WorldWideScience

Sample records for proton signal intensity

  1. High intensity circular proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1987-12-01

    Circular machines suitable for the acceleration of high intensity proton beams include cyclotrons, FFAG accelerators, and strong-focusing synchrotrons. This paper discusses considerations affecting the design of such machines for high intensity, especially space charge effects and the role of beam brightness in multistage accelerators. Current plans for building a new generation of high intensity 'kaon factories' are reviewed. 47 refs

  2. The intense proton accelerator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1990-01-01

    The Science and Technology Agency of Japan has formulated the OMEGA project, in which incineration of nuclear wastes by use of accelerators is defined as one of the important tasks. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been engaged for several years in basic studies in incineration technology with use of an intense proton linear accelerator. The intense proton accelerator program intends to provide a large scale proton linear accelerator called Engineering Test Accelerator. The principal purpose of the accelerator is to develop nuclear waste incineration technology. The accelerator will also be used for other industrial applications and applied science studies. The present report further outlines the concept of incineration of radio-activities of nuclear wastes, focusing on nuclear reactions and a concept of incineration plant. Features of Engineering Test Accelerator are described focusing on the development of the accelerator, and research and development of incineration technology. Applications of science and technology other than nuclear waste incineration are also discussed. (N.K.)

  3. Proton energy dependence of slow neutron intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Kai, Tetsuya; Sakata, Hideaki; Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    The choice of the proton energy is an important issue for the design of an intense-pulsed-spallation source. The optimal proton beam energy is rather unique from a viewpoint of the leakage neutron intensity but no yet clear from the slow-neutron intensity view point. It also depends on an accelerator type. Since it is also important to know the proton energy dependence of slow-neutrons from the moderators in a realistic target-moderator-reflector assembly (TMRA). We studied on the TMRA proposed for Japan Spallation Neutron Source. The slow-neutron intensities from the moderators per unit proton beam power (MW) exhibit the maximum at about 1-2 GeV. At higher proton energies the intensity per MW goes down; at 3 and 50 GeV about 0.91 and 0.47 times as low as that at 1 GeV. The proton energy dependence of slow-neutron intensities was found to be almost the same as that of total neutron yield (leakage neutrons) from the same bare target. It was also found that proton energy dependence was almost the same for the coupled and decoupled moderators, regardless the different moderator type, geometry and coupling scheme. (author)

  4. High intensity proton accelerator and its application (Proton Engineering Center)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1995-01-01

    A plan called PROTON ENGINEERING CENTER has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities and a beam shape and storage ring based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA. The research facilities planned are OMEGA·Nuclear Energy Development Facility, Neutron Facility for Material Irradiation, Nuclear Data Experiment Facility, Neutron Factory, Meson Factory, Spallation Radioisotope Beam Facility, and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutrons, π-mesons, muons, and unstable isotopes originated from the protons are available for promoting the innovative research of nuclear energy and basic science and technology. (author)

  5. Development of high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, M.; Kusano, J.; Hasegawa, K.; Ouchi, N.; Oguri, H.; Kinsho, M.; Touchi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Mukugi, K.; Ino, H.; Noda, F.; Akaoka, N.; Kaneko, H.; Chishiro, E.; Fechner, B.

    1997-01-01

    The high-intensity proton linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 5.33mA has been proposed for the Neutron Science Project (NSP) at JAERI. the NSP is aiming at exploring nuclear technologies for nuclear waste transmutation based on a proton induced spallation neutrons. The proposed accelerators facilities will be also used in the various basic research fields such as condensed matter physics in combination with a high intensity proton storage ring. The R and D work has been carried out for the components of the front-end of the proton accelerator. For the high energy portion above 100 MeV, superconducting (SC) accelerator linac has been designed and developed as a major option. (Author) 7 refs

  6. High intensity proton accelerator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Nishida, Takahiko

    1991-06-01

    Industrial applications of proton accelerators to the incineration of the long-lived nuclides contained in the spent fuels have long been investigated. Department of Reactor Engineering of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has formulated the Accelerator Program through the investigations on the required performances of the accelerator and its development strategies and also the research plan using the accelerator. Outline of the Program is described in the present report. The target of the Program is the construction of the Engineering Test Accelerators (ETA) of the type of a linear accelerator with the energy 1.5 GeV and the proton current ∼10 mA. It is decided that the construction of the Basic Technology Accelerator (BTA) is necessary as an intermediate step, aiming at obtaining the required technical basis and human resources. The Basic Technology Accelerator with the energy of 10 MeV and with the current of ∼10 mA is composed of the ion source, RFQ and DTL, of which system forms the mock-up of the injector of ETA. Development of the high-β structure which constitutes the main acceleration part of ETA is also scheduled. This report covers the basic parameters of the Basic Technology Accelerator (BTA), development steps of the element and system technologies of the high current accelerators and rough sketch of ETA which can be prospected at present. (J.P.N.)

  7. Fan-beam intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick; Westerly, David; Mackie, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a concept for a proton therapy system capable of delivering intensity modulated proton therapy using a fan beam of protons. This system would allow present and future gantry-based facilities to deliver state-of-the-art proton therapy with the greater normal tissue sparing made possible by intensity modulation techniques. A method for producing a divergent fan beam of protons using a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles is described and particle transport through the quadrupole doublet is simulated using a commercially available software package. To manipulate the fan beam of protons, a modulation device is developed. This modulator inserts or retracts acrylic leaves of varying thickness from subsections of the fan beam. Each subsection, or beam channel, creates what effectively becomes a beam spot within the fan area. Each channel is able to provide 0-255 mm of range shift for its associated beam spot, or stop the beam and act as an intensity modulator. Results of particle transport simulations through the quadrupole system are incorporated into the MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code along with a model of the range and intensity modulation device. Several design parameters were investigated and optimized, culminating in the ability to create topotherapy treatment plans using distal-edge tracking on both phantom and patient datasets. Beam transport calculations show that a pair of electromagnetic quadrupoles can be used to create a divergent fan beam of 200 MeV protons over a distance of 2.1 m. The quadrupole lengths were 30 and 48 cm, respectively, with transverse field gradients less than 20 T/m, which is within the range of water-cooled magnets for the quadrupole radii used. MCNPX simulations of topotherapy treatment plans suggest that, when using the distal edge tracking delivery method, many delivery angles are more important than insisting on narrow beam channel widths in order to obtain conformal target coverage. Overall, the sharp distal

  8. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  9. Applications of High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Rajendran; Mishra, Shekhar

    2010-06-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency linac development at Fermilab / S. D. Holmes -- Rare muon decay experiments / Y. Kuno -- Rare kaon decays / D. Bryman -- Muon collider / R. B. Palmer -- Neutrino factories / S. Geer -- ADS and its potential / J.-P. Revol -- ADS history in the USA / R. L. Sheffield and E. J. Pitcher -- Accelerator driven transmutation of waste: high power accelerator for the European ADS demonstrator / J. L. Biarrotte and T. Junquera -- Myrrha, technology development for the realisation of ADS in EU: current status & prospects for realisation / R. Fernandez ... [et al.] -- High intensity proton beam production with cyclotrons / J. Grillenberger and M. Seidel -- FFAG for high intensity proton accelerator / Y. Mori -- Kaon yields for 2 to 8 GeV proton beams / K. K. Gudima, N. V. Mokhov and S. I. Striganov -- Pion yield studies for proton driver beams of 2-8 GeV kinetic energy for stopped muon and low-energy muon decay experiments / S. I. Striganov -- J-Parc accelerator status and future plans / H. Kobayashi -- Simulation and verification of DPA in materials / N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov -- Performance and operational experience of the CNGS facility / E. Gschwendtner -- Particle physics enabled with super-conducting RF technology - summary of working group 1 / D. Jaffe and R. Tschirhart -- Proton beam requirements for a neutrino factory and muon collider / M. S. Zisman -- Proton bunching options / R. B. Palmer -- CW SRF H linac as a proton driver for muon colliders and neutrino factories / M. Popovic, C. M. Ankenbrandt and R. P. Johnson -- Rapid cycling synchrotron option for Project X / W. Chou -- Linac-based proton driver for a neutrino factory / R. Garoby ... [et al.] -- Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders / N. V. Mokhov ... [et al.] -- Proton bunch compression strategies / V. Lebedev -- Accelerator test facility for muon collider and neutrino factory R&D / V. Shiltsev -- The superconducting RF linac for muon

  10. Development of a high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu; Kusano, Joichi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ito, Nobuo; Oguri, Hidetomo; Touchi, Yutaka; Mukugi, Ken; Ino, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    The high-intensity proton linear accelerator with a beam power of 15 MW has been proposed for various engineering tests for the nuclear waste transmutation system as one of the research plans in the Neutron Science Research Program (NSRP) in JAERI. High intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutron, pion, muon and unstable radio isotope (RI) beam generated from the proton spallation reaction will be utilized at these facilities in each research field. The R and D work has been carried out for the components of the front-end part of the proton accelerator; ion source, RFQ, DTL and RF source. In the beam test, the current of 70 mA with a duty factor of 7% has been accelerated from the RFQ at the energy of 2 MeV. A hot test model of the DTL for the high power and high duty operation was fabricated and tested. For the high energy portion above 100 MeV, superconducting accelerating cavity is studied as a main option. The superconducting linac is expected to have several favourable characteristics for high intensity accelerator such as short accelerator length, large bore radius resulting in low beam losses and cost effectiveness for construction and operation. A test stand with equipment of cryogenics system, vacuum system, RF system and cavity processing and cleaning is prepared to test the physics issues and fabrication process. The proposed plan for accelerator design and construction will compose of two consecutive stages. The first stage will be completed in about 7 years with the beam power of 1.5 MW. As the second stage gradual upgrading of the beam power will be made up to 15 MW. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of regionally ischemic canine hearts: effects of paramagnetic proton signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Pykett, I.L.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Newhouse, J.H.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the potential of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with and without manganese contrast enhancement for detecting acute myocardial infarction, 12 dogs underwent 90-minute occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. Transverse-section NMR images of the excised, nonbeating heart were obtained at 1-cm intervals using the steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) technique. All NMR images revealed detailed structure of the heart. The three hearts without manganese showed no difference in intensity between the normal and the ischemic posterior regions, whereas those with manganese demonstrated a clearly demarcated zone of reduced signal intensity consistent with the ischemic zone. It is concluded that high-resolution tomograms of the excised canine myocardium can be obtained using proton NMR imaging. With the SSFP imaging technique, proton signal enhancement with manganese infusion is necessary to differentiate between ischemic and nonischemic myocardium after 90 minutes of coronary occlusion

  12. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-09-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described. The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods. It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan. When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  13. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-10-07

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT.

