiggers, John H

    2016-02-01

    Reducing child exposure to tobacco smoke is a public health priority. Guidelines recommend that health care professionals in child health settings should address tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) in children. To determine the effectiveness of interventions delivered by health care professionals who provide routine child health care in reducing TSE in children. A secondary analysis of 57 trials included in a 2014 Cochrane review and a subsequent extended search was performed. Controlled trials (published through June 2015) of interventions that focused on reducing child TSE, with no restrictions placed on who delivered the interventions, were identified. Secondary data extraction was performed in August 2015. Controlled trials of routine child health care delivered by health care professionals (physicians, nurses, medical assistants, health educators, and dieticians) that addressed the outcomes of interest (TSE reduction in children and parental smoking behaviors) were eligible for inclusion in this review and meta-analysis. Study details and quality characteristics were independently extracted by 2 authors. If outcome measures were sufficiently similar, meta-analysis was performed using the random-effects model by DerSimonian and Laird. Otherwise, the results were described narratively. The primary outcome measure was reduction in child TSE. Secondary outcomes of interest were parental smoking cessation, parental smoking reduction, and maternal postpartum smoking relapse prevention. Sixteen studies met the selection criteria. Narrative analysis of the 6 trials that measured child TSE indicated no intervention effects relative to comparison groups. Similarly, meta-analysis of 9 trials that measured parental smoking cessation demonstrated no overall intervention effect (n = 6399) (risk ratio 1.05; 95% CI, 0.74-1.50; P = .78). Meta-analysis of the 3 trials that measured maternal postpartum smoking relapse prevention demonstrated a significant overall intervention effect (n

  20. PRINCIPLES OF FORMATION OF UNIFIED STATE SYSTEM OF INFORMATIVE PROVIDING OF HEALTH CARE INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Mintser

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Principles of the new unified informative system of health care (UISHC are considered. In the system unlike existent analogues the complex reflection of all factors influencing on the state of health, including environment, pharmaceutical factors etc are under discussion. Principles of formation of UISHC among which the most important is realization of duality (availability of stationary and mobile - medical electronic passport of a citizen are also defined.

  1. Military Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Awareness Training for Health Care Providers Within the Military Health System [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrader, Angela; Casero, Kellie; Casper, Bethany; Kelley, Mary; Lewis, Laura; Calohan, Jess

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals serving within the U.S. military and their beneficiaries have unique health care requirements. Department of Defense Directive 1304.26 "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" created a barrier for service members to speak candidly with their health care providers, which left specific health care needs unaddressed. There are no standardized cultural education programs to assist Military Health System (MHS) health care providers in delivering care to LGBT patients and their beneficiaries. The purpose of this project was to develop, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of an LGBT educational program for health care providers within the MHS to increase cultural awareness in caring for this special population. This multisite educational program was conducted at Travis Air Force Base and Joint Base Lewis-McChord from November 15, 2014, to January 30, 2015. A 15-question multiple-choice questionnaire was developed based on the education program and was administered before and after the education program. A total of 51 individuals completed the program. Overall posttest scores improved compared to pretest scores. This program was designed to begin the process of educating health care providers about the unique health care issues of military LGBT Service Members and their beneficiaries. This program was the first to address the disparities in LGBT health care needs within the Department of Defense. It also provided a platform for facilitating open communication among providers regarding LGBT population health needs in the military.

  2. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-06-19

    Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to identify strategies that could improve collaboration between these disciplines from the perspective of dental participants. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between 2013 and 2015 with visiting, local and regional dental practitioners (n = 12) who had provided dental services to patients from eight rural and remote Queensland communities that did not have a resident dentist. Participants were purposely recruited through a snow ball sampling technique. Interview data were analysed using thematic analysis with the assistance of QSR Nvivo v.10. Four major themes emerged from the data: (1) Communication between dental practitioners and rural primary care providers; (2) Relationships between dental and primary care providers; (3) Maintenance of professional dualism; (4) Strategies to improve interprofessional relationships (with subthemes: face to face meetings; utilisation of technology; oral health training for primary care providers; and having a community based oral health contact person). Participants observed that there was a lack of communication between the dental providers who saw patients from these rural communities and the primary care providers who worked in each community. This was attributed to poor communication, the high turnover of staff and the siloed behaviours of some practitioners. Visiting dental practitioners were likely to have stronger professional relationships with hospital nursing, administrative and allied health care staff who were often long term

  3. The health reform monitoring survey: addressing data gaps to provide timely insights into the affordable care act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sharon K; Kenney, Genevieve M; Zuckerman, Stephen; Goin, Dana E; Wissoker, Douglas; Blavin, Fredric; Blumberg, Linda J; Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Holahan, John; Hempstead, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS) was launched in 2013 as a mechanism to obtain timely information on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) during the period before federal government survey data for 2013 and 2014 will be available. Based on a nationally representative, probability-based Internet panel, the HRMS provides quarterly data for approximately 7,400 nonelderly adults and 2,400 children on insurance coverage, access to health care, and health care affordability, along with special topics of relevance to current policy and program issues in each quarter. For example, HRMS data from summer 2013 show that more than 60 percent of those targeted by the health insurance exchanges struggle with understanding key health insurance concepts. This raises concerns about some people's ability to evaluate trade-offs when choosing health insurance plans. Assisting people as they attempt to enroll in health coverage will require targeted education efforts and staff to support those with low health insurance literacy.

  4. Integration for coexistence? Implementation of intercultural health care policy in Ghana from the perspective of service users and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyasi, Razak Mohammed; Poku, Adjoa Afriyie; Boateng, Simon; Amoah, Padmore Adusei; Mumin, Alhassan Abdul; Obodai, Jacob; Agyemang-Duah, Williams

    2017-01-01

    In spite of the World Health Organization's recommendations over the past decades, Ghana features pluralistic rather than truly integrated medical system. Policies about the integration of complementary medicine into the national health care delivery system need to account for individual-level involvement and cultural acceptability of care rendered by health care providers. Studies in Ghana, however, have glossed over the standpoint of the persons of the illness episode about the intercultural health care policy framework. This paper explores the health care users, and providers' experiences and attitudes towards the implementation of intercultural health care policy in Ghana. In-depth interviews, augmented with informal conversations, were conducted with 16 health service users, 7 traditional healers and 6 health professionals in the Sekyere South District and Kumasi Metropolis in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. Data were thematically analysed and presented based on the a posteriori inductive reduction approach. Findings reveal a widespread positive attitude to, and support for integrative medical care in Ghana. However, inter-provider communication in a form of cross-referrals and collaborative mechanisms between healers and health professionals seldom occurs and remains unofficially sanctioned. Traditional healers and health care professionals are skeptical about intercultural health care policy mainly due to inadequate political commitment for provider education. The medical practitioners have limited opportunity to undergo training for integrative medical practice. We also find a serious mistrust between the practitioners due to the "diversity of healing approaches and techniques." Weak institutional support, lack of training to meet standards of practice, poor registration and regulatory measures as well as negative perception of the integrative medical policy inhibit its implementation in Ghana. In order to advance any useful intercultural health care policy in

  5. Organizational factors associated with Health Care Provider (HCP) influenza campaigns in the Veterans health care system: a qualitative study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Razouki, Zayd; Knighton, Troy; Martinello, Richard A; Hirsch, Pamela R; McPhaul, Kathleen M; Rose, Adam J; McCullough, Megan

    2016-01-01

    .... We sought to characterize organizational factors and practices that were associated with vaccination campaign success among six sites within the Veterans Health Administration, where receipt of flu...

  6. Provider perceptions and expectations of breast cancer posttreatment care: a University of California Athena Breast Health Network project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Erin E; Ganz, Patricia A; Melisko, Michelle E; Pierce, John P; von Friederichs-Fitzwater, Marlene; Lane, Karen T; Hiatt, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    The Athena Breast Health Network collaboration is a University of California system-wide project initiated with the intent to drive innovation in breast cancer prevention, screening, and treatment. This qualitative research examines provider perceptions and expectations of posttreatment breast cancer care across five network sites with the goal of better understanding provider behavior during the posttreatment phase of the cancer care trajectory. Investigators at each site conducted semi-structured interviews with oncology specialists and primary care providers (PCPs). Interviews used case study examples and open- and closed-ended questions on the delivery of posttreatment breast cancer care. Informant responses were manually recorded by the interviewer, compiled in a database, then coded and analyzed using NVivo 9 software. There were 39 key informants across the sites: 14 medical oncologists, 7 radiation oncologists, 11 surgeons, 3 oncology nurses, and 4 PCPs. Care coordination was a major unprompted theme identified in the interviews. There was a perceived need for greater care coordination across institutions in order to improve delivery of posttreatment health care services and a need for greater care coordination within oncology, particularly to help avoid duplication of follow-up care and services. Participants expect frequent follow-up visits and to use biomarker tests and advanced imaging services as part of routine surveillance care. Implementing survivorship care programs was perceived as a way to improve care delivery. These results identify a need for increased focus on care coordination during the posttreatment phase of breast cancer care within the University of California system and the potential for system and provider-level interventions that could help increase coordination of posttreatment care. Breast cancer survivors do not always receive evidence-based care. This research helps to better understand what motivates provider behavior during the

  7. Provider perceptions and expectations of breast cancer post-treatment care: A University of California Athena Breast Health Network project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Erin E.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Melisko, Michelle; Pierce, John; von Friederichs-Fitzwater, Marlene; Lane, Karen; Hiatt, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The Athena Breast Health Network collaboration is a University of California system-wide project initiated with the intent to drive innovation in breast cancer prevention, screening and treatment. This qualitative research examines provider perceptions and expectations of post-treatment breast cancer care across five Network sites with the goal of better understanding provider behavior during the post-treatment phase of the cancer care trajectory. Methods Investigators at each site conducted semi-structured interviews with oncology specialists and primary care providers (PCPs). Interviews used case study examples and open- and closed-ended questions on the delivery of post-treatment breast cancer care. Informant responses were manually recorded by the interviewer, compiled in a database, then coded and analyzed using NVivo 9 software. Results There were 39 key informants across the sites: 14 medical oncologists, 7 radiation oncologists, 11 surgeons, 3 oncology nurses, and 4 PCPs. Care coordination was a major unprompted theme identified in the interviews. There was a perceived need for greater care coordination across institutions in order to improve delivery of post-treatment health care services and a need for greater care coordination within oncology, particularly to help avoid duplication of follow-up care and services. Participants expect frequent follow-up visits and to use biomarker tests and advanced imaging services as part of routine surveillance care. Implementing survivorship care programs was perceived as a way to improve care delivery. Conclusions These results identify a need for increased focus on care coordination during the post-treatment phase of breast cancer care within the UC system, and the potential for system and provider level interventions that could help increase coordination of post-treatment care. Implications for Cancer Survivors Breast cancer survivors do not always receive evidence-based care. This research helps to better

  8. Communication architecture for AAL. Supporting patient care by health care providers in AAL-enhanced living quarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, T; Thiele, S; Häber, A; Winter, A

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Using Data from Ambient Assisted Living and Smart Homes in Electronic Health Records". Concepts of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) support a long-term health monitoring and further medical and other services for multi-morbid patients with chronic diseases. In Germany many AAL and telemedical applications exist. Synergy effects by common agreements for essential application components and standards are not achieved. It is necessary to define a communication architecture which is based on common definitions of communication scenarios, application components and communication standards. The development of a communication architecture requires different steps. To gain a reference model for the problem area different AAL and telemedicine projects were compared and relevant data elements were generalized. The derived reference model defines standardized communication links. As a result the authors present an approach towards a reference architecture for AAL-communication. The focus of the architecture lays on the communication layer. The necessary application components are identified and a communication based on standards and their extensions is highlighted. The exchange of patient individual events supported by an event classification model, raw and aggregated data from the personal home area over a telemedicine center to health care providers is possible.

  9. Health-care provider screening for tobacco smoking and advice to quit - 17 countries, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable mortality in the world. Article 14 of the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) states that countries should promote cessation of tobacco use and adequate treatment for tobacco dependence. Health-care providers asking all patients about their tobacco use and advising tobacco users to quit are evidence-based strategies that increase tobacco abstinence. This report examines the proportion of tobacco smokers in 17 countries responding to the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) who saw a health-care provider in the past year and who reported that a health-care provider asked them about smoking and advised them to quit. Respondents were tobacco smokers aged ≥15 years surveyed during 2008-2011 in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Russia, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, and Vietnam. The proportion of smokers who had visited a health-care provider during the previous 12 months ranged from 21.6% in Egypt to 62.3% in Poland. Among these, the proportion reporting that a health-care provider asked if they smoked ranged from 34.9% in Vietnam to 82.1% in Romania. Among those screened for tobacco use, those who reported their health-care providers advised them to quit ranged from 17.3% in Mexico to 67.3% in Romania. In most countries, persons aged ≥45 years were more likely to report being screened and advised to quit than were persons aged ≤24 years. Health-care providers should identify smokers and provide advice and assistance in quitting at each visit as an adjunct to effective community interventions (e.g., increased price of tobacco products; smoke-free policies, mass media campaigns, and tobacco quitlines).

  10. Knowledge, attitude, and practice towards blood donation among health care providers in hospitals at Bahir Dar City, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, Bayeh; Mohammed, Beyan; Betela, Wendmagegn; Yimam, Reshid; Oljira, Adam; Ahmed, Merhab; Tsega, Wubet; Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yizengaw, Endalew

    2017-06-01

    Like other sub-Saharan Africa, in Ethiopia there is a shortage of adequate and safe blood supplies. Health care providers are potential resource and promoter of voluntary blood donation. This study was conducted to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice towards blood donation among health care providers in Bahir Dar City, Ethiopia. Paper based questionnaire was distributed to 276 health care providers from May 01 to June 30, 2016. Overall, 42.8% had donated blood at least once. Of these, males accounted for 60%. The median age of blood donors was 26 years. Voluntary-unpaid donation was 21.2%. Overall, 75.5% health care providers were knowledgeable. The levels of knowledge were significantly different among different disciplines (One-way ANOVA; F=69.7; P=0.004). Males were more knowledgeable than females (Pattitude was 78.6%. Previous practice of blood donation determined the odds of favorable attitude to be a future regular voluntary-unpaid blood donor (OR: 5.7, 95% CI: 3.2-10.4). Majority of health care providers had adequate knowledge and favorable attitude. However, voluntary-unpaid donation practice (21.1%) was lower compared to 100% target of voluntary-unpaid donation. There should be motivation packages to enhance voluntary-unpaid blood donation among health care professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance assessment in health care providers: a critical review of evidence and current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Karen E Stc; Coates, Vivien; Kelly, Billy; Boore, Jennifer R P; Cundell, Jill H; Gracey, Jacquie; McFetridge, Brian; McGonigle, Mary; Sinclair, Marlene

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate methods of performance assessment through an international literature review and a survey of current practice. Over the past two decades health care organizations have focussed on promoting high quality care in conjunction with retaining motivated staff. Cognisant of such initiatives, we sought to evaluate assessment methods for qualified staff according to their utility in the working environment. A systematic literature search was completed and each paper independently reviewed. All health care organizations in Northern Ireland submitted details of their performance assessments. Each was critically appraised using a utility index. Performance was not universally defined. A broad range of assessments were identified, each method had advantages and disadvantages. Although many lacked rigorous testing, areas of good practice were also noted. No single method is appropriate for assessing clinical performance. Rather, this study endorses proposals for a multi-method strategy to ensure that performance assessment demonstrates all attributes required for effective nursing and midwifery practice.

  12. Safety Risks Among Home Infusion Nurses and Other Home Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Catherine; Quinn, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, home health care (HHC) is a rapidly growing industry and home infusion therapy is a rapidly growing market. HHC can present substantial occupational safety and health (OSH) risks. This article summarizes major OSH risks relevant to home infusion therapy by illustrating them through real-life scenarios collected systematically using qualitative research methods by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-funded research projects at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. The need for home infusion therapy will continue to grow in the future, and safety interventions to prevent or minimize OSH risks are essential. PMID:28683000

  13. Explaining the Growth in US Health Care Spending Using State-Level Variation in Income, Insurance, and Provider Market Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Bradley; Trish, Erin

    2015-01-01

    The slowed growth in national health care spending over the past decade has led analysts to question the extent to which this recent slowdown can be explained by predictable factors such as the Great Recession or must be driven by some unpredictable structural change in the health care sector. To help address this question, we first estimate a regression model for state personal health care spending for 1991-2009, with an emphasis on the explanatory power of income, insurance, and provider market characteristics. We then use the results from this simple predictive model to produce state-level projections of health care spending for 2010-2013 to subsequently compare those average projected state values with actual national spending for 2010-2013, finding that at least 70% of the recent slowdown in health care spending can likely be explained by long-standing patterns. We also use the results from this predictive model to both examine the Great Recession's likely reduction in health care spending and project the Affordable Care Act's insurance expansion's likely increase in health care spending. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Health care provider and caregiver preferences regarding nasogastric and intravenous rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Stephen B; Keating, Laura E; Rumatir, Maggie; Schuh, Suzanne

    2012-12-01

    Despite evidence supporting its use, nasogastric rehydration is rarely used in North America. We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, 3-phase study to evaluate current perspectives. We compared the proportions of respondents in favor of nasogastric (as opposed to intravenous) rehydration, should oral rehydration fail, between clinicians and caregivers. Phase 1: caregivers of children aged 3 to 48 months, who presented to a Canadian pediatric emergency department with symptoms of gastroenteritis, were invited to complete a survey. Phase 2: phase 1 participants administered intravenous or nasogastric rehydration had the procedure observed and outcome data recorded. Phase 3: pediatric emergency medicine physicians, fellows, and nurses completed a survey. Four hundred thirty-five children-parent dyads and 113 health care providers participated. If oral rehydration were to fail, 10% (47 of 435) of caregivers and 14% (16 of 113) of clinicians would choose nasogastric rehydration (difference = 3.4%; 95% confidence interval: -2.8 to 11.4). Caregivers were more familiar with the term intravenous than nasogastric rehydration (80% vs 20%; P rehydration; none received nasogastric rehydration. Participating nurses have inserted 90 (interquartile range: 25-150) intravenous cannulas compared with 4 (interquartile range: 2-10) nasogastric tubes during the preceding 6 months (P rehydration increased to 27% (117 of 435) among caregivers (P rehydration when oral rehydration fails. Enhanced change management strategies will be required for nasogastric rehydration to become adopted in this environment.

