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Sample records for providing energy-selective images

  1. Energy-selective neutron transmission imaging at a pulsed source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockelmann, W.; Frei, G.; Lehmann, E. H.; Vontobel, P.; Santisteban, J. R.

    2007-08-01

    Energy-selective neutron radiography experiments were carried out at the ISIS pulsed spallation source. This neutron transmission imaging technique combines the hardware used for conventional neutron radiography with the Bragg edge transmission features of time-of-flight methods. The main component of the energy-selective radiography set-up was a gated image-intensified CCD camera that viewed a neutron sensitive scintillation screen via a mirror. Energy resolution was obtained via synchronization of the light-intensifier with the pulse structure of the neutron source. It is demonstrated that contrast enhancement of materials can be straightforwardly achieved, and that microstructural features in metal samples can be directly visualized with high spatial resolution by taking advantage of the Bragg edges in the energy dependent neutron cross sections.

  2. Energy-selective neutron imaging with high spatial resolution and its impact on the study of crystalline-structured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, E.H., E-mail: eberhard.lehmann@psi.ch [Neutron Imaging and Activation Group, Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland); Peetermans, S.; Josic, L. [Neutron Imaging and Activation Group, Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland); Leber, H. [W. Blösch AG, CH-2540 Grenchen, P.O. Box 244 (Switzerland); Swygenhoven, H. van [Material Science and Simulation Group, Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen, PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-01-21

    Crystalline-structured materials with preferentially large grains were investigated by means of energy-selective neutron imaging methods (transmission radiography and tomography) under the conditions of the best possible spatial resolution at the ICON facility, SINQ, and PSI. Because of the cold spectrum at that beam line, access to the Bragg diffraction features was possible even when the energy resolution of the used selector device was only 15%. Grains with a size below the detector resolution (approximately 25 μm) are not visible, and a quasi-homogeneous contrast variation is found when the neutron energy is varied.In the cases of welded stainless steel samples and rolled Al plates, we obtained structural information from a very short exposure of approximately 60 s. Tomographic examinations of these samples at suitable neutron energies qualitatively verified the radiographic findings by showing the same features in the bulk. Comparison to common electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) investigations in selected regions of the samples provided a complete verification of the neutron-image data with respect to the grain size and the different grain orientations. The method of energy-selective neutron imaging provides an easy and straightforward approach for non-invasive material research that can be performed without any sample preparation if the most suitable neutron energy is chosen. Further studies will be necessary to extend the experimental data base to other materials with different crystal structures and grain sizes. A comparison to diffraction data will enhance the quantitative value of the investigations.

  3. Energy-selective neutron imaging with high spatial resolution and its impact on the study of crystalline-structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Peetermans, S.; Josic, L.; Leber, H.; van Swygenhoven, H.

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline-structured materials with preferentially large grains were investigated by means of energy-selective neutron imaging methods (transmission radiography and tomography) under the conditions of the best possible spatial resolution at the ICON facility, SINQ, and PSI. Because of the cold spectrum at that beam line, access to the Bragg diffraction features was possible even when the energy resolution of the used selector device was only 15%. Grains with a size below the detector resolution (approximately 25 μm) are not visible, and a quasi-homogeneous contrast variation is found when the neutron energy is varied.In the cases of welded stainless steel samples and rolled Al plates, we obtained structural information from a very short exposure of approximately 60 s. Tomographic examinations of these samples at suitable neutron energies qualitatively verified the radiographic findings by showing the same features in the bulk. Comparison to common electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) investigations in selected regions of the samples provided a complete verification of the neutron-image data with respect to the grain size and the different grain orientations. The method of energy-selective neutron imaging provides an easy and straightforward approach for non-invasive material research that can be performed without any sample preparation if the most suitable neutron energy is chosen. Further studies will be necessary to extend the experimental data base to other materials with different crystal structures and grain sizes. A comparison to diffraction data will enhance the quantitative value of the investigations.

  4. Multi-Frame Energy-Selective Imaging System for Fast-Neutron Radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Dangendorf, Volker; Bromberger, Benjamin; Feldman, Gennady; Goldberg, Mark B; Lauck, Ronald; Mor, Ilan; Tittelmeier, Kai; Vartsky, David; Weierganz, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    A new instrument for high resolution imaging of fast-neutrons is presented here. It is designed for energy selective radiography in nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1 - 10 MeV) neutron beams. The device presented here is based on hydrogenous scintillator screens and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). A key element is a newly developed optical amplifier which generates sufficient light for the high-speed intensified camera system, even from such faint light sources as fast plastic and liquid scintillators. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, the detector incorporating the above components is capable of simultaneously taking up to 8 images, each at a different neutron energy.

  5. Dissociation of internal energy-selected methyl bromide ion revealed from threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence velocity imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xiaofeng [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Zhou, Xiaoguo, E-mail: xzhou@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: yanbing@jlu.edu.cn; Liu, Shilin [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sun, Zhongfa [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Liu, Fuyi; Sheng, Liusi [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Yan, Bing, E-mail: xzhou@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: yanbing@jlu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-01-28

    Dissociative photoionization of methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br) in an excitation energy range of 10.45–16.90 eV has been investigated by using threshold photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) velocity imaging. The coincident time-of-flight mass spectra indicate that the ground state X{sup 2}E of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} is stable, and both A{sup 2}A{sub 1} and B{sup 2}E ionic excited states are fully dissociative to produce the unique fragment ion of CH{sub 3}{sup +}. From TPEPICO 3D time-sliced velocity images of CH{sub 3}{sup +} dissociated from specific state-selected CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} ion, kinetic energy release distribution (KERD) and angular distribution of CH{sub 3}{sup +} fragment ion are directly obtained. Both spin-orbit states of Br({sup 2}P) atom can be clearly observed in fast dissociation of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(A{sup 2}A{sub 1}) ion along C–Br rupture, while a KERD of Maxwell-Boltzmann profile is obtained in dissociation of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(B{sup 2}E) ion. With the aid of the re-calculated potential energy curves of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} including spin-orbit coupling, dissociation mechanisms of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +} ion in A{sup 2}A{sub 1} and B{sup 2}E states along C–Br rupture are revealed. For CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(A{sup 2}A{sub 1}) ion, the CH{sub 3}{sup +} + Br({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) channel is occurred via an adiabatic dissociation by vibration, while the Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) formation is through vibronic coupling to the high vibrational level of X{sup 2}E state followed by rapid dissociation. C–Br bond breaking of CH{sub 3}Br{sup +}(B{sup 2}E) ion can occur via slow internal conversion to the excited vibrational level of the lower electronic states and then dissociation.

  6. Image processing and enhancement provided by commercial dental software programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lehmann, T M; Troeltsch, E; Spitzer, K

    2002-01-01

    To identify and analyse methods/algorithms for image processing provided by various commercial software programs used in direct digital dental imaging and to map them onto a standardized nomenclature...

  7. Healthcare provider and patient perspectives on diagnostic imaging investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanjee, Chandra R; Bergh, Anne-Marie; Hoffmann, Willem A

    2015-05-20

    Much has been written about the patient-centred approach in doctor-patient consultations. Little is known about interactions and communication processes regarding healthcare providers' and patients' perspectives on expectations and experiences of diagnostic imaging investigations within the medical encounter. Patients journey through the health system from the point of referral to the imaging investigation itself and then to the post-imaging consultation. AIM AND SETTING: To explore healthcare provider and patient perspectives on interaction and communication processes during diagnostic imaging investigations as part of their clinical journey through a healthcare complex. A qualitative study was conducted, with two phases of data collection. Twenty-four patients were conveniently selected at a public district hospital complex and were followed throughout their journey in the hospital system, from admission to discharge. The second phase entailed focus group interviews conducted with providers in the district hospital and adjacent academic hospital (medical officers and family physicians, nurses, radiographers, radiology consultants and registrars). Two main themes guided our analysis: (1) provider perspectives; and (2) patient dispositions and reactions. Golden threads that cut across these themes are interactions and communication processes in the context of expectations, experiences of the imaging investigations and the outcomes thereof. Insights from this study provide a better understanding of the complexity of the processes and interactions between providers and patients during the imaging investigations conducted as part of their clinical pathway. The interactions and communication processes are provider-patient centred when a referral for a diagnostic imaging investigation is included.

  8. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Mars Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMars server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Mars images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of Mars. The OnMars server is an implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server. Unlike other Mars Internet map servers that provide Martian data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMars WMS server supports encoding of data in Mars-specific coordinate systems. The OnMars server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Martian image and elevation data, including an 8-meter-per-pixel uncontrolled mosaic of most of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Observer Camera Narrow Angle (MOCNA) image collection, which is not available elsewhere. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. The OnMars server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  9. Providing Internet Access to High-Resolution Lunar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesea, Lucian

    2008-01-01

    The OnMoon server is a computer program that provides Internet access to high-resolution Lunar images, maps, and elevation data, all suitable for use in geographical information system (GIS) software for generating images, maps, and computational models of the Moon. The OnMoon server implements the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) server protocol and supports Moon-specific extensions. Unlike other Internet map servers that provide Lunar data using an Earth coordinate system, the OnMoon server supports encoding of data in Moon-specific coordinate systems. The OnMoon server offers access to most of the available high-resolution Lunar image and elevation data. This server can generate image and map files in the tagged image file format (TIFF) or the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), 8- or 16-bit Portable Network Graphics (PNG), or Keyhole Markup Language (KML) format. Image control is provided by use of the OGC Style Layer Descriptor (SLD) protocol. Full-precision spectral arithmetic processing is also available, by use of a custom SLD extension. This server can dynamically add shaded relief based on the Lunar elevation to any image layer. This server also implements tiled WMS protocol and super-overlay KML for high-performance client application programs.

  10. Healthcare provider and patient perspectives on diagnostic imaging investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra R. Makanjee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Much has been written about the patient-centred approach in doctor–patient consultations. Little is known about interactions and communication processes regarding healthcare providers’ and patients’ perspectives on expectations and experiences of diagnostic imaging investigations within the medical encounter. Patients journey through the health system from the point of referral to the imaging investigation itself and then to the post-imaging consultation.Aim and setting: To explore healthcare provider and patient perspectives on interaction and communication processes during diagnostic imaging investigations as part of their clinical journey through a healthcare complex.Methods: A qualitative study was conducted, with two phases of data collection. Twenty-four patients were conveniently selected at a public district hospital complex and were followed throughout their journey in the hospital system, from admission to discharge. The second phase entailed focus group interviews conducted with providers in the district hospital and adjacent academic hospital (medical officers and family physicians, nurses, radiographers, radiology consultants and registrars.Results: Two main themes guided our analysis: (1 provider perspectives; and (2 patient dispositions and reactions. Golden threads that cut across these themes are interactions and communication processes in the context of expectations, experiences of the imaging investigations and the outcomes thereof.Conclusion: Insights from this study provide a better understanding of the complexity of the processes and interactions between providers and patients during the imaging investigations conducted as part of their clinical pathway. The interactions and communication processes are provider–patient centred when a referral for a diagnostic imaging investigation is included.

  11. Body Image Assessment Among Community Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer Winter, Virginia; Brett, Anna; Pevehouse-Pfeiffer, Danielle; O'Neill, Elizabeth A; Ellis-Ordway, Nancy

    2017-11-14

    Although research suggests an association between body image and mental health, with poor body image related to several mental illnesses, there is no research exploring mental health clinicians' body image screening practices. This study aims to fill this gap among a sample of community mental health providers (N = 216). Using a cross-sectional design, clinicians in Community Health Centers were recruited through email using purposeful and snowball sampling in a Midwest state. The majority of participants identified as women (88.4%) and White (88.4%). Additionally, the mean age of the sample was 36.66 years and participants reported working an average of 8.44 years as a mental health provider. We ran descriptive and Chi square analyses. Results suggest a relationship between viewing body image screening as important and level of preparedness as well as level of preparedness and actual assessment. Training and assessment tools may be warranted to increase clinician's preparedness. Additional clinical and policy recommendations are discussed.

  12. Fractal image perception provides novel insights into hierarchical cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, M J; Fischmeister, F P; Puig-Waldmüller, E; Oh, J; Geissler, A; Robinson, S; Fitch, W T; Beisteiner, R

    2014-08-01

    Hierarchical structures play a central role in many aspects of human cognition, prominently including both language and music. In this study we addressed hierarchy in the visual domain, using a novel paradigm based on fractal images. Fractals are self-similar patterns generated by repeating the same simple rule at multiple hierarchical levels. Our hypothesis was that the brain uses different resources for processing hierarchies depending on whether it applies a "fractal" or a "non-fractal" cognitive strategy. We analyzed the neural circuits activated by these complex hierarchical patterns in an event-related fMRI study of 40 healthy subjects. Brain activation was compared across three different tasks: a similarity task, and two hierarchical tasks in which subjects were asked to recognize the repetition of a rule operating transformations either within an existing hierarchical level, or generating new hierarchical levels. Similar hierarchical images were generated by both rules and target images were identical. We found that when processing visual hierarchies, engagement in both hierarchical tasks activated the visual dorsal stream (occipito-parietal cortex, intraparietal sulcus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). In addition, the level-generating task specifically activated circuits related to the integration of spatial and categorical information, and with the integration of items in contexts (posterior cingulate cortex, retrosplenial cortex, and medial, ventral and anterior regions of temporal cortex). These findings provide interesting new clues about the cognitive mechanisms involved in the generation of new hierarchical levels as required for fractals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Time-gated energy-selected cold neutron radiography

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, T E; Claytor, T N; Farnum, E H; Greene, G L; Morris, C

    1999-01-01

    A technique is under development at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) for producing neutron radiography using only a narrow energy range of cold neutrons. The technique, referred to as time-gated energy-selected (TGES) neutron radiography, employs the pulsed neutron source at the Lujan Center with time of flight to obtain a neutron pulse having an energy distribution that is a function of the arrival time at the imager. The radiograph is formed on a short persistence scintillator and a gated, intensified, cooled CCD camera is employed to record the images, which are produced at the specific neutron energy range determined by the camera gate. The technique has been used to achieve a degree of material discrimination in radiographic images. For some materials, such as beryllium and carbon, at energies above the Bragg cutoff the neutron scattering cross section is relatively high while at energies below the Bragg cutoff the scattering cross ...

  14. A Compact, Wide Area Surveillance 3D Imaging LIDAR Providing UAS Sense and Avoid Capabilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Eye safe 3D Imaging LIDARS when combined with advanced very high sensitivity, large format receivers can provide a robust wide area search capability in a very...

  15. Relationship between low back pain, disability, MR imaging findings and health care provider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Molla, Enrique; Costa, Salvador; Montijano, Ruben [Clinica Quiron, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Clinica Quiron, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Vega, Maria [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Bautista, Daniel [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Preventive Medicine, Valencia (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the association between the self-report of pain and disability and findings on lumbar MR images, and to compare two different health care providers in Spanish patients with low back pain (LBP). Cross-sectional A total of 278 patients, 137 men and 141 women aged 44{+-}14 years submitted with low back pain (LBP) were studied. One hundred and nine patients were from the National Health System (NHS) and 169 from private practice. Patients with previous discitis, surgery, neoplasm or traumatic episodes were excluded. Every patient completed a disability questionnaire with six core items, providing a score of disability from 2 to 28. All patients had sagittal spin-echo T1 and turbo spin-echo T2, axial proton-density and MR myelography weighted images. MR images of the two most affected disc levels were read, offering an MR imaging score from 0 to 30. Patients with a combination of LBP and sciatica showed the highest levels of disability (p=0.002). MR imaging scores only correlated with pain interference with normal work (p=0.04), but not with other disability questions. Patients from the NHS showed greater disability scores than private ones (p=0.001) and higher MR imaging scores (p=0.01). In patients with LBP, MR imaging only correlates with pain interference with work but not with other disability questions. Differences are found between private and NHS patients, the latter being more physically affected. (orig.)

  16. Providing integrity, authenticity, and confidentiality for header and pixel data of DICOM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haj, Ali

    2015-04-01

    Exchange of medical images over public networks is subjected to different types of security threats. This has triggered persisting demands for secured telemedicine implementations that will provide confidentiality, authenticity, and integrity for the transmitted images. The medical image exchange standard (DICOM) offers mechanisms to provide confidentiality for the header data of the image but not for the pixel data. On the other hand, it offers mechanisms to achieve authenticity and integrity for the pixel data but not for the header data. In this paper, we propose a crypto-based algorithm that provides confidentially, authenticity, and integrity for the pixel data, as well as for the header data. This is achieved by applying strong cryptographic primitives utilizing internally generated security data, such as encryption keys, hashing codes, and digital signatures. The security data are generated internally from the header and the pixel data, thus a strong bond is established between the DICOM data and the corresponding security data. The proposed algorithm has been evaluated extensively using DICOM images of different modalities. Simulation experiments show that confidentiality, authenticity, and integrity have been achieved as reflected by the results we obtained for normalized correlation, entropy, PSNR, histogram analysis, and robustness.

  17. Multi-provider architecture for cloud outsourcing of medical imaging repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Tiago Marques; Bastião Silva, Luís A; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luís

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, the extended usage of medical imaging procedures has raised the medical community attention towards the optimization of their workflows. More recently, the federation of multiple institutions into a seamless distribution network has brought hope of increased quality healthcare services along with more efficient resource management. As a result, medical institutions are constantly looking for the best infrastructure to deploy their imaging archives. In this scenario, public cloud infrastructures arise as major candidates, as they offer elastic storage space, optimal data availability without great requirements of maintenance costs or IT personnel, in a pay-as-you-go model. However, standard methodologies still do not take full advantage of outsourced archives, namely because their integration with other in-house solutions is troublesome. This document proposes a multi-provider architecture for integration of outsourced archives with in-house PACS resources, taking advantage of foreign providers to store medical imaging studies, without disregarding security. It enables the retrieval of images from multiple archives simultaneously, improving performance, data availability and avoiding the vendor-locking problem. Moreover it enables load balancing and cache techniques.

  18. Monolayer-crystal streptavidin support films provide an internal standard of cryo-EM image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bong-Gyoon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Watson, Zoe [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Cate, Jamie H. D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Glaeser, Robert M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of images of biotinylated Escherichia coli 70S ribosome particles, bound to streptavidin affinity grids, demonstrates that the image-quality of particles can be predicted by the image-quality of the monolayer crystalline support film. Also, the quality of the Thon rings is a good predictor of the image-quality of particles, but only when images of the streptavidin crystals extend to relatively high resolution. When the estimated resolution of streptavidin was 5 Å or worse, for example, the ribosomal density map obtained from 22,697 particles went to only 9.5 Å, while the resolution of the map reached 4.0 Å for the same number of particles, when the estimated resolution of streptavidin crystal was 4 Å or better. It thus is easy to tell which images in a data set ought to be retained for further work, based on the highest resolution seen for Bragg peaks in the computed Fourier transforms of the streptavidin component. The refined density map obtained from 57,826 particles obtained in this way extended to 3.6 Å, a marked improvement over the value of 3.9 Å obtained previously from a subset of 52,433 particles obtained from the same initial data set of 101,213 particles after 3-D classification. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that interaction with the air-water interface can damage particles when the sample becomes too thin. Finally, streptavidin monolayer crystals appear to provide a good indication of when that is the case.

  19. Ultrahigh sensitivity endoscopic camera using a new CMOS image sensor: providing with clear images under low illumination in addition to fluorescent images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hisae; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshiyuki; Fukuyo, Tsuneo; Chiba, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    We developed a new ultrahigh-sensitive CMOS camera using a specific sensor that has a wide range of spectral sensitivity characteristics. The objective of this study is to present our updated endoscopic technology that has successfully integrated two innovative functions; ultrasensitive imaging as well as advanced fluorescent viewing. Two different experiments were conducted. One was carried out to evaluate the function of the ultrahigh-sensitive camera. The other was to test the availability of the newly developed sensor and its performance as a fluorescence endoscope. In both studies, the distance from the endoscopic tip to the target was varied and those endoscopic images in each setting were taken for further comparison. In the first experiment, the 3-CCD camera failed to display the clear images under low illumination, and the target was hardly seen. In contrast, the CMOS camera was able to display the targets regardless of the camera-target distance under low illumination. Under high illumination, imaging quality given by both cameras was quite alike. In the second experiment as a fluorescence endoscope, the CMOS camera was capable of clearly showing the fluorescent-activated organs. The ultrahigh sensitivity CMOS HD endoscopic camera is expected to provide us with clear images under low illumination in addition to the fluorescent images under high illumination in the field of laparoscopic surgery.

  20. Signal to noise ratio of energy selective x-ray photon counting systems with pileup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    To derive fundamental limits on the effect of pulse pileup and quantum noise in photon counting detectors on the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and noise variance of energy selective x-ray imaging systems. An idealized model of the response of counting detectors to pulse pileup is used. The model assumes a nonparalyzable response and delta function pulse shape. The model is used to derive analytical formulas for the noise and energy spectrum of the recorded photons with pulse pileup. These formulas are first verified with a Monte Carlo simulation. They are then used with a method introduced in a previous paper [R. E. Alvarez, "Near optimal energy selective x-ray imaging system performance with simple detectors," Med. Phys. 37, 822-841 (2010)] to compare the signal to noise ratio with pileup to the ideal SNR with perfect energy resolution. Detectors studied include photon counting detectors with pulse height analysis (PHA), detectors that simultaneously measure the number of photons and the integrated energy (NQ detector), and conventional energy integrating and photon counting detectors. The increase in the A-vector variance with dead time is also computed and compared to the Monte Carlo results. A formula for the covariance of the NQ detector is developed. The validity of the constant covariance approximation to the Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB) for larger counts is tested. The SNR becomes smaller than the conventional energy integrating detector (Q) SNR for 0.52, 0.65, and 0.78 expected number photons per dead time for counting (N), two, and four bin PHA detectors, respectively. The NQ detector SNR is always larger than the N and Q SNR but only marginally so for larger dead times. Its noise variance increases by a factor of approximately 3 and 5 for the A1 and A2 components as the dead time parameter increases from 0 to 0.8 photons per dead time. With four bin PHA data, the increase in variance is approximately 2 and 4 times. The constant covariance approximation

  1. Extracellular volume imaging by magnetic resonance imaging provides insights into overt and sub-clinical myocardial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugander, Martin; Oki, Abiola J; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Kellman, Peter; Greiser, Andreas; Aletras, Anthony H; Sibley, Christopher T; Chen, Marcus Y; Bandettini, W Patricia; Arai, Andrew E

    2012-05-01

    Conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance can detect myocardial infarction and some forms of non-ischaemic myocardial fibrosis. However, quantitative imaging of extracellular volume fraction (ECV) may be able to detect subtle abnormalities such as diffuse fibrosis or post-infarct remodelling of remote myocardium. The aims were (1) to measure ECV in myocardial infarction and non-ischaemic myocardial fibrosis, (2) to determine whether ECV varies with age, and (3) to detect sub-clinical abnormalities in 'normal appearing' myocardium remote from regions of infarction. Cardiac magnetic resonance ECV imaging was performed in 126 patients with T1 mapping before and after injection of gadolinium contrast. Conventional LGE images were acquired for the left ventricle. In patients with a prior myocardial infarction, the infarct region had an ECV of 51 ± 8% which did not overlap with the remote 'normal appearing' myocardium that had an ECV of 27 ± 3% (P infarctions increased as left ventricular ejection fraction decreased (r = -0.50, P = 0.02). Extracellular volume fraction imaging can quantitatively characterize myocardial infarction, atypical diffuse fibrosis, and subtle myocardial abnormalities not clinically apparent on LGE images. Taken within the context of prior literature, these subtle ECV abnormalities are consistent with diffuse fibrosis related to age and changes remote from infarction.

  2. Extracellular volume imaging by magnetic resonance imaging provides insights into overt and sub-clinical myocardial pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugander, Martin; Oki, Abiola J.; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Kellman, Peter; Greiser, Andreas; Aletras, Anthony H.; Sibley, Christopher T.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Arai, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance can detect myocardial infarction and some forms of non-ischaemic myocardial fibrosis. However, quantitative imaging of extracellular volume fraction (ECV) may be able to detect subtle abnormalities such as diffuse fibrosis or post-infarct remodelling of remote myocardium. The aims were (1) to measure ECV in myocardial infarction and non-ischaemic myocardial fibrosis, (2) to determine whether ECV varies with age, and (3) to detect sub-clinical abnormalities in ‘normal appearing’ myocardium remote from regions of infarction. Methods and results Cardiac magnetic resonance ECV imaging was performed in 126 patients with T1 mapping before and after injection of gadolinium contrast. Conventional LGE images were acquired for the left ventricle. In patients with a prior myocardial infarction, the infarct region had an ECV of 51 ± 8% which did not overlap with the remote ‘normal appearing’ myocardium that had an ECV of 27 ± 3% (P myocardial infarctions increased as left ventricular ejection fraction decreased (r = −0.50, P = 0.02). Conclusion Extracellular volume fraction imaging can quantitatively characterize myocardial infarction, atypical diffuse fibrosis, and subtle myocardial abnormalities not clinically apparent on LGE images. Taken within the context of prior literature, these subtle ECV abnormalities are consistent with diffuse fibrosis related to age and changes remote from infarction. PMID:22279111

  3. A portable dental image viewer using a mobile network to provide a tele-dental service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wonse; Kim, Dong-Keun; Kim, Jung-Chae; Kim, Kee-Deog; Yoo, Sun K

    2009-01-01

    We tested three imaging devices for suitability in emergency dental situations for telemedicine. The three devices were a special-purpose oral camera, a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera, and the built-in camera of a mobile phone. A total of 20 subjects volunteered to take part in the study. We simulated five different conditions which could affect the quality of the image and measured image transmission times across two widely available mobile networks (a CDMA-based 3G network and a Wireless Broadband Network, WiBRO). The DSLR produced the best quality images, although it was a relatively large device and not easy to use. The oral camera failed to give satisfactory images under certain conditions (i.e. without extra lighting, out of focus and head motion). In contrast, the mobile phone based camera was very easy to use and to handle, and it gave good information for initial diagnosis, even at high compression ratios. If the image acquisition conditions are carefully set up, this device might be the best for emergency dental trauma situations.

  4. Sequential imaging of intraneural sciatic nerve endometriosis provides insight into symptoms of cyclical sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Collins, Mark S; Sandroni, Paola; Cheville, John C; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis of the nerve often remains an elusive diagnosis. We report the first case of intraneural lumbosacral plexus endometriosis with sequential imaging at different phases of the menstrual cycle: during the luteal phase and menstruation. Compared to the first examination, the examination performed during the patient's period revealed the lumbosacral plexus larger and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. The intraneural endometriosis cyst was also larger and showed recent hemorrhage. Additionally, this case represents another example of perineural spread of endometriosis from the uterus to the lumbosacral plexus along the autonomic nerves and then distally to the sciatic nerve and proximally to the spinal nerves.

  5. Hybrid Imaging Labels: Providing the Link Between Mass Spectrometry-Based Molecular Pathology and Theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, Tessa; van der Wal, Steffen; van Malderen, Stijn J M; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; van Unen, Vincent; Peters, Ruud J B; van Bemmel, Margaretha E M; McDonnell, Liam A; Velders, Aldrik H; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2017-01-01

    Development of theranostic concepts that include inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) imaging can be hindered by the lack of a direct comparison to more standardly used methods for in vitro and in vivo evaluation; e.g. fluorescence or nuclear medicine. In this study a bimodal (or rather, hybrid) tracer that contains both a fluorescent dye and a chelate was used to evaluate the existence of a direct link between mass spectrometry (MS) and in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging findings using fluorescence and radioisotopes. At the same time, the hybrid label was used to determine whether the use of a single isotope label would allow for MS-based diagnostics. A hybrid label that contained both a DTPA chelate (that was coordinated with either 165Ho or 111In) and a Cy5 fluorescent dye was coupled to the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) targeting peptide Ac-TZ14011 (hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011). This receptor targeting tracer was used to 1) validate the efficacy of (165Ho-based) mass-cytometry in determining the receptor affinity via comparison with fluorescence-based flow cytometry (Cy5), 2) evaluate the microscopic binding pattern of the tracer in tumor cells using both fluorescence confocal imaging (Cy5) and LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho), 3) compare in vivo biodistribution patterns obtained with ICP-MS (165Ho) and radiodetection (111In) after intravenous administration of hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011 in tumor-bearing mice. Finally, LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho) was linked to fluorescence-based analysis of excised tissue samples (Cy5). Analysis with both mass-cytometry and flow cytometry revealed a similar receptor affinity, respectively 352 ± 141 nM and 245 ± 65 nM (p = 0.08), but with a much lower detection sensitivity for the first modality. In vitro LA-ICP-MS imaging (165Ho) enabled clear discrimination between CXCR4 positive and negative cells, but fluorescence microscopy was required to determine the intracellular distribution. In

  6. Miniature stereoscopic video system provides real-time 3D registration and image fusion for minimally invasive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, Avi; Bar-Zohar, Meir; Horesh, Nadav

    2007-02-01

    Sophisticated surgeries require the integration of several medical imaging modalities, like MRI and CT, which are three-dimensional. Many efforts are invested in providing the surgeon with this information in an intuitive & easy to use manner. A notable development, made by Visionsense, enables the surgeon to visualize the scene in 3D using a miniature stereoscopic camera. It also provides real-time 3D measurements that allow registration of navigation systems as well as 3D imaging modalities, overlaying these images on the stereoscopic video image in real-time. The real-time MIS 'see through tissue' fusion solutions enable the development of new MIS procedures in various surgical segments, such as spine, abdomen, cardio-thoracic and brain. This paper describes 3D surface reconstruction and registration methods using Visionsense camera, as a step toward fully automated multi-modality 3D registration.

  7. High-Speed AFM Images of Thermal Motion Provide Stiffness Map of Interfacial Membrane Protein Moieties

    OpenAIRE

    Preiner, Johannes; Horner, Andreas; Karner, Andreas; Ollinger, Nicole; Siligan, Christine; Pohl, Peter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The flexibilities of extracellular loops determine ligand binding and activation of membrane receptors. Arising from fluctuations in inter- and intraproteinaceous interactions, flexibility manifests in thermal motion. Here we demonstrate that quantitative flexibility values can be extracted from directly imaging the thermal motion of membrane protein moieties using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). Stiffness maps of the main periplasmic loops of single reconstituted water channels ...

  8. Method for providing a polarization filter for processing synthetic aperture radar image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Pascale C. (Inventor); vanZyl, Jakob J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polarization filter can maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of a polarimetric SAR and help discriminate between targets or enhance image features, e.g., enhance contract between different types of target. The method disclosed is based on the Stokes matrix/Stokes vector representation, so the targets of interest can be extended targets, and the method can also be applied to the case of bistatic polarimetric radars.

  9. Deep machine learning provides state-of-the-art performance in image-based plant phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Michael P; Atkinson, Jonathan A; Townsend, Alexandra J; Wilson, Michael H; Griffiths, Marcus; Jackson, Aaron S; Bulat, Adrian; Tzimiropoulos, Georgios; Wells, Darren M; Murchie, Erik H; Pridmore, Tony P; French, Andrew P

    2017-10-01

    In plant phenotyping, it has become important to be able to measure many features on large image sets in order to aid genetic discovery. The size of the datasets, now often captured robotically, often precludes manual inspection, hence the motivation for finding a fully automated approach. Deep learning is an emerging field that promises unparalleled results on many data analysis problems. Building on artificial neural networks, deep approaches have many more hidden layers in the network, and hence have greater discriminative and predictive power. We demonstrate the use of such approaches as part of a plant phenotyping pipeline. We show the success offered by such techniques when applied to the challenging problem of image-based plant phenotyping and demonstrate state-of-the-art results (>97% accuracy) for root and shoot feature identification and localization. We use fully automated trait identification using deep learning to identify quantitative trait loci in root architecture datasets. The majority (12 out of 14) of manually identified quantitative trait loci were also discovered using our automated approach based on deep learning detection to locate plant features. We have shown deep learning-based phenotyping to have very good detection and localization accuracy in validation and testing image sets. We have shown that such features can be used to derive meaningful biological traits, which in turn can be used in quantitative trait loci discovery pipelines. This process can be completely automated. We predict a paradigm shift in image-based phenotyping bought about by such deep learning approaches, given sufficient training sets. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging May Provide Prognostic Information in Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome: Report of a Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dervisoglu, E.; Yegenaga, I.; Anik, Y.; Sengul, E.; Turgut, T. [Kocaeli Univ. (Turkey). Internal Medicine

    2006-03-15

    Hyponatremia and its rapid correction may cause osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) with damage to the pontine and extrapontine areas of the brain. The damage may become persistent or may regress and disappear during follow-up. We describe the case of a 35-year-old woman with chronic renal failure who was admitted to the emergency department with profound hyponatremia which was corrected rapidly after hemodialysis treatment. During follow-up, she developed quadriparesis and dysartria. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated abnormalities characteristic of ODS in the pons as well as the basal ganglia with increased signal intensity on T2 and diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI and low apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. After the sixth day, her clinical status improved progressively. Control MRI revealed rapid normalization of the ADC values during the first week and month parallel to the clinical improvement. However, the hyperintensities on T2-weighted images persisted. Four months later the MRI findings were completely normal. The close relationship between the ADC abnormality and the clinical status suggests that DW-MRI may be useful in predicting the prognosis of ODS. Keywords: Apparent diffusion coefficient; correction of hyponatremia; magnetic resonance imaging; osmotic demyelination.

  11. Fourier component imaging of water resonance in the human breast provides markers for malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medved, Milica; Newstead, Gillian M.; Fan, Xiaobing; Du, Yiping P.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Shimauchi, Akiko; Zamora, Marta A.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that voxels with inhomogeneously broadened water resonances, as revealed by high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI, correlate with underlying tumor pathology findings, and thus carry diagnostically useful information. Thirty-four women with mammographically suspicious breast lesions were imaged at 1.5 T, using high-resolution echo-planar spectroscopic imaging. Fourier component images (FCIs) of the off-peak spectral signal were generated, and clusters of voxels with significant inhomogeneous broadening (broadened clusters) were identified and correlated to biopsy results. Inhomogeneously broadened clusters were found significantly more frequently in malignant than in benign lesions. A larger percentage of broadened cluster voxels were found inside the malignant versus benign lesions. The high statistical significance for separation of benign and malignant lesions was robust over a large range of post-processing parameters, with a maximum ROC area under curve of 0.83. In the human breast, an inhomogeneously broadened water resonance can serve as a correlate marker for malignancy and is likely to reflect the underlying anatomy or physiology.

  12. Parenchymal Thoracic Splenosis: History and Nuclear Imaging Without Invasive Procedures May Provide Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Umer Feroze; Martin, Mersadies R.; Patel, Rupal; Mahmoud, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Splenosis is a rare finding of ectopic splenic tissue found within the thoracic cavity, abdomen or peritoneal cavity. Most cases occur in the abdomen and the thoracic location is a comparatively rare finding. In thoracic splenosis the splenic tissue most often grows in the form of a nodule and the autotransplantation is usually caused by a previous operation and/or most commonly a penetrating or blunt trauma to the thoracoabdominal region, resulting in splenic rupture and in some cases left diaphragmatic tear. In majority of the cases the patients are asymptomatic and are incidentally diagnosed with left hemithorax pulmonary lesions found via chest radiography or thoracic computed tomography. We present a 45-year-old Caucasian male who was incidentally diagnosed with parenchymal thoracic splenosis secondary to a gunshot wound to the abdomen 13 years ago that resulted in distal pancreatectomy, splenectomy and gastrorrhaphy. In this case report we will briefly discuss the current updates in the literature regarding thoracic splenosis, and highlight the fact that the findings raise the suspicion of malignancy requiring numerous investigations yet early recognition of thoracic splenosis can prevent unnecessary tests and procedures. Preoperative diagnosis of splenosis should be made with the use of nuclear imaging studies such as the 99mTc heat-damaged erythrocyte study rather than computed tomography-guided biopsy or invasive surgery. Keywords Thoracic splenosis; Computed tomography; Ppancreatectomy; Splenectomy; Gastrorrhaphy PMID:21629536

  13. Providing an intelligible explanation to pet owners by using three-dimensional CT images: use of clinical imaging for better informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Miori; Yamada, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Junichiro; Lee, Ki-Ja; Watarai, Hirokazu; Hassan, Hany Y; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Miyake, Yoh-Ichi

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to discuss the level of intelligibility of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) images of clinical patients for persons who are lacking veterinary knowledge. 143 undergraduate students were participated in this study. They were entirely unfamiliar with veterinary anatomy. A survey was conducted using the visual analog scale method with a focus on the level of intelligibility of the 3D-CT images compared to that of the two-dimensional CT images or radiographs. As a result, the mean value of the intelligibility of the 3D-CT image was 88.4 +/- 17.8 points out of 100 points. In clinical cases, it is very difficult for pet owners lacking veterinary knowledge to understand the clinical status of their pets even with explanations using illustrations, radiographs, and transverse CT images. It is considered that better informed consent and patient satisfaction will be obtained provided veterinarians make an effort towards intelligible patient education by using 3D-CT images.

  14. MEDXVIEWER: PROVIDING A WEB-ENABLED WORKSTATION ENVIRONMENT FOR COLLABORATIVE AND REMOTE MEDICAL IMAGING VIEWING, PERCEPTION STUDIES AND READER TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looney, P T; Young, K C; Halling-Brown, M D

    2016-06-01

    MedXViewer (Medical eXtensible Viewer) has been developed to address the need for workstation-independent, picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-less viewing and interaction with anonymised medical images. The aim of this paper is to describe the design and features of MedXViewer as well as to introduce the new features available in the latest release (version 1.2). MedXViewer currently supports digital mammography and tomosynthesis. The flexible software design used to develop MedXViewer allows it to be easily extended to support other imaging modalities. Regions of interest can be drawn by a user, and any associated information about a mark, an image or a study can be added. The questions and settings can be easily configured depending on the need of the research allowing both ROC and FROC studies to be performed. Complex tree-like questions can be asked where a given answer presents the user to new questions. The hanging protocol can be specified for each study. Panning, windowing, zooming and moving through slices are all available while modality-specific features can be easily enabled, e.g. quadrant zooming in digital mammography and tomosynthesis studies. MedXViewer can integrate with a web-based image database OPTIMAM Medical Image Database allowing results and images to be stored centrally. The software can, alternatively, run without a network connection where the images and results can be encrypted and stored locally on a machine or external drive. MedXViewer has been used for running remote paper-less observer studies and is capable of providing a training infrastructure and coordinating remote collaborative viewing sessions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by CMR provides strong prognostic value to cardiac events regardless of patient's sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Filho, Otavio R; Seabra, Luciana F; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Abdullah, Shuaib M; Francis, Sanjeev A; Blankstein, Ron; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2011-08-01

    The major aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging can provide robust prognostic value in women presenting with suspected ischemia, to the same extent as in men. Compelling evidence indicates that women with coronary artery disease (CAD) experience worse outcomes than men owing to a lack of early diagnosis and management. Numerous clinical studies have shown that stress CMR detects evidence of myocardial ischemia and infarction at high accuracy. Compared to nuclear scintigraphy, CMR is free of ionizing radiation, has high spatial resolution for imaging small hearts, and overcomes breast attenuation artifacts, which are substantial advantages when imaging women for CAD. We performed stress CMR in 405 patients (168 women, mean age 58 ± 14 years) referred for ischemia assessment. CMR techniques included cine cardiac function, perfusion imaging during vasodilating stress, and late gadolinium enhancement imaging. All patients were followed for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). At a median follow-up of 30 months, MACE occurred in 36 patients (9%) including 21 cardiac deaths and 15 acute myocardial infarctions. In women, CMR evidence of ischemia (ISCHEMIA) demonstrated strong association with MACE (unadjusted hazard ratio: 49.9, p women with ISCHEMIA(+) had an annual MACE rate of 15%, women with ISCHEMIA(-) had very low annual MACE rate (0.3%), which was not statistically different from the low annual MACE rate in men with ISCHEMIA(-) (1.1%). CMR myocardial ischemia score was the strongest multivariable predictor of MACE in this cohort, for both women and men, indicating robust cardiac prognostication regardless of sex. In addition to avoiding exposure to ionizing radiation, stress CMR myocardial perfusion imaging is an effective and robust risk-stratifying tool for patients of either sex presenting with possible ischemia. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  16. In vivo testing of a prototype system providing simultaneous white light and near infrared autofluorescence image acquisition for detection of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Michael C.; deVere White, Ralph; Demos, Stavros G.

