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Sample records for prouhet tarry escott

  1. Removal of ammonia from tarry water using a tubular furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.V. Grabko; V.A. Kofanova; V.M. Li; M.A. Solov' ev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15

    An ammonia-processing system without the use of live steam from OAO Alchevskkoks plant's supply network is considered. Steam obtained from the wastewater that leaves the ammonia column is used to process the excess tarry water, with the release of volatile ammonia.

  2. Bloody or tarry stools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... small intestine Diverticulosis (abnormal pouches in the colon) Hemorrhoids (common cause of bright red blood) Inflammatory bowel ... have an exam even if you think that hemorrhoids are causing the blood in your stool. In ...

  3. Development of clean soil technology using coals as oily/tarry contaminant removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignasiak, T.; Szymocha, K.; Carson, D.; Ignasiak, B.

    1991-01-01

    A Clean Soil Process for the treatment of oil/tar contaminated soils has been developed. The mechanics, of the clean-up process that utilizes coal as a cleaning medium is described. The experience and results obtained in the batch-scale testing as well as in the 250 kg/hr continuous facility have been applied for a conceptual design of a 200 t/day mobile plant

  4. Tube Feeding Troubleshooting Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... around the rectum Black, tarry stool or diarrhea Black/brown blood in vomit (looks like coffee grounds) Vomiting ... your doc tor. Black, tarry stool or diarrhea; black/brown blood in vomit; or >1 Tablespoon bright red ...

  5. Conversion of hot coke oven gas into light fuel gas over Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L.Y.; Morishita, K.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan). Dept. of Biology & Chemical Engineering

    2006-04-15

    Conversion of hot coke oven gas (COG, containing tarry material) into light fuel gas over a Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied. Laboratory scale tests were carried out in a two-stage fixed-bed reactor at ambient pressure. The nickel catalyst promoted the hydropyrolysis reaction of tarry materials. High yields of total product gas and methane were obtained at high hydrogen concentrations. If the hydrogen supply was adequate for hydropyrolysis of the tarry material, conversion of coal volatiles was high, at more than 95% on carbon balance, even with a gas residence time as short as 0.15 s in the catalyst bed. The product gas yield depended on catalytic temperature. At 923 K, the maximum conversion of coal volatiles into the light gas was achieved at 95.0% on carbon balance, with methane 86.7 vol% of the carbonaceous gas product. Although carbon deposits deactivated the catalyst after a long period of use, the catalyst could be regenerated by treatment with oxygen at 800 K, providing high activity in subsequent decomposition of tarry material. The influence of sulphide on the tarry material decomposition reaction was small even in a 2000 ppm H{sub 2}S atmosphere.

  6. Multifocal choroiditis following simultaneous hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escott S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Escott, Ahmad B Tarabishy, Frederick H DavidorfHavener Eye Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: The paper describes the first reported case of multifocal choroiditis following simultaneous hepatitis-A, typhoid, and yellow fever vaccinations. A 33-year-old male developed sudden onset of flashing lights and floaters in his right eye 3 weeks following hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever vaccinations. Fundus examination and angiography confirmed the presence of multiple peripheral chorioretinal lesions. These lesions demonstrated characteristic morphologic changes over a period of 8 weeks which were consistent with a diagnosis of self-resolving multifocal choroiditis. Vaccine-induced intraocular inflammation has been described infrequently. We demonstrate the first case of self-resolving multifocal choroiditis following simultaneous administration of hepatitis A, yellow fever, and typhoid immunizations.Keywords: multifocal choroiditis, vaccination, hepatitis A, typhoid, yellow fever

  7. Berliini festivali Kuldkaru pälvis Iraani draama / Andres Laasik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laasik, Andres, 1960-2016

    2011-01-01

    61. Berliini filmifestivalil parima filmi Kuldkaru võitnud Asghar Farhadi filmist "Nader ja Simin. Lahkuminek" ("Nader and Simin, A Separation", Iraan), žürii grand prix' ja Hõbekaru võitnud Béla Tarri filmist "Torino hobune" (Ungari). Teisi auhinnasaajaid

  8. Elimination of Salmonella typhimurium infection by the strategic movement of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J.; Wingstrand, Anne; Nielsen, B.

    1997-01-01

    Three field investigations were tarried out to assess the feasibility of raising salmonella-free finishers from pigs born in infected herds, by moving the pigs to clean and disinfected facilities before their expected exposure to the bacteria from the environment. Three herds with persistently hi...

  9. Bortezomib

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unusual bruising or bleeding black and tarry stools red blood in stools bloody vomit vomiting material that looks like coffee grounds slurred speech or inability to speak or understand speech loss of balance or coordination loss of memory paralysis (loss of ability to move a part ...

  10. High purity hydrogen production system by the PSA method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    In a process developed by Nippon Steel, coke oven gas is compressed and purified of tarry matter, sulphur compounds and gum-formers by adsorption. It is then passed through a three-tower pressure-swing adsorption system to recover hydrogen whose purity can be selected in the range 99 to 99.999%. A composite adsorption agent is used.

  11. Liver Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called if any of the following occur: ● Persistent abdominal or chest pain ● Vomiting ● Pallor, weakness or dizziness ● Bleeding from the site of the biopsy ● Passage of tarry black stools For more information or to locate a pediatric gastroen- terologist in your area please visit our ...

  12. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It is usually taken with food every 6 hours as needed for up to 1 week. Follow ... pain vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds black, tarry, or bloody stools slowed breathing ...

  13. Tretinoin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretinoin comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It is usually taken twice a day for up to 90 days. Take tretinoin at around ... bleeding vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds bright red or black and tarry stools ...

  14. Pyrolysis of fibre residues with plastic contamination from a paper recycling mill: Energy recoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Logan Jeremy; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pyrolysis of fibre-plastics residues from paper recycling mill into fuel products. • Product with remarkable energy content up to 42.8 MJ/kg. • Influence of temperature on the product yields and fuel properties. • Effect of plastic composition on product properties. - Abstract: Pyrolysis is a promising technology for the production of marketable energy products from waste mixtures, as it decomposes heterogeneous material into homogenous fuel products. This research assessed the ability of slow pyrolysis to convert three waste streams, composed of fibre residues contaminated with different plastic mixtures, into char and tarry phase products at three different temperatures (300, 425 and 550 °C). The products were characterised in terms of mass yield, higher heating value (HHV) and gross energy conversion (EC). Significant amounts of hydrocarbon plastics in the feed materials increased the calorific values of the char (up to 32.9 MJ/kg) and tarry phase (up to 42.8 MJ/kg) products, comparable to high volatile bituminous A coal and diesel respectively. For all three waste streams converted at 300 °C, the majority of the energy in the feedstock was recovered in the char product (>80%), while deoxygenation of fibre component resulted in char with increased calorific value (up to 31.6 MJ/kg) being produced. Pyrolysis at 425 °C for two of the waste streams containing significant amounts of plastic produced both a valuable char and tarry phase, which resulted in an EC greater than 74%. Full conversion of plastic at 550 °C increased the tarry phase yield but dramatically decreased the char HHV. The influence of temperature on product yield and HHV was discussed based on the pyrolysis mechanisms and in relation to the plastic composition of the waste streams.

  15. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus following a Puestow Procedure in a Patient with Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Hirotaka; Miura, Kazuo; Fujii, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding that occurs as a complication of chronic or acute pancreatitis. We report a case of extremely acute-onset hemosuccus pancreaticus occurring in a patient with chronic pancreatitis over a long-term follow-up after a Puestow procedure (side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy). The patient was admitted to our hospital due to severe anemia and tarry stools indicative of gastrointestinal bleeding. Emergent endoscopy, including gas...

  16. Hemobilia into a metallic biliary stent due to pseudoaneurysm. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Naoki; Nishida, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Yoshito

    2013-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with locally advanced pancreatic cancer underwent combined treatment with gemcitabine and proton radiation therapy. Because of subsequent obstruction of the common bile duct, a metallic biliary stent was placed and he received further gemcitabine chemotherapy. During chemotherapy, he developed an acute abdomen with a sudden-onset of tarry stool and jaundice. Gastroduodenoscopy revealed hemobilia from the biliary metallic stent. Contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography revealed the presence of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the right hepatic artery adjacent to the top of the stent. Hemostasis of the right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm was achieved via transcatheter arterial embolization using cyanoacrylate. (author)

  17. Method to produce combustible gas with low tar content out of biomass. Foerfarande foer att ur biomassa framstaella en tjaerfattig braennbar gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindman, N

    1988-01-11

    The gas is led in a controlled flow to a vertical reactor shaft with a circulating fluidized bed containing dispersed calcined limestone. The biomass is pyrolyzed by means of the reactor heat in order to produce tarry gas and charcoal. While the gas flows upward in the reactor shaft the tar is gasified in a heterogeneous catalytic reaction with limestone. Charcoal and limestone are separated from the gas at the top of the reactor shaft and brought back to the fluidized bed for combustion. (L.F.).

  18. Process for preparing hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauch, C; Anther, E; Pier, M

    1926-04-07

    A process is described for the conversion of coal of all kinds, wood, oil, shale, as well as other carbonaceous materials into liquid hydrocarbons in two steps, characterized by treatment of the coal and so forth with a stream of hydrogen or hydrogen-containing gases at raised temperatures and raised pressures and producing a tarry product which, after separation of the ashlike residue, is converted by a further treatment, in the presence of catalysts, with hydrogen or hydrogen-containing gases at raised temperature and pressure, largely into low-boiling products.