  15. Assessing a nephrology-focused YouTube channel's potential to educate health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Tejas; Sanghani, Vivek; Fang, Xiangming; Christiano, Cynthia; Ferris, Maria

    2013-01-01

    YouTube has emerged as a potential teaching tool. Studies of the teaching potential of YouTube videos have not addressed health care provider (HCP) satisfaction; a necessary prerequisite for any teaching tool. We conducted a 4-month investigation to determine HCP satisfaction with a nephrology-specific YouTube channel. The Nephrology On-Demand YouTube channel was analyzed from January 1 through April 30, 2011. Sixty-minute nephrology lectures at East Carolina University were compressed into 10-minute videos and uploaded to the channel. HCPs were asked to answer a 5-point Likert questionnaire regarding the accuracy, currency, objectivity and usefulness of the digital format of the teaching videos. Means, standard deviations and 2-sided chi-square testing were performed to analyze responses. Over 80% of HCPs considered the YouTube channel to be accurate, current and objective. A similar percentage considered the digital format useful despite the compression of videos and lack of audio. The nephrology-specific YouTube channel has the potential to educate HCPs of various training backgrounds. Additional studies are required to determine if such specialty-specific channels can improve knowledge acquisition and retention.

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life after Pediatric Liver Transplantation: A Qualitative Analysis of the Perspectives of Health Care Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Miserachs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With improved survival outcomes after pediatric liver transplantation (LT, health-related quality of life (HRQoL is an important outcome metric. Understanding the elements contributing to HRQoL after LT in children would enable more targeted strategies towards optimizing best outcomes. This qualitative study aimed to explore health care providers (HCP perceptions about HRQoL after pediatric LT. Thirteen experienced HCP participated in two focus group discussions. Data analysis via a thematic analysis approach revealed 4 major themes: “LT as a facilitator of better HRQoL,” “coping and adapting to LT,” “living with a transplanted liver,” and “the family context.” HCP identified elements that both enhance (improved physical health, peer relationship, and activities of daily living and challenge (need for immunosuppression, transplant follow-up, and restrictions the multidimensional domains of HRQoL. HCP perceived LT to be a stressful life-changing event for children and their families. Patients and their parents’ ability to cope and adjust positively to LT was perceived as a key contributor to better HRQoL. HCP perspective highlights the importance of promoting psychosocial support and a family-centered care delivery model towards the overarching goal of optimizing durable outcomes.

  17. Influence of perceived provider performance on satisfaction with oral health care among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okullo, Isaac; Astrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Haugejorden, Ola

    2004-12-01

    To investigate satisfaction with dental care received at the last dental appointment among adolescents and to analyse factors influencing their satisfaction scores. A total of 1146 subjects (mean age 15.8 years) attending secondary schools in Kampala (urban, n = 591) and Lira (rural, n = 555) completed structured questionnaires at school in 2001. A total of 63% and 75% of Kampala and Lira students, respectively, reported attendance to dental clinics during the previous 2 years. The corresponding rates of students who confirmed satisfaction with oral health care services received were 73 and 77. In a logistic regression model, the students of Kampala who attended a dentist more than once, had no painful experience at the visit, evaluated their oral condition positively, were satisfied with the dentist's communication and dentist's information, were more likely to be satisfied with the oral health services received (OR = 1.7, 2.2, 4.1, 2.9 and 4.9, respectively). Regarding rural students, being satisfied with oral condition, dentist's communication and dentist's information were associated with higher odds of being satisfied with oral health care services (OR = 2.9, 1.9 and 2.3, respectively). Inter-personal interaction with the dentist is a key determinant in establishing satisfaction with dental care among urban as well as rural adolescents.

  18. Perceptions and use of complementary and alternative medicine in American Samoa: a survey of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krosch, Sara L

    2010-06-01

    American Samoa health care providers' use and perceptions of common complementary and alternative treatments, with a focus on traditional Samoan healing for women diagnosed with breast cancer or cervical cancer, was investigated to inform the development of the first locally produced women's cancer prevention radio drama and the first cancer patient navigator program in the US Territory. A 10-item self-administered survey was completed by a total of 47 health care providers employed at the Lyndon B. Johnson Tropical Medical Center and the American Samoa Department of Health Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. Comprehensive health care is limited in American Samoa, especially cancer treatment. Dissatisfaction or disconnection with Western medicine leads some patients to seek complementary or alternative health care from traditional Samoan healers who provide massage and herbal remedies. Health care providers in American Samoa use and recommend many complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) popular in the United States. The most common CAM recommended to patients is exercise (81%), diet modification (81%), prayer (36%), massage (36%), support group participation (26%), and relaxation techniques (19%). Traditional Samoan healing methods are unique CAM that 19% of mainstream health care providers have used, and 17% have recommended these techniques to patients. Most survey respondents believe traditional Samoan healing methods have a harmful effect on patient quality of life and 72% have advised a patient to discontinue using this type of CAM. While most providers feel that the majority of American Samoan patients use traditional healing methods to complement Western healthcare, 55% are aware of a breast cancer or cervical cancer patient utilizing these techniques as an alternative to hospital treatment. A provider's ethnicity, gender, age and years of professional experience appear to be indicators of different CAM method endorsement and patient

  19. Nursing care provided to young people in two health centers compared with Watson Theory

    OpenAIRE

    María Alejandra Pichardo Meza; María Catalina Zúñiga Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    This article has as objective to present the analysis of the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital, related to Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal. The study corresponds to a joint research of parallel type with concurrent triangulation. The study populations were made up by twenty-six young adult people (who face morbid process health or chronic p...

  20. Beliefs, Knowledge, Implementation, and Integration of Evidence-Based Practice Among Primary Health Care Providers: Protocol for a Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Filipa; Salvi, Mireille; Verloo, Henk

    2017-08-01

    The adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted because it is widely recognized for improving the quality and safety of health care for patients, and reducing avoidable costs. Providers of primary care face numerous challenges to ensuring the effectiveness of their daily practices. Primary health care is defined as: the entry level into a health care services system, providing a first point of contact for all new needs and problems; patient-focused (not disease-oriented) care over time; care for all but the most uncommon or unusual conditions; and coordination or integration of care, regardless of where or by whom that care is delivered. Primary health care is the principal means by which to approach the main goal of any health care services system: optimization of health status. This review aims to scope publications examining beliefs, knowledge, implementation, and integration of EBPs among primary health care providers (HCPs). We will conduct a systematic scoping review of published articles in the following electronic databases, from their start dates until March 31, 2017: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) via PubMed (from 1946), Embase (from 1947), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; from 1937), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; from 1992), PsycINFO (from 1806), Web of Science (from 1900), Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) database (from 1998), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE; from 1996), Trip medical database (from 1997), and relevant professional scientific journals (from their start dates). We will use the predefined search terms of, "evidence-based practice" and, "primary health care" combined with other terms, such as, "beliefs", "knowledge", "implementation", and "integration". We will also conduct a hand search of the bibliographies of all relevant articles and a search for unpublished studies using Google Scholar, ProQuest, Mednar, and World

  1. Providing Our Fellows in Training with Education on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Health Maintenance to Improve the Quality of Care in Our Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ann Joo; Kraemer, Dale F; Smotherman, Carmen; Eid, Emely

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) quality measures were established in an effort to standardize IBD health care. Despite effort to improve clinical performance, considerable variations in practice still exist. To further improve IBD health care, we propose incorporating an in-service educational session on IBD health maintenance to provide trainees with increasing awareness and knowledge on IBD management. Fifty electronic medical charts were randomly selected, and the level of quality documentation was assessed for 15 core IBD quality measures. Data were reported as the percentage of charts meeting audit criteria (compliance score). Fellows then attended an in-service educational session to review IBD quality measures and reinforce practice expectations. A second audit was then performed on an additional 50 patient charts to determine whether documentation practices improved after the educational session. We found a positive correlation between an in-service educational session and fellows' compliance with IBD health maintenance. Overall, the fellows' compliance score increased by 18% (before intervention, 65%; after intervention, 83%; P training level. Although the magnitude of improvement was comparable, the mean compliance score was highest in year 2 at 81% (year 1: 72% [P = 0.019] and year 3: 70% [P = 0.002]). Fellows expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the educational intervention and emphasized the value in reviewing the conceptual bases for IBD health maintenance. Incorporating a standard curriculum on IBD health maintenance provides fellows in training with increased awareness and guidance on managing the unique preventive care needs of patients with IBD.

  2. Patient engagement at the margins: Health care providers' assessments of engagement and the structural determinants of health in the safety-net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Mark D; Shim, Janet K; Yen, Irene H; Thompson-Lastad, Ariana; Rubin, Sara; Van Natta, Meredith; Burke, Nancy J

    2017-06-01

    Increasing "patient engagement" has become a priority for health care organizations and policy-makers seeking to reduce cost and improve the quality of care. While concepts of patient engagement have proliferated rapidly across health care settings, little is known about how health care providers make use of these concepts in clinical practice. This paper uses 20 months of ethnographic and interview research carried out from 2015 to 2016 to explore how health care providers working at two public, urban, safety-net hospitals in the United States define, discuss, and assess patient engagement. We investigate how health care providers describe engagement for high cost patients-the "super-utilizers" of the health care system-who often face complex challenges related to socioeconomic marginalization including poverty, housing insecurity, exposure to violence and trauma, cognitive and mental health issues, and substance use. The health care providers in our study faced institutional pressure to assess patient engagement and to direct care towards engaged patients. However, providers considered such assessments to be highly challenging and oftentimes inaccurate, particularly because they understood low patient engagement to be the result of difficult socioeconomic conditions. Providers tried to navigate the demand to assess patient engagement in care by looking for explicit positive and negative indicators of engagement, while also being sensitive to more subtle and intuitive signs of engagement for marginalized patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE TOWARDS CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGES AMONG A COHORT OF MULTIETHNIC HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS IN SAUDI ARABIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaqeb, Dhekra; Hamamy, Hanan; Youssef, Amira M; Al-Rubeaan, Khalid

    2016-12-29

    This study aimed to assess knowledge, attitude and practice related to consanguinity among multiethnic health care providers in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Using a cross-sectional study design, a validated, self-administered close-ended questionnaire was randomly distributed to health care providers in different health institutions in the country between 1st August 2012 and 31st July 2013. A total of 1235 health care providers completed the study questionnaire. Of the 892 married participants (72.23% of total), 11.43% were married to a first cousin, and were predominantly Arabs, younger than 40 years and male. Only 17.80% of the patients seen by the health care providers requested consanguinity related counselling. A knowledge barrier was expressed by 27.49% of the participants, and 85.67% indicated their willingness to have more training in basic genetic counselling. A language barrier was expressed as a limiting factor to counselling for consanguinity among non-Arabs. The health care providers had a major dearth of knowledge that was reflected in their attitude and practice towards consanguinity counselling. This finding indicates the need for more undergraduate and postgraduate medical and nursing education and training in the counselling of consanguineous couples. It is recommended that consanguinity counselling is included in the current premarital screening and counselling programmes in the Kingdom.

  4. The quality of health care services provided in health care centers of Khorramabad using SERVQUAL model in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad javad tarrahi

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Expectations of the clients in all aspects of offering services are beyond than their perceptions, and needed to improve the quality of offering services in these centers in all the dimensions especially empathy dimension. It is recommended that the quality of the offering services be assessed periodically in these centers and intervene to improve the delivering of health services.

  5. Identifying Challenges Associated With the Care Transition Workflow From Hospital to Skilled Home Health Care: Perspectives of Home Health Care Agency Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasarwanji, Mahiyar; Werner, Nicole E; Carl, Kimberly; Hohl, Dawn; Leff, Bruce; Gurses, Ayse P; Arbaje, Alicia I

    2015-01-01

    Older adults discharged from the hospital to skilled home health care (SHHC) are at high risk for experiencing suboptimal transitions. Using the human factors approach of shadowing and contextual inquiry, we studied the workflow for transitioning older adults from the hospital to SHHC. We created a representative diagram of the hospital to SHHC transition workflow, we examined potential workflow variations, we categorized workflow challenges, and we identified artifacts developed to manage variations and challenges. We identified three overarching challenges to optimal care transitions-information access, coordination, and communication/teamwork. Future investigations could test whether redesigning the transition from hospital to SHHC, based on our findings, improves workflow and care quality.

  6. Stigma experience of people with epilepsy in Mexico and views of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espínola-Nadurille, Mariana; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Sánchez-Guzmán, Maria Alejandra

    2014-03-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder with neurobiological, cognitive, psychological, and social consequences. Epilepsy stigma is a social determinant of ill health that affects the quality of life of people who suffer from epilepsy and that renders a poor social prognosis even worse than the clinical one. From a phenomenological approach, between January and July 2011, we explored the experience of epilepsy stigma through 25 in-depth qualitative interviews with 10 persons with temporal lobe epilepsy (PWE) (we avoided terms such as "epileptics" or "epileptic patients" because they can be labeling and stigmatizing), 10 carers (CEs) of PWE who attended the epilepsy clinic of the Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery of Mexico, and 5 physicians specialized in epilepsy. The objective of the study was to identify the following: perceptions that could indicate any form of discrimination due to having epilepsy, reactions of people in front of a person having seizures, and social functioning of PWE since epilepsy onset, particularly their interpersonal relationships and participation in educational or working activities. Through the health providers' narratives, we explored the mainstream care practices, their perspectives on epilepsy, and their views about how the disease should be addressed. Thematic guidelines were elaborated for each type of participant. All information was processed with the use of the computer-assisted data analysis, Atlas.ti5. We made a codification of broad themes that corresponded to the main topics of the interview guidelines and then proceeded to finer categorization to elaborate the analytical categories. Epilepsy was attached to a powerful stereotype that includes notions of contamination, danger, sin, divine punishment, supernatural forces, and madness. Internalized, interpersonal, and institutional stigma prevents PWE from participating in school and employment and reduces their opportunities to establish peer and couple relationships

  7. Rising Need for Health Education Among Renal Transplant Patients and Caregiving Competence in Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianfei; Ming, Yingzi; Ding, Siqing; Wu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Jia; Liu, Lifang; Zhou, Jianda

    2017-06-01

    Health education positively affects the efficacy of self-management and should be carried out according to the status of patients' needs, knowledge, and the competence of the primary caregivers. This study was to investigate the needs of health education knowledge in transplant patients and the competence of the primary caregivers. This is a cross-sectional study using a convenient sampling approach. Self-report questionnaires were applied to 351 renal transplantation patients and their primary caregivers. Three-hundred nine valid questionnaires were included in the analysis. The intensive care unit environment, stress coping strategies, the operation procedure, anesthesia and adverse reactions, and hand hygiene were the 5 most poorly understood aspects in health education. Stress coping strategies, at-home self-monitoring of health, pulmonary infection prevention, dietary needs, and anesthesia and other adverse reactions were the top 5 health education needs. Decision and self-efficacy were the weakest caregiving competence. Significant positive correlations were observed between health education knowledge level and caregiving competence in the primary caregivers. Marriage, education level, career, expense reimbursement, and residence significantly contributed to the health education demand questionnaire model, whereas gender, age, ethnic group, education level, career, and expense reimbursement significantly contributed to health education knowledge questionnaire model ( P decision-making and self-efficacy.

  8. Determinants of satisfaction with health care provider interactions at health centres in central Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woldie Mirkuzie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In primary health care, provider-patient interaction is fundamental platform and critically affects service delivery. Nevertheless, it is often ignored in medical research and practice and it is infrequently subjected to scientific inquiry, particularly in Ethiopia. This study aimed to assess patient satisfaction with health care provider interactions and its influencing factors among out-patients at health centers in West Shoa, Central Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional facility based study was conducted on 768 out-patients of six health centers in West Shoa Zone, Central Ethiopia. The total sample size was allocated to each of the six health centers based on patient flow during the ten days prior to the start of data collection. Pre-tested instruments were used for data collection and the data were analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 statistical software. Factor score was computed for the items identified to represent the satisfaction scale by varimax rotation method. Using this regression factor score, multivariate linear regression analysis was performed and the effect of independent variables on the regression factor score was quantified. Results Seventy three percent of the respondents perceived that provider's empathy was good and 35% complained that providers were not technically competent enough. In addition, 82% of the respondents rated non-verbal communication by the providers to be good, very good or excellent on a five-point ordinal scale. Regardless of the process, only 34.1% of the patients implied that the consultations made a difference in understanding their illness and coping with it. Generally speaking, 62.6% of the patients reported that they have been satisfied with their visit. Perceived empathy, perceived technical competency, non-verbal communication, patient enablement, being told the name of once illness, type and frequency of visit, knowing the providers and educational status were main independent

  9. Impact of comorbidity on the individual's choice of primary health care provider

    OpenAIRE

    Zielinski, Andrzej; Håkansson, Anders; Beckman, Anders; Halling, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective. This study examined whether age, gender, and comorbidity were of importance for an individual's choice of listing with either a public or a private primary health care (PHC) practice. Design and setting. The study was a register-based closed cohort study in one private and one public PHC practice in Blekinge County in southern Sweden. Subjects. A cohort (12 696 individuals) was studied comprising all those listed with the public or private PHC practice on 1 October 200...

  10. Emerging roles of health care providers to mitigate climate change impacts: a perspective from East Harlem, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Perry E; Durante, Kathleen T; Rahona, Elena; Zarcadoolas, Christina

    2014-06-14

    Professional associations of health care workers are issuing policy statements on climate change and health with greater frequency, calling on their members to act in their duty to protect and fulfill the right to health. These health care providers' perceptions of their roles in the intersection of climate and health, however, have not been well-studied. This article presents results from a qualitative study using focus groups conducted with health care providers serving the low-income, ethnic minority population in East Harlem, New York. The focus groups sought to identify and explore providers' perceived health threats of climate change, as well as their perceived role as frontline disseminators of information and detectors of disease for their patients. Extreme heat events were used to frame the discussion in each group. Three major themes emerged: 1) environmental awareness, 2) an "ecohealth" lens, and 3) heat and health vulnerability. The participants demonstrated their interest in playing a role in climate change adaptation by identifying at-risk patients and helping to tailor clinical care to better serve these individuals. Copyright © 2014 Sheffield, Durante, Rahona, and Zarcadoolas. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  11. Educational Strategies to Help Students Provide Respectful Sexual and Reproductive Health Care for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kelly; Arbour, Megan; Waryold, Justin

    2016-11-01

    Graduate medical, nursing, and midwifery curricula often have limited amounts of time to focus on issues related to cultural competency in clinical practice, and respectful sexual and reproductive health care for all individuals in particular. Respectful health care that addresses sexual and reproductive concerns is a right for everyone, including those who self-identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT). LGBT persons have unique reproductive health care needs as well as increased risks for poor health outcomes. Both the World Health Organization and Healthy People 2020 identified the poor health of LGBT persons as an area for improvement. A lack of educational resources as well as few student clinical experiences with an LGBT population may be barriers to providing respectful sexual and reproductive health care to LGBT persons. This article offers didactic educational strategies for midwifery and graduate nursing education programs that may result in reducing barriers to the provision of respectful sexual and reproductive health care for LGBT clients. Specific ideas for implementation are discussed in detail. In addition to what is presented here, other educational strategies and clinical experiences may help to support students for caring for LGBT persons prior to entrance into clinical practice. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  12. Attitudes, practices, and barriers to adolescent suicide and mental health screening: a survey of pennsylvania primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Guy S; O'Malley, Alana; Wintersteen, Matthew B; Peters, Sherry; Yunghans, Suzanne; Biddle, Virginia; O'Brien, Connell; Schrand, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To determine primary care providers' rates of screening for suicide and mental health problems in adolescents and the factors that promote or discourage this practice. Overall, 671 medical professionals (ie, pediatricians, family physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) completed an electronic survey. The 53 items focused on (1) attitudes, knowledge, and comfort with general psychosocial and suicide screening and (2) current practices and barriers regarding screening and referrals to behavioral health services. Forty percent had a patient attempt suicide in the past year, and 7.7% had 6 or more patients attempt suicide. At a well visit, 67% screened for mental health, and 35.2% screened for suicide risk. Most (61.1%) primary care providers rarely screened for suicide or only when it was indicated. Only 14.2% of primary care providers often used a standardized suicide screening tool. Factors associated with screening were being knowledgeable about suicide risk, being female, working in an urban setting, and having had a suicidal patient. Only 3.0% reported adequate compensation for these practices, and 44% agreed that primary care providers frequently use physical health billing codes for behavioral health services. Nearly 90% said parent involvement was needed if adolescents were to follow through with referrals to mental health services. Only 21% frequently heard back from the behavioral health providers after a referral was made. Policy that promotes mental health education for primary care providers, provides reimbursement for mental health screening, and encourages better service integration could increase suicide screening and save healthcare costs and patients' lives.