    2012-03-01

    A prototype instrument developed to provide simultaneously ordinary visual endoscopy together with near infrared (NIR) autofluorescence imaging via parallel image acquisition is demonstrated. The two images are recorded concurrently and the instrument interfaces with any ordinary endoscope. Preliminary results of a pilot study focused on imaging of bladder tumors in vivo using this instrumentation are presented. The experimental results demonstrate the capabilities of this instrumentation design, imaging methodology, and define the current limitation for further development of the system.

  17. Multisite Machine Learning Analysis Provides a Robust Structural Imaging Signature of Schizophrenia Detectable Across Diverse Patient Populations and Within Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozycki, Martin; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Koutsouleris, Nikolaos; Erus, Guray; Doshi, Jimit; Wolf, Daniel H; Fan, Yong; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Meisenzahl, Eva M; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Ying, Hong; Yan, Hao; Yue, Weihua; Zhang, Dai; Davatzikos, Christos

    2017-11-24

    Past work on relatively small, single-site studies using regional volumetry, and more recently machine learning methods, has shown that widespread structural brain abnormalities are prominent in schizophrenia. However, to be clinically useful, structural imaging biomarkers must integrate high-dimensional data and provide reproducible results across clinical populations and on an individual person basis. Using advanced multi-variate analysis tools and pooled data from case-control imaging studies conducted at 5 sites (941 adult participants, including 440 patients with schizophrenia), a neuroanatomical signature of patients with schizophrenia was found, and its robustness and reproducibility across sites, populations, and scanners, was established for single-patient classification. Analyses were conducted at multiple scales, including regional volumes, voxelwise measures, and complex distributed patterns. Single-subject classification was tested for single-site, pooled-site, and leave-site-out generalizability. Regional and voxelwise analyses revealed a pattern of widespread reduced regional gray matter volume, particularly in the medial prefrontal, temporolimbic and peri-Sylvian cortex, along with ventricular and pallidum enlargement. Multivariate classification using pooled data achieved a cross-validated prediction accuracy of 76% (AUC = 0.84). Critically, the leave-site-out validation of the detected schizophrenia signature showed accuracy/AUC range of 72-77%/0.73-0.91, suggesting a robust generalizability across sites and patient cohorts. Finally, individualized patient classifications displayed significant correlations with clinical measures of negative, but not positive, symptoms. Taken together, these results emphasize the potential for structural neuroimaging data to provide a robust and reproducible imaging signature of schizophrenia. A web-accessible portal is offered to allow the community to obtain individualized classifications of magnetic resonance

  18. Design of a large acceptance, high efficiency energy selection system for the ELIMAIA beam-line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, F.; Maggiore, M.; Andó, L.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Gallo, G.; Korn, G.; Leanza, R.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.

    2016-08-01

    A magnetic chicane based on four electromagnetic dipoles is going to be realized by INFN-LNS to be used as an Energy Selection System (ESS) for laser driven proton beams up to 300 MeV and C6+ up to 70 MeV/u. The system will provide, as output, ion beams with a contrallable energy spread varying from 5% up to 20% according to the aperture slit size. Moreover, it has a very wide acceptance in order to ensure a very high transmission efficiency and, in principle, it has been designed to be used also as an active energy modulator. This system is the core element of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and Multidisciplinary applications) beam transport, dosimetry and irradiation line that will be developed by INFN-LNS (It) and installed at the ELI-Beamlines facility in Prague (Cz). ELIMED will be the first user's open transport beam-line where a controlled laser-driven ion beam will be used for multidisciplinary research. The definition of well specified characteristics, both in terms of performance and field quality, of the magnetic chicane is crucial for the system realization, for the accurate study of the beam dynamics and for the proper matching with the Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles (PMQs) used as a collection system already designed. Here, the design of the magnetic chicane is described in details together with the adopted solutions in order to realize a robust system form the magnetic point of view. Moreover, the first preliminary transport simulations are also described showing the good performance of the whole beam line (PMQs+ESS).

  19. Ultrafast laser driven micro-lens to focus and energy select MeV protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toncian, Toma

    2008-05-15

    A technique for simultaneous focusing and energy selection of high-current, MeV proton beams using radial, transient electric fields (10{sup 7}-10{sup 10} V/m) triggered on the inner wall of a hollow micro-cylinder by an intense, sub-picosecond laser-pulse is presented. Due to the transient nature of the radial focusing field, the proposed method allows selection of a desired range out of the spectrum of the poly-energetic proton beam. This technique addresses current drawbacks of laser-accelerated proton beams, i.e. their broad spectrum and divergence at the source. This thesis presents both experimental and computational studies that led to the understanding of the physical processes driving the micro-lens. After an one side irradiation of a hollow metallic cylinder a radial electric field develops inside the cylinder. Hot electrons generated by the interaction between laser pulse and cylinder wall spread inside the cylinder generating a plasma at the wall. This plasma expands into vacuum and sustains an electric field that acts as a collecting lens on a proton beam propagating axially through the cylinder. Both focusing and the reduction of the intrinsic beam divergence from 20 deg to.3 deg for a narrow spectral range was demonstrated. By sub-aperturing the beam a narrow spectral range ({delta}{epsilon}/{epsilon} < 3%) was selected from the poly-energetic beam. The micro-lens properties are tunable allowing for optimization towards applications. Optical probing techniques and proton imaging were employed to study the spacial and temporal evolution of the field and revealed a complex physical scenario of the rise and decay of the radial electric field. Each aspect studied experimentally is interpreted using 2D PIC and ray tracing simulations. A very good agreement between the experimental and computational data is found. The PIC simulations are used to upscale the demonstrated micro-lens capabilities to the focusing of a 270 MeV proton beam, an energy relevant

  20. Artificial intelligence in medicine and cardiac imaging: harnessing big data and advanced computing to provide personalized medical diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilsizian, Steven E; Siegel, Eliot L

    2014-01-01

    Although advances in information technology in the past decade have come in quantum leaps in nearly every aspect of our lives, they seem to be coming at a slower pace in the field of medicine. However, the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) in hospitals is increasing rapidly, accelerated by the meaningful use initiatives associated with the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services EHR Incentive Programs. The transition to electronic medical records and availability of patient data has been associated with increases in the volume and complexity of patient information, as well as an increase in medical alerts, with resulting "alert fatigue" and increased expectations for rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, these increased demands on health care providers create greater risk for diagnostic and therapeutic errors. In the near future, artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning will likely assist physicians with differential diagnosis of disease, treatment options suggestions, and recommendations, and, in the case of medical imaging, with cues in image interpretation. Mining and advanced analysis of "big data" in health care provide the potential not only to perform "in silico" research but also to provide "real time" diagnostic and (potentially) therapeutic recommendations based on empirical data. "On demand" access to high-performance computing and large health care databases will support and sustain our ability to achieve personalized medicine. The IBM Jeopardy! Challenge, which pitted the best all-time human players against the Watson computer, captured the imagination of millions of people across the world and demonstrated the potential to apply AI approaches to a wide variety of subject matter, including medicine. The combination of AI, big data, and massively parallel computing offers the potential to create a revolutionary way of practicing evidence-based, personalized medicine.

  1. Three-dimensional imaging provides valuable clinical data to aid in unilateral tissue expander-implant breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Oren M; Karp, Nolan S; Small, Kevin; Unger, Jacob; Rudolph, Lauren; Pritchard, Ashley; Choi, Mihye

    2008-01-01

    The current approach to breast reconstruction remains largely subjective and is based on physical examination and visual-estimates of breast size. Thus, the overall success of breast reconstruction is limited by the inability of plastic surgeons to objectively assess breast volume and shape, which may result in suboptimal outcomes. A potential solution to this obstacle may be three-dimensional (3D) imaging, which can provide unique clinical data that was previously unattainable to plastic surgeons. The following study represents a prospective analysis of patient volunteers undergoing unilateral tissue expander (TE)-implant reconstruction by one of the two senior authors (MC, NSK). All patients underwent unilateral mastectomy with immediate or delayed insertion of a TE, followed by an exchange for a permanent silicone or saline implant. 3D scans were obtained during routine pre- and postoperative office visits. The 3D breast-volume calculations served as a guide for surgical management. Twelve patients have completed 3D-assisted unilateral breast reconstruction to date. These patients represent a wide range of body habitus and breast size/shape; 3D volume range from 136 to 518 cm(3). The mean baseline breast asymmetry in this group was 12.0 +/- 10.8%. Contralateral symmetry procedures were performed in eleven patients, consisting of the following: mastopexy (n = 6), augmentation (n = 1), mastopexy/augmentation (n = 2), and reduction mammoplasty (n = 2). Reconstruction was completed in a total number of 2 (n = 10) or 3 (n = 2) operations. Overall breast symmetry improved at the completion of reconstruction in the majority of patients, with an average postoperative symmetry of 95.1 +/- 4.4% (relative to 88% preoperatively). 3D imaging serves a valuable adjunct to TE-implant breast reconstruction. This technology provides volumetric data that can help guide breast reconstruction, such as in choosing the initial TE size, total volume of expansion, and final implant size

  2. Low-magnification image analysis of Giemsa stained, electroporation and bleomycin treated endothelial monolayers provides reliable monolayer integrity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulenberg, Cécil J W; Cemazar, Maja

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro cell model for studying the in vivo observed vascular effect, induced by exposing blood vessels to changing electric field strengths. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were cultured as monolayers on 8 chamber glass slides as a model of capillary wall. Exposed to electric pulses alone, or in the presence of bleomycin (electrochemotherapy), monolayers were incubated with culture medium, fixed with methanol, stained with Giemsa, and photographed. Images of high-contrast low-magnification monolayers made under identical optimal light exposure were converted to greyscale, and the use of a threshold tool yielded a binary distribution, from which we determined two parameters of monolayer integrity: the covered surface area and the number of cells. We show that this low-magnification image analysis method for attached endothelial cells provides reliable control parameters of monolayer integrity, representing capillary wall. Besides, already within 2h post-treatment the data show distinct effects in the monolayer integrity parameters for electric pulses alone, or in the presence of bleomycin. The present method can be readily introduced to short and long-term toxicity assays with a variety of treatment conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multimodal 4D imaging of cell-pathogen interactions in the lungs provides new insights into pulmonary infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiole, Daniel; Douady, Julien; Cleret, Aurélie; Garraud, Kévin; Mathieu, Jacques; Quesnel-Hellmann, Anne; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas

    2011-07-01

    Lung efficiency as gas exchanger organ is based on the delicate balance of its associated mucosal immune system between inflammation and sterility. In this study, we developed a dynamic imaging protocol using confocal and twophoton excitation fluorescence (2PEF) on freshly harvested infected lungs. This modus operandi allowed the collection of important information about CX3CR1+ pulmonary cells. This major immune cell subset turned out to be distributed in an anisotropic way in the lungs: subpleural, parenchymal and bronchial CX3CR1+ cells have then been described. The way parenchymal CX3CR1+ cells react against LPS activation has been considered using Matlab software, demonstrating a dramatic increase of average cell speed. Then, interactions between Bacillus anthracis spores and CX3CR1+ dendritic cells have been investigated, providing not only evidences of CX3CR1+ cells involvement in pathogen uptake but also details about the capture mechanisms.

  4. Two-dimensional XD-GRASP provides better image quality than conventional 2D cardiac cine MRI for patients who cannot suspend respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarski, Eve; Chitiboi, Teodora; Ramb, Rebecca; Latson, Larry A; Bhatla, Puneet; Feng, Li; Axel, Leon

    2017-10-24

    Residual respiratory motion degrades image quality in conventional cardiac cine MRI (CCMRI). We evaluated whether a free-breathing (FB) radial imaging CCMRI sequence with compressed sensing reconstruction [extradimensional (e.g. cardiac and respiratory phases) golden-angle radial sparse parallel, or XD-GRASP] could provide better image quality than a conventional Cartesian breath-held (BH) sequence in an unselected population of patients undergoing clinical CCMRI. One hundred one patients who underwent BH and FB imaging in a midventricular short-axis plane at a matching location were included. Visual and quantitative image analysis was performed by two blinded experienced readers, using a five-point qualitative scale to score overall image quality and visual signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) grade, with measures of noise and sharpness. End-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular areas were also measured and compared for both BH and FB images. Image quality was generally better with the BH cines (overall quality grade for BH vs FB images 4 vs 2.9, p images regarding end-diastolic or end-systolic areas (p = 0.35 and p = 0.12). Eighteen of the 101 patients had poor BH image quality (grade 1 or 2). In this subgroup, the quality of the FB images was better (p = 0.0032), as was the SNR grade (p = 0.003), but there were no significant differences regarding noise and sharpness (p = 0.45 and p = 0.47). Although FB XD-GRASP CCMRI was visually inferior to conventional BH CCMRI in general, it provided improved image quality in the subgroup of patients with respiratory-motion-induced artifacts on BH images.

  5. 2D XD-GRASP provides better image quality than conventional 2D cardiac cine MRI for patients who cannot suspend respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarski, Eve; Chitiboi, Teodora; Ramb, Rebecca; Latson, Larry A; Bhatla, Puneet; Feng, Li; Axel, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Object Residual respiratory motion degrades image quality in conventional cardiac cine MRI (CCMR). We evaluated whether a free-breathing (FB) radial imaging CCMR sequence with compressed sensing reconstruction (eXtra-Dimension (e.g. cardiac and respiratory phases) Golden-angle RAdial Sparse Parallel, or XD-GRASP) could provide better image quality than a conventional Cartesian breath-held (BH) sequence, in an unselected population of patients undergoing clinical CCMR. Material and Methods 101 patients who underwent BH and FB imaging in a mid-ventricular short-axis plane at a matching location were included. Visual and quantitative image analysis was performed by two blinded experienced readers, using a 5-point qualitative scale to score overall image quality and visual signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) grade, with measures of noise and sharpness. End-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) left-ventricular areas were also measured and compared for both BH and FB images. Results Image quality was generally better with the BH cines (overall quality grade BH vs FB: 4 vs 2.9, pcine in general, it provided improved image quality in the subgroup of patients presenting respiratory motion-induced artifacts on breath-held images. PMID:29067539

  6. beta sup + -gamma coincidence positron lifetime spectrometer with positron energy selection by electromagnetic lens

    CERN Document Server

    Chalermkarnnon, P; Araki, H; Shirai, Y; Shishido, I

    2002-01-01

    A beta sup + -gamma coincidence positron lifetime spectrometer equipped with two electromagnetic lenses was constructed. The electromagnetic lens was used to have energy-selected positron beam. It accomplished a time resolution of 385 ps (FWHM) for the total system with a Pilot U plastic scintillator. By using a silicon avalanche diode instead of Pilot U plastic scintillator to initiate start timing signals, the time resolution was improved to 345 ps (FWHM). With this method, in-situ positron lifetime measurements at high temperatures or under high stresses can be attained easily. (author)

  7. Analysis of students' aptitude to provide meaning to images that represent cellular components at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmani, Hassen-Reda; Schneeberger, Patricia; Kramer, Ijsbrand M

    2009-01-01

    The number of experimentally derived structures of cellular components is rapidly expanding, and this phenomenon is accompanied by the development of a new semiotic system for teaching. The infographic approach is shifting from a schematic toward a more realistic representation of cellular components. By realistic we mean artist-prepared or computer graphic images that closely resemble experimentally derived structures and are characterized by a low level of styling and simplification. This change brings about a new challenge for teachers: designing course instructions that allow students to interpret these images in a meaningful way. To determine how students deal with this change, we designed several image-based, in-course assessments. The images were highly relevant for the cell biology course but did not resemble any of the images in the teaching documents. We asked students to label the cellular components, describe their function, or both. What we learned from these tests is that realistic images, with a higher apparent level of complexity, do not deter students from investigating their meaning. When given a choice, the students do not necessarily choose the most simplified representation, and they were sensitive to functional indications embedded in realistic images.

  8. Resonant tunneling diodes as energy-selective contacts used in hot-carrier solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Yasuhiko, E-mail: takeda@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Sugimoto, Noriaki [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Ichiki, Akihisa [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Kusano, Yuya [Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Toyota Motor Corp., 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories, Inc., 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-09-28

    Among the four features unique to hot-carrier solar cells (HC-SCs): (i) carrier thermalization time and (ii) carrier equilibration time in the absorber, (iii) energy-selection width and (iv) conductance of the energy-selective contacts (ESCs), requisites of (i)-(iii) for high conversion efficiency have been clarified. We have tackled the remaining issues related to (iv) in the present study. The detailed balance model of HC-SC operation has been improved to involve a finite value of the ESC conductance to find the required values, which in turn has been revealed to be feasible using resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and quantum wells (QWs) by means of a formulation to calculate the conductance of the QD- and QW-RTDs derived using the rigorous solutions of the effective-mass Hamiltonians. Thus, all of the four requisites unique to HC-SCs to achieve high conversion efficiency have been elucidated, and the two requisites related to the ESCs can be fulfilled using the QD- and QW-RTDs.

  9. Utilization Management of High-Cost Imaging in an Outpatient Setting in a Large Stable Patient and Provider Cohort over 7 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilburg, Jeffrey B; Sistrom, Christopher L; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Stout, Markus B; Dreyer, Keith J; Rockett, Helaine R; Baron, Jason M; Ferris, Timothy G; Thrall, James H

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To quantify the effect of a comprehensive, long-term, provider-led utilization management (UM) program on high-cost imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, and positron emission tomography) performed on an outpatient basis. Materials and Methods This retrospective, 7-year cohort study included all patients regularly seen by primary care physicians (PCPs) at an urban academic medical center. The main outcome was the number of outpatient high-cost imaging examinations per patient per year ordered by the patient's PCP or by any specialist. The authors determined the probability of a patient undergoing any high-cost imaging procedure during a study year and the number of examinations per patient per year (intensity) in patients who underwent high-cost imaging. Risk-adjusted hierarchical models were used to directly quantify the physician component of variation in probability and intensity of high-cost imaging use, and clinicians were provided with regular comparative feedback on the basis of the results. Observed trends in high-cost imaging use and provider variation were compared with the same measures for outpatient laboratory studies because laboratory use was not subject to UM during this period. Finally, per-member per-year high-cost imaging use data were compared with statewide high-cost imaging use data from a major private payer on the basis of the same claim set. Results The patient cohort steadily increased in size from 88 959 in 2007 to 109 823 in 2013. Overall high-cost imaging utilization went from 0.43 examinations per year in 2007 to 0.34 examinations per year in 2013, a decrease of 21.33% (P < .0001). At the same time, similarly adjusted routine laboratory study utilization decreased by less than half that rate (9.4%, P < .0001). On the basis of unadjusted data, outpatient high-cost imaging utilization in this cohort decreased 28%, compared with a 20% decrease in statewide utilization (P = .0023). Conclusion

  10. Long-term live imaging provides new insight into stem cell regulation and germline-soma coordination in the Drosophila ovary

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Lucy X.; Spradling, Allan C.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila ovariole tip produces new ovarian follicles on a 12-hour cycle by controlling niche-based germline and follicle stem cell divisions and nurturing their developing daughters. Static images provide a thumbnail view of folliculogenesis but imperfectly capture the dynamic cellular interactions that underlie follicle production. We describe a live-imaging culture system that supports normal ovarian stem cell activity, cyst movement and intercellular interaction over 14 hours, which ...

  11. Expected Satiety: Application to Weight Management and Understanding Energy Selection in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Ciarán G; Almiron-Roig, Eva; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in the approaches used to quantify expectations of satiation and satiety have led to a better understanding of how humans select and consume food, and the associated links to energy intake regulation. When compared calorie for calorie some foods are expected to deliver several times more satiety than others, and multiple studies have demonstrated that people are able to discriminate between similar foods reliably and with considerable sensitivity. These findings have implications for the control of meal size and the design of foods that can be used to lower the energy density of diets. These methods and findings are discussed in terms of their implications for weight management. The current paper also highlights why expected satiety may also play an important role beyond energy selection, in moderating appetite sensations after a meal has been consumed, through memory for recent eating and the selection of foods across future meals.

  12. Accuracy of device-specific 2D and 3D image distortion correction algorithms for magnetic resonance imaging of the head provided by a manufacturer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karger, Christian P [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hoess, Angelika [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bendl, Rolf [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Canda, Valer [Siemens Medical Solutions, MRE W, Karl-Schall-Str. 4, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schad, Lothar [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-06-21

    For the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in precision radiotherapy, image distortions must be reduced to a minimum to maintain geometrical accuracy. Recently, two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) algorithms for MRI-device-specific distortion corrections were developed by the manufacturers of MRI devices. A previously developed phantom (Karger C P et al 2003 Phys. Med. Biol. 48 211-21) was used to quantify and assess the size of geometrical image distortions before and after application of the 2D and 3D correction algorithm in the head region. Four different types of MRI devices with different gradient systems were measured. For comparison, measurements were also performed with two computed tomography (CT) devices. Mean distortions of up to 4.6{+-}1.4 mm (maximum: 5.8 mm) were found prior to the correction. After the correction, the mean distortions were well below 2.0 mm in most cases. Distortions in the CT images were below or equal to 1.0 mm on average. Generally, the 3D algorithm produced comparable or better results than the 2D algorithm. The remaining distortions after the correction appear to be acceptable for fractionated radiotherapy. (note)

  13. Automated image analysis of cyclin D1 protein expression in invasive lobular breast carcinoma provides independent prognostic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Nicholas P; Lundgren, Katja L; Conway, Catherine; Anagnostaki, Lola; Costello, Sean; Landberg, Göran

    2012-11-01

    The emergence of automated image analysis algorithms has aided the enumeration, quantification, and immunohistochemical analyses of tumor cells in both whole section and tissue microarray samples. To date, the focus of such algorithms in the breast cancer setting has been on traditional markers in the common invasive ductal carcinoma subtype. Here, we aimed to optimize and validate an automated analysis of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 in a large collection of invasive lobular carcinoma and relate its expression to clinicopathologic data. The image analysis algorithm was trained to optimally match manual scoring of cyclin D1 protein expression in a subset of invasive lobular carcinoma tissue microarray cores. The algorithm was capable of distinguishing cyclin D1-positive cells and illustrated high correlation with traditional manual scoring (κ=0.63). It was then applied to our entire cohort of 483 patients, with subsequent statistical comparisons to clinical data. We found no correlation between cyclin D1 expression and tumor size, grade, and lymph node status. However, overexpression of the protein was associated with reduced recurrence-free survival (P=.029), as was positive nodal status (Pinvasive lobular carcinoma. Finally, high cyclin D1 expression was associated with increased hazard ratio in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.89). In conclusion, we describe an image analysis algorithm capable of reliably analyzing cyclin D1 staining in invasive lobular carcinoma and have linked overexpression of the protein to increased recurrence risk. Our findings support the use of cyclin D1 as a clinically informative biomarker for invasive lobular breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Synchrotron imaging of dentition provides insights into the biology of Hesperornis and Ichthyornis, the "last" toothed birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumont, Maïtena; Tafforeau, Paul; Bertin, Thomas; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan; Field, Daniel; Schulp, Anne; Strilisky, Brandon; Thivichon-Prince, Béatrice; Viriot, Laurent; Louchart, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Background: The dentitions of extinct organisms can provide pivotal information regarding their phylogenetic position, as well as paleobiology, diet, development, and growth. Extant birds are edentulous (toothless), but their closest relatives among stem birds, the Cretaceous Hesperornithiformes and

  15. Mesoscopic quantum ratchets and the thermodynamics of energy selective electron heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Tammy E.

    A ratchet is an asymmetric, non-equilibriated system that can produce a directed current of particles without the need for macroscopic potential gradients. In rocked quantum electron ratchets, tunnelling and wave-reflection can induce reversals in the direction of the net current as a function of system parameters. An asymmetric quantum point contact in a GaAs/GaAlAs heterostructure has been studied experimentally as a realisation of a quantum electron ratchet. A Landauer model predicts reversals in the direction of the net current as a function of temperature, amplitude of the rocking voltage, and Fermi energy. Artifacts such as circuit-induced asymmetry, also known as "self-gating", were carefully removed from the experimental data, which showed net current and net differential conductance reversals, as predicted by the model. The model also predicts the existence of a heat current where the net electron current changes sign, as equal numbers of high and low energy electrons are pumped in opposite directions. An idealised quantum electron ratchet is studied analytically as an energy selective electron heat engine and refrigerator. The hypothetical device considered consists of two electron reservoirs with different temperatures and Fermi energies. The reservoirs are linked via a resonant state in a quantum dot, which functions as an idealised energy filter for electrons. The efficiency of the device approaches the Carnot value when the energy transmitted by the filter is tuned to that where the Fermi distributions in the reservoirs are equal. The maximum power regime, where the filter transmits all electrons that contribute positively to the power, is also examined. Analytic expressions are obtained for the power and efficiency of the idealised device as both a heat engine and as a refrigerator in this regime of operation. The expressions depend on the ratio of the voltage to the difference in temperature of the reservoirs, and on the ratio of the reservoir

  16. Brain pathology in first-episode psychosis: magnetization transfer imaging provides additional information to MRI measurements of volume loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gary; Cercignani, Mara; Chu, Elvina M; Barnes, Thomas R E; Barker, Gareth J; Joyce, Eileen M; Ron, Maria A

    2010-01-01

    Loss of brain volume in first-episode psychosis can be detected using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but subtle changes--not leading to reduction in volume--that may contribute to clinical and cognitive abnormalities, may go undetected. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), a technique more sensitive to subtle neuropathological changes than conventional MRI, could yield important information on the extent and nature of structural abnormalities. Forty-eight patients (33 males) from a population-based sample with first-episode psychosis (41 with schizophrenia and 7 with schizoaffective psychosis) and 47 healthy volunteers (27 males) were studied. Differences in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and white and grey matter volumes between groups were investigated. In patients, MTR was reduced in right entorhinal cortex, fusiform, dentate and superior frontal gyri and in left superior frontal and inferior/rostral cingulate gyri. Grey matter volume was reduced in right insula, frontal operculum and middle and superior temporal gyri and in left middle temporal gyrus. Grey matter volume increases were seen in patients in the superior frontal gyrus. White matter volume loss was found adjacent to grey matter loss. In patients MTR was lower in all areas of volumetric differences between groups suggesting that both changes may be related. Similar findings were observed when patients with schizoaffective psychosis were removed from the analysis. The correlations between clinical and MRI parameters did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. MTI frontal and temporal abnormalities suggesting neuroaxonal and myelin changes were more extensive in our patients than those detected with conventional MRI. Our findings also suggest that there is regional variation in the severity of structural brain abnormalities.

  17. Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Catherine, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The theme of this month's issue is "Images"--from early paintings and statuary to computer-generated design. Resources on the theme include Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and others. A page of reproducible activities is also provided. Features include photojournalism, inspirational Web sites, art history, pop art, and myths. (AEF)

  18. An imaging informatics-based ePR (electronic patient record) system for providing decision support in evaluating dose optimization in stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent J.; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Ximing; Konersman, Matt; Martinez, Clarisa; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability in America. After stroke, about 65% of survivors still suffer from severe paresis, while rehabilitation treatment strategy after stroke plays an essential role in recovery. Currently, there is a clinical trial (NIH award #HD065438) to determine the optimal dose of rehabilitation for persistent recovery of arm and hand paresis. For DOSE (Dose Optimization Stroke Evaluation), laboratory-based measurements, such as the Wolf Motor Function test, behavioral questionnaires (e.g. Motor Activity Log-MAL), and MR, DTI, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) imaging studies are planned. Current data collection processes are tedious and reside in various standalone systems including hardcopy forms. In order to improve the efficiency of this clinical trial and facilitate decision support, a web-based imaging informatics system has been implemented together with utilizing mobile devices (eg, iPAD, tablet PC's, laptops) for collecting input data and integrating all multi-media data into a single system. The system aims to provide clinical imaging informatics management and a platform to develop tools to predict the treatment effect based on the imaging studies and the treatment dosage with mathematical models. Since there is a large amount of information to be recorded within the DOSE project, the system provides clinical data entry through mobile device applications thus allowing users to collect data at the point of patient interaction without typing into a desktop computer, which is inconvenient. Imaging analysis tools will also be developed for structural MRI, DTI, and TMS imaging studies that will be integrated within the system and correlated with the clinical and behavioral data. This system provides a research platform for future development of mathematical models to evaluate the differences between prediction and reality and thus improve and refine the models rapidly and efficiently.

  19. Software-based hybrid perfusion SPECT/CT provides diagnostic accuracy when other pulmonary embolism imaging is indeterminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nishant; Xie, Karen; Mar, Winnie; Anderson, Thomas M.; Carney, Benjamin; Mehta, Nikhil; Machado, Roberto; Blend, Michael J.; Lu, Yang [University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, Chicago (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (Q-SPECT/CT) in patients suspected to have pulmonary embolism (PE) but with indeterminate computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) or planar ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scans. This retrospective study included two groups of patients. Group I consisted of 49 patients with nondiagnostic CTPA. These 49 patients underwent subsequent V/Q scans. Further Q-SPECTs were obtained in patients with indeterminate planar images and fused with existing CTPA. Group II consisted of 182 non-CTPA patients with indeterminate V/Q scans. These 182 patients underwent further Q-SPECT and separate noncontrast low-dose CT chest. Fusion Q-SPECT/CT scans were obtained through FDA-approved software and interpreted according to published criteria as positive, negative, or indeterminate for PE. Upon retrospective analyses, the final diagnosis was made using composite reference standards including all available clinical and imaging information for at least 6-month follow-up. In group I patients, 1 was positive, 24 were negative, and another 24 (49 %, 24/49) were indeterminate. In the subsequent 24 Q-SPECT/CTPAs, 4 were positive, 19 were negative, and 1 was indeterminate (4.2 %, 1/24). In group II patients, 9 (4.9 %, 9/182) were indeterminate, 33 were positive, and 140 were negative. The combined nondiagnostic rate for Q-SPECT/CT was only 4.9 % (10/206). There was six false-negative and one false-positive Q-SPECT/CT examinations. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of Q-SPECT/CT were 85.7 % (36/42), 99.4 % (153/154), 97.3 % (36/37) and 96.2 % (153/159), respectively. Q-SPECT/CT improves the diagnostic rate with promising accuracy in diagnosing PE that yields a satisfactory clinical verdict, especially when the CTPA and planar V/Q scan are indeterminate.

  20. Performance optimization of total momentum filtering double-resonance energy selective electron heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ze-Min; Chen, Lin-Gen; Ge, Yan-Lin; Sun, Feng-Rui

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model for energy selective electron (ESE) heat pumps operating with two-dimensional electron reservoirs is established in this study. In this model, a double-resonance energy filter operating with a total momentum filtering mechanism is considered for the transmission of electrons. The optimal thermodynamic performance of the ESE heat pump devices is also investigated. Numerical calculations show that the heating load of the device with two resonances is larger, whereas the coefficient of performance (COP) is lower than the ESE heat pump when considering a single-resonance filter. The performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps in the total momentum filtering condition are generally superior to those with a conventional filtering mechanism. In particular, the performance characteristics of the ESE heat pumps considering a conventional filtering mechanism are vastly different from those of a device with total momentum filtering, which is induced by extra electron momentum in addition to the horizontal direction. Parameters such as resonance width and energy spacing are found to be associated with the performance of the electron system.

  1. Multi-slice echo-planar spectroscopic MR imaging provides both global and local metabolite measures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Henrik Kahr; Tscherning, Thomas; Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2005-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about neuronal loss or dysfunction by measuring decreases in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a metabolite widely believed to be a marker of neuronal viability. In multiple sclerosis (MS), whole-brain NAA (WBNAA) has been suggested as a marker of disease progre...

  2. Narrow-band imaging provides reliable screening for esophageal malignancy in patients with head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Ryuta; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Hori, Keisuke; Inoue, Masafumi; Kawano, Seiji; Tanioka, Daisuke; Tsuzuki, Takao; Uemura, Masayuki; Ohara, Nobuya; Tominaga, Susumu; Onoda, Tomoo; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2009-12-01

    The narrow-band imaging (NBI) system is a novel technology that enhances the visualization of microvasculature and mucosal patterns. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of the NBI system for esophageal cancer screening in patients with head and neck cancers. A total of 142 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were examined by NBI endoscopy, followed by Lugol chromoendoscopy between April 2006 and June 2008 at the Okayama University Hospital, Okayama, Japan. Detection of SCC and high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGIN) was conducted. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range: 29-86 years), and approximately three-fourths of all the patients were male. In total, 21 superficial lesions in 16 patients were detected by NBI endoscopy. Of these, 4 lesions were diagnosed histologically as SCC and 11 lesions as HGIN. An additional 22 Lugol-voiding lesions >or=5 mm were detected in 19 patients by Lugol chromoendoscopy. Although 1 of these lesions was diagnosed as HGIN, 21 lesions were diagnosed as low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia or lesions without atypical findings. The sensitivity of NBI endoscopy for detecting esophageal SCC and HGIN was 90.9% (95% confidence interval (CI), 58.7-99.8), specificity was 95.4% (95% CI, 90.3-98.3), and accuracy was 95.1% (95% CI, 90.1-98.0). NBI seems to be useful and reliable for screening for esophageal SCC in patients with head and neck cancers.

  3. Polytellurophenes provide imaging contrast towards unravelling the structure–property–function relationships in semiconductor:insulator polymer blends

    KAUST Repository

    Jahnke, Ashlee A.

    2015-02-27

    Polymer blends are broadly important in chemical science and chemical engineering and have led to a wide range of commercial products, however their precise structure and phase morphology is often not well understood. Here we show for the first time that π-conjugated polytellurophenes and high-density polyethylene form blends that can serve as active layers in field-effect transistor devices and can be characterized by a variety of element-specific imaging techniques such as STEM and EDX. Changing the hydrocarbon content and degree of branching on the polytellurophene side-chain leads to a variety of blend structures, and these variations can be readily visualized. Characterization by electron microscopy is complemented by topographic and X-ray methods to establish a nano- to micro-scale picture of these systems. We find that blends that possess microscale networks function best as electronic devices; however, contrary to previous notions a strong correlation between nanofiber formation and electrical performance is not observed. Our work demonstrates that use of organometallic polymers assists in clarifying relevant structure–property–function relationships in multicomponent systems such as semiconductor:insulator blends and sheds light on the structure development in polymer:polymer blends including crystallization, phase separation, and formation of supramolecular arrangements.

  4. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with

  5. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the registration accuracy and robustness in the presence of strong image content mismatch. This capability could offer valuable assistance and decision support in spine level localization in a manner consistent with clinical workflow.

  6. Combined magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging analyses provide a powerful tool for in vivo assessment of deformation along human muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamuk, Uluç; Karakuzu, Agah; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Acar, Burak; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle fiber direction strain provides invaluable information for characterizing muscle function. However, methods to study this for human muscles in vivo are lacking. Using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based deformation analyses and diffusion tensor (DT) imaging based tractography combined, we aimed to assess muscle fiber direction local tissue deformations within the human medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle. Healthy female subjects (n=5, age=27±1 years) were positioned prone within the MR scanner in a relaxed state with the ankle angle fixed at 90°. The knee was brought to flexion (140.8±3.0°) (undeformed state). Sets of 3D high resolution MR, and DT images were acquired. This protocol was repeated at extended knee joint position (177.0±1.0°) (deformed state). Tractography and Demons nonrigid registration algorithm was utilized to calculate local deformations along muscle fascicles. Undeformed state images were also transformed by a synthetic rigid body motion to calculate strain errors. Mean strain errors were significantly smaller then mean fiber direction strains (lengthening: 0.2±0.1% vs. 8.7±8.5%; shortening: 3.3±0.9% vs. 7.5±4.6%). Shortening and lengthening (up to 23.3% and 116.7%, respectively) occurs simultaneously along individual fascicles despite imposed GM lengthening. Along-fiber shear strains confirm the presence of much shearing between fascicles. Mean fiber direction strains of different tracts also show non-uniform distribution. Inhomogeneity of fiber strain indicates epimuscular myofascial force transmission. We conclude that MR and DT imaging analyses combined provide a powerful tool for quantifying deformation along human muscle fibers in vivo. This can help substantially achieving a better understanding of normal and pathological muscle function and mechanisms of treatment techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Method and device for intraoperative imaging of lumpectomy specimens to provide feedback to breast surgeon for prompt re-excision during the same procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Andrzej; Hemingway, Susan; Kort, Kara; de la Rosa, Gustavo; Adhikary, Ravi; Masrani, Deepa; Feiglin, David; O'Connell, Avice; Nagarajan, Mahesh; Yang, Chien-Chun; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) of breast cancer is now widely accepted due to improved cosmetic outcome and improved patients' quality of life. One of the critical issues in performing breast-conserving surgery is trying to achieve microscopically clear surgical margins while maintaining excellent cosmesis. Unfortunately, unacceptably close or positive surgical margins occur in at least 20-25% of all patients undergoing BCT requiring repeat surgical excision days or weeks later, as permanent histopathology routinely takes days to complete. Our aim is to develop a better method for intraoperative imaging of non-palpable breast malignancies excised by wire or needle localization. Providing non-deformed three dimensional imaging of the excised breast tissue should allow more accurate assessment of tumor margins and consequently allow further excision at the time of initial surgery thus limiting the enormous financial and emotional burden of additional surgery. We have designed and constructed a device that allows preservation of the excised breast tissue in its natural anatomic position relative to the breast as it is imaged to assess adequate excision. We performed initial tests with needle-guided lumpectomy specimens using micro-CT and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Our device consists of a plastic sphere inside a cylindrical holder. The surgeon inserts a freshly excised piece of breast tissue into the sphere and matches its anatomic orientation with the fiducial markers on the sphere. A custom-shaped foam is placed inside the sphere to prevent specimen deformation due to gravity. DBT followed by micro-CT images of the specimen were obtained. We confirmed that our device preserved spatial orientation of the excised breast tissue and that the location error was lower than 10mm and 10 degrees. The initial obtained results indicate that breast lesions containing microcalcifications allow a good 3D imaging of margins providing immediate intraoperative feedback for

  8. Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Images for the website main pages and all configurations. The upload and access points for the other images are: Website Template RSW images BSCW Images HIRENASD...

  9. Evaluation of Clinical Contributions Provided by Addition of the Brain, Calvarium, and Scalp to the Limited Whole Body Imaging Area in FDG-PET/CT Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Tasdemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to detect additional findings in whole body FDG-PET/CT scan including the brain, calvarium, and scalp (compared to starting from the base of the skull in cancer patients and to determine contributions of these results to tumor staging and treatment protocols. Materials and Methods. We noted whether the findings related to the brain, calvarium, and scalp in 1359 patients had a potential to modify staging of the disease, chemotherapy protocol, radiotherapy protocol, and surgical management. We identified rates of metastatic findings on the brain, calvarium, and scalp according to the tumor types on FDG-PET/CT scanning. Results. We found FDG-PET/CT findings for malignancy above the base of the skull in 42 patients (3.1%, one of whom was a patient with an unknown primary tumor. Twenty-two of the metastatic findings were in the brain, 16 were in the calvarium, and two were in the scalp. Conclusion. This study has demonstrated that addition of the brain to the limited whole body FDG-PET/CT scanning may provide important contributions to the patient’s clinical management especially in patients with lung cancer, bladder cancer, malignant melanoma, breast cancer, stomach cancer, and unknown primary tumor.