  19. Destructive distillation of shale, torbanite, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lensvelt, M W

    1931-09-21

    In the production of oil by the distillation of coal, shale, torbanite, or the like below 600/sup 0/C the occurrence of tarry matters, free carbon, ammonia, or sulfur compounds in the oils is prevented by the addition of an alkali such as caustic soda, or an alkaline earth as lime, to which sodium carbonate may be added. The carbonaceous material is ground to pass through a 20 mesh screen, and is treated for example with a slurry of quicklime having an addition of sodium carbonate, the adherent water being evaporated before the material is passed into the retort.

  20. PCB-Caulk Replacement Project Johnson Space Center Houston, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, William M.; Stanch, Penney M.; Molenda, William

    2011-01-01

    Wet method reduced exposure by minimizing overall respirable particulate release. Dry method didn't introduce delays for primer/caulk application. Removed caulks came in many forms, from dry powdery to tarry sticky. Varying textures were not sampled or packaged differently. During the course of the project, EPA modified recommended practices to include full containment for exterior caulk removal. Changes are ongoing. Initial recommendations were directed to school buildings. EPA is researching risks due to caulk. Exposure guidance lacking except for 2 of 209 PCB congeners. Work was safely completed on schedule and under budget.

  1. Distilling tar; distillation, destructive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brash, P; Young, W

    1866-09-17

    The tarry residue, which separates on treating crude shale oil with sulfuric acid, is redistilled, in the manner described in Specification No. 1278, A.D. 1866, together with shale. Previous to the distillation, the acid is neutralized with lime, or may be separated by blowing steam into the tar and adding salt. The purified tar thus obtained is absorbed by ashes, or is mixed with lime or other alkaline matter, or the shale may be mixed with lime and distilled with the tar, which is allowed to flow over and through the shale during the process. The tar obtained in the purification of natural paraffin may be similarly utilized.

  2. Making coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodehouse-Temple, C G

    1929-07-12

    Semi-coke is produced by mixing low-value absorbent solid carbonaceous material such as coal dust, slack, gas-works coke, lignite, torbanite, raphilite, cannel, or shale with not more than 20% of a carbonaceous binding material such as petroleum distillation residue, tarry residues, pitch bitumen, Trinidad asphalt, Manjak or the substance known under the registered Trade Mark Gilsonite and subjecting the mixture without briquetting to a temperature not exceeding 550/sup 0/C. According to the first Provisional Specification, the mixture may if desired be briquetted before being heated and the second constituent may be present to the extent of 30%.

  3. A field guide for the protection and treatment of shorelines following an Orimulsion spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, E. O.; Sergy, G.

    1997-01-01

    A field guide for use in marine shoreline protection and treatment for Orimulsion was prepared. Orimulsion is a bitumen-based fuel consisting of 70 per cent bitumen and 30 per cent water, stabilized by a surfactant. The guide addresses a wide range of issues related to the protection and cleanup of Orimulsion contamination. Topics covered include the fate, behaviour, persistence and natural removal rates, recommended techniques for shoreline protection, terminology for assessment documentation, and response decision guidelines. The manual covers both forms of Orimulsion, i.e. the non-sticky dispersed bitumen, as well as the tarry residue that results from weathering. 13 refs., 8 figs

  4. Efficacy of ivermectin (Ivomec® against intestinal capillariosis in falcons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarello W.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available 52 captive falcons out of 3,988 (1.3% raptors microscopically examined for intestinal parasites in the Middle East proved infested with hairworms (capillariid parasites. 26 of these (50% showed concurrent parasitoses. In the group of 26 falcons diagnosed with capillariosis as sole infestation (50% compatible clinical signs such as anorexia, weight loss, weakness, dyspnoea, regurgitation of food and blood, diarrhoea and dark tarry faeces, were recorded. These birds were treated intramuscularly with ivermectin at doses of 2 mg/kg. In fecal samples examined 10- 15 days later, the eggs of capillariid parasites had disappeared, in association with complete clinical recovery.

  5. Characterization and remediation of a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murarka, I.P.; Neuhauser, E.F.; Sherman, M.W.; Taylor, B.B.; Mauro, D.M.; Ripp, J.A.; Taylor, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    From the early 1800s through the late 1940s, the production of gas using coal, coke or oil resulted in generation of large volumes of residues including coal tar, lamp black and wood chips containing cyanides at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. Often, these tarry residues were disposed of by burial at or near these plants. In recent years, old MGP sites have come under increased scrutiny from environmental regulators. To address the issues of groundwater contamination and need for clean-up, it is necessary to accurately determine where the tarry materials are now located and how different chemicals released from tars have migrated away from their sources. EPRI research at a coal-tar disposal site in New York has focused on examining and evaluating conventional and innovative methods for sampling and analysis to delineate the nature and extent of subsurface contamination, and to assess the efficacy of remedial actions. This paper presents some of the results of this research and offers recommendations on conducting size investigations as well as selecting appropriate remediation measures

  6. 2008 Program for Invitation of Foreign Research Institutes to Jeonbuk Province and Enhancement of Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, J. W.; Yang, S. T.; Kim, S. W.; Song, B. S.; Cho, S. W.; Han, C. S.; Lee, G. J.

    2009-08-01

    This project was carried out to establish long-term tactical partnership with foreign research institutions for technology exchanges and facilities, and to develop cooperation projects for the core technology. Technical bases for inviting foreign R and D centers to Jeonbuk province has been established through consulting discussion and signing arrangement on cooperation between ARTI and the partner institute. Discussion in-depth on an R and D center of Russian IBMP in Jeonbuk has been made and an agendum for the R and D center was submitted to the 13th Korea-Russian Federation Joint Committee on Nuclear Cooperation. Based on consensus that technology exchange and enhanced collaboration would be reciprocally beneficial, the second ARTI-TARRI joint seminar is scheduled at Jeongeup in September 2009, when further discussion will be made on the subsidiary arrangement to KAERI-JAEA MOU. An consultant meeting was done in order to strengthen international cooperation and to get advice on attracting foreign R and D centers at the Provincial Office in May 2009. A fact finding visit to iThemba LABS in south Africa was made to conclude a Letter of Understanding (LOU) for cooperation in R and D of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. The established collaborative relationship with world-leading research institutes such as IBMP, TARRI and iThemba LABS can make a role for inviting in the near future foreign R and D centers to Jeonbuk Province, and surely give a tactical influence on radiation industries in the Jeonbuk Province

  7. Chemical and physical characteristics of tar samples from selected Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripp, J.; Taylor, B.; Mauro, D.; Young, M.

    1993-05-01

    A multiyear, multidisciplinary project concerning the toxicity of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) tarry residues was initiated by EPRI under the Environmental Behavior of Organic Substances (EBOS) Program. This report concerns one portion of that work -- the collection and chemical characterization of tar samples from several former MGP sites. META Environmental, Inc. and Atlantic Environmental Services, Inc. were contracted by EPRI to collect several samples of tarry residues from former MGP sites with varied historical gas production processes and from several parts of the country. The eight tars collected during this program were physically very different. Some tars were fluid and easily pumped from existing wells, while other tars were thicker, semi-solid, or solid. Although care was taken to collect only tar, the nature of the residues at several sites made it impossible not to collect other material, such as soil, gravel, and plant matter. After the samples were collected, they were analyzed for 37 organic compounds, 8 metals, and cyanide. In addition, elemental analysis was performed on the tar samples for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen content and several physical/chemical properties were determined for each tar. The tars were mixed together in different batches and distributed to researchers for use in animal toxicity studies. The results of this work show that, although the tars were produced from different processes and stored in different manners, they had some chemical similarities. All of the tars, with the exception of one unusual solid tar, contained similar relative abundances of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

  8. Mapping axel heyst's island: the limits of allegory in Conrad's Victory Mapping axel heyst's island: the limits of allegory in Conrad's Victory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Derrick

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Readers of Treasure Island may remember Stevenson's observation that his novel grew up around the treasure map he had one day draw in a mood of daydream. The map receeded and incited his prose, providing not only tmosphere, but stimulus for plot. Thus Jim Hawkins discovers Stevenson's map (attributed to Captain Flint in Billy Bones' tarry trunk, and the game is afoot. Having invented such places as the anchorage, the stockade, Spyglass Hill and the like, the author was at pains to connect them in a story that converges in time as well as space at the X that marks the spot of Flint's silver. Readers of Treasure Island may remember Stevenson's observation that his novel grew up around the treasure map he had one day draw in a mood of daydream. The map receeded and incited his prose, providing not only tmosphere, but stimulus for plot. Thus Jim Hawkins discovers Stevenson's map (attributed to Captain Flint in Billy Bones' tarry trunk, and the game is afoot. Having invented such places as the anchorage, the stockade, Spyglass Hill and the like, the author was at pains to connect them in a story that converges in time as well as space at the X that marks the spot of Flint's silver.

  9. Mapping axel heyst's island: the limits of allegory in Conrad's victory Mapping axel heyst's island: the limits of allegory in Conrad's victory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Derrick

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Readers of Treasure Island may remember Stevenson's observation that his novel grew up around the treasure map he had one day draw in a mood of daydream. The map preceeded and incited his prose, providing not only atmosphere, but stimulus for plot. Thus Jim Hawkins discovers Stevenson's map (attributed to Captain Flint in Billy Bones' tarry trunk, and the game is afoot. Having invented such places as the anchorage, the stockade, Spyglass Hill and the like, the author was at pains to connect them in a story that converges in time as well as space at the X that marks the spot of Flint's silver. Readers of Treasure Island may remember Stevenson's observation that his novel grew up around the treasure map he had one day draw in a mood of daydream. The map preceeded and incited his prose, providing not only atmosphere, but stimulus for plot. Thus Jim Hawkins discovers Stevenson's map (attributed to Captain Flint in Billy Bones' tarry trunk, and the game is afoot. Having invented such places as the anchorage, the stockade, Spyglass Hill and the like, the author was at pains to connect them in a story that converges in time as well as space at the X that marks the spot of Flint's silver.