  13. Narrative review of provider behavior in primary care behavioral health: How process data can inform quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beehler, Gregory P; Lilienthal, Kaitlin R; Possemato, Kyle; Johnson, Emily M; King, Paul R; Shepardson, Robyn L; Vair, Christina L; Reyner, Jacqueline; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Maisto, Stephen A; Wray, Laura O

    2017-09-01

    Primary care behavioral health (PCBH) is a population-based approach to delivering mental and behavioral health care in the primary care setting. Implementation of the PCBH model varies across practice settings, which can impact how PCBH providers deliver services to patients and in turn may predict a variety of important outcomes. This article aims to characterize PCBH provider engagement in key processes of integrated care as demonstrated in results from empirical studies of real-world clinical practice. For this narrative review of published studies on PCBH provider engagement in processes of care, PubMed and PsycINFO databases were searched from January 1990 through May 2016 to identify relevant articles. Provider adherence to the brief, time-limited treatment model appears suboptimal. Common mental health conditions, such as depression, were often the primary focus of provider attention, with less consistent emphasis on behavioral medicine concerns. Whereas providers regularly conducted qualitative functional assessments with patients, routine use of standardized measures was low. Engagement in interprofessional collaboration with the primary care team was also low, but engagement in behaviors that fostered therapeutic relationships was high. This review identified several strengths and weaknesses of typical PCBH provider practices. Results are discussed in relation to their value as areas for future quality improvement initiatives that can improve PCBH service delivery and, ultimately, patient outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Trust in the health-care provider-patient relationship: a systematic mapping review of the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Nicola; Barnes, Rebecca; Calnan, Mike; Corrigan, Oonagh; Dieppe, Paul; Entwistle, Vikki

    2013-12-01

    Trust is important for patients and may be used as an indicator and potential 'marker' for how patients evaluate the quality of health care. The review aimed to classify the current evidence base on trust in the patient-provider relationship in order to identify strengths and weaknesses and to point towards areas for future research. Nine electronic databases were searched from 2004 onwards using text and subject heading keywords relating to 'trust' and 'health care' and 'relationships'. Abstracts were identified for empirical studies carried out in health-care settings that explicitly examined trust or reported trust-related findings as a secondary outcome. Data extraction Two review authors assessed the relevance of abstracts and extracted data relating to year published, country of study, clinical speciality, and participants. Five hundred and ninety-six abstracts were included. Most reported on patients' trust in providers; were carried out in the USA; collected data in family care or oncology/palliative care settings; used questionnaires and interviews and elicited patients' perspectives. Only one study explicitly set out to examine providers' trust in patients and patients. Providers' trust in patients remains a neglected area on the trust research agenda. Empirical studies examining the factors that influence providers' trust in patients and how this might affect the quality of care and patient health-related behaviours are urgently needed to readdress this imbalance. Further exploration of this area using observational methods is recommended.

  15. What Obstetric Health Care Providers Need to Know About Measles and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    From January 1 to April 3, 2015, 159 people from 18 states and the District of Columbia were reported as having measles. Most cases are part of an outbreak linked to a California amusement park. Because measles was eliminated in the United States in 2000, most U.S. clinicians are unfamiliar with the condition. We reviewed information on the current outbreak, measles manifestations, diagnostic methods, treatment, and infection-control recommendations. To identify information on measles and pregnancy, we reviewed reports with 20 or more measles cases during pregnancy that included data on effects on pregnant women or pregnancy outcomes. These reports were identified through MEDLINE from inception through February 2015 using the following strategy: (((pregnan*) AND measles) AND English[Language]) NOT review[Publication Type]. Reference lists also were reviewed to identify additional articles. Pregnant women infected with measles are more likely to be hospitalized, develop pneumonia, and die than nonpregnant women. Adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pregnancy loss, preterm birth, and low birth weight, are associated with maternal measles; however, the risk of congenital defects does not appear to be increased. No antiviral therapy is available; treatment is supportive. Early identification of possible cases is needed so that appropriate infection control can be instituted promptly. The recent measles outbreak highlights the role that obstetric health care providers play in vaccine-preventable illnesses; obstetrician–gynecologists should ensure that patients are up to date on all vaccines, including measles-containing vaccines, and should recommend and ideally offer a measles-containing vaccine to women without evidence of measles immunity before or after pregnancy. PMID:25899422

  16. Current attitudes and practices of obesity counselling by health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrin, Christine; Kahan, Scott; Turner, Monique; Gallagher, Christine; Dietz, William H

    Relatively few patients receive obesity counselling consistent with the USPSTF guidelines, and many health care professionals (HCPs) are biased in their attitudes towards obesity management. A national sample of family physicians, internists, OB/GYN physicians, and nurse practitioners (NPs) completed a web-based survey of beliefs, practice, and knowledge regarding obesity management. A majority of HCPs believe that it is both the patient's and the provider's responsibility to ensure that the patient is counselled about obesity. Obesity (77%), obesity-related diseases (79%), or obesity-related risk factors (71%) prompt HCPs to offer obesity counselling; 59% of HCPs wait for the patient to broach the subject of their weight. Increased blood pressure (89%) and heart disease risks (90%) are the most common themes in counselling. Across all HCPs except NPs "exercise" is discussed more frequently than "physical activity" (85% vs 81%), "diet" more frequently than "eating habits" (77% vs 75%), and "obesity" more frequently than "unhealthy weight" (60% vs 45%). NPs are more likely to discuss physical activity, eating habits, and unhealthy weight instead. To improve counselling for obesity, HCPs reported needing more time (70%), training in obesity management (53%), improved reimbursement (53%), and better tools to help patients recognise obesity risks (50%). Obesity-related diseases, risk factors, or obesity alone predict obesity counselling amongst HCPs. Better training in weight management and tools to help patients recognise risks appear to be key elements in helping patients compare the risks of what they may consider invasive therapy against the risks of continued obesity. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The use of interest rate swaps by nonprofit organizations: evidence from nonprofit health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Louis J; Trussel, John

    2006-01-01

    Although the use of derivatives, particularly interest rate swaps, has grown explosively over the past decade, derivative financial instrument use by nonprofits has received only limited attention in the research literature. Because little is known about the risk management activities of nonprofits, the impact of these instruments on the ability of nonprofits to raise capital may have significant public policy implications. The primary motivation of this study is to determine the types of derivatives used by nonprofits and estimate the frequency of their use among these organizations. Our study also extends contemporary finance theory by an empirical examination of the motivation for interest rate swap usage among nonprofits. Our empirical data came from 193 large nonprofit health care providers that issued debt to the public between 2000 and 2003. We used a univariate analysis and a multivariate analysis relying on logistic regression models to test alternative explanations of interest rate swaps usage by nonprofits, finding that more than 45 percent of our sample, 88 organizations, used interest rate swaps with an aggregate notional value in excess of $8.3 billion. Our empirical tests indicate the primary motive for nonprofits to use interest rate derivatives is to hedge their exposure to interest rate risk. Although these derivatives are a useful risk management tool, under conditions of falling bond market interest rates these derivatives may also expose a nonprofit swap user to the risk of a material unscheduled termination payment. Finally, we found considerable diversity in the informativeness of footnote disclosure among sample organizations that used interest rate swaps. Many nonprofits did not disclose these risks in their financial statements. In conclusion, we find financial managers in large nonprofits commonly use derivative financial instruments as risk management tools, but the use of interest rate swaps by nonprofits may expose them to other risks

  18. Strengthening partnerships: The involvement of health care providers in the evaluation of authentic assessment within midwifery undergraduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Amanda G; Sidebotham, Mary; Creedy, Debra K; Fenwick, Jennifer; Gamble, Jenny

    2015-07-01

    Collaborative partnerships between health care providers and academics are essential in the provision of quality undergraduate midwifery programs. While health care providers often contribute to clinical assessment and teaching in midwifery programs, they are rarely involved in assessment design and evaluation. This paper describes the evaluation of an assessment task designed to develop critical thinking skills in final year undergraduate midwifery students. Health care providers' involvement sought to confirm the authenticity and validity of the assessment task and facilitate further engagement. A mixed method descriptive study design was used. After reviewing a sample of student work, health care providers completed a 20 item survey and participated in a focus group. Survey items were based on the domains of Educational Acceptability, Educational Impact and Preparation for Practice. Participants gave high scores for each domain and commented positively on the innovative nature of the assessment, students' ability to undertake in-depth analysis of complex cases, and development of student's critical thinking skills. Participants also reported greater confidence in students' competence and the program. Involving health care providers in evaluation of an assessment task validated the assessment, contributed to clinicians' perceptions of student credibility, and fostered strong links between the program and industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Health care Providers Needs About Malaria Control Program in Puskesmas Kisam Tinggi, South Ogan Komering Ulu District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Arisanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malaria is an infectious disease that is still a health problem in Indonesia, which can cause death, especially in high-risk groups such as infants, toddlers, pregnant women and can directly lead to anemia and decreased work productivity. South Ogan Komering Ulu District was one of the endemic areas in South Sumatera Province. In a previous study in the District South Ogan Komering Ulu County Superior Data AMI found that high and low knowledge society related to malaria and most of respondents have not received counseling. Objective:The purpose of this study was to determine the needs of health care providers in malaria control programs. Methods:Data collected through in-depth interviews. Informant interviews are two people responsible for malaria at the health department, the head of health centers and two people responsible for malaria in health centers. Results: The results showed that the needs required by the health care providers to improve health care services, especially malaria is a need for laboratory equipment (microscope, reagents, and rapid diagnostic test, the need for microscopic power, the need for malaria drugs that are still effective, procurement of mosquito nets, education malaria to the community, and training needs for existing microscopic officer. Conclusion: The need of health care providers is the fulfillment of the malaria supplies equipment, laboratory personnel and training that support the ability of health care providers. With the fulfillment of the provider of health services to the community are expected to be performing well. Recommendation:Budget is needed to support supplier equipment & training.

  20. Improving sexual health for HIV patients by providing a combination of integrated public health and hospital care services; a one-group pre- and post test intervention comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukers-Muijrers Nicole HTM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital HIV care and public sexual health care (a Sexual Health Care Centre services were integrated to provide sexual health counselling and sexually transmitted infections (STIs testing and treatment (sexual health care to larger numbers of HIV patients. Services, need and usage were assessed using a patient perspective, which is a key factor for the success of service integration. Methods The study design was a one-group pre-test and post-test comparison of 447 HIV-infected heterosexual individuals and men who have sex with men (MSM attending a hospital-based HIV centre serving the southern region of the Netherlands. The intervention offered comprehensive sexual health care using an integrated care approach. The main outcomes were intervention uptake, patients’ pre-test care needs (n=254, and quality rating. Results Pre intervention, 43% of the patients wanted to discuss sexual health (51% MSM; 30% heterosexuals. Of these patients, 12% to 35% reported regular coverage, and up to 25% never discussed sexual health topics at their HIV care visits. Of the patients, 24% used our intervention. Usage was higher among patients who previously expressed a need to discuss sexual health. Most patients who used the integrated services were new users of public health services. STIs were detected in 13% of MSM and in none of the heterosexuals. The quality of care was rated good. Conclusions The HIV patients in our study generally considered sexual health important, but the regular counselling and testing at the HIV care visit was insufficient. The integration of public health and hospital services benefited both care sectors and their patients by addressing sexual health questions, detecting STIs, and conducting partner notification. Successful sexual health care uptake requires increased awareness among patients about their care options as well as a cultural shift among care providers.

  1. Care Provided by Students in Community-Based Dental Education: Helping Meet Oral Health Needs in Underserved Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Keith A; Maguire, Meghan

    2018-01-01

    Since 2000, reports have documented the challenges faced by many Americans in receiving oral health care and the consequences of inadequate care such as high levels of dental caries among many U.S. children. To help address this problem, many dental schools now include community-based dental education (CBDE) in their curricula, placing students in extramural clinics where they provide care in underserved communities. CBDE is intended to both broaden the education of future oral health professionals and expand care for patients in community clinics. The aim of this study was to develop a three-year profile of the patients seen and the care provided by students at extramural clinics associated with one U.S. dental school. Three student cohorts participated in the rotations: final-year students in the Doctor of Dental Surgery, Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene, and Master of Dental Therapy programs. The study was a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the school's database for three consecutive academic years. The data included patients' demographics and special health care needs status (based on information collected by students from their patients) and procedures students performed while on rotations. For the three-year period, the results showed a total of 43,128 patients were treated by 418 student providers. Approximately 25% of all encounters were with pediatric patients. Students completed 5,908 child prophylaxis, 5,386 topical fluoride varnish, and 7,678 sealant procedures on pediatric patients. Annually, 7% of the total patients treated had special health care needs. The results show that these students in CBDE rotations provided a substantial amount of oral health care at extramural sites and gained additional experience in caring for a diverse population of patients and performing a wide range of procedures.

  2. Factors that affect parent perceptions of provider-family partnership for children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Caprice A; Madden, Vanessa L; Marcu, Mircea I

    2010-09-01

    Partnering between families and their children's providers is a cornerstone of family-centered care. This study aimed to identify factors associated with family-provider partnership and determine the association between partnership and other outcome measures for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were conducted using data from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Multivariate models showed that CSHCN who are White non-Hispanic, younger than 12, reside in households with incomes above 400% of the federal poverty level, and have a usual source of care were associated with family-provider partnership. Multivariate models showed that family-provider partnership was significantly associated with adequate insurance, early and continual screening, organized health care services, and transition preparedness. Family-provider partnership was associated with 20% fewer emergency department visits and 9% fewer school days missed. This study suggests that policies aimed at promoting family-provider partnership could increase health outcomes for CSHCN.

  3. Knowledge and Antibiotics Prescription Pattern among Ugandan Oral Health Care Providers: A Cross-sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Kamulegeya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Irrational prescription of antibiotics by clinicians might lead to drug resistance. Clinicians do prescribe antibiotics for either prophylactic or therapeutic reasons. The decision of when and what to prescribe leaves room for misuse and therefore it is imperative to continuously monitor knowledge and pattern of prescription. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge of antibiotic use and the prescription pattern among dental health care practitioners in Uganda. Materials and methods. A structured and pretested questionnaire was sent to 350 dental health care practitioners by post or physical delivery. All the questionnaires were sent with self-addressed and prepaid postage envelopes to enable respondents to mail back the filled questionnaires. Chi-squared test was used to test for any significant differences between groups of respondents based on qualitative variables. Results. The response rate was 40.3% (n=140. Of these 52.9 % were public health dental officers (PHDOs and 47.1% were dental surgeons. The males constituted 74.3% of the respondents. There were statistically significant differences between dental surgeons and (PHDOs in knowledge on prophylactic antibiotic use (P = 0.001 and patient influence on prescription (P = 0.001. Amoxicillin, in combination with metronidazole, was the most common combination of antibiotics used followed by co-trimoxazole with metronidazole. Conclusion. The knowledge of dental health care practitioners in antibiotic use in this study was generally low. A combination of amoxicillin with metronidazole was the most commonly prescribed antibiotics subsequent to different dental procedures.

  4. Pediatricians' knowledge, perceptions, and attitudes towards providing health care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lena, Suji M; Wiebe, Tannis; Ingram, Sara; Jabbour, Mona

    2002-10-01

    Pediatricians are often the first health-care contacts for gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents who are developing their sexual orientation. This study investigated pediatricians' attitudes and practices towards gay, lesbian, and bisexual adolescents. We sent anonymous self-administered questionnaires to 112 pediatricians in the Ottawa area. Of those who responded, 36 per cent reported having treated lesbian, gay, or bisexual patients, and 70 per cent reported not addressing the issue of sexual orientation. Reservations in discussing sexual orientation were due to fears of offending patients, and a lack of knowledge regarding their needs. Furthermore, 59 per cent of these pediatricians were unfamiliar with community resources for homosexual youths, and 78 per cent reported wanting more information with regards to the care of this population. Many pediatricians experience difficulties in discussing issues of sexual orientation, and generally feel inadequately prepared to address issues pertaining to the health-care needs of these adolescents. While certain issues remain controversial, the overall attitude of pediatricians towards homosexually oriented patients is positive in that they are interested in becoming more aware of issues of homosexual orientation, to better serve this population.

  5. Integration Between Mental Health-Care Providers and Traditional Spiritual Healers: Contextualising Islam in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nayeefa

    2016-10-01

    In the United Arab Emirates, neuropsychiatric disorders are estimated to contribute to one-fifth of the global burden of disease. Studies show that the UAE citizens' apathy towards seeking professional mental health services is associated with the 'religious viewpoints' on the issue, societal stigma, lack of awareness of mental health and lack of confidence in mental health-care providers. Mental health expenditures by the UAE government health ministry are not available exclusively. The majority of primary health-care doctors and nurses have not received official in-service training on mental health within the last 5 years. Efforts are to be made at deconstructing the position of mental illness and its treatments in the light of Islamic Jurisprudence; drafting culturally sensitive and relevant models of mental health care for Emirati citizens; liaising between Imams of mosques and professional mental health service providers; launching small-scale pilot programs in collaboration with specialist institutions; facilitating mentoring in line with Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) outreach programmes for senior school Emirati students concerning mental health; and promoting mental health awareness in the wider community through participation in events open to public.