  10. Development of an MR-compatible hand exoskeleton that is capable of providing interactive robotic rehabilitation during fMRI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangjoon J; Kim, Yeongjin; Lee, Hyosang; Ghasemlou, Pouya; Kim, Jung

    2017-07-15

    Following advances in robotic rehabilitation, there have been many efforts to investigate the recovery process and effectiveness of robotic rehabilitation procedures through monitoring the activation status of the brain. This work presents the development of a two degree-of-freedom (DoF) magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible hand device that can perform robotic rehabilitation procedures inside an fMRI scanner. The device is capable of providing real-time monitoring of the joint angle, angular velocity, and joint force produced by the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints of four fingers. For force measurement, a custom reflective optical force sensor was developed and characterized in terms of accuracy error, hysteresis, and repeatability in the MR environment. The proposed device consists of two non-magnetic ultrasonic motors to provide assistive and resistive forces to the MCP and PIP joints. With actuation and sensing capabilities, both non-voluntary-passive movements and active-voluntary movements can be implemented. The MR compatibility of the device was verified via the analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of MR images of phantoms. SNR drops of 0.25, 2.94, and 11.82% were observed when the device was present but not activated, when only the custom force sensor was activated, and when both the custom force sensor and actuators were activated, respectively.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in children under anesthesia: the relationship between the degree of information provided to parents and parents' anxiety scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güzel, Abdulmenap; Atlı, Abdullah; Doğan, Erdal; Çelik, Feyzi; Tüfek, Adnan; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Sen, Velat; Yıldırım, Zeynep Baysal

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the correlation between the anxiety scores of parents whose children are administered anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the level of information provided to them before the MRI. The study included 146 children and their parents. The demographic information of the children and their parents was recorded. The parents were divided into two groups. In Group I, the patient's medical history and physical exam findings were recorded on a standard consultation form by an anesthesiologist. In Group II, the parents were additionally provided with more detailed information on how the anesthesia would be administered and the drugs to be used and their side effects and complications. The anxiety scores of the parents were found to be lower in Group II. A higher level of education was associated with higher anxiety scores. Intergroup comparison detected lower anxiety scores for Group II parents whose education levels were up to high school. However, no change upon receiving detailed information was detected in the anxiety scores of parents with higher education levels. In conclusion, this may lower the anxiety scores in parents informed about details of anesthesia administration and may raise parents' sense of confidence in the doctor.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children under Anesthesia: The Relationship between the Degree of Information Provided to Parents and Parents’ Anxiety Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmenap Güzel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We aimed to investigate the correlation between the anxiety scores of parents whose children are administered anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and the level of information provided to them before the MRI. The study included 146 children and their parents. The demographic information of the children and their parents was recorded. The parents were divided into two groups. In Group I, the patient’s medical history and physical exam findings were recorded on a standard consultation form by an anesthesiologist. In Group II, the parents were additionally provided with more detailed information on how the anesthesia would be administered and the drugs to be used and their side effects and complications. The anxiety scores of the parents were found to be lower in Group II. A higher level of education was associated with higher anxiety scores. Intergroup comparison detected lower anxiety scores for Group II parents whose education levels were up to high school. However, no change upon receiving detailed information was detected in the anxiety scores of parents with higher education levels. In conclusion, this may lower the anxiety scores in parents informed about details of anesthesia administration and may raise parents’ sense of confidence in the doctor.

  13. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  14. Providing the Fire Risk Map in Forest Area Using a Geographically Weighted Regression Model with Gaussin Kernel and Modis Images, a Case Study: Golestan Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah-Heydari pour, A.; Pahlavani, P.; Bigdeli, B.

    2017-09-01

    According to the industrialization of cities and the apparent increase in pollutants and greenhouse gases, the importance of forests as the natural lungs of the earth is felt more than ever to clean these pollutants. Annually, a large part of the forests is destroyed due to the lack of timely action during the fire. Knowledge about areas with a high-risk of fire and equipping these areas by constructing access routes and allocating the fire-fighting equipment can help to eliminate the destruction of the forest. In this research, the fire risk of region was forecasted and the risk map of that was provided using MODIS images by applying geographically weighted regression model with Gaussian kernel and ordinary least squares over the effective parameters in forest fire including distance from residential areas, distance from the river, distance from the road, height, slope, aspect, soil type, land use, average temperature, wind speed, and rainfall. After the evaluation, it was found that the geographically weighted regression model with Gaussian kernel forecasted 93.4% of the all fire points properly, however the ordinary least squares method could forecast properly only 66% of the fire points.

  15. Modeling and characterization of double resonant tunneling diodes for application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Zacharie; Suchet, Daniel; Julian, Anatole; Bernard, Cyril; Miyashita, Naoya; Gibelli, Francois; Okada, Yoshitaka; Guillemolles, Jean-Francois

    2017-02-01

    Double resonant tunneling barriers are considered for an application as energy selective contacts in hot carrier solar cells. Experimental symmetric and asymmetric double resonant tunneling barriers are realized by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized by temperature dependent current-voltage measurements. The negative differential resistance signal is enhanced for asymmetric heterostructures, and remains unchanged between low- and room-temperatures. Within Tsu-Esaki description of the tunnel current, this observation can be explained by the voltage dependence of the tunnel transmission amplitude, which presents a resonance under finite bias for asymmetric structures. This effect is notably discussed with respect to series resistance. Different parameters related to the electronic transmission of the structure and the influence of these parameters on the current voltage characteristic are investigated, bringing insights on critical processes to optimize in double resonant tunneling barriers applied to hot carrier solar cells.

  16. Ion mass and energy selective hyperthermal ion-beam assisted deposition setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, J. W.; Schumacher, P.; Mensing, M.; Rauschenbach, S.; Cermak, I.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2017-06-01

    For the synthesis of high-quality thin films, ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is a frequently used technique providing precise control over several substantial film properties. IBAD typically relies on the use of a broad-beam ion source. Such ion sources suffer from the limitation that they deliver a blend of ions with different ion masses, each of them possessing a certain distribution of kinetic energy. In this paper, a compact experimental setup is presented that enables the separate control of ion mass and ion kinetic energy in the region of hyperthermal energies (few 1 eV - few 100 eV). This ion energy region is of increasing interest not only for ion-assisted film growth but also for the wide field of preparative mass spectrometry. The setup consists of a constricted glow-discharge plasma beam source and a tailor-made, compact quadrupole system equipped with entry and exit ion optics. It is demonstrated that the separation of monoatomic and polyatomic nitrogen ions (N+ and N2+) is accomplished. For both ion species, the kinetic energy is shown to be selectable in the region of hyperthermal energies. At the sample position, ion current densities are found to be in the order of 1 μA/cm2 and the full width at half maximum of the ion beam profile is in the order of 10 mm. Thus, the requirements for homogeneous deposition processes in sufficiently short periods of time are fulfilled. Finally, employing the described setup, for the first time in practice epitaxial GaN films were deposited. This opens up the opportunity to fundamentally study the influence of the simultaneous irradiation with hyperthermal ions on the thin film growth in IBAD processes and to increase the flexibility of the technique.

  17. Providing and optimizing functional MR (Magnetic Resonance) of motor cortex of human brain by MRI ( Magnetic Resonance Imaging) facilities of Imam Khomeinie Hospital

    CERN Document Server

    Khosravie, H R

    2000-01-01

    During the stimulation, an observable increased signal (%2-%5)in respective sensory-motor cortex was obtained after correcting for partial volume effects, optimizing S/N,and incorporating small vowels. The 2 D F A S T functional image obtained by this method, showed an anatomical association of the increased signal with gray matter of sensory-motor cortex(in T 1 weighted image). The resultant data showed the feasibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging using optimized gradient echo sequences on a standard 1.5 T imager. Display of human brain cortical activity is accomplished using various techniques, by them different spatial and temporal resolution may be obtained. F MRI technique with proper spatial and temporal resolution due to its noninvasivity is one of the promising techniques for detection of brain activities. This can be used as an important tool by neurologists, since a great development has been achieved for display different brain function. This thesis report the results of simulation effe...

  18. Surgeon assessment of renal preservation with partial nephrectomy provides information comparable to measurement of volume preservation with 3-dimensional image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobert, Conrad M; Boelkins, Bradley; Culver, Shannon; Mammen, Leena; Kahnoski, Richard J; Lane, Brian R

    2014-05-01

    The strongest predictors of renal function after partial nephrectomy are the preoperative glomerular filtration rate and the amount of preserved parenchyma. Measuring volume preservation by 3-dimensional imaging is accurate but time-consuming. Percent functional volume preservation was designed to replace surgeon assessment of volume preservation with a less labor intensive, objective assessment. We compared volume preservation with 3-dimensional imaging, percent functional volume preservation and surgeon assessment of volume preservation as predictors of renal function after partial nephrectomy. We calculated volume preservation with 3-dimensional imaging, percent functional volume preservation and surgeon assessment of volume preservation in 41 patients with preoperative and postoperative cross-sectional imaging available. Surgeon assessment was validated internally in another 75 patients. Short-term and long-term renal function was assessed with univariate and multivariate linear regression models. Median parenchymal preservation was 85% (range 37% to 105%) by 3-dimensional imaging, 91% (range 51% to 114%) by percent functional preservation and 88% (range 45% to 99%) by surgeon assessment. Each method strongly correlated with nadir glomerular filtration rate (r(2) = 0.75, 0.65 and 0.78) and latest glomerular filtration rate (r(2) = 0.65, 0.66 and 0.67, respectively, each p analysis revealed that age, preoperative glomerular filtration rate, renal nephrometry score and each assessment were significant predictors of renal function (p analysis parenchymal preservation was the strongest predictor (p comparable to those of more time intensive alternatives. We propose that surgeon assessment of volume preservation should be routinely reported to facilitate analysis of partial nephrectomy outcomes. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. New epifluorescence microscope providing pairs of specific fluorescence images of double-stained cells for simultaneous visual perception and for quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Thomas; Tribukait, Bernhard

    1996-05-01

    A new epi-fluorescence microscope for analysis of cells stained with two fluorochromes which can be spectrally isolated is described. The system makes it possible to perform independent and specific spectral selection of each dye (e.g. DAPI and CY3) while perceiving the two specific images simultaneously by eye. The optics uses splitting of the primary excitation and emission light beams, independent modification of the separated beams, and their reunification. Modifications in the separated beams comprise: (1) isolation of specific wavelengths (365 nm and 546 nm in the excitation light path, 435 - 500 nm and 590 - 750 nm in the emission light beams), (2) wavelength switching without image displacement and blur by means of a light chopper alternating between ultraviolet-excitation/blue-detection and green-excitation/red-detection at frequencies of up to 140 Hz for observation by eye without image flicker, and (3) the possible separate positioning of lenses for compensation of chromatic aberrations. The system demonstrates a good transmission of the chosen wavelengths. A high specificity of double fluorescence analysis with minimal effects of spectral overlap was attained with good temporal resolution. It has been shown that it is feasible to obtain separate chromatic compensations for the use of a microscope objective in spectral regions outside the range for which the objective is corrected. Quantitative and independent measurements of the two fluorescence images by a CCD camera synchronized with the light chopper are feasible. In conclusion, this imaging system is outlined for highly specific visual analysis and exact quantitative measurement of double fluorescence labeled specimens in cytology and histology.

  20. Using pore-scale imaging and modeling to provide new insights in multi-phase flow, transport and reaction phenomena in porous media (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijeljic, B.; Andrew, M. G.; Menke, H. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in X ray imaging techniques made it possible not only to accurately describe solid and fluid(s) distributions in the pore space but also to study dynamics of multi-phase flow and reactive transport in-situ. This has opened up a range of new opportunities to better understand fundamental physics at the pore scale by experiment, and test and validate theoretical models in order to develop predictive tools at the pore scale and use it for upscaling. Firstly, we illustrate this concept by describing a new methodology for predicting non-Fickian transport in millimeter-sized three-dimensional micro-CT images of a beadpack, a sandstone, and a carbonate, representing porous media with an increasing degree of pore-scale complexity. The key strategy is to retain the full information on flow and transport signature of a porous medium by using probability distribution functions (PDFs) of voxel velocities for flow, and both PDFs of particle displacements and PDFs of particle transit times between voxels for transport. For this purpose, direct-simulation flow and transport model is used to analyse the relationship between pore structure, velocity, and the dynamics of the evolving plume. The model predictions for PDFs of particle displacements obtained by the model are in excellent agreement with those measured on similar cores in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. A key determinant for non-Fickian transport is the spread in velocity distribution in the pore space. Further, we present micro-CT imaging of capillary trapping of scCO2 at reservoir conditions in a range of carbonates and sandstones having different pore structure and demonstrate that substantial quantities of scCO2 can be trapped in the pore space. Higher residual scCO2 saturations are found in sandstones compared to carbonates. The trapped ganglia exhibit different distribution of size, related to the inherent structure of pore space. Pore structures with large, open pores that are well connected lead

  1. Fluorescence lifetime FRET non-invasive imaging of breast cancer xenografts provides a measure of target engagement in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FLIM-FRET) is a unique non-invasive imaging platform to monitor and quantify in vivo target engagement in pre-clinical studies. FLIM FRET is a valuable tool in targeted drug delivery due to its nanoscale-range molecular resolution that detects near-infrared labeled ligand binding to dimerized receptors followed by their uptake into cancer cells in vivo. Various imaging platforms, including PET, lack the ability to directly discriminate between unbound and internalized ligands. Since transferrin receptor (TfR) level is significantly elevated in cancer cells compared to non-cancerous cells, transferrin (Tf) has been successfully used in molecular imaging and targeted anti-cancer drug delivery. The dimeric nature of TfR allows for the quantification of Tf internalization into cancer cells by measuring FLIM FRET between receptor-bound Tf donor and acceptor NIR fluorophore pairs, based on the reduction of donor fluorophore lifetime in live mice. We analyzed tumor morphology, the level of expression of TfR, estrogen receptor (ER) and Tf accumulation in human breast cancer tumor xenografts. We found a remarkable heterogeneity of breast cancer tumors regarding their size, cell density, TfR and ER expression and Tf uptake. The results of this study confirm a strong correlation between in vivo NIR FLIM FRET and ex vivo evaluation of Tf uptake into tumor tissues, thus validating FD% as a robust measure of the target engagement of TfR-Tf in tumor cells in vivo.

  2. Repetitive flash x-ray generator utilizing a simple diode with a new type of energy-selective function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, E.; Kimura, S.; Kawasaki, S.; Isobe, H.; Takahashi, K.; Tamakawa, Y.; Yanagisawa, T.

    1990-09-01

    The construction and the fundamental studies of a repetitive flash x-ray generator having a simple diode with an energy-selective function are described. This generator consisted of the following components: a constant high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage pulser, a repetitive high-energy impulse switching system, a turbo molecular pump, and a flash x-ray tube. The circuit of this pulser employed a modified two-stage surge Marx generator with a capacity during main discharge of 425pF. The x-ray tube was of the demountable-diode type which was connected to the turbo molecular pump and consisted of the following major devices: a rod-shaped anode tip made of tungsten, a disk cathode made of graphite, an aluminum filter, and a tube body made of glass. Two condensers inside of the pulser were charged from 40 to 60 kV, and the output voltage was about 1.9 times the charging voltage. The peak tube voltage was primarily determined by the anode-cathode (A-C) space, and the peak tube current was less than 0.6 kA. The peak tube voltage slightly increased when the charging voltage was increased, but the amount of change rate was small. Thus, the maximum photon energy could be easily controlled by varying the A-C space. The pulse width ranged from 40 to 100 ns, and the x-ray intensity was less than 1.0 μC/kg at 0.3 m per pulse. The repetitive frequency was less than 50 Hz, and the effective focal spot size was determined by the diameter of the anode tip and ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 mm in diameter.

  3. Baseline magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve provides limited predictive information on short-term recovery after acute optic neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Berg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In acute optic neuritis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may help to confirm the diagnosis as well as to exclude alternative diagnoses. Yet, little is known on the value of optic nerve imaging for predicting clinical symptoms or therapeutic outcome. PURPOSE: To evaluate the benefit of optic nerve MRI for predicting response to appropriate therapy and recovery of visual acuity. METHODS: Clinical data as well as visual evoked potentials (VEP and MRI results of 104 patients, who were treated at the Department of Neurology with clinically definite optic neuritis between December 2010 and September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed including a follow up within 14 days. RESULTS: Both length of the Gd enhancing lesion (r = -0.38; p = 0.001 and the T2 lesion (r = -0.25; p = 0.03 of the optic nerve in acute optic neuritis showed a medium correlation with visual acuity after treatment. Although visual acuity pre-treatment was little but nonsignificantly lower if Gd enhancement of the optic nerve was detected via orbital MRI, improvement of visual acuity after adequate therapy was significantly better (0.40 vs. 0.24; p = 0.04. Intraorbitally located Gd enhancing lesions were associated with worse visual improvement compared to canalicular, intracranial and chiasmal lesions (0.35 vs. 0.54; p = 0.02. CONCLUSION: Orbital MRI is a broadly available, valuable tool for predicting the improvement of visual function. While the accurate individual prediction of long-term outcomes after appropriate therapy still remains difficult, lesion length of Gd enhancement and T2 lesion contribute to its prediction and a better short-term visual outcome may be associated with detection and localization of Gd enhancement along the optic nerve.

  4. Subtracted dynamic MR perfusion source images (sMRP-SI) provide collateral blood flow assessment in MCA occlusions and predict tissue fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villringer, Kersten; Serrano-Sandoval, Rafael; Galinovic, Ivana; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Brunecker, Peter; Fiebach, Jochen B. [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin, Academic Neuroradiology, Center for Stroke Research (CSB), Berlin (Germany); Grittner, Ulrike [Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research, Berlin (Germany); Charite, Department for Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, Berlin (Germany); Schneider, Alice [Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research, Berlin (Germany); Rocco, Andrea [Charite, Department of Neurology and Center for Stroke Research, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Collateral blood flow is accepted as a predictive factor of tissue fate in ischemic stroke. Thus, we aimed to evaluate a new method derived from MR perfusion source images to assess collateral flow in patients with ICA/MCA occlusions. A total of 132 patients of the prospective 1000+ study were examined. MR perfusion source images were assessed according to Δimg{sub n} = img{sub n} + 1 - img{sub n} - 1 using the five-grade Higashida collateral flow rating system. Higashida scores were correlated to mismatch (MM) volume, mismatch ratio, day 6 FLAIR lesion volumes and day 90 mRS. Patients with Higashida scores 3 and 4 had significantly lower admission NIHSS, smaller FLAIR day 6 lesion volumes (p < 0.001) and higher rates of better long-term outcome (mRS 0-2, p = 0.002). There was a linear trend for the association of Higashida grade 1 (p = 0.002) and 2 (p = 0.001) with unfavourable outcome (day 90 mRS 3-6), but no significant association was found for MM volume, MM ratio and day 90 mRS. Inter-rater agreement was 0.58 (95 % CI 0.43-0.73) on day 1, 0.70 (95 % CI 0.58-0.81) on day 2. sMRP-SI Higashida score offers a non-invasive collateral vessel and tissue perfusion assessment of ischemic tissue. The predictive value of Higashida rating proved superior to MM with regard to day 90 mRS. (orig.)

  5. IMAGES, IMAGES, IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, A.

    1980-07-01

    The role of images of information (charts, diagrams, maps, and symbols) for effective presentation of facts and concepts is expanding dramatically because of advances in computer graphics technology, increasingly hetero-lingual, hetero-cultural world target populations of information providers, the urgent need to convey more efficiently vast amounts of information, the broadening population of (non-expert) computer users, the decrease of available time for reading texts and for decision making, and the general level of literacy. A coalition of visual performance experts, human engineering specialists, computer scientists, and graphic designers/artists is required to resolve human factors aspects of images of information. The need for, nature of, and benefits of interdisciplinary effort are discussed. The results of an interdisciplinary collaboration are demonstrated in a product for visualizing complex information about global energy interdependence. An invited panel will respond to the presentation.

  6. A robotic welding system using image processing techniques and a CAD model to provide information to a multi-intelligent decision module

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, David; Lambert, Gareth; Graham-Jones, J; Tewkesbury, Giles; Onuh, S.; Ndzi, David; Ross, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Design/methodology/approach – A pattern recognition system recognizes shipbuilding parts using shape contour information. Fourier-descriptors provide information and neural networks make decisions about shapes. Findings – The system has distinguished between various parts and programs have been generated so that the methods have proved to be valid approaches. Practical implications – The new system used a rudimentary curvature metric that measured Euclidean distance between two points in a wi...

  7. Use of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents and awareness of brain gadolinium deposition among pediatric providers in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mithal, Leena B. [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Patel, Payal S. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Mithal, Divakar [Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Chicago, IL (United States); Palac, Hannah L. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics, Feinberg School of Medicine, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rozenfeld, Michael N. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Numerous recent articles have reported brain gadolinium deposition when using linear but not macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). To determine the current landscape of gadolinium use among pediatric institutions and the knowledge base of radiologists and referring providers with regard to GBCAs and brain gadolinium deposition. We e-mailed voluntary closed surveys to 5,390 physicians in various pediatric professional societies between January 2016 and March 2016. We used chi-square and Fisher exact tests to compare response distributions among specialties. We found that 80% of surveyed pediatric hospitals use macrocyclic contrast agents. In the last year, 58% switched their agent, most commonly to gadoterate meglumine, with the most common reason being brain gadolinium deposition. Furthermore, surveys indicated that 23% of hospitals are considering switching, and, of these, 83% would switch to gadoterate meglumine; the most common reasons were brain gadolinium deposition and safety. Radiologists were more aware of brain gadolinium deposition than non-radiologist physicians (87% vs. 26%; P<0.0001). Radiologists and referring providers expressed similar levels of concern (95% and 89%). Twelve percent of radiologists and 2% of referring providers reported patients asking about brain gadolinium deposition. Radiologists were significantly more comfortable addressing patient inquiries than referring pediatric physicians (48% vs. 6%; P<0.0001). The number of MRIs requested by referring pediatric physicians correlated with their knowledge of brain gadolinium deposition, contrast agent used by their hospital, and comfort discussing brain gadolinium deposition with patients (P<0.0001). Since the discovery of brain gadolinium deposition, many pediatric hospitals have switched to or plan to switch to a more stable macrocyclic MR contrast agent, most commonly gadoterate meglumine. Despite this, there is need for substantial further education of radiologists and

  8. Staging PET-CT Scanning Provides Superior Detection of Lymph Nodes and Distant Metastases than Traditional Imaging in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Deo, Suryanarayana V S; Kumar, Rakesh; Shukla, Nootan Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay; Gogia, Ajay; Sharma, Daya Nand; Mathur, Sandeep R

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the role of a single 18-FDG positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) scan in comparison to multiple organ-directed conventional investigations (CI) as a staging tool in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) to detect regional and distant metastasis. All eligible patients were subjected to CI (chest X-ray, abdominal sonography, and bone scintigraphy) followed by a single 18-FDG PET-CT scan. Standard imaging criteria were used for diagnosis of metastasis. Histopathological confirmation was undertaken for suspicious lesions. An exploratory analysis was done to assess the impact of PET-CT on the staging of LABC and how it resulted in a change in management. The study included 79 patients of LABC. PET-CT detected distant metastasis in 36 (45.5 %) patients while CI could identify distant metastasis in 20 (25.3 %) patients. Two of the 36 patients in whom PET-CT detected distant metastasis were false positive. Overall PET-CT upstaged the disease in 38 (48.1 %) patients as compared to CI: stage III to stage IV migration in 14 (17.7 %) patients due to identification of additional sites of distant metastasis, and within stage III upstaging in 24 (30.3 %) patients due to identification of additional regional lymphadenopathy. PET-CT led to a change in management plan in 14 (17.7 %) patients. PET-CT has a role in identifying additional sites of regional lymphadenopathy and distant metastasis to upstage the disease in a significant number of LABC patients in comparison to CI; this would help in accurate staging, selecting optimal treatment, and better prognostication of disease.

  9. Non-invasive imaging provides spatiotemporal information on disease progression and response to therapy in a murine model of multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone S Riedel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple myeloma (MM is a B-cell malignancy, where malignant plasma cells clonally expand in the bone marrow of older people, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Typical clinical symptoms include increased serum calcium levels, renal insufficiency, anemia, and bone lesions. With standard therapies, MM remains incurable; therefore, the development of new drugs or immune cell-based therapies is desirable. To advance the goal of finding a more effective treatment for MM, we aimed to develop a reliable preclinical MM mouse model applying sensitive and reproducible methods for monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis in response to therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A mouse model was created by intravenously injecting bone marrow-homing mouse myeloma cells (MOPC-315.BM that expressed luciferase into BALB/c wild type mice. The luciferase in the myeloma cells allowed in vivo tracking before and after melphalan treatment with bioluminescence imaging (BLI. Homing of MOPC-315.BM luciferase+ myeloma cells to specific tissues was examined by flow cytometry. Idiotype-specific myeloma protein serum levels were measured by ELISA. In vivo measurements were validated with histopathology. RESULTS: Strong bone marrow tropism and subsequent dissemination of MOPC-315.BM luciferase(+ cells in vivo closely mimicked the human disease. In vivo BLI and later histopathological analysis revealed that 12 days of melphalan treatment slowed tumor progression and reduced MM dissemination compared to untreated controls. MOPC-315.BM luciferase(+ cells expressed CXCR4 and high levels of CD44 and α4β1 in vitro which could explain the strong bone marrow tropism. The results showed that MOPC-315.BM cells dynamically regulated homing receptor expression and depended on interactions with surrounding cells. CONCLUSIONS: This study described a novel MM mouse model that facilitated convenient, reliable, and sensitive tracking of myeloma cells with whole body BLI in

  10. NCALM's Lessons Learned and Insights into the Future from Ten + Years of Providing Geodetic Images for the monitoring of Hazards and the Response to Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Diaz, J. C.; Shrestha, R. L.; Carter, W. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Sartori, M. P.; Singhania, A.

    2012-12-01

    The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping NCALM was created in 2003 through a grant from and National Science Foundation to support the use of airborne laser swath mapping technology (ALSM aka LiDAR) by the scientific community. NCALM's main goals are to provide research quality airborne LiDAR observations to the scientific community, to advance the state of the art in airborne laser mapping, and to train and educate graduate students with knowledge of airborne mapping to meet the needs of private industry, government agencies and academic institutions. Even before its creation, NCALM researchers had been exploring the application of LiDAR technologies for the monitoring of Geohazards and the response and recovery from man-made and natural disasters. Some of these applications include: mapping debris caused by the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks in New York; mapping thousands of km of faults along the Pacific coast of the US extending from Southern California to Alaska, through the OSU/USGS B4 and UNAVCO EarthScope projects; mapping of lava fields in Hawaii; mapping post-forest-fire zones in the San Gabriel Mountains, CA and Valles Caldera, NM; mapping beach erosion/deposition induced by hurricanes along the Panhandle and Atlantic coasts of Florida; rapid-response mapping of the Iowa river floods in 2008 and the El Mayor - Cucapah Earthquake in 2010. The experience gained and lessons learned by NCALM regarding the long term monitoring of hazards for the preparation, response and recovery of disasters range from navigating the regulatory and logistic challenges of being present in a disaster area, to the production of real-time geodetic imagery and data for support of the authorities, to performing change detection (surface deformation, sediment transport, infrastructure damage) using LiDAR data products obtained by different vendors, with different equipment and operated under different specifications. End users of the information uniquely provided by

  11. Combination of serum phosphorylated neurofilament heavy subunit and hyperintensity of intramedullary T2W on magnetic resonance imaging provides better prognostic value of canine thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashita, Tadahisa; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Nakamoto, Yuya; Akagi, Yosuke; Nakanishi, Ataru; Harasaki, Yusuke; Ozawa, Tsuyoshi; Uemura, Takashi; Kobatake, Yui; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Kitamura, Naoki; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Uzuka, Yuji; Shaw, Gerry; Yasuda, Jun

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of concurrent measurement of serum phosphorylated neurofilament heavy subunit (pNF-H) concentration and intramedullary T2W hyperintensity in paraplegic to paraplegic dogs. Our hypothesis was that concurrent measurement of these would provide a more accurate prediction of functional outcome in dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH). A prospective case-control clinical study was designed using 94 dogs with acute onset of thoracolumbar IVDH. The association of serum pNF-H concentration, T2W hyperintensity on sagittal MRI (T2H/L2), deep pain perception and surgical outcome were evaluated with logistic regression analysis after three months for all 94 surgically treated dogs. Sensitivity to predict non-ambulatory outcome was compared among pNF-H and T2H/L2 and combination of both. Logistic regression analysis indicated that serum pNF-H concentration and T2H/L2 were significantly correlated with surgical outcome (PpNF-H concentration, 1.9 for T2H/L2 and 2.3 for deep pain sensation. The sensitivity and specificity to predict non-ambulatory outcome for using serum parameter pNF-H>2.6 ng/ml, using T2H/L2 value of>0.84 and using both serum pNF-H and T2H/L2, were 95% and 75.7%, 65% and 86.5%, and 90.0% and 97.5%, respectively. Therefore, combined measurements of serum pNF-H and T2H/L2 might be useful for predicting long-term outcome in dogs with thoracolumbar IVDH.

  12. The KIDROP model of combining strategies for providing retinopathy of prematurity screening in underserved areas in India using wide-field imaging, tele-medicine, non-physician graders and smart phone reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Vinekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the Karnataka Internet Assisted Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity (KIDROP program for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP screening in underserved rural areas using an indigenously developed tele-ROP model. Materials and Methods: KIDROP currently provides ROP screening and treatment services in three zones and 81 neonatal units in Karnataka, India. Technicians were trained to use a portable Retcam Shuttle (Clarity, USA and validated against ROP experts performing indirect ophthalmoscopy. An indigenously developed 20-point score (STAT score graded their ability (Level I to III to image and decide follow-up based on a three-way algorithm. Images were also uploaded on a secure tele-ROP platform and accessed and reported by remote experts on their smart phones (iPhone, Apple. Results: 6339 imaging sessions of 1601 infants were analyzed. A level III technician agreed with 94.3% of all expert decisions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for treatment grade disease were 95.7, 93.2, 81.5 and 98.6 respectively. The kappa for technicians to decide discharge of babies was 0.94 (P < 0.001. Only 0.4% of infants needing treatment were missed.The kappa agreement of experts reporting on the iPhone vs Retcam for treatment requiring and mild ROP were 0.96 and 0.94 (P < 0.001 respectively. Conclusions: This is the first and largest real-world program to employ accredited non-physicians to grade and report ROP. The KIDROP tele-ROP model demonstrates that ROP services can be delivered to the outreach despite lack of specialists and may be useful in other middle-income countries with similar demographics.

  13. Volume-Based F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging Markers Provide Supplemental Prognostic Information to Histologic Grading in Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid

    2015-01-01

    to 2012 including 92 patients with histologically verified high-grade BS (N = 37) or STS (N = 55). All patients underwent a pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan. Clinical data were registered. Measurements of the accuracy of metabolic tumor volume with a preset threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized...... analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare the degree of equality of survival distributions. Prognostic variables with related hazard ratios (HR) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%; 12 BS.......05, HR 3.37 [95% CI 1.02-11.11]). No significant results were demonstrated for MTV40%.Volume-based F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging markers in terms of pretreatment estimation of TLG provide supplemental prognostic information to histologic grading, with significant independent properties for prediction...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Provides Added Value to the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator for Patients With Estimated Risk of High-grade Prostate Cancer Less Than or Equal to 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric H; Weaver, John K; Shetty, Anup S; Vetter, Joel M; Andriole, Gerald L; Strope, Seth A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the added value of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator. Between January 2012 and December 2015, 339 patients underwent prostate MRI prior to biopsy at our institution. MRI was considered positive if there was at least 1 Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System 4 or 5 MRI suspicious region. Logistic regression was used to develop 2 models: biopsy outcome as a function of the (1) Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator alone and (2) combined with MRI findings. When including all patients, the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial with and without MRI models performed similarly (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.74 and 0.78, P = .06). When restricting the cohort to patients with estimated risk of high-grade (Gleason ≥7) prostate cancer ≤10%, the model with MRI outperformed the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial alone model (AUC = 0.69 and 0.60, P = .01). Within this cohort of patients, there was no significant difference in discrimination between models for those with previous negative biopsy (AUC = 0.61 vs 0.63, P = .76), whereas there was a significant improvement in discrimination with the MRI model for biopsy-naïve patients (AUC = 0.72 vs 0.60, P = .01). The use of prostate MRI in addition to the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator provides a significant improvement in clinical risk discrimination for patients with estimated risk of high-grade (Gleason ≥7) prostate cancer ≤10%. Prebiopsy prostate MRI should be strongly considered for these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced biomedical image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    "This book covers the four major areas of image processing: Image enhancement and restoration, image segmentation, image quantification and classification, and image visualization. Image registration, storage, and compression are also covered. The text focuses on recently developed image processing and analysis operators and covers topical research"--Provided by publisher.

  16. Microwave imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorino, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the most relevant theoretical and algorithmic aspects of modern microwave imaging approaches Microwave imaging-a technique used in sensing a given scene by means of interrogating microwaves-has recently proven its usefulness in providing excellent diagnostic capabilities in several areas, including civil and industrial engineering, nondestructive testing and evaluation, geophysical prospecting, and biomedical engineering. Microwave Imaging offers comprehensive descriptions of the most important techniques so far proposed for short-range microwave imaging-in

  17. Mammographic image quality in relation to positioning of the breast: A multicentre international evaluation of the assessment systems currently used, to provide an evidence base for establishing a standardised method of assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K; Parashar, D; Bouverat, G; Poulos, A; Gullien, R; Stewart, E; Aarre, R; Crystal, P; Wallis, M

    2017-11-01

    Optimum mammography positioning technique is necessary to maximise cancer detection. Current criteria for mammography appraisal lack reliability and validity with a need to develop a more objective system. We aimed to establish current international practice in assessing image quality (IQ), of screening mammograms then develop and validate a reproducible assessment tool. A questionnaire sent to centres in countries undertaking population screening identified practice, participants for an expert panel (EP) of radiologists/radiographers and a testing panel (TP) of radiographers. The EP developed category criteria and descriptors using a modified Delphi process to agree definitions. The EP scored 12 screening mammograms to test agreement then a main set of 178 cases. Weighted scores were derived for each descriptor enabling calculation of numerical parameters for each new category. The TP then scored the main set. Statistical analysis included ANOVA, t-tests and Kendall's coefficient. 11 centres in 8 countries responded forming an EP of 7 members and TP of 44 members. The EP showed moderate agreement when the scoring the mini test set W = 0.50 p < 0.001 and the main set W = 0.55 p < 0.001, 'posterior nipple line' being the most difficult descriptor. The weighted total scores differentiated the 4 new categories Perfect, Good, Adequate and Inadequate (p < 0.001). We have developed an assessment tool by Delphi consensus and weighted consensus criteria. We have successfully tabulated a range of numerical scores for each new category providing the first validated and reproducible mammography IQ scoring system. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeesu Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic (PA imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

  19. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  20. Medical imaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is a relatively young discipline that started with Conrad Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of the x-ray in 1885. X-ray imaging was rapidly adopted in hospitals around the world. However, it was the advent of computerized data and image processing that made revolutionary new imaging modalities possible. Today, cross-sections and three-dimensional reconstructions of the organs inside the human body is possible with unprecedented speed, detail and quality. This book provides an introduction into the principles of image formation of key medical imaging modalities: X-ray projection imaging, x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and radionuclide imaging. Recent developments in optical imaging are also covered. For each imaging modality, the introduction into the physical principles and sources of contrast is provided, followed by the methods of image formation, engineering aspects of the imaging devices, and a discussion of strengths and limitations of the modal...

  1. Preferred provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J D

    1984-05-01

    The 1980s has marked the beginning of a new alternative health care delivery system: the preferred provider organization ( PPO ). This system has developed from the health maintenance organization model and is predominant in California and Colorado. A PPO is a group of providers, usually hospitals and doctors, who agree to provide health care to subscribers for a negotiated fee that is usually discounted. Preferred provider organizations are subject to peer review and strict use controls in exchange for a consistent volume of patients and speedy turnaround on claims payments. This article describes the factors leading to the development of PPOs and the implications for occupational therapy.

  2. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  3. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  4. Iterative image reconstruction for multienergy computed tomography via structure tensor total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dong; Bian, Zhaoying; Gong, Changfei; Huang, Jing; He, Ji; Zhang, Hua; Lu, Lijun; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Multienergy computed tomography (MECT) has the potential to simultaneously offer multiple sets of energy- selective data belonging to specific energy windows. However, because sufficient photon counts are not available in the specific energy windows compared with that in the whole energy window, the MECT images reconstructed by the analytical approach often suffer from poor signal-to-noise (SNR) and strong streak artifacts. To eliminate this drawback, in this work we present a penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) scheme by incorporating the new concept of structure tensor total variation (STV) regularization to improve the MECT images quality from low-milliampere-seconds (low-mAs) data acquisitions. Henceforth the present scheme is referred to as `PWLS- STV' for simplicity. Specifically, the STV regularization is derived by penalizing the eigenvalues of the structure tensor of every point in the MECT images. Thus it can provide more robust measures of image variation, which can eliminate the patchy artifacts often observed in total variation regularization. Subsequently, an alternating optimization algorithm was adopted to minimize the objective function. Experiments with a digital XCAT phantom clearly demonstrate that the present PWLS-STV algorithm can achieve more gains than the existing TV-based algorithms and the conventional filtered backpeojection (FBP) algorithm in terms of noise-induced artifacts suppression, resolution preservation, and material decomposition assessment.

  5. Monitoring of the Parasite Load in the Digestive Tract of Rhodnius prolixus by Combined qPCR Analysis and Imaging Techniques Provides New Insights into the Trypanosome Life Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe de Almeida Dias

    Full Text Available Here we report the monitoring of the digestive tract colonization of Rhodnius prolixus by Trypanosoma cruzi using an accurate determination of the parasite load by qPCR coupled with fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging (BLI. These complementary methods revealed critical steps necessary for the parasite population to colonize the insect gut and establish vector infection.qPCR analysis of the parasite load in the insect gut showed several limitations due mainly to the presence of digestive-derived products that are thought to degrade DNA and inhibit further the PCR reaction. We developed a real-time PCR strategy targeting the T. cruzi repetitive satellite DNA sequence using as internal standard for normalization, an exogenous heterologous DNA spiked into insect samples extract, to precisely quantify the parasite load in each segment of the insect gut (anterior midgut, AM, posterior midgut, PM, and hindgut, H. Using combined fluorescence microscopy and BLI imaging as well as qPCR analysis, we showed that during their journey through the insect digestive tract, most of the parasites are lysed in the AM during the first 24 hours independently of the gut microbiota. During this short period, live parasites move through the PM to establish the onset of infection. At days 3-4 post-infection (p.i., the parasite population begins to colonize the H to reach a climax at day 7 p.i., which is maintained during the next two weeks. Remarkably, the fluctuation of the parasite number in H remains relatively stable over the two weeks after refeeding, while the populations residing in the AM and PM increases slightly and probably constitutes the reservoirs of dividing epimastigotes.These data show that a tuned dynamic control of the population operates in the insect gut to maintain an equilibrium between non-dividing infective trypomastigote forms and dividing epimastigote forms of the parasite, which is crucial for vector competence.

  6. Imaging genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Paul M; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2010-08-01

    Imaging genomics is an emerging field that is rapidly identifying genes that influence the brain, cognition, and risk for disease. Worldwide, thousands of individuals are being scanned with high-throughput genotyping (genome-wide scans), and new imaging techniques [high angular resolution diffusion imaging and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] that provide fine-grained measures of the brain's structural and functional connectivity. Along with clinical diagnosis and cognitive testing, brain imaging offers highly reproducible measures that can be subjected to genetic analysis. Recent studies of twin, pedigree, and population-based datasets have discovered several candidate genes that consistently show small to moderate effects on brain measures. Many studies measure single phenotypes from the images, such as hippocampal volume, but voxel-wise genomic methods can plot the profile of genetic association at each 3D point in the brain. This exploits the full arsenal of imaging statistics to discover and replicate gene effects. Imaging genomics efforts worldwide are now working together to discover and replicate many promising leads. By studying brain phenotypes closer to causative gene action, larger gene effects are detectable with realistic sample sizes obtainable from meta-analysis of smaller studies. Imaging genomics has broad applications to dementia, mental illness, and public health.

  7. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  8. The Provident Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  9. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  10. care Providers in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and eighty six respondents (77.7%) were aware of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT). Awareness ... Key Words: malaria in pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria control, health care providers. Department of Obstetrics .... Auxiliary nurses do not have formal training prior to employment.