  10. Case of radiation gastroduodenitis caused by /sup 60/Co-irradiation therapy for hepatoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, H; Hayashi, N; Morise, K; Tunekawa, J; Kaneshiro, K [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1981-02-01

    A 56-year-old man with hepatoma, who had been treated with total 3,960 rad of /sup 60/Co-irradiation 2 months previously, was readmitted to the hospital because of fever and anemia. Following admission, he passed tarry stools every day. Barium meal examination revealed esophageal varices and erosive gastritis of the antrum. At endoscopy, many hemorrhagic erosions were found in the gastric antrum and the first part of duodenum, which were located in the irradiation area. Since repeated blood transfusion failed to improve anemia, a complete fasting with intravenous hyperalimentation and antacid therapy were started. Two months later, feeding was started and thereafter continued without any appreciable GI bleeding or worsening of anemia. Endoscopic examination at this time revealed only a few erosions scattered over the edematous antral mucosa as well as the proximal duodenum. IVH, antacids and abstinence from food seem to be an effective measure in the treatment of radiation injury of the gut.

  11. Effect of oil pollution on pattern and functions of soil microbiosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talibli, A.K.; Mamedova, I.S.; Mamedyarov, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text : The soil polluted by oil and petroleum creates severe social and ecological problem. The solution of indicated problem is requires the development and intrusion of modern progressive technology. Most perspective in this sense can be clearing the oil-polluted soils with usage of activity of microorganisms. The modern level of learning of microorganisms oxidizing oil hydrocarbon testifies to a capability of creation of the non-polluting, economically effective biotechnological schemes. It was established by our researches that in oil polluted soils of Absheron peninsula alongside with hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria it is finding everywhere lithotrophic bacteria of cycle of sulfur - representatives of sulfate-reducing and bacteria of genus Thiobacillus. It was established that the soil polluted by heavy tarry oil renders negative influencing on development of microorganisms

  12. A Case of Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia Which Was Aggravated by Acid Reducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiomi Nakade

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE is known to be characterized by red patches or spots in a diffuse or linear array in the antrum of the stomach. The precise etiology of GAVE remains to be elucidated. Argon plasma laser coagulation (APC has been used to control oozing from GAVE; however, there is no satisfactory long-term effect of APC in the control of oozing from GAVE. An acid reducer is used after APC because even physiological acid exposure might delay post-APC ulcer healing. We describe the case of a patient who had used an acid reducer and experienced repeated gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to GAVE. After ceasing to administer the acid reducer, incidences of hospitalization due to oozing from GAVE stopped. After the administration of the acid reducer was restarted, the patient had tarry stool, and diffuse oozing of blood was seen again. We report a first case of GAVE which was aggravated by acid reducer.

  13. A geochemical study of oil in metalliferous veins, Idarado Mine, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrild, Peter M.

    1976-01-01

    A tarry, benzene-soluble material is present in metal-rich veins in the Idarado mine, Ouray County, Colo., in an area not known to have petroleum resources. The material was compared chemically, spectometrically, and chromatographically with oils from four fields in the nearby Paradox basin. Each of these oil fields contains reservoir rocks equivalent to rock units known to extend beneath volcanic rocks near the mine. Carbon and sulfur isotope data and gas chromatographic data indicate a similarity between the oil from the nearby Sierra field and the oil from the mine. Thus, it seems both geologically and chemically possible that oil in the mine originated in Cretaceous sediments. Variations in the composition of oil from the mine and differences between the mine oil and Sierra oil, notably in the distributions of hydrocarbons, are attributed to bacterial degradation.

  14. Recovering oil from shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leahey, T; Wilson, H

    1920-11-13

    To recover oil free from inorganic impurities and water, and utilize the oil vapor and tarry matter for the production of heat, shale is heated in a retort at a temperature of not less than 120/sup 0/C. The vapors pass by a pipe into a water jacketed condenser from which the condensate and gas pass through a pipe into a chamber and then by a pipe to a setting chamber from where the light oils are decanted through a pipe into a tank. The heavy oil is siphoned through a pipe into a tank, while the gas passes through a pipe into a scrubber and then into a drier, exhauster and pipe to the flue and ports, above the fire-bars, into the retort. Air is introduced through a pipe, flue, and ports.

  15. Energy conversion assessment of vacuum, slow and fast pyrolysis processes for low and high ash paper waste sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridout, Angelo J.; Carrier, Marion; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Vacuum, slow and fast pyrolysis of low and high ash paper waste sludge (PWS) is compared. • Reactor temperature and pellet size optimised to maximise liquid and solid product yields. • Gross energy recovery from solid and liquid was assessed. • Fast pyrolysis of low and high ash PWS offers higher energy conversions. - Abstract: The performance of vacuum, slow and fast pyrolysis processes to transfer energy from the paper waste sludge (PWS) to liquid and solid products was compared. Paper waste sludges with low and high ash content (8.5 and 46.7 wt.%) were converted under optimised conditions for temperature and pellet size to maximise both product yields and energy content. Comparison of the gross energy conversions, as a combination of the bio-oil/tarry phase and char (EC_s_u_m), revealed that the fast pyrolysis performance was between 18.5% and 20.1% higher for the low ash PWS, and 18.4% and 36.5% higher for high ash PWS, when compared to the slow and vacuum pyrolysis processes respectively. For both PWSs, this finding was mainly attributed to higher production of condensable organic compounds and lower water yields during FP. The low ash PWS chars, fast pyrolysis bio-oils and vacuum pyrolysis tarry phase products had high calorific values (∼18–23 MJ kg"−"1) making them promising for energy applications. Considering the low calorific values of the chars from alternative pyrolysis processes (∼4–7 MJ kg"−"1), the high ash PWS should rather be converted to fast pyrolysis bio-oil to maximise the recovery of usable energy products.

  16. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  17. Site characterization design and techniques used at the Southern Shipbuilding Corporation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.P.; Geraghty, C.A.; Moore, G.W.; Mullins, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Southern Shipbuilding Corporation (SSC) site is an inactive barge/ship manufacturing and repair facility situated on approximately 54 acres in Slidell, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana. Two unlined surface impoundments (North and South impoundments) are situated on the northwest portion of the site and are surrounded on three sides by Bayou Bonfouca. These impoundments are the sources of carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (CPAH) contamination at the site. Inadequate containment has resulted in the release of impoundment wastes into the bayou. To evaluate potential response alternatives for the site, an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) field investigation was conducted from July through October 1994. A two phase sampling approach was used in combination with innovative and traditional sampling techniques, field screening technologies, and exploitation of the visual characteristics of the waste to determine the extent of waste migration with limited off-site laboratory confirmation. A skid-mounted mobile drilling unit, secured to a specialized sampling platform designed for multiple applications, was used for collection of sediment cores from the bayou as well as tarry sludge cores from the impoundments. Field screening of core samples was accomplished on site using an organic vapor analyzer and a total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) field analyzer. Pollutants of concern include metals, cyanide, dioxin, and organic compounds. This paper presents details on the sampling design and characterization techniques used to accomplish the EE/CA field investigation

  18. Effects of air pollution on plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleasadle, J K.A.

    1959-01-01

    The environment for plant growth is affected in three ways by the presence of coal smoke (1) by a reduction in the amount of light available to the plants, (2) by an alteration in soil conditions, and (3) by the contamination of the air by foreign gases. The smoke haze in or near industrial areas reduced the light available to plants for photosynthesis, thus reducing their growth rate. The tarry deposit on leaves further reduced the light available to the plant, and lowered the assimilation rate. It was generally thought that rain falling in or near industrial areas dissolved the predominantly acidic polluting gases from the air and leached bases from the soil. Rainwater collected showed a reduced number of soil bacteria, resulting in a reduction in the availability of plant nutrients. The most common and abundant gaseous pollutant in Britain was sulfur dioxide formed from the sulfur contained in coal. Concentrations of 0.5 parts per million induced symptoms of leaf scorch in many species. Results showed the yield of Aberystwyth 523 ryegrass was reduced when plants were grown continuously in air polluted with coal smoke. This affected the processes involving cell division. Coal smoke and sulfur also increased the rate of leaf senescence. This rate increased as the concentration of sulfur dioxide increased, or as the length of exposure per day to a standard concentration was increased. The leaves of evergreen trees and shrubs also aged more rapidly in conditions of pollution. 14 references.

  19. Battlefield: mud, cold, grit and no TV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, A.

    1997-10-06

    The early history of Suncor, initially called the Great Canadian Oil Sands (GCOS) Corporation, beginning with the marathon drive of men and equipment on unpaved roads up to Fort McMurray in 1966, was told. Despite the hardships of the early years, no proper housing, sanitation, churches, schools, doctors or dentists, no television or radio, recruits came from all over Canada and Europe because the pay was very good and skills requirements were very low. Early experiences with the giant bucketwheel excavators were recalled, including the constant need to change the giant teeth that snapped in the frozen tundra every two to four hours. Conveyor belts made from rubber-coated steel cables were a constant fire hazard (they were sprayed with diesel oil to prevent the tarry sand from sticking). Unreliable boilers and monster sand pumps that plugged the oil extraction plant were other trials to endure in the constant battle with nature and the laws of physics. Although the attrition rate was high, enough people endured to keep the plant operating. Thirty years later 1,600 employees celebrated production records, the opening of a new Suncor mine, and the inauguration of a new bridge for Fort McMurray, now a thriving modern city and home to some 41,000 people.