  6. 25 CFR 900.193 - Does FTCA coverage extend to individuals who provide health care services under a personal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does FTCA coverage extend to individuals who provide health care services under a personal services contract providing services in a facility that is owned, operated, or constructed under the jurisdiction of the IHS? 900.193 Section 900.193 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND...

  7. Dental Provider Attitudes Are a Barrier to Expanded Oral Health Care for Children ≤3 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Clark MPH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the perspectives of general dentists regarding oral health care for children ≤3 years. Methods. Mailed survey of 444 general dentists in Michigan. Results. Although most dentists were aware of recommendations for early dental visits, only 36% recommended their own patients begin dental visits by 1 year of age. Only 37% dentists felt that screening for oral health problems can be done by medical providers, whereas 34% agreed administration of fluoride varnish by medical providers would be effective in preventing dental problems in young children. Conclusions. Dentists’ failure to recommend 1-year dental visits is due neither to lack of awareness nor to capacity problems. The limited enthusiasm for involving children’s medical providers in oral health promotion signals attitudinal barriers that must be overcome to improve children’s oral health. Primary care providers should identify and refer to dentists in their community who are willing to see young children.

  8. Attitudes and perceptions of patients, caregivers, and health care providers toward background music in patient care areas: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, Pedro; Nguyen, Linh; Rhondali, Wadih; Hui, David; Palmer, J Lynn; Sevy, Ingrid; Richardson, Michael; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    Background music can be used to distract from ordinary sounds and improve wellbeing in patient care areas. Little is known about individuals' attitudes and beliefs about music versus ordinary sound in this setting. To assess the preferences of patients, caregivers and healthcare providers regarding background music or ordinary sound in outpatient and inpatient care areas, and to explore their attitudes and perceptions towards music in general. All participants were exposed to background music in outpatient or inpatient clinical settings. 99 consecutive patients, 101 caregivers and 65 out of 70 eligible healthcare providers (93%) completed a survey about music attitudes and preferences. The primary outcome was a preference for background music over ordinary sound in patient care areas. Preference for background music was high and similar across groups (70 patients (71%), 71 caregivers (71%) and 46 providers (71%), p=0.58). The three groups had very low disapproval for background music in patient care areas (10%, 9% and 12%, respectively; p=0.91). Black ethnicity independently predicted lower preference for background music (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.98). Patients, caregivers and providers reported recent use of music for themselves for the purpose of enjoyment (69%, 80% and 86% respectively p=0.02). Age, gender, religion and education level significantly predicted preferences for specific music styles. Background music in patient care areas was preferred to ordinary sound by patients, caregivers and providers. Demographics of the population are strong determinants of music style preferences.

  9. Information, education, and communication services in MCH care provided at an urban health center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Bratati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regular IEC programs during antenatal and intranatal period, through individual or group approach, brings desirable changes in health practices of people, resulting in a healthy mother and a healthy baby. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted to assess the level of IEC services regarding pregnancy and child care, received by the women at an MCH clinic of an urban health center, where the study subjects comprised 400 antenatal (AN and postnatal (PN women and mothers of children under five years. Results: Warning signs of danger was explained to only 10% of the AN and PN women. Advice regarding family planning appeared to be the most frequently covered, though that too was explained to less than half of the subjects. About one third of the women were advised on breast feeding. Only 8% of the mothers had been told about all issues regarding pregnancy and child care. Breast feeding and weaning was properly explained to 85.7 and 81.1% of the total mothers of U5 children. Advice regarding subsequent nutrition was given to 60.9% of mothers. About only a quarter of the total mothers were advised on home management of diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. Very few mothers were counseled about the growth pattern of the children and none were shown the growth chart. Only 12.9% of the mothers were informed about all issues. Conclusion: IEC regarding maternal and child care other than feeding practices is a neglected service in the health facility where the study was conducted.

  10. Health care providers' perceptions of and attitudes towards induced abortions in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia : a systematic literature review of qualitative and quantitative data.

    OpenAIRE

    Rehnstr?m Loi, Ulrika; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Faxelid, Elisabeth; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background Unsafe abortions are a serious public health problem and a major human rights issue. In low-income countries, where restrictive abortion laws are common, safe abortion care is not always available to women in need. Health care providers have an important role in the provision of abortion services. However, the shortage of health care providers in low-income countries is critical and exacerbated by the unwillingness of some health care providers to provide abortion services. The aim...

  11. Study Protocol: establishing good relationships between patients and health care providers while providing cardiac care. Exploring how patient-clinician engagement contributes to health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Yvette L; Zeitz, Christopher J; Fredericks, Bronwyn

    2012-11-14

    Studies that compare Indigenous Australian and non-Indigenous patients who experience a cardiac event or chest pain are inconclusive about the reasons for the differences in-hospital and survival rates. The advances in diagnostic accuracy, medication and specialised workforce has contributed to a lower case fatality and lengthen survival rates however this is not evident in the Indigenous Australian population. A possible driver contributing to this disparity may be the impact of patient-clinician interface during key interactions during the health care process. This study will apply an Indigenous framework to describe the interaction between Indigenous patients and clinicians during the continuum of cardiac health care, i.e. from acute admission, secondary and rehabilitative care. Adopting an Indigenous framework is more aligned with Indigenous realities, knowledge, intellects, histories and experiences. A triple layered designed focus group will be employed to discuss patient-clinician engagement. Focus groups will be arranged by geographic clusters i.e. metropolitan and a regional centre. Patient informants will be identified by Indigenous status (i.e. Indigenous and non-Indigenous) and the focus groups will be convened separately. The health care provider focus groups will be convened on an organisational basis i.e. state health providers and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services. Yarning will be used as a research method to facilitate discussion. Yarning is in congruence with the oral traditions that are still a reality in day-to-day Indigenous lives. This study is nestled in a larger research program that explores the drivers to the disparity of care and health outcomes for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians who experience an acute cardiac admission. A focus on health status, risk factors and clinical interventions may camouflage critical issues within a patient-clinician exchange. This approach may provide a way forward to reduce the

  12. Study Protocol: establishing good relationships between patients and health care providers while providing cardiac care. Exploring how patient-clinician engagement contributes to health disparities between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians in South Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roe Yvette L

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies that compare Indigenous Australian and non-Indigenous patients who experience a cardiac event or chest pain are inconclusive about the reasons for the differences in-hospital and survival rates. The advances in diagnostic accuracy, medication and specialised workforce has contributed to a lower case fatality and lengthen survival rates however this is not evident in the Indigenous Australian population. A possible driver contributing to this disparity may be the impact of patient-clinician interface during key interactions during the health care process. Methods/Design This study will apply an Indigenous framework to describe the interaction between Indigenous patients and clinicians during the continuum of cardiac health care, i.e. from acute admission, secondary and rehabilitative care. Adopting an Indigenous framework is more aligned with Indigenous realities, knowledge, intellects, histories and experiences. A triple layered designed focus group will be employed to discuss patient-clinician engagement. Focus groups will be arranged by geographic clusters i.e. metropolitan and a regional centre. Patient informants will be identified by Indigenous status (i.e. Indigenous and non-Indigenous and the focus groups will be convened separately. The health care provider focus groups will be convened on an organisational basis i.e. state health providers and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services. Yarning will be used as a research method to facilitate discussion. Yarning is in congruence with the oral traditions that are still a reality in day-to-day Indigenous lives. Discussion This study is nestled in a larger research program that explores the drivers to the disparity of care and health outcomes for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians who experience an acute cardiac admission. A focus on health status, risk factors and clinical interventions may camouflage critical issues within a patient

  13. Impact of educational intervention on knowledge, attitude and awareness of good clinical practice among health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Divya; Walia, Rani; Sharma, Poonam; Kaur, Harmanjeet; Agnihotri, Pallak

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trials play an important role in the generation of evidence-based data in health care practices. To ensure the credibility of data and the safety and well-being of the patients Good clinical practice (GCP) guidelines play an important role. At present, we have little knowledge about awareness of GCP guidelines among health care providers in India. To assess the level of awareness, and perception of the health care providers toward GCP and subsequent change in these after a dayer training session on GCP guidelines. A cross-sectional descriptive questionnaire-based study was conducted amongst health care providers, that is, doctors, dentists, nurses of a Tertiary Health Care and Teaching Institute. Participants were given descriptive questionnaire; they completed the questionnaire before and after undergoing a day training program in GCP guidelines. The impact of the effectiveness of educational intervention among healthcare professionals was evaluated by two-tailed Z-test. Out of 120 participants, 80 were medical doctors, 20 dental doctors, and 20 nurses. A dayse training program on GCP guidelines was found to increase positive attitudes toward various aspects of clinical trials. A day's training program on GCP guidelines may help to increase the knowledge as well as awareness about principles and techniques of clinical research, which will increase the credibility of clinical research in the country.

  14. Health care providers' requests to Teratogen Information Services on medication use during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Marie-Pierre; Martin, Brigitte; Oraichi, Driss; Bérard, Anick

    2009-05-01

    Medication use during pregnancy and lactation is prevalent. However, current knowledge of the risks and benefits of medication use during pregnancy and lactation is incomplete as the best available evidence has been obtained from cohort studies of inadvertent exposures and registries. This situation may partly explain health care providers' (HCP) risk perceptions and thus the increasing number of calls to Teratogen Information Services (TIS). The objectives of this study were (1) to identify the medication classes for which HCP are seeking counseling from the IMAGe center, a Quebec TIS; (2) to identify the medical conditions for which medication classes were used during pregnancy and lactation; (3) to identify and quantify predictors of medication information requests during pregnancy and lactation. A retrospective analysis of data was conducted within the population served by the IMAGe center, a TIS based at CHU Ste-Justine in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, that serves the French population of Canada. To be included, calls had to be received between January 1, 2004 and April 30, 2007, and the subject of the call had to be directly associated with the exposure, or not, of a pregnant or breastfeeding woman to medication. Multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were performed to identify the predictors of medication requests. A total of 11, 076 requests regarding medication exposure during pregnancy, 12 055 requests regarding pregnant women before the exposure took place, and 13, 364 requests regarding lactation were included for analyses. Pregnant women were most frequently exposed to antidepressants (17.3), antibiotics (6.3%), and benzodiazepines (5.3%). Prior to drug exposure, the most frequent inquiries by HCP were on antibiotics (11.0%), anti-inflammatory drugs (6.0%), and antiemetics (5.1%). Inquiries concerning lactating women most frequently requested information on the drug classes of antidepressants (10.8%), antibiotics (9.1%), and

  15. Where do Peer Providers Fit into Newly Integrated Mental Health and Primary Care Teams? A Mixed Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siantz, Elizabeth; Rice, Eric; Henwood, Benjamin; Palinkas, Lawrence

    2017-12-21

    Little is known about the involvement of peer providers in integrated behavioral health teams. This study asks where peer providers fit within integrated care teams in Los Angeles County. Social network analysis combined with qualitative fieldwork was used to understand the network positions of peer providers in 14 integrated pilot programs. Four programs' peer providers were highly central, while 3 programs' were on the network's periphery. Positional variation appeared to be related to the peers' mental health status. Targeted efforts are needed to support the implementation of peer providers on integrated teams at the program and system levels.

  16. A pilot training programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to lesbian, gay and bisexual patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reygan, Finn C G

    2012-05-09

    OBJECTIVE: The international literature points to the specific cancer risks and palliative care needs of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, with the exception of a programme in the USA, there is a lack of training internationally for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. In Ireland, a training project funded by the Irish Cancer Society, the Irish Hospice Foundation and the Health Service Executive developed a training pilot programme for health and social care professionals providing oncological and palliative care to LGB patients. METHODS: Over 200 (N = 201) oncology and palliative care staff participated in 17 brief, 50-min trainings in pilot sites. Evaluation of the training included self-report questionnaires at the end of each training and an evaluation interview with one participant from each of the four sites. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported that they would recommend the training to their colleagues, were interested in further training in the area and found the training useful for their practice. They also reported becoming more familiar with LGB-related language and terminology, became more knowledgeable of LGB health issues and reported becoming more confident in providing care to LGB patients. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations are that the training be made available across the health services in Ireland and included in postgraduate courses for trainee health and social care professionals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Emergency contraception in Mexico City: what do health care providers and potential users know and think about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, A; Harper, C; Garcia-Barrios, C; Schiavon, R; Heimburger, A; Elul, B; Renoso Delgado, S; Ellertson, C

    1999-10-01

    Emergency contraception promises to reduce Mexico's high unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion rates. Because oral contraceptives are sold over-the-counter, several emergency contraceptive regimens are already potentially available to those women who know about the method. Soon, specially packaged emergency contraceptives may also arrive in Mexico. To initiate campaigns promoting emergency contraception, we interviewed health care providers and clients at health clinics in Mexico City, ascertaining knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning the method. We found limited knowledge, but nevertheless cautious support for emergency contraception in Mexico. Health care providers and clients greatly overestimated the negative health effects of emergency contraception, although clients overwhelmingly reported that they would use or recommend it if needed. Although providers typically advocated medically controlled distribution, clients believed emergency contraception should be more widely available, including in schools and vending machines with information prevalent in the mass media and elsewhere.

  18. Building Trust and Relationships Between Patients and Providers: An Essential Complement to Health Literacy in HIV Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Rose, Carol; Cuca, Yvette P; Webel, Allison R; Solís Báez, Solymar S; Holzemer, William L; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Reid, Paula; Johnson, Mallory O; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reyes, Darcel; Nokes, Kathleen; Nicholas, Patrice K; Matshediso, Ellah; Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Sabone, Motshedisi B; Ntsayagae, Esther I; Shaibu, Sheila; Corless, Inge B; Wantland, Dean; Lindgren, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is important for access to and quality of HIV care. While most models of health literacy acknowledge the importance of the patient-provider relationship to disease management, a more nuanced understanding of this relationship is needed. Thematic analysis from 28 focus groups with HIV-experienced patients (n = 135) and providers (n = 71) identified a long-term and trusting relationship as an essential part of HIV treatment over the continuum of HIV care. We found that trust and relationship building over time were important for patients with HIV as well as for their providers. An expanded definition of health literacy that includes gaining a patient's trust and engaging in a process of health education and information sharing over time could improve HIV care. Expanding clinical perspectives to include trust and the importance of the patient-provider relationship to a shared understanding of health literacy may improve patient experiences and engagement in care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. How do general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems? A qualitative study from Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen Natasja Koitzsch; Norredam Marie; Priebe Stefan; Krasnik Allan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Refugees are a particularly vulnerable group in relation to the development of mental illness and many may have been subjected to torture or other traumatic experiences. General practitioners are gatekeepers for access to several parts of the psychiatric system and knowledge of their patients’ refugee background is crucial to secure adequate care. The aim of this study is to investigate how general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health prob...

  20. Validation of an HIV-related stigma scale among health care providers in a resource-poor Ethiopian setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyissa GT

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Garumma Tolu Feyissa1, Lakew Abebe1, Eshetu Girma1, Mirkuzie Woldie21Department of Health Education and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Health Services Management, Jimma University, Jimma, EthiopiaBackground: Stigma and discrimination (SAD against people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are barriers affecting effective responses to HIV. Understanding the causes and extent of SAD requires the use of a psychometrically reliable and valid scale. The objective of this study was to validate an HIV-related stigma scale among health care providers in a resource-poor setting.Methods: A cross-sectional validation study was conducted in 18 health care institutions in southwest Ethiopia, from March 14, 2011 to April 14, 2011. A total of 255 health care providers responded to questionnaires asking about sociodemographic characteristics, HIV knowledge, perceived institutional support (PIS and HIV-related SAD. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA with principal component extraction and varimax with Kaiser normalization rotation were employed to develop scales for SAD. Eigenvalues greater than 1 were used as a criterion of extraction. Items with item-factor loadings less than 0.4 and items loading onto more than one factor were dropped. The convergent validity of the scales was tested by assessing the association with HIV knowledge, PIS, training on topics related to SAD, educational status, HIV case load, presence of an antiretroviral therapy (ART service in the health care facility, and perceived religiosity.Results: Seven factors emerged from the four dimensions of SAD during the EFA. The factor loadings of the items ranged from 0.58 to 0.93. Cronbach's alphas of the scales ranged from 0.80 to 0.95. An in-depth knowledge of HIV, perceptions of institutional support, attendance of training on topics related to SAD, degree or higher education levels, high HIV case loads, the availability of ART in the health care facility and claiming oneself as

  1. Insure Kids Now (IKN) (Dental Care Providers)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Insure Kids Now (IKN) Dental Care Providers in Your State locator provides profile information for oral health providers participating in Medicaid and Children's...

  2. Adverse Effects of Tattoos and Piercing on Parent/Patient Confidence in Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scarlett C; Doi, Maegan L M; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2016-09-01

    First impressions based on practitioner appearance often form the basis for preliminary assumptions regarding trust, confidence, and competence, especially in situations where patients or family members do not have an established relationship with the physician. Given their growing prevalence, we strove to further investigate whether visible tattoos or piercings on a medical provider affects a patient's perception of the provider's capabilities and their trust in the care that would be provided. A survey using photographs of simulated practitioners was administered to 314 participants split between rural and urban locations. Study volunteers rated tattooed practitioners with lower confidence ratings when compared with nontattooed practitioners and reported greater degrees of discomfort with greater degrees of facial piercing. We concluded that these factors adversely affect the clinical confidence ratings of practitioners, regardless of the gender, age group, or location of participants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Burnout: Interpreting the perception of Iranian primary rural health care providers from working and organizational conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Keshvari

    2012-01-01

    Results: During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; "instability and frequent changes", "involved in laws and regulations", "pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower", "helplessness in performing the tasks and duties", "sense of identity threat and low self-concept", and "deprivation of professional development". The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called "burnout". Conclusions: Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community.

  4. Non-dental primary care providers? views on challenges in providing oral health services and strategies to improve oral health in Australian rural and remote communities: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Len

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the challenges of providing oral health advice/treatment as experienced by non-dental primary care providers in rural and remote areas with no resident dentist, and their views on ways in which oral health and oral health services could be improved for their communities. Design Qualitative study with semistructured interviews and thematic analysis. Setting Four remote communities in outback Queensland, Australia. Participants 35 primary care providers who had experie...