  11. Internet Medline providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, D L; Coady, T R

    1998-01-01

    Each database in this review has features that will appeal to some users. Each provides a credible interface to information available within the Medline database. The major differences are pricing and interface design. In this context, features that cost more and might seem trivial to the occasional searcher may actually save time and money when used by the professional. Internet Grateful Med is free, but Ms. Coady and I agree the availability of only three ANDable search fields is a major functional limitation. PubMed is also free but much more powerful. The command line interface that permits very sophisticated searches requires a commitment that casual users will find intimidating. Ms. Coady did not believe the feedback currently provided during a search was sufficient for sustained professional use. Paper Chase and Knowledge Finder are mature, modestly priced Medline search services. Paper Chase provides a menu-driven interface that is very easy to use, yet permits the user to search virtually all of Medline's data fields. Knowledge Finder emphasizes the use of natural language queries but fully supports more traditional search strategies. The impact of the tradeoff between fuzzy and Boolean strategies offered by Knowledge Finder is unclear and beyond the scope of this review. Additional software must be downloaded to use all of Knowledge Finders' features. Other providers required no software beyond the basic Internet browser, and this requirement prevented Ms. Coady from evaluating Knowledge Finder. Ovid and Silver Platter offer well-designed interfaces that simplify the construction of complex queries. These are clearly services designed for professional users. While pricing eliminates these for casual use, it should be emphasized that Medline citation access is only a portion of the service provided by these high-end vendors. Finally, we should comment that each of the vendors and government-sponsored services provided prompt and useful feedback to e

  12. Medical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  13. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  14. MRI texture analysis (MRTA) of T2-weighted images in Crohn's disease may provide information on histological and MRI disease activity in patients undergoing ileal resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makanyanga, Jesica; Bhatnagar, Gauraang; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A. [University College London and University College London Hospitals NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Center for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Ganeshan, Balaji; Groves, Ashley; Miles, Ken [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel [University College London, Department of Research Pathology, University College London Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    To associate MRI textural analysis (MRTA) with MRI and histological Crohn's disease (CD) activity. Sixteen patients (mean age 39.5 years, 9 male) undergoing MR enterography before ileal resection were retrospectively analysed. Thirty-six small (≤3 mm) ROIs were placed on T2-weighted images and location-matched histological acute inflammatory scores (AIS) measured. MRI activity (mural thickness, T2 signal, T1 enhancement) (CDA) was scored in large ROIs. MRTA features (mean, standard deviation, mean of positive pixels (MPP), entropy, kurtosis, skewness) were extracted using a filtration histogram technique. Spatial scale filtration (SSF) ranged from 2 to 5 mm. Regression (linear/logistic) tested associations between MRTA and AIS (small ROIs), and CDA/constituent parameters (large ROIs). Skewness (SSF = 2 mm) was associated with AIS [regression coefficient (rc) 4.27, p = 0.02]. Of 120 large ROI analyses (for each MRI, MRTA feature and SSF), 15 were significant. Entropy (SSF = 2, 3 mm) and kurtosis (SSF = 3 mm) were associated with CDA (rc 0.9, 1.0, -0.45, p = 0.006-0.01). Entropy and mean (SSF = 2-4 mm) were associated with T2 signal [odds ratio (OR) 2.32-3.16, p = 0.02-0.004], [OR 1.22-1.28, p = 0.03-0.04]. MPP (SSF = 2 mm) was associated with mural thickness (OR 0.91, p = 0.04). Kurtosis (SSF = 3 mm), standard deviation (SSF = 5 mm) were associated with decreased T1 enhancement (OR 0.59, 0.42, p = 0.004, 0.007). MRTA features may be associated with CD activity. (orig.)

  15. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  16. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ysla S. Catalina & Providence

    OpenAIRE

    Diazgranados, Carlos Nicolás; Torres Carreño, Guillermo Andrés; Castell, Edmon; Moreno, Santiago; Ramirez, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Esta Hoja de Mano pertenece a la exposición temporal "Ysla S. Catalina & Providence". Contiene un resumen histórico de las Islas de Santa Catalina y Providencia en los idiomas inglés y español y un mapa del siglo VI que lo hace más didáctico apoyado por figuras recortables. Esta muestra hace parte del proyecto IDA y VUELTA del Sistema de Patrimonio Cultural y Museos SPM que gestiona la descentralización del patrimonio cultural de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia a otras ciudades del pa...

  18. What HERA May Provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  19. Providing traceability for neuroimaging analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchey, Richard; Branson, Andrew; Anjum, Ashiq; Bloodsworth, Peter; Habib, Irfan; Munir, Kamran; Shamdasani, Jetendr; Soomro, Kamran

    2013-09-01

    With the increasingly digital nature of biomedical data and as the complexity of analyses in medical research increases, the need for accurate information capture, traceability and accessibility has become crucial to medical researchers in the pursuance of their research goals. Grid- or Cloud-based technologies, often based on so-called Service Oriented Architectures (SOA), are increasingly being seen as viable solutions for managing distributed data and algorithms in the bio-medical domain. For neuroscientific analyses, especially those centred on complex image analysis, traceability of processes and datasets is essential but up to now this has not been captured in a manner that facilitates collaborative study. Few examples exist, of deployed medical systems based on Grids that provide the traceability of research data needed to facilitate complex analyses and none have been evaluated in practice. Over the past decade, we have been working with mammographers, paediatricians and neuroscientists in three generations of projects to provide the data management and provenance services now required for 21st century medical research. This paper outlines the finding of a requirements study and a resulting system architecture for the production of services to support neuroscientific studies of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. The paper proposes a software infrastructure and services that provide the foundation for such support. It introduces the use of the CRISTAL software to provide provenance management as one of a number of services delivered on a SOA, deployed to manage neuroimaging projects that have been studying biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In the neuGRID and N4U projects a Provenance Service has been delivered that captures and reconstructs the workflow information needed to facilitate researchers in conducting neuroimaging analyses. The software enables neuroscientists to track the evolution of workflows and datasets. It also tracks the outcomes of

  20. COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lafon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present specific capabilities and limitations of the use of color digital images in a characterization process. The whole process is investigated, from the acquisition of digital color images to the analysis of the information relevant to various applications in the field of material characterization. A digital color image can be considered as a matrix of pixels with values expressed in a vector-space (commonly 3 dimensional space whose specificity, compared to grey-scale images, is to ensure a coding and a representation of the output image (visualisation printing that fits the human visual reality. In a characterization process, it is interesting to regard color image attnbutes as a set of visual aspect measurements on a material surface. Color measurement systems (spectrocolorimeters, colorimeters and radiometers and cameras use the same type of light detectors: most of them use Charge Coupled Devices sensors. The difference between the two types of color data acquisition systems is that color measurement systems provide a global information of the observed surface (average aspect of the surface: the color texture is not taken into account. Thus, it seems interesting to use imaging systems as measuring instruments for the quantitative characterization of the color texture.

  1. Nanoplatform-based molecular imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    "Nanoplathform-Based Molecular Imaging provides rationale for using nanoparticle-based probes for molecular imaging, then discusses general strategies for this underutilized, yet promising, technology...

  2. scikit-image: image processing in Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéfan van der Walt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available scikit-image is an image processing library that implements algorithms and utilities for use in research, education and industry applications. It is released under the liberal Modified BSD open source license, provides a well-documented API in the Python programming language, and is developed by an active, international team of collaborators. In this paper we highlight the advantages of open source to achieve the goals of the scikit-image library, and we showcase several real-world image processing applications that use scikit-image. More information can be found on the project homepage, http://scikit-image.org.

  3. scikit-image: image processing in Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Stéfan; Schönberger, Johannes L; Nunez-Iglesias, Juan; Boulogne, François; Warner, Joshua D; Yager, Neil; Gouillart, Emmanuelle; Yu, Tony

    2014-01-01

    scikit-image is an image processing library that implements algorithms and utilities for use in research, education and industry applications. It is released under the liberal Modified BSD open source license, provides a well-documented API in the Python programming language, and is developed by an active, international team of collaborators. In this paper we highlight the advantages of open source to achieve the goals of the scikit-image library, and we showcase several real-world image processing applications that use scikit-image. More information can be found on the project homepage, http://scikit-image.org.

  4. Hyperspectral imaging flow cytometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2017-10-25

    A hyperspectral imaging flow cytometer can acquire high-resolution hyperspectral images of particles, such as biological cells, flowing through a microfluidic system. The hyperspectral imaging flow cytometer can provide detailed spatial maps of multiple emitting species, cell morphology information, and state of health. An optimized system can image about 20 cells per second. The hyperspectral imaging flow cytometer enables many thousands of cells to be characterized in a single session.

  5. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - provider data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical...

  6. NAIP Public Image Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — This map provides a preview and information about the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) image services available on the APFO public image server. Click on...

  7. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  8. PhenoImageShare: an image annotation and query infrastructure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adebayo, Solomon; McLeod, Kenneth; Tudose, Ilinca; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Burdett, Tony; Baldock, Richard; Burger, Albert; Parkinson, Helen

    2016-01-01

    .... PhenoImageShare provides an ontology-enabled lightweight image data query, annotation service and a single point of access backed by a Solr server for programmatic access to an integrated image...

  9. Biblical Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Yeshayahu

    1987-01-01

    Responds to Marjorie Munsterberg's review of "The Bible and the Image: The History of Photography in the Holy Land 1839-1899." Claims that Munsterberg provided an incomplete and inaccurate knowledge of the book's content, and that she considered Western pictorial traditions as the only valid measure in the study of the history of…

  10. Optical Imaging Provides a Clear Picture of Ionospheric Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-15

    coordinates, allowing scientists to determine the locations of probable communicatio n or navigation outages . They can also reference the same time...although an Internet connection is highly desirabl e to facilitate real-time data use and remote monitoring of system performance .

  11. Fish skin provides invisibility in open ocean (image 11)

    National Science Foundation

    2017-02-10

    Full Text Available Skin preparation from fish shows birefringence under cross polarization microscopy Skin preparation from fish shows birefringence under cross polarization microscopySkin preparation from fish shows birefringence under cross polarization microscopy Skin pr

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  14. Ditigal-Image Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, R.; Gonzalez, R.

    1984-01-01

    Programable system enhances digitally monocular and stereographic images at video rates. Provides automatic and interactive enhancement modes based on histogram modification and intensity-mapping techniques.

  15. Molecular photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frogh Jafarian Dehkordi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hybrid imaging modalities which simultaneously benefit from capabilities of combined modalities provides an opportunity to modify quality of the images which can be obtained by each of the combined imaging systems. One of the imaging modalities, emerged in medical research area as a hybrid of ultrasound imaging and optical imaging, is photoacoustic imaging which apply ultrasound wave generated by tissue, after receiving laser pulse, to produce medical images. Materials and Methods: In this review, using keywords such as photoacoustic, optoacoustic, laser-ultrasound, thermoacoustic at databases such as PubMed and ISI, studies performed in the field of photoacoustic and related findings were evaluated. Results: Photoacoustic imaging, acquiring images with high contrast and desired resolution, provides an opportunity to perform physiologic and anatomic studies. Because this technique does not use ionizing radiation, it is not restricted by the limitation of the ionizing-based imaging systems therefore it can be used noninvasively to make images from cell, vessels, whole body imaging of the animal and distinguish tumor from normal tissue. Conclusion: Photoacoustic imaging is a new method in preclinical researches which can be used in various physiologic and anatomic studies. This method, because of application of non-ionizing radiation, may resolve limitation of radiation based method in diagnostic assessments.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, older ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  18. Trans Media Relevance Feedback for Image Autoannotation

    OpenAIRE

    Mensink, Thomas; Verbeek, Jakob; Csurka, Gabriela

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Automatic image annotation is an important tool for keyword-based image retrieval, providing a textual index for non-annotated images. Many image auto annotation methods are based on visual similarity between images to be annotated and images in a training corpus. The annotations of the most similar training images are transferred to the image to be annotated. In this paper we consider using also similarities among the training images, both visual and textual, to deriv...

  19. Hyperspectral image analysis. A tutorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Babamoradi, Hamid; Elcoroaristizabal Martin, Saioa

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial aims at providing guidelines and practical tools to assist with the analysis of hyperspectral images. Topics like hyperspectral image acquisition, image pre-processing, multivariate exploratory analysis, hyperspectral image resolution, classification and final digital image processing...... to differentiate between several types of plastics by using Near infrared hyperspectral imaging and Partial Least Squares - Discriminant Analysis. Thus, the reader is guided through every single step and oriented in order to adapt those strategies to the user's case....

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  1. Body Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Body Image Developing a positive body image and a healthy mental attitude is crucial ... Read on for tips to have a healthy body image. Â Topics About body image When you ...

  2. Querying Data Providing Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Sabesan, Manivasakan

    2010-01-01

    Web services are often used for search computing where data is retrieved from servers providing information of different kinds. Such data providing web services return a set of objects for a given set of parameters without any side effects. There is need to enable general and scalable search capabilities of data from data providing web services, which is the topic of this Thesis. The Web Service MEDiator (WSMED) system automatically provides relational views of any data providing web service ...

  3. Image processing and recognition for biological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Seiichi

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews image processing and pattern recognition techniques, which will be useful to analyze bioimages. Although this paper does not provide their technical details, it will be possible to grasp their main tasks and typical tools to handle the tasks. Image processing is a large research area to improve the visibility of an input image and acquire some valuable information from it. As the main tasks of image processing, this paper introduces gray-level transformation, binarization, image filtering, image segmentation, visual object tracking, optical flow and image registration. Image pattern recognition is the technique to classify an input image into one of the predefined classes and also has a large research area. This paper overviews its two main modules, that is, feature extraction module and classification module. Throughout the paper, it will be emphasized that bioimage is a very difficult target for even state-of-the-art image processing and pattern recognition techniques due to noises, deformations, etc. This paper is expected to be one tutorial guide to bridge biology and image processing researchers for their further collaboration to tackle such a difficult target. © 2013 The Author Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  4. Imaging Characteristics Of Electronic Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    1989-03-01

    Electronic imaging in the form of television has served the public for over 40 years. Television cameras have up to now used mostly photoconductive tubes to capture the live image. However, the last ten years have seen the advances in microelectronics, including VLSI technology, introduce newer, more flexible ways to record images via the solid state sensor. One version of the solid state sensor, the charge coupled device (CCD) has found its way into consumer electronic imaging, replacing the Super 8 movie system, and today, portable, commercial television cameras are starting to use CCD arrays instead of the more conventional photoconductive tubes. There are several electronic still cameras (ESC) on the market using solid state sensors, but due to the limited number of imaging sites or pixels on these imaging sensors, the quality is far below that of present photographic-based systems. This paper will consider imaging characteristics of photoconductive tubes (solid state imaging sensors) and how they compare to photographic film. Also, based on a system analysis, the requirements for a solid state sensor that will provide image quality equal to current photographic systems will be defined. The importance of digital image processing and digital image compression will also be discussed.

  5. Choosing a primary care provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Choosing a primary care provider URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001939.htm Choosing a primary care provider To ...

  6. Types of health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Types of health care providers URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001933.htm Types of health care providers To ...

  7. Generalized internal multiple imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Zuberi, Mohammad Akbar Hosain

    2014-12-04

    Various examples are provided for generalized internal multiple imaging (GIMI). In one example, among others, a method includes generating a higher order internal multiple image using a background Green\\'s function and rendering the higher order internal multiple image for presentation. In another example, a system includes a computing device and a generalized internal multiple imaging (GIMI) application executable in the computing device. The GIMI application includes logic that generates a higher order internal multiple image using a background Green\\'s function and logic that renders the higher order internal multiple image for display on a display device. In another example, a non-transitory computer readable medium has a program executable by processing circuitry that generates a higher order internal multiple image using a background Green\\'s function and renders the higher order internal multiple image for display on a display device.

  8. Image Enhancement, Image Quality, and Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2005-01-01

    The Multiscale Retinex With Color Restoration (MSRCR) is a non-linear image enhancement algorithm that provides simultaneous dynamic range compression, color constancy and rendition. The overall impact is to brighten up areas of poor contrast/lightness but not at the expense of saturating areas of good contrast/brightness. The downside is that with the poor signal-to-noise ratio that most image acquisition devices have in dark regions, noise can also be greatly enhanced thus affecting overall image quality. In this paper, we will discuss the impact of the MSRCR on the overall quality of an enhanced image as a function of the strength of shadows in an image, and as a function of the root-mean-square (RMS) signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of the image.

  9. Digital image inpainting and microscopy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Stefan G; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A

    2011-11-01

    A considerable amount of image processing techniques known as inpainting techniques have been recently developed aiming to provide solutions for filling in missing or damaged regions in a digital image. Typical such techniques reconstruct a defined area by using information from its neighborhood, for example, by completing inside the missing region the isophote lines arriving at its boundaries. In this article, we show that inpainting techniques have considerable potential usefulness in microscopy imaging, even though experimenting and using them in this domain has been almost entirely neglected up until now. In this purpose, we experiment the "curvature-preserving" partial differential equations as a solution to inpainting regions in images collected by several optical and scanning probe microscopy techniques. The results achieved are presented along with a discussion on typical problematic scenarios of microscopy imaging for which this type of techniques can provide a viable solution. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Temporal bone imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmerling, Marc [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Sint-Lucas, Gent (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Foer, Bert de (ed.) [Sint-Augustinus Ziekenhuis, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Complete overview of imaging of normal and diseased temporal bone. Straightforward structure to facilitate learning. Detailed consideration of newer imaging techniques, including the hot topic of diffusion-weighted imaging. Includes a chapter on anatomy that will be of great help to the novice interpreter of imaging findings. Excellent illustrations throughout. This book provides a complete overview of imaging of normal and diseased temporal bone. After description of indications for imaging and the cross-sectional imaging anatomy of the area, subsequent chapters address the various diseases and conditions that affect the temporal bone and are likely to be encountered regularly in clinical practice. The classic imaging methods are described and discussed in detail, and individual chapters are included on newer techniques such as functional imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging. There is also a strong focus on postoperative imaging. Throughout, imaging findings are documented with the aid of numerous informative, high-quality illustrations. Temporal Bone Imaging, with its straightforward structure based essentially on topography, will prove of immense value in daily practice.

  11. Digital imaging in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil Vasdev

    2012-12-01

    Advances in computing speed and power have made a pure digital work flow for pathology. New technologies such as whole slide imaging (WSI), multispectral image analysis, and algorithmic image searching seem poised to fundamentally change the way in which pathology is practiced. This article provides the practicing pathologist with a primer on digital imaging. Building on this primer, the current state of the art concerning digital imaging in pathology is described. Emphasis is placed on WSI and its ramifications, showing how it is useful in both anatomic (histology, cytopathology) and clinical (hematopathology) pathology. Future trends are also extrapolated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Providing for the Future: Providers' Views on Apprenticeship Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrone, Tami; Sims, David; Gladding, Cath

    2016-01-01

    Apprenticeships are currently undergoing reform in England. Funding mechanisms and the content of Apprenticeship programmes are being restructured. NFER and the Association of Employment and Learning Providers (AELP) have carried out a joint research project to inform future policy and practice with evidence on how providers of Apprenticeships are…

  13. Prehospital Providers' Perceptions on Providing Patient and Family Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Emily M; Sampayo, Esther M; Shah, Manish I; Doughty, Cara B

    2017-01-01

    A gap exists in understanding a provider's approach to delivering care that is mutually beneficial to patients, families, and other providers in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes, beliefs, and perceived barriers to providing patient and family centered care (PFCC) in the prehospital setting and to describe potential solutions for improving PFCC during critical pediatric events. We conducted a qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposive sample of Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics from an urban, municipal, fire-based EMS system, who participated in the Pediatric Simulation Training for Emergency Prehospital Providers (PediSTEPPS) course. Two coders reviewed transcriptions of audio recordings from participants' first simulation scenario debriefings and performed constant comparison analysis to identify unifying themes. Themes were verified through member checking with two focus groups of prehospital providers. A total of 122 EMTs and paramedics participated in 16 audiotaped debriefing sessions and two focus groups. Four overarching themes emerged regarding the experience of PFCC by prehospital providers: (1) Perceived barriers included the prehospital environment, limited manpower, multi-tasking medical care, and concern for interference with patient care; (2) Providing emotional support comprised of empathetically comforting caregivers, maintaining a calm demeanor, and empowering families to feel involved; (3) Effective communication strategies consisted of designating a family point person, narration of actions, preempting the next steps, speaking in lay terms, summarizing during downtime, and conveying a positive first impression; (4) Tactics to overcome PFCC barriers were maintaining a line of sight, removing and returning a caregiver to and from the scene, and providing situational awareness. Based on debriefings from simulated scenarios, some prehospital providers identified the provision of

  14. Analysis of inter-provider conflicts among healthcare providers

    OpenAIRE

    Stecker, Mona; Epstein, Nancy; Mark M Stecker; Ausman, James I.; Harrigan, Noyes

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is a top priority of healthcare organizations. The Joint Commission (TJC) is now requiring that healthcare organizations promulgate polices to investigate and resolve disruptive behavior among employees. Methods: Our aims in this investigation utilizing the Provider Conflict Questionnaire (PCQ: Appendix A) included; determining what conflicts exist among a large sample of healthcare providers, how to assess the extent and frequency of disruptive behaviors, and what ...

  15. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  16. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  17. Imaging Cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofts, Paul S.; Jackson, Jonathan S.; Tozer, Daniel J.; Cercignani, Mara; Keir, Geoffrey; MacManus, David G.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Ridha, Basil H.; Schmierer, Klaus; Siddique, Durre; Thornton, John S.; Wroe, Stephen J.; Fox, Nick C.

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing interest in imaging cadavers for noninvasive autopsies for research purposes. However, the temperature is well below that of in vivo imaging, and a variety of interesting ‘cold brain’ effects are observed. At lower temperatures conventional FLAIR sequences no longer produce dark cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); T1 is reduced from about 4.0 sec in vivo to 1.7 sec at 1°C. The diffusion coefficient (DC) of CSF is much reduced (from 3.1 10−9 m2s−1 in vivo to 1.1 at 1°C). DC values therefore provide a noninvasive thermometer to measure brain core temperature to within 1.0°C. In three cadavers DC values were 1.1-1.5 10−9 m2s−1, indicating brain core temperatures of 1-10°C, consistent with external thermocouple measurements. An improved inversion time (TI0) can then be found for FLAIR. At 10°C this Cold FLAIR sequence (TI0 = 1.5 sec) gave black CSF. Expressions for CSF DC and T1 as a function of temperature were produced. A measurement of CSF DC could be converted directly to temperature and the required TI0 found. In vitro values of CSF DC were about 1% lower than that of water. Thus, FLAIR imaging can be optimized for cadaveric brains at low and unknown temperatures, thereby improving value for autopsy purposes and facilitating comparisons with in vivo imaging. PMID:18058937

  18. Images of Usability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    The term usability is ubiquitous in human-computer interaction, so much so that it is commonly used without definition. Rather than one established meaning of usability, there are, however, multiple images of usability. While each image provides a partial view, the partiality remains implicit...... unless confronted with alternative images. This study delineates six images of usability: universal usability, situational usability, perceived usability, hedonic usability, organizational usability, and cultural usability. The different foci of the images provide opportunities for becoming sensitized...... to manifold aspects of the use of a system and thereby acquiring a genuine understanding of its usability. The six images differ, for example, in the extent to which they include aspects of the outcome of the process of using a system or merely the process of use, whether they involve collaborative use...

  19. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Paul

    2011-08-06

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2-3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  20. Advances in oncologic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Alexander J; Trout, Andrew T; Roebuck, Derek J

    2014-12-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been an increased reliance on radiologic imaging to diagnose and stage malignancies. This increased reliance on imaging has occurred because the quality of imaging has improved markedly. Currently, modalities such as MRI and CT allow the radiologist to obtain highly detailed images of the human body with a resolution of less than 1mm. More recently, researchers have shifted their focus from anatomic imaging to functional imaging. This burgeoning field of radiology strives to provide quantitative information regarding the behavior of tumors (or other pathology) to deliver patients and clinicians with prognostic information regarding the disease process. The purpose of this article is to describe the recent advances in pediatric oncologic imaging. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. GOATS Image Projection Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Benjamin M.; Green, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    When doing mission analysis and design of an imaging system in orbit around the Earth, answering the fundamental question of imaging performance requires an understanding of the image products that will be produced by the imaging system. GOATS software represents a series of MATLAB functions to provide for geometric image projections. Unique features of the software include function modularity, a standard MATLAB interface, easy-to-understand first-principles-based analysis, and the ability to perform geometric image projections of framing type imaging systems. The software modules are created for maximum analysis utility, and can all be used independently for many varied analysis tasks, or used in conjunction with other orbit analysis tools.

  2. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  3. Image Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Laura Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    In large datasets, it is time consuming or even impossible to pick out interesting images. Our proposed solution is to find statistics to quantify the information in each image and use those to identify and pick out images of interest.

  4. Image Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance that explains the process for getting images approved in One EPA Web microsites and resource directories. includes an appendix that shows examples of what makes some images better than others, how some images convey meaning more than others

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such ... abdomen help determine causes of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be ... obtain clear images. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the ...

  7. Imaging of parasitic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Maurice C. [American Univ. of Beirut Medical Center (Lebanon). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Abd El Bagi, Mohamed E. [Riyadh Military Hospital (Saudi Arabia). Radiology and Imaging Dept. 920W; Tamraz, Jean C. (eds.) [CHU Hotel-Dieu de France, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2008-07-01

    This book provides an overview of the imaging findings of parasitic diseases using modern imaging equipment. The chapters consist of short descriptions of causative pathogens, epidemiology, modes of transmission, pathology, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, and imaging findings, with illustrative examples of parasitic diseases that can affect various systems of the human body. Tables summarizing key diagnostic features and clinical data pertinent to diagnosis are also included. This book is intended for radiologists worldwide. (orig.)

  8. Coordination of primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, D L; McAlister, W H

    1988-02-01

    Surveys were sent to family physicians in Illinois to determine knowledge and attitude concerning optometry. The respondents were knowledgeable in certain aspects of optometry. However, many need to become more aware of the optometrist as a health care provider.

  9. Medicare Referring Provider DMEPOS PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset, which is part of CMSs Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data, details information on Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and...

  10. Seeing Your Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reduce Font Size 100% Increase Font Size Positive Spin Basics Federal Response Digital Tools Events Blog Home ... that may assist you. Be on time. Most healthcare providers have full appointment schedules—if you are ...

  11. EAMJ Provider April 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-04-04

    Apr 4, 2010 ... with breast cancer is known to result in more adverse outcomes (1). ... Objective: To determine the extent and nature of provider delay in breast cancer management at .... and calls for a review of booking procedures. Also.

  12. TERRAIN, PROVIDENCE COUNTY, RHODE ISLAND

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Providence AOI consists of the costal portion of the county, and meshes up seamlessly with the Kent county AOI directly south. Ground Control is collected...

  13. Lodging Update: Providence, Rhode Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragel Roginsky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Each quarter, Pinnacle Advisory Group prepares an analysis of the New England lodging industry, which provides a regional summary and then focuses in depth on a particular market. These reviews look at recent and proposed supply changes, factors affecting demand and growth rates, and the effects of interactions between such supply and demand trends. In this issue, the authors spotlight the lodging market in Providence, Rhode Island.

  14. Price transparency for MRIs increased use of less costly providers and triggered provider competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sze-jung; Sylwestrzak, Gosia; Shah, Christiane; DeVries, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    To encourage patients to select high-value providers, an insurer-initiated price transparency program that focused on elective advanced imaging procedures was implemented. Patients having at least one outpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan in 2010 or 2012 were divided according to their membership in commercial health plans participating in the program (the intervention group) or in nonparticipating commercial health plans (the reference group) in similar US geographic regions. Patients in the intervention group were informed of price differences among available MRI facilities and given the option of selecting different providers. For those patients, the program resulted in a $220 cost reduction (18.7 percent) per test and a decrease in use of hospital-based facilities from 53 percent in 2010 to 45 percent in 2012. Price variation between hospital and nonhospital facilities for the intervention group was reduced by 30 percent after implementation. Nonparticipating members residing in intervention areas also observed price reductions, which indicates increased price competition among providers. The program significantly reduced imaging costs. This suggests that patients select lower-price facilities when informed about available alternatives. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  15. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  16. Ecosystem services provided by waterbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andy J; Elmberg, Johan

    2014-02-01

    Ecosystem services are ecosystem processes that directly or indirectly benefit human well-being. There has been much recent literature identifying different services and the communities and species that provide them. This is a vital first step towards management and maintenance of these services. In this review, we specifically address the waterbirds, which play key functional roles in many aquatic ecosystems, including as predators, herbivores and vectors of seeds, invertebrates and nutrients, although these roles have often been overlooked. Waterbirds can maintain the diversity of other organisms, control pests, be effective bioindicators of ecological conditions, and act as sentinels of potential disease outbreaks. They also provide important provisioning (meat, feathers, eggs, etc.) and cultural services to both indigenous and westernized societies. We identify key gaps in the understanding of ecosystem services provided by waterbirds and areas for future research required to clarify their functional role in ecosystems and the services they provide. We consider how the economic value of these services could be calculated, giving some examples. Such valuation will provide powerful arguments for waterbird conservation. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  17. Ancillary Services Provided from DER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.B.

    2005-12-21

    Distributed energy resources (DER) are quickly making their way to industry primarily as backup generation. They are effective at starting and then producing full-load power within a few seconds. The distribution system is aging and transmission system development has not kept up with the growth in load and generation. The nation's transmission system is stressed with heavy power flows over long distances, and many areas are experiencing problems in providing the power quality needed to satisfy customers. Thus, a new market for DER is beginning to emerge. DER can alleviate the burden on the distribution system by providing ancillary services while providing a cost adjustment for the DER owner. This report describes 10 types of ancillary services that distributed generation (DG) can provide to the distribution system. Of these 10 services the feasibility, control strategy, effectiveness, and cost benefits are all analyzed as in the context of a future utility-power market. In this market, services will be provided at a local level that will benefit the customer, the distribution utility, and the transmission company.

  18. Image-Enhancement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Christine G.; Stacy, Kathryn

    1993-01-01

    ENHANCETOOL computer program has capabilities for interactive enhancement of digital images. Includes particularly useful combination of algorithms not existing in single interactive program. Software package also provides means through which additional image-enhancement algorithms easily integrated and made available to user. Written in C Language.

  19. Reading Violent Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gaye

    2004-01-01

    The power of images to convince, impact, illuminate, and provide long-lasting reminders of events underscores the significance of contemporary images to art education (Green, 1999). Incorporating such imagery into curriculum can, however, be a daunting enterprise. Relevant and compelling on the one hand, on the other, the undertaking can be…

  20. Enstore with Chimera namespace provider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvintsev, Dmitry [Fermilab; Moibenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Oleynik, Gene [Fermilab; Zalokar, Michael [Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Enstore is a mass storage system developed by Fermilab that provides distributed access and management of data stored on tapes. It uses a namespace service, PNFS, developed by DESY to provide a filesystem-like view of the stored data. PNFS is a legacy product and is being replaced by a new implementation, called Chimera, which is also developed by DESY. Chimera offers multiple advantages over PNFS in terms of performance and functionality. The Enstore client component, encp, has been modified to work with Chimera, as well as with any other namespace provider. We performed high load end-to-end acceptance test of Enstore with the Chimera namespace. This paper describes the modifications to Enstore, the test procedure and the results of the acceptance testing.

  1. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Il An, Gwang [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Il [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungmin [Korea Basic Science Institute Chuncheon Center, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Joo [Department of Physics and Energy Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-710 (Korea, Republic of); Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Welch, Michael J. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.k [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [{sup 32}P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy {beta}{sup +}/{beta}{sup -} particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [{sup 32}P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic {beta}{sup +} or {beta}{sup -} particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  2. Providing Southern Perspectives on CSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Søren; Kothuis, Bas

    The article seeks to contribute to the SMEs and CSR literature in developing countries by providing; a) a ‘Southern’ SME perspective, which includes the voices of managers and workers, b) a perspective of CSR, which opens up to informal CSR practices that SMEs undertake, and c) an analysis...

  3. Wind Turbine Providing Grid Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A variable speed wind turbine is arranged to provide additional electrical power to counteract non-periodic disturbances in an electrical grid. A controller monitors events indicating a need to increase the electrical output power from the wind turbine to the electrical grid. The controller...

  4. Narratives of Ghanaian abortion providers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Michigan, Department of Women's Studies, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 7University of Michigan, Department of Obstetrics and. Gynaecology, Ann Arbor, MI USA ..... personal spending habits of physicians who were known to provide abortion – a new ..... characterized by safe space for speaking can improve physician's resilience to ...

  5. Twitter for travel medicine providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Deborah J; Kohl, Sarah E

    2016-03-01

    Travel medicine practitioners, perhaps more so than medical practitioners working in other areas of medicine, require a constant flow of information to stay up-to-date, and provide best practice information and care to their patients. Many travel medicine providers are unaware of the popularity and potential of the Twitter platform. Twitter use among our travellers, as well as by physicians and health providers, is growing exponentially. There is a rapidly expanding body of published literature on this information tool. This review provides a brief overview of the ways Twitter is being used by health practitioners, the advantages that are peculiar to Twitter as a platform of social media, and how the interested practitioner can get started. Some key points about the dark side of Twitter are highlighted, as well as the potential benefits of using Twitter as a way to disseminate accurate medical information to the public. This article will help readers develop an increased understanding of Twitter as a tool for extracting useful facts and insights from the ever increasing volume of health information. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Elastic nonlinearity imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy J; Oberait, Assad A; Barbone, Paul E; Sommer, Amy M; Gokhale, Nachiket H; Goenezent, Sevan; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2009-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated improved diagnostic performance of highly trained breast radiologists when provided with B-mode plus elastography images over B-mode images alone. In those studies we have observed that elasticity imaging can be difficult to perform if there is substantial motion of tissue out of the image plane. So we are extending our methods to 3D/4D elasticity imaging with 2D arrays. Further, we have also documented the fact that some breast tumors change contrast with increasing deformation and those observations are consistent with in vitro tissue measurements. Hence, we are investigating imaging tissue stress-strain nonlinearity. These studies will require relatively large tissue deformations (e.g., > 20%) which will induce out of plane motion further justifying 3D/4D motion tracking. To further enhance our efforts, we have begun testing the ability to perform modulus reconstructions (absolute elastic parameter) imaging of in vivo breast tissues. The reconstructions are based on high quality 2D displacement estimates from strain imaging. Piecewise linear (secant) modulus reconstructions demonstrate the changes in elasticity image contrast seen in strain images but, unlike the strain images, the contrast in the modulus images approximates the absolute modulus contrast. Nonlinear reconstructions assume a reasonable approximation to the underlying constitutive relations for the tissue and provide images of the (near) zero-strain shear modulus and a nonlinearity parameter that describes the rate of tissue stiffening with increased deformation. Limited data from clinical trials are consistent with in vitro measurements of elastic properties of tissue samples and suggest that the nonlinearity of invasive ductal carcinoma exceeds that of fibroadenoma and might be useful for improving diagnostic specificity. This work is being extended to 3D.

  7. Image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Blanken, Henk; Vries de, A.P.; Blok, H.E.; Feng, L; Feng, L.

    2007-01-01

    The field of image processing addresses handling and analysis of images for many purposes using a large number of techniques and methods. The applications of image processing range from enhancement of the visibility of cer- tain organs in medical images to object recognition for handling by

  8. Image city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities.......Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities....

  9. Tumor Molecular Imaging with Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging (MI can provide not only structural images using traditional imaging techniques but also functional and molecular information using many newly emerging imaging techniques. Over the past decade, the utilization of nanotechnology in MI has exhibited many significant advantages and provided new opportunities for the imaging of living subjects. It is expected that multimodality nanoparticles (NPs can lead to precise assessment of tumor biology and the tumor microenvironment. This review addresses topics related to engineered NPs and summarizes the recent applications of these nanoconstructs in cancer optical imaging, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and radionuclide imaging. Key challenges involved in the translation of NPs to the clinic are discussed.

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast ... or for a referral to a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  12. NASA Image Exchange (NIX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) provides access to aerospace-related citations, full-text online documents, and images and videos. The types of information...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can often determine whether a patient is a good candidate for a procedure like angioplasty . top of ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  14. Multi-dimensional imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram; Andres, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Provides a broad overview of advanced multidimensional imaging systems with contributions from leading researchers in the field Multi-dimensional Imaging takes the reader from the introductory concepts through to the latest applications of these techniques. Split into 3 parts covering 3D image capture, processing, visualization and display, using 1) a Multi-View Approach and 2.) a Holographic Approach, followed by a 3rd part addressing other 3D systems approaches, applications and signal processing for advanced 3D imaging. This book describes recent developments, as well as the prospects and

  15. Photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustics promises to revolutionize medical imaging and may well make as dramatic a contribution to modern medicine as the discovery of the x-ray itself once did. Combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically, photoacoustics can provide deep speckle-free imaging with high electromagnetic contrast at high ultrasonic resolution and without any health risk. While photoacoustic imaging is probably the fastest growing biomedical imaging technology, this book is the first comprehensive volume in this emerging field covering both the physics and the remarkable noninvasive applic

  16. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI.......Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  17. Preparing to provide MTM services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Zandra M; Mahdavian, Soheyla L; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Medication Therapy Management (MTM) has been a way for pharmacist to enhance their position as an integral member of the health care team as the need for improved clinical and economic outcomes in relation to the US health care system became apparent. MTM Certificate training programs are provided by numerous organizations. Collaboration Practice Agreements (CPA) are gaining significance as the role of the pharmacist is expanding in the care of patients as part of a multidisciplinary health care team. One major hurdle that many pharmacists are faced with is receiving reimbursement for the services provided. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 recognized that pharmacists play an important role in the management of patient care and that pharmacists bring an expertise and knowledge that will help to identify and resolve patient medication therapy problems. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Support Net for Frontline Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    With a multidisciplinary team that included an external evaluator (Dr. Robert Durham), and an extended research team (Drs. Alan Peterson and Bret...21.7%) indicated being single. The sample of providers included 13 clinical psychologists (21.7%), 17 counselors or psychotherapists (28.3%), three...a sample of service members from Iraq and Afghanistan. Military Medicine, 172, 359–363. Figley, C. R. (2002). Compassion fatigue: Psychotherapists

  19. Fuzzy image processing in sun sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasser, S.; Liebe, C. C.; Howard, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper will describe how the fuzzy image processing is implemented in the instrument. Comparison of the Fuzzy image processing and a more conventional image processing algorithm is provided and shows that the Fuzzy image processing yields better accuracy then conventional image processing.

  20. Medical imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frangioni, John V [Wayland, MA

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  1. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David H.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue...... anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been...... vectors. This review briefly introduces the principles behind colour Doppler imaging and describes some clinical applications. It then describes the basic components of conventional colour Doppler systems and the methods used to derive velocity information from the ultrasound signal. Next, a number of new...

  2. Second harmonic generation imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has shown great promise for imaging live cells and tissues, with applications in basic science, medical research, and tissue engineering. Second Harmonic Generation Imaging offers a complete guide to this optical modality, from basic principles, instrumentation, methods, and image analysis to biomedical applications. The book features contributions by experts in second-harmonic imaging, including many pioneering researchers in the field. Written for researchers at all levels, it takes an in-depth look at the current state of the art and possibilities of SHG microscopy. Organized into three sections, the book: Provides an introduction to the physics of the process, step-by-step instructions on how to build an SHG microscope, and comparisons with related imaging techniques Gives an overview of the capabilities of SHG microscopy for imaging tissues and cells—including cell membranes, muscle, collagen in tissues, and microtubules in live cells—by summarizing experi...

  3. Annotating images by mining image search results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Jing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Xirong; Ma, Wei-Ying

    2008-11-01

    Although it has been studied for years by the computer vision and machine learning communities, image annotation is still far from practical. In this paper, we propose a novel attempt at model-free image annotation, which is a data-driven approach that annotates images by mining their search results. Some 2.4 million images with their surrounding text are collected from a few photo forums to support this approach. The entire process is formulated in a divide-and-conquer framework where a query keyword is provided along with the uncaptioned image to improve both the effectiveness and efficiency. This is helpful when the collected data set is not dense everywhere. In this sense, our approach contains three steps: 1) the search process to discover visually and semantically similar search results, 2) the mining process to identify salient terms from textual descriptions of the search results, and 3) the annotation rejection process to filter out noisy terms yielded by Step 2. To ensure real-time annotation, two key techniques are leveraged-one is to map the high-dimensional image visual features into hash codes, the other is to implement it as a distributed system, of which the search and mining processes are provided as Web services. As a typical result, the entire process finishes in less than 1 second. Since no training data set is required, our approach enables annotating with unlimited vocabulary and is highly scalable and robust to outliers. Experimental results on both real Web images and a benchmark image data set show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm. It is also worth noting that, although the entire approach is illustrated within the divide-and conquer framework, a query keyword is not crucial to our current implementation. We provide experimental results to prove this.

  4. Do drug advertisements provide therapeutic information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimson, G V

    1977-01-01

    In this study of advertisements appearing in medical periodicals and by direct mail advertising to general practitioners, Dr. Stimson, a sociologist, concludes that from what is intended to provide therapeutic information hardly any therapeutic information is provided. He reminds the reader of the safeguards which surround all drug advertising by law and by the code of practice of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry but these safeguards do not appear to control real or potential sins of omission. Frequently in these advertisements the literature relating to the drug is quoted but Dr. Stimson found that it was difficult to trace all the papers quoted in different types of medical library. (Some references quoted were to unpublished papers but surely the blame should be shared in this situation?) Dr. Stimson also gives a vivid and fascinating glimpse of what he calls the 'images and stereotypes' of the patients who, it is claimed, would benefit from the drug being advertised. Certainly most general practitioners must be aware that when they prescribe that image is displaced by an individual but the portrait gallery is indeed depressing. However, to balance these advertisements drug companies issue data sheets which must be more informative than advertisements and conform to regulations in their format. Unfortunately data sheets are only issued every 15 months whereas the 'average general practitioner is potentially exposed to 1,300 advertisements every month'. In other words, the data sheet and not the advertisement should be the guideline but it arrives too infrequently to offset the lack of therapeutic information contained in advertisements. PMID:870694

  5. Providing Southern Perspectives on CSR

    OpenAIRE

    Jeppesen, Søren; Kothuis, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The article seeks to contribute to the SMEs and CSR literature in developing countries by providing; a) a ‘Southern’ SME perspective, which includes the voices of managers and workers, b) a perspective of CSR, which opens up to informal CSR practices that SMEs undertake, and c) an analysis of the key institutional issues affecting the CSR practices of SMEs. It presents perceptions of CSR practices among 21 SMEs in the garment industry in South Africa, based on 40 interviews with managers and ...