  14. Single-energy intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Cianchetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In this note, an intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) technique, based on the use of high single-energy (SE-IMPT) pencil beams, is described.The method uses only the highest system energy (226 MeV) and only lateral penumbra to produce dose gradient, as in photon therapy. In the study, after a preliminary analysis of the width of proton pencil beam penumbras at different depths, SE-IMPT was compared with conventional IMPT in a phantom containing titanium inserts and in a patient, affected by a spinal chordoma with fixation rods.It was shown that SE-IMPT has the potential to produce a sharp dose gradient and that it is not affected by the uncertainties produced by metal implants crossed by the proton beams. Moreover, in the chordoma patient, target coverage and organ at risk sparing of the SE-IMPT plan resulted comparable to that of the less reliable conventional IMPT technique. Robustness analysis confirmed that SE-IMPT was not affected by range errors, which can drastically affect the IMPT plan.When accepting a low-dose spread as in modern photon techniques, SE-IMPT could be an option for the treatment of lesions (e.g. cervical bone tumours) where steep dose gradient could improve curability, and where range uncertainty, due for example to the presence of metal implants, hampers conventional IMPT. (note)

  15. Inverse planning of intensity modulated proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nill, S.; Oelfke, U.; Bortfeld, T.

    2004-01-01

    A common requirement of radiation therapy is that treatment planning for different radiation modalities is devised on the basis of the same treatment planning system (TPS). The present study presents a novel multi-modal TPS with separate modules for the dose calculation, the optimization engine and the graphical user interface, which allows to integrate different treatment modalities. For heavy-charged particles, both most promising techniques, the distal edge tracking (DET) and the 3-dimensional scanning (3D) technique can be optimized. As a first application, the quality of optimized intensity-modulated treatment plans for photons (IMXT) and protons (IMPT) was analyzed in one clinical case on the basis of the achieved physical dose distributions. A comparison of the proton plans with the photon plans showed no significant improvement in terms of target volume dose, however there was an improvement in terms of organs at risk as well as a clear reduction of the total integral dose. For the DET technique, it is possible to create a treatment plan with almost the same quality of the 3D technique, however with a clearly reduced number (factor of 5) of beam spots as well as a reduced optimization time. Due to its modular design, the system can be easily expanded to more sophisticated dose-calculation algorithms or to modeling of biological effects. (orig.) [de

  16. High intensity proton accelerator controls network upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krempaska, R.; Bertrand, A.; Lendzian, F.; Lutz, H.

    2012-01-01

    The High Intensity Proton Accelerator (HIPA) control system network is spread through a vast area in PSI and it was grown historically in an unorganized way. The miscellaneous network hardware infrastructure and the lack of the documentation and components overview could no longer guarantee the reliability of the control system and the facility operation. Therefore, a new network, based on modern network topology, PSI standard hardware with monitoring and detailed documentation and overview was needed. The number of active components has been reduced from 25 to 9 Cisco Catalyst 24- or 48-port switches. They are the same type as other PSI switches, thus a replacement emergency stock is not an issue anymore. We would like to present how we successfully achieved this goal and the advantages of the clean and well documented network infrastructure. (authors)

  17. Intense-proton-beam transport through an insulator beam guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanamori, Susumu; Kawata, Shigeo; Kikuchi, Takashi; Fujita, Akira; Chiba, Yasunobu; Hikita, Taisuke; Kato, Shigeru

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we study intense-proton-beam transport through an insulator guide. In our previous papers (Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 34 (1995) L520, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 35 (1996) L1127) we proposed a new system for intense-electron-beam transport using an insulator guide. In contrast to the electron beam, an intense-proton beam tends to generate a virtual anode, because of the large proton mass. The virtual anode formation at the initial stage is prevented by prefilled plasma in this system. During and after this, electrons are extracted from the plasma generated at the insulator surface by the proton beam space charge and expand over the transport area. The proton beam charge is effectively neutralized by the electrons. Consequently, the proton beam propagates efficiently through the insulator beam guide. The electron extraction is self-regulated by the net space charge of the proton beam. (author)

  18. An experimental study on MRI signal intensity of albumin solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, In Oak; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Song, Chi Sung; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1990-01-01

    This in vitro study attempted to correlate magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity with concentration of albumin solution in magnetic field strength of 2.0 Tesla (T) and 0.5T. MR imaging of bovine serum albumin solutions of various concentrations ranging from 0 to 40 g/dl was performed on both 2.0T and 0.5T MR units. The relative (with respect to normal saline) signal intensities of each albumin solution were measured in T1-weighted, proton density-weighted and T2-weighted MR images, correlated with albumin concentration on each pulse sequence, and compared between 2.0T and 0.5T. Additionally, the albumin concentrations showing signal intensities identical to those of white matter, cortical gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of normal brain MRI were determined by visual comparison of those images. 1. On T1-weighted (SE 400-500 msec/30 msec) images under 2.0T and 0.5T field strength, the signal intensity increased with increasing albumin concentrations up to about 30-35 g/dl and the decreased. For the solutions ranging from 0 to about 5 g/dl concentration, the signal intensities appeared isointense to normal saline on visual inspection. 2. On proton density-weighted (SE 2000-2500 msec/30 msec) images under 2.0T and 0.5T field strength, the signal intensity slightly increased with increasing albumin concentrations up to about 7.5-10 g/dl, and then gradually decreased. 3. On T2-weighted (SE 2000-2500 msec/80-100 msec) images under 2.0T and 0.5T field strength, the signal intensity slightly increased with increasing albumin concentrations up to about 7.5-10 g/dl, and then gradually decreased. Above the concentration of about 25-30 g/dl, the signal intensity appeared lower than that of normal saline on visual inspection. 4. Compared with the signal intensities of normal brain structures on T1-weighted images under 2.0T and 0.5T field strength, the signal intensities of the albumin solution below 2.5-5 g/dl concentration were similar to that of CSF, and those of

  19. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Macek, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures

  20. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  1. Proton induction linacs as high-intensity neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keefe, D.; Hoyer, E.

    1981-01-01

    Proton induction linacs are explored as high intensity neutron sources. The induction linac - concept, properties, experience with electrons, and possibilities - and its limitations for accelerating ions are reviewed. A number of proton induction linac designs are examined with the LIACEP program and general conclusions are given. Results suggest that a proton induction accelerator of the lowest voltage, consistent with good neutron flux, is preferred and could well be cost competitive with the usual rf linac/storage ring designs. (orig.)

  2. Formation of an intense proton beam of microsecond duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelko, V [Efremov Inst. of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Giese, H; Schalk, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The proton beam facility PROFA serves as a test installation for ion source development and beam transport optimization for an intense pulsed proton beam of low kinetic energy, envisaged for ITER divertor load simulation. The present state of the investigations is discussed with emphasis on the diode operation parameters, beam divergence and beam transport efficiency. (author). 7 figs., 5 refs.

  3. Ultra-High Intensity Proton Accelerators and their Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W. T.

    1997-01-01

    The science and technology of proton accelerators have progressed considerably in the past three decades. Three to four orders of magnitude increase in both peak intensity and average flux have made it possible to construct high intensity proton accelerators for modern applications, such as: spallation neutron sources, kaon factory, accelerator production of tritium, energy amplifier and muon collider drivers. The accelerator design focus switched over from intensity for synchrotrons, to brightness for colliders to halos for spallation sources. An overview of this tremendous progress in both accelerator science and technology is presented, with special emphasis on the new challenges of accelerator physics issues such as: H(-) injection, halo formation and reduction of losses

  4. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.

    2012-01-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS)...

  5. Ablative acceleration of thin foil targets by intense proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, S.; Ozaki, T.; Imasaki, K.; Higaki, S.; Nakai, S.

    1981-01-01

    A focused proton beam of up to 2 x 10 10 w/cm 2 was obtained using pinch-reflex ion diode connected to Reiden IV generator. Experiments of beam target interaction have been done using thin foil targets. In this power range the interaction was explained classically. The experimental dependence of ablation pressure on proton beam intensity was obtained as P sub(a) = 3 x 10 -3 I sup(0.7) bar (I in w/cm 2 ). (author)

  6. Application of superconductivity to intense proton linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrichs, H.

    1996-01-01

    Three examples of proposed superconducting linacs for intense particle beams are presented, and in two cases compared to normal conducting counterparts. Advantages and disadvantages of both types are discussed. Suggestions for future developments are presented. Finally a comparison of estimated operational costs of the normal and the superconducting linac for the ESS is given. (R.P.)

  7. An outline of research facilities of high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1995-01-01

    A plan called PROTON ENGINEERING CENTER has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities and a beam shape and storage ring based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA. The research facilities planned are OMEGA·Nuclear Energy Development Facility, Neutron Facility for Material Irradiation, Nuclear Data Experiment Facility, Neutron Factory, Meson Factory, spallation Radioisotope Beam Facility, and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutrons, π-mesons, muons, and unstable isotopes originated from the protons are available for promoting the innovative research of nuclear energy and basic science and technology. (author)

  8. Beam intensity monitoring for the external proton beam at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.; Anderson, B.D.; Willard, H.B.; Anderson, A.N.; Jarmie, N.

    1975-07-01

    Three different intensity monitors were tested in the external proton beam at LAMPF, and together cover the entire range of beam currents available. A 800 kg Faraday cup was installed and used to measure the absolute intensity to better than 1 percent for beam currents up to several nanoamperes. A high gain ion chamber was used as part of the calibration procedure for the Faraday cup, and was found to be useful when monitoring very small beam intensities, being reliable down to the few picoampere level. A secondary emission monitor was also tested, calibrated, and found to be trustworthy only for beams of greater than 50 pA intensity. (auth)

  9. High Intensity Beam Issues in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Aumon, Sandra; Rivkin, Leonid

    This PhD work is about limitations of high intensity proton beams observed in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and, in particular, about issues at injection and transition energies. With its 53 years, the CERN PS would have to operate beyond the limit of its performance to match the future requirements. Beam instabilities driven by transverse impedance and aperture restrictions are important issues for the operation and for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade which foresees an intensity increase delivered by the injectors. The main subject of the thesis concerns the study of a fast transverse instability occurring at transition energy. The proton beams crossing this energy range are particularly sensitive to wake forces because of the slow synchrotron motion. This instability can cause a strong vertical emittance blow-up and severe losses in less than a synchrotron period. Experimental observations show that the particles at the peak density of the beam longitudinal distribution oscillate in the vertical plane du...

  10. Reuse Recycler: High Intensity Proton Stacking at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, P. [Fermilab

    2016-07-17

    After a successful career as an antiproton storage and cooling ring, Recycler has been converted to a high intensity proton stacker for the Main Injector. We discuss the commissioning and operation of the Recycler in this new role, and the progress towards the 700 kW design goal.