  5. Attitudes and Perceptions of Patients, Caregivers, and Health Care Providers toward Background Music in Patient Care Areas: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, Pedro; Nguyen, Linh; Rhondali, Wadih; Hui, David; Palmer, J. Lynn; Sevy, Ingrid; Richardson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Background music can be used to distract from ordinary sounds and improve wellbeing in patient care areas. Little is known about individuals' attitudes and beliefs about music versus ordinary sound in this setting. Objectives To assess the preferences of patients, caregivers and healthcare providers regarding background music or ordinary sound in outpatient and inpatient care areas, and to explore their attitudes and perceptions towards music in general. Methods All participants were exposed to background music in outpatient or inpatient clinical settings. 99 consecutive patients, 101 caregivers and 65 out of 70 eligible healthcare providers (93%) completed a survey about music attitudes and preferences. The primary outcome was a preference for background music over ordinary sound in patient care areas. Results Preference for background music was high and similar across groups (70 patients (71%), 71 caregivers (71%) and 46 providers (71%), p=0.58). The three groups had very low disapproval for background music in patient care areas (10%, 9% and 12%, respectively; p=0.91). Black ethnicity independently predicted lower preference for background music (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.98). Patients, caregivers and providers reported recent use of music for themselves for the purpose of enjoyment (69%, 80% and 86% respectively p=0.02). Age, gender, religion and education level significantly predicted preferences for specific music styles. Conclusion Background music in patient care areas was preferred to ordinary sound by patients, caregivers and providers. Demographics of the population are strong determinants of music style preferences. PMID:22957677

  6. How do general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems? A qualitative study from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Norredam, Marie; Priebe, Stefan; Krasnik, Allan

    2013-01-28

    Refugees are a particularly vulnerable group in relation to the development of mental illness and many may have been subjected to torture or other traumatic experiences. General practitioners are gatekeepers for access to several parts of the psychiatric system and knowledge of their patients' refugee background is crucial to secure adequate care. The aim of this study is to investigate how general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems. The study was conducted as part of an EU project on European Best Practices in Access, Quality and Appropriateness of Health Services for Immigrants in Europe (EUGATE). Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nine general practitioners in the vicinity of Copenhagen purposively selected from areas with a high proportion of immigrants. The analysis of the interviews is inspired by qualitative content analysis. One of the main themes identified in the analysis is communication. This includes the use of professional interpreters and that communication entails more than sharing a common language. Quality of care is another theme that emerges and includes awareness of possible trauma history, limited possibilities for refugees to participate in certain treatments due to language barriers and feelings of hopelessness in the general practitioners. The general practitioners may also choose different referral pathways for refugees and they report that their patients lack understanding regarding the differences between psychological problems and physical symptoms. General practitioners experience that providing care to refugees differs from providing care for patients from the majority population. The different strategies employed by the general practitioners in the health care treatment of refugees may be the result of the great diversity in the organisation of general practice in Denmark and the lack of a national strategy in the health care management of refugees. The findings from this

  7. Surgical education at Weill Bugando Medical Centre: supplementing surgical training and investing in local health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Katrina B; Giiti, Geofrey; Kotecha, Vihar; Chandika, Alphonce; Pryor, Kane O; Härtl, Roger; Gilyoma, Japhet

    2013-06-01

    Global surgery initiatives increasingly are focused on strengthening education and local health care systems to build surgical capacity. The goal of this education project was to support local health care providers in augmenting the surgical curriculum at a new medical school, thus promoting long-term local goals and involvement. Working with local surgeons, residents, and medical and assistant medical officer students, we identified the most common surgical conditions presenting to Weill Bugando Medical Centre in Mwanza, Tanzania, and the areas of greatest need in surgical education. We developed an 8-week teaching schedule for undergraduate students and an electronic database of clinical surgery topics. In addition, we started teaching basic surgical skills in the operating theatre, bridging to an official and recurring workshop through a supporting international surgery organization. The medical and assistant medical officer students reported increased satisfaction with their clinical surgery rotations and mastery of key educational subjects. The initiation of an Essential Surgical Skills workshop through the Canadian Network for International Surgery showed students had improved comfort with basic surgical techniques. Short-term surgical missions may appear to fill a void in the shortage of health care in the developing world. However, we conclude that global health resources are more appropriately used through projects giving ownership to local providers and promoting education as a foundation of development. This results in better coordination among local and visiting providers and greater impact on education and long-term growth of health care capacity.

  8. Enhancing the Collection, Discussion and Use of Family Health History by Consumers, Nurses and Other Health Care Providers: Because Family Health History Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Sandra Millon; Kelber, Sheryl

    2015-09-01

    The family health history (FHH) has long been used by nurses and other health care providers in clinical practice to determine if an individual, their family members, or their future generations are at an increased risk of heritable disease development. Information gleaned from the FHH can be used to better integrate preventive strategies into the plan of care. This report presents a summary of an exploratory pilot study that focused on the collection and use of FHH among a targeted group of Midwestern men and women. Findings suggest a need for efforts to further enhance the public's awareness of the importance of FHH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Qualitative study of language barriers between South African health care providers and cross-border migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Adams, Jo; Rother, Hanna-Andrea

    2017-01-31

    Communication with health care providers represents an essential part of access to health care for the over 230 million cross-border migrants around the world. In this article, we explore the complexity of health communication from the perspective of cross-border migrants seeking antenatal care in Cape Town, South Africa in order to highlight the importance of high quality medical interpretation. As part of a broader study of migrant maternal and infant nutrition, we conducted a secondary data analysis of semi-structured in-depth interviews (N = 23) with Congolese (n = 7), Somali (n = 8) and Zimbabwean (n = 8) women living in Cape Town, as well as nine focus group discussions (including men: n = 3 and women: n = 6) were conducted with migrant Somalis, Congolese, and Zimbabweans (N = 48). We first used content analysis to gather all data related to language and communication. We then analysed this data thematically. Zimbabwean participants described how the inability to speak the local South African language (IsiXhosa) gave rise to labelling and stereotyping by healthcare staff. Congolese and Somali participants described medical procedures, including tubal ligation, which were performed without consent. Partners often tried to play the role of interpreter, which resulted in loss of income and non-professional medical interpretation. Participants' highlighted fears over unwanted procedures or being unable to access care. Challenges of communication without a common language (and without professional medical interpretation), rather than outright denial of care by healthcare professionals, mediated these encounters. Although there are several factors impeding cross-border migrants' access to health care, effective communication is a prerequisite for quality care. Free-to-patient professional medical interpretation would not only benefit migrant populations but would benefit the broader community where language and health literacy are

  10. "I Didn't Even Know You Cared About That Stuff": Youths' Perceptions of Health Care Provider Roles in Addressing Bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, Judith A; DiFazio, Rachel L; Strout, Tania D

    Youth bullying is a critical public health problem, with those exposed to bullying at risk for development of serious sequelae lasting into adulthood. The purpose of this study was to explore youths' perceptions regarding the role that advanced practice nurses and physicians play in addressing bullying. A qualitative descriptive approach was used; focus groups were used to generate study data. Twenty-four adolescents participated in focus groups centered on exploring health care providers' roles in addressing bullying. Three themes emerged through qualitative analysis: (a) Not sure that's part of their job, (b) That's way too personal, and (c) They couldn't help anyway. Participants described a very limited role for health care providers in addressing bullying. Youths recognized a narrow role for health care providers in addressing bullying, characterizing bullying as a school- or-community-related issue rather than one influencing health. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Perceived Preparedness of Health Care Students for Providing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Zolezzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Early assessment and management of risk factors is known to have significant impact in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD and its associated burden. Cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management (CVDRAM is best approached by teamwork across health care professionals. This study aimed at assessing health care students’ (HCSs knowledge about the parameters needed for estimating CVD risk, their self-assessed preparedness/confidence and perceived barriers for the provision of CVDRAM services through a survey administered to third and fourth year pharmacy, medical, and nursing students in Qatar. Although all student cohorst achieved similar knowledge scores, less than half (n = 38, 47% were able to identify all of the six main risk factors necessary to estimate absolute CVD risk, and a third (32% were unable to identify total cholesterol as an independent risk factor necessary to estimate CVD risk. Training on the use of CVD risk assessment tools differed among the three student cohorts. All student cohorts also perceived similar levels of preparedness in CVDRAM. However, pharmacy students reported the highest preparedness/confidence with the use of the latest CVDRAM guidelines. The majority of statements listed under the barriers scale were perceived by the students as being moderate (median score = 3. Poor public acceptance or unawareness of importance of estimating CVD risk was the only barrier perceived as major by nursing students. Future integration of interprofessional educational (IPE activities in the CVDRAM curricula of HCSs may be a suitable strategy to minimize barriers and foster collaborative practice for the provision of CVDRAM services in Qatar.

  12. 75 FR 69449 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... Staff on Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication of Important Safety Information... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry and FDA staff entitled... include in a DHCP letter, how to organize that information, and formatting techniques to make the...

  13. Perspectives on Obesity and Its Treatment: Health Care Providers and the General Public in Rural West Virginia and Urban Baltimore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menez, Steven; Cheskin, Lawrence; Geller, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the perspectives of the general public and health care providers (HCPs) on obesity and its treatment in rural West Virginia (WV) and Baltimore, MD. Method: Surveys were completed in both locations by the general public (WV: "n" = 200; Baltimore: "n" = 171) and HCPs (WV: "n" = 25;…

  14. Defining a Fall and Reasons for Falling: Comparisons among the Views of Seniors, Health Care Providers, and the Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Aleksandra A.; Salmoni, Alan W.; Speechley, Mark; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was (a) to obtain information about the perceptions held by seniors and health care providers concerning what constitutes a fall and potential reasons for falling, and (b) to compare these perceptions to the research literature. Design and Methods: As part of a larger telephone survey, interviewers asked 477…

  15. Nondisclosure of Smoking Status to Health Care Providers among Current and Former Smokers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Laurel Erin; Richardson, Amanda; Xiao, Haijun; Niaura, Raymond S.

    2013-01-01

    An unintended consequence of tobacco control's success in marginalizing smoking is that smokers may conceal their smoking from those who are best positioned to help them quit: health care providers (HCPs). The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of, and factors related to, nondisclosure of smoking to HCPs. Data were obtained from…

  16. 25 CFR 900.195 - Does FTCA coverage extend to the contractor's health care practitioners providing services to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does FTCA coverage extend to the contractor's health care practitioners providing services to private patients on a fee-for-services basis when such personnel (not the self-determination contractor) receive the fee? 900.195 Section 900.195 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND...

  17. 78 FR 68364 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers; Delay of Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ...The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) published in the Federal Register on May 6, 2013 (78 FR 26250) a final rule to change the billing methodology for non-VA providers of home health services and hospice care. The preamble of that final rule stated the effective date was November 15, 2013. This document delays that effective date to April 1, 2014.

  18. The views and attitudes of health professionals providing antenatal care to women with a high BMI: a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Agarwal, Catherine Ruth; Kaur, Manmeet; Williams, Lauren T; Davey, Rachel; Davis, Deborah

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing amongst women of child bearing age. The objective of this study was to investigate the views and attitudes of providers of antenatal care for women who have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m(2) and over. A qualitative study using focus groups was undertaken within the department of obstetrics and gynaecology at a large teaching hospital in south-eastern Australia. Three focus group discussions were held. One with hospital midwives (n=10), one with continuity of care midwives (n=18) and one with obstetricians (n=5). Data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Six dominant themes emerged: (1) obesity puts the health of mothers, babies and health professionals at risk; (2) overweight and obesity has become the norm; (3) weighing women and advising about weight gain is out of fashion; (4) weight is a sensitive topic to discuss; (5) there are significant barriers to weight control in pregnancy; and (6) health professionals and women need to deal with maternal obesity. These themes are drawn together to form a model representing current health care issues for these women. Health professionals, who have a high BMI, can find it difficult to discuss obesity during antenatal visits with obese women. Specialist dietary interventions and evidence based guidelines for working with child-bearing women is seen as a public health priority by health care professionals. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Influence of Family History of Diabetes on Health Care Provider Practice and Patient Behavior Among Nondiabetic Oregonians

    OpenAIRE

    Zlot, Amy I.; Bland, Mary Pat; Silvey, Kerry; Epstein, Beth; Leman, Richard F.; Mielke, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    Introduction People with a family history of diabetes are at increased risk of developing diabetes; however, the effect of family history of diabetes on health care provider practice and patient behavior has not been well defined. Methods We analyzed data from the 2005 Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based, random-digit?dialed telephone survey, to evaluate, among people with diabetes, associations between family history of diabetes and 1) patients' reports of health...

  20. Experiences of sexual harassment and sexual assault in the military among OEF/OIF veterans: implications for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Margret E; Reardon, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Given the frequent occurrence and significant health impact of sexual harassment and sexual assault in the military, it is important that for health care providers working with Veterans to have at least some basic knowledge in this area. Targeting providers addressing mental health and psychosocial issues, but also applicable to clinicians working with survivors in a variety of capacities, this article provides an overview of clinical care with survivors of sexual trauma in the military, particularly those who are OEF/OIF Veterans. We cover basic background information, focusing primarily on the impact of sexual trauma in the military, how survivor's reactions are shaped by various aspects of the military context, and general principles to assist clinicians in working effectively with survivors, whatever their role.

  1. VISION: a regional performance improvement initiative for HIV health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Theodore O; Hicks, Charles B; Naggie, Susanna; Wohl, David A; Albrecht, Helmut; Thielman, Nathan M; Rabin, Daniel U; Layton, Sherry; Subramaniam, Chitra; Grichnik, Katherine P; Shlien, Amanda; Weyer, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    VISION (HIV Integrated Learning ModuleS: Achieving Performance Improvement through CollaboratiON) was a regional performance improvement (PI) continuing medical education (CME) initiative designed to increase guideline-conforming practice of clinicians who manage patients with HIV infection. The 3-part activity consisted of (1) clinical practice assessment and development of an action plan for practice change, (2) completion of relevant education, and (3) reassessment. The activity did not change practitioners' performance in clinical status monitoring and in patient treatment, in large part because guidelines were being appropriately implemented at baseline as well as after the educational intervention. There was a trend toward improvement, however, in practitioner performance in the area of patient medication adherence (increased from 66% to 74%). Results observed in the VISION initiative were consistent with HIVQUAL metrics. Ongoing education in HIV is important, and VISION demonstrated performance improvement in medication adherence, a critical aspect of health care. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  2. Practice and Perceived Importance of Advance Care Planning and Difficulties in Providing Palliative Care in Geriatric Health Service Facilities in Japan: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoya, Shoji; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Maeno, Takami

    2018-03-01

    The provision of end-of-life (EOL) care by geriatric health service facilities (GHSFs) in Japan is increasing. Advance care planning (ACP) is one of the most important issues to provide quality EOL care. This study aimed to clarify the practice and perceived importance of ACP and the difficulties in providing palliative care in GHSFs. A self-report questionnaire was mailed to head nurses at 3437 GHSFs nationwide. We asked participants about their practices regarding ACP, their recognition of its importance, and their difficulties in providing palliative care. We also analyzed the relationship between these factors and EOL care education. Among 844 respondents (24.5% response rate), approximately 69% to 81% of head nurses confirmed that GHSF residents and their families understood disease conditions and goals of care. There was a large discrepancy between the actual practice of ACP components and the recognition of their importance (eg, asking residents about existing advance directive [AD; 27.5% practiced it, while 79.6% considered it important]; recommending completion of an AD [18.1% vs 68.4%], and asking for designation of a health-care proxy [30.4% vs 76.8%]). The EOL care education was provided at 517 facilities (61.3%). Head nurses working at EOL care education-providing GHSFs practiced ACP significantly more frequently and had significantly fewer difficulties in providing palliative care. A large discrepancy was found between GHSF nurses' practice of ACP and their recognition of its importance. Providing EOL care education in GHSFs may increase ACP practices and enhance respect for resident's preferences concerning EOL care.

  3. Barriers and facilitators in providing oral health care to nursing home residents, from the perspective of care aides-a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Hu, Huimin; Xiong, Tianyuan; Kent, Angelle; Kobagi, Nadia; Yoon, Minn N

    2016-04-07

    Unregulated care aides provide up to 80 % of direct resident care in nursing homes. They have little formal training, manage high workloads, frequently experience responsive behaviours from residents, and are at high risk for burnout. This affects quality of resident care, including quality of oral health care. Poor quality of oral health care in nursing homes has severe consequences for residents and the health care system. Improving quality of oral health care requires tailoring interventions to identified barriers and facilitators if these interventions are to be effective. Identifying barriers and facilitators from the care aide's perspective is crucial. We will systematically search the databases MEDLINE, Embase, Evidence Based Reviews-Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, and Web of Science. We will include qualitative and quantitative research studies and systematic reviews published in English that assess barriers and facilitators, as perceived by care aides, to providing oral health care to nursing home residents. Two reviewers will independently screen studies for eligibility. We will also search by hand the contents of key journals, publications of key authors, and reference lists of all the studies included. Two reviewers will independently assess the methodological quality of the studies included using four validated checklists appropriate for different research designs. Discrepancies at any stage of review will be resolved by consensus. We will conduct a thematic analysis of barriers and facilitators using all studies included. If quantitative studies are sufficiently homogeneous, we will conduct random-effects meta-analyses of the associations of barriers and facilitators with each other, with care aide practices in resident oral health care, and with residents' oral health. If quantitative study results cannot be pooled, we will present a narrative synthesis of the results. Finally, we will compare quantitative findings to

  4. Positive psychological impact of treating victims of politically motivated violence among hospital-based health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Shimon; Wexler, Isaiah D; Alkalay, Yasmin; Meiner, Zeev; Kreitler, Shulamith