  20. The big bitumen breakthrough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, G.

    1996-01-01

    The ongoing transformation of the oilsands and heavy oil sector from a poor cousin a few years ago into the cornerstone of the Alberta oil industry, was discussed. Much of this change is due to the development of SAGD (steam assisted gravity drainage) technology for the underground recovery of heavy oil and tarry bitumens, aided by partly government-funded research, and boosted by a revised provincial royalty regime. The thermal recovery process makes use of a pair of horizontal injection and recovery wells, drilled one above the other. The efficiency of this new technology could produce a shift in the petroleum industry's spending towards oil sands and heavy oil if investors conclude that it is more profitable to produce heavy oil than conventional light oil. Some of the oil sands producers that are poised to invest billions of dollars in various underground bitumen projects in Alberta over the next five years include Suncor, Syncrude, Alberta Energy Co., Amoco Canada, Elan Energy, Imperial Oil Resources, CS Resources, Koch Oil, and Gulf Resources. The ultimate goal is recovery costs of $6 per barrel, which is comparable to the costs of the conventional oil sector. The added advantage of oil sands production is, of course, the virtual elimination of the exploration risk. 3 figs

  1. Hexone Storage and Treatment Facility closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The HSTF is a storage and treatment unit subject to the requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure is being conducted under interim status and will be completed pursuant to the requirements of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and WAC 173-303-640. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of WAC 173-303 or of this closure plan. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge where appropriate. The known hazardous/dangerous waste remaining at the site before commencing other closure activities consists of the still vessels, a tarry sludge in the storage tanks, and residual contamination in equipment, piping, filters, etc. The treatment and removal of waste at the HSTF are closure activities as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and WAC 173-303

  2. Effects of Post-Pyrolysis Air Oxidation of Biomass Chars on Adsorption of Neutral and Ionizable Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2016-06-21

    This study was conducted to understand the effects of thermal air oxidation of biomass chars experienced during formation or production on their adsorptive properties toward various compounds, including five neutral nonpolar and polar compounds and seven weak acids and bases (pKa = 3-5.2) selected from among industrial chemicals and the triazine and phenoxyacetic acid herbicide classes. Post-pyrolysis air oxidation (PPAO) at 400 °C of anoxically prepared wood and pecan shell chars for up to 40 min enhanced the mass-normalized adsorption at pH ∼ 7.4 of all test compounds, especially the weak acids and bases, by up to 100-fold. Both general and specific effects were identified. The general effect results from "reaming" of pores by the oxidative removal of pore wall matter and/or tarry deposits generated during the pyrolysis step. Reaming creates new surface area and enlarges nanopores, which helps relieve steric hindrance to adsorption. The specific effect results from creation of new acidic functionality that provides sites for the formation of very strong, charge-assisted hydrogen bonds (CAHB) with solutes having comparable pKa. The CAHB hypothesis was supported by competition experiments and the finding that weak acid anion adsorption increased with surface carboxyl content, despite electrostatic repulsion from the growing negative charge. The results provide insight into the effects of air oxidation on pollutant retention.

  3. Implementation of an ex situ stabilization technique at the Sand Springs superfund site to solidify and stabilize acid tar sludges involving a quick-lime based stabilization process and innovative equipment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManus, R.W.; Grajczak, P.; Wilcoxson, J.C.; Webster, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    An old refinery site was safely remediated a year before schedule and for 25% less than final engineering estimates for the stabilization remedy thanks to energetic project management and innovative design involving ex situ stabilization/solidification of acid tar sludges. A quicklime based process, Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR trademark), was employed to solidify and stabilize (SS) over 103,000 cubic meters (135,000 cubic yards) of petroleum waste, mostly acidic tarry sludge. The SS process was selected over competing methods because it afforded minimal volume increase, could readily achieve Record of Decision (ROD) specified physical and chemical treatment goals, could be implemented with treatment equipment that minimized emissions, and could be performed with low reagent usage and at low cost. To ensure treatment goals were achieved and an accelerated schedule met, a custom designed and fabricated transportable treatment unit (TTU) was employed to implement the process. The treated material was visually soil-like in character, it was left in stockpiles for periods of time, and it was placed and compacted in the on site landfill using standard earth-moving equipment

  4. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus following a Puestow Procedure in a Patient with Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Okamoto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding that occurs as a complication of chronic or acute pancreatitis. We report a case of extremely acute-onset hemosuccus pancreaticus occurring in a patient with chronic pancreatitis over a long-term follow-up after a Puestow procedure (side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy. The patient was admitted to our hospital due to severe anemia and tarry stools indicative of gastrointestinal bleeding. Emergent endoscopy, including gastrointestinal fiberscopy and colon fiberscopy, showed no abnormal findings. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography and hemorrhagic scintigraphy did not detect a hemorrhagic lesion. Although interventional radiology was considered for diagnosis and treatment, conservative therapy seemed sufficient to affect hemostasis. Two weeks later, however, acute intestinal bleeding with hemodynamic shock occurred, and exploration was performed without delay. Intraoperative endoscopy through an incision of the reconstructed jejunal loop in the close proximal end revealed a site of active bleeding from the side-to-side anastomotic pancreatic duct. Following a longitudinal incision of the jejunal loop, a bleeding point was sutured and ligated on direct inspection. The patient showed a good postoperative course.

  5. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus following a Puestow Procedure in a Patient with Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hirotaka; Miura, Kazuo; Fujii, Hideki

    2011-05-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding that occurs as a complication of chronic or acute pancreatitis. We report a case of extremely acute-onset hemosuccus pancreaticus occurring in a patient with chronic pancreatitis over a long-term follow-up after a Puestow procedure (side-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy). The patient was admitted to our hospital due to severe anemia and tarry stools indicative of gastrointestinal bleeding. Emergent endoscopy, including gastrointestinal fiberscopy and colon fiberscopy, showed no abnormal findings. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography and hemorrhagic scintigraphy did not detect a hemorrhagic lesion. Although interventional radiology was considered for diagnosis and treatment, conservative therapy seemed sufficient to affect hemostasis. Two weeks later, however, acute intestinal bleeding with hemodynamic shock occurred, and exploration was performed without delay. Intraoperative endoscopy through an incision of the reconstructed jejunal loop in the close proximal end revealed a site of active bleeding from the side-to-side anastomotic pancreatic duct. Following a longitudinal incision of the jejunal loop, a bleeding point was sutured and ligated on direct inspection. The patient showed a good postoperative course.

  6. Carbon elimination from silicon kerf: Thermogravimetric analysis and mechanistic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Pufleau, Miguel; Chadha, Tandeep S; Yablonsky, Gregory; Biswas, Pratim

    2017-01-18

    40% of ultrapure silicon is lost as kerf during slicing to produce wafers. Kerf is currently not being recycled due to engineering challenges and costs associated with removing its abundant impurities. Carbon left behind from the lubricant remains as one of the most difficult contaminants to remove in kerf without significant silicon oxidation. The present work enables to better understand the mechanism of carbon elimination in kerf which can aid the design of better processes for kef recycling and low cost photovoltaics. In this paper, we studied the kinetics of carbon elimination from silicon kerf in two atmospheres: air and N 2, under a regime of no-diffusion-limitation. We report the apparent activation energy in both atmospheres using three methods: Kissinger, and two isoconversional approaches. In both atmospheres, a bimodal apparent activation energy is observed, suggesting a two stage process. A reaction mechanism is proposed in which (a) C-C and C-O bond cleavage reactions occur in parallel with polymer formation; (b) at higher temperatures, this polymer fully degrades in air but leaves a tarry residue in N 2 that accounts for about 12% of the initial total carbon.

  7. Neutron transportation simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenohara, Yuzo.

    1995-01-01

    In the present invention, problems in an existent parallelized monte carlo method is solved, and behaviors of neutrons in a large scaled system are accurately simulated at a high speed. Namely, a neutron transportation simulator according to the monte carlo method simulates movement of each of neutrons by using a parallel computer. In this case, the system to be processed is divided based on a space region and an energy region to which neutrons belong. Simulation of neutrons in the divided regions is allotted to each of performing devices of the parallel computer. Tarry data and nuclear data of the neutrons in each of the regions are memorized dispersedly to memories of each of the performing devices. A transmission means for simulating the behaviors of the neutrons in the region by each of the performing devices, as well as transmitting the information of the neutrons, when the neutrons are moved to other region, to the performing device in a transported portion are disposed to each of the performing devices. With such procedures, simulation for the neutrons in the allotted region can be conducted with small capacity of memories. (I.S.)

  8. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Orii

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage.

  9. A Case of Primary Gastric Small-Cell Carcinoma in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Chang Yu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of primary small-cell carcinoma of the stomach in a 75-year-old man. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a 1-week history of intermittent tarry stool. An upper gastrointestinal examination revealed a large stage A2 ulcer in the greater curvature of the body of the stomach, and pathological findings from biopsy specimens revealed small-cell carcinoma. The tumor cells were small-sized, composed of hyperchromatic nuclei with scant cytoplasm, and stained positive for cytokeratin, synaptophysin, and chromogranin A. The patient was diagnosed with primary small-cell carcinoma of the stomach. He declined further evaluation and received palliative management. This is a rare carcinoma of the stomach, with aggressive manifestations and a poor prognosis. The mean survival of patients with primary gastric small-cell carcinoma is reported to be 7 months. The choice of treatment for this disease is still controversial. This rare gastric tumor should be listed in the differential diagnosis of gastric carcinoma in the elderly.

  10. [Florence Nightingale: an Italian portrait.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanelli, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    Florence Nightingale was the pioneer of modern nursing. The aim of this article is to give a brief review of her character. Her Christian name derives from her birthplace, albeit her English nationality. She was trained in England, save for a brief spell in Germany. The nursing profession of her time left much to desire; competent nurses were hard to find, their preparation was poor, and so was availability. In Paris, she first encountered real issues related to nursing and sanitation, but did not tarry a moment to get to grips with them. She did not hide her organisational skills and humanitarian outlook, and the occasion to put them to good use presented itself with the Crimean War, where the opposition of army officers only aggravated the arduous process of putting local hygienic conditions under control. Invariably, Florence Nightingale was perceived by soldiers as an almost mythical mother figure, gentle and authoritative, a single firm point in moments of physical or moral decline. She did her best to help improve conditions in India, despite the odds. She died in London in 1910.