  11. Dynamics of intense pulsed proton beam in the Nagaoka ETIGO-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hajime; Konno, Kohji; Masugata, Katsumi; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Masao

    1982-01-01

    Dynamics of an intense pulsed proton beam have been studied by measuring nuclear reactions as well as by a biased ion-collector (BIC). When the ion-current density (Jsub(i)) is small such that Jsub(i) lt 30 A/cm 2 , the proton numer measured by BIC is in good agreement with that by nuclear activation. Good linearity exists between time integrated gamma -ray signal and proton number measured by the activation. Hence, it would be possible to obtain the proton number quantitatively even when a target ''blow-off'' takes place at Jsub(i) gt 1 kA/cm 2 . Prompt gamma -ray is also measured by the time-of-flight method to yield reasonable agreement with the applied peak potential. (author)

  12. Proton and Ion Sources for High Intensity Accelerators

    CERN Multimedia

    Scrivens, R

    2004-01-01

    Future high intensity ion accelerators, including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the European Spallation Source (ESS), the Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) etc, will require high current and high duty factor sources for protons and negative hydrogen ions. In order to achieve these goals, a comparison of the Electron Cyclotron Resonance, radio-frequency and Penning ion sources, among others, will be made. For each of these source types, the present operational sources will be compared to the state-of-the-art research devices with special attention given to reliability and availability. Finally, the future research and development aims will be discussed.

  13. High intensity proton linac activities at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusnak, B.; Chan, K.C.; Campbell, B.

    1998-01-01

    High-current proton linear accelerators offer an attractive alternative for generating the intense neutron fluxes needed for transmutations technologies, tritium production and neutron science. To achieve the fluxes required for tritium production, a 100-mA, 1700-MeV cw proton accelerator is being designed that uses superconducting cavities for the high-energy portion of the linac, from 211 to 1,700 MeV. The development work supporting the linac design effort is focused on three areas: superconducting cavity performance for medium-beta cavities at 700 MHz, high power rf coupler development, and cryomodule design. An overview of the progress in these three areas is presented

  14. KEK/JAERI joint project on high intensity proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    From JFY01, which started on April 1, 2001, a new accelerator project to provide high-intensity proton beams proceeded into a construction phase. This project is conducted under a cooperation of two institutions, KEK and JAERI. The accelerator complex will provide 1 MW proton beams at 3 GeV and 0.75 MW beams at 50 GeV. The project will be completed within six years. In this article I will describe a) the project itself, b) sciences to be pursued at this new accelerator complex and c) the present status and future plans of the project. (author)

  15. Intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lasse; Brinkløv, Signe; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2013-01-01

    will increase signal directionality in the field along with intensity thus increasing sonar range. During the last phase of prey pursuit, vespertilionid bats broaden their echolocation beam considerably, probably to counter evasive maneuvers of eared prey. We highlight how multiple call parameters (frequency......The paper reviews current knowledge of intensity and directionality of bat echolocation signals. Recent studies have revealed that echolocating bats can be much louder than previously believed. Bats previously dubbed "whispering" can emit calls with source levels up to 110 dB SPL at 10 cm......, duration, intensity, and directionality of echolocation signals) in unison define the search volume probed by bats and in turn how bats perceive their surroundings. Small changes to individual parameters can, in combination, drastically change the bat's perception, facilitating successful navigation...

  16. Characterization of a proton beam driven by a high-intensity laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagisaka, Akito; Daido, Hiroyuki; Ogura, Koichi; Orimo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yukio; Mori, Michiaki; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Yogo, Akifumi; Kado, Masataka; Fukumi, Atsushi; Li, Zhong; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Nakamura, Shu

    2007-01-01

    High-energy protons are observed with a 3 μm thick tantalum target irradiated with a high intensity laser. The maximum proton energy is ∼900 keV. The half angle of the generated proton beam (>500 keV) is about 10deg. Characterization of the proton beam will significantly contribute to the proton applications. (author)

  17. Pulsed Power Applications in High Intensity Proton Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Wu; Ducimetière, Laurent; Fowler, Tony; Kawakubo, Tadamichi; Mertens, Volker; Sandberg, Jon; Shirakabe, Yoshihisa

    2005-01-01

    The pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  18. High intensity proton linear accelerator development for nuclear waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Oguri, H.; Ito, N.; Kusano, J.; Okumura, Y.; Murata, H.; Sakogawa, K.

    1997-01-01

    A high-intensity proton linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA has been proposed for various engineering tests for the transmutation system of nuclear waste by JAERI. The conceptual and optimization studies for this accelerator performed for a proper choice of operating frequency, high b structure, mechanical engineering considerations and RF source aspects are briefly described

  19. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-01-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition open-quotes jumpclose quotes, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle

  20. Ultrafast Melting of Carbon Induced by Intense Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, A.; Guenther, M. M.; Harres, K.; Otten, A.; Roth, M.; Gregori, G.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kritcher, A. L.; Heathcote, R.; Li, B.; Neely, D.; Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.; Makita, M.; Riley, D.; Mithen, J.; Schaumann, G.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-produced proton beams have been used to achieve ultrafast volumetric heating of carbon samples at solid density. The isochoric melting of carbon was probed by a scattering of x rays from a secondary laser-produced plasma. From the scattering signal, we have deduced the fraction of the material that was melted by the inhomogeneous heating. The results are compared to different theoretical approaches for the equation of state which suggests modifications from standard models.

  1. High intensity negative proton beams from a SNICS ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, C.R.; Hollander, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    For the past year we have been involved in a project to develop an intense (> 100μA) negative proton beam from a SNICS (Source of Negative Ions by Cesium Sputtering) ion source. This report will cover how we accomplished and exceeded this goal by more than 40%. Included in these observations will be the following: A description of an effective method for making titanium hydride cathodes. How to overcome the limitations of the titanium hydride cathode. The modification of the SNICS source to improve output; including the installation of the conical ionizer and the gas cathode. A discussion of problems including: poisoning the proton beam with oxygen, alternative gas cathode materials, the clogging of the gas inlet, long burn-in times, and limited cathode life times. Finally, how to optimize source performance when using a gas cathode, and what is the mechanism by which a gas cathode operates; facts, fantasies, or myth

  2. Expected proton signal sizes in the PRaVDA Range Telescope for proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, T.; Parker, D.J.; Green, S.; Esposito, M.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N.M.; Poludniowski, G.; Evans, P.; Taylor, J.; Manolopoulos, S.; Anaxagoras, T.; Nieto-Camero, J.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy has demonstrated benefits in the treatment of certain cancers. Accurate measurements of the proton stopping powers in body tissues are required in order to fully optimise the delivery of such treaments. The PRaVDA Consortium is developing a novel, fully solid state device to measure these stopping powers. The PRaVDA Range Telescope (RT), uses a stack of 24 CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APS) to measure the residual proton energy after the patient. We present here the ability of the CMOS sensors to detect changes in the signal sizes as the proton traverses the RT, compare the results with theory, and discuss the implications of these results on the reconstruction of proton tracks

  3. The joint project for high-intensity proton accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) agreed to promote the joint project integrating both the Neutron Science Project (NSP) of JAERI and the Japan Hadron Facility Project (JHF) of KEK for comprehensive studies on basic science and technology using high-intensity proton accelerator. This document describes the joint proposal prepared by the Joint Project Team of JAERI and KEK to construct accelerators and research facilities necessary both for the NSP and the JHF at the site of JAERI Tokai Establishment. (author)

  4. JAERI-KEK joint project on high intensity proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    2000-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the High Energy Accelerator Organization (KEK) are promoting the joint project integrating both the Neutron Science Project (NSP) of JAERI and the Japan Hadron Facility Project (JHF) of KEK for comprehensive studies on basic science and technology using high-intensity proton accelerator. This paper describes the joint project prepared by the Joint Project Team of JAERI and KEK to construct accelerators and research facilities necessary both for the NSP and the JHF at the site of JAERI Tokai Establishment. (author)

  5. Overview of high intensity proton accelerator facility, J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The J-PARC project of high intensity proton accelerator research complex, conducted jointly by JAERI and KEK, has been completed with demonstration of all beam productions in 2009 as the facility construction phase, and the operation started to offer the secondary beams of neutron, muon, kaon, and neutrino, to the advanced scientific experimental research aiming at making breakthroughs in materials and life science, nuclear and elementary physics, etc. This text describes the overview of the J-PARC present status with emphasis of a performance toward to 1MW power as user facilities. (author)

  6. Polarized proton and deuteron targets for the usage in intensive proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Get'man, V.A.; Derkach, A.Ya.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Razumnyj, A.A.; Sorokin, P.V.; Sporo, E.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    1982-01-01

    Polarized proton and deuteron targets are developed and tested for conducting investigations in intense photon beams. A flowsheet of polarization targets which includes: working agent of the target, superconducting magnet, cryostat of 3 He evaporation with 3 He pumping and recirculation systems, SHF system of 4 mm range for polarization pumping, measuring system of target polarization protons is presented. Working agent of the targets includes frozen balls with 1.5 mm diameter. Ethylene-glucol and 1.2-propylene-glycol were used as a working substance for proton targets. Completely deuterated ethylene-glycol was used for the deuteron target. Vertical magnetic field with 2.7 T intensity is produced by a superconducting magnetic system. Polarization pumping is exercised at 75 GHz frequency. Q-meter of direct current is used for determination of polarization. Working temperature of the cryostat is approximately 0.5 K. The lock device permits to exercise replacement of the target working agent during 30 minutes

  7. Longitudinal tracking studies for a high intensity proton synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessner, E.; Cho, Y.; Harkay, K.; Symon, K.

    1995-01-01

    Results from longitudinal tracking studies for a high intensity proton synchrotron designed for a 1-MW spallation source are presented. The machine delivers a proton beam of 0.5 mA time-averaged current at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The accelerator is designed to have radiation levels that allow hands-on-maintenance. However, the high beam intensity causes strong space charge fields whose effects may lead to particle loss and longitudinal instabilities. The space charge fields modify the particle distribution, distort the stable bucket area and reduce the rf linear restoring force. Tracking simulations were conducted to analyze the space charge effects on the dynamics of the injection and acceleration processes and means to circumvent them. The tracking studies led to the establishment of the injected beam parameters and rf voltage program that minimized beam loss and longitudinal instabilities. Similar studies for a 10-GeV synchrotron that uses the 2-GeV synchrotron as its injector are also discussed

  8. Proton Beam Intensity Upgrades for the Neutrino Program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C. M. [Fermilab

    2016-12-15

    Fermilab is committed to upgrading its accelerator complex towards the intensity frontier to pursue HEP research in the neutrino sector and beyond. The upgrade has two steps: 1) the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP), which is underway, has its primary goal to start providing 700 kW beam power on NOvA target by the end of 2017 and 2) the foreseen PIP–II will replace the existing LINAC, a 400 MeV injector to the Booster, by an 800 MeV superconducting LINAC by the middle of next decade, with output beam intensity from the Booster increased significantly and the beam power on the NOvA target increased to <1.2 MW. In any case, the Fermilab Booster is going to play a very significant role for the next two decades. In this context, we have recently developed and commissioned an innovative beam injection scheme for the Booster called "early injection scheme". This scheme is already in operation and has a potential to increase the Booster beam intensity from the PIP design goal by a considerable amount with a reduced beam emittance and beam loss. In this paper, we will present results from our experience from the new scheme in operation, current status and future plans.