    2008-01-01

    Health care personnel treating victims of politically motivated violence are at risk for traumatic stress symptoms. Few studies have assessed the positive psychological impact of politically motivated violence on health care workers. In this study, the level of positive psychological impact among health care workers with recurrent exposure to victims of politically motivated violence was examined. A validated questionnaire survey of health care personnel treating victims of politically motivated violence during 2000-2005 in two hospital settings was conducted. Positive psychological impact was assessed by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and traumatic stress symptoms were assessed using the Revised Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Inventory. Subjects included physicians (surgeons and anesthesiologists), nurses, and psychotherapists. The rate of response to the mail-in questionnaires was 68.3% (n = 138). The sample consisted of 70 physicians, 37 nurses, and 31 hospital-based psychotherapists. Positive psychological impact was noted for the entire sample and among all professions. Traumatic stress symptoms predicted positive psychological impact for the entire sample and for each profession, and there was a curvilinear relationship between traumatic stress symptoms and positive psychological impact. Women experienced greater levels of positive psychological impact. Hospital-based health care providers treating victims of politically motivated violence experience both positive and negative psychological impact. Individuals who are more traumatized by their experience are more likely to also have a positive psychological impact. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Parents' experiences of family functioning, health and social support provided by nurses--a pilot study in paediatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakio, Nora; Rantanen, Anja; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe parents' experiences of family functioning, health and social support provided by nursing personnel, while their child was in intensive care, and to determine how social support was associated with family functioning and family health. Cross-sectional study. The data were collected by a self-administered questionnaire from 31 parents of critically ill children from 2010 to 2011. The data were analysed statistically. The parents considered their family functioning, health and social support provided by the nursing personnel to be good. The sub-area of family functioning that rated the lowest was strengths of family, whereas the lowest rated sub-area of family health was ill-being. Child's previous hospital treatments were associated with family health. Parents, whose child had already been in hospital care, reported more well-being and less ill-being than parents with children hospitalised for the first time. Parents' education was associated with family functioning, family health and social support given by the nurses. Weak positive correlation was also found between social support given by nurses and family health experienced by parents. There is a need to discuss how nursing care can further support parental resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Barriers to Office-Based Mental Health Care and Interest in E-Communication With Providers: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Minnie; Vigod, Simone N; Hensel, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    With rising availability and use of Internet and mobile technology in society, the demand and need for its integration into health care is growing. Despite great potential within mental health care and growing uptake, there is still little evidence to guide how these tools should be integrated into traditional care, and for whom. To examine factors that might inform how e-communication should be implemented in our local outpatient mental health program, including barriers to traditional office-based care, patient preferences, and patient concerns. We conducted a survey in the waiting room of our outpatient mental health program located in an urban, academic ambulatory hospital. The survey assessed (1) age, mobile phone ownership, and general e-communication usage, (2) barriers to attending office-based appointments, (3) preferences for, and interest in, e-communication for mental health care, and (4) concerns about e-communication use for mental health care. We analyzed the data descriptively and examined associations between the presence of barriers, identifying as a social media user, and interest level in e-communication. Respondents (N=68) were predominantly in the age range of 25-54 years. The rate of mobile phone ownership was 91% (62/68), and 59% (40/68) of respondents identified as social media users. There was very low existing use of e-communication between providers and patients, with high levels of interest endorsed by survey respondents. Respondents expressed an interest in using e-communication with their provider to share updates and get feedback, coordinate care, and get general information. In regression analysis, both a barrier to care and identifying as a social media user were significantly associated with e-communication interest (P=.03 and P=.003, respectively). E-communication interest was highest among people who both had a barrier to office-based care and were a social media user. Despite high interest, there were also many concerns

  7. Primary health care providers' advice for a dental checkup and dental use in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, Heather A; Rozier, R Gary

    2010-08-01

    In this study we estimated factors associated with children being advised to see the dentist by a doctor or other health provider; tested for an association between the advisement on the likelihood that the child would visit the dentist; and estimated the effect of the advisement on dental costs. We identified a sample of 5268 children aged 2 to 11 years in the 2004 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey. A cross-sectional analysis with logistic regression models was conducted to estimate the likelihood of the child receiving a recommendation for a dental checkup, and to determine its effect on the likelihood of having a dental visit. Differences in cost for children who received a recommendation were assessed by using a linear regression model. All analyses were conducted separately on children aged 2 to 5 (n = 2031) and aged 6 to 11 (n = 3237) years. Forty-seven percent of 2- to 5-year-olds and 37% of 6- to 11-year-olds had been advised to see the dentist. Children aged 2 to 5 who received a recommendation were more likely to have a dental visit (odds ratio: 2.89 [95% confidence interval: 2.16-3.87]), but no difference was observed among older children. Advice had no effect on dental costs in either age group. Health providers' recommendation that pediatric patients visit the dentist was associated with an increase in dental visits among young children. Providers have the potential to play an important role in establishing a dental home for children at an early age. Future research should examine potential interventions to increase effective dental referrals by health providers.

  8. Creating a “Wellness Pathway” between health care providers and community-based organizations to improve the health of older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Han, MD, MSHPM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To effectively manage the health of older high-risk patients, health care organizations need to adopt strategies that go beyond the doctor's office and into patients' homes and communities. Community-based organizations (CBOs are important underutilized partners in activating and providing the resources necessary to deliver coordinated, culturally-tailored services to older individuals. This paper describes the process and preliminary results of creating and implementing a “Wellness Pathway” to improve the health of older individuals by coordinating care between health care providers and CBOs, such as senior centers. The Wellness Pathway provides a mechanism whereby health care providers refer patients to programs at the senior center, and senior center staff members refer patients for urgent or primary care services at the health care provider organization. The aim of the project was to determine whether the creation of the Wellness Pathway through the health care provider and CBO education and engagement is feasible and to identify challenges in scalability. During the 6 month study period, 25 patients were referred through the Wellness Pathway, and six patients acted on the referral. Stakeholders at both organizations were interviewed to obtain detailed information regarding their experiences with, and perceptions of, the Wellness Pathway. Patients and providers who participated in the pilot believe that it has the potential to positively impact the health of older patients and is worth continuing. The primary challenges that arose in the implementation of the Wellness Pathway resulted from inadequate levels of health care provider and staff engagement and from lagging patient recruitment.

  9. Meeting psychosocial needs for persons with dementia in home care services - a qualitative study of different perceptions and practices among health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anette; Hauge, Solveig; Bergland, Ådel

    2017-09-11

    The majority of persons with dementia are home-dwelling. To enable these persons to stay in their own homes as long as possible, a holistic, individual and flexible care is recommended. Despite a requirement for meeting psychological, social and physical needs, home care services seem to focus on patients' physical needs. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to explore how the psychosocial needs of home-dwelling, older persons with dementia were perceived, emphasized and met by home care services. A descriptive, qualitative approach was used. Data were collected through semi-structured focus group interviews with 24 health care providers in home care services from four municipalities. Data were analysed using systematic text condensation. This study showed major differences in how health care providers perceived the psychosocial needs of older home-dwelling persons with dementia and how they perceived their responsibilities for meeting those psychosocial needs. The differences in the health care providers' perceptions seemed to significantly influence the provided care. Three co-existing logics of care were identified: the physical need-oriented logic, the renouncement logic and the integrated logic. The differences in how health care providers perceived the psychosocial needs of persons with dementia and their responsibilities for meeting those needs, influenced how the psychosocial needs were met. These differences indicates a need for a clarification of how psychosocial needs should be conceptualized and who should be responsible for meeting these needs. Further, increased competence and increased consciousness of psychosocial needs and how those needs can be met, are essential for delivering high-quality holistic care that enables persons with dementia to live in their own home for as long as possible.

  10. Updated CDC recommendations for the management of hepatitis B virus-infected health-care providers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    This report updates the 1991 CDC recommendations for the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected health-care providers and students to reduce risk for transmitting HBV to patients during the conduct of exposure-prone invasive procedures (CDC. Recommendations for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus to patients during exposure-prone invasive procedures. MMWR 1991;40[No. RR-8]). This update reflects changes in the epidemiology of HBV infection in the United States and advances in the medical management of chronic HBV infection and policy directives issued by health authorities since 1991. The primary goal of this report is to promote patient safety while providing risk management and practice guidance to HBV-infected health-care providers and students, particularly those performing exposure-prone procedures such as certain types of surgery. Because percutaneous injuries sustained by health-care personnel during certain surgical, obstetrical, and dental procedures provide a potential route of HBV transmission to patients as well as providers, this report emphasizes prevention of operator injuries and blood exposures during exposure-prone surgical, obstetrical, and dental procedures. These updated recommendations reaffirm the 1991 CDC recommendation that HBV infection alone should not disqualify infected persons from the practice or study of surgery, dentistry, medicine, or allied health fields. The previous recommendations have been updated to include the following changes: no prenotification of patients of a health-care provider's or student's HBV status; use of HBV DNA serum levels rather than hepatitis B e-antigen status to monitor infectivity; and, for those health-care professionals requiring oversight, specific suggestions for composition of expert review panels and threshold value of serum HBV DNA considered "safe" for practice (<1,000 IU/ml). These recommendations also explicitly address the issue of medical and

  11. Characteristics of electronic patient-provider messaging system utilisation in an urban health care organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Patrick Mikles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Research suggests that electronic messaging can improve patient engagement. Studies indicate that a ‘digital divide’ may exist, where certain patient populations may be using electronic messaging less frequently. This study aims to determine which patient characteristics are associated with different levels of usage of an electronic patient-provider messaging system in a diverse urban population.Methods Cross-sectional electronic health record data were extracted for patients 10 years of age or older who live in New York City and who visited a set of clinics between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012. Regression analyses determined which participant characteristics were associated with the sending of electronic messages.Results Older, female, English-speaking participants of white race who received more messages, had any diagnoses, more office visits and a provider who sent messages were more likely to send more messages. Non-Millennial, non-white participants who received fewer messages, had more office visits, any diagnoses, a provider who saw fewer patients with patient portal accounts, lived in a low socioeconomic status neighbourhood, and did not have private insurance were more likely to send zero messages.Conclusion This study found significant differences in electronic messaging usage based on demographic, socioeconomic and health-related patient characteristics. Future studies are needed to support these results and determine the causes of observed associations.

  12. Consumer Health Informatics: The Application of ICT in Improving Patient-Provider Partnership for a Better Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaidoo, Benjamin; Larweh, Benjamin Teye

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest concerning the potential of ICT solutions that are customized to consumers. This emerging discipline referred to as consumer health informatics (CHI) plays a major role in providing information to patients and the public, and facilitates the promotion of self-management. The concept of CHI has emerged out of the desire of most patients to shoulder responsibilities regarding their health and a growing desire of health practitioners to fully appreciate the potential of the patient. To describe the role of ICT in improving the patient-provider partnership in consumer health informatics. Systematic reviewing of literature, identification of reference sources and formulation of search strategies and manual search regarding the significance of developed CHI applications in healthcare delivery. New consumer health IT applications have been developed to be used on a variety of different platforms, including the Web, messaging systems, PDAs, and cell phones. These applications assists patients with self-management through reminders and prompts, delivery of real-time data on a patient's health condition to patients and providers, web-based communication and personal electronic health information. New tools are being developed for the purposes of providing information to patients and the public which has enhanced decision making in health matters and an avenue for clinicians and consumers to exchange health information for personal and public use. This calls for corroboration among healthcare organizations, governments and the ICT industry to develop new research and IT innovations which are tailored to the health needs of the consumer.

  13. Non-dental primary care providers' views on challenges in providing oral health services and strategies to improve oral health in Australian rural and remote communities: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Len

    2015-10-29

    To investigate the challenges of providing oral health advice/treatment as experienced by non-dental primary care providers in rural and remote areas with no resident dentist, and their views on ways in which oral health and oral health services could be improved for their communities. Qualitative study with semistructured interviews and thematic analysis. Four remote communities in outback Queensland, Australia. 35 primary care providers who had experience in providing oral health advice to patients and four dental care providers who had provided oral health services to patients from the four communities. In the absence of a resident dentist, rural and remote residents did present to non-dental primary care providers with oral health problems such as toothache, abscess, oral/gum infection and sore mouth for treatment and advice. Themes emerged from the interview data around communication challenges and strategies to improve oral health. Although, non-dental care providers commonly advised patients to see a dentist, they rarely communicated with the dentist in the nearest regional town. Participants proposed that oral health could be improved by: enabling access to dental practitioners, educating communities on preventive oral healthcare, and building the skills and knowledge base of non-dental primary care providers in the field of oral health. Prevention is a cornerstone to better oral health in rural and remote communities as well as in more urbanised communities. Strategies to improve the provision of dental services by either visiting or resident dental practitioners should include scope to provide community-based oral health promotion activities, and to engage more closely with other primary care service providers in these small communities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Teaching Evidence Assimilation for Collaborative Health Care (TEACH) 2009-2014: Building Evidence-Based Capacity within Health Care Provider Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyer, Peter C; Umscheid, Craig A; Wright, Stewart; Silva, Suzana A; Lang, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    Clinical guidelines, prediction tools, and computerized decision support (CDS) are underutilized outside of research contexts, and conventional teaching of evidence-based practice (EBP) skills fails to change practitioner behavior. Overcoming these challenges requires traversing practice, policy, and implementation domains. In this article, we describe a program's conceptual design, the results of institutional participation, and the program's evolution. Next steps include integration of instruction in principles of CDS. Teaching Evidence Assimilation for Collaborative Health Care (TEACH) is a multidisciplinary annual conference series involving on- and off-site trainings and facilitation within health care provider organizations (HPOs). Separate conference tracks address clinical policy and guideline development, implementation science, and foundational EBP skills. The implementation track uses a model encompassing problem delineation, identifying knowing-doing gaps, synthesizing evidence to address those gaps, adapting guidelines for local use, assessing implementation barriers, measuring outcomes, and sustaining evidence use. Training in CDS principles is an anticipated component within this track. Within participating organizations, the program engages senior administration, middle management, and frontline care providers. On-site care improvement projects serve as vehicles for developing ongoing, sustainable capabilities. TEACH facilitators conduct on-site workshops to enhance project development, integration of stakeholder engagement and decision support. Both on- and off-site components emphasize narrative skills and shared decision-making. Since 2009, 430 participants attended TEACH conferences. Delegations from five centers attended an initial series of three conferences. Improvement projects centered on stroke care, hospital readmissions, and infection control. Successful implementation efforts were characterized by strong support of senior administration

  15. eHealth, Participatory Medicine, and Ethical Care: A Focus Group Study of Patients' and Health Care Providers' Use of Health-Related Internet Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Anne; Leese, Jenny; Adam, Paul; McDonald, Michael; Li, Linda C; Kerr, Sheila; Backman, Catherine L

    2015-06-22

    The rapid explosion in online digital health resources is seen as transformational, accelerating the shift from traditionally passive patients to patients as partners and altering the patient-health care professional (HCP) relationship. Patients with chronic conditions are increasingly engaged, enabled, and empowered to be partners in their care and encouraged to take responsibility for managing their conditions with HCP support. In this paper, we focus on patients' and HCPs' use of health-related Internet information and how it influences the patient-HCP relationship. In particular, we examine the challenges emerging in medical encounters as roles and relationships shift and apply a conceptual framework of relational ethics to examine explicit and nuanced ethical dimensions emerging in patient-HCP interactions as both parties make increased use of health-related Internet information. We purposively sampled patients and HCPs in British Columbia, Canada, to participate in focus groups. To be eligible, patients self-reported a diagnosis of arthritis and at least one other chronic health condition; HCPs reported a caseload with >25% of patients with arthritis and multimorbidity. We used a semistructured, but flexible, discussion guide. All discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Elements of grounded theory guided our constant comparison thematic analytic approach. Analysis was iterative. A relational ethics conceptual lens was applied to the data. We recruited 32 participants (18 patients, 14 HCPs). They attended seven focus groups: four with patients and three with rehabilitation professionals and physicians. Predominant themes to emerge were how use of health-related Internet information fostered (1) changing roles, (2) patient-HCP partnerships, and (3) tensions and burdens for patients and HCPs. Relational aspects such as mutual trust, uncertainty, and vulnerability are illuminated in patient-HCP interactions around health-related Internet information

  16. Composite Measures of Health Care Provider Performance: A Description of Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwartz, Michael; Restuccia, Joseph D; Rosen, Amy K

    2015-01-01

    Context Since the Institute of Medicine’s 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm, there has been a rapid proliferation of quality measures used in quality-monitoring, provider-profiling, and pay-for-performance (P4P) programs. Although individual performance measures are useful for identifying specific processes and outcomes for improvement and tracking progress, they do not easily provide an accessible overview of performance. Composite measures aggregate individual performance measures into a summary score. By reducing the amount of data that must be processed, they facilitate (1) benchmarking of an organization’s performance, encouraging quality improvement initiatives to match performance against high-performing organizations, and (2) profiling and P4P programs based on an organization’s overall performance. Methods We describe different approaches to creating composite measures, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and provide examples of their use. Findings The major issues in creating composite measures are (1) whether to aggregate measures at the patient level through all-or-none approaches or the facility level, using one of the several possible weighting schemes; (2) when combining measures on different scales, how to rescale measures (using z scores, range percentages, ranks, or 5-star categorizations); and (3) whether to use shrinkage estimators, which increase precision by smoothing rates from smaller facilities but also decrease transparency. Conclusions Because provider rankings and rewards under P4P programs may be sensitive to both context and the data, careful analysis is warranted before deciding to implement a particular method. A better understanding of both when and where to use composite measures and the incentives created by composite measures are likely to be important areas of research as the use of composite measures grows. PMID:26626986

  17. Living with fibromyalgia: results from the functioning with fibro survey highlight patients' experiences and relationships with health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golden A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Angela Golden,1 Yvonne D'Arcy,2 Elizabeth T Masters,3 Andrew Clair3 1NP from Home, LLC, Munds Park, AZ, 2Pain Management and Palliative Care, Suburban Hospital-Johns Hopkins Medicine, Bethesda, MD, 3Pfizer, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Fibromyalgia (FM is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain, which can limit patients' physical function and daily activities. FM can be challenging to treat, and the treatment approach could benefit from a greater understanding of patients' perspectives on their condition and their care. Patients with FM participated in an online survey conducted in the USA that sought to identify the symptoms that had the greatest impact on patients' daily lives. The purpose of the survey was to facilitate efforts toward improving care of patients by nurse practitioners, primary care providers, and specialists, in addition to contributing to the development of new outcome measures in both clinical trials and general practice. A total of 1,228 patients with FM completed the survey, responding to specific questions pertaining to symptoms, impact of symptoms, management of FM, and the relationship with health care providers. Chronic pain was identified as the key FM symptom, affecting personal and professional relationships, and restricting physical activity, work, and social commitments. Patients felt that the severity of their condition was underestimated by family, friends, and health care providers. The results of this survey highlight the need for nurse practitioners, primary care providers, and specialists to provide understanding and support to patients as they work together to enable effective diagnosis and management of FM. Keywords: fibromyalgia, pain, survey, impact, support

  18. Scoping review: strategies of providing care for children with chronic health conditions in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Hamish; Tokhi, Mariam; Duke, Trevor

    2016-11-01

    To identify and review strategies of providing care for children living with chronic health conditions in low- and middle-income countries. We searched MEDLINE and Cochrane EPOC databases for papers evaluating strategies of providing care for children with chronic health conditions in low- or middle-income countries. Data were systematically extracted using a standardised data charting form, and analysed according to Arksey and O'Malley's 'descriptive analytical method' for scoping reviews. Our search identified 71 papers addressing eight chronic conditions; two chronic communicable diseases (HIV and TB) accounted for the majority of papers (n = 37, 52%). Nine (13%) papers reported the use of a package of care provision strategies (mostly related to HIV and/or TB in sub-Saharan Africa). Most papers addressed a narrow aspect of clinical care provision, such as patient education (n = 23) or task-shifting (n = 15). Few papers addressed the strategies for providing care at the community (n = 10, 15%) or policy (n = 6, 9%) level. Low-income countries were under-represented (n = 24, 34%), almost exclusively involving HIV interventions in sub-Saharan Africa (n = 21). Strategies and summary findings are described and components of future models of care proposed. Strategies that have been effective in reducing child mortality globally are unlikely to adequately address the needs of children with chronic health conditions in low- and middle-income settings. Current evidence mostly relates to disease-specific, narrow strategies, and more research is required to develop and evaluate the integrated models of care, which may be effective in improving the outcomes for these children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Does training on performance based financing make a difference in performance and quality of health care delivery? Health care provider's perspective in Rungwe Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manongi, Rachel; Mushi, Declare; Kessy, Joachim; Salome, Saria; Njau, Bernard