  11. A rare case of primary amenorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Bal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crytomenorrhea arises usually due to the imperforate hymen, sometimes due to vaginal septum, rarely due to cervical agenesis. Here, we present a case of primary amenorrhea resulting from cervical agenesis in a 38-year-old woman. She presented with primary amenorrhea and cyclic lower abdominal pain. She had undergone some surgery 5 years back, details of which were not available. On examination secondary sexual characters were normal, per abdomen there was an 18 weeks size firm abdominopelvic mass. Local vaginal examination showed a blind vaginal pouch. A clinical diagnosis of hematometra due to transverse vaginal septum was made. However, magnetic resonance imaging pelvis suggested hematometra with cervical stenosis. The patient was taken up for examination under anaesthesia (EUA and exploratory laparotomy. On opening the abdomen uterus found to be enlarged with dense adhesions all around and signs of endometriosis. Extensive adhesiolysis revealed bilateral chocolate cysts of ovaries with hematosalpinges and peritubal adhesions. Hysterotomy and drainage of tarry contents were followed by an exploration of the uterine cavity. The lower pole ended blindly with no evidence of any cervix. Peroperative diagnosis of cervical agenesis leading to hematometra and endometriosis was made. A subtotal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was done. Histopathological examination confirmed ovarian endometriosis and adenomyosis of uterus. Though reconstructive surgery for cervical dysgenesis has been successful in some cases, hysterectomy is generally recommended for cervical agenesis.

  12. The Galeta Oil Spill. III. Chronic Reoiling, Long-term Toxicity of Hydrocarbon Residues and Effects on Epibiota in the Mangrove Fringe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levings, Sally C.; Garrity, Stephen D.; Burns, Kathryn A.

    1994-04-01

    In April 1986, 75 000-100 000 barrels of medium-weight crude oil (˜ 10 000-13 500 metric tons) spilled into Bahía las Minas, a large mangrove-lined bay on the Caribbean coast of Panamá. Between 1986 and 1991, biological and chemical effects of this spill were studied. The epibiota of fringing mangroves ( Rhizophora mangle L.) were examined in three habitats: (1) the shoreward margins of reef flats that fronted the open sea, (2) the edges of channels and lagoons, and (3) the banks of streams and man-made cuts that drained interior mangroves or uplands into lagoons. Chemical analyses of bivalves collected from submerged prop roots (oysters and false mussels) and records of slicks and tarry deposits on artificial roots documented chronic reoiling. Each habitat was repeatedly oiled between 1986 and 1991, with petroleum residues identified as the oil spilled in 1986. There was a decline in the release of tarry oils recorded as slicks and on roots over time, but not in tissue burdens of hydrocarbons in bivalves. This suggested that the processes that released these different types of oil residues were at least partially independent and that toxic hydrocarbons were likely to be released from sediments over the long term. The submerged prop roots of fringing mangroves in each habitat had a characteristic epibiota. On the open coast, roots were covered with a diverse assemblage of sessile invertebrates and algae. In channels, the most abundant species on roots was the edible oyster Crassostrea virginica ( rhizophorae morph). In streams, the false mussel Mytilopsis sallei covered the most space on roots. Cover of sessile invertebrates was significantly reduced at oiled compared with unoiled sites on the open coast for 4 years after oiling, while oysters and false mussels were reduced in cover at oiled sites in channels and streams through at least 1991, when observations ended. False mussels transplanted from an unoiled stream to oiled and unoiled streams were

  13. Acid Tar Lagoons: Management and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohers, Anna; Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj

    2017-04-01

    liquid state et sim. Because of lack of geological research caused by fragile limestone bedrock under the lagoon in combination with aggressive substance in the lagoon, waste management of this contaminated site became even more complicated. The main aim of this work is to present by analysis a new possibility of acid tarry-waste management thanks to the technique of thermal desorption as a method for acid tar processing, through which it is possible to gain only organic part; and a technology of Blowing Decomposition as a method for its consequent recovery. Thermal desorption process is an effective separation process through which is possible to split acid tarry material into matrix (soil, sediments) and organic contaminants (PCB and POPs compounds). The process is carried out through a mobile unit which is relocatable. The work also presents a relation between volume of de-contaminated matrix and organic compounds. In order to boost the efficiency in processing of acid tar waste through thermal desorption, the work will present possibility of application of innovative technology - method of Blowing Decomposition for recovering of organic matter into technological lubricating oil.

  14. Development and testing of the cooling coil cleaning end effector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.I.; Mullen, O.D.; Powell, M.R.; Daly, D.S.; Engel, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancement (KPD ampersand E) program has developed and tested an end effector to support the waste retrieval mission at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The end effector was developed specifically to remove a sticky waste material from the cooling coils in the High Level Liquid Waste (HLLW) tank, and to vacuum up a sediment layer that has settled beneath the cooling coils. An extensive testing program was conducted in the hydraulic test bed (HTB) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to evaluate the performance of the end effector under simulated in-tank conditions. A mock up of the cooling coils was installed in the test bed tank, and simulated waste materials were included to represent the sticky waste on the tubes and the particulate waste settled beneath them. The testing program focused on assessing long-duration mining strategies for cleaning the cooling coils and removing the particulate waste forms. The report describes the results of the end effector testing program at PNNL. Section 2 describes the physical characteristics of the HLLW tanks, including the layout of the cooling coils, and it also describes what is known of the waste forms in the tanks. Section 3 describes the cleaning and retrieval strategy that was used in developing the end effector design. Section 4 describes the cooling coil mockup in the hydraulic test bed. Section 5 discusses the rationale used in selecting the simulants for the tarry waste and particulate waste forms. Section 6 describes the tests that were performed to evaluate cleaning of the cooling coils and retrieval of the particulate simulant. Section 7 summarizes the cleaning and retrieval tests, assesses the relative importance of cleaning the cooling coils and retrieving the particulate waste, and suggests modifications that would simplify the end effector design

  15. A field and laboratory assessment of oil spill effects on survival and reproduction of Pacific herring following the Exxon Valdez spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, W.H.; Moksness, E.

    1995-01-01

    Field and laboratory investigations in 1989 and 1990 were designed to assess potential injury to Prince William Sound herring by testing for differences between oiled regions and unoiled reference areas and by relating biological response variables to the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in eggs-on-kelp samples. Hydrocarbon analyses and laboratory incubation were conducted on eggs-on-kelp samples from Prince William Sound and Sitka Sound. The eggs and hatching larvae were examined to evaluate several response variables: egg development, hatch, larval survival, abnormal development of larvae, larval length, and larval yolk-sac volume. Analysis of 1989 shoreline surveys indicate that about 96% of the total spawn length (158 km) in Prince William Sound occurred along shorelines with no oiling, and less than 1% of the 1989 total spawn length occurred along shorelines with moderate to heavy oiling. Analysis of shoreline oiling in both 1989 and 1990 from all surveys indicates that about 90 to 91% of the total 1989 spawn length occurred along unoiled shorelines. Effects on herring eggs were minor in 1989 even in oiled areas. No significant relationship was found between 1989 PAH burdens in eggs-on-kelp samples and 9 out of 10 biological response variables. In 1989, significantly lower proportions of developed eggs were observed for Cabin Bay samples visibly contaminated with tarry deposits. The location where these effects were seen represented less than 2% of total 1989 spawn length. No effects of the spill on herring were evident in 1990. No significant relationship was found between 1990 PAH burdens and the seven biological response variables studied. 33 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Commercial aspects of rapid thermal processing (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, R.G.; Huffman, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    In its broadest sense, Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP TM ) covers the conversion of all types of carbonaceous materials to liquid fuels, high quality fuel gases, and chemicals. Commercial RTP TM activities (including the actual implementation in the market as well as the short-term R and D initiatives) are much narrower in scope, and are focused on the production of high yields of light, non-tarry liquids (i.e. 'bio-crude') from biomass for fuel and chemical markets. RTP TM is not an incineration process. In commercial applications, it is simply the liquification of biomass by the addition of heat at atmospheric pressure in the absence of air or oxygen. There is no direct combustion in the conversion unit. In effect, wood is converted to liquid wood, bagasse to liquid bagasse, straw to liquid straw, etc. The liquid is pourable and pumpable at room temperature, and has approximately the same heating value as the feedstock entering the conversion unit. The typical liquid yield from a representative hardwood at 10 - 15 % moisture content is about 73 % by mass in industrial operations. In general, the yield increases slightly with an increase in feedstock cellulose composition and slightly decreases with an increase in feedstock lignin composition. However, the energy yield remains approximately constant since lignin-derived liquids have a higher energy content than cellulose-derived liquids. RTP TM was commercialised in 1989 after about 10 years of research, development and demonstration. Current product applications include boiler fuel and food chemicals. It is important to note that the primary liquid product or 'bio-crude' is essentially the same whether it is destined for the fuel or the food chemicals markets. refs

  17. The review of 134 cases colon and rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chung Kyu; Choi, Byung Sook [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-10-15

    Barium Enema study for colon examination is of great importance in the health care of our people and its value can be increased by a wide understanding of the attendant difficulties and limitation. Since the incidence of the colon and rectal carcinoma is increasing, the barium enema examination is more valuable. Radiologically diagnosed 134 cases of colon and rectal carcinoma from January 1964 to June 1970 have been reviewed at Yensei Univ., College of Medicine. Among the total admission during these years, the ratio of the colon and rectal carcinoma was 0.29 percent, and the incidence among barium enema examination was 5.3%. The peak age range was between 40 and 50 years. The average age of the patients was 46 years. It was more common in male. The clinical picture was rather vague in some cases, especially in the lesions of right colon. The large number of cases has bowel habit change, tarry or bloody stool and abdominal pain. About 60% of the lesions were located in rectum and 40% was proximal portion from the rectum, which could not be completely diagnosed only by digital examination and proctosigmoidoscopy. On roentgenogram, the most common form was encircling type, next was fungating. The positivity for accuracy of the barium enema examination was 90%. Majority of cancers of the colon, particularly those that produce symptoms are relative gross lesions. In daily practise we have to eager to find out small lesions by repeat and complete barium enema examination, including double contrast study. Early diagnosis is an aid immediate, logical objective in attempts to decrease the morbidity and mortality from carcinoma of colon.