  9. High signal intensity of the septum pellucidum at MR imaging; Significance in hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Eun Ha; Chung, Chun Phil; Kim, Chang Soo

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of high signal intensity of the septum pellucidum in hydrocephalus on proton density-weighted brain MR images. Authors reviewed the MR images of 418 cases of patients with normal (175 case), hydrocephalic(35 cases), atrophic(58 cases), and other groups(150 cases) retrospectively. We analyzed the signal intensity of the septum pellucidum in the normal group and the incidences of high signal intensities of periventricular area of frontal horn of lateral ventricle(area 1), periventricular area except area 1 (area 2), callososeptal area(area 3), and septum pellucidum(area 4) in the normal and abnormal groups. In the normal group, the septum pellucidum was isointense to the head of caudate nucleus on proton density-weighted image. High signal intensity of the septum pellucidum was seen in 31 cases (22 cases of hydrocephalus, 5 cases of brain atrophy, and 4 cases of others), and showed high specificity(91.4%) for hydrocephalus in spite of low sensitivity(62.9%), as compared with periventricular hyperintensities of other areas. High signal intensity of the septum pellucidum on proton density- weighted image may be caused by transependymal CSF migration in the patients with hydrocephalus, and considered as an additional finding of hydrocephalus in the cases of ventriculomegaly

  10. Simplified shielding calculation system for high-intensity proton accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masumura, Tomomi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Nakane, Yoshihiro; Sasamoto, Nobuo [Center for Neutron Science, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    A simplified shielding calculation system is developed for applying conceptual shielding design of facilities in the joint project for high-intensity proton accelerators. The system is composed of neutron transmission calculation part for bulk shielding using simplified formulas: Moyer model and Tesch's formula, and neutron skyshine calculation part using an empirical formula: Stapleton's formula. The system is made with the Microsoft Excel software for user's convenience. This report provides a manual for the system as well as calculation conditions used in the calculation such as Moyer model's parameters. In this report preliminary results based on data at December 8, 1999, are also shown as an example. (author)

  11. Optical diagnostics of mercury jet for an intense proton target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H; Tsang, T; Kirk, H G; Ladeinde, F; Graves, V B; Spampinato, P T; Carroll, A J; Titus, P H; McDonald, K T

    2008-04-01

    An optical diagnostic system is designed and constructed for imaging a free mercury jet interacting with a high intensity proton beam in a pulsed high-field solenoid magnet. The optical imaging system employs a backilluminated, laser shadow photography technique. Object illumination and image capture are transmitted through radiation-hard multimode optical fibers and flexible coherent imaging fibers. A retroreflected illumination design allows the entire passive imaging system to fit inside the bore of the solenoid magnet. A sequence of synchronized short laser light pulses are used to freeze the transient events, and the images are recorded by several high speed charge coupled devices. Quantitative and qualitative data analysis using image processing based on probability approach is described. The characteristics of free mercury jet as a high power target for beam-jet interaction at various levels of the magnetic induction field is reported in this paper.

  12. Two-dimensional computer simulation of high intensity proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Lapostolle, Pierre M

    1972-01-01

    A computer program has been developed which simulates the two- dimensional transverse behaviour of a proton beam in a focusing channel. The model is represented by an assembly of a few thousand 'superparticles' acted upon by their own self-consistent electric field and an external focusing force. The evolution of the system is computed stepwise in time by successively solving Poisson's equation and Newton's law of motion. Fast Fourier transform techniques are used for speed in the solution of Poisson's equation, while extensive area weighting is utilized for the accurate evaluation of electric field components. A computer experiment has been performed on the CERN CDC 6600 computer to study the nonlinear behaviour of an intense beam in phase space, showing under certain circumstances a filamentation due to space charge and an apparent emittance growth. (14 refs).

  13. Material studies for pulsed high-intensity proton beam targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W-T.; McDonald, K.; Yoshimura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Intense beams for muon colliders and neutrino facilities require high-performance target stations of 1-4 MW proton beams. The physics requirements for such a system push the envelope of our current knowledge as to how materials behave under high-power beams for both short and long exposure. The success of an adopted scheme that generates, captures and guides secondary particles depends on the useful life expectancy of this critical system. This paper presents an overview of what has been achieved during the various phases of the experimental effort including a tentative plan to continue the effort by expanding the material matrix. The first phase of the project was to study the changes after irradiation in mechanical properties and specially in thermal expansion coefficient of various materials. During phase-I the study attention was primarily focused on Super-invar and in a lesser degree on Inconel-718. Invar is a metal alloy which predominantly consists of 62% Fe, 32% Ni and 5% Co. It is showed that this metal, whose non-irradiated properties held such promise, can only be considered a serious target candidate for an intense proton beam only if one can anneal the atomic displacements followed by the appropriate heat treatment to restore its favorable expansion coefficient. New materials that have been developed for various industrial needs by optimizing key properties, might be of value for the accelerator community. These materials like carbon-carbon composites, titanium alloys, the Toyota 'gum metal', the Vascomax material and the AlBeMet alloy will be explored and tested in the second phase of the project. (A.C.)

  14. An intense neutron generator based on a proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, G A; Milton, J C.D.; Vogt, E W

    1964-07-01

    A study has been made of the demand for a neutron facility with a thermal flux of {>=} 10{sup 16} n cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} and of possible methods of producing such fluxes with existing or presently developing technology. Experimental projects proposed by neutron users requiring high fluxes call for neutrons of all energies from thermal to 100 MeV with both continuous-wave and pulsed output. Consideration of the heat generated in the source per useful neutron liberated shows that the (p,xn) reaction with 400 1000 MeV bombarding energies and heavy element targets (e.g. bismuth, lead) is capable of greater specific source strength than other possible methods realizable within the time scale. A preliminary parameter optimization carried through for the accelerator currently promising greatest economy (the separated orbit cyclotron or S.O.C.), reveals that a facility delivering a proton beam of about 65 mA at about 1 BeV would satisfy the flux requirement with a neutron cost significantly more favourable than that projected for a high flux reactor. It is suggested that a proton storage ring providing post-acceleration pulsing of the proton beam should be developed for the facility. With this elaboration, and by taking advantage of the intrinsic microscopic pulse structure provided by the radio frequency duty cycle, a very versatile source may be devised capable of producing multiple beams of continuous and pulsed neutrons with a wide range of energies and pulse widths. The source promises to be of great value for high flux irradiations and as a pilot facility for advanced reactor technology. The proposed proton accelerator also constitutes a meson source capable of producing beams of {pi} and {mu} mesons and of neutrinos orders of magnitude more intense than those of any accelerator presently in use. These beams, which can be produced simultaneously with the neutron beams, open vast areas of new research in fundamental nuclear structure, elementary particle physics

  15. An intense neutron generator based on a proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, G.A.; Milton, J.C.D.; Vogt, E.W.

    1964-01-01

    A study has been made of the demand for a neutron facility with a thermal flux of ≥ 10 16 n cm -2 sec -1 and of possible methods of producing such fluxes with existing or presently developing technology. Experimental projects proposed by neutron users requiring high fluxes call for neutrons of all energies from thermal to 100 MeV with both continuous-wave and pulsed output. Consideration of the heat generated in the source per useful neutron liberated shows that the (p,xn) reaction with 400 1000 MeV bombarding energies and heavy element targets (e.g. bismuth, lead) is capable of greater specific source strength than other possible methods realizable within the time scale. A preliminary parameter optimization carried through for the accelerator currently promising greatest economy (the separated orbit cyclotron or S.O.C.), reveals that a facility delivering a proton beam of about 65 mA at about 1 BeV would satisfy the flux requirement with a neutron cost significantly more favourable than that projected for a high flux reactor. It is suggested that a proton storage ring providing post-acceleration pulsing of the proton beam should be developed for the facility. With this elaboration, and by taking advantage of the intrinsic microscopic pulse structure provided by the radio frequency duty cycle, a very versatile source may be devised capable of producing multiple beams of continuous and pulsed neutrons with a wide range of energies and pulse widths. The source promises to be of great value for high flux irradiations and as a pilot facility for advanced reactor technology. The proposed proton accelerator also constitutes a meson source capable of producing beams of π and μ mesons and of neutrinos orders of magnitude more intense than those of any accelerator presently in use. These beams, which can be produced simultaneously with the neutron beams, open vast areas of new research in fundamental nuclear structure, elementary particle physics, and perhaps also in

  16. Injection and capture simulations for a high intensity proton synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.; Lessner, E.; Symon, K.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    1994-01-01

    The injection and capture processes in a high intensity, rapid cycling, proton synchrotron are simulated by numerical integration. The equations of motion suitable for rapid numerical simulation are derived so as to maintain symplecticity and second-order accuracy. By careful bookkeeping, the authors can, for each particle that is lost, determine its initial phase space coordinates. They use this information as a guide for different injection schemes and rf voltage programming, so that a minimum of particle losses and dilution are attained. A fairly accurate estimate of the space charge fields is required, as they influence considerably the particle distribution and reduce the capture efficiency. Since the beam is represented by a relatively coarse ensemble of macro particles, the authors study several methods of reducing the statistical fluctuations while retaining the fine structure (high intensity modulations) of the beam distribution. A pre-smoothing of the data is accomplished by the cloud-in-cell method. The program is checked by making sure that it gives correct answers in the absence of space charge, and that it reproduces the negative mass instability properly. Results of simulations for stationary distributions are compared to their analytical predictions. The capture efficiency for the rapid-cycling synchrotron is analyzed with respect to variations in the injected beam energy spread, bunch length, and rf programming

  17. Linear energy transfer incorporated intensity modulated proton therapy optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenhua; Khabazian, Azin; Yepes, Pablo P.; Lim, Gino; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David R.; Mohan, Radhe

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating linear energy transfer (LET) into the optimization of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. Because increased LET correlates with increased biological effectiveness of protons, high LETs in target volumes and low LETs in critical structures and normal tissues are preferred in an IMPT plan. However, if not explicitly incorporated into the optimization criteria, different IMPT plans may yield similar physical dose distributions but greatly different LET, specifically dose-averaged LET, distributions. Conventionally, the IMPT optimization criteria (or cost function) only includes dose-based objectives in which the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is assumed to have a constant value of 1.1. In this study, we added LET-based objectives for maximizing LET in target volumes and minimizing LET in critical structures and normal tissues. Due to the fractional programming nature of the resulting model, we used a variable reformulation approach so that the optimization process is computationally equivalent to conventional IMPT optimization. In this study, five brain tumor patients who had been treated with proton therapy at our institution were selected. Two plans were created for each patient based on the proposed LET-incorporated optimization (LETOpt) and the conventional dose-based optimization (DoseOpt). The optimized plans were compared in terms of both dose (assuming a constant RBE of 1.1 as adopted in clinical practice) and LET. Both optimization approaches were able to generate comparable dose distributions. The LET-incorporated optimization achieved not only pronounced reduction of LET values in critical organs, such as brainstem and optic chiasm, but also increased LET in target volumes, compared to the conventional dose-based optimization. However, on occasion, there was a need to tradeoff the acceptability of dose and LET distributions. Our conclusion is that the