    2014-04-04

    In recent years, Performance Based Financing (PBF); a form of result based financing, has attracted a global attention in health systems in developing countries. PBF promotes autonomous health facilities, motivates and introduces financial incentives to motivate health facilities and health workers to attain pre-determined targets. To achieve this, the Tanzanian government through the Christian Social Services Commission initiated a PBF pilot project in Rungwe district, Mbeya region. Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center was given the role of training health workers on PBF principles in Rungwe. The aim of this study was to explore health care providers' perception on a three years training on PBF principles in a PBF pilot project at Rungwe District in Mbeya, Tanzania. This was an explorative qualitative study, which took place at Rungwe PBF pilot area in October 2012. Twenty six (26) participants were purposively selected. Six took part in- depth interviews (IDIs) and twenty (20) in the group discussions. Both the IDIs and the GDs explored the perceived benefit and challenges of implementing PBF in their workplace. Data were manually analyzed using content analysis approach. Overall informants had positive perspectives on PBF training. Most of the health facilities were able to implement some of the PBF concepts in their work places after the training, such as developing job descriptions for their staff, creating quarterly business plans for their facilities, costing for their services and entering service agreement with the government, improved record keeping, customer care and involving community as partners in running their facilities. The most common principle of paying individual performance bonuses was mentioned as a major challenge due to inadequate funding and poor design of Rungwe PBF pilot project. Despite poor design and inadequate funding, our findings have shown some promising results after PBF training in the study area. The findings have highlighted

  20. Determinants of use of care provided by complementary and alternative health care practitioners to pregnant women in primary midwifery care : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen-de Jong, Esther I.; Jansen, Danielle E. M. C.; Baarveld, Frank; Spelten, Evelien; Schellevis, Francois; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women visit complementary/alternative health care practitioners in addition to regular maternal health care practitioners. A wide variation has been reported with regard to rates and determinants of use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM), which may be due to

  1. Determinants of use of care provided by complementary and alternative health care practitioners to pregnant women in primary midwifery care: a prospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen-de Jong, E.I.; Jansen, D.E.M.C.; Baarveld, F.; Boerleider, A.W.; Spelten, E.; Schellevis, F.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women visit complementary/alternative health care practitioners in addition to regular maternal health care practitioners. A wide variation has been reported with regard to rates and determinants of use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM), which may be due to

  2. Development of an online information and support resource for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients considering surgery: perspectives of health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas David

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis who are considering spinal surgery face a major decision that requires access to in-depth information and support. Unfortunately, most online resources provide incomplete and inconsistent information and minimal social support. The aim of this study was to develop an online information and support resource for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS patients considering spinal surgery. Prior to website development, a user-based needs assessment was conducted. The needs assessment involved a total of six focus groups with three stakeholder groups: (1 post-operative AIS patients or surgical candidates (10-18 years (n = 11, (2 their parents (n = 6 and (3 health care providers (n = 11. This paper reports on the findings from focus groups with health care providers. Methods Focus group methodology was used to invite a range of perspectives and stimulate discussion. During audio-recorded focus groups, an emergent table of website content was presented to participants for assessment of relevance, viability and comprehensiveness in targeting global domains of need. Specifically, effective presentation of content, desired aspects of information and support, and discussions about the value of peer support and the role of health professionals were addressed. Focus group transcripts were then subject to content analysis through a constant comparative review and analysis. Results Two focus groups were held with health care providers, consisting of 5 and 6 members respectively. Clinicians provided their perceptions of the information and support needs of surgical patients and their families and how this information and support should be delivered using internet technology. Health care providers proposed four key suggestions to consider in the development of this online resource: (1 create the website with the target audience in mind; (2 clearly state the purpose of the website and organize website content

  3. Development of an online information and support resource for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients considering surgery: perspectives of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macculloch, Radha; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Nicholas, David; Donaldson, Sandra; Wright, James G

    2010-06-29

    Adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis who are considering spinal surgery face a major decision that requires access to in-depth information and support. Unfortunately, most online resources provide incomplete and inconsistent information and minimal social support. The aim of this study was to develop an online information and support resource for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients considering spinal surgery. Prior to website development, a user-based needs assessment was conducted. The needs assessment involved a total of six focus groups with three stakeholder groups: (1) post-operative AIS patients or surgical candidates (10-18 years) (n = 11), (2) their parents (n = 6) and (3) health care providers (n = 11). This paper reports on the findings from focus groups with health care providers. Focus group methodology was used to invite a range of perspectives and stimulate discussion. During audio-recorded focus groups, an emergent table of website content was presented to participants for assessment of relevance, viability and comprehensiveness in targeting global domains of need. Specifically, effective presentation of content, desired aspects of information and support, and discussions about the value of peer support and the role of health professionals were addressed. Focus group transcripts were then subject to content analysis through a constant comparative review and analysis. Two focus groups were held with health care providers, consisting of 5 and 6 members respectively. Clinicians provided their perceptions of the information and support needs of surgical patients and their families and how this information and support should be delivered using internet technology. Health care providers proposed four key suggestions to consider in the development of this online resource: (1) create the website with the target audience in mind; (2) clearly state the purpose of the website and organize website content to support the user; (3) offer a

  4. Is there a demand for physical activity interventions provided by the health care sector? Findings from a population survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lars

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care providers in many countries have delivered interventions to improve physical activity levels among their patients. Thus far, less is known about the population's interest to increase their physical activity levels and their opinion about the health care provider's role in physical activity promotion. The aims of this paper were to investigate the self-reported physical activity levels of the population and intention to increase physical activity levels, self-perceived need for support, and opinions about the responsibilities of both individuals and health care providers to promote physical activity. Methods A regional public health survey was mailed to 13 440 adults (aged 18-84 years living in Östergötland County (Sweden in 2006. The survey was part of the regular effort by the regional Health Authorities. Results About 25% of the population was categorised as physically active, 38% as moderately active, 27% as somewhat active, and 11% as low active. More than one-third (37% had no intentions to increase their physical activity levels, 36% had thought about change, while 27% were determined to change. Lower intention to change was mainly associated with increased age and lower education levels. 28% answered that physical activity was the most important health-related behaviour to change "right now" and 15% of those answered that they wanted or needed support to make this change. Of respondents who might be assumed to be in greatest need of increased activity (i.e. respondents reporting poor general health, BMI>30, and inactivity more than one-quarter wanted support to make improvements to their health. About half of the respondents who wanted support to increase their physical activity levels listed health care providers as a primary source for support. Conclusions These findings suggest that there is considerable need for physical activity interventions in this population. Adults feel great responsibility for

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes, Practices and Beliefs about Medical Male Circumcision (MMC) among a Sample of Health Care Providers in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dévieux, Jessy G; Saxena, Anshul; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Jean-Gilles, Michèle; Madhivanan, Purnima; Gaston, Stéphanie; Rubens, Muni; Theodore, Harry; Deschamps, Marie-Marcelle; Koenig, Serena P; Pape, Jean William

    2015-01-01

    Haiti has the highest number of people living with HIV infection in the Caribbean/Latin America region. Medical male circumcision (MMC) has been recommended to help prevent the spread of HIV. We sought to assess knowledge, attitudes, practices and beliefs about MMC among a sample of health care providers in Haiti. A convenience sample of 153 health care providers at the GHESKIO Centers in Haiti responded to an exploratory survey that collected information on several topics relevant to health providers about MMC. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the responses and multivariable logistic regression was conducted to determine opinions of health care providers about the best age to perform MMC on males. Bayesian network analysis and sensitivity analysis were done to identify the minimum level of change required to increase the acceptability of performing MMC at age less than 1 year. The sample consisted of medical doctors (31.0%), nurses (49.0%), and other health care professionals (20.0%). Approximately 76% showed willingness to offer MMC services if they received training. Seventy-six percent believed that their male patients would accept circumcision, and 59% believed infancy was the best age for MMC. More than 90% of participants said that MMC would reduce STIs. Physicians and nurses who were willing to offer MMC if provided with adequate training were 2.5 (1.15-5.71) times as likely to choose the best age to perform MMC as less than one year. Finally, if the joint probability of choosing "the best age to perform MMC" as one year or older and having the mistaken belief that "MMC prevents HIV entirely" is reduced by 63% then the probability of finding that performing MMC at less than one year acceptable to health care providers is increased by 35%. Participants demonstrated high levels of knowledge and positive attitudes towards MMC. Although this study suggests that circumcision is acceptable among certain health providers in Haiti, studies with larger and

  6. Rural health professionals' perspectives on providing grief and loss support in cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, L J; O'Connor, M

    2013-11-01

    Research demonstrates considerable inequalities in service delivery and health outcomes for people with cancer living outside large metropolitan cities. Semi-structured interviews with 11 professionals providing grief and loss support for people with cancer and their families in rural, regional, and remote areas Western Australia revealed the challenges they faced in delivering such support. The data are presented in four themes - Inequity of regional versus metropolitan services, Strain of the 'Jack of all trades' role, Constraints to accessing professional development, and Challenges in delivering post-bereavement services. These challenges are likely to be of growing concern given that populations are declining in rural areas as Australia becomes increasingly urban. The findings have implications in enhancing the loss and grief support services available in rural, regional, and remote Western Australia, including those grieving the death of a loved one through cancer. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Anticipatory guidance for children and adolescents with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): practice points for primary health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon-Dearman, Ana; Green, Courtney R; Andrew, Gail; LeBlanc, Nicole; Cook, Jocelynn L

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term that describes the range of effects that can occur in an individual who was prenatally exposed to alcohol and includes an array of complex neurodevelopmental and physical findings. To give primary healthcare providers (PHCP) evidence-based recommendations for supporting and managing the symptoms of FASD after patients have received a diagnosis. MethodsPrimary health recommendations for the management of children and adolescents with FASD were developed based on expert clinical judgment and supported by evidence-based research, where appropriate. The format was adapted from other health supervision practice guidelines as developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical practice "Points" for the PHCP are highlighted. A reference table of anticipatory recommendations by age is presented. In most cases, the initial screening and referral for diagnosis will be made by the PHCP, and they will be responsible for ongoing management. It is anticipated that these recommendations will provide the PHCP with evidence to support the longitudinal health care of children and adolescents with FASD and their families as they transition throughout all developmental stages. There is a pressing need for the involvement of PHCP in the active care of children and adolescents with FASD and their families over the lifespan. PHCP are trained in screening, prevention, and management of health needs, and are in the position to coordinate sub-specialty referrals as needed. Engaging PHCP will provide a truly integrated care system for individuals with FASD and their families.

  8. Choosing a primary care provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Choosing a primary care provider URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001939.htm Choosing a primary care provider To ...

  9. Diagnostic work-up of neurological syndromes in a rural African setting: knowledge, attitudes and practices of health care providers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mpanya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurological disorders of infectious origin are common in rural sub-Saharan Africa and usually have serious consequences. Unfortunately, these syndromes are often poorly documented for lack of diagnostic tools. Clinical management of these diseases is a major challenge in under-equipped rural health centers and hospitals. We documented health care provider knowledge, attitudes and practices related to this syndrome in two rural health zones in Bandundu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo. METHODS: We used a qualitative research approach combining observation, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. We observed 20 patient-provider contacts related to a neurological syndrome, conducted 12 individual interviews and 4 focus group discussions with care providers. All interviews were audiotaped and the transcripts were analyzed with the software ATLAS.ti. RESULTS: Care providers in this region usually limit their diagnostic work-up to clinical examination primarily because of the financial hurdles in this entirely out-of-pocket payment system. The patients prefer to purchase drugs rather than diagnostic tests. Moreover the general lack of diagnostic tools and the representation of the clinician as a "diviner" do not enhance any use of laboratory or other diagnostic methods. CONCLUSION: Innovation in diagnostic technology for neurological disorders is badly needed in Central-Africa, but its uptake in clinical practice will only be a success if tools are simple, affordable and embedded in a patient-centered approach.

  10. Challenges in Providing End-of-Life Care for People with Intellectual Disability: Health Services Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, Stuart; Hussain, Rafat; Müller, Arne; Ryan, Peta; Parmenter, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    Background: Increasing life expectancy for people with intellectual disability is resulting in greater need for end-of-life care services. However, limited knowledge is available regarding what barriers to accessing end-of-life care support are evident, particularly comparatively across rural and metropolitan locations. Methods: Focus group…

  11. The Role of Health Advocacy in Transitions from Pediatric to Adult Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Bridging Families, Provider and Community Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Megumi J; Saunders, Mara; Rehm, Roberta S

    2015-01-01

    Youth and young adults with special healthcare needs (YASHCN) experience challenges during transition from pediatric to adult care. Prior studies have not examined how community and healthcare resources can work together to assist YASHCN in transitioning from child-focused care and services to adult-oriented providers. The aim of this study was to develop a theoretical understanding of how family, healthcare providers and community supports can assist YASHCN during the transition from pediatric to adult healthcare and services. We conducted 41 semi-structured interviews with YASHCN aged 16-25, their family members and healthcare and community providers. We focused our interviews on support mechanisms, both within the traditional healthcare system, and those available in the community. Using grounded theory methods, we performed a multi-step analysis process. The theoretical code "Transition Advocacy" was developed from the data. This theoretical perspective arose from three major categories, which were developed in the analysis: "Fighting for healthcare", "Obtaining resources", and "Getting ready to transition". Transition Advocacy consists of the presence of, or need for, a healthcare "advocate" who did or can assist the YASHCN with the healthcare transition, particularly to navigate complex health or community services. The "advocate" role was performed by family members, healthcare or agency professionals, or sometimes the YASHCN themselves. If advocates were identified, youth were more likely to obtain needed services. Parents, health providers, and community agencies are potentially well-poised to assist transitioning YASHCN. Efforts to encourage development of strong advocacy skills will facilitate better transitions for YASHCN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding health care provider barriers to hospital affiliated medical fitness center facility referral: a questionnaire survey and semi structured interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Carissa; Alemagno, Sonia

    2017-08-03

    The purpose of this study is to understand health care provider barriers to referring patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities within an affiliated teaching hospital system using referral of diabetic services as an example. The aims of this study include: (1) to assess health care providers' awareness and use of facilities, (2) to determine barriers to referring patients to facilities, (3) identify current and needed resources and/or changes to increase referral to facilities. A 20-item electronic survey and requests for semi-structured interviews were administered to hospital system directors and managers (n = 51). Directors and managers instructed physicians and staff to complete the survey and interviews as applicable. Perceived barriers, knowledge, utilization, and referral of patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities were collected and examined. Descriptive statistics were generated regarding practice characteristics, provider characteristics, and referral. Of the health care providers surveyed and interviewed (n = 25) 40% indicated verbally suggesting use of facilities, 24% provided a flyer about the facilities. No respondents indicated that they directly referred patients to the facilities. However, 16% referred patients to other locations for physical activity - including their own department's management and prevention services. 20% do not refer to Medical Fitness Center Facilities or any other lifestyle programs/locations. Lack of time (92%) and lack of standard guidelines and operating procedures (88%) are barriers to referral. All respondents indicated a strong ability to refer patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities if given education about referral programs available as well as standard clinical guidelines and protocol for delivery. The results of this study indicate that, although few healthcare providers are currently referring patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities, health care providers with an affiliated Medical Fitness

  13. Performance evaluation of hospitals that provide care in the public health system, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cristiano de Azevedo Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze if size, administrative level, legal status, type of unit and educational activity influence the hospital network performance in providing services to the Brazilian Unified Health System.METHODS This cross-sectional study evaluated data from the Hospital Information System and the Cadastro Nacional de Estabelecimentos de Saúde (National Registry of Health Facilities, 2012, in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. We calculated performance indicators, such as: the ratio of hospital employees per bed; mean amount paid for admission; bed occupancy rate; average length of stay; bed turnover index and hospital mortality rate. Data were expressed as mean and standard deviation. The groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA and Bonferroni correction.RESULTS The hospital occupancy rate in small hospitals was lower than in medium, big and special-sized hospitals. Higher hospital occupancy rate and bed turnover index were observed in hospitals that include education in their activities. The hospital mortality rate was lower in specialized hospitals compared to general ones, despite their higher proportion of highly complex admissions. We found no differences between hospitals in the direct and indirect administration for most of the indicators analyzed.CONCLUSIONS The study indicated the importance of the scale effect on efficiency, and larger hospitals had a higher performance. Hospitals that include education in their activities had a higher operating performance, albeit with associated importance of using human resources and highly complex structures. Specialized hospitals had a significantly lower rate of mortality than general hospitals, indicating the positive effect of the volume of procedures and technology used on clinical outcomes. The analysis related to the administrative level and legal status did not show any significant performance differences between the categories of public hospitals.

  14. Fluid resuscitation practices in cardiac surgery patients in the USA: a survey of health care providers

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    Solomon Aronson

    2017-10-01

    were also more likely to use 25% albumin as an adjunct fluid than were anesthesiologists. While most perfusionists reported using crystalloids to prime the CPB circuit, one third preferred a mixture of 25% albumin and crystalloids. Less interstitial edema and more sustained volume expansion were considered the most important colloid traits in volume expansion. Conclusions Fluid utilization practice patterns in the USA varied depending on patient characteristics and clinical specialties of health care professionals.

  15. NHSC Jobs Center for Primary Care Medical, Dental and Mental Health Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Jobs Center helps doctors and nurses who are interested in working at areas where there is the highest need find out more...

  16. Announcement: Guidance for U.S. Laboratory Testing for Zika Virus Infection: Implications for Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-25

    CDC has released updated guidance online for U.S. laboratory testing for Zika virus infection. The guidance is available at https://www.cdc.gov/zika/laboratories/lab-guidance.html. Frequently asked questions are addressed at https://www.cdc.gov/zika/laboratories/lab-guidance-faq.html. This guidance updates recommendations for testing of specimens by U.S. laboratories for possible Zika virus infection. Major updates to the guidance with clinical implications for health care providers include the following.

  17. Adolescent health care in a large multispecialty prepaid group practice. Who provides it and how well are they doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitsner, I. N.; Borok, G. M.; Neinstein, L.; MacKenzie, R.