  18. Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma: a needle in a haystack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa G. Hayes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC is an exceedingly rare neoplasm which is often misdiagnosed as gastric adenocarcinoma at presentation. A markedly elevated serum beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (Beta HCG level is a characteristic feature of this tumor. A 44 year old white male presented with generalized abdominal pain and fullness, tarry black stools and weight loss of 3 months duration. Medical work-up including imaging with CT scans revealed the presence of a gastric mass and multiple liver metastases. Tumor markers were significant for a Beta HCG of 23717.5 MIU/ML. Scrotal ultrasound did not show the presence of a testicular mass. Upper GI endoscopy with biopsy was positive for a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with Beta HCG staining on immunohistochemistry. The patient was diagnosed with metastatic PGC. He received four cycles of chemotherapy with Bleomycin, Etoposide and Cisplatinum. At the end of the fourth cycle, Beta HCG was 23 MIU/ML. CT scan for restaging, however showed an increase in the size of the metastatic lesions. The patient subsequently became profoundly pancytopenic, developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC and expired 12 months after initial presentation. PGC genetically and morphologically represents an adenocarcinoma and a choriocarcinoma. The significance of an elevated serum Beta HCG is controversial and it may have a role in evaluating response to treatment and tumor recurrence. Curative resection, appropriate chemotherapy and the absence of metastatic lesions is associated with improved survival. Hence, a high index of suspicion must be maintained to diagnose this tumor correctly at presentation and tailor therapy accordingly.

  19. The review of 134 cases colon and rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Kyu; Choi, Byung Sook

    1971-01-01

    Barium Enema study for colon examination is of great importance in the health care of our people and its value can be increased by a wide understanding of the attendant difficulties and limitation. Since the incidence of the colon and rectal carcinoma is increasing, the barium enema examination is more valuable. Radiologically diagnosed 134 cases of colon and rectal carcinoma from January 1964 to June 1970 have been reviewed at Yensei Univ., College of Medicine. Among the total admission during these years, the ratio of the colon and rectal carcinoma was 0.29 percent, and the incidence among barium enema examination was 5.3%. The peak age range was between 40 and 50 years. The average age of the patients was 46 years. It was more common in male. The clinical picture was rather vague in some cases, especially in the lesions of right colon. The large number of cases has bowel habit change, tarry or bloody stool and abdominal pain. About 60% of the lesions were located in rectum and 40% was proximal portion from the rectum, which could not be completely diagnosed only by digital examination and proctosigmoidoscopy. On roentgenogram, the most common form was encircling type, next was fungating. The positivity for accuracy of the barium enema examination was 90%. Majority of cancers of the colon, particularly those that produce symptoms are relative gross lesions. In daily practise we have to eager to find out small lesions by repeat and complete barium enema examination, including double contrast study. Early diagnosis is an aid immediate, logical objective in attempts to decrease the morbidity and mortality from carcinoma of colon

  20. Foreword

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aime, C.; Soummer, R.

    very short explanation of how the reports are ordered is given here. The Journées of 2003 started with the delocalized lectures (delocalized means here “not in Paris”!) of the Collège de France, of Antoine Labeyrie who wrote a report on Removal of coronagraphy residues with an adaptive hologram. Three invited seminars follow: Olivier Guyon (Pupil remapping techniques), Daniel Rouan (Ultra-nulling interferometers), and Kjetil Dohlen (Phase masks in astronomy). An illustration from Daniel Rouan's talk on the properties of Prouhet-Thué-Morse series was also selected for the cover figure of this edition. These papers are followed by the courses and communications given during the 4 days of the school, in a slightly different order of their presentation. The first two days were on atmospheric turbulence and adaptive optics for coronagraphy, and also coronagraphic space projects. Steve Ridgway gives a general introduction to the problem (Astronomy with high contrast imaging). This is followed by a presentation on Fourier and Statistical Optics: Shaped and Apodized apertures (Claude Aime), The effect of a coronagraph on the statistics of adaptive optics pinned speckles (Claude Aime and Rémi Soummer). A general introduction to the problem of atmospheric turbulence is made by Julien Borgnino. A presentation of the Concordia site with emphasis on its advantages for high contrast imaging is given by Eric Fossat. Several presentations relative to numerical simulations of Adaptive Optics and coronagraphy follow: Marcel Carbillet (AO for very high contrast imaging), Lyu Abe and Anthony Boccaletti share two presentations on Numerical simulations for coronagraphy. These presentations are followed by reports on experiments: Sandrine Thomas (SAM-the SOAR adaptive module), Pierre Baudoz (Cryogenic IR test of the 4QPM coronagraph), Anthony Boccaletti (Coronagraphy with JWST in the thermal IR). Pierre Bourget (Hg-Mask Coronagraph) ends this part with a coronagraph using a mercury

  1. Fluorine uptake into human enamel around fluoride-containing dental materials during cariogenic pH cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, H.; Yamamoto, H.; Nomachi, M.; Yasuda, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Kinugawa, M.; Kijimura, T.; Sano, H.; Satou, T.; Oikawa, S.; Kamiya, T.

    2009-01-01

    Using PIGE (Proton Induced Gamma Emission) technique at TARRI (Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute), Japan, we measured fluorine (F) uptake into the tooth enamel around two fluoride-containing materials during caries progression using pH cycling. Class V cavities in extracted human teeth were drilled and filled with fluoride-containing materials (i.e. 'Fuji IX' (FN) and 'UniFil flow with MEGA bond' (UF)) and a non-fluoride-containing material (i.e. 'SOLARE with MEGA bond' (SO)). Three 120 μm longitudinal sections including the filling material were obtained from each tooth. In order to simulate daily acid attack occurring in the oral cavity, the pH cycling (pH 6.8-4.5) was carried out for 1, 3 and 5 weeks, separately. After pH cycling, the caries progression in all specimens was observed using transverse microradiography (TMR). The F and calcium distributions of the specimens were evaluated using PIGE and PIXE techniques. The F distribution of the specimens clearly showed the F uptake from FN into enamel adjacent to the filling material, while the F uptakes from UF and SO were not detected. For UF, the MEGA bond (non-fluoride-containing) between the tooth and UniFil flow interfered with the F absorption into the tooth. For FN, the amount of F uptake into the subsurface enamel increased during pH cycling. The amount of F uptake in 5-week pH cycling had significantly higher value compared to those in 1- and 3-week pH cycling. For UF and SO, there were no significant differences between the different durations of pH cycling. Among fluoride-containing materials, there were some differences in the F uptake with increased pH cycling, which could possibly lead to obtaining difference in clinical performance. The data obtained using PIGE and PIXE techniques were useful in understanding the benefit of fluorine by means of fluoride-containing material for preventing caries.

  2. Fluorine analysis of human dentin surrounding resin composite after fluoride application by μ-PIGE/PIXE analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Katsushi; Komatsu, Hisanori; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Pereira, Patricia N.R.; Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Sato, Takahiro; Sano, Hidehiko

    2011-01-01

    The use of fluoride for the prevention of caries is based on the transformation of hydroxylapatite to fluoroapatite in the presence of fluoride ions, thereby strengthening tooth structure. Adhesion of dentin and resin composite (tooth-colored restoration material) requires a dentin bonding system, since resin composite is not able to adhere to dentin directly. Demineralization of dentin by acid etching is an important step in the dentin bonding system, however, demineralization also introduces weaknesses in tooth structure. If the demineralized dentin could be strengthened by the application of fluoride, then the dentin-resin composite bond strength might also improve. To test this hypothesis, the present study evaluated the influence of fluoride applications on the strength of the dentin-resin composite bond by (1) tensile strength testing analyses, (2) SEM analyses of tooth structure, and (3) detection of calcium (Ca) and fluorine (F) distribution patterns by micro proton-induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) and micro proton-induced gamma-ray emission (μ-PIGE) analyses conducted at the Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA) at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI). In this study, the dentin in extracted human molars was exposed by grinding and the dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid. Fluoride was applied at two concentrations, 0.022% (100 ppm F) and 2.21% (10,000 ppm F) NaF solution, for two time periods, 30 and 60 s, prior to bonding the resin composite with the treated dentin. Controls were prepared in the same manner, but without the fluoride application. Bond strength was measured with a micro-tensile testing unit, and the fluorine and calcium distributions at the interface between dentin and resin composite were detected by μ-PIGE and μ-PIXE analysis, respectively. Results indicate that the 10,000 ppm F applications resulted in higher bond strengths than observed in either the 100 ppm F applications or

  3. Fluorine analysis of human dentin surrounding resin composite after fluoride application by μ-PIGE/PIXE analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Katsushi; Komatsu, Hisanori; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Pereira, Patricia N. R.; Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Sato, Takahiro; Sano, Hidehiko