  6. Myocardial wall motion imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, Dani�l; Kuijpers, D.; Oudkerk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Wall motion imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) provides important functional information about global and regional myocardial function. This review will give an overview of the current state of myocardial wall motion imaging, especially focusing on the clinical role of dobutamine

  7. Imaging angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Natalie; Donaldson, Stephanie; Price, Pat

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for direct imaging of effects on tumor vasculature in assessment of response to antiangiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents. Imaging tumor vasculature depends on differences in permeability of vasculature of tumor and normal tissue, which cause changes in penetration of contrast agents. Angiogenesis imaging may be defined in terms of measurement of tumor perfusion and direct imaging of the molecules involved in angiogenesis. In addition, assessment of tumor hypoxia will give an indication of tumor vasculature. The range of imaging techniques available for these processes includes positron emission tomography (PET), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), perfusion computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US).

  8. Correlation plenoptic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Francesco V.; Di Lena, Francesco; Garuccio, Augusto; D'Angelo, Milena

    2017-06-01

    Plenoptic Imaging (PI) is a novel optical technique for achieving tridimensional imaging in a single shot. In conventional PI, a microlens array is inserted in the native image plane and the sensor array is moved behind the microlenses. On the one hand, the microlenses act as imaging pixels to reproduce the image of the scene; on the other hand, each microlens reproduces on the sensor array an image of the camera lens, thus providing the angular information associated with each imaging pixel. The recorded propagation direction is exploited, in post- processing, to computationally retrace the geometrical light path, thus enabling the refocusing of different planes within the scene, the extension of the depth of field of the acquired image, as well as the 3D reconstruction of the scene. However, a trade-off between spatial and angular resolution is built in the standard plenoptic imaging process. We demonstrate that the second-order spatio-temporal correlation properties of light can be exploited to overcome this fundamental limitation. Using two correlated beams, from either a chaotic or an entangled photon source, we can perform imaging in one arm and simultaneously obtain the angular information in the other arm. In fact, we show that the second order correlation function possesses plenoptic imaging properties (i.e., it encodes both spatial and angular information), and is thus characterized by a key re-focusing and 3D imaging capability. From a fundamental standpoint, the plenoptic application is the first situation where the counterintuitive properties of correlated systems are effectively used to beat intrinsic limits of standard imaging systems. From a practical standpoint, our protocol can dramatically enhance the potentials of PI, paving the way towards its promising applications.

  9. Reputational concerns with altruistic providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivella, Pau; Siciliani, Luigi

    2017-09-01

    We study a model of reputational concerns when doctors differ in their degree of altruism and they can signal their altruism by their (observable) quality. When reputational concerns are high, following the introduction or enhancement of public reporting, the less altruistic (bad) doctor mimics the more altruistic (good) doctor. Otherwise, either a separating or a semi-separating equilibrium arises: the bad doctor mimics the good doctor with probability less than one. Pay-for-performance incentive schemes are unlikely to induce crowding out, unless some dimensions of quality are unobservable. Under the pooling equilibrium a purchaser can implement the first-best quality by appropriately choosing a simple payment scheme with a fixed price per unit of quality provided. This is not the case under the separating equilibrium. Therefore, policies that enhance public reporting complement pay-for-performance schemes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. GIMP Retinex and Underwater Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show and discuss some examples of the use of a Retinex filter provided by GIMP, the GNU image manipulation program for X window systems, for enhancing the images obtained by underwater photography. The tool seems suitable for applications in the processing of images recorded during the underwater automated surveying made by drones.

  11. Image Searching across the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to find digital images on the Web. Considers images and copyright; provides an overview of the search capabilities of six search engines, including AltaVista, Google, AllTheWeb.com, Ditto.com, Picsearch, and Lycos; and describes specialized image search engines. (LRW)

  12. Image Analysis for X-ray Imaging of Food

    OpenAIRE

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Larsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    X-ray imaging systems are increasingly used for quality and safety evaluation both within food science and production. They offer non-invasive and nondestructive penetration capabilities to image the inside of food. This thesis presents applications of a novel grating-based X-ray imaging technique for quality and safety evaluation of food products. In this effort the fields of statistics, image analysis and statistical learning are combined, to provide analytical tools for determining the afo...

  13. Hip Imaging in Athletes: Sports Imaging Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Christoph A; Sutter, Reto; Buck, Florian M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2016-08-01

    Hip or groin pain in athletes is common and clinical presentation is often nonspecific. Imaging is a very important diagnostic step in the work-up of athletes with hip pain. This review article provides an overview on hip biomechanics and discusses strategies for hip imaging modalities such as radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MR arthrography and traction MR arthrography). The authors explain current concepts of femoroacetabular impingement and the problem of high prevalence of cam- and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic persons. With the main focus on MR imaging, the authors present abnormalities of the hip joint and the surrounding soft tissues that can occur in athletes: intraarticular and extraarticular hip impingement syndromes, labral and cartilage disease, microinstability of the hip, myotendinous injuries, and athletic pubalgia. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  14. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  15. Optical Imaging of the Breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    As the increased prevalence of breast cancer and the advances in breast evaluation awareness have resulted in an increased number of breast examinations and benign breast biopsies, several investigations have been performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy for breast lesions. Optical imaging of the breast that uses nearinfrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue is a novel non-invasive imaging technique to characterize breast lesions in clinical practice. This review provides a summary of the current state of optical breast imaging and it describes the basic concepts of optical imaging, the potential clinical applications for breast cancer imaging and its potential incorporation with other imaging modalities

  16. Multiple Segmentation of Image Stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smets, Jonathan; Jaeger, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method for the simultaneous construction of multiple image segmentations by combining a recently proposed “convolution of mixtures of Gaussians” model with a multi-layer hidden Markov random field structure. The resulting method constructs for a single image several, alternative...... segmentations that capture different structural elements of the image. We also apply the method to collections of images with identical pixel dimensions, which we call image stacks. Here it turns out that the method is able to both identify groups of similar images in the stack, and to provide segmentations...

  17. Image denoising using cloud images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Huanjing; Sun, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Feng

    2013-09-01

    Image denoising manages to recover a digital image from its noisy version by exploring the statistical features inside a given noisy image. Most denoising methods perform well at low noise levels but lose efficiency at higher ones. In this paper, we propose a novel image denoising method, which restores an image by exploiting the correlations between the noisy image and the images retrieved from the cloud. Given a noisy image, we first retrieve relevant images based on feature-level similarity. These images are then geometrically aligned to the noisy image to increase global statistical correlation. Using the aligned images as references, we propose recovering the image with patch-level noise removal. For each noisy patch, we first retrieve similar patches from the references and stack these patches (including the noisy one) into a three dimensional (3D) group. We then obtain the noise free (NF) patches by collaborative filtering over the 3D groups. These recovered NF patches are aggregated together, producing the desired NF image. Experimental results demonstrate that our scheme achieves significantly better results compared to state-of-the-art methods in terms of both objective and subjective qualities.

  18. Providing global WLCG transfer monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Andreeva, J; Campana, S; Flix, J; Flix, J; Keeble, O; Magini, N; Molnar, Z; Oleynik, D; Petrosyan, A; Ro, G; Saiz, P; Salichos, M; Tuckett, D; Uzhinsky, A; Wildish, T

    2012-01-01

    The WLCG[1] Transfers Dashboard is a monitoring system which aims to provide a global view of WLCG data transfers and to reduce redundancy in monitoring tasks performed by the LHC experiments. The system is designed to work transparently across LHC experiments and across the various technologies used for data transfer. Currently each LHC experiment monitors data transfers via experiment-specific systems but the overall cross-experiment picture is missing. Even for data transfers handled by FTS, which is used by 3 LHC experiments, monitoring tasks such as aggregation of FTS transfer statistics or estimation of transfer latencies are performed by every experiment separately. These tasks could be performed once, centrally, and then served to all experiments via a well-defined set of APIs. In the design and development of the new system, experience accumulated by the LHC experiments in the data management monitoring area is taken into account and a considerable part of the code of the ATLAS DDM Dashboard is being...

  19. Imaging for pediatricians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Leon, Maria I.; Ceres-Ruiz, Luisa (eds.) [Hospital Materno-Infantil del Hospital Regional Universitario, Carlos Haya, Malaga (Spain). Dept. of Radiology, Pediatric Radiology Unit; Martinez-Valverde, Antonio [Hospital Materno-Infantil del Hospital Regional Universitario, Carlos Haya, Malaga (Spain). Dept. of Pediatrics

    2012-07-01

    Ideal introduction to pediatric diagnostic imaging. Presents 100 pediatric radiology cases with clinical correlation. Includes 400 representative images. Provides bibliographic recommendations including books, web links, and recent articles. This user-friendly book adopts a multimodality approach in providing a concise overview of both basic and complex issues encountered by pediatric radiologists and pediatricians in their daily practice. The book is written by leading pediatric radiologists and pediatricians from renowned children's hospitals in Spain, the United Kingdom, and the USA. It focuses particularly on multimodality imaging, covering the full gamut of radiologic diagnostic techniques, including conventional radiography, ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound, CT, and multiple MRI techniques. Chapters are arranged according to organ systems, providing the reader with clinically oriented information. Each chapter is illustrated with high-quality images, as well as graphs, tables, decision flowcharts, and feature cases. This is the first book in the series Imaging for Clinicians, which will cover new pediatric radiology subspecialties not included in Learning Pediatric Imaging such as Cardiac Imaging, Interventional Radiology, and Emergencies.

  20. Image Processing and Geographic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Ronald G.; Daily, Julie; Kiss, Kenneth

    1985-12-01

    A Geographic Information System, which is a product of System Development Corporation's Image Processing System and a commercially available Data Base Management System, is described. The architecture of the system allows raster (image) data type, graphics data type, and tabular data type input and provides for the convenient analysis and display of spatial information. A variety of functions are supported through the Geographic Information System including ingestion of foreign data formats, image polygon encoding, image overlay, image tabulation, costatistical modelling of image and tabular information, and tabular to image conversion. The report generator in the DBMS is utilized to prepare quantitative tabular output extracted from spatially referenced images. An application of the Geographic Information System to a variety of data sources and types is highlighted. The application utilizes sensor image data, graphically encoded map information available from government sources, and statistical tables.

  1. Vaccine hesitancy and healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Pauline; Meurice, François; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Glismann, Steffen; Rosenthal, Susan L; Larson, Heidi J

    2016-12-20

    While most people vaccinate according to the recommended schedule, this success is challenged by individuals and groups who delay or refuse vaccines. The aim of this article is to review studies on vaccine hesitancy among healthcare providers (HCPs), and the influences of their own vaccine confidence and vaccination behaviour on their vaccination recommendations to others. The search strategy was developed in Medline and then adapted across several multidisciplinary mainstream databases including Embase Classic & Embase, and PschInfo. All foreign language articles were included if the abstract was available in English. A total of 185 articles were included in the literature review. 66% studied the vaccine hesitancy among HCPs, 17% analysed concerns, attitudes and/or behaviour of HCPs towards vaccinating others, and 9% were about evaluating intervention(s). Overall, knowledge about particular vaccines, their efficacy and safety, helped to build HCPs own confidence in vaccines and their willingness to recommend vaccines to others. The importance of societal endorsement and support from colleagues was also reported. In the face of emerging vaccine hesitancy, HCPs still remain the most trusted advisor and influencer of vaccination decisions. The capacity and confidence of HCPs, though, are stretched as they are faced with time constraints, increased workload and limited resources, and often have inadequate information or training support to address parents' questions. Overall, HCPs need more support to manage the quickly evolving vaccine environment as well as changing public, especially those who are reluctant or refuse vaccination. Some recommended strategies included strengthening trust between HCPs, health authorities and policymakers, through more shared involvement in the establishment of vaccine recommendations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Image blur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissen, M.R.

    1993-04-01

    The image blur in a photograph is produced by the exposure of a moving object. Knowing the amount of image blur is important for recording useful data. If there is too much blur, it becomes hard to make quantitative measurements. This report discusses image blur, the parameters used to control it, and how to calculate it.

  3. Biomedical Optical Imaging Technologies Design and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to design of biomedical optical imaging technologies and their applications. The main topics include: fluorescence imaging, confocal imaging, micro-endoscope, polarization imaging, hyperspectral imaging, OCT imaging, multimodal imaging and spectroscopic systems. Each chapter is written by the world leaders of the respective fields, and will cover: principles and limitations of optical imaging technology, system design and practical implementation for one or two specific applications, including design guidelines, system configuration, optical design, component requirements and selection, system optimization and design examples, recent advances and applications in biomedical researches and clinical imaging. This book serves as a reference for students and researchers in optics and biomedical engineering.

  4. MATLAB-Based Applications for Image Processing and Image Quality Assessment – Part I: Software Description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Krasula

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes several MATLAB-based applications useful for image processing and image quality assessment. The Image Processing Application helps user to easily modify images, the Image Quality Adjustment Application enables to create series of pictures with different quality. The Image Quality Assessment Application contains objective full reference quality metrics that can be used for image quality assessment. The Image Quality Evaluation Applications represent an easy way to compare subjectively the quality of distorted images with reference image. Results of these subjective tests can be processed by using the Results Processing Application. All applications provide Graphical User Interface (GUI for the intuitive usage.

  5. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, David H; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been...... vectors. This review briefly introduces the principles behind colour Doppler imaging and describes some clinical applications. It then describes the basic components of conventional colour Doppler systems and the methods used to derive velocity information from the ultrasound signal. Next, a number of new...... techniques that seek to overcome the vector problem mentioned above are described. Finally, some examples of vector velocity images are presented....

  6. Images in Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne; Lund, Haakon

    This book focuses on methodologies, organization and communication of digital image collection research that utilize social media content. (“Image” is here understood as cultural, conventional and commercial - stock photos - representations.) The lecture offer expert views that provide different ...... fake news, image manipulation, mobile photos etc. these issues are very complex and need a publication of their own. This book should primarily be useful for students in library and information science, psychology, and computer science....... focus on the proper features of an image such as persons, object, time etc., and if a prescribed theme affects the eye movements of the observers. The results may point to renewed requirements for building image search engines. As it stands, image management already requires new algorithms and a new...

  7. Efficient Graffiti Image Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chunlei; Wong, Pak C.; Ribarsky, William; Fan, Jianping

    2012-07-05

    Research of graffiti character recognition and retrieval, as a branch of traditional optical character recognition (OCR), has started to gain attention in recent years. We have investigated the special challenge of the graffiti image retrieval problem and propose a series of novel techniques to overcome the challenges. The proposed bounding box framework locates the character components in the graffiti images to construct meaningful character strings and conduct image-wise and semantic-wise retrieval on the strings rather than the entire image. Using real world data provided by the law enforcement community to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we show that the proposed framework outperforms the traditional image retrieval framework with better retrieval results and improved computational efficiency.

  8. Imaging voltage in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Takahashi, Hiroto; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, imaging membrane potential has become a fruitful approach to study neural circuits, especially in invertebrate preparations with large, resilient neurons. At the same time, particularly in mammalian preparations, voltage imaging methods suffer from poor signal to noise and secondary side effects, and they fall short of providing single-cell resolution when imaging of the activity of neuronal populations. As an introduction to these techniques, we briefly review different voltage imaging methods (including organic fluorophores, SHG chromophores, genetic indicators, hybrid, nanoparticles and intrinsic approaches), and illustrate some of their applications to neuronal biophysics and mammalian circuit analysis. We discuss their mechanisms of voltage sensitivity, from reorientation, electrochromic or electro-optical phenomena, to interaction among chromophores or membrane scattering, and highlight their advantages and shortcomings, commenting on the outlook for development of novel voltage imaging methods. PMID:21220095

  9. Cellular image classification

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Xiang; Lin, Feng

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces new techniques for cellular image feature extraction, pattern recognition and classification. The authors use the antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in patient serum as the subjects and the Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) technique as the imaging protocol to illustrate the applications of the described methods. Throughout the book, the authors provide evaluations for the proposed methods on two publicly available human epithelial (HEp-2) cell datasets: ICPR2012 dataset from the ICPR'12 HEp-2 cell classification contest and ICIP2013 training dataset from the ICIP'13 Competition on cells classification by fluorescent image analysis. First, the reading of imaging results is significantly influenced by one’s qualification and reading systems, causing high intra- and inter-laboratory variance. The authors present a low-order LP21 fiber mode for optical single cell manipulation and imaging staining patterns of HEp-2 cells. A focused four-lobed mode distribution is stable and effective in optical...

  10. Digital image processing mathematical and computational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Blackledge, J M

    2005-01-01

    This authoritative text (the second part of a complete MSc course) provides mathematical methods required to describe images, image formation and different imaging systems, coupled with the principle techniques used for processing digital images. It is based on a course for postgraduates reading physics, electronic engineering, telecommunications engineering, information technology and computer science. This book relates the methods of processing and interpreting digital images to the 'physics' of imaging systems. Case studies reinforce the methods discussed, with examples of current research

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  12. UV imaging in pharmaceutical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    UV imaging provides spatially and temporally resolved absorbance measurements, which are highly useful in pharmaceutical analysis. Commercial UV imaging instrumentation was originally developed as a detector for separation sciences, but the main use is in the area of in vitro dissolution...... administration. UV imaging has potential for providing new insights to drug dissolution and release processes in formulation development by real-time monitoring of swelling, precipitation, diffusion and partitioning phenomena. Limitations of current instrumentation are discussed and a perspective to new...

  13. Image Analysis for X-ray Imaging of Food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur

    X-ray imaging systems are increasingly used for quality and safety evaluation both within food science and production. They offer non-invasive and nondestructive penetration capabilities to image the inside of food. This thesis presents applications of a novel grating-based X-ray imaging technique...... for quality and safety evaluation of food products. In this effort the fields of statistics, image analysis and statistical learning are combined, to provide analytical tools for determining the aforementioned food traits. The work demonstrated includes a quantitative analysis of heat induced changes...... that the combination of grating-based X-ray imaging and advanced analysis provides a valuable tool for microstructure analysis. Thus, the method can be considered as an alternative to other existing imaging techniques. Furthermore, the thesis presents the application of grating-based X-ray imaging for novelty...

  14. Imaging with Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2010-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy, based on the inelastic scattering of a photon, has been widely used as an analytical tool in many research fields. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has also been explored for biomedical applications (e.g. cancer diagnosis) because it can provide detailed information on the chemical composition of cells and tissues. For imaging applications, several variations of Raman spectroscopy have been developed to enhance its sensitivity. This review article will provide a brief summary of Raman spectroscopy-based imaging, which includes the use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS, primarily used for imaging the C-H bond in lipids), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, for which a variety of nanoparticles can be used as contrast agents), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs, with its intrinsic Raman signal). The superb multiplexing capability of SERS-based Raman imaging can be extremely powerful in future research where different agents can be attached to different Raman tags to enable the interrogation of multiple biological events simultaneously in living subjects. The primary limitations of Raman imaging in humans are those also faced by other optical techniques, in particular limited tissue penetration. Over the last several years, Raman spectroscopy imaging has advanced significantly and many critical proof-of-principle experiments have been successfully carried out. It is expected that imaging with Raman Spectroscopy will continue to be a dynamic research field over the next decade.

  15. Imaging shoulder impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Seeger, L.L. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Yao, L. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Appropriate imaging and clinical examinations may lead to early diagnosis and treatment of the shoulder impingement syndrome, thus preventing progression to a complete tear of the rotator cuff. In this article, we discuss the anatomic and pathophysiologic bases of the syndrome, and the rationale for certain imaging tests to evaluate it. Special radiographic projections to show the supraspinatus outlet and inferior surface of the anterior third of the acromion, combined with magnetic resonance images, usually provide the most useful information regarding the causes of impingement. (orig.)

  16. Review of cardiomyopathy imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunaratnam, Kughan, E-mail: Kughan@hotmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Wong, Lok Hun, E-mail: nuhkol@hotmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Nasis, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.nasis@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Ellims, Andris, E-mail: aellims@hotmail.com [The Alfred Hospital, 55 Commercial Road, Melbourne, VIC 3004 (Australia); Nandurkar, Dee, E-mail: nandurkar.dee@gmail.com [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Soo, Geoffrey, E-mail: geoffrey.soo@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Cameron, James, E-mail: james.cameron@monash.edu.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia); Troupis, John, E-mail: john.troupis@southernhealth.org.au [Monash Medical Centre, Southern Health, Melbourne (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are increasingly being detected on both routine and non-routine imaging. Furthermore, the diagnosis of cardiomyopathy is changing from the traditional method of clinical presentation and cardiac morphology to a quantifiable method based on both cardiac morphology and function. With cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, coronary computed tomography and nuclear medicine increasingly being utilized along with echocardiography in the diagnostic process, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of the relevant criteria in formulating a diagnosis. We aim to provide an overview of the imaging characteristics of the most commonly encountered cardiomyopathies.

  17. Biomedical Image Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Deserno, Thomas Martin

    2011-01-01

    In modern medicine, imaging is the most effective tool for diagnostics, treatment planning and therapy. Almost all modalities have went to directly digital acquisition techniques and processing of this image data have become an important option for health care in future. This book is written by a team of internationally recognized experts from all over the world. It provides a brief but complete overview on medical image processing and analysis highlighting recent advances that have been made in academics. Color figures are used extensively to illustrate the methods and help the reader to understand the complex topics.

  18. Cerebral imaging and dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rascol, A.; Celsis, P.; Berry, I.

    1989-02-01

    Modern imaging techniques undoubtedly are of value when applied to the study of dementia. This value, however, varies with the technique utilized, and one must distinguish between acquired and potential knowledge. Morphological imaging with computerized tomography or magnetic resonance detects or confirms certain causes of dementia (tumours, lacunae, hydrocephalus with normal CSF pressure), but it is still not sensitive and specific enough to be very useful in primary dementias. Functional imaging (essentially with emission tomography) has already provided interesting data in the study of degenerative dementia (correlations with neuropsychology, subtyping), but what is most promising is its possibilities in the physiopathological approach of the disease.

  19. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  20. Image Reconstruction for Prostate Specific Nuclear Medicine imagers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Smith

    2007-01-11

    There is increasing interest in the design and construction of nuclear medicine detectors for dedicated prostate imaging. These include detectors designed for imaging the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with single gamma as well as positron-emitting radionuclides. New detectors and acquisition geometries present challenges and opportunities for image reconstruction. In this contribution various strategies for image reconstruction for these special purpose imagers are reviewed. Iterative statistical algorithms provide a framework for reconstructing prostate images from a wide variety of detectors and acquisition geometries for PET and SPECT. The key to their success is modeling the physics of photon transport and data acquisition and the Poisson statistics of nuclear decay. Analytic image reconstruction methods can be fast and are useful for favorable acquisition geometries. Future perspectives on algorithm development and data analysis for prostate imaging are presented.

  1. Live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Richard

    2014-01-01

    It would be hard to argue that live-cell imaging has not changed our view of biology. The past 10 years have seen an explosion of interest in imaging cellular processes, down to the molecular level. There are now many advanced techniques being applied to live cell imaging. However, cellular health is often under appreciated. For many researchers, if the cell at the end of the experiment has not gone into apoptosis or is blebbed beyond recognition, than all is well. This is simply incorrect. There are many factors that need to be considered when performing live-cell imaging in order to maintain cellular health such as: imaging modality, media, temperature, humidity, PH, osmolality, and photon dose. The wavelength of illuminating light, and the total photon dose that the cells are exposed to, comprise two of the most important and controllable parameters of live-cell imaging. The lowest photon dose that achieves a measureable metric for the experimental question should be used, not the dose that produces cover photo quality images. This is paramount to ensure that the cellular processes being investigated are in their in vitro state and not shifted to an alternate pathway due to environmental stress. The timing of the mitosis is an ideal canary in the gold mine, in that any stress induced from the imaging will result in the increased length of mitosis, thus providing a control model for the current imagining conditions.

  2. Photothermal imaging of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-02-01

    We present photothermal images of melanin using modulation with two laser beams. Strong melanin absorption followed by efficient nonradiative relaxation caused heating and an increase in temperature. This temperature effect was used as an imaging contrast to detect melanin. Melanin from several samples including Sepia officinalis, black human hair, and live zebra fish, were imaged with a high signal-to-noise ratio. For the imaging, we focused two near infrared laser beams (pump and probe) collinearly with different wavelengths and the pump was modulated in amplitude. The thermally induced variations in the refractive index, at the modulation frequency, were detected by the scattering of the probe beam. The Photothermal method brings several imaging benefits including the lack of background interference and the possibility of imaging for an extended period of time without photodamage to the melanin. The dependence of the photothermal signal on the laser power, modulation frequency, and spatial offset of the probe is discussed. The new photothermal imaging method is promising and provides background-free and label-free imaging of melanin and can be implemented with low-cost CW lasers.

  3. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  4. Autocorrelation and regularization in digital images. II - Simple image models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    1989-01-01

    The variogram function used in geostatistical analysis is a useful statistic in the analysis of remotely sensed images. Using the results derived by Jupp et al. (1988), the basic second-order, or covariance, properties of scenes modeled by simple disks of varying size and spacing after imaging into disk-shaped pixels are analyzed to explore the relationship betwee image variograms and discrete object scene structure. The models provide insight into the nature of real images of the earth's surface and the tools for a complete analysis of the more complex case of three-dimensional illuminated discrete-object images.

  5. Image Inpainting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Image Inpainting Marcelo Bertalmio and Guillermo Sapiro Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota Vicent Caselles and Coloma...Ballester Escola Superior Politecnica, Universitat Pompeu Fabra Abstract Inpainting , the technique of modifying an image in an undetectable form, is as...removal/replacement of selected objects. In this paper, we introduce a novel algorithm for digital inpainting of still images that attempts to replicate the

  6. Intermediate Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paech Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a definition of the word ‘picture’ as a real-world object that shows other objects on its surface as a representation of its image, I propose that the intermediality of pictures of all kinds is only possible through their images, after they have been separated from their material basis or foundation (for example, a painting in its physical reality can never be directly connected with a movie. In all technical reproductions of images, such as printing processes, an image is taken from a negative matrix in order to realize multiple prints of the same representation. The most effective model of this procedure is photography: photographic images can easily be connected with their media forms to produce other, more complex forms, such as magazines, printed books, or films. Intermediate images in the form of matrices - sometimes transparent (e.g. in the light beam of a film projection, sometimes opaque - are required to transform one pictorial media form into another. Finally, for the digital matrix-image, there is no longer any difference between the matrix and the image: the matrix has become its own image, which can be linked to all other media forms.

  7. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-12-31

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  8. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frangioni, John V.

    2016-05-03

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  9. World Wide Web Based Image Search Engine Using Text and Image Content Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bo; Wang, Xiaogang; Tang, Xiaoou

    2003-01-01

    Using both text and image content features, a hybrid image retrieval system for Word Wide Web is developed in this paper. We first use a text-based image meta-search engine to retrieve images from the Web based on the text information on the image host pages to provide an initial image set. Because of the high-speed and low cost nature of the text-based approach, we can easily retrieve a broad coverage of images with a high recall rate and a relatively low precision. An image content based ordering is then performed on the initial image set. All the images are clustered into different folders based on the image content features. In addition, the images can be re-ranked by the content features according to the user feedback. Such a design makes it truly practical to use both text and image content for image retrieval over the Internet. Experimental results confirm the efficiency of the system.

  10. Optical Design for Biomedical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Rongguang

    2010-01-01

    Designing an efficient imaging system for biomedical optics requires a solid understanding of the special requirements of the optical systems for biomedical imaging and the optical components used in the systems. However, a lack of reference books on optical design (imaging and illumination) for biomedical imaging has led to some inefficient systems. This book fills the gap between biomedical optics and optical design by addressing the fundamentals of biomedical optics and optical engineering, and biomedical imaging systems. The first half provides a brief introduction to biomedical optics and

  11. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT and Magnetic resonance (MR imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  12. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  13. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2017-04-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  14. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-10-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  15. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-11-22

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  16. Providing an efficient intelligent transportation system through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Syst. 11(4): 917–930. Hou Z 2009 An automated road sign inventory system based on computer vision, Thesis. Kellmeyer D and Zwahlen H 1994 Detection of highway warning signs in natural video images using color image processing and neural networks, IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence, Orlando,.

  17. Social image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guoping; Kheiri, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Current subjective image quality assessments have been developed in the laboratory environments, under controlledconditions, and are dependent on the participation of limited numbers of observers. In this research, with the help of Web 2.0 and social media technology, a new method for building a subjective image quality metric has been developed where the observers are the Internet users. A website with a simple user interface that enables Internet users from anywhere at any time to vote for a better quality version of a pair of the same image has been constructed. Users' votes are recorded and used to rank the images according to their perceived visual qualities. We have developed three rank aggregation algorithms to process the recorded pair comparison data, the first uses a naive approach, the second employs a Condorcet method, and the third uses the Dykstra's extension of Bradley-Terry method. The website has been collecting data for about three months and has accumulated over 10,000 votes at the time of writing this paper. Results show that the Internet and its allied technologies such as crowdsourcing offer a promising new paradigm for image and video quality assessment where hundreds of thousands of Internet users can contribute to building more robust image quality metrics. We have made Internet user generated social image quality (SIQ) data of a public image database available online (http://www.hdri.cs.nott.ac.uk/siq/) to provide the image quality research community with a new source of ground truth data. The website continues to collect votes and will include more public image databases and will also be extended to include videos to collect social video quality (SVQ) data. All data will be public available on the website in due course.

  18. [Magnetic resonance tomography: potentials of molecular imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Karl-Heinz; Faber, Cornelius; Neuberger, Thomas; Köhler, Sascha; Stroh, Albrecht; Zimmer, Claus; Jakob, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imaging is "the in-vivo characterization and measurement of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level" and allows the imaging of molecular abnormalities associated with diseases long before morphological changes can be detected. At present, the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for molecular and cellular imaging is rapidly increasing. MRI is a very attractive candidate, since current MRI protocols already provide anatomic, functional, and biochemical information of excellent image quality and with high spatial resolution. Combining this high spatial resolution/high contrast imaging modality with specific MRI contrast imaging agents for molecular imaging is currently the focus of research in many laboratories worldwide. This paper summarizes the rationale for molecular MRI imaging and describes the basic features of modern molecular imaging strategies with MRI. Finally, a special focus is given to the growing field of applications, e.g., stem cell imaging, imaging of apoptosis, plaques, and other biological targets of interest.

  19. Four Dimensional Cardiac Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. D. R.; Quarendon, P.

    1986-05-01

    A system for the production of a four dimensional (moving three dimensional) human epicardial left ventriculogram, modelled and highlighted to show regional wall motion changes, is described. The moving image is derived by fitting a surface to the three dimensional coordinates of coronary artery bifurcations. These are determined by analysis of digitised biplane coronary cineangiograms. This image system not only provides a unique 3-D view of left ventricular activity but might also provide measures of cardiac dynamics such as, stroke volume and velocity of wall movement. The system is not fully automated although operator interaction may be minimised. Further work on vessel tracking systems is required before full automation is possible.

  20. Neuroperformance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    the descent into sleep and are altered by sleep deprivation; 3) EEG /fMRI studies designed to improve our understanding of the interaction between sleep ... studies clearly indicate changes in resting state brain network connectivity in the transition from alert wakefulness to sleep . 15. SUBJECT TERMS...Neuroperformance, Sleep cycle, metabolism, thalamic structures, PET Imaging, MR Imaging, functional MRI, electroencephalography ( EEG ) 16. SECURITY

  1. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  2. Incompatible Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sassene, Michel J.; Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    is, however, based on a taken-for-granted image of asthmatics as, per se, striving to be symptom-free. This image is incompatible with interviewed asthmatics' day-to-day performances of their asthma, and renders invisible (a) that their asthma performances emphasize an economy of good passages...

  3. Blurred Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Maryse

    1975-01-01

    The growing influence of Western culture has greatly affected African women's status and image in the traditional society. Working women are confronted with the dilemma of preserving family traditions while changing their behavior and image to become members of the labor force. (MR)

  4. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  5. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  6. Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Mela

    Full Text Available We have developed novel stereoscopic wearable multimodal intraoperative imaging and display systems entitled Integrated Imaging Goggles for guiding surgeries. The prototype systems offer real time stereoscopic fluorescence imaging and color reflectance imaging capacity, along with in vivo handheld microscopy and ultrasound imaging. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, both wide-field fluorescence imaging and in vivo microscopy are provided. The real time ultrasound images can also be presented in the goggle display. Furthermore, real time goggle-to-goggle stereoscopic video sharing is demonstrated, which can greatly facilitate telemedicine. In this paper, the prototype systems are described, characterized and tested in surgeries in biological tissues ex vivo. We have found that the system can detect fluorescent targets with as low as 60 nM indocyanine green and can resolve structures down to 0.25 mm with large FOV stereoscopic imaging. The system has successfully guided simulated cancer surgeries in chicken. The Integrated Imaging Goggle is novel in 4 aspects: it is (a the first wearable stereoscopic wide-field intraoperative fluorescence imaging and display system, (b the first wearable system offering both large FOV and microscopic imaging simultaneously,

  7. Imaging of Physeal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawetz, Shari T.; Shah, Parina H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2015-01-01

    Context: As the intensity of youth participation in athletic activities continues to rise, the number of overuse injuries has also increased. A subset of overuse injuries involves the physis, which is extremely susceptible to injury. This paper aims to review the utility of the various imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of physeal injuries in the skeletally immature population. Evidence Acquisition: A search for the keywords pediatric, physis, growth plate, x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and overuse injury was performed using the PubMed database. No limits were set for the years of publication. Articles were reviewed for relevance with an emphasis on the imaging of growth plate injuries. Study Design: Retrospective literature review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Three major imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) complement each other in the evaluation of pediatric patients with overuse injuries. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the only modality that offers direct visualization of the physis, and it also offers the best soft tissue contrast for evaluating the other periarticular structures for concomitant injury. Conclusion: Imaging has an important role in the diagnosis of physeal injuries, and the information it provides has a tremendous impact on the subsequent management of these patients. PMID:25984260

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging based functional imaging in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Karen A; Gill, Simrandip K; MacPherson, Lesley; Foster, Katharine; Oates, Adam; Peet, Andrew C

    2017-02-01

    Imaging is central to management of solid tumours in children. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard imaging modality for tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs and is increasingly used in the abdomen. It provides excellent structural detail, but imparts limited information about tumour type, aggressiveness, metastatic potential or early treatment response. MRI based functional imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, probe tissue properties to provide clinically important information about metabolites, structure and blood flow. This review describes the role of and evidence behind these functional imaging techniques in paediatric oncology and implications for integrating them into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Image Content Engine (ICE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brase, J M

    2007-03-26

    The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

  10. Web Based Distributed Coastal Image Analysis System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project develops Web based distributed image analysis system processing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data to provide decision...

  11. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Adolescent Brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GIEDD, JAY N

    2004-01-01

    A bstract : Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides accurate anatomical brain images without the use of ionizing radiation, allowing longitudinal studies of brain morphometry during adolescent development...

  12. Hubble Provides Infrared View of Jupiter's Moon, Ring, and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Probing Jupiter's atmosphere for the first time, the Hubble Space Telescope's new Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) provides a sharp glimpse of the planet's ring, moon, and high-altitude clouds.The presence of methane in Jupiter's hydrogen- and helium-rich atmosphere has allowed NICMOS to plumb Jupiter's atmosphere, revealing bands of high-altitude clouds. Visible light observations cannot provide a clear view of these high clouds because the underlying clouds reflect so much visible light that the higher level clouds are indistinguishable from the lower layer. The methane gas between the main cloud deck and the high clouds absorbs the reflected infrared light, allowing those clouds that are above most of the atmosphere to appear bright. Scientists will use NICMOS to study the high altitude portion of Jupiter's atmosphere to study clouds at lower levels. They will then analyze those images along with visible light information to compile a clearer picture of the planet's weather. Clouds at different levels tell unique stories. On Earth, for example, ice crystal (cirrus) clouds are found at high altitudes while water (cumulus) clouds are at lower levels.Besides showing details of the planet's high-altitude clouds, NICMOS also provides a clear view of the ring and the moon, Metis. Jupiter's ring plane, seen nearly edge-on, is visible as a faint line on the upper right portion of the NICMOS image. Metis can be seen in the ring plane (the bright circle on the ring's outer edge). The moon is 25 miles wide and about 80,000 miles from Jupiter.Because of the near-infrared camera's narrow field of view, this image is a mosaic constructed from three individual images taken Sept. 17, 1997. The color intensity was adjusted to accentuate the high-altitude clouds. The dark circle on the disk of Jupiter (center of image) is an artifact of the imaging system.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the

  13. SUPER-RESOLUTION MICROSCOPY LIVE CELL IMAGING AND IMAGE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Lukes, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Novel fundamental research results provided new techniques going beyond the diffraction limit. These recent advances known as super-resolution microscopy have been awarded by the Nobel Prize as they promise new discoveries in biology and live sciences. All these techniques rely on complex signal and image processing. The applicability in biology, and particularly for live cell imaging, remains challenging and needs further investigation. Focusing on image processing and analysis, the thesis i...

  14. Multimodality imaging in nanomedicine and nanotheranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Zhang, Xue-Ning; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of tumors needs much detailed information. However, available single imaging modality cannot provide complete or comprehensive data. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine, and multimodality imaging based on nanoparticles has been receiving extensive attention. This new hybrid imaging technology could provide complementary information from different imaging modalities using only a single injection of contrast agent. In this review, we introduce recent developments in multifunctional nanoparticles and their biomedical applications to multimodal imaging and theragnosis as nanomedicine. Most of the reviewed studies are based on the intrinsic properties of nanoparticles and their application in clinical imaging technology. The imaging techniques include positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging, and ultrasound imaging. PMID:27807501

  15. Infrared thermal imaging in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, E F J; Ammer, K

    2012-03-01

    This review describes the features of modern infrared imaging technology and the standardization protocols for thermal imaging in medicine. The technique essentially uses naturally emitted infrared radiation from the skin surface. Recent studies have investigated the influence of equipment and the methods of image recording. The credibility and acceptance of thermal imaging in medicine is subject to critical use of the technology and proper understanding of thermal physiology. Finally, we review established and evolving medical applications for thermal imaging, including inflammatory diseases, complex regional pain syndrome and Raynaud's phenomenon. Recent interest in the potential applications for fever screening is described, and some other areas of medicine where some research papers have included thermal imaging as an assessment modality. In certain applications thermal imaging is shown to provide objective measurement of temperature changes that are clinically significant.

  16. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Doug [Baker-Hughes Oilfield Operation Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Leggett, Jim [Baker-Hughes Oilfield Operation Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  17. Morphological segmentation for sagittal plane image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, F N; Paula, I C; Medeiros, F S; Ushizima, D M; Cintra, L S

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a morphological image segmentation method by applying watershed transform with markers to scale-space smoothed images and furthermore provides images for clinical monitoring and analysis of patients. The database comprises sagittal plane images taken from a digital camera of patients submitted to Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) physiotherapy treatment. Orthopaedic specialists can use these segmented images to diagnose posture problems, assess physiotherapy treatment evolution and thus reduce diagnostic errors due to subjective analysis.

  18. Principles of digital image synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Glassner, Andrew S

    1995-01-01

    Image synthesis, or rendering, is a field of transformation: it changesgeometry and physics into meaningful images. Because the most popularalgorithms frequently change, it is increasingly important for researchersand implementors to have a basic understanding of the principles of imagesynthesis. Focusing on theory, Andrew Glassner provides a comprehensiveexplanation of the three core fields of study that come together to formdigital image synthesis: the human visual system, digital signalprocessing, and the interaction of matter and light. Assuming no more thana basic background in calculus,

  19. Body Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The high-tech art of digital signal processing (DSP) was pioneered at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in the mid-1960s for use in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. Designed to computer enhance pictures of the Moon, this technology became the basis for the Landsat Earth resources satellites and subsequently has been incorporated into a broad range of Earthbound medical and diagnostic tools. DSP is employed in advanced body imaging techniques including Computer-Aided Tomography, also known as CT and CATScan, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). CT images are collected by irradiating a thin slice of the body with a fan-shaped x-ray beam from a number of directions around the body's perimeter. A tomographic (slice-like) picture is reconstructed from these multiple views by a computer. MRI employs a magnetic field and radio waves, rather than x-rays, to create images.