  18. High intensity proton linear accelerator for Neutron Science Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu

    1999-01-01

    JAERI has been proposing the Neutron Science Project (NSP) which will be composed of a high intensity proton accelerator and various research facilities. With an energy of 1.5 GeV and a beam power of 8 MW, the accelerator is required for basic research fields and nuclear waste transmutation studies. The R and D work has been carried out for the components of the accelerator. In the low energy accelerator part, a beam test with an ion source and an RFQ has been performed with a current of 80 mA and a duty factor of 10% at an energy of 2 MeV. A 1 m long high power test model of DTL has been fabricated and tested with a duty factor of 20%. In the high energy accelerator part, a superconducting (SC) linac has been selected as a main option from 100 MeV to 1.5 GeV. A test stand for SC linac cavity with equipment of cryogenics, vacuum, RF source and cavity processing and cleaning system has been prepared to test the fabrication process and physics issues. The vertical tests of β = 0.5 (145 MeV) and β = 0.89 (1.1 GeV) single cell SC cavities have been made resulting in a maximum electric field strength of 44 MV/m and 47 MV/m at 2 K, respectively. (author)

  19. An experimental study on MRI signal intensity vs concentration of water-soluble contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ghi Jai; Han, Chang Yul; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Han, Man Chung

    1991-01-01

    There has been only one report that water-soluble contrast media containing iodine and used in conventional X -ray radiography reduce T1-and T2-relaxation times. We evaluated the relationship between signal intensity (relative signal intensity to normal saline) and T2-relaxation time of MRI and the concentration of 3 water-soluble contrast media [meglumine ioxithalamate (Telebrix 30), iopromide (Ultravist 300), iotrolan (Isovist 300)] through the phantom study, using both 2.0T and 0.5T MR units. We found that the signal intensity increased significantly on the T1-weighted images as the concentration of contrast media increased. The degree of the increase was larger on 0.5T MR than on 2.0T MR. The signal intensity on proton density image showed no significant difference at various concentrations. However, there were significant decreases of both signal intensity on the T2-weighted images and T2-relaxation time as the concentration of contrast media increased, which was more prominent on 2.0T MR than 0.5T MR. Between the contrast media of the same concentration, there was no significant difference in signal intensity and T2-relaxation time

  20. Low-intensive proton generators for radiation testing; Nizkointensivnyj protonnyj generator dlya radiatsionnykh ispytanij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istomin, I V; Gurbich, A F; Semenov, A V

    1994-12-31

    Experiment is conducted and calculations are performed grounding the possibility of creating a low-intensity proton generator based on nuclear reaction. The necessity in such a proton source is defined by the need of conducting long-term testings and by the absence of appropriate equipment.

  1. A proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingchang

    2001-01-01

    A scattering proton beam delivery system for conformal therapy and intensity modulated therapy is described. The beam is laterally spread out by a dual-ring double scattering system and collimated by a program-controlled multileaf collimator and patient specific fixed collimators. The proton range is adjusted and modulated by a program controlled binary filter and ridge filters

  2. Direct measurement of the energy spectrum of an intense proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, R.J.; Lee, J.R.; Kissel, L.; Johnson, D.J.; Stygar, W.A.; Hebron, D.E.; Roose, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    A time-resolved magnetic spectrometer has been used to measure the energy spectrum of an intense (0.5 TW/cm 2 ) proton beam. A thin (2400 A) gold foil placed at the focus of an ion diode Rutherford scattered protons by 90 0 into the spectrometer, reducing the beam intensity to a level suitable for magnetic analysis. The scattered beam was collimated by two 1 mm diameter apertures separated by 12.3 cm. The collimated protons were deflected in a 12.7 cm diameter, 6.65 Kg samarium-cobalt permanent magnet. The deflected protons were recorded simultaneously on CR-39 and eight 1 mm 2 by 35 μm thick PIN diodes. A Monte Carlo computer code was used to calculate the sensitivity and resolution of the spectrometer. Data taken on Proto-I show a 150 keV to 250 keV wide proton energy spectrum at each instant in time

  3. Proton emission from laser-generated plasmas at different intensities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Margarone, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 2 (2012), s. 237-240 ISSN 0029-5922. [International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas (PLASMA). Warsaw, 12.09.2011-16.09.2011] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-generated plasma * hydrogenated targets * proton acceleration Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.507, year: 2012

  4. Proton Drivers for neutrino beams and other high intensity applications

    CERN Document Server

    Garoby, R; Koseki, T; Thomason, J

    2013-01-01

    CERN, Fermilab, J-PARC and RAL tentatively plan to have proton accelerators delivering multi-MW of beam power in view of enhancing their physics reach especially in the domain of neutrinos. These plans are described, together with their benefits for other applications.

  5. The Energy Efficiency of High Intensity Proton Driver Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovlev, Vyacheslav [Fermilab; Grillenberger, Joachim [PSI, Villigen; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL, Oak Ridge (main); Seidel, Mike [PSI, Villigen; Yoshii, Masahito [JAEA, Ibaraki

    2017-05-01

    For MW class proton driver accelerators the energy efficiency is an important aspect; the talk reviews the efficiency of different accelerator concepts including s.c./n.c. linac, rapid cycling synchrotron, cyclotron; the potential of these concepts for very high beam power is discussed.

  6. RF acceleration of intense laser generated proton bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almomani, Ali

    2012-07-13

    With respect to laser-accelerated beams, the high current capability of the CH-DTL cavity has been investigated. Beam simulations have demonstrated that 10{sup 10} protons per bunch can be accelerated successfully and loss free along the structure. It was shown that, the maximum number of protons per bunch that can be accelerated in the first cavity by exploiting about 1% of the stored field energy is 2.02 x 10{sup 11} protons. One further aspect is the total number of protons arriving at the linac entrance. One main aspect of an rf postacceleration experiment is the rf operation stability under these beam load conditions. Detailed simulations from the target along the solenoid and down to the linac entrance were presented, applying adapted software. Special care was taken on the time steps, especially close to the target, and on the collective phenomena between electron and proton distributions. The effect of comoving electrons on the beam dynamics has been investigated in detail. A CH-linac with high space charge limit and large transverse and longitudinal acceptance was designed to accept a maximum fraction of the laser generated proton bursts. Due to well-known transformations of the injected beam emittances along the CH-cavity, it is aimed to derive parameters of the laser generated beam by measuring the beam properties behind of the CH-cavity. With respect to the linac development it is intended to realize the first cavity of the proposed CH-DTL and to demonstrate the acceleration of a laser generated proton bunch with the LIGHT project. The first cavity consists of 7 gaps within a total length of about 668 mm. It is operated at 325 MHz and has an effective accelerating field gradient of about 12.6 MV/m. The study on the surface electric field for this cavity shows, that maximum surface fields of about 94 MV/m and 88 MV/m on the third and sixth drift tubes are reachable, respectively.

  7. A study on MR signal intensity of calcifications according to calcium concentration and compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sun Ae; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1996-01-01

    The signal of intracranial calcification on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been known to be variable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the MR signal of calcifications according to calcium concentration and compound. T1-weighted, proton density and T2-weighted images were obtained in phantoms with various conposition of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. The signal intensities and T1/T2 relaxation times were measured and analyzed according to calcium concentration and compound. The configurations of calcium particles were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The signal intensity of calcium carbonate on T1-weighted images gradually decreased as the concentration increased, while that of calcium phosphate showed a biphasic curve with a peak intensity at 0.2g/ml. The signal intensity of both calcium phosphate decreased up to 0.2g/ml and then remained constant. The T2 relaxation time of both calcium compounds decreased in a similar fashion with increasing concentration, Calcium phosphate showed larger surface area on scanning electron microscope. Calcifications show variable MR signal due to difference of T1 and T2 relaxation times according to calcium concentration and compound. Large surface area of calcium particle might cause shortening of T1 relaxation time leading to high signal on T1-weighted image. Understanding of these findings will help interpretation of MR images more precisely

  8. Activation of acid-sensing ion channels by localized proton transient reveals their role in proton signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Di-Shi; Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Tian-Le

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular transients of pH alterations likely mediate signal transduction in the nervous system. Neuronal acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) act as sensors for extracellular protons, but the mechanism underlying ASIC activation remains largely unknown. Here, we show that, following activation of a light-activated proton pump, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), proton transients induced ASIC currents in both neurons and HEK293T cells co-expressing ASIC1a channels. Using chimera proteins that bridge Arch and ASIC1a by a glycine/serine linker, we found that successful coupling occurred within 15 nm distance. Furthermore, two-cell sniffer patch recording revealed that regulated release of protons through either Arch or voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 activated neighbouring cells expressing ASIC1a channels. Finally, computational modelling predicted the peak proton concentration at the intercellular interface to be at pH 6.7, which is acidic enough to activate ASICs in vivo. Our results highlight the pathophysiological role of proton signalling in the nervous system.

  9. Analysis of small-signal intensity modulation of semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper demonstrates theoretical characterization of intensity modulation of semiconductor lasers (SL's). The study is based on a small-signal model to solve the laser rate equations taking into account suppression of optical gain. Analytical forms of the small-signal modulation response and modulation bandwidth are ...

  10. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima

    2016-01-01

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  11. Enhanced proton acceleration by intense laser interaction with an inverse cone target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Aimidula, Aimierding, E-mail: amir@mail.bnu.edu.cn; Xiaerding, Fuerkaiti; Rashidin, Reyima [School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The generation and control of high-quality proton bunches using focused intense laser pulse on an inverse cone target is investigated with a set of particle-in-cell simulations. The inverse cone is a high atomic number conical frustum with a thin solid top and open base, where the laser impinges onto the top surface directly, not down the open end of the cone. Results are compared with a simple planar target, where the proton angular distribution is very broad because of transverse divergence of the electromagnetic fields behind the target. For a conical target, hot electrons along the cone wall surface induce a transverse focusing sheath field. This field can effectively suppress the spatial spreading of the protons, resulting in a high-quality small-emittance, low-divergence proton beam. A slightly lower proton beam peak energy than that of a conventional planar target was also found.