    2011-10-01

    The use of fluoride for the prevention of caries is based on the transformation of hydroxylapatite to fluoroapatite in the presence of fluoride ions, thereby strengthening tooth structure. Adhesion of dentin and resin composite (tooth-colored restoration material) requires a dentin bonding system, since resin composite is not able to adhere to dentin directly. Demineralization of dentin by acid etching is an important step in the dentin bonding system, however, demineralization also introduces weaknesses in tooth structure. If the demineralized dentin could be strengthened by the application of fluoride, then the dentin-resin composite bond strength might also improve. To test this hypothesis, the present study evaluated the influence of fluoride applications on the strength of the dentin-resin composite bond by (1) tensile strength testing analyses, (2) SEM analyses of tooth structure, and (3) detection of calcium (Ca) and fluorine (F) distribution patterns by micro proton-induced X-ray emission (μ-PIXE) and micro proton-induced gamma-ray emission (μ-PIGE) analyses conducted at the Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA) at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI). In this study, the dentin in extracted human molars was exposed by grinding and the dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid. Fluoride was applied at two concentrations, 0.022% (100 ppm F) and 2.21% (10,000 ppm F) NaF solution, for two time periods, 30 and 60 s, prior to bonding the resin composite with the treated dentin. Controls were prepared in the same manner, but without the fluoride application. Bond strength was measured with a micro-tensile testing unit, and the fluorine and calcium distributions at the interface between dentin and resin composite were detected by μ-PIGE and μ-PIXE analysis, respectively. Results indicate that the 10,000 ppm F applications resulted in higher bond strengths than observed in either the 100 ppm F applications or

  4. Organic Minerals in the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, S.; Biondi, E.; Kim, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Models for the origin of life are plagued by fundamental problems that, due to their difficulty, are called "paradoxes". One of these, known to anyone who has ever worked in a kitchen, is that organics, when given energy and left to itself, does not generate life. Rather, organics devolve to give tarry mixtures that become increasingly complex and increasingly less likely to support life (like asphalt). However, even if those mixtures escape devolution to create something useful for Darwinism, like building blocks for RNA, the water in which they must work is corrosive, leading to their destruction. Even if RNA is created, it is itself easily degraded. One current trend to manage those paradoxes turns to minerals in environments on early Earth. Inorganic minerals containing borate have now been shown to prevent the destruction of ribose (the R in RNA) and other carbohydrates essential for early Earth. Evaporite desert basins supplied with aqueous runoff from tourmaline-containing basalts are ideal environments for forming borate minerals, especially if they are made alkaline by serpentinizing peridotite. In the evaporite environments, drying cycles mitigate the destructive capability of water. Further, we have shown that phosphate is segregated from calcium (avoiding formation of relatively unreacted apatites) if magnesium and borate are present. Further, a common magnesium borophosphate (luneburgite) not only makes phosphate available for prebiotic synthesis, but selectively phosphorylates RNA building blocks as it releases borate to stabilize them against further degradation. Finally, a variety of minerals bind and stabilize RNA itself. Research in this area has also discovered organic minerals that might have been relevant to the origins of life on Earth. Such minerals are scarce on Earth today, since they are easily consumed by microbial communities. However, on a prebiotic Earth, organic minerals could have stored organic species as intermediates towards our

  5. Fluorine uptake into human enamel around fluoride-containing dental materials during cariogenic pH cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, H. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan)], E-mail: kom@den.hokudai.ac.jp; Yamamoto, H. [Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Nomachi, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yasuda, K. [The Wakasa wan Energy Research Center, 64-52-1 Hase, Tsuruga 914-0192 (Japan); Matsuda, Y.; Kinugawa, M.; Kijimura, T.; Sano, H. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Satou, T.; Oikawa, S.; Kamiya, T. [Advanced Radiation Technology, TARRI, JAEA, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Using PIGE (Proton Induced Gamma Emission) technique at TARRI (Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute), Japan, we measured fluorine (F) uptake into the tooth enamel around two fluoride-containing materials during caries progression using pH cycling. Class V cavities in extracted human teeth were drilled and filled with fluoride-containing materials (i.e. 'Fuji IX' (FN) and 'UniFil flow with MEGA bond' (UF)) and a non-fluoride-containing material (i.e. 'SOLARE with MEGA bond' (SO)). Three 120 {mu}m longitudinal sections including the filling material were obtained from each tooth. In order to simulate daily acid attack occurring in the oral cavity, the pH cycling (pH 6.8-4.5) was carried out for 1, 3 and 5 weeks, separately. After pH cycling, the caries progression in all specimens was observed using transverse microradiography (TMR). The F and calcium distributions of the specimens were evaluated using PIGE and PIXE techniques. The F distribution of the specimens clearly showed the F uptake from FN into enamel adjacent to the filling material, while the F uptakes from UF and SO were not detected. For UF, the MEGA bond (non-fluoride-containing) between the tooth and UniFil flow interfered with the F absorption into the tooth. For FN, the amount of F uptake into the subsurface enamel increased during pH cycling. The amount of F uptake in 5-week pH cycling had significantly higher value compared to those in 1- and 3-week pH cycling. For UF and SO, there were no significant differences between the different durations of pH cycling. Among fluoride-containing materials, there were some differences in the F uptake with increased pH cycling, which could possibly lead to obtaining difference in clinical performance. The data obtained using PIGE and PIXE techniques were useful in understanding the benefit of fluorine by means of fluoride-containing material for preventing caries.

  6. Analysis of Polish internet retail sites offering electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarobkiewicz, Michał Konrad; Woźniakowski, Mateusz Mariusz; Sławiński, Mirosław Aleksander; Samborski, Patryk Michał; Wawryk-Gawda, Ewelina; Jodłowska-Jędrych, Barbara

    Electronic cigarettes as possibly healthier alternative to conventional cigarettes are gaining popularity worldwide, although they are still hazardous to human health. Partly it is caused by unregulated advertising and online sales. Unfortunately it is more and more popular for youth to try electronic cigarettes. The aim of the study was to assess the marketing claims used by Polish websites offering electronic cigarettes. A search using Google search engine was performed in July 2015 for two keywords: e-papierosy [e-cigarettes] and elektroniczne papierosy [electronic cigarettes]. First 150 websites (15 pages) were listed. After initial review 86 pages met all inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Pages were searched for presence of 13 selected marketing claims as well as age-related warning and any social websites connections. Age-related warning was present on only 33.72% (n=29) websites. Two thirds has its own Facebook fan-page with average 1922.09 ± 3634.86 likes. Articles about health are available on 10.46% (n=9) websites, 53.49% (n=46) states that e-cigarettes are healthier than conventional ones, 39.53% (n=34) emphasized that during usage of e-cigarettes no tarry substances are produced. Two pages had special article in which conventional and electronic cigarettes were compared. Almost half (44.19%) remarked that e-cigarettes are cheaper in usage than conventional, one third pointed out the simplicity of usage. 32.56% advertised e-cigarettes as aid in quitting smoking. One fourth stated that e-cigarettes are harmless for surroundings. 33.72% marketed them as a way of bypassing public smoking act. 56.98% remarked the variety of liquid tastes offered. Electronic cigarettes and their rising popularity create another new possible threat for public health as the widely available information emphasize safety of e-cigarettes usage and as their availability and usage is not limited or restricted by law. electronic cigarettes, e-cigarettes, internet

  7. Fluorine analysis of human dentin surrounding resin composite after fluoride application by {mu}-PIGE/PIXE analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, Katsushi, E-mail: katsu@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Hokkaido, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan) and School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Department of Operative Dentistry, 302 Brauer, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7450 (United States); Komatsu, Hisanori [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Hokkaido, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Yamamoto, Hiroko [Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Osaka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Pereira, Patricia N.R. [School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Department of Operative Dentistry, 302 Brauer, CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7450 (United States); Bedran-Russo, Ana K. [University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Dentistry, Department of Restorative Dentistry, 801 S. Paulina St., Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Nomachi, Masaharu [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Osaka, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sato, Takahiro [TARRI, JAEA, Advanced Radiation Technology, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Gunma, Takasaki 370-1292 (Japan); Sano, Hidehiko [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Department of Restorative Dentistry, Kita-13, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Hokkaido, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    The use of fluoride for the prevention of caries is based on the transformation of hydroxylapatite to fluoroapatite in the presence of fluoride ions, thereby strengthening tooth structure. Adhesion of dentin and resin composite (tooth-colored restoration material) requires a dentin bonding system, since resin composite is not able to adhere to dentin directly. Demineralization of dentin by acid etching is an important step in the dentin bonding system, however, demineralization also introduces weaknesses in tooth structure. If the demineralized dentin could be strengthened by the application of fluoride, then the dentin-resin composite bond strength might also improve. To test this hypothesis, the present study evaluated the influence of fluoride applications on the strength of the dentin-resin composite bond by (1) tensile strength testing analyses, (2) SEM analyses of tooth structure, and (3) detection of calcium (Ca) and fluorine (F) distribution patterns by micro proton-induced X-ray emission ({mu}-PIXE) and micro proton-induced gamma-ray emission ({mu}-PIGE) analyses conducted at the Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA) at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute (TARRI). In this study, the dentin in extracted human molars was exposed by grinding and the dentin was etched with 35% phosphoric acid. Fluoride was applied at two concentrations, 0.022% (100 ppm F) and 2.21% (10,000 ppm F) NaF solution, for two time periods, 30 and 60 s, prior to bonding the resin composite with the treated dentin. Controls were prepared in the same manner, but without the fluoride application. Bond strength was measured with a micro-tensile testing unit, and the fluorine and calcium distributions at the interface between dentin and resin composite were detected by {mu}-PIGE and {mu}-PIXE analysis, respectively. Results indicate that the 10,000 ppm F applications resulted in higher bond strengths than observed in either the 100 ppm F