  20. Body imaging: Diagnosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    smart phone or mobile device to read online. Read online: We congratulate Dr Ian Haynes from Pietermaritzburg for his spot-on diagnosis for which he will receive the prize of R1000 sponsored by RSSA. Drs Misser et al. elaborate on the findings and provide a brief discussion. FIGURE 1: Sagittal B-mode sonar image.

  1. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-10-23

    Oct 23, 2013 ... &Corresponding author: Cherkaoui Mandour , Departement Of Neurosurgery, Military Hospital Mohammed V, Rabat, PC: 10000 Morocco ... Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showing brain and intra orbital metastasis associated with a lens dislocation. The histological result was provided by a ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  3. Rethinking Destination Image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josiassen, Alexander; Kock, Florian; Assaf, Albert G.

    . The article further provides an extensive review of the literature with regard to the definitions, dimensionality, antecedents, and outcomes of the focal concepts as well as geographical scope of destination imagery and image studies and methodologies. This review has led to a novel understanding...

  4. SPECT imaging of myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulkin, B.L.; Wahl, R.L.

    1987-11-01

    Gallium-67 citrate has been useful in providing scintigraphic evidence for pericarditis and myocarditis. However, the differentiation between pericardial and myocardial localization is difficult with planar images alone. SPECT can be valuable in making these distinctions, and a case of myocarditis is presented in which uptake of Gallium is shown to lie within the heart, correlating with the histologic proof.

  5. Imaging windows for long-term intravital imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alieva, Maria; Ritsma, Laila; Giedt, Randy J; Weissleder, Ralph; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2014-01-01

    Intravital microscopy is increasingly used to visualize and quantitate dynamic biological processes at the (sub)cellular level in live animals. By visualizing tissues through imaging windows, individual cells (e.g., cancer, host, or stem cells) can be tracked and studied over a time-span of days to months. Several imaging windows have been developed to access tissues including the brain, superficial fascia, mammary glands, liver, kidney, pancreas, and small intestine among others. Here, we review the development of imaging windows and compare the most commonly used long-term imaging windows for cancer biology: the cranial imaging window, the dorsal skin fold chamber, the mammary imaging window, and the abdominal imaging window. Moreover, we provide technical details, considerations, and trouble-shooting tips on the surgical procedures and microscopy setups for each imaging window and explain different strategies to assure imaging of the same area over multiple imaging sessions. This review aims to be a useful resource for establishing the long-term intravital imaging procedure. PMID:28243510

  6. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart. This paper presents a synthesis technique to generate images of 3D objects that are detectable by humans, but difficult for an automatic algorithm to recognize. The technique allows generating an infinite number of images with emerging figures. Our algorithm is designed so that locally the synthesized images divulge little useful information or cues to assist any segmentation or recognition procedure. Therefore, as we demonstrate, computer vision algorithms are incapable of effectively processing such images. However, when a human observer is presented with an emergence image, synthesized using an object she is familiar with, the figure emerges when observed as a whole. We can control the difficulty level of perceiving the emergence effect through a limited set of parameters. A procedure that synthesizes emergence images can be an effective tool for exploring and understanding the factors affecting computer vision techniques. © 2009 ACM.

  7. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  8. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the ...

  11. Digital Images and Globalized Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaagaard, Bolette; Mortensen, Mette; Neumayer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    As the number of digital images of globalized conflicts online grow, critical examination of their impact and consequence is timely. This editorial provides an overview of digital images and globalized conflict as a field of study by discussing regimes of visibility and invisibility, proximity...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various parts of the ... open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams ... ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ... or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety ... or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ...

  15. Turbine imaging technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moursund, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The goal of this project was to identify and evaluate imaging technologies for observing juvenile fish within a Kaplan turbine, and specifically that would enable scientists to determine mechanisms of fish injury within an operating turbine unit. This report documents the opportunities and constraints for observing juvenile fish at specific locations during turbine passage. These observations were used to make modifications to dam structures and operations to improve conditions for fish passage while maintaining or improving hydropower production. The physical and hydraulic environment that fish experience as they pass through the hydroelectric plants were studied and the regions with the greatest potential for injury were defined. Biological response data were also studied to determine the probable types of injuries sustained in the turbine intake and what types of injuries are detectable with imaging technologies. The study grouped injury-causing mechanisms into two categories: fluid (pressure/cavitation, shear, turbulence) and mechanical (strike/collision, grinding/pinching, scraping). The physical constraints of the environment, together with the likely types of injuries to fish, provided the parameters needed for a rigorous imaging technology evaluation. Types of technology evaluated included both tracking and imaging systems using acoustic technologies (such as sonar and acoustic tags) and optic technologies (such as pulsed-laser videography, which is high-speed videography using a laser as the flash). Criteria for determining image data quality such as frame rate, target detectability, and resolution were used to quantify the minimum requirements of an imaging sensor.

  16. Chromatic X-ray imaging with a fine pitch CdTe sensor coupled to a large area photon counting pixel ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellazzini, R.; Spandre, G.; Brez, A.; Minuti, M.; Pinchera, M.; Mozzo, P.

    2013-02-01

    An innovative X-ray imaging sensor based on Chromatic Photon Counting technology with intrinsic digital characteristics is presented. The system counts individually the incident X-ray photons and selects them according to their energy to produce two color images per exposure. The energy selection occurs in real time and at radiographic imaging speed (GHz global counting rate). Photon counting, color mode and a very fine spatial resolution (more than 10 LP/mm at MTF50) allow to obtain a high ratio between image quality and absorbed dose. The individual building block of the imaging system is a two-side buttable semiconductor radiation detector made of a thin pixellated CdTe crystal coupled to a large area VLSI CMOS pixel ASIC. Modules with 1, 2, 4, and 8 block units have been built. The largest module has 25 × 2.5 cm2 sensitive area. Results and images obtained from testing different modules are presented.

  17. Direct imaging of exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, Anne-Marie

    2014-04-28

    Most of the exoplanets known today have been discovered by indirect techniques, based on the study of the host star radial velocity or photometric temporal variations. These detections allowed the study of the planet populations in the first 5-8 AU from the central stars and have provided precious information on the way planets form and evolve at such separations. Direct imaging on 8-10 m class telescopes allows the detection of giant planets at larger separations (currently typically more than 5-10 AU) complementing the indirect techniques. So far, only a few planets have been imaged around young stars, but each of them provides an opportunity for unique dedicated studies of their orbital, physical and atmospheric properties and sometimes also on the interaction with the 'second-generation', debris discs. These few detections already challenge formation theories. In this paper, I present the results of direct imaging surveys obtained so far, and what they already tell us about giant planet (GP) formation and evolution. Individual and emblematic cases are detailed; they illustrate what future instruments will routinely deliver for a much larger number of stars. I also point out the limitations of this approach, as well as the needs for further work in terms of planet formation modelling. I finally present the progress expected in direct imaging in the near future, thanks in particular to forthcoming planet imagers on 8-10 m class telescopes.

  18. Critical Review of Noninvasive Optical Technologies for Wound Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jayachandran, Maanasa; Rodriguez, Suset; Solis, Elizabeth; Lei, Jiali; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Noninvasive imaging approaches can provide greater information about a wound than visual inspection during the wound healing and treatment process. This review article focuses on various optical imaging techniques developed to image different wound types (more specifically ulcers).

  19. Image noise in X-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilts, M [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Duzenli, C [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    This work investigates factors which affect image noise in CT polymer gel dosimetry, discusses techniques that can be used to further improve image noise and provides overall recommendations for the CT imaging of polymer gels.

  20. X-ray examination apparatus with an imaging arrangement having a plurality of image sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slump, Cornelis H.

    1995-01-01

    An imaging arrangement including a multi-sensor for use in an x-ray examination apparatus is described that combines a plurality of partially overlapping sub-images, resulting in an increased effective sensor area when compared to a single sensor-image. Thus an imaging arrangement is provided

  1. X-ray examination apparatus with an imaging arrangement having a plurality of image sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slump, Cornelis H.; Harms, M.O.

    1999-01-01

    An imaging arrangement including a multi-sensor for use in an x-ray examination apparatus is described that combines a plurality of partially overlapping sub-images, resulting in an increased effective sensor area when compared to a single sensor-image. Thus an imaging arrangement is provided

  2. Image Representation and Interactivity: An Exploration of Utility Values, Information-Needs and Image Interactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elise C.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the relationships between users and interactive images. Three factors were identified and provided different perspectives on how users interact with images: image utility, information-need, and images with varying levels of interactivity. The study used a mixed methodology to gain a more comprehensive…

  3. High spatial resolution fast-neutron imaging detectors for Pulsed Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Katz, D.; Sayag, E.; Shmueli, I.; Cohen, Y.; Tal, A.; Vagish, Z.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendorf, V.; Mugai, D.; Tittelmeier, K.; Weierganz, M.

    2009-05-01

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber scintillator screen and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). This detector is designed for energy-selective neutron radiography with nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1-10 MeV) neutron beams. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, such a detector is capable of simultaneously capturing several images, each at a different neutron energy (TOF). In addition, a gamma-ray image can also be simultaneously registered, allowing combined neutron/gamma inspection of objects. This permits combining the sensitivity of the fast-neutron resonance method to low-Z elements with that of gamma radiography to high-Z materials.

  4. Semi-automated Image Processing for Preclinical Bioluminescent Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavine, Nikolai V; McColl, Roderick W

    Bioluminescent imaging is a valuable noninvasive technique for investigating tumor dynamics and specific biological molecular events in living animals to better understand the effects of human disease in animal models. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a strategy behind automated methods for bioluminescence image processing from the data acquisition to obtaining 3D images. In order to optimize this procedure a semi-automated image processing approach with multi-modality image handling environment was developed. To identify a bioluminescent source location and strength we used the light flux detected on the surface of the imaged object by CCD cameras. For phantom calibration tests and object surface reconstruction we used MLEM algorithm. For internal bioluminescent sources we used the diffusion approximation with balancing the internal and external intensities on the boundary of the media and then determined an initial order approximation for the photon fluence we subsequently applied a novel iterative deconvolution method to obtain the final reconstruction result. We find that the reconstruction techniques successfully used the depth-dependent light transport approach and semi-automated image processing to provide a realistic 3D model of the lung tumor. Our image processing software can optimize and decrease the time of the volumetric imaging and quantitative assessment. The data obtained from light phantom and lung mouse tumor images demonstrate the utility of the image reconstruction algorithms and semi-automated approach for bioluminescent image processing procedure. We suggest that the developed image processing approach can be applied to preclinical imaging studies: characteristics of tumor growth, identify metastases, and potentially determine the effectiveness of cancer treatment.

  5. Insure Kids Now (IKN) (Dental Care Providers)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Insure Kids Now (IKN) Dental Care Providers in Your State locator provides profile information for oral health providers participating in Medicaid and Children's...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used in a complementary role to echocardiography (heart ultrasound), computed tomography and catheter angiography to provide information ... imaging modalities such as x-ray, CT and ultrasound. top of page How is the procedure performed? ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to detect and identify any metal objects. In general, metal objects used in orthopedic surgery pose no ... units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  10. Nonlinear spectral imaging of fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaus, H.

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopy combined with fluorescence spectroscopy is known as nonlinear spectral imaging microscopy (NLSM). This method provides simultaneously specimen morphology – distinguishing different parts in a tissue – and (auto)fluorescence spectra, thus their biochemical composition. A novel

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, each of which shows ... tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older ... believed to be caused by the injection of high doses of gadolinium-based contrast material in patients ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, ... believed to be caused by the injection of high doses of gadolinium-based contrast material in patients ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ... medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... quality images for many types of exams; however, older open MRI units may not provide this same ... child may resume their usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. A few patients experience ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be ... the metallic objects. Patient movement can have the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures are clearer and more detailed than with ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the heart, such as electrocardiography (ECG). MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  1. Haemophilia imaging: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclachlan, Jody; Gough-Palmer, Antony; Hargunani, Rikin; Farrant, Joanna; Holloway, Brian [Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Haemophilia disorders are characterised by a blood coagulation anomaly leading to prolonged and excessive bleeding. Imaging provides an essential role in the investigation of both the musculoskeletal and the non-musculoskeletal complications of haemophilia. Our institution is home to a large tertiary referral centre for haemophilia treatment. Using our broad experience, we present a multi-modality pictorial review of the musculoskeletal manifestations of haemophilia, including haemophilic arthropathy, intra-muscular haemorrhage and haemophilic pseudotumour. The main imaging features of haemophilic arthropathy are described, including synovial hypertrophy, haemosiderin deposition, sub-chondral cyst formation and loss of joint space. (orig.)

  2. Imaging of patellofemoral disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, D.A. E-mail: david.elias@kingsch.nhs.uk; White, L.M

    2004-07-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common symptom, which may have a large variety of causes including patellofemoral pathologies. Patellofemoral maltracking refers to dynamic abnormality of patellofemoral alignment and has been measured using plain film, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using static and kinematic techniques. Patellar dislocation is usually transient, but specific conventional radiographic and MRI features may provide evidence of prior acute or chronic dislocation. In addition, chondromalacia patellae, osteochondritis dissecans, patellofemoral osteoarthritis, excessive lateral pressure syndrome, and bipartite patella have all been implicated in causing patellofemoral pain. The imaging and clinical features of these processes are reviewed, highlighting the specific diagnostic features of each condition.

  3. NANOPARTICLES IN NUCLEAR IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Vicky V Mody PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review article summarizes the current state radiolabeled nanoparticles for molecular imaging applications mainly targeting cancer. Due to their enormous flexibility, and versatility the radiolabeled nanoparticles have shown their potential in the diagnosis and therapy. As the matter of fact, these radiolabeled imaging agents enable the visualization of the cellular function and the follow-up of the molecular process in living organisms. Moreover, the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology has provided various innovative radionuclides and delivery systems, such as liposomes, magnetic agents, polymers, dendrimers, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes to cope up with the hurdles which have been posed by various disease states.

  4. Stochastic geometry for image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Descombes, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This book develops the stochastic geometry framework for image analysis purpose. Two main frameworks are  described: marked point process and random closed sets models. We derive the main issues for defining an appropriate model. The algorithms for sampling and optimizing the models as well as for estimating parameters are reviewed.  Numerous applications, covering remote sensing images, biological and medical imaging, are detailed.  This book provides all the necessary tools for developing an image analysis application based on modern stochastic modeling.

  5. Evolutionary Image Enhancement Using Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Dhirendra Pal Singh; Ashish Khare

    2013-01-01

    Image Processing is the art of examining, identifying and judging the significances of the Images. Image enhancement refers to attenuation, or sharpening, of image features such as edgels, boundaries, or contrast to make the processed image more useful for analysis. Image enhancement procedures utilize the computers to provide good and improved images for study by the human interpreters. In this paper we proposed a novel method that uses the Genetic Algorithm with Multi-objective criteria to ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy in Cancer Theranostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Jin, Jiefu; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-10-01

    With its exquisite anatomical resolution and wide-ranging functional imaging capabilities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has found multiple applications in detection, staging, and monitoring treatment response in cancer. The metabolic information provided by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is being actively investigated to complement MRI parameters, as well as existing biomarkers, in cancer detection and in monitoring response to treatment. Located at the interface of detection and therapy, theranostic imaging is a rapidly expanding new field that is showing significant promise for precision medicine of cancer. Innovations in the development of novel nanoparticles decorated with imaging reporters that can be used to deliver therapeutic cargo to specific cells and environments have provided new roles for MRI and MRS in theranostic imaging.

  7. Nuclear imaging in epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Correct localization of epileptogenic zone is important for the successful epilepsy surgery. Both ictal perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and interictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can provide useful information in the presurgical localization of intractable partial epilepsy. These imaging modalities have excellent diagnostic sensitivity in medial temporal lobe epilepsy and provide good presurgical information in neocortical epilepsy. Also provide functional information about cellular functions to better understand the neurobiology of epilepsy and to better define the ictal onset zone, symptomatogenic zone, propagation pathways, functional deficit zone and surround inhibition zones. Multimodality imaging and developments in analysis methods of ictal perfusion SPECT and new PET ligand other than FDG help to better define the localization.

  8. ADVANCED CLUSTER BASED IMAGE SEGMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kesavaraja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents efficient and portable implementations of a useful image segmentation technique which makes use of the faster and a variant of the conventional connected components algorithm which we call parallel Components. In the Modern world majority of the doctors are need image segmentation as the service for various purposes and also they expect this system is run faster and secure. Usually Image segmentation Algorithms are not working faster. In spite of several ongoing researches in Conventional Segmentation and its Algorithms might not be able to run faster. So we propose a cluster computing environment for parallel image Segmentation to provide faster result. This paper is the real time implementation of Distributed Image Segmentation in Clustering of Nodes. We demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of our method on a set of Medical CT Scan Images. Our general framework is a single address space, distributed memory programming model. We use efficient techniques for distributing and coalescing data as well as efficient combinations of task and data parallelism. The image segmentation algorithm makes use of an efficient cluster process which uses a novel approach for parallel merging. Our experimental results are consistent with the theoretical analysis and practical results. It provides the faster execution time for segmentation, when compared with Conventional method. Our test data is different CT scan images from the Medical database. More efficient implementations of Image Segmentation will likely result in even faster execution times.

  9. Image Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 19th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis was held at the IT University of Copenhagen in Denmark during June 15-17, 2015. The SCIA conference series has been an ongoing biannual event for more than 30 years and over the years it has nurtured a world-class regional research and development....... The topics of the accepted papers range from novel applications of vision systems, pattern recognition, machine learning, feature extraction, segmentation, 3D vision, to medical and biomedical image analysis. The papers originate from all the Scandinavian countries and several other European countries...

  10. Intelligent web image retrieval system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungyong; Lee, Chungwoo; Nah, Yunmook

    2001-07-01

    Recently, the web sites such as e-business sites and shopping mall sites deal with lots of image information. To find a specific image from these image sources, we usually use web search engines or image database engines which rely on keyword only retrievals or color based retrievals with limited search capabilities. This paper presents an intelligent web image retrieval system. We propose the system architecture, the texture and color based image classification and indexing techniques, and representation schemes of user usage patterns. The query can be given by providing keywords, by selecting one or more sample texture patterns, by assigning color values within positional color blocks, or by combining some or all of these factors. The system keeps track of user's preferences by generating user query logs and automatically add more search information to subsequent user queries. To show the usefulness of the proposed system, some experimental results showing recall and precision are also explained.

  11. FROM IMAGE CONTOURS TO PIXELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scarmana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper relates to the reconstruction of digital images using their contour representations. The process involves determining the pixel intensity value which would exist at the intersections of a regular grid using the nodes of randomly spaced contour locations. The reconstruction of digital images from their contour maps may also be used as a tool for image compression. This reconstruction process may provide for more accurate results and improved visual details than existing compressed versions of the same image, while requiring similar memory space for storage and speed of transmission over digital links. For the class of images investigated in this work, the contour approach to image reconstruction and compression requires contour data to be filtered and eliminated from the reconstruction process. Statistical tests which validate the proposed process conclude this paper.

  12. High-Speed Electrochemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momotenko, Dmitry; Byers, Joshua C; McKelvey, Kim; Kang, Minkyung; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-09-22

    The design, development, and application of high-speed scanning electrochemical probe microscopy is reported. The approach allows the acquisition of a series of high-resolution images (typically 1000 pixels μm(-2)) at rates approaching 4 seconds per frame, while collecting up to 8000 image pixels per second, about 1000 times faster than typical imaging speeds used up to now. The focus is on scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM), but the principles and practicalities are applicable to many electrochemical imaging methods. The versatility of the high-speed scan concept is demonstrated at a variety of substrates, including imaging the electroactivity of a patterned self-assembled monolayer on gold, visualization of chemical reactions occurring at single wall carbon nanotubes, and probing nanoscale electrocatalysts for water splitting. These studies provide movies of spatial variations of electrochemical fluxes as a function of potential and a platform for the further development of high speed scanning with other electrochemical imaging techniques.

  13. Health Provider Networks, Quality and Costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Schottmuller, C.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a modeling framework to think about selective contracting in the health care sector. Two health care providers differ in quality and costs. When buying health insurance, consumers observe neither provider quality nor costs. We derive an equilibrium where health insurers signal provider

  14. Health provider networks, quality and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, Jan; Schottmuller, C.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a modeling framework to think about selective contracting in the health care sector. Two health care providers differ in quality and costs. When buying health insurance, consumers observe neither provider quality nor costs. We derive an equilibrium where health insurers signal provider

  15. Computational intelligence in biomedical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art computational intelligence research and technologies in biomedical images with emphasis on biomedical decision making. Biomedical imaging offers useful information on patients’ medical conditions and clues to causes of their symptoms and diseases. Biomedical images, however, provide a large number of images which physicians must interpret. Therefore, computer aids are demanded and become indispensable in physicians’ decision making. This book discusses major technical advancements and research findings in the field of computational intelligence in biomedical imaging, for example, computational intelligence in computer-aided diagnosis for breast cancer, prostate cancer, and brain disease, in lung function analysis, and in radiation therapy. The book examines technologies and studies that have reached the practical level, and those technologies that are becoming available in clinical practices in hospitals rapidly such as computational inte...

  16. Contrast media in breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Luis F; Morrell, Brooke; Mai, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Although mammography is the standard imaging modality for detection of breast cancer, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable adjunct and, in certain cases, is the imaging of choice. Contrast-enhanced breast MR imaging provides a noninvasive means of staging disease, assessing posttreatment response, and screening of high-risk patients with genetic predispositions. Additional indications for MR mammography include lesion characterization, contralateral breast evaluation in patients with proved malignancy, and identifying primary malignancy in patients with axillary nodal disease. There are several competing factors that influence the quality of the study. Finding the right balance is the key to providing high-quality images that can be accurately interpreted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Micro-optics for imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Robert R.

    2010-09-01

    This project investigates the fundamental imaging capability of an optic with a physical thickness substantially less than 1 mm. The analysis assumes that post-processing can overcome certain restrictions such as detector pixel size and image degradation due to aberrations. A first order optical analysis quickly reveals the limitations of even an ideal thin lens to provide sufficient image resolution and provides the justification for pursuing an annular design. Some straightforward examples clearly show the potential of this approach. The tradeoffs associated with annular designs, specifically field of view limitations and reduced mid-level spatial frequencies, are discussed and their impact on the imaging performance evaluated using several imaging examples. Additionally, issues such as detector acceptance angle and the need to balance aberrations with resolution are included in the analysis. With these restrictions, the final results present an excellent approximation of the expected performance of the lens designs presented.

  18. Mechanotransduction: vinculin provides stability when tension rises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjaard, E.; de Rooij, J.

    2013-01-01

    By beautiful imaging and state-of-the-art experiments, vinculin is established to be a central switch in mechanotransduction at integrin-based focal adhesions. Cycles of tension-regulated vinculin switching control focal adhesion dynamics and signaling to enable polarized cell migration and

  19. Still Photography: Can It Provide Program Portrayal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Patricia Scheyer

    Still photography can help portray educational programs for description and evaluation. There may, however, be problems with this method. Photographic images idealize the subjects; the framing is arbitrary, lends importance and veracity at the same time it levels an event to a very thin slice of reality. The evaluator-photographer may have…

  20. 75 FR 875 - Guidance for Industry on New Contrast Imaging Indication Considerations for Devices and Approved...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-06

    .../biological products that provide image contrast enhancement. The final guidance announced in this document... specific medical imaging indications (e.g., myocardial perfusion or breast cancer imaging) and offered... developers of medical imaging devices and imaging drug/ biological products that provide image contrast...

  1. Imaging macrophages with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomaterials have much to offer, not only in deciphering innate immune cell biology and tracking cells, but also in advancing personalized clinical care by providing diagnostic and prognostic information, quantifying treatment efficacy and designing better therapeutics. This Review presents different types of nanomaterial, their biological properties and their applications for imaging macrophages in human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm, diabetes and other conditions. We anticipate that future needs will include the development of nanomaterials that are specific for immune cell subsets and can be used as imaging surrogates for nanotherapeutics. New in vivo imaging clinical tools for noninvasive macrophage quantification are thus ultimately expected to become relevant to predicting patients' clinical outcome, defining treatment options and monitoring responses to therapy.

  2. Imaging and Documenting Gammarideans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Haug

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We give an overview of available techniques for imaging and documenting applied to gammarideans and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Although recent techniques, such as confocal laser scanning microscopy (cLSM, focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB SEM, or computed microtomography (μCT, provide new possibilities to detect and document structures, these high-tech devices are expensive, and access to them is often limited. Alternatively, there are many possibilities to enhance the capabilities of established techniques such as macrophotography and light microscopy. We discuss improvements of the illumination with polarized light and the possibilities of utilizing the autofluorescence of animals such as the gammarideans. In addition, we present software-based enhancing tools such as image fusion and image stitching.

  3. Phased array imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    The problem of recoverable image resolution is investigated for the case where an imaging array is used which array has an optical transfer function that may be described as consisting of islands of nonzero value in a sea of zero values. Can the missing spatial frequency information can be provided--can, in effect, a form of (interpolative) super resolution. The CLEAN algorithm used by radio astronomers suggests that this should be possible. The results developed here indicate that this can be done, with no significant price in terms of signal-to-noise ratio to be paid, and further show that a nonlinear algorithm, like CLEAN, is not required. The results show that the feasibility of doing this depends on the angular size of the object being imaged. We find that its size must be less than the inverse of the largest gap between islands in the array's optical transfer function.

  4. Meninges in cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, V.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Primary malignant tumours arising from the meninges are distinctly uncommon, and when they occur, they are usually sarcomas. In contrast, metastatic meningeal involvement is increasingly seen as advances in cancer therapy have changed the natural history of malignant disease and prolonged the life span of cancer patients. The meninges can either be infiltrated by contiguous extension of primary tumours of the central nervous system, paranasal sinuses and skull base origin or can be diffusely infiltrated from haematogenous dissemination from distant primary malignancies. Imaging in these patients provides crucial information in planning management. This article reviews the pertinent anatomy that underlies imaging findings, discusses the mechanism of meningeal metastasis and highlights different imaging patterns of meningeal carcinomatosis and the pitfalls. PMID:19965290

  5. ACIR: automatic cochlea image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dhamari, Ibraheem; Bauer, Sabine; Paulus, Dietrich; Lissek, Friedrich; Jacob, Roland

    2017-02-01

    Efficient Cochlear Implant (CI) surgery requires prior knowledge of the cochlea's size and its characteristics. This information helps to select suitable implants for different patients. To get these measurements, a segmentation method of cochlea medical images is needed. An important pre-processing step for good cochlea segmentation involves efficient image registration. The cochlea's small size and complex structure, in addition to the different resolutions and head positions during imaging, reveals a big challenge for the automated registration of the different image modalities. In this paper, an Automatic Cochlea Image Registration (ACIR) method for multi- modal human cochlea images is proposed. This method is based on using small areas that have clear structures from both input images instead of registering the complete image. It uses the Adaptive Stochastic Gradient Descent Optimizer (ASGD) and Mattes's Mutual Information metric (MMI) to estimate 3D rigid transform parameters. The use of state of the art medical image registration optimizers published over the last two years are studied and compared quantitatively using the standard Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). ACIR requires only 4.86 seconds on average to align cochlea images automatically and to put all the modalities in the same spatial locations without human interference. The source code is based on the tool elastix and is provided for free as a 3D Slicer plugin. Another contribution of this work is a proposed public cochlea standard dataset which can be downloaded for free from a public XNAT server.

  6. OSPACS: Ultrasound image management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessant Conrad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound scanning uses the medical imaging format, DICOM, for electronically storing the images and data associated with a particular scan. Large health care facilities typically use a picture archiving and communication system (PACS for storing and retrieving such images. However, these systems are usually not suitable for managing large collections of anonymized ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. Results We have developed a system enabling the accurate archiving and management of ultrasound images gathered during a clinical screening trial. It is based upon a Windows application utilizing an open-source DICOM image viewer and a relational database. The system automates the bulk import of DICOM files from removable media by cross-validating the patient information against an external database, anonymizing the data as well as the image, and then storing the contents of the file as a field in a database record. These image records may then be retrieved from the database and presented in a tree-view control so that the user can select particular images for display in a DICOM viewer or export them to external media. Conclusion This system provides error-free automation of ultrasound image archiving and management, suitable for use in a clinical trial. An open-source project has been established to promote continued development of the system.

  7. Medical imaging principles and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D; Peterson, Donald R

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a selective review of key imaging modalities focusing on modalities with established clinical utilization. It provides a detailed overview of x-ray imaging and computed tomography, fundamental concepts in signal acquisition and processes, followed by an overview of functional MRI (fMRI) and chemical shift imaging. It also covers topics in Magnetic Resonance Microcopy, the physics of instrumentation and signal collection, and their application in clinical practice. The selection of topics provides readers with an appreciation of the depth and breadth of the field and the challenges ahead of the technical and clinical community of researchers and practitioners.

  8. clinical: imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI), with asso- ciation between HAD and both diffuse atrophy with ventricular dilatation9 and deep white matter lesions. Furthermore, a correlation between declining cognitive function and the loss of volume in certain brain struc- tures, including the basal ganglia and caudate nucleus,.

  9. Geriatric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guglielmi, Giuseppe [Scientific Institute Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy). Dept. of Radiology; Peh, Wilfred C.G. [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Guermazi, Ali (eds.) [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2013-08-01

    Considers all aspect of geriatric imaging. Explains clearly how to distinguish the healthy elderly from those in need of treatment. Superbly illustrated. Written by recognized experts in field. In the elderly, the coexistence of various diseases, the presence of involutional and degenerative changes, and the occurrence of both physical and cognitive problems represent ''the norm.'' It is therefore important to know how to distinguish the healthy elderly from those in need of treatment as a sound basis for avoiding overdiagnosis and overtreatment. This aspect is a central theme in Geriatric Imaging, which covers a wide range of applications of different imaging techniques and clearly explains both the potential and the limitations of diagnostic imaging in geriatric patients. Individual sections are devoted to each major region or system of the body, and a concluding section focuses specifically on interventional procedures. The book, written by recognized experts in the field, is superbly illustrated and will be an ideal resource for geriatricians, radiologists, and trainees.

  10. Image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    from text, image to object. An empirical study, based on 17 newspaper archives, demonstrates user group requirements including archivists (creators), journalists (immediate users), and newspaper readers (end-users). A word association test is completed and the terms are used to build a user interface...

  11. A Review on Medical Image Registration as an Optimization Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guoli; Han, Jianda; Zhao, Yiwen; Wang, Zheng; Du, Huibin

    2017-08-01

    In the course of clinical treatment, several medical media are required by a phy-sician in order to provide accurate and complete information about a patient. Medical image registra-tion techniques can provide a richer diagnosis and treatment information to doctors and to provide a comprehensive reference source for the researchers involved in image registration as an optimization problem. The essence of image registration is associating two or more different images spatial asso-ciation, and getting the translation of their spatial relationship. For medical image registration, its pro-cess is not absolute. Its core purpose is finding the conversion relationship between different images. The major step of image registration includes the change of geometrical dimensions, and change of the image of the combination, image similarity measure, iterative optimization and interpo-lation process. The contribution of this review is sort of related image registration research methods, can provide a brief reference for researchers about image registration.

  12. Diverse Image Annotation

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Baoyuan

    2017-11-09

    In this work we study the task of image annotation, of which the goal is to describe an image using a few tags. Instead of predicting the full list of tags, here we target for providing a short list of tags under a limited number (e.g., 3), to cover as much information as possible of the image. The tags in such a short list should be representative and diverse. It means they are required to be not only corresponding to the contents of the image, but also be different to each other. To this end, we treat the image annotation as a subset selection problem based on the conditional determinantal point process (DPP) model, which formulates the representation and diversity jointly. We further explore the semantic hierarchy and synonyms among the candidate tags, and require that two tags in a semantic hierarchy or in a pair of synonyms should not be selected simultaneously. This requirement is then embedded into the sampling algorithm according to the learned conditional DPP model. Besides, we find that traditional metrics for image annotation (e.g., precision, recall and F1 score) only consider the representation, but ignore the diversity. Thus we propose new metrics to evaluate the quality of the selected subset (i.e., the tag list), based on the semantic hierarchy and synonyms. Human study through Amazon Mechanical Turk verifies that the proposed metrics are more close to the humans judgment than traditional metrics. Experiments on two benchmark datasets show that the proposed method can produce more representative and diverse tags, compared with existing image annotation methods.

  13. Determinants of patient loyalty to healthcare providers: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-Jiao; Wan, Qiao-Qin; Liu, Cong-Ying; Feng, Xiao-Lin; Shang, Shao-Mei

    2017-08-01

    Patient loyalty is key to business success for healthcare providers and also for patient health outcomes. This study aims to identify determinants influencing patient loyalty to healthcare providers and propose an integrative conceptual model of the influencing factors. PubMed, CINAHL, OVID, ProQuest and Elsevier Science Direct databases were searched. Publications about determinants of patient loyalty to health providers were screened, and 13 articles were included. Date of publication, location of the research, sample details, objectives and findings/conclusions were extracted for 13 articles. Thirteen studies explored eight determinants: satisfaction, quality, value, hospital brand image, trust, commitment, organizational citizenship behavior and customer complaints. The integrated conceptual model comprising all the determinants demonstrated the significant positive direct impact of quality on satisfaction and value, satisfaction on trust and commitment, trust on commitment and loyalty, and brand image on quality and loyalty. This review identifies and models the determinants of patient loyalty to healthcare providers. Further studies are needed to explore the influence of trust, commitment, and switching barriers on patient loyalty.

  14. Potential of HfN, ZrN, and TiH as hot carrier absorber and Al2O3/Ge quantum well/Al2O3 and Al2O3/PbS quantum dots/Al2O3 as energy selective contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Santosh; Chung, Simon; Liao, Yuanxun; Wang, Pei; Cao, Wenkai; Wen, Xiaoming; Gupta, Neeti; Conibeer, Gavin

    2017-08-01

    The hot carrier (HC) solar cell is one of the most promising advanced photovoltaic concepts. It aims to minimise two major losses in single junction solar cells due to sub-band gap loss and thermalisation of above band gap photons by using a small bandgap absorber, and, importantly, collecting the photo-generated carriers before they thermalise. In this paper we will present recent development of the two critical components of the HC solar cell, i.e., the absorber and energy selective contacts (ESCs). For absorber, fabrication and carrier cooling rates in potential bulk materials — hafnium nitride, zirconium nitride, and titanium hydride are presented. Results of ESCs employing double barrier resonant tunneling structures Al2O3/Ge quantum well (QW)/Al2O3 and Al2O3/PbS quantum dots (QDs)/Al2O3 are also presented. These results are expected to guide further development of practical HC solar cell devices.

  15. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space-based interferometry missions have the potential to revolutionize imaging and astrometry, providing observations of unprecedented accuracy. Realizing the full...

  16. Imaging in oral cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreeta Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist.

  17. Body image and paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Felicity; Freeman, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Paranoia builds upon feelings of vulnerability. Our clinical experience indicates that negative body image, including concerns regarding weight, may be one source of feeling vulnerable and hence raise the risk of paranoia. There has been no empirical test of an association between body image and paranoia. Our aim was to provide the first test of this issue by examining in epidemiologically representative cohorts the cross-sectional associations between paranoia and a proxy measure of body image. This was an initial exploration of a potentially important but overlooked issue. Data were used from 5515 participants in the US National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (NCS-R). To validate the findings, the analyses were replicated with 10,113 participants in the US National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescents (NCS-A). Concerns about weight were associated with paranoia in the NCS-R (OR = 1.48, p = 0.006, CI = 1.123, 1.955) and NCS-A (OR = 1.67, p < 0.001, CI = 1.490, 1.873). The associations remained significant after controlling for gender and body mass index. The results show that negative body image and paranoia are associated in the general population, consistent with the idea that paranoia may build upon feelings of vulnerability arising from body image concerns. Studies are needed to examine whether there is a causal relationship. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Pyramid image codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    All vision systems, both human and machine, transform the spatial image into a coded representation. Particular codes may be optimized for efficiency or to extract useful image features. Researchers explored image codes based on primary visual cortex in man and other primates. Understanding these codes will advance the art in image coding, autonomous vision, and computational human factors. In cortex, imagery is coded by features that vary in size, orientation, and position. Researchers have devised a mathematical model of this transformation, called the Hexagonal oriented Orthogonal quadrature Pyramid (HOP). In a pyramid code, features are segregated by size into layers, with fewer features in the layers devoted to large features. Pyramid schemes provide scale invariance, and are useful for coarse-to-fine searching and for progressive transmission of images. The HOP Pyramid is novel in three respects: (1) it uses a hexagonal pixel lattice, (2) it uses oriented features, and (3) it accurately models most of the prominent aspects of primary visual cortex. The transform uses seven basic features (kernels), which may be regarded as three oriented edges, three oriented bars, and one non-oriented blob. Application of these kernels to non-overlapping seven-pixel neighborhoods yields six oriented, high-pass pyramid layers, and one low-pass (blob) layer.

  19. Imaging of male urethra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlica, Pietro [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hospital M. Malpighi, Via Palagi 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Barozzi, Libero [Department of Emergency Radiology, Hospital S. Orsola-Malpighi, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Menchi, Ilario [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hospital S. Maria Nuova, 55100 Florence (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    The male urethral imaging and pathology is not widespread in the radiology literature because this part of the urinary tract is easily studied by urologists with clinical or endoscopic examinations. Ultrasonography and MR imaging are increasingly being used in association with voiding cystourethrography and retrograde urethrography. The posterior urethra is being studied with voiding cystourethrography or voiding sonography which allows the detection of bladder neck pathology, post-surgical stenosis, and neoplasms. The functional aspects of the bladder neck and posterior urethra can be monitored continuously in patients with neuromuscular dysfunction of the bladder. The anterior urethral anatomy and pathology is commonly explored by retrograde urethrography, but recently sonourethrography and MR imaging have been proposed, distending the lumen with simple saline solution instead of iodinated contrast media. They are being used to study the urethral mucosa and the periurethral spongy tissue which can be involved in the urethral pathologies such as strictures, diverticula, trauma, and tumors. Imaging has an important role to play in the study of the diseases of the male urethra since it can detect pathology not visible on urethroscopy. The new imaging techniques in this area, such as sonography and MR, can provide adjunct information that cannot be obtained with other modalities. (orig.)

  20. Animal imaging using immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Rand, Kendra; Faris, Gregory W.

    2003-07-01

    We are using rodent animal models to study and compare contrast mechanisms for detection of breast cancer. These measurements are performed with the animals immersed in a matching scattering medium. The matching scattering medium or liquid tissue phantom comprises a mixture of Ropaque (hollow acrylic/styrene microspheres) and ink. We have previously applied matched imaging to imaging in humans. Surrounding the imaged region with a matched tissue phantom compensates for variations in tissue thickness and geometry, provides more uniform illumination, and allows better use of the dynamic range of the imaging system. If the match is good, the boundaries of the imaged region should almost vanish, enhancing the contrast from internal structure as compared to contrast from the boundaries and surface topography. For our measurements in animals, the immersion plays two additional roles. First, we can readily study tumors through tissue thickness similar to that of a human breast. Although the heterogeneity of the breast is lost, this is a practical method to study the detection of small tumors and monitor changes as they grow. Second, the immersion enhances our ability to quantify the contrast mechanisms for peripheral tumors on the animal because the boundary effects on photon migration are eliminated. We are currently developing two systems for these measurements. One is a continuous-wave (CW) system based on near-infrared LED illumination and a CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. The second system, a frequency domain system, can help quantify the changes observed with the CW system.

  1. THE EFFECT OF IMAGE ENHANCEMENT METHODS DURING FEATURE DETECTION AND MATCHING OF THERMAL IMAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Akcay, O.; Avsar, E. O.

    2017-01-01

    A successful image matching is essential to provide an automatic photogrammetric process accurately. Feature detection, extraction and matching algorithms have performed on the high resolution images perfectly. However, images of cameras, which are equipped with low-resolution thermal sensors are problematic with the current algorithms. In this paper, some digital image processing techniques were applied to the low-resolution images taken with Optris PI 450 382 x 288 pixel optical re...