  12. Intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated protons: a Monte Carlo dosimetric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourkal, E; Li, J S; Xiong, W; Nahum, A; Ma, C-M

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present Monte Carlo studies of intensity modulated radiation therapy using laser-accelerated proton beams. Laser-accelerated protons coming out of a solid high-density target have broad energy and angular spectra leading to dose distributions that cannot be directly used for therapeutic applications. Through the introduction of a spectrometer-like particle selection system that delivers small pencil beams of protons with desired energy spectra it is feasible to use laser-accelerated protons for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The method presented in this paper is a three-dimensional modulation in which the proton energy spectrum and intensity of each individual beamlet are modulated to yield a homogeneous dose in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. As an evaluation of the efficacy of this method, it has been applied to two prostate cases using a variety of beam arrangements. We have performed a comparison study between intensity modulated photon plans and those for laser-accelerated protons. For identical beam arrangements and the same optimization parameters, proton plans exhibit superior coverage of the target and sparing of neighbouring critical structures. Dose-volume histogram analysis of the resulting dose distributions shows up to 50% reduction of dose to the critical structures. As the number of fields is decreased, the proton modality exhibits a better preservation of the optimization requirements on the target and critical structures. It is shown that for a two-beam arrangement (parallel-opposed) it is possible to achieve both superior target coverage with 5% dose inhomogeneity within the target and excellent sparing of surrounding tissue

  13. Status of spallation neutron source program in High Intensity Proton Accelerator Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and High Energy Accelerator Organization are jointly designing a 1 MW spallation neutron source as one of the research facilities planned in the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Project. The spallation neutron source is driven by 3 GeV proton beam with a mercury target and liquid hydrogen moderators. The present status of design for these spallation source and relevant facility is overviewed. (author)

  14. Report of the Snowmass M6 Working Group on high intensity proton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou and J. Wei

    2002-08-20

    The U.S. high-energy physics program needs an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver (PD), by the end of this decade. This machine will serve as a stand-alone facility that will provide neutrino superbeams and other high intensity secondary beams such as kaons, muons, neutrons, and anti-protons (cf. E1 and E5 group reports) and also serve as the first stage of a neutrino factory (cf. M1 group report). It can also be a high brightness source for a VLHC. Based on present accelerator technology and project construction experience, it is both feasible and cost-effective to construct a 1-4 MW Proton Driver. Two recent PD design studies have been made, one at FNAL and the other at the BNL. Both designed PD's for 1 MW proton beams at a cost of about U.S. $200M (excluding contingency and overhead) and both designs were upgradeable to 4 MW. An international collaboration between FNAL, BNL and KEK on high intensity proton facilities is addressing a number of key design issues. The superconducting (sc) RF cavities, cryogenics, and RF controls developed for the SNS can be directly adopted to save R&D efforts, cost, and schedule. PD studies are also actively being pursued at Europe and Japan.

  15. Improvement of single detector proton radiography by incorporating intensity of time-resolved dose rate functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Cascio, Ethan; Sharp, Gregory C.; Flanz, Jacob B.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2018-01-01

    Proton radiography, which images patients with the same type of particles as those with which they are to be treated, is a promising approach to image guidance and water equivalent path length (WEPL) verification in proton radiation therapy. We have shown recently that proton radiographs could be obtained by measuring time-resolved dose rate functions (DRFs) using an x-ray amorphous silicon flat panel. The WEPL values were derived solely from the root-mean-square (RMS) of DRFs, while the intensity information in the DRFs was filtered out. In this work, we explored the use of such intensity information for potential improvement in WEPL accuracy and imaging quality. Three WEPL derivation methods based on, respectively, the RMS only, the intensity only, and the intensity-weighted RMS were tested and compared in terms of the quality of obtained radiograph images and the accuracy of WEPL values. A Gammex CT calibration phantom containing inserts made of various tissue substitute materials with independently measured relative stopping powers (RSP) was used to assess the imaging performances. Improved image quality with enhanced interfaces was achieved while preserving the accuracy by using intensity information in the calibration. Other objects, including an anthropomorphic head phantom, a proton therapy range compensator, a frozen lamb’s head and an ‘image quality phantom’ were also imaged. Both the RMS only and the intensity-weighted RMS methods derived RSPs within  ±  1% for most of the Gammex phantom inserts, with a mean absolute percentage error of 0.66% for all inserts. In the case of the insert with a titanium rod, the method based on RMS completely failed, whereas that based on the intensity-weighted RMS was qualitatively valid. The use of intensity greatly enhanced the interfaces between different materials in the obtained WEPL images, suggesting the potential for image guidance in areas such as patient positioning and tumor tracking by proton

  16. Design concept of radiation control system for the high intensity proton accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yukihiro; Ikeno, Koichi; Akiyama, Shigenori; Harada, Yasunori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    Description is given for the characteristic radiation environment for the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility and the design concept of the radiation control system of it. The facility is a large scale accelerator complex consisting of high energy proton accelerators carrying the highest beam intensity in the world and the related experimental facilities and therefore provides various issues relevant to the radiation environment. The present report describes the specifications for the radiation control system for the facility, determined in consideration of these characteristics. (author)

  17. High signal intensity of fat on fast spin echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Akio; Yamazaki, Masaru; Hongoh, Takaharu; Inoue, Hiroshi; Ishikuro, Akihiro

    2000-01-01

    The fast spin echo (FSE) technique of producing T 2 -weighted images in greatly reduced imaging times has recently been used for routine clinical study. FSE images show contrast that is very similar in most tissues to that of conventional SE images. However, fat shows a high signal intensity that is influenced by j-coupling and the magnetization transfer effect. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the higher signal intensity of fat is different among MRI systems and to examine the effects of j-coupling and magnetization transfer on the high signal intensity of fat on FSE. The contrast in signal intensity between fat and water was measured for various echo train lengths (ETL) with and without multislicing on FSE using a contrast phantom. Measurements were obtained with four different MRI systems. In addition, the effective T 2 values of fat were calculated for the above conditions. Results indicated that contrast for fat and water was reduced with increased ETL and by using multislicing and was different among the four MRI systems. The effective T 2 values of fat were extended for increased ETL and were not dependent on multislicing. They also differed among the four MRI systems. The extent of effective T 2 values was affected by j-coupling. In this study, it was indicated that the degree of the high signal intensity of fat on FSE differed for different MRI systems. In addition, the reasons for the high signal intensity of fat on FSE were related to the effects of j-coupling and magnetization transfer. (author)

  18. Signal intensity enhancement of laser ablated volume holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnel, J. M.; Williams, C.; Davidson, C. A. B.; Wilkinson, T. D.; Lowe, C. R.

    2017-11-01

    Conventional volume holographic gratings (VHGs) fabricated in photosensitive emulsions such as gelatin containing silver salts enable the facile visualization of the holographic image in ambient lighting. However, for the fabrication of holographic sensors, which require more defined and chemically-functionalised polymer matrices, laser ablation has been introduced to create the VHGs and thereby broaden their applications, although the replay signal can be challenging to detect in ambient lighting. When traditional photochemical bleaching solutions used to reduce light scattering and modulate refractive index within the VHG are applied to laser ablated volume holographic gratings, these procedures decrease the holographic peak intensity. This is postulated to occur because both light and dark fringes contain a proportion of metal particles, which upon solubilisation are converted immediately to silver iodide, yielding no net refractive index modulation. This research advances a hypothesis that the reduced intensity of holographic replay signals is linked to a gradient of different sized metal particles within the emulsion, which reduces the holographic signal and may explain why traditional bleaching processes result in a reduction in intensity. In this report, a novel experimental protocol is provided, along with simulations based on an effective medium periodic 1D stack, that offers a solution to increase peak signal intensity of holographic sensors by greater than 200%. Nitric acid is used to etch the silver nanoparticles within the polymer matrix and is thought to remove the smaller particles to generate more defined metal fringes containing a soluble metal salt. Once the grating efficiency has been increased, this salt can be converted to a silver halide, to modulate the refractive index and increase the intensity of the holographic signal. This new protocol has been tested in a range of polymer chemistries; those containing functional groups that help to

  19. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS M6 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH INTENSITY PROTON SOURCES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOU,W.; WEI,J.

    2001-08-14

    The M6 working group had more than 40 active participants (listed in Section 4). During the three weeks at Snowmass, there were about 50 presentations, covering a wide range of topics associated with high intensity proton sources. The talks are listed in Section 5. This group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), E5 (Fixed-Target Experiments), M1 (Muon Based Systems), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), T7 (High Performance Computing) and T9 (Diagnostics). The M6 group performed a survey of the beam parameters of existing and proposed high intensity proton sources, in particular, of the proton drivers. The results are listed in Table 1. These parameters are compared with the requirements of high-energy physics users of secondary beams in Working Groups E1 and E5. According to the consensus reached in the E1 and E5 groups, the U.S. HEP program requires an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver, by the end of this decade.

  20. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS M6 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH INTENSITY PROTON SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHOU, W.; WEI, J.

    2001-01-01

    The M6 working group had more than 40 active participants (listed in Section 4). During the three weeks at Snowmass, there were about 50 presentations, covering a wide range of topics associated with high intensity proton sources. The talks are listed in Section 5. This group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), E5 (Fixed-Target Experiments), M1 (Muon Based Systems), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), T7 (High Performance Computing) and T9 (Diagnostics). The M6 group performed a survey of the beam parameters of existing and proposed high intensity proton sources, in particular, of the proton drivers. The results are listed in Table 1. These parameters are compared with the requirements of high-energy physics users of secondary beams in Working Groups E1 and E5. According to the consensus reached in the E1 and E5 groups, the U.S. HEP program requires an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver, by the end of this decade

  1. Evanescent-wave proton postaccelerator driven by intense THz pulse

    OpenAIRE

    L. Pálfalvi; J. A. Fülöp; Gy. Tóth; J. Hebling

    2014-01-01

    Hadron therapy motivates research dealing with the production of particle beams with ∼100  MeV/nucleon energy and relative energy fluctuation on the order of 1%. Laser-driven accelerators produce ion beams with only tens of MeV/nucleon energy and an extremely broad spectra. Here, a novel method is proposed for postacceleration and monochromatization of particles, leaving the laser-driven accelerator, by using intense THz pulses. It is based on further developing the idea of using the evanesce...