  8. ESA's Rosetta mission and the puzzles that Hale-Bopp left behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    orbiting spacecraft can give exact measurements of the comet's volume and mass. * Is a comet a dirty snowball or an icy dirtball? In other words, is it made of ices contaminated with mineral and tarry dust, or is it a consolidation of dust coated with ices? * Why is the nucleus of a comet so dark? Giotto established that Halley's nucleus is like brownish-black velvet, absorbing 96 per cent of the sunlight falling on it. Is the colour due to a surface deposit of tarry dust, or is the interior dark too? * Why are small regions of a comet highly active when most of its surface is not? Multiple jets of dust seen emanating from Halley's Comet, and spectacularly from Comet Hale-Bopp, imply that certain hot-spots differ physically or chemically from the rest of the comet's surface. * Is a comet made as single piece, or does it consist of loosely joined blocks, as suggested by the Giotto images? This relates to the questions of how comets are built, and why they break up into smaller fragments, as seen spectacularly with Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 which hit Jupiter in 1994. * Does a dying comet evaporate and disappear, or does it simply exhaust the stocks of ice that drive the emissions of gas and dust from an active comet? If the latter answer is correct, dead comets persist long afterwards as dark, inactive masses of minerals and tar, and pose a lasting threat of collisions with the Earth. * What is a comet's exact composition? Many ingredients are known, and the approximate abundances of the main constituents. Details coming from Rosetta will pin down (1) how comets were fashioned from similar constituents of interstellar dust and (2) how comets contributed to building the planets, including the Earth, and stocking their atmospheres. * Is the tarry, carbon-rich material in comets a jumble of every kind of chemical that inorganic processes can make from carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen, or does it contain special compounds? This is relevant to assessing the role of comets in

  9. Commercial aspects of rapid thermal processing (RTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R G; Huffman, D R [Ensyn Technologies Inc., Greely, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    In its broadest sense, Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP{sup TM}) covers the conversion of all types of carbonaceous materials to liquid fuels, high quality fuel gases, and chemicals. Scientifically, it is based on the general premise that products which result from the extremely rapid application of heat to a given feedstock are inherently more valuable than those which are produced when heat is applied much more slowly over longer periods of processing time. Commercial RTP{sup TM} activities (including the actual implementation in the market as well as the short-term R and D initiatives) are much narrower in scope, and are focused on the production of high yields of light, non-tarry liquids (i.e. `bio-crude`) from biomass for fuel and chemical markets. Chemicals are of significant interest from an economical point of view since they typically have a higher value than fuel products. Liquid fuels are of interest for many reasons: (1) Liquid fuels do not have to be used immediately after production, such as is the case with hot combustion gases or combustible gases produced via gasification. This allows the decoupling of fuel production from the end-use (ie. the conversion of fuel to energy). (2) The higher energy density of liquid fuels vs. that of fuel gases and solid biomass results in a large reduction in the costs associated with storage and transportation. (3) The costs to retrofit an existing gas or oil fired combustion system are much lower than replacement with a solid fuel combustor. (4) In general, liquid fuel combustion is much more efficient, controllable, and cleaner than the combustion of solid fuels. (5) The production of liquid `bio-crude` permits the removal of ash from the biomass prior to combustion or other end-use applications. (6) Gas or liquid fuel-fired diesel or turbine engines cannot operate commercially on solid fuels. Although wood represents the biomass which is of principal commercial interest (including a vast array of wood residues

  10. Commercial aspects of rapid thermal processing (RTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.G.; Huffman, D.R. [Ensyn Technologies Inc., Greely, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    In its broadest sense, Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP{sup TM}) covers the conversion of all types of carbonaceous materials to liquid fuels, high quality fuel gases, and chemicals. Scientifically, it is based on the general premise that products which result from the extremely rapid application of heat to a given feedstock are inherently more valuable than those which are produced when heat is applied much more slowly over longer periods of processing time. Commercial RTP{sup TM} activities (including the actual implementation in the market as well as the short-term R and D initiatives) are much narrower in scope, and are focused on the production of high yields of light, non-tarry liquids (i.e. `bio-crude`) from biomass for fuel and chemical markets. Chemicals are of significant interest from an economical point of view since they typically have a higher value than fuel products. Liquid fuels are of interest for many reasons: (1) Liquid fuels do not have to be used immediately after production, such as is the case with hot combustion gases or combustible gases produced via gasification. This allows the decoupling of fuel production from the end-use (ie. the conversion of fuel to energy). (2) The higher energy density of liquid fuels vs. that of fuel gases and solid biomass results in a large reduction in the costs associated with storage and transportation. (3) The costs to retrofit an existing gas or oil fired combustion system are much lower than replacement with a solid fuel combustor. (4) In general, liquid fuel combustion is much more efficient, controllable, and cleaner than the combustion of solid fuels. (5) The production of liquid `bio-crude` permits the removal of ash from the biomass prior to combustion or other end-use applications. (6) Gas or liquid fuel-fired diesel or turbine engines cannot operate commercially on solid fuels. Although wood represents the biomass which is of principal commercial interest (including a vast array of wood residues

  11. Radiation-thermal processes of conversion in the coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafaev, I.I.

    2002-01-01

    steam and carbon dioxide. c)Desulphurization The application of radiation action to desulphurization of solid fuels is perspectively. At the radiation action it is possible the occurrence selective activation of sulphuric bounds. Pulse electric discharge, laser, microwave vibration, high frequency electric field, can effectively activate desulphurization processes as a result of stimulation of pyrite decomposition. In this work were investigated the stimulation of the sulphur removal processes at the radiation thermal hydro desulphurization of brown coal in presence of the methane. The radiation-thermal desulphurization of brown coal (So=4%) in presence of methane, oxygen, steam and argon under the accelerated electrons with dose rate P=350 Gy/s in the intervals of temperature T=200-500 degrees centigrade, absorbed dose up to 60 kGy have been studied. d)Production and modification of active carbon: In the thermal processes of carbonization of raw materials (coals, polymers, natural compounds, etc) the micro- and macroporous in the product are cleaned non-completely, the part of sorption ability is lost. In case of using of ionizing radiation due to a high penetrating ability and destructive effect these pores are cleaned of tarry matters. By radiation-thermal impact on semi coke of brown coal the high quality activated carbon with adsorption capacity V=0.55 ml/g are produced. In case of modification of carbonic adsorbent it is possible to increase of the specific surface in 2 times at absorbed doses 250 kGy and temperature 300-350 0 C. e) Influence of preirradiation on optical and paramagnetic properties of coals. It has been shown, that at g-preirradiation of lignites in low doses ( 100 kGy) - polycondensation processes. By Application of Electron-spin Resonance and Infra-red Spectroscopy were measured of effectivity destructive and polycondensation processes

  12. ISO Results Presented at International Astronomical Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-01

    describes several stages in our cosmic ancestry, revealed when ISO examines their counterparts still observable today. The evolving galaxies In the beginning was hydrogen, mixed with helium and minute traces of other light atoms. These were the atomic products of the Big Bang, the hypothetical cataclysm that created the Universe more than 10 billion years ago. The primeval gas was very dull. Nature could not make dust from it, never mind a living creature. But gravity gathered the hydrogen and helium into stars, and by nuclear reactions the stars glowed. As the first stars aged, the reactions made novel chemical elements like carbon, oxygen and silicon. Expelled into the stars' surroundings, these materials reacted with one another and with hydrogen to make the icy, tarry and stony grains of cosmic dust. The vast assemblies of stars called galaxies became crucibles where Nature could use physics and chemistry to make new materials and new stars. Rays from the most distant galaxies have taken so many billions of years to reach us that we see them as they were when they were young. The farthest galaxy observed so far by ISO is a quasar called BR 1202-0225, dating from a time when the Universe was less than one-tenth of its present age. Already it is dusty. ISO has also observed many galaxies at about half the age of the Universe, by staring long and hard through a window in the dust of our own Milky Way Galaxy, called the Lockman Hole. In those that glow most brightly in the infrared, astronomers suspect that frantic star-making is in progress, in episodes called starbursts. In nearer galaxies, ISO's astronomers can relate strong infrared emissions to collisions and to violent eruptions in the galactic cores, which have punctuated the evolution of the galaxies. "Having ISO in space brings special opportunities for the study of the history of the galaxies," says the Japanese astronomer Yoshiaki Taniguchi of Tohoku University. "By detecting infrared wavelengths that are hard to

  13. New water and remote galaxies complete ISO's observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    to deduce the presence of diverse materials in interstellar space, in the surroundings of stars, and in other galaxies. As previously reported, ISO has identified stony materials, tarry compounds of carbon, and vapours and ices like water and carbon monoxide. Together they give the first clear picture of how Mother Nature prepares, from elements manufactured in stars, the ingredients needed for planets and for life itself. Particularly striking for the human imagination are ISO's repeated discoveries of water in the deserts of space. They encourage expectations of life elsewhere in the Universe. Water has turned up around dying stars, newborn stars, in the general interstellar medium, in the atmospheres of the outer planets and in other galaxies too. A link to the Earth's oceans and the water we live by comes in the water- ice long known to be a major ingredient of comets, which are relics from the era of planet-building. A further link to the investigation of the origin of life is the apparent detection of water vapour in the mysterious atmosphere of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A preliminary announcement comes from an international team headed by Athena Coustenis of Paris Observatory and Alberto Salama of the ISO Science Operations Center at Villafranca. The team used ISO's Short Wavelength Spectrometer during several hours of observations last December, when Titan was at its farthest from Saturn as seen by ISO. Emissions at wavelengths of 39 and 44 microns showed up, as an expected signature of water vapour. The news will excite the scientists involved in ESA's probe Huygens, launched last year aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft. It will parachute into Titan's atmosphere to see what the chemistry of the Earth may have been like before life began. "Water vapour makes Titan much richer," comments Athena Coustenis. "We knew there was carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in Titan's atmosphere, so we expected water vapour too. Now that we believe we've found it, we can