  2. FunImageJ: a Lisp framework for scientific image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kyle I S; Rueden, Curtis T; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2017-11-02

    FunImageJ is a Lisp framework for scientific image processing built upon the ImageJ software ecosystem. The framework provides a natural functional-style for programming, while accounting for the performance requirements necessary in big data processing commonly encountered in biological image analysis. Freely available plugin to Fiji (http://fiji.sc/#download). Installation and use instructions available at (http://imagej.net/FunImageJ). kharrington@uidaho.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Nanoparticle imaging probes for molecular imaging with computed tomography and application to cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, Ryan K.; Curtis, Tyler E.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Irimata, Lisa E.; McGinnity, Tracie L.; Cole, Lisa E.; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2017-03-01

    Precision imaging is needed to realize precision medicine in cancer detection and treatment. Molecular imaging offers the ability to target and identify tumors, associated abnormalities, and specific cell populations with overexpressed receptors. Nuclear imaging and radionuclide probes provide high sensitivity but subject the patient to a high radiation dose and provide limited spatiotemporal information, requiring combined computed tomography (CT) for anatomic imaging. Therefore, nanoparticle contrast agents have been designed to enable molecular imaging and improve detection in CT alone. Core-shell nanoparticles provide a powerful platform for designing tailored imaging probes. The composition of the core is chosen for enabling strong X-ray contrast, multi-agent imaging with photon-counting spectral CT, and multimodal imaging. A silica shell is used for protective, biocompatible encapsulation of the core composition, volume-loading fluorophores or radionuclides for multimodal imaging, and facile surface functionalization with antibodies or small molecules for targeted delivery. Multi-agent (k-edge) imaging and quantitative molecular imaging with spectral CT was demonstrated using current clinical agents (iodine and BaSO4) and a proposed spectral library of contrast agents (Gd2O3, HfO2, and Au). Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au nanoparticles were demonstrated to enhance sensitivity and specificity for the detection of breast microcalcifications by conventional radiography and CT in both normal and dense mammary tissue using murine models. Moreover, photon-counting spectral CT enabled quantitative material decomposition of the Au and calcium signals. Immunoconjugated Au@SiO2 nanoparticles enabled highly-specific targeting of CD133+ ovarian cancer stem cells for contrast-enhanced detection in model tumors.

  4. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  5. Healthcare providers' attitudes and perceptions in infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Healthcare providers demonstrated attitudes and perceptions in antibiotic prescribing or use of laboratory derived information in infection diagnosis that could have negative impacts on antibiotic prescribing. Key words: Healthcare providers, Lesotho, antibiotic prescribing, laboratory derived information ...

  6. Medicare Provider Data - Part D Prescriber

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Part D Prescriber Public Use File (PUF) provides information on prescription drugs prescribed by individual physicians and other health care providers and paid...

  7. Medicare Provider Data - Physician and Other Supplier

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File (Physician and Other Supplier PUF) provides information on services and procedures provided to Medicare...

  8. Medicare Provider Payment Data - Skilled Nursing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Skilled Nursing Facility Utilization and Payment Public Use File (Skilled Nursing Facility PUF) provides information on services provided to Medicare...

  9. Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Discussing Diabetes with Your Healthcare Provider Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Diabetes Medicines—Always Discuss Them with Your Healthcare Provider ...

  10. Institutional Provider and Beneficiary Summary PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CMS IPBS PUFs are aggregated files in which each record summarizes information for a particular institutional provider. An institutional provider refers to a...

  11. Identifiable Data Files - Medicare Provider Analysis and ...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) File contains data from claims for services provided to beneficiaries admitted to Medicare certified inpatient...

  12. The new old age of the provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nívia Cardoso Guirra Santana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Longevity and the improved quality of life of the elderly population reflected in various sectors of society, including family formations. The image of elderly people as dependents is switched to other images that affirm the role of the elderly participating in the social, economic and affective spheres. The aim of this study is to discuss the role of the elderly in contemporary society as protector of childhood. The methodology adopted was qualitative in nature, with review of literature and use of data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (CENSUS, PNAD and PEA. The results indicate that, despite the importance of the subject, the Brazilian scientific production on the care of children and adolescents by their grandparents, understood as a child protection mechanism developed in intergenerational family relationships, is scant.

  13. Coronary magnetic resonance vein imaging: imaging contrast, sequence, and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezafat, Reza; Han, Yuchi; Peters, Dana C; Herzka, Daniel A; Wylie, John V; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig K; Yeon, Susan B; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Manning, Warren J

    2007-12-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in imaging the coronary vein anatomy to guide interventional cardiovascular procedures such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), a device therapy for congestive heart failure (CHF). With CRT the lateral wall of the left ventricle is electrically paced using a transvenous coronary sinus lead or surgically placed epicardial lead. Proper transvenous lead placement is facilitated by the knowledge of the coronary vein anatomy. Cardiovascular MR (CMR) has the potential to image the coronary veins. In this study we propose and test CMR techniques and protocols for imaging the coronary venous anatomy. Three aspects of design of imaging sequence were studied: magnetization preparation schemes (T(2) preparation and magnetization transfer), imaging sequences (gradient-echo (GRE) and steady-state free precession (SSFP)), and imaging time during the cardiac cycle. Numerical and in vivo studies both in healthy and CHF subjects were performed to optimize and demonstrate the utility of CMR for coronary vein imaging. Magnetization transfer was superior to T(2) preparation for contrast enhancement. Both GRE and SSFP were viable imaging sequences, although GRE provided more robust results with better contrast. Imaging during the end-systolic quiescent period was preferable as it coincided with the maximum size of the coronary veins. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. From Image to Neutrosophic Image

    OpenAIRE

    Shimaa Fathi Ali

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the growth of computer technology, using multimedia data in various fields such as remote sensing, medical and online information services the massive volume of electronic data a large part of which is in the form of images. Thus the need for efficient and automated search tools to index and retrieve information from these visual databases is necessary.

  15. Co-providing: understanding the logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2011-11-01

    Continuing nursing education providers have sometimes said that they don't want to co-provide because "it's too much trouble" or they "won't be able to control what happens" or because they don't understand the process. This column clarifies the logistics of the co-provider relationship. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. 5 CFR 890.910 - Provider information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provider information. 890.910 Section 890.910 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS..., and FEHB Benefit Payments § 890.910 Provider information. The hospital provider information used to...

  17. 78 FR 14034 - Health Insurance Providers Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 57 RIN 1545-BL20 Health Insurance Providers Fee AGENCY: Internal... covered entities engaged in the business of providing health insurance for United States health risks... regulations affect persons engaged in the business of providing health insurance for United States health...

  18. Healthcare providers' knowledge, attitude and behaviour towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A systematic review of studies conducted from 2008 till 2015 was undertaken to analyze the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of Malaysian healthcare providers regarding breast cancer, in an attempt to obtain an overall picture of how wellequipped the healthcare providers are to provide optimal breast cancer education, ...

  19. Piezoelectric pump and pressurised circuit provided therewith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, Johannes; Wits, Wessel Willems

    2015-01-01

    A piezoelectric pump for use in a pressurised circuit is provided, comprising a pump chamber (5) with an inlet (6) provided with a one way inlet valve (7), for connection to a feeding line (8) of the pressurised circuit and an outlet (9) provided with a one way outlet valve (10), for connection to a

  20. Cardiac Applications of PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jeffrey M C; Laforest, Richard; Nensa, Felix; Zheng, Jie; Gropler, Robert J; Woodard, Pamela K

    2017-05-01

    Simultaneous acquisition PET/MR imaging combines the anatomic capabilities of cardiac MR imaging with quantitative capabilities of both PET and MR imaging. Cardiac PET/MR imaging has the potential not only to assess cardiac tumors but also to provide thorough assessment of myocardial ischemia, infarction, and function and specific characterization of cardiomyopathies, such as cardiac sarcoid. In this article, the authors start with a discussion of the technical challenges specific to cardiovascular PET/MR imaging followed by a discussion of the use of PET/MR imaging in various cardiovascular conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Millimeter wave imaging: a historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Roger; Robertson, Duncan A.; Wikner, David

    2017-05-01

    The SPIE Passive and Active Millimeter Wave Imaging conference has provided an annual focus and forum for practitioners in the field of millimeter wave imaging for the past two decades. To celebrate the conference's twentieth anniversary we present a historical review of the evolution of millimeter wave imaging over the past twenty years. Advances in device technology play a fundamental role in imaging capability whilst system architectures have also evolved. Imaging phenomenology continues to be a crucial topic underpinning the deployment of millimeter wave imaging in diverse applications such as security, remote sensing, non-destructive testing and synthetic vision.

  2. CMOS imagers from phototransduction to image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    The idea of writing a book on CMOS imaging has been brewing for several years. It was placed on a fast track after we agreed to organize a tutorial on CMOS sensors for the 2004 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2004). This tutorial defined the structure of the book, but as first time authors/editors, we had a lot to learn about the logistics of putting together information from multiple sources. Needless to say, it was a long road between the tutorial and the book, and it took more than a few months to complete. We hope that you will find our journey worthwhile and the collated information useful. The laboratories of the authors are located at many universities distributed around the world. Their unifying theme, however, is the advancement of knowledge for the development of systems for CMOS imaging and image processing. We hope that this book will highlight the ideas that have been pioneered by the authors, while providing a roadmap for new practitioners in this field to exploit exc...

  3. Handheld microwave bomb-detecting imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo

    2017-05-01

    Proposed novel imaging technique will provide all weather high-resolution imaging and recognition capability for RF/Microwave signals with good penetration through highly scattered media: fog, snow, dust, smoke, even foliage, camouflage, walls and ground. Image resolution in proposed imaging system is not limited by diffraction and will be determined by processor and sampling frequency. Proposed imaging system can simultaneously cover wide field of view, detect multiple targets and can be multi-frequency, multi-function. Directional antennas in imaging system can be close positioned and installed in cell phone size handheld device, on small aircraft or distributed around protected border or object. Non-scanning monopulse system allows dramatically decrease in transmitting power and at the same time provides increased imaging range by integrating 2-3 orders more signals than regular scanning imaging systems.

  4. Toward privacy-preserving JPEG image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hang; Wang, Jingyue; Wang, Meiqing; Zhong, Shangping

    2017-07-01

    This paper proposes a privacy-preserving retrieval scheme for JPEG images based on local variance. Three parties are involved in the scheme: the content owner, the server, and the authorized user. The content owner encrypts JPEG images for privacy protection by jointly using permutation cipher and stream cipher, and then, the encrypted versions are uploaded to the server. With an encrypted query image provided by an authorized user, the server may extract blockwise local variances in different directions without knowing the plaintext content. After that, it can calculate the similarity between the encrypted query image and each encrypted database image by a local variance-based feature comparison mechanism. The authorized user with the encryption key can decrypt the returned encrypted images with plaintext content similar to the query image. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme not only provides effective privacy-preserving retrieval service but also ensures both format compliance and file size preservation for encrypted JPEG images.

  5. MR imaging of prostate. Preliminary experience with calculated imaging in 28 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevenois, P.A.; Van Regemorter, G.; Ghysels, M.; Delepaut, A.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Struyven, J.

    1988-04-01

    The majority of studies with MR imaging in prostate disease are based on a semiology obtained using images weighted in T1 and T2. A study was carried out to evaluate effects of images calculated in T1 and T2 obtained at 0.5T. This preliminary study concerns 28 prostate examinations with spin-echo acquisition and inversion-recuperation parameters, and provided images calculated in T1, weighted and calculated in T2. Images allowed detection and characterization of prostate lesions. However, although calculated images accentuate discrimination of the method, the weighted images conserve their place because of their improved spatial resolution.

  6. Imaging dementias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoiardo, M.; Grisoli, M. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milan (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    Dementia is the progressive loss of intellectual functions due to involvement of cortical or subcortical areas. Specific involvement of certain brain areas in the different diseases leads to impairment of different functions, e. g., memory, language, visuospatial abilities, and behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging and other neuroradiological studies may indicate which structures are mainly or selectively involved in a demented patient, thus allowing clinical-radiological correlations. Clinical presentation and evolution of the disease, supported by imaging studies, may lead to a highly probable diagnosis. The most common disorders, or the most relevant from the neuroradiological point of view, such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementias, dementia associated with parkinsonism, Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  7. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-03-21

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  8. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm2 pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  9. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  10. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    12 mars 2013 ... Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Image en médicine. L׳ulcère de Marjolin désigne la transformation maligne d׳une cicatrice de brûlure ou de toute autre ...

  11. Imaging stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brielle, Shlomi; Gura, Rotem; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Recent innovations in cell biology and imaging approaches are changing the way we study cellular stress, protein misfolding, and aggregation. Studies have begun to show that stress responses are even more variegated and dynamic than previously thought, encompassing nano-scale reorganization of cytosolic machinery that occurs almost instantaneously, much faster than transcriptional responses. Moreover, protein and mRNA quality control is often organized into highly dynamic macromolecular assemblies, or dynamic droplets, which could easily be mistaken for dysfunctional "aggregates," but which are, in fact, regulated functional compartments. The nano-scale architecture of stress-response ranges from diffraction-limited structures like stress granules, P-bodies, and stress foci to slightly larger quality control inclusions like juxta nuclear quality control compartment (JUNQ) and insoluble protein deposit compartment (IPOD), as well as others. Examining the biochemical and physical properties of these dynamic structures necessitates live cell imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution, and techniques to make quantitative measurements with respect to movement, localization, and mobility. Hence, it is important to note some of the most recent observations, while casting an eye towards new imaging approaches that offer the possibility of collecting entirely new kinds of data from living cells.

  12. Imaging Borrelly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, L.A.; Boice, D.C.; Britt, D.T.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Kirk, R.L.; Lee, M.; Nelson, R.M.; Oberst, J.; Sandel, B.R.; Stern, S.A.; Thomas, N.; Yelle, R.V.

    2004-01-01

    The nucleus, coma, and dust jets of short-period Comet 19P/Borrelly were imaged from the Deep Space 1 spacecraft during its close flyby in September 2001. A prominent jet dominated the near-nucleus coma and emanated roughly normal to the long axis of nucleus from a broad central cavity. We show it to have remained fixed in position for more than 34 hr, much longer than the 26-hr rotation period. This confirms earlier suggestions that it is co-aligned with the rotation axis. From a combination of fitting the nucleus light curve from approach images and the nucleus' orientation from stereo images at encounter, we conclude that the sense of rotation is right-handed around the main jet vector. The inferred rotation pole is approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the nucleus, consistent with a simple rotational state. Lacking an existing IAU comet-specific convention but applying a convention provisionally adopted for asteroids, we label this the north pole. This places the sub-solar latitude at ???60?? N at the time of the perihelion with the north pole in constant sunlight and thus receiving maximum average insolation. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced Land Imager Assessment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Gyanesh; Choate, Mike; Christopherson, Jon; Hollaren, Doug; Morfitt, Ron; Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Shar; Storey, James; Helder, Dennis; Ruggles, Tim; hide

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager Assessment System (ALIAS) supports radiometric and geometric image processing for the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) instrument onboard NASA s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. ALIAS consists of two processing subsystems for radiometric and geometric processing of the ALI s multispectral imagery. The radiometric processing subsystem characterizes and corrects, where possible, radiometric qualities including: coherent, impulse; and random noise; signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs); detector operability; gain; bias; saturation levels; striping and banding; and the stability of detector performance. The geometric processing subsystem and analysis capabilities support sensor alignment calibrations, sensor chip assembly (SCA)-to-SCA alignments and band-to-band alignment; and perform geodetic accuracy assessments, modulation transfer function (MTF) characterizations, and image-to-image characterizations. ALIAS also characterizes and corrects band-toband registration, and performs systematic precision and terrain correction of ALI images. This system can geometrically correct, and automatically mosaic, the SCA image strips into a seamless, map-projected image. This system provides a large database, which enables bulk trending for all ALI image data and significant instrument telemetry. Bulk trending consists of two functions: Housekeeping Processing and Bulk Radiometric Processing. The Housekeeping function pulls telemetry and temperature information from the instrument housekeeping files and writes this information to a database for trending. The Bulk Radiometric Processing function writes statistical information from the dark data acquired before and after the Earth imagery and the lamp data to the database for trending. This allows for multi-scene statistical analyses.

  14. Hyperspectral image analysis. A tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amigo, José Manuel, E-mail: jmar@food.ku.dk [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Babamoradi, Hamid [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Elcoroaristizabal, Saioa [Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Group, Department of Food Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, Frederiksberg C DK–1958 (Denmark); Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering, University of the Basque Country, Alameda de Urquijo s/n, E-48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-10-08

    This tutorial aims at providing guidelines and practical tools to assist with the analysis of hyperspectral images. Topics like hyperspectral image acquisition, image pre-processing, multivariate exploratory analysis, hyperspectral image resolution, classification and final digital image processing will be exposed, and some guidelines given and discussed. Due to the broad character of current applications and the vast number of multivariate methods available, this paper has focused on an industrial chemical framework to explain, in a step-wise manner, how to develop a classification methodology to differentiate between several types of plastics by using Near infrared hyperspectral imaging and Partial Least Squares – Discriminant Analysis. Thus, the reader is guided through every single step and oriented in order to adapt those strategies to the user's case. - Highlights: • Comprehensive tutorial of Hyperspectral Image analysis. • Hierarchical discrimination of six classes of plastics containing flame retardant. • Step by step guidelines to perform class-modeling on hyperspectral images. • Fusion of multivariate data analysis and digital image processing methods. • Promising methodology for real-time detection of plastics containing flame retardant.

  15. Buried object detection in GPR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paglieroni, David W; Chambers, David H; Bond, Steven W; Beer, W. Reginald

    2014-04-29

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  16. Data Service Provider Cost Estimation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Kathy; Hunolt, Greg; Booth, Arthur L.; Banks, Mel

    2011-01-01

    The Data Service Provider Cost Estimation Tool (CET) and Comparables Database (CDB) package provides to NASA s Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) the ability to estimate the full range of year-by-year lifecycle cost estimates for the implementation and operation of data service providers required by ESE to support its science and applications programs. The CET can make estimates dealing with staffing costs, supplies, facility costs, network services, hardware and maintenance, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software licenses, software development and sustaining engineering, and the changes in costs that result from changes in workload. Data Service Providers may be stand-alone or embedded in flight projects, field campaigns, research or applications projects, or other activities. The CET and CDB package employs a cost-estimation-by-analogy approach. It is based on a new, general data service provider reference model that provides a framework for construction of a database by describing existing data service providers that are analogs (or comparables) to planned, new ESE data service providers. The CET implements the staff effort and cost estimation algorithms that access the CDB and generates the lifecycle cost estimate for a new data services provider. This data creates a common basis for an ESE proposal evaluator for considering projected data service provider costs.

  17. Objective Image Quality Metrics for Ultrasound Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Cecilie Øinæs

    2009-01-01

    Objective evaluation of the image quality on ultrasound images is a comprehensive task due to the relatively low image quality compared to other imaging techniques. It is desirable to objectively determine the quality of ultrasound images since quantification of the quality removes the subjective evaluation which can lead to varying results. The scanner will also be more user friendly if the user is given feedback on the quality of the current image. This thesis has investigated in the obje...

  18. Home Care Providers to the Rescue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen M; Brøndum, Stig; Thomas, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the implementation of a novel first-responder programme in which home care providers equipped with automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were dispatched in parallel with existing emergency medical services in the event of a suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA......). METHODS: We evaluated a one-year prospective study that trained home care providers in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and using an AED in cases of suspected OHCA. Data were collected from cardiac arrest case files, case files from each provider dispatch and a survey among dispatched...... providers. The study was conducted in a rural district in Denmark. RESULTS: Home care providers were dispatched to 28 of the 60 OHCAs that occurred in the study period. In ten cases the providers arrived before the ambulance service and subsequently performed CPR. AED analysis was executed in three cases...

  19. Provider practice characteristics that promote interpersonal continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, Tyler S; Mori, Motomi; Lambert, William E; Saultz, John W

    2013-01-01

    Becoming certified as a patient-centered medical home now requires practices to measure how effectively they provide continuity of care. To understand how continuity can be improved, we studied the association between provider practice characteristics and interpersonal continuity using the Usual Provider Continuity Index (UPC). We conducted a mixed-methods study of the relationship between provider practice characteristics and UPC in 4 university-based family medicine clinics. For the quantitative part of the study, we analyzed data extracted from monthly provider performance reports for 63 primary care providers (PCPs) between July 2009 and June 2010. We tested the association of 5 practice parameters on UPC: (1) clinic frequency; (2) panel size; (3) patient load (ratio of panel size to clinic frequency); (4) attendance ratio; and (5) duration in practice (number of years working in the current practice). Clinic, care team, provider sex, and provider type (physicians versus nonphysician providers) were analyzed as covariates. Simple and multiple linear regressions were used for statistical modeling. Findings from the quantitative part of the study were validated using qualitative data from provider focus groups that were analyzed using sequential thematic coding. There were strong linear associations between UPC and both clinic frequency (β = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.62-1.27) and patient load (β = -0.37; 95% CI, -0.48 to -0.26). A multiple linear regression including clinic frequency, patient load, duration in practice, and provider type explained more than 60% of the variation in UPC (adjusted R(2) = 0.629). UPC for nurse practitioners and physician assistants was more strongly dependent on clinic frequency and was at least as high as it was for physicians. Focus groups identified 6 themes as other potential sources of variability in UPC. Variability in UPC between providers is strongly correlated with variables that can be modified by practice managers. Our study

  20. AstroImageJ: Image Processing and Photometric Extraction for Ultra-precise Astronomical Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Hessman, Frederic V.

    2017-02-01

    ImageJ is a graphical user interface (GUI) driven, public domain, Java-based, software package for general image processing traditionally used mainly in life sciences fields. The image processing capabilities of ImageJ are useful and extendable to other scientific fields. Here we present AstroImageJ (AIJ), which provides an astronomy specific image display environment and tools for astronomy specific image calibration and data reduction. Although AIJ maintains the general purpose image processing capabilities of ImageJ, AIJ is streamlined for time-series differential photometry, light curve detrending and fitting, and light curve plotting, especially for applications requiring ultra-precise light curves (e.g., exoplanet transits). AIJ reads and writes standard Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) files, as well as other common image formats, provides FITS header viewing and editing, and is World Coordinate System aware, including an automated interface to the astrometry.net web portal for plate solving images. AIJ provides research grade image calibration and analysis tools with a GUI driven approach, and easily installed cross-platform compatibility. It enables new users, even at the level of undergraduate student, high school student, or amateur astronomer, to quickly start processing, modeling, and plotting astronomical image data with one tightly integrated software package.

  1. Integrating medical imaging analyses through a high-throughput bundled resource imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Kelsie; Welch, E. Brian; Jeong, Ha-Kyu; Landman, Bennett A.

    2011-03-01

    Exploitation of advanced, PACS-centric image analysis and interpretation pipelines provides well-developed storage, retrieval, and archival capabilities along with state-of-the-art data providence, visualization, and clinical collaboration technologies. However, pursuit of integrated medical imaging analysis through a PACS environment can be limiting in terms of the overhead required to validate, evaluate and integrate emerging research technologies. Herein, we address this challenge through presentation of a high-throughput bundled resource imaging system (HUBRIS) as an extension to the Philips Research Imaging Development Environment (PRIDE). HUBRIS enables PACS-connected medical imaging equipment to invoke tools provided by the Java Imaging Science Toolkit (JIST) so that a medical imaging platform (e.g., a magnetic resonance imaging scanner) can pass images and parameters to a server, which communicates with a grid computing facility to invoke the selected algorithms. Generated images are passed back to the server and subsequently to the imaging platform from which the images can be sent to a PACS. JIST makes use of an open application program interface layer so that research technologies can be implemented in any language capable of communicating through a system shell environment (e.g., Matlab, Java, C/C++, Perl, LISP, etc.). As demonstrated in this proof-of-concept approach, HUBRIS enables evaluation and analysis of emerging technologies within well-developed PACS systems with minimal adaptation of research software, which simplifies evaluation of new technologies in clinical research and provides a more convenient use of PACS technology by imaging scientists.

  2. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  3. Sparse Representations of Hyperspectral Images

    KAUST Repository

    Swanson, Robin J.

    2015-11-23

    Hyperspectral image data has long been an important tool for many areas of sci- ence. The addition of spectral data yields significant improvements in areas such as object and image classification, chemical and mineral composition detection, and astronomy. Traditional capture methods for hyperspectral data often require each wavelength to be captured individually, or by sacrificing spatial resolution. Recently there have been significant improvements in snapshot hyperspectral captures using, in particular, compressed sensing methods. As we move to a compressed sensing image formation model the need for strong image priors to shape our reconstruction, as well as sparse basis become more important. Here we compare several several methods for representing hyperspectral images including learned three dimensional dictionaries, sparse convolutional coding, and decomposable nonlocal tensor dictionaries. Addi- tionally, we further explore their parameter space to identify which parameters provide the most faithful and sparse representations.

  4. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  5. Phytochemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plants provide many beneficial nutrients (phytochemicals) which may protect against cancer. Isothiocyanates (found in broccoli, cauliflower and brussel sprouts) may suppress tumor growth and hormone production. Flavonoids ( ...

  6. Riverine Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    13000 14000 Sweep Number Figure II Chseup of Simulated Range compressed signals of 7 Point Canal Boat Model Xpatch Canal Boat Simulation An...Imaging Studies and Demonstration MTRI • 1-10 Range Histories From Xpatch Simulated Signal History of Canal Boat _ 12000 13000 14000 Sweep Number -16...Orientation Nomenclature H-Plane Cut Fnqway *•HI. Mm tm pk| ind Nor. Honu m, il CO, V»>, i dag. ht, dB E-Plane Cut 100 ISO 200 250 300 M0 Figure 49: Co

  7. Providing Culturally Sensitive Care for Transgender Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguen, Shira; Shipherd, Jillian C.; Harris, Holly N.

    2005-01-01

    Culturally sensitive information is crucial for providing appropriate care to any minority population. This article provides an overview of important issues to consider when working with transgender patients, including clarification of transgender terminology, diagnosis issues, identity development, and appropriate pronoun use. We also review…

  8. Inside out Studio: Hope Arts Providence Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdts, Nadine

    2008-01-01

    The construction and infrastructure of a city provide the foundation of an ideal urban lab for high school students to discover how to dissect the multifaceted layers of a place and make it their own. For six weeks in the winter of 2008, ninth-grade students in Providence, Rhode Island's Hope High School/Hope Arts Community learned to look closely…

  9. Providing Continuing Education for International Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Debra L

    2015-10-01

    In an increasingly globalized world, providing continuing education (CE) for nurses is becoming a more common opportunity for U.S. educators. It is important for educators to provide CE programs in a culturally competent and sensitive environment. The challenges involved include effective communication, appropriate teaching methodologies, contextually appropriate content, and awareness of cultural-specific needs and customs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. South African healthcare provider perspectives on transitioning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regarded their patients as particularly vulnerable, they felt a strong and protective attachment towards them. A second barrier identified was a lack of .... parents to keep their children in adolescent care. Youth healthcare providers aimed to ... Patient attachment to adolescent healthcare providers and facilities. In all five sites ...

  11. 75 FR 48273 - Technical Service Provider Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... provisions by expanding the definition Technical Service Provider Assistance, which contained an error in the omission of ``Indian Tribe'' in the definition of Technical Service Provider. DATES: Effective Date: This amendment is effective on August 10, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Angel Figueroa, Team Leader...

  12. 75 FR 6839 - Technical Service Provider Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-12

    ... Conservation Service 7 CFR Part 652 RIN 0578-AA48 Technical Service Provider Assistance AGENCY: Natural... Final rule amends the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) regulations for technical service provider (TSP) provisions under the Food Security Act of 1985. The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of...

  13. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  14. a qualitative study of providers' perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Glaucoma management is challenging to patients as well as to the eye care providers.The study is aimed at describing the challenges faced by providers using qualitative methods. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with selected Ophthalmologists and resident doctors in ophthalmology at centres ...

  15. Piezo pump and pressurized circuit provided therewith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, Johannes; Wits, Wessel Willems

    2015-01-01

    A piezo pump for use in a pressurized circuit includes a pump chamber with an inlet provided with a one way inlet valve, for connection to a feeding line of the pressurized circuit and an outlet provided with a one way outlet valve, for connection to a discharge line of the pressurized circuit and a

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  17. Mobile Applications for Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganstein, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets have fundamentally changed the ways in which we interact with information. Far more than communication devices, smartphones and tablets are now indispensable tools in the pocket of healthcare providers. Mobile mental health applications (apps) provide instant access to up-to-date information on prevention, assessment and treatment. Self-help apps allow patients to take greater ownership of their own health and well-being. The past decade has seen an extraordinarily rapid proliferation of mobile medical apps. Though thousands of apps now exist, the challenge for healthcare providers and consumers alike has become sorting through mobile apps for those which provide accurate content delivered in the most user-friendly format. This article will review six mobile apps that can assist healthcare providers and consumers interested in enhancing mental health.

  18. Microbubble Cavitation Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, William T.; Powers, Jeffry E.; Everbach, E. Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Gao, Shunji; Xie, Feng; Porter, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications such as sonothrombolysis (STL) in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (moderate oscillations, stable cavitation, and inertial cavitation) and activity level in and around a treatment area. Acoustic passive cavitation detectors (PCDs) have been used to this end but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2-D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and activity level in a region of interest. Similar to PCDs, the cavitation imaging described here is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, whereas elevated noise bands indicate inertial cavitation; the absence of both indicates moderate oscillations. The prototype system is a modified commercially available ultrasound scanner with a sector imaging probe. The lateral resolution of the system is 1.5 mm at a focal depth of 3 cm, and the axial resolution is 3 cm for a therapy pulse length of 20 µs. The maximum frame rate of the prototype is 2 Hz. The system has been used for assessing and mapping the relative importance of the different cavitation states of a microbubble contrast agent. In vitro (tissue-mimicking flow phantom) and in vivo (heart, liver, and brain of two swine) results for cavitation states and their changes as a function of acoustic amplitude are presented. PMID:23549527

  19. Wavelets in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahra, Noor e; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H. [Sharda University, SET, Department of Electronics and Communication, Knowledge Park 3rd, Gr. Noida (India); University of Kocaeli, Department of Mathematics, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Istanbul Aydin University, Department of Computer Engineering, 34295 Istanbul (Turkey); Sharda University, SET, Department of Mathematics, 32-34 Knowledge Park 3rd, Greater Noida (India)

    2012-07-17

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  20. Wavelets in medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, Noor e.; Sevindir, Hulya Kodal; Aslan, Zafer; Siddiqi, A. H.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and ... here Images × Image Gallery General ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  2. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... usually given through an IV in the arm. MRI Research Programs at FDA Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  3. Image fusion techniques in permanent seed implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Polo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last twenty years major software and hardware developments in brachytherapy treatment planning, intraoperative navigation and dose delivery have been made. Image-guided brachytherapy has emerged as the ultimate conformal radiation therapy, allowing precise dose deposition on small volumes under direct image visualization. In thisprocess imaging plays a central role and novel imaging techniques are being developed (PET, MRI-MRS and power Doppler US imaging are among them, creating a new paradigm (dose-guided brachytherapy, where imaging is used to map the exact coordinates of the tumour cells, and to guide applicator insertion to the correct position. Each of these modalities has limitations providing all of the physical and geometric information required for the brachytherapy workflow.Therefore, image fusion can be used as a solution in order to take full advantage of the information from each modality in treatment planning, intraoperative navigation, dose delivery, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation.Image fusion, understood as the visualization of any morphological volume (i.e. US, CT, MRI together with an additional second morpholo gical volume (i.e. CT, MRI or functional dataset (functional MRI, SPECT, PET, is a well known method for treatment planning, verification and follow-up of interstitial irradiation. The term image fusion is used when multiple patient image datasets are registered and overlaid or merged to provide additional information. Fused images may be created from multiple images from the same imaging modality taken at different moments (multi-temporalapproach, or by combining information from multiple modalities. Quality means that the fused images should provide additional information to the brachythe rapy process (diagnosis and staging, treatment planning, intraoperative imaging, treatment delivery and follow-up that cannot be obtained in other ways. In this review I will focus on the role of

  4. Trajectory Auto-Corrected image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Julianna D; Grissom, William A

    2016-09-01

    To estimate k-space trajectory errors in non-Cartesian acquisitions and reconstruct distortion-free images, without trajectory measurements or gradient calibrations. The Trajectory Auto-Corrected image Reconstruction method jointly estimates k-space trajectory errors and images, based on SENSE and SPIRiT parallel imaging reconstruction. The underlying idea is that parallel imaging and oversampling in the center of k-space provides data redundancy that can be exploited to simultaneously reconstruct images and correct trajectory errors. Trajectory errors are represented as weighted sums of trajectory-dependent error basis functions, the coefficients of which are estimated using gradient-based optimization. Trajectory Auto-Corrected image Reconstruction was applied to reconstruct images and errors in golden angle radial, center-out radial, and spiral in vivo 7 Tesla brain acquisitions in five subjects. Compared to reconstructions using nominal trajectories, Trajectory auto-corrected image reconstructions contained considerably less blurring and streaking and were of similar quality to images reconstructed using measured k-space trajectories in the center-out radial and spiral cases. Reconstruction cost function reductions and improvements in normalized image gradient squared were also similar to those for images reconstructed using measured trajectories. Trajectory Auto-Corrected image Reconstruction enables non-Cartesian image reconstructions free from trajectory errors without the need for separate gradient calibrations or trajectory measurements. Magn Reson Med 76:757-768, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Managing and querying whole slide images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Oh, Tae W.; Vergara-Niedermayr, Cristobal; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel

    2012-02-01

    High-resolution pathology images provide rich information about the morphological and functional characteristics of biological systems, and are transforming the field of pathology into a new era. To facilitate the use of digital pathology imaging for biomedical research and clinical diagnosis, it is essential to manage and query both whole slide images (WSI) and analytical results generated from images, such as annotations made by humans and computed features and classifications made by computer algorithms. There are unique requirements on modeling, managing and querying whole slide images, including compatibility with standards, scalability, support of image queries at multiple granularities, and support of integrated queries between images and derived results from the images. In this paper, we present our work on developing the Pathology Image Database System (PIDB), which is a standard oriented image database to support retrieval of images, tiles, regions and analytical results, image visualization and experiment management through a unified interface and architecture. The system is deployed for managing and querying whole slide images for In Silico brain tumor studies at Emory University. PIDB is generic and open source, and can be easily used to support other biomedical research projects. It has the potential to be integrated into a Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) with powerful query capabilities to support pathology imaging.

  6. Microbial Cell Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Sullivan, Claretta [Eastern Virginia Medical School; Mortensen, Ninell P [ORNL; Allison, David P [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    limitation on the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  7. Essentials of nuclear medicine imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Mettler, Fred A. Jr

    2012-01-01

    Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging, by Drs. Fred A Mettler and Milton J Guiberteau, provides the practical and comprehensive guidance you need to master key nuclear imaging techniques. From physics, instrumentation, quality control, and legal requirements to hot topics such as sodium fluoride, radiopharmaceuticals, and recommended pediatric administered doses and guidelines, this sixth edition covers the fundamentals and recent developments in the practice of nuclear medicine.

  8. Industrial Applications of Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciora, Radu Adrian; Simion, Carmen Mihaela

    2014-11-01

    The recent advances in sensors quality and processing power provide us with excellent tools for designing more complex image processing and pattern recognition tasks. In this paper we review the existing applications of image processing and pattern recognition in industrial engineering. First we define the role of vision in an industrial. Then a dissemination of some image processing techniques, feature extraction, object recognition and industrial robotic guidance is presented. Moreover, examples of implementations of such techniques in industry are presented. Such implementations include automated visual inspection, process control, part identification, robots control. Finally, we present some conclusions regarding the investigated topics and directions for future investigation

  9. Medical imaging technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The book has two intentions. First, it assembles the latest research in the field of medical imaging technology in one place. Detailed descriptions of current state-of-the-art medical imaging systems (comprised of x-ray CT, MRI, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine) and data processing techniques are discussed. Information is provided that will give interested engineers and scientists a solid foundation from which to build with additional resources. Secondly, it exposes the reader to myriad applications that medical imaging technology has enabled.

  10. Image understanding using sparse representations

    CERN Document Server

    Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J; Turaga, Pavan; Spanias, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Image understanding has been playing an increasingly crucial role in several inverse problems and computer vision. Sparse models form an important component in image understanding, since they emulate the activity of neural receptors in the primary visual cortex of the human brain. Sparse methods have been utilized in several learning problems because of their ability to provide parsimonious, interpretable, and efficient models. Exploiting the sparsity of natural signals has led to advances in several application areas including image compression, denoising, inpainting, compressed sensing, blin

  11. Surface coil magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axel, L; Hayes, C

    1985-12-01

    Detection of MR signals with surface coils provides increased signal-to-noise ratio for superficial structures relative to detection by circumferential coils, permitting improved spatial resolution. Different geometries of surface coils can be used for different regions. Coils that are flat or curved to fit body contours are good for general imaging, with a range of coil sizes useful for structures of different size or depth. Solenoidal coils are useful for imaging protruding structures such as breasts, while smaller versions of conventional circumferential coils that can be slipped over limbs are useful for imaging extremities.

  12. Organizational culture associated with provider satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammon, Debra L; Tabler, Jennifer; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Gren, Lisa H; Kim, Jaewhan; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Day, Julie; Farrell, Timothy W; Waitzman, Norman J; Magill, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is key to the successful implementation of major improvement strategies. Transformation to a patient-centered medical home (PCHM) is such an improvement strategy, requiring a shift from provider-centric care to team-based care. Because this shift may impact provider satisfaction, it is important to understand the relationship between provider satisfaction and organizational culture, specifically in the context of practices that have transformed to a PCMH model. This was a cross-sectional study of surveys conducted in 2011 among providers and staff in 10 primary care clinics implementing their version of a PCMH: Care by Design. Measures included the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument and the American Medical Group Association provider satisfaction survey. Providers were most satisfied with quality of care (mean, 4.14; scale of 1-5) and interactions with patients (mean, 4.12) and were least satisfied with time spent working (mean, 3.47), paperwork (mean, 3.45), and compensation (mean, 3.35). Culture profiles differed across clinics, with family/clan and hierarchical cultures the most common. Significant correlations (P ≤ .05) between provider satisfaction and clinic culture archetypes included family/clan culture negatively correlated with administrative work; entrepreneurial culture positively correlated with the Time Spent Working dimension; market/rational culture positively correlated with how practices were facing economic and strategic challenges; and hierarchical culture negatively correlated with the Relationships with Staff and Resource dimensions. Provider satisfaction is an important metric for assessing experiences with features of a PCMH model. Identification of clinic-specific culture archetypes and archetype associations with provider satisfaction can help inform practice redesign. Attention to effective methods for changing organizational culture is recommended.

  13. AUTOMATION OF IMAGE DATA PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preuss Ryszard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the current capabilities of automate processing of the image data on the example of using PhotoScan software by Agisoft . At present, image data obtained by various registration systems (metric and non - metric cameras placed on airplanes , satellites , or more often on UAVs is used to create photogrammetric products. Multiple registrations of object or land area (large groups of photos are captured are usually performed in order to eliminate obscured area as well as to raise the final accuracy of the photogrammetric product. Because of such a situation t he geometry of the resulting image blocks is far from the typical configuration of images . For fast images georeferencing automatic image matching algorithms are currently applied . They can create a model of a block in the local coordinate system or using initial exterior orientation and measured control points can provide image georeference in an external reference frame. In the case of non - metric image application, it is also possible to carry out self - calibration process at this stage . Image matching algorithm is also used in generation of dense point clouds reconstructing spatial shape of the object ( area. In subsequent processing steps it is possible to obtain typical photogrammetric products such as orthomosaic , DSM or DTM and a photorealistic solid model of an object . All aforementioned processing steps are implemented in a single program in contrary to standard commercial software dividing all steps into dedicated modules . I mage processing leading to final geo referenced products can be fully automated including sequential implementation of the processing steps at predetermined control parameters . The paper presents the practical results of the application fully automatic generation of othomosaic for both images obtained by a metric Vexell camera and a block of images acquired by a non - metric UAV system.

  14. Effective communication with primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen

    2014-08-01

    Effective communication requires direct interaction between the hospitalist and the primary care provider using a standardized method of information exchange with the opportunity to ask questions and assign accountability for follow-up roles. The discharge summary is part of the process but does not provide the important aspects of handoff, such as closed loop communication and role assignments. Hospital discharge is a significant safety risk for patients, with more than half of discharged patients experiencing at least one error. Hospitalist and primary care providers need to collaborate to develop a standardized system to communicate about shared patients that meets handoff requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanomaterials for In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2017-02-08

    In vivo imaging, which enables us to peer deeply within living subjects, is producing tremendous opportunities both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool. Contrast material is often required to clearly visualize the functional architecture of physiological structures. Recent advances in nanomaterials are becoming pivotal to generate the high-resolution, high-contrast images needed for accurate, precision diagnostics. Nanomaterials are playing major roles in imaging by delivering large imaging payloads, yielding improved sensitivity, multiplexing capacity, and modularity of design. Indeed, for several imaging modalities, nanomaterials are now not simply ancillary contrast entities, but are instead the original and sole source of image signal that make possible the modality's existence. We address the physicochemical makeup/design of nanomaterials through the lens of the physical properties that produce contrast signal for the cognate imaging modality-we stratify nanomaterials on the basis of their (i) magnetic, (ii) optical, (iii) acoustic, and/or (iv) nuclear properties. We evaluate them for their ability to provide relevant information under preclinical and clinical circumstances, their in vivo safety profiles (which are being incorporated into their chemical design), their modularity in being fused to create multimodal nanomaterials (spanning multiple different physical imaging modalities and therapeutic/theranostic capabilities), their key properties, and critically their likelihood to be clinically translated.