  2. Radiation-Induced Cancers From Modern Radiotherapy Techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare secondary cancer risk resulting from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton therapy in patients with prostate and head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy in the scattering mode were planned for 5 prostate caner patients and 5 head-and-neck cancer patients. The secondary doses during irradiation were measured using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and proton therapy, respectively. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk was estimated by applying organ equivalent dose to dose distributions. Results: The average secondary doses of proton therapy for prostate cancer patients, measured 20-60cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.4 mSv/Gy to 0.1 mSv/Gy. The average secondary doses of IMRT for prostate patients, however, ranged between 3 mSv/Gy and 1 mSv/Gy, approximately one order of magnitude higher than for proton therapy. Although the average secondary doses of IMRT were higher than those of proton therapy for head-and-neck cancers, these differences were not significant. Organ equivalent dose calculations showed that, for prostate cancer patients, the risk of secondary cancers in out-of-field organs, such as the stomach, lungs, and thyroid, was at least 5 times higher for IMRT than for proton therapy, whereas the difference was lower for head-and-neck cancer patients. Conclusions: Comparisons of organ-specific organ equivalent dose showed that the estimated secondary cancer risk using scattering mode in proton therapy is either significantly lower than the cases in IMRT treatment or, at least, does not exceed the risk induced by conventional IMRT treatment.

  3. Imaging of endogenous exchangeable proton signals in the human brain using frequency labeled exchange transfer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Nirbhay N; Jones, Craig K; Hua, Jun; Xu, Jiadi; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2013-04-01

    To image endogenous exchangeable proton signals in the human brain using a recently reported method called frequency labeled exchange transfer (FLEX) MRI. As opposed to labeling exchangeable protons using saturation (i.e., chemical exchange saturation transfer, or CEST), FLEX labels exchangeable protons with their chemical shift evolution. The use of short high-power frequency pulses allows more efficient labeling of rapidly exchanging protons, while time domain acquisition allows removal of contamination from semi-solid magnetization transfer effects. FLEX-based exchangeable proton signals were detected in human brain over the 1-5 ppm frequency range from water. Conventional magnetization transfer contrast and the bulk water signal did not interfere in the FLEX spectrum. The information content of these signals differed from in vivo CEST data in that the average exchange rate of these signals was 350-400 s(-1) , much faster than the amide signal usually detected using direct saturation (∼30 s(-1) ). Similarly, fast exchanging protons could be detected in egg white in the same frequency range where amide and amine protons of mobile proteins and peptides are known to resonate. FLEX MRI in the human brain preferentially detects more rapidly exchanging amide/amine protons compared to traditional CEST experiments, thereby changing the information content of the exchangeable proton spectrum. This has the potential to open up different types of endogenous applications as well as more easy detection of rapidly exchanging protons in diaCEST agents or fast exchanging units such as water molecules in paracest agents without interference of conventional magnetization transfer contrast. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Control of proton beam divergence in intense-laser foil-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, S.; Sonobe, R.; Miyazaki, S.; Sakai, K.; Kikuchi, T.

    2006-01-01

    Quality of an ion beam is one of the critical factors in intense-laser ion beam generation. A purpose of this study is the suppression of transverse proton divergence by a controlled electron cloud in laser-foil interactions. In this study, the foil target has a hole at the opposite side of the laser illumination. The electrons accelerated by an intense laser are limited in transverse by a neutral plasma at a protuberant part. Therefore the protons are accelerated and also controlled transversely by the electron cloud structure. In our 2.5-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations we demonstrate that the transverse shape of the electron cloud is well controlled and the collimated proton beam is generated successfully in the target with the hole. (authors)

  5. Handling of high intensity proton beams at 12 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasaki, M.; Minakawa, M.; Yamanoi, Y.; Ieiri, M.; Kato, Y.; Ishii, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tanaka, K.H.

    1990-01-01

    A new counter experimental hall is now being constructed at the KEK (National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Japan) 12 GeV Proton Synchrotron (KEK-PS). This hall will be completed by the end of 1989, immediately followed by magnet installation. The present report describes the new technical achievements employed at the hall. The most important and essential feature of the equipment is that the beam-handling system is maintenance-free, though in case of need, maintenance should be carried out quickly from a distant location in order to reduce the absorbed dose during the maintenance work. This paper is divided into three parts. The first part outlines the general design concept of the hall, focusing on the handling of high-intensity beams. The second part addresses the development of a quick-disconnect system, focusing on electric power, interlock signals, cooling water, pumping port, and vacuum flange. The third part describes the development of radiation-resistant instruments, focusing on polyimide magnets and cement magnets. (N.K.)

  6. High intensity proton acceleration at the Brookhaven AGS -- An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, L.; Alessi, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    1997-01-01

    The AGS accelerator complex is into its third year of 60+ x 10 12 (teraproton = Tp) per cycle operation. The hardware making up the complex as configured in 1997 is briefly mentioned. The present level of accelerator performance is discussed. This includes beam transfer efficiencies at each step in the acceleration process, i.e. losses; which are a serious issue at this intensity level. Progress made in understanding beam behavior at the Linac-to-Booster (LtB) injection, at the Booster-to-AGS (BtA) transfer as well as across the 450 ms AGS accumulation porch is presented. The state of transition crossing, with the gamma-tr jump is described. Coherent effects including those driven by space charge are important at all of these steps

  7. Physics with a high-intensity proton accelerator below 30 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    The types of physics that would be pursued at a high-intensity, moderate-energy proton accelerator are discussed. The discussion is drawn from the deliberations of the 30-GeV subgroup of the Fixed-Target Group at this workshop

  8. Amide proton transfer imaging of high intensity focused ultrasound-treated tumor tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, S.J.C.G.; Jacobs, I.; Strijkers, G.J.; Nicolay, K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the suitability of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging as a biomarker for the characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-treated tumor tissue was assessed. Methods: APT imaging was performed on tumor-bearing mice before (n=15), directly after (n=15) and at 3

  9. Amide Proton Transfer Imaging of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound-Treated Tumor Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, Stefanie J. C. G.; Jacobs, Igor; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    PurposeIn this study, the suitability of amide proton transfer (APT) imaging as a biomarker for the characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-treated tumor tissue was assessed. MethodsAPT imaging was performed on tumor-bearing mice before (n=15), directly after (n=15) and at 3

  10. Treatment planning, optimization, and beam delivery technqiues for intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengbusch, Evan R.

    , beamlet weight, the number of delivered beamlets, and the number of delivery angles. These methods are evaluated via treatment planning studies including left-sided whole breast irradiation, lung stereotactic body radiotherapy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal avoidance. Improvements in efficiency and efficacy relative to traditional proton therapy and intensity modulated photon radiation therapy are discussed.

  11. Dosimetric Comparison of Three-Dimensional Conformal Proton Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy, and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pediatric Craniopharyngiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehling, Nicholas S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Grosshans, David R., E-mail: dgrossha@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques B. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Palmer, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Song, Xiaofei; Amos, Richard A.; Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Meyer, Jeffrey J.; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Cranial irradiation in pediatric patients is associated with serious long-term adverse effects. We sought to determine whether both three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decrease integral dose to brain areas known to harbor neuronal stem cells, major blood vessels, and other normal brain structures for pediatric patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: IMRT, forward planned, passive scattering proton, and IMPT plans were generated and optimized for 10 pediatric patients. The dose was 50.4 Gy (or cobalt Gy equivalent) delivered in 28 fractions with the requirement for planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% or better. Integral dose data were calculated from differential dose-volume histograms. Results: The PTV target coverage was adequate for all modalities. IMRT and IMPT yielded the most conformal plans in comparison to 3D-PRT. Compared with IMRT, 3D-PRT and IMPT plans had a relative reduction of integral dose to the hippocampus (3D-PRT, 20.4; IMPT, 51.3%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), dentate gyrus (27.3, 75.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and subventricular zone (4.5, 57.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Vascular organs at risk also had reduced integral dose with the use of proton therapy (anterior cerebral arteries, 33.3{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100.0%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; middle cerebral arteries, 25.9%{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 100%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; anterior communicating arteries, 30.8{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 41.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }; and carotid arteries, 51.5{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 77.6{sup Asterisk-Operator }). Relative reduction of integral dose to the infratentorial brain (190.7{sup Asterisk-Operator }, 109.7%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), supratentorial brain without PTV (9.6, 26.8%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), brainstem (45.6, 22.4%{sup Asterisk-Operator }), and whole brain without PTV (19.4{sup Asterisk

  12. H- Ion Sources for High Intensity Proton Drivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dudnikov, Vadim [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-02-20

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H+ and H- ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm2 per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H- ion production efficiency, reliability and availability for pulsed operation as used in the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source . At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm2 per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power 1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with 4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H- beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the aluminum nitride (AlN) discharge chamber for 32 days at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. While this project demonstrated the advantages of the pulsed version of the SA RF SPS as an upgrade to the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source, it led to a possibility for upgrades to CW machines like the many cyclotrons used for commercial applications. Four appendices contain important details of the work carried out under this grant.

  13. KEK/JAERI Joint Project on high-intensity proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    2003-01-01

    From JFY01, which started on April 1, 2001, a new accelerator project to provide high-intensity proton beams proceeded into a construction phase. This project is conducted under a cooperation of two institutions, KEK and JAERI. The accelerator complex will provide 1 MW proton beams at 3 GeV and 0.75 MW beams at 50 GeV. The project will be completed within 6 years. In this article I will describe (a) the project itself, (b) sciences to be pursued at this new accelerator complex and (c) the present status and future plans of the project

  14. A research plan based on high intensity proton accelerator Neutron Science Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu

    1997-01-01

    A plan called Neutron Science Research Center (NSRC) has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5GeV and an average current of 10mA. The research facilities will consist of Thermal/Cold Neutron Facility, Neutron Irradiation Facility, Neutron Physics Facility, OMEGA/Nuclear Energy Facility, Spallation RI Beam Facility, Meson/Muon Facility and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutron, pion, muon and unstable radio isotope (RI) beams generated from the proton beam will be utilized for innovative researches in the fields on nuclear engineering and basic sciences. (author)

  15. A research plan based on high intensity proton accelerator Neutron Science Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A plan called Neutron Science Research Center (NSRC) has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5GeV and an average current of 10mA. The research facilities will consist of Thermal/Cold Neutron Facility, Neutron Irradiation Facility, Neutron Physics Facility, OMEGA/Nuclear Energy Facility, Spallation RI Beam Facility, Meson/Muon Facility and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutron, pion, muon and unstable radio isotope (RI) beams generated from the proton beam will be utilized for innovative researches in the fields on nuclear engineering and basic sciences. (author)

  16. Energetic proton generation in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilks, S.C.; Langdon, A.B.; Cowan, T.E.; Roth, M.; Singh, M.; Hatchett, S.; Key, M. H.; Pennington, D.; MacKinnon, A.; Snavely, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    An explanation for the energetic ions observed in the PetaWatt experiments is presented. In solid target experiments with focused intensities exceeding 10 20 W/cm 2 , high-energy electron generation, hard bremsstrahlung, and energetic protons have been observed on the backside of the target. In this report, an attempt is made to explain the physical process present that will explain the presence of these energetic protons, as well as explain the number, energy, and angular spread of the protons observed in experiment. In particular, we hypothesize that hot electrons produced on the front of the target are sent through to the back off the target, where they ionize the hydrogen layer there. These ions are then accelerated by the hot electron cloud, to tens of MeV energies in distances of order tens of μm, whereupon they end up being detected in the radiographic and spectrographic detectors