    1992-01-01

    Adolescents are at risk for pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, suicide, homicide, accidents, and substance abuse. Adolescent medicine involves an overlap of many skills needed to provide routine medical care, as well as care for those conditions that require psychosocial assessment. We report the results of a mail survey covering care of this age group by practitioners of pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, family practice, and adolescent medicine in a large, multispecialty, prepaid group practice. The mail survey covered 10 areas of adolescent care. Adolescent medicine physicians expressed the highest level of perceived knowledge and competence in these areas, with family practitioners ranked second. More than 50% of internists and pediatricians felt only fair to poor competence for a variety of adolescent conditions, whereas a third of internists and pediatricians reported that they liked to care for adolescents. Physicians in all 4 of the primary care specialties reported a need for a teen health center for both consultation and education. These results are similar to those reported for pediatricians and primary care physicians in private practice and for residents in internal medicine. PMID:1615655

  18. How do general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems? A qualitative study from Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Natasja Koitzsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Refugees are a particularly vulnerable group in relation to the development of mental illness and many may have been subjected to torture or other traumatic experiences. General practitioners are gatekeepers for access to several parts of the psychiatric system and knowledge of their patients’ refugee background is crucial to secure adequate care. The aim of this study is to investigate how general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems. Methods The study was conducted as part of an EU project on European Best Practices in Access, Quality and Appropriateness of Health Services for Immigrants in Europe (EUGATE. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nine general practitioners in the vicinity of Copenhagen purposively selected from areas with a high proportion of immigrants. The analysis of the interviews is inspired by qualitative content analysis. Results One of the main themes identified in the analysis is communication. This includes the use of professional interpreters and that communication entails more than sharing a common language. Quality of care is another theme that emerges and includes awareness of possible trauma history, limited possibilities for refugees to participate in certain treatments due to language barriers and feelings of hopelessness in the general practitioners. The general practitioners may also choose different referral pathways for refugees and they report that their patients lack understanding regarding the differences between psychological problems and physical symptoms. Conclusion General practitioners experience that providing care to refugees differs from providing care for patients from the majority population. The different strategies employed by the general practitioners in the health care treatment of refugees may be the result of the great diversity in the organisation of general practice in Denmark and the lack of a national strategy

  19. The problems of the providing the regions with health care infrastructure in conditions of increase of migratory mobility

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    Yelena Borisovna Bedrina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Subject matter of the article is a question of the providing the newcomers to regions of the Russian Federation with healthcare infrastructure facilities. The purpose of the research is an assessment of level of this providing. On the basis of calculation of the integrated indicators of the development of health care infrastructure and the providing the population with healthcare infrastructure facilities the grouping of regions is carried out. By means of the two-dimensional analysis, we made a comparison of regions on indicators of arrival of the population and the above-named settlement indicators. The analysis of dynamics of the number change of healthcare infrastructure facilities during its reforming from 2005 to 2011 is performed. As a result of the research, the following conclusion is drawn: the level of investment into the regions as well as in its health care infrastructure do influence on the intensity of migratory flows, however, distribution of investments into health care facilities in regions does not take in to account the directions of migratory flows and poorly considers the population size of territories. This article may be interesting to the experts dealing with issues of development of regions.

  20. Collaborating with Families: Exploring Family Member and Health Care Provider Perspectives on Engaging Families Within Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Genevieve; Abi-Jaoude, Alexxa; Johnson, Andrew; Saikaly, Riley; Woldemichael, Bethel; Maharaj, Asha; Soklaridis, Sophie; Nirula, Latika; Hasan, Mahreen; Wiljer, David

    2018-02-12

    With 40 to 65% of mental health patients being cared for by family members, nearly 500,000 Canadians are serving as caregivers. Yet family members are often excluded from daily clinical interactions and the development of mental health continuing medical education (CME). This qualitative study aimed to understand how best to involve families in mental health CME and how to advance their meaningful and equitable engagement in such initiatives. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two samples: mental health care providers (n = 8) and family members of individuals diagnosed with a co-occurring addiction and mental health problems (n = 12) to explore barriers, facilitators, and strategies for family engagement. Several themes related to the perception of expertise emerged from the interviews, including the tension between the validity of knowledge based on education/credentials and knowledge based on lived experience, as well as expressions of "voice." Participants also identified barriers to, and ethical considerations related to, family engagement, including stigma and confidentiality, and recommended strategies and supports to meaningfully include the family perspective within mental health CME. Aligning with the movement to improve collaboration between mental health professionals and service users requires developing relationships with family members. Identifying strategies to involve families in the development of CME is crucial to initiating and maintaining family engagement.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of health care waste treatment facilities in iran hospitals; a provider perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Arash; Alinia, Cyrus; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to make right and informative decision about choosing the most cost-effectiveness heterogeneous infectious waste treatment methods and devices. In this descriptive study, decision tree analysis, with 10-yr time horizon in bottom-up approach was used to estimate the costs and effectiveness criteria of the employed devices at provider perspective in Iranian hospitals. We used the one-way and scenario sensitivity analysis to measure the effects of variables with uncertainty. The resources of data were national Environmental and Occupational Health Center Survey (EOHCS) in 2012, field observation and completing questionnaire by relevant authorities in mentioned centers. Devices called Saray 2, Autoclave based, and Newster 10, Hydroclave based, with 92032.4 (±12005) and 6786322.9 (±826453) Dollars had the lowest and highest costs respectively in studied time period and given the 5-10% discount rate. Depending on effectiveness factor type, Newster 10 with Ecodas products and Saray products respectively had the highest and lowest effectiveness. In most considered scenarios, Caspian-Alborz device was the most cost-effectiveness alternative, so for the treatment of each adjusted unit of volume and weight of infectious waste in a 10 year period and in different conditions, between 39.4 (±5.1) to 915 (±111.4) dollars must be spent. The findings indicate the inefficiency and waste of resources, so in order to efficient resource allocation and to encourage further cost containment in infectious waste management we introduce policy recommendation that be taken in three levels.

  2. Care decision making of frontline providers of maternal and newborn health services in the greater Accra region of Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebenezer Oduro-Mensah

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To explore the "how" and "why" of care decision making by frontline providers of maternal and newborn services in the Greater Accra region of Ghana and determine appropriate interventions needed to support its quality and related maternal and neonatal outcomes. METHODS: A cross sectional and descriptive mixed method study involving a desk review of maternal and newborn care protocols and guidelines availability, focus group discussions and administration of a structured questionnaire and observational checklist to frontline providers of maternal and newborn care. RESULTS: Tacit knowledge or 'mind lines' was an important primary approach to care decision making. When available, protocols and guidelines were used as decision making aids, especially when they were simple handy tools and in situations where providers were not sure what their next step in management had to be. Expert opinion and peer consultation were also used through face to face discussions, phone calls, text messages, and occasional emails depending on the urgency and communication medium access. Health system constraints such as availability of staff, essential medicines, supplies and equipment; management issues (including leadership and interpersonal relations among staff, and barriers to referral were important influences in decision making. Frontline health providers welcomed the idea of interventions to support clinical decision making and made several proposals towards the development of such an intervention. They felt such an intervention ought to be multi-faceted to impact the multiple influences simultaneously. Effective interventions would also need to address immediate challenges as well as more long-term challenges influencing decision-making. CONCLUSION: Supporting frontline worker clinical decision making for maternal and newborn services is an important but neglected aspect of improved quality of care towards attainment of MDG 4 & 5. A multi

  3. Association of Provider Scope of Practice With Successful Transition for Youth With Special Health Care Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    centeredhealth care?A focus on cerebral palsy and spina bifida. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2007;88:1064–73. g ance p-value % encouraged in self-responsibility...Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina Article history : Received March 3, 2010; Accepted June 16, 2010 Keywords:Adolescent

  4. When Terminal Illness Is Worse Than Death: A Multicenter Study of Health-Care Providers' Resuscitation Desires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Luis O; Einav, Sharon; Varon, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    To investigate how a terminal illness may affect the health-care providers' resuscitation preferences. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 9 health-care institutions located in 4 geographical regions in North and Central America, investigating attitudes toward end-of-life practices in health-care providers. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and χ2 test for the presence of associations ( P code status and their preference for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in case of terminal illness. A total of 852 surveys were completed. Among the respondents, 21% (n = 180) were physicians, 36.9% (n = 317) were nurses, 10.5% (n = 90) were medical students, and 265 participants were other staff members of the institutions. Most respondents (58.3%; n = 500) desired "definitely full code" (physicians 73.2%; n = 131), only 13.8% of the respondents (physicians 8.33%; n = 15) desired "definitely no code" or "partial support," and 20.9% of the respondents (n = 179; among physicians 18.4%; n = 33) had never considered their code status. There was an association between current code status and resuscitation preference in case of terminal illness ( P code status and terminal illness code preference among physicians ( P = .290) and nurses ( P = .316), whereupon other hospital workers were more consistent ( P < .01, Cramer V = .291). Doctors and nurses have different end-of-life preferences than other hospital workers. Their desire to undergo CPR may change when facing a terminal illness.

  5. Australians with osteoarthritis: satisfaction with health care providers and the perceived helpfulness of treatments and information sources

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    Basedow M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Martin Basedow,1 Peter Hibbert,1 Tamara Hooper,1 William Runciman,1 Adrian Esterman,2 1School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction of Australian patients who suffer from osteoarthritis (OA with their health care providers and the perceived helpfulness of treatments and information sources. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was conducted with a sample of 560 Australian patients who suffer from OA with questions about satisfaction with health care providers and the helpfulness of different treatment options and information sources. Logistic regression models were used to assess potential predictors of satisfaction. Thematic analysis was undertaken for attitudinal factors associated with satisfaction. Results: A total of 435 participants returned questionnaires (response rate 78%. Most respondents were highly satisfied with the care provided by their general practitioner (GP (84%, communication with their GP (88%, time spent with their GP (84%, and their ability to talk freely with their GP about their medical problem (93%, but less satisfied with their ability to talk freely about associated emotional problems (77%. Satisfaction with pharmacists (80%, rheumatologists (76%, and orthopedic surgeons (72% was high. Joint replacement surgery (91%, prescription anti-inflammatory medications (66%, aids and assistive devices (65%, intra-articular injections (63%, and prescription painkiller medications (62% were perceived as effective treatments. Less highly rated treatments were exercise (48%, physiotherapy (43%, and complementary medicines (29%. A majority of patients were satisfied with the information to manage their OA (65%. From the multivariable logistic regression analysis, four GP satisfaction factors were found to be predictors of overall satisfaction with GP care: the amount

  6. Potential role of complementary and alternative health care providers in chronic disease prevention and health promotion: an analysis of National Health Interview Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Ndetan, Harrison; Evans, Marion Willard

    2012-01-01

    To make a preliminary assessment of the potential role of the most frequently used licensed or certified United States complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers in chronic disease prevention and health promotion. This was a secondary analysis of the 2007 United States National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the most recent to include CAM use. The Adult Core Sample, Person and Adult Complementary and Alternative Medicine data files were included. NHIS's complete survey design structure (strata, cluster and survey weights) was applied in generating national population estimates for CAM usage. Chiropractic or osteopathic manipulation (8.4%) and massage (8.1%) were most commonly used; acupuncture was used by 1.4% and naturopathy by 0.3% of respondents. Substantial proportions of respondents reported using CAM for wellness and disease prevention, and informed their medical physician of use. Fifty-four percent were overweight or obese, 22.0% physically inactive, and 17.4% smokers; 18.0% reported hypertension, 19.6% high cholesterol, and 9.1% prediabetes or diabetes. CAM users present with risk factors which are priority public health issues. This implies a need to train CAM providers in evidence-based health promotion counseling. CAM encounters may provide opportunities to coordinate health promotion and prevention messages with patients' primary care providers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding the state variation in Medicare home health care. The impact of Medicaid program characteristics, state policy, and provider attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M A; Tumlinson, A

    1997-06-01

    During the past 7 years there has been a significant increase in the use of the Medicare home health benefit. In this article, the authors document trends in the use of the benefit and develop multivariate models to identify the factors that explain state variation in its use. To develop quantitative models, the authors collected state information on all variables for each of 3 years: 1991, 1992, and 1993. The authors chose to focus on those variables that had been found to be significant in other research as well as those that we posited would likely influence utilization. The authors tested similar sets of explanatory variables for each year of the analysis. The unit of analysis is the "state" and depending on data availability, the number of states included in the analyses range from between 46 to 49. (Arizona does not have a state Medicaid program.) The authors' analysis shows that interaction exists between state policies and use of the benefit. Utilization is higher in states that face greater fiscal pressure concerning their Medicaid budgets; the lack of state personal care programs increases Medicare use, and, when Medicaid home health expenditures decline, the number of Medicare home health care users increases. There is also an inverse relationship between the number of long-term care and skilled nursing facilities in a state and the use of the benefit. Thus, for some, the benefit serves as a substitute for long-term care needs and, for others, for postacute care needs. The overlap between the population served and the services provided by state programs and Medicare has given states and providers an opportunity to leverage Federal dollars in lieu of state program dollars. As the Federal government attempts to control expenditure growth, policy-makers must be mindful of how state actions can influence the level and type of Federal expenditure.

  8. Role of informal care providers in home based long term care in diabetes mellitus at Kaiwara Primary Health Center area, Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjunan Isaac

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find the prevalence of diabetics, identify informal care providers for them in Kaiwara Primary Health Center (PHC area, assess the level of knowledge and skills of an informal care provider in home based long term care and improve the level of knowledge and skill of the informal care provider through a structured training capsule. Methods: A cross sectional and an interventional study was conducted on diabetics and their informal care providers in Kaiwara PHC area. Data were collected using pre-tested, structured questionnaire by an interview method. A structured training capsule was developed and implemented. Evaluation of the knowledge and skills was assessed at the beginning and at the end of the training. Student ’s paired/unpaired ‘t ’ tests and correlation analysis were done. Results: Improvement scores were calculated by subtracting the pre-evaluation scores from the post-evaluation scores. The mean improvement scores was (2.66暲0.32 and was statistically significant (P<0.001. No significant difference in mean values was found in the knowledge and skills scores in relation to the socio-demographic variables in the study. Conclusions: Knowledge and skills component of the informal care provider in home based care of diabetes could be perceived as a “felt need ”.

  9. Talking about Complementary and Alternative Medicine with Your Health Care Providers: A Workbook and Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used in the United States. • Examples: Homeopathy, Naturopathy, Ayurveda Complex Natural Products: An assortment of plant samples ( ... Health-enhancing systems of exercise and movement. • Example: Yoga Manipulative and Body-Based Methods: Methods based on ...

  10. DoD Did Not Negotiate Rates With Overseas Health Care Providers and Generally Paid Claims as Billed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    rate than necessary for health care provided in Guam in the following instances. • A provider billed $945 for a sleep study in March 2011—TMA paid...the amount in full. However, the highest Medicare allowable rate for a sleep study in Guam was $603, about 36 percent less than the full amount that... Malaysia 51,034 51,938 70,959 74,572 46.1 Appendixes 24 │ DODIG-2014-052 Location1 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 Percent Change (FY09-12)2 Bermuda

  11. The Role of Special and Incentive Pays in Retaining Military Mental Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    can be used to update the model in the future and take advantage of an increased sample size, and it may be possible to extend the model in promising... marriage and family therapy, mental health counseling, substance abuse counseling, and occupational therapy. As we discuss in later chapters, we estimate...have specific occupational codes for psychiatric nursing, marriage and family therapy, mental health counseling, and substance abuse counseling

  12. Barriers to Health Care Providers' Provision of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception to Adolescent and Nulliparous Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Brooke

    Despite recommendations for long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) as a first-line contraceptive method for adolescents and young women, its use in the United States remains low. This integrative review highlights previously unidentified barriers to health care providers' provision of LARC to adolescent and nulliparous young women. Four themes emerged: Appropriateness of Candidates and Contraceptive Safety, Provider Training and Work Setting, Appropriate Resources, and Opportunity. Raising awareness of barriers to LARC use may galvanize providers to find solutions. Nurses and other clinicians can remain aware of new contraceptive options and guidelines to reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy among adolescents. © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  13. Health Provider Networks, Quality and Costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Schottmuller, C.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a modeling framework to think about selective contracting in the health care sector. Two health care providers differ in quality and costs. When buying health insurance, consumers observe neither provider quality nor costs. We derive an equilibrium where health insurers signal provider

  14. Health provider networks, quality and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, Jan; Schottmuller, C.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a modeling framework to think about selective contracting in the health care sector. Two health care providers differ in quality and costs. When buying health insurance, consumers observe neither provider quality nor costs. We derive an equilibrium where health insurers signal provider

  15. 76 FR 32815 - Medicaid Program; Payment Adjustment for Provider-Preventable Conditions Including Health Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-06

    ... correct adverse outcomes that may result from such errors. To address and reduce the occurrence of these... health system agendas to promote quality outcomes. We believe the use of evidence-based measures and the... following total knee replacement or hip replacement in pediatric and obstetric patients, as the minimum...

  16. The health system burden of chronic disease care: an estimation of provider costs of selected chronic diseases in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settumba, Stella Nalukwago; Sweeney, Sedona; Seeley, Janet; Biraro, Samuel; Mutungi, Gerald; Munderi, Paula; Grosskurth, Heiner; Vassall, Anna

    2015-06-01

    To explore the chronic disease services in Uganda: their level of utilisation, the total service costs and unit costs per visit. Full financial and economic cost data were collected from 12 facilities in two districts, from the provider's perspective. A combination of ingredients-based and step-down allocation costing approaches was used. The diseases under study were diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), epilepsy and HIV infection. Data were collected through a review of facility records, direct observation and structured interviews with health workers. Provision of chronic care services was concentrated at higher-level facilities. Excluding drugs, the total costs for NCD care fell below 2% of total facility costs. Unit costs per visit varied widely, both across different levels of the health system, and between facilities of the same level. This variability was driven by differences in clinical and drug prescribing practices. Most patients reported directly to higher-level facilities, bypassing nearby peripheral facilities. NCD services in Uganda are underfunded particularly at peripheral facilities. There is a need to estimate the budget impact of improving NCD care and to standardise treatment guidelines. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Provider Payment Trends and Methods in the Massachusetts Health Care System

    OpenAIRE

    Allison Barrett; Timothy Lake

    2010-01-01

    This report investigates provider payment methods in Massachusetts. Payments include fee-for-service, the predominant model; global payments, which pay providers a single fee for all or most required services during a contract period; and pay-for-performance models, which layer quality incentives onto payments.

  18. Ten Things Gay Men Should Discuss with Their Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does not seem comfortable with you as a gay man, find another provider. 2. HIV/AIDS, Safe Sex Many men who have sex with men are ... rate of HIV infection is one of the gay community’s great success stories. ... a good HIV provider. Safe sex is proven to reduce the risk of receiving ...

  19. "A Lot of Things Passed Me by": Rural Stroke Survivors' and Caregivers' Experience of Receiving Education From Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)<