  16. Accuracy of marketing claims by providers of stereotactic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A; Deweese, Theodore L; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pronovost, Peter J; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. We reviewed the Web sites of all U.S. hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed.

  17. Accuracy of Marketing Claims by Providers of Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K.; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. Methods: We reviewed the Web sites of all US hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Results: Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Conclusion: Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed. PMID:23633973

  18. Image wavelet decomposition and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treil, N.; Mallat, S.; Bajcsy, R.

    1989-01-01

    The general problem of computer vision has been investigated for more that 20 years and is still one of the most challenging fields in artificial intelligence. Indeed, taking a look at the human visual system can give us an idea of the complexity of any solution to the problem of visual recognition. This general task can be decomposed into a whole hierarchy of problems ranging from pixel processing to high level segmentation and complex objects recognition. Contrasting an image at different representations provides useful information such as edges. An example of low level signal and image processing using the theory of wavelets is introduced which provides the basis for multiresolution representation. Like the human brain, we use a multiorientation process which detects features independently in different orientation sectors. So, images of the same orientation but of different resolutions are contrasted to gather information about an image. An interesting image representation using energy zero crossings is developed. This representation is shown to be experimentally complete and leads to some higher level applications such as edge and corner finding, which in turn provides two basic steps to image segmentation. The possibilities of feedback between different levels of processing are also discussed.

  19. Field of Particle Filters Image Inpainting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuzol, Anne; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Nielsen, Mads

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for solving the image inpainting problem based on a field of locally interacting particle filters. Image inpainting, also known as image completion, is concerned with the problem of filling image regions with new visually plausible data. In order to avoid the difficulty...... of solving the problem globally for the region to be inpainted, we introduce a field of local particle filters. The states of the particle filters are image patches. Global consistency is enforced by a Markov random field image model which connects neighbouring particle filters. The benefit of using locally...... interacting particle filters is that several competing hypotheses on inpainting solutions are kept active, allowing the method to provide globally consistent solutions on problems where other local methods may fail. We provide examples of applications of the developed method. Keywords: Inpainting · Image...

  20. Oregon's mobility needs : social service provider survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    In 1998, the Oregon Department of Transportation undertook the Social Services Provider Survey as part of an investigation of the transportation needs of mobility impaired individuals in Oregon. This survey was designed to gain information about the ...

  1. Provider Customer Service Program - Performance Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS is continuously analyzing performance and quality of the Provider Customer Service Programs (PCSPs) of the contractors and will be identifying trends and making...

  2. Extensive IT outsourcing: advice from providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike; Whiting, Stacilee

    2007-01-01

    In summary, providers are reporting some benefits related to resources and knowledge, improved service levels/performance and stronger IT staff/leadership. Also, on average, providers are reporting satisfactory experiences with application support and CIO outsourcing. However, not all of their expectations are being met, and some providers have discontinued outsourcing due to unmet expectations. Clearly, outsourcing is an option one must research in depth--it is not for everyone. When one evaluates the results of extensive IT outsourcing, it becomes easier to see what outsourcing mix and firm may be a good match for your organization's needs and expected outcomes. As you decide upon the outsourcing mix and firm that is right for you, providers advise you to pay special attention to contractual arrangements. With adequate research and contractual provisions, organizations can find the outsourcing mix that is right for them.

  3. Mounting for diodes provides efficient heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    Efficient heat sink is provided by soldering diodes to metal support bars which are brazed to a ceramic base. Electrical connections between diodes on adjacent bars are made flexible by metal strips which aid in heat dissipation.

  4. Capitated contracting of integrated health provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzoli, G J; Dynan, L; Burns, L R

    This paper examines global capitation of integrated health provider organizations that link physicians and hospitals, such as physician-hospital organizations and management service organizations. These organizations have proliferated in recent years, but their contracting activity has not been studied. We develop a conceptual model to understand the capitated contracting bargaining process. Exploratory multivariate analysis suggests that global capitation of these organizations is more common in markets with high health maintenance organization (HMO) market share, greater numbers of HMOs, and fewer physician group practices. Additionally, health provider organizations with more complex case mix, nonprofit status, more affiliated physicians, health system affiliations, and diversity in physician organizational arrangements are more likely to have global capitation. Finally, state regulation of provider contracting with self-insured employers appears to have spillover effects on health plan risk contracting with health providers.

  5. Elder Care for Alzheimer's: Choosing a Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... elder care center for a loved one with Alzheimer's. What should I look for when considering a ... provide an opportunity for your loved one with Alzheimer's to receive assistance and therapeutic activities in a ...

  6. CARAVAN: Providing Location Privacy for VANET

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sampigethaya, Krishna; Huang, Leping; Li, Mingyan; Poovendran, Radha; Matsuura, Kanta; Sezaki, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    .... This type of tracking leads to threats on the location privacy of the vehicle's user. In this paper, we study the problem of providing location privacy in VANET by allowing vehicles to prevent tracking of their broadcast communications...

  7. National Provider Identifier Standard - Data Dissemination

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Plan and Provider Enumeration System, NPPES, downloadable file, also referred to as the NPI Downloadable File, contains FOIA disclosable NPPES health...

  8. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS has released a series of publicly available data files that summarize the utilization and payments for procedures, services, and prescription drugs provided to...

  9. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Outpatient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Outpatient Utilization and Payment Public Use File (Outpatient PUF) presents information on common outpatient services provided to Medicare fee-for-service...

  10. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Inpatient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data provided here include hospital-specific charges for the more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals that receive Medicare Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS)...

  11. Medicare Referring Provider DMEPOS PUF CY2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset, which is part of CMSs Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data, details information on Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and...

  12. Medicare Referring Provider (DMEPOS) Data CY2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released a new dataset, the Referring Provider Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics and Supplies...

  13. VT Wireless Internet Service Providers 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The VT Wireless Internet Service Provider (ISP) dataset (WISP2006) includes polygons depicting the extent of Vermont's WISP broadband system as of...

  14. VT Wireless Internet Service Providers 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The VT Wireless Internet Service Provider (ISP) dataset (WISP2007) includes polygons depicting the extent of Vermont's WISP broadband system as of...

  15. Nigella sativa provides protection against metabolic syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigella sativa provides protection against metabolic syndrome. Abdul Saboor Shah, Gul Majid Khan, Amir Badshah, Shefaat Ullah Shah, Kifayat Ullah Shah, Shakeel Ahmad Mirza, Kifayat Ullah Shah, Kamran Ahmad Khan ...

  16. Medicare Provider Analysis and Review (MEDPAR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MEDPAR files contain information on Medicare beneficiaries using hospital inpatient services. The data is provided by the state and the Diagnosis Related Groups...

  17. Medication abortion knowledge among adolescent medicine providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Mandy S; Makino, Kevin K; Phelps, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adolescents are at high risk for unintended pregnancy and abortion. The purpose of this study is to understand if providers caring for adolescents have the knowledge to counsel accurately on medication abortion, a suitable option for many teens seeking to terminate a pregnancy. Methods Using an online questionnaire, we surveyed US providers in the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine on medication abortion. We conducted chi-squared analyses to evaluate medication abortion knowledge by adolescent medicine fellowship training, and to compare responses to specific knowledge questions by medication abortion counseling. Further, we examined the relationship between providers’ self-assessed and actual knowledge using ANOVA. Results We surveyed 797 providers, with a 54% response rate. Almost a quarter of respondents incorrectly believed medication abortion was not very safe, 40% misidentified that it was pregnant teens receive accurate counseling on all options, adolescent medicine providers need better education on medication abortion. PMID:22443843

  18. Radarsat survey provides accurate map of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Explorers of Antarctica have trudged with dog sleds, wintered in boats trapped in ice, and daringly flown across the coldest, windiest, highest, driest, and most desolate continental expanse. Their names are legendary: Ross, Scott, Amundsen, Byrd. And now add Radarsat.Taking about 5,500 microwave images over 18 days—from September 26 through October 14—a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) on this Earth-orbiting satellite completed the first-ever, real-time and high-resolution radar survey of Antarctica last week. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) satellite, orbiting 800 km above Antarctica, accomplished this task by performing an unusual 180° yaw, or rotational maneuver, for NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  19. Supercomputing Centers and Electricity Service Providers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patki, Tapasya; Bates, Natalie; Ghatikar, Girish

    2016-01-01

    Supercomputing Centers (SCs) have high and variable power demands, which increase the challenges of the Electricity Service Providers (ESPs) with regards to efficient electricity distribution and reliable grid operation. High penetration of renewable energy generation further exacerbates this pro......Supercomputing Centers (SCs) have high and variable power demands, which increase the challenges of the Electricity Service Providers (ESPs) with regards to efficient electricity distribution and reliable grid operation. High penetration of renewable energy generation further exacerbates...

  20. Providing driving rain data for hygrothermal calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mikkel Kristian

    1996-01-01

    Due to a wish for driving rain data as input for hygrothermal calculations, this report deals with utilizing commonly applied empirical relations and standard meteorological data, in an attempt to provide realistic estimates rather than exact correlations.......Due to a wish for driving rain data as input for hygrothermal calculations, this report deals with utilizing commonly applied empirical relations and standard meteorological data, in an attempt to provide realistic estimates rather than exact correlations....

  1. Categorizing biomedicine images using novel image features and sparse coding representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Images embedded in biomedical publications carry rich information that often concisely summarize key hypotheses adopted, methods employed, or results obtained in a published study. Therefore, they offer valuable clues for understanding main content in a biomedical publication. Prior studies have pointed out the potential of mining images embedded in biomedical publications for automatically understanding and retrieving such images' associated source documents. Within the broad area of biomedical image processing, categorizing biomedical images is a fundamental step for building many advanced image analysis, retrieval, and mining applications. Similar to any automatic categorization effort, discriminative image features can provide the most crucial aid in the process. Method We observe that many images embedded in biomedical publications carry versatile annotation text. Based on the locations of and the spatial relationships between these text elements in an image, we thus propose some novel image features for image categorization purpose, which quantitatively characterize the spatial positions and distributions of text elements inside a biomedical image. We further adopt a sparse coding representation (SCR) based technique to categorize images embedded in biomedical publications by leveraging our newly proposed image features. Results we randomly selected 990 images of the JPG format for use in our experiments where 310 images were used as training samples and the rest were used as the testing cases. We first segmented 310 sample images following the our proposed procedure. This step produced a total of 1035 sub-images. We then manually labeled all these sub-images according to the two-level hierarchical image taxonomy proposed by [1]. Among our annotation results, 316 are microscopy images, 126 are gel electrophoresis images, 135 are line charts, 156 are bar charts, 52 are spot charts, 25 are tables, 70 are flow charts, and the remaining 155 images are

  2. Arkansas community pharmacists' opinions on providing immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Anne C; Flowers, Schwanda K; Hastings, Jan K

    2010-10-01

    To determine community pharmacists' attitudes and knowledge on providing immunizations including perceived barriers to immunizing. The study also examined the percentage of Arkansas pharmacists providing immunizations and the utilization of student pharmacists. Survey. Arkansas community pharmacies from February to March 2009. Community pharmacists. Mailed survey. Perceived barriers to providing immunizations, pharmacists' attitudes regarding immunizations, number of immunization-certified pharmacists, immunization administration rates within the last year, and senior student pharmacists utilization. A total of 350 surveys were mailed, and 129 were returned. In all, 79% of the respondents believed administering immunizations has advanced or significantly advanced the profession. Being certified and attitude toward providing immunizations were correlated; 37% of the respondents held certification to immunize, of which 77% reported immunizing within the last year. Commonly reported barriers included time (76%) followed by reimbursement and legal liability. Only half the respondents realized fourth year student pharmacists could immunize and only 33% of certified pharmacists utilized student pharmacists to immunize. Pharmacists perceive many barriers to providing immunizations. Training student pharmacists to give immunizations may not result in them providing immunizations upon graduation. Additional education on overcoming potential barriers and using senior student pharmacists to administer immunizations is needed.

  3. [Current requirements for image management in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steil, V; Röhner, F; Schneider, F; Wenz, F; Lohr, F; Weisser, G

    2012-06-01

    Treatment techniques of increasing complexity such as dynamic/rotational techniques mandate digital management and increasingly image guidance. This constantly increases requirements for image management and archiving. This article discusses the current status of these requirements and will present potential image administration strategies. Fundamentals of image administration and storage/archiving are presented (DICOM Standard, radiotherapy-specific issues) along the typical patient pathway (demographic data, radiotherapy treatment planning, signatures/approval of plan and image data, archiving of plan and image data). Different strategies for image management are presented (archiving centered on individual application vs. integral approach with central archiving in a DICOM-RT-PACS governed by a radiation oncology information system (ROCIS)). Infrastructural requirements depending on the amount of image data generated in the department are discussed. Application-centered image management provides access to image data including all relevant RT-specific elements. This approach, however, is not migration-safe, requires significant administrative work to ensure a redundancy level that protects against data loss and does not provide datasets that are linked to respective therapeutic interventions. Therefore, centralized image management and archiving that links images to patients and individual steps in the treatment pathway within a standardized DICOM(-RT) environment is preferable despite occasional problems with visualization of specific data elements.

  4. Speckle imaging algorithms for planetary imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    I will discuss the speckle imaging algorithms used to process images of the impact sites of the collision of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter. The algorithms use a phase retrieval process based on the average bispectrum of the speckle image data. High resolution images are produced by estimating the Fourier magnitude and Fourier phase of the image separately, then combining them and inverse transforming to achieve the final result. I will show raw speckle image data and high-resolution image reconstructions from our recent experiment at Lick Observatory.

  5. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques (fusion imaging).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandulescu, Daniela Larisa; Dumitrescu, Daniela; Rogoveanu, Ion; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate non-invasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location, size, and morphology. Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and molecular (single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography) imaging modalities. One example is real-time virtual sonography, which combines ultrasound (grayscale, colour Doppler, or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging) with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI. The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence, direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities, more precise monitoring of interventional procedures, and reduced radiation exposure.

  6. Small animal imaging. Basics and practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Fabian [Aachen Univ. (RWTH) (Germany). Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging; Pichler, Bernd J. (eds.) [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Lab. for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation

    2011-07-01

    Small animal imaging has been recognized as an important tool in preclinical research. Nevertheless, the results of non-invasive imaging are often disappointing owing to choice of a suboptimal imaging modality and/or shortcomings in study design, experimental setup, and data evaluation. This textbook is a practical guide to the use of non-invasive imaging in preclinical research. Each of the available imaging modalities is discussed in detail, with the assistance of numerous informative illustrations. In addition, many useful hints are provided on the installation of a small animal unit, study planning, animal handling, and the cost-effective performance of small animal imaging. Cross-calibration methods, data postprocessing, and special imaging applications are also considered in depth. This is the first book to cover all the practical basics in small animal imaging, and it will prove an invaluable aid for researchers, students, and technicians. (orig.)

  7. A comparison of image inpainting techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaojie; Shu, Chang

    2015-03-01

    Image inpainting is an important research topic in the field of image processing. The objective of inpainting is to "guess" the lost information according to surrounding image information, which can be applied in old photo restoration, object removal and demosaicing. Based on the foundation of previous literature of image inpainting and image modeling, this paper provides an overview of the state-of-art image inpainting methods. This survey first covers mathematics models of inpainting and different kinds of image impairment. Then it goes to the main components of an image, the structure and the texture, and states how these inpainting models and algorithms deal with the two separately, using PDE's method, exemplar-based method and etc. Afterwards sparse-representation-based inpainting and related techniques are introduced. Experimental analysis will be presented to evaluate the relative merits of different algorithms, with the measure of Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) as well as direct visual perception.

  8. MISR Images Northeastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    MISR images of the Ntwetwe and Sua Pans in northeastern Botswana, acquired on August 18, 2000 (Terra orbit 3553). The left image is a color view from the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. On the right is a composite of red band imagery in which the 45-degree aft camera data are displayed in blue, 45-degree forward as green, and vertical as red. This combination causes wet areas to appear blue because of the glint-like reflection from water and damp surfaces. Clouds are visible in the upper left corner and right center of each image. The clouds look peculiar in the multi-angle view because geometric parallax resulting from their elevation above the surface causes a misregistration of the individual images making up the composite. This stereoscopic effect provides a way of distinguishing clouds from bright surfaces.The images are approximately 250 kilometers across. Ntwetwe and Sua pans are closed interior basins that catch rainwater and surface runoff during the wet season. Seasonal lakes form that may reach several meters in depth. During the dry season the collected waters rapidly evaporate leaving behind dissolved salts that coat the surface and turn it bright ('sua' means salt). The mining town of Sowa is located where the Sua Spit (a finger of grassland extending into the pan) attaches to the shore. Sowa represents headquarters for a JPL contingent carrying out MISR field experiments using the evaporite surface and the grasslands as targets and for Botswana scientists studying migration of groundwaters beneath the pans and surrounding areas. These efforts support the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI-2000), which is now underway.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.For more information: http://www-misr.jpl.nasa.gov

  9. Multimode imaging device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M

    2013-08-27

    Apparatus for detecting and locating a source of gamma rays of energies ranging from 10-20 keV to several MeV's includes plural gamma ray detectors arranged in a generally closed extended array so as to provide Compton scattering imaging and coded aperture imaging simultaneously. First detectors are arranged in a spaced manner about a surface defining the closed extended array which may be in the form a circle, a sphere, a square, a pentagon or higher order polygon. Some of the gamma rays are absorbed by the first detectors closest to the gamma source in Compton scattering, while the photons that go unabsorbed by passing through gaps disposed between adjacent first detectors are incident upon second detectors disposed on the side farthest from the gamma ray source, where the first spaced detectors form a coded aperture array for two or three dimensional gamma ray source detection.

  10. Transionospheric synthetic aperture imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Mikhail; Tsynkov, Semyon

    2017-01-01

    This landmark monograph presents the most recent mathematical developments in the analysis of ionospheric distortions of SAR images and offers innovative new strategies for their mitigation. As a prerequisite to addressing these topics, the book also discusses the radar ambiguity theory as it applies to synthetic aperture imaging and the propagation of radio waves through the ionospheric plasma, including the anisotropic and turbulent cases. In addition, it covers a host of related subjects, such as the mathematical modeling of extended radar targets (as opposed to point-wise targets) and the scattering of radio waves off those targets, as well as the theoretical analysis of the start-stop approximation, which is used routinely in SAR signal processing but often without proper justification. The mathematics in this volume is clean and rigorous – no assumptions are hidden or ambiguously stated. The resulting work is truly interdisciplinary, providing both a comprehensive and thorough exposition of the field,...

  11. Electromyography (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Each muscle fiber that contracts will produce an action potential. The presence, size, and shape of the wave form of the action potential produced on the oscilloscope, provides information about the ...

  12. Egypt satellite images for land surface characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    Satellite images provide information on the land surface properties. From optical remote sensing images in the blue, green, red and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum it is possible to identify a large number of surface features. The report briefly describes different satellite im...... images used for mapping the vegetation cover types and other land cover types in Egypt. The mapping ranges from 1 km resolution to 30 m resolution. The aim is to provide satellite image mapping with land surface characteristics relevant for roughness mapping.......Satellite images provide information on the land surface properties. From optical remote sensing images in the blue, green, red and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum it is possible to identify a large number of surface features. The report briefly describes different satellite...

  13. Image catalogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomoll, Andreas H; Thornhill, Thomas S

    2004-04-01

    The advent of digital photography and radiography allows documentation of interesting clinical findings with unprecedented ease, and many orthopaedic surgeons have taken extensive advantage of this opportunity to create large digital libraries of clinical results. However, this leaves surgeons with a rapidly increasing volume of data to store and organize; therefore, a system for archiving, locating, and managing images, radiographs, and digital slide presentations has become a crucial need in most orthopaedic groups and practices. However, many surgical groups and practices are not familiar with the computer technology available to initiate such systems. In this review, we discuss several software solutions currently on the market to address the specific needs of orthopaedic surgeons, and as a practical example, discuss a system that is in place in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at our institution. Overall, depending on the individual circumstances of each institution, there are various options that meet different technologic and financial requirements.

  14. Birefringence imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Geday, M A

    2001-01-01

    in tendons. Many transparent materials are optically anisotropic i.e. the refractive index varies with the polarisation orientation of the light. The variation, birefringence, can reveal the underlying anisotropy of the material, whether this anisotropy is caused by the structure of the material or by applied stress. Several methods have been developed to measure the birefringence, although only two imaging microscope techniques, the 'rotating polariser technique' and the 'Polscope', capable of separating the magnitude of the anisotropy (delta or vertical bar sin delta vertical bar), its orientation (phi) and its transmission (l sub 0) are in common use today. In this thesis the rotating polariser technique has been completely revised, with a new and easily accessible user interface as a result. Calibration routines and several analytical tools have been developed. The technique is now capable of measuring the change in birefringence during phase transitions to very high a degree of precision. Examples of the...

  15. Exposure of prehospital care providers to violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, S W; Grange, J T; Thomas, T L

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the experience of prehospital care providers with violence. A survey addressing experiences with prehospital violence was administered to a convenience sample of emergency medical services (EMS) providers in a southern California metropolitan area. Descriptive statistics are reported. Of 774 EMS providers surveyed, 522 (67%) returned the questionnaire. Members of law enforcement were excluded because their experience with violence, weapons, and tactics is not typical of most paramedics. This left a sample of 490 for further analysis. These prehospital care providers had a median of ten years' experience on the job. They tended to be male (93%) and white (80%). All together, 61% recounted assault on the job, with 25% reporting injury from the assault. Respondents reported a median of three episodes, and the number of assaults for each individual was unrelated to the number of years of experience on the job (r = 0.068). Of those injured, 37% required medical attention. On the other hand, 35% reported that their company had a specific protocol for managing violent situations and 28% stated ever having received formal training in the management of violent encounters. This limited training notwithstanding, nearly all (95%) providers described restraining patients. Use of protective gear was reported (73%), and some (19%) admitted to ever carrying a weapon on the job. By their own report, EMS providers encounter a substantial amount of violence and injury due to assault on the job. Formal training and protocols to provide a standardized safe approach for such encounters are lacking. Although the limitations of survey data are recognized, further research characterizing the level of violence and potential interventions seems warranted.

  16. Parenchymal Thoracic Splenosis: History and Nuclear Imaging Without Invasive Procedures May Provide Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, Umer Feroze; Martin, Mersadies R.; Patel, Rupal; Mahmoud, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Splenosis is a rare finding of ectopic splenic tissue found within the thoracic cavity, abdomen or peritoneal cavity. Most cases occur in the abdomen and the thoracic location is a comparatively rare finding. In thoracic splenosis the splenic tissue most often grows in the form of a nodule and the autotransplantation is usually caused by a previous operation and/or most commonly a penetrating or blunt trauma to the thoracoabdominal region, resulting in splenic rupture and in some cases left d...

  17. The art of good governance: how images from the past provide inspiration for modern practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, G.; van Asperen, H.

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, discourse on ‘good governance’ has become more prevalent. What ‘good governance’ means and entails, however, and when we can speak of ‘good’ governance in this discourse, is not always clear. Many scholars in public administration and other social sciences writing about good

  18. Time-lapse imaging provides further evidence that planar arrangement of blastomeres is highly abnormal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Thomas; Höggerl, Alexandra; Oppelt, Peter; Radler, Elisabeth; Enzelsberger, Simon-Hermann; Mayer, Richard B; Petek, Erwin; Shebl, Omar

    2017-12-01

    Recently, guidelines on the annotation of dynamic human embryo monitoring recommended screening for the presence of planar blastomere arrangement at the 4-cell stage. This observational study was set up in order to analyze whether developmental kinetics of planar human embryos are different from tetrahedral ones. Therefore, embryos of 115 consecutive ICSI patients (showing 32 planar and 554 tetrahedral embryos) were cultured in a new time-lapse system (Miri TL) and their embryos were annotated for morphokinetic development and screened for irregular cleavages and morphological dysmorphisms. Significantly less planar embryos reached blastocyst stage and showed worse quality as compared to regular tetrahedral embryos. The rate of bi- and/or multinucleation was also significantly higher in the affected group. Irregular cleavages, particularly embryo rolling, were more often seen in planar embryos. Morphokinetics between planar and tetrahedral were distinguishable up to 4-cell stage (t2-t4), thereafter the observed delay in planar embryos (t8) was more likely the result of a higher rate of arrested embryos in the planar group. Planar embryos are associated with both a significant increase in irregular cleavage as well as a delay in preimplantation development. This indicates that planar embryos are rather abnormal and should only be considered for transfer if no other embryos are available.

  19. Evaluation of spinal and pelvic parameters from three-dimensional medical images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrtovec, T.

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging of the spine and pelvis is usually performed by conventional and digital radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Radiographic imaging provides two-dimensional (2D) projection images, while CT and MR imaging provide a series of 2D cross-sections that

  20. Logistic service providers and sustainable physical distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef Weijers

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Logistic Service Providers main concern was to ensure reliability for a low price (Christopher, 2005. Dutch Logistic Service Providers still have these two aspects at the top of their list, but also have to take in a new aspect: sustainability. 88% Of the investigated Logistic Service Providers have included sustainability in the company's goals. These Logistic Service Providers have developed different strategies to achieve a higher level of sustainability. This paper presents the results of a study into what Logistic Service Providers say what they are doing, or intend to do, to improve sustainability for their transport services. In this way insight is given in the attitude of Dutch Logistic Service Providers towards sustainability and how they intend to translate this into business practise: internal solutions or new methods incorporating external partners. Methods: Various methods of the investigations were used, among which the analysis of the statements about the sustainabilityon the websites of various companies as well as the questionnaire per Internet. The research covered 50 largest logistics companies operating in the Netherlands and 60 companies that competed for the award "Lean and Green" advertised in the Netherlands. In addition, the Internet survey was answered by 41 companies that belong to the network of our university. Results: The investigation has shown that sustainability is handled by the logistics company as an integral part of the corporate strategy. In contrast, shippers depend in the choice of logistics services primarily on such classical aspects as the reliability or the price and the sustainability play a minor role. Conclusions: Trying to find methods to improve the sustainability, Dutch logistics service providers, in the first place, look for solutions that increase the efficiency and therefore the cost reduction potential. Solutions, which require the involvement of clients, were less often

  1. Image guided prostate cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bard, Robert L. [Bard Cancer Center, Biofoundation for Angiogenesis Research and Development, New York, NY (United States); Fuetterer, Jurgen J. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Medical Centre (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Sperling, Dan (ed.) [Sperling Prostate Center, Alpha 3TMRI, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Detailed information on image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, and microwave and laser ablation. Numerous high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment. Represents the state of the art in Non Invasive Imaging and Minimally Invasive Ablation Treatment (MIAT). Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Treatments is a comprehensive reference and practical guide on the technology and application of ultrasound and MRI in the male pelvis, with special attention to the prostate. The book is organized into three main sections, the first of which is devoted to general aspects of imaging and image-guided treatments. The second section provides a systematic overview of the application of ultrasound and MRI to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lower urinary tract. Performance of the ultrasound and MRI studies is explained, and the normal and abnormal pathological anatomy is reviewed. Correlation with the ultrasound in the same plane is provided to assist in understanding the MRI sequences. Biopsy and interventional procedures, ultrasound-MRI fusion techniques, and image-guided therapies, including focused ultrasound, photodynamic therapy, microwave and laser ablation, are all fully covered. The third section focuses on securing treatment effectiveness and the use of follow-up imaging to ensure therapeutic success and detect tumor recurrence at an early stage, which is vital given that prompt focal treatment of recurrence is very successful. Here, particular attention is paid to the role of Doppler ultrasound and DCE-MRI technologies. This book, containing a wealth of high-quality illustrations based on high-end equipment, will acquaint beginners with the basics of prostate ultrasound and MRI, while more advanced practitioners will learn new skills, means of avoiding pitfalls, and ways of effectively

  2. Natural user interfaces in medical image analysis cognitive analysis of brain and carotid artery images

    CERN Document Server

    Ogiela, Marek R

    2014-01-01

    This unique text/reference highlights a selection of practical applications of advanced image analysis methods for medical images. The book covers the complete methodology for processing, analysing and interpreting diagnostic results of sample CT images. The text also presents significant problems related to new approaches and paradigms in image understanding and semantic image analysis. To further engage the reader, example source code is provided for the implemented algorithms in the described solutions. Features: describes the most important methods and algorithms used for image analysis; e

  3. High Resolution Depth-Resolved Imaging From Multi-Focal Images for Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging technique providing subdiffraction limit axial resolution for point sources is proposed. It is based on simultaneously acquired multi-focal images of the same object, and on the image metric of sharpness. The sharpness is extracted by image data and presents higher values...... for in-focus images. The technique is derived from biological microscopy and is validated here with simulated ultrasound data. A linear array probe is used to scan a point scatterer phantom that moves in depth with a controlled step. From the beamformed responses of each scatterer position the image...

  4. Systems for increasing the sensitivity of gamma-ray imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.; Chivers, Daniel H.

    2012-12-11

    Systems that increase the position resolution and granularity of double sided segmented semiconductor detectors are provided. These systems increase the imaging resolution capability of such detectors, either used as Compton cameras, or as position sensitive radiation detectors in imagers such as SPECT, PET, coded apertures, multi-pinhole imagers, or other spatial or temporal modulated imagers.

  5. An Analysis of Web Image Queries for Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Hsiao-Tieh

    2003-01-01

    Examines the differences between Web image and textual queries, and attempts to develop an analytic model to investigate their implications for Web image retrieval systems. Provides results that give insight into Web image searching behavior and suggests implications for improvement of current Web image search engines. (AEF)

  6. Automatic detection of blurred images in UAV image sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberth, Till; Wackrow, Rene; Chandler, Jim H.

    2016-12-01

    additional images. However, the calculated blur value named SIEDS (saturation image edge difference standard-deviation) on its own does not provide an absolute number to judge if an image is blurred or not. To achieve a reliable judgement of image sharpness the SIEDS value has to be compared to other SIEDS values from the same dataset. The speed and reliability of the method was tested using a range of different UAV datasets. Two datasets will be presented in this paper to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm. The algorithm proves to be fast and the returned values are optically correct, making the algorithm applicable for UAV datasets. Additionally, a close range dataset was processed to determine whether the method is also useful for close range applications. The results show that the method is also reliable for close range images, which significantly extends the field of application for the algorithm.

  7. The Application of Fractal Theory in Image Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available At present, technicians are constantly exploring how to do effective managements and convenient and efficient queries on the large number of images in database. This article puts forward a new idea that doing the image retrieval with the similarity characteristics of fractal theory. It makes image similarity verification with the method of Opency image histogram and makes explanations by using the application of fractal theory in image pattern recognition. Fractal theory has provided a new method for the methods of image pattern recognition, the recognition research on related images and the classification of huge image database.

  8. Total ankle arthroplasty: An imaging overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Da Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Chun, Ka Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  9. Fuzzy image processing and applications with Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to classical image analysis methods that employ ""crisp"" mathematics, fuzzy set techniques provide an elegant foundation and a set of rich methodologies for diverse image-processing tasks. However, a solid understanding of fuzzy processing requires a firm grasp of essential principles and background knowledge.Fuzzy Image Processing and Applications with MATLAB® presents the integral science and essential mathematics behind this exciting and dynamic branch of image processing, which is becoming increasingly important to applications in areas such as remote sensing, medical imaging,

  10. Precise Multi-Spectral Dermatological Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, David Delgado; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2004-01-01

    In this work, an integrated imaging system to obtain accurate and reproducible multi-spectral dermatological images is proposed. The system is made up of an integrating sphere, light emitting diodes and a generic monochromatic camera. The system can collect up to 10 different spectral bands......-spectral images provide more information than the classical thri-chromatic images and that this information is enough to segment lesions easily. These two facts together indicate the suitability of the system to collect images and to summarize and track the evolution of dermatological diseases....

  11. Digital-image processing and image analysis of glacier ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Joan J.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides a methodology for extracting grain statistics from 8-bit color and grayscale images of thin sections of glacier ice—a subset of physical properties measurements typically performed on ice cores. This type of analysis is most commonly used to characterize the evolution of ice-crystal size, shape, and intercrystalline spatial relations within a large body of ice sampled by deep ice-coring projects from which paleoclimate records will be developed. However, such information is equally useful for investigating the stress state and physical responses of ice to stresses within a glacier. The methods of analysis presented here go hand-in-hand with the analysis of ice fabrics (aggregate crystal orientations) and, when combined with fabric analysis, provide a powerful method for investigating the dynamic recrystallization and deformation behaviors of bodies of ice in motion. The procedures described in this document compose a step-by-step handbook for a specific image acquisition and data reduction system built in support of U.S. Geological Survey ice analysis projects, but the general methodology can be used with any combination of image processing and analysis software. The specific approaches in this document use the FoveaPro 4 plug-in toolset to Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended but it can be carried out equally well, though somewhat less conveniently, with software such as the image processing toolbox in MATLAB, Image-Pro Plus, or ImageJ.

  12. Early Skin Tumor Detection from Microscopic Images through Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AYESHA AMIR SIDDIQI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The research is done to provide appropriate detection technique for skin tumor detection. The work is done by using the image processing toolbox of MATLAB. Skin tumors are unwanted skin growth with different causes and varying extent of malignant cells. It is a syndrome in which skin cells mislay the ability to divide and grow normally. Early detection of tumor is the most important factor affecting the endurance of a patient. Studying the pattern of the skin cells is the fundamental problem in medical image analysis. The study of skin tumor has been of great interest to the researchers. DIP (Digital Image Processing allows the use of much more complex algorithms for image processing, and hence, can offer both more sophisticated performance at simple task, and the implementation of methods which would be impossibly by analog means. It allows much wider range of algorithms to be applied to the input data and can avoid problems such as build up of noise and signal distortion during processing. The study shows that few works has been done on cellular scale for the images of skin. This research allows few checks for the early detection of skin tumor using microscopic images after testing and observing various algorithms. After analytical evaluation the result has been observed that the proposed checks are time efficient techniques and appropriate for the tumor detection. The algorithm applied provides promising results in lesser time with accuracy. The GUI (Graphical User Interface that is generated for the algorithm makes the system user friendly

  13. [Collaboration patients-health care providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezet-Bento de Carvalho, Angela; Griesser, Anne-Claude; Hertz, Silvana; Constantin, Michèle; Forni, Michel; Blagojevic, Stina; Bouchardy, Christine; Vlastos, Georges

    2007-10-24

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Daily suffering of patients and their relatives is often ignored or underestimated. Scientific advances focus on medical treatments and survival and very little on the psychosocial impact of the disease. The shared expertise between breast cancer patients and health care providers is an innovative and promising approach aiming to provide better quality of life and care. The participation of patients permits to bring together professionals around common goals and to promote multidisciplinary disease management, networking and global care. Focusing on very concrete problems highlighted from patients' expertise also improves research, medical training, and health policy standards.

  14. The EU as an international security provider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodt, Annemarie Peen; Wolff, Stefan; Whitman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    of analysis, which could serve as the foundation for a mid-range theory of the EU as an international security provider, will examine the relevance of, and apply, existing theories of international relations/international security and foreign policy analysis to the specific case of the EU. The framework...... that will emerge from this analysis will then be tested and applied empirically in the following contributions that focus on how particular policies are formulated and implemented, and that analyse, in single and comparative case studies, the impact and effectiveness of the EU as an international security provider....

  15. Providing Feedback: Practical Skills and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkany, David; Deitte, Lori

    2017-06-01

    Feedback is an essential component of education. It is designed to influence, reinforce, and change behaviors, concepts, and attitudes in learners. Although providing constructive feedback can be challenging, it is a learnable skill. The negative consequences of destructive feedback or lack of feedback all together are far-reaching. This article summarizes the components of constructive feedback and provides readers with tangible skills to enhance their ability to give effective feedback to learners and peers. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Face Image Retrieval of Efficient Sparse Code words and Multiple Attribute in Binning Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchitra S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In photography, face recognition and face retrieval play an important role in many applications such as security, criminology and image forensics. Advancements in face recognition make easier for identity matching of an individual with attributes. Latest development in computer vision technologies enables us to extract facial attributes from the input image and provide similar image results. In this paper, we propose a novel LOP and sparse codewords method to provide similar matching results with respect to input query image. To improve accuracy in image results with input image and dynamic facial attributes, Local octal pattern algorithm [LOP] and Sparse codeword applied in offline and online. The offline and online procedures in face image binning techniques apply with sparse code. Experimental results with Pubfig dataset shows that the proposed LOP along with sparse codewords able to provide matching results with increased accuracy of 90%.

  17. Functional imaging in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandhagopal, R; McKeown, Martin J; Stoessl, A Jon

    2008-04-15

    Functional imaging techniques represent useful tools to assess in vivo the neurochemical alterations and functional connectivity in Parkinson disease (PD). Here, the authors review the various approaches and potential application of these imaging techniques to the study of PD. Radiotracer imaging using dopaminergic markers facilitates assessment of pre- and postsynaptic nigrostriatal integrity, while imaging with other appropriate radiotracers explores nondopaminergic neurotransmitter function, local metabolism, blood flow, and mechanisms potentially related to disease progression and pathogenesis. Activation studies using functional MRI detect blood oxygen level dependent signal, as an indirect marker of neuronal activity. Functional imaging techniques have been applied to infer the potential role of inflammation and other factors in etiopathogenesis as well as to study compensatory and regulatory mechanisms in early PD and subclinical disease in genetic forms of PD. Imaging studies also help to understand the neurobiological basis of motor and nonmotor complications. Recent reports suggest a role for striatal dopaminergic transmission in modulating neurobehavioral processes including the placebo effect in PD. Although functional imaging has been employed to monitor disease progression, the discordance between clinical outcome and imaging measures after therapeutic interventions precludes their use as surrogate end points in clinical trials. Beyond these limitations and potential challenges, imaging techniques continue to find wide application in the study of PD. Functional imaging can provide meaningful insights into mechanisms underlying various aspects of motor and nonmotor dysfunction in Parkinson disease and the role of striatal dopaminergic transmission in behavioral processes beyond motor control. These modalities hold promise to study the preclinical phase and to elucidate further the benefits and complications of surgical interventions and the utility of

  18. Foundations of image science

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Harrison H

    2013-01-01

    Winner of the 2006 Joseph W. Goodman Book Writing Award! A comprehensive treatment of the principles, mathematics, and statistics of image science In today's visually oriented society, images play an important role in conveying messages. From seismic imaging to satellite images to medical images, our modern society would be lost without images to enhance our understanding of our health, our culture, and our world. Foundations of Image Science presents a comprehensive treatment of the principles, mathematics, and st

  19. Hyperspectral imaging in medicine: image pre-processing problems and solutions in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents problems and solutions related to hyperspectral image pre-processing. New methods of preliminary image analysis are proposed. The paper shows problems occurring in Matlab when trying to analyse this type of images. Moreover, new methods are discussed which provide the source code in Matlab that can be used in practice without any licensing restrictions. The proposed application and sample result of hyperspectral image analysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime imaging and reflectance confocal microscopy for multiscale imaging of oral precancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Cheng, Shuna; Malik, Bilal H.; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Jo, Javier A.; Wright, John; Cheng, Yi-Shing Lisa; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-04-01

    Optical imaging techniques using a variety of contrast mechanisms are under evaluation for early detection of epithelial precancer; however, tradeoffs in field of view (FOV) and resolution may limit their application. Therefore, we present a multiscale multimodal optical imaging system combining macroscopic biochemical imaging of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with subcellular morphologic imaging of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). The FLIM module images a 16×16 mm2 tissue area with 62.5 μm lateral and 320 ps temporal resolution to guide cellular imaging of suspicious regions. Subsequently, coregistered RCM images are acquired at 7 Hz with 400 μm diameter FOV, mucosa, and a hamster cheek pouch model of oral carcinogenesis. While FLIM is sensitive to biochemical and macroscopic architectural changes in tissue, RCM provides images of cell nuclear morphology, all key indicators of precancer progression.