  17. Bilateral Pulvinar Signal Intensity Decrease on T2-Weighted Images in Patients with Aspartylglucosaminuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autti, T.; Loennqvist, T.; Joensuu, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disease caused by deficiency of aspartylglucosaminidase. A thalamic T2 signal intensity decrease is associated with lysosomal diseases. Purpose: To investigate thalamic signal intensity in AGU by performing a retrospective review of brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of AGU patients. Material and Methods: A total of 25 MR examinations were available for 11 patients aged between 3 and 32 years (four patients underwent bone marrow transplantation). Of these, 13 examinations were performed after bone marrow transplantation. Five patients had from two to six examinations, and six patients had one examination each. In every patient, the diagnosis of AGU was confirmed by blood and urine tests. Eighteen examinations were performed with a 1.0T imager including dual spin-echo T2 and proton density (PD) axial and coronal images, and 10 examinations also included T1-weighted images. Seven examinations were performed with a 1.5T imager including turbo spin-echo axial and coronal T2-weighted images and axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images; three examinations included T1-weighted three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (3D MPRAGE) images. The signal intensity of the thalamus and pulvinar in every sequence was compared to that of the putamina. Results: In AGU, thalamic alterations were first detectable on T2-weighted images (25 examinations in 11 patients) from the age of 3 years 6 months, showing decreased signal intensity in 21 of 24 examinations. T1-weighted images (13 examinations) showed slightly increased thalamic signal intensity in five out of seven examinations from the age of 7 years, and PD images (19 examinations) showed decreased signal intensity from the age of 16 years (three examinations). The pulvinar showed decreased signal intensity on spin-echo T2-weighted images for 14 of 18 examinations or on FLAIR sequences for seven

  18. Technical development of high intensity proton accelerators in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu

    1995-01-01

    Science and Technology Agency decided 'Options making extra gains of actinides and fission products (OMEGA)' and to promote the related researches. Also in JAERI, the research on the group separation method for separating transuranic elements, strontium and cesium from high level radioactive wastes has been carried out since the beginning of 1970s. Also the concept of the fast reactors using minor actinide mixture fuel is being established, and the accelerator annihilation treatment utilizing the nuclear spallation reaction by high energy protons has been examined. In this report, from the viewpoint of the application of accelerators to atomic energy field, the annihilation treatment method by the nuclear spallation reaction utilizing high intensity proton accelerators, the plan of the various engineering utilization of proton beam, and the development of accelerators in JAERI are described. The way of thinking on the annihilation treatment of radioactive waste, the system using fast neutrons, the way of thinking on the development of high intensity proton accelerator technology, the steps of the development, the research and development for constructing the basic technology accelerator, 2 MeV beam acceleration test, the basic technology accelerator utilization facility and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Acoustic signal generation in excised muscle by pulsed proton beam irradiation and the possibility of its clinical application to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Tada, Junichiro; Inada, Tetsuo; Kitagawa, Toshio; Wagai, Toshio; Yoshioka, Katsuya.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic signals generated in liquids and in metals by pulsed proton beam are thought to be thermal shock wave due to localized energy deposition of incident protons. Thus the intensity of generated acoustic signals is almost proportional to the energy deposited at the region. This suggests the possibility for measuring spatial distribution of energy deposition of proton beam using the acoustic method. In proton beam radiation therapy, treatment planning is developed from data of X-ray computer tomography which reflects the information on the electron density distribution in the patient's body. Ensuring the agreement of the dose distribution in the patient with the planned one, however, is difficult. It is expected that the acoustic method can provide a useful tool for this purpose. The pulsed proton beam of 50ns in pulse width is used for cancer therapy at the University of Tsukuba. A hydrophone is used to detect acoustic signals generated by pulsed proton beam. Detected signals are amplified ten thousand times before being averaged and analyzed by digital oscilloscope. Measurements made suggest that the method could be useful for radiation therapy. (N.K.)

  20. Development plan of basic technology for a high intensity proton linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    The national program called OMEGA (Option Making Extra Gains from Actinide and Fission Products) has started with the aim of promoting the research and development of the new technologies for nuclear waste partitioning and transmutation. As a part of this program, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, JAERI, has laid out several R and D plans for accelerator based actinide transmutation. The present article first outlines the status of the high intensity proton linear accelerator. Then it describes the time schedule for the development of a high intensity proton linac, focusing on the first step development (basic technology accelerator), second step development (engineering test accelerator, and third step development (commercial plant). It also outlines the conceptual design study and preliminary design calculations for basic technology accelerator, focusing on general consideration, ion source, radio frequency quadrupole, drift tube linac, and high beta linac. (N.K.)

  1. Histologic correlation of MR signal intensity in parathyroid adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumancik, W.M.; Khan, A.; Mir, R.N.; Attie, J.N.; Davis, J.E.; Ashtari, M.; Herman, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The classic MR signal intensity pattern of parathyroid adenoma (PTA) is bright enhancement on T2-weighted images. However, variations in SI pattern have been observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this report is to describe the histologic characteristics of surgically removed PTAs as correlated with their in vivo MR imaging appearance. From May 1987 to April 1988, 51 consecutive patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were evaluated with MR imaging for preoperative localization of PTA. Surgical confirmation was obtained in all patients, with histologic evaluation available in 40. MR imaging was performed on 1.0-T system (Siemens, Magnetom) using a Helmhotz surface coil positioned at the neck. Spin-echo T1-weighted and T2-weighted multisection images were evaluated retrospectively. Signal intensities of PTA, adjacent thyroid, fat, and skeletal muscle were obtained (1) from direct region of interest determinations, and (2) visually as respective relationships of PTA to thyroid, fat, and muscle. Histologic classification was graded for (1) predominant cell type (i.e., chief or oxyphil cells), (2) acinar or solid growth pattern, (3) cystic change, (4) presence or absence of residual fat, (5) cell count per high power field, (6) heterogeneous histology, (7) gland weight, and (8) giant size (≥3 cm). The relationship of MR signal intensity to histology appears multifactorial

  2. Intensity maps of MeV electrons and protons below the radiation belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, T.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, H.; Nakamoto, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kikuchi, J.; Doke, T.

    1988-01-01

    The global distributions of energetic electrons (0.19 - 3.2 MeV) and protons (0.64 - 35 MeV) are shown in the form of contour maps. The data were obtained by two sets of energetic particle telescopes on board the satellite OHZORA. The observed altitude range is 350 - 850 Km. Ten degress meshes in longitude and latitude were used to obtain the intensity contours. A pitch angle distribution of J(α) = J(90). sin n α with n = 5 A is assumed to get the average intensity in each mesh. (author) [pt

  3. Shortening Delivery Times of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy by Reducing Proton Energy Layers During Treatment Plan Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Steven van de, E-mail: s.vandewater@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kooy, Hanne M. [F. H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To shorten delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing the number of energy layers in the treatment plan. Methods and Materials: We have developed an energy layer reduction method, which was implemented into our in-house-developed multicriteria treatment planning system “Erasmus-iCycle.” The method consisted of 2 components: (1) minimizing the logarithm of the total spot weight per energy layer; and (2) iteratively excluding low-weighted energy layers. The method was benchmarked by comparing a robust “time-efficient plan” (with energy layer reduction) with a robust “standard clinical plan” (without energy layer reduction) for 5 oropharyngeal cases and 5 prostate cases. Both plans of each patient had equal robust plan quality, because the worst-case dose parameters of the standard clinical plan were used as dose constraints for the time-efficient plan. Worst-case robust optimization was performed, accounting for setup errors of 3 mm and range errors of 3% + 1 mm. We evaluated the number of energy layers and the expected delivery time per fraction, assuming 30 seconds per beam direction, 10 ms per spot, and 400 Giga-protons per minute. The energy switching time was varied from 0.1 to 5 seconds. Results: The number of energy layers was on average reduced by 45% (range, 30%-56%) for the oropharyngeal cases and by 28% (range, 25%-32%) for the prostate cases. When assuming 1, 2, or 5 seconds energy switching time, the average delivery time was shortened from 3.9 to 3.0 minutes (25%), 6.0 to 4.2 minutes (32%), or 12.3 to 7.7 minutes (38%) for the oropharyngeal cases, and from 3.4 to 2.9 minutes (16%), 5.2 to 4.2 minutes (20%), or 10.6 to 8.0 minutes (24%) for the prostate cases. Conclusions: Delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy can be reduced substantially without compromising robust plan quality. Shorter delivery times are likely to reduce treatment uncertainties and costs.

  4. Medium energy high intensity proton accelerator (MEHIPA): Reference Design Report (RDR) Ver. 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in accelerator technology has made it possible to use a proton accelerator to produce nuclear energy. In an accelerator-driven system (ADS), a high-intensity proton accelerator is used to produce protons of around 1 GeV energy, which strike a target such as lead or tungsten to produce spallation neutrons. ADS can be used to produce power, incinerate minor actinides and long-lived fission products, and for the utilization of thorium as an alternative nuclear fuel. The accelerator for ADS has to produce high energy (1 GeV) protons, and deliver tens of milli amperes of beam current with minimum (< 1 nA/m) beam loss for hands-on maintenance of the accelerator. This makes the development of accelerators for ADS very challenging. In India, it is planned to take a staged approach towards development of the requisite accelerator technology, and it is planned to develop the accelerator in three phases: 20 MeV, 200 MeV and 1 GeV. This report presents a reference design report for the Medium Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (MEHIPA) which will accelerate the beam to 200 MeV. The linac consists of a 3 MeV normal conducting RFQ followed by three families of superconducting Single Spoke Resonators (SSR) to accelerate the beam to 200 MeV. The major elements of the physics design of MEHIPA, as well as layouts and specifications of the major accelerator sub-systems are presented in this report. (author)

  5. Normal liver tissue sparing by intensity-modulated proton stereotactic body radiotherapy for solitary liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Joergen B. B.; Hansen, Anders T.; Lassen, Yasmin; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten; Muren, Ludvig P.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is often the preferred treatment for the advanced liver tumours which owing to tumour distribution, size and multi-focality are out of range of surgical resection or radiofrequency ablation. However, only a minority of patients with liver tumours may be candidates for conventional SBRT because of the limited radiation tolerance of normal liver, intestine and other normal tissues. Due to the favourable depth-dose characteristics of protons, intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) may be a superior alternative to photon-based SBRT. The purpose of this treatment planning study was therefore to investigate the potential sparing of normal liver by IMPT compared to photon-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for solitary liver tumours. Material and methods. Ten patients with solitary liver metastasis treated at our institution with multi-field SBRT were retrospectively re-planned with IMRT and proton pencil beam scanning techniques. For the proton plans, two to three coplanar fields were used in contrast to five to six coplanar and non-coplanar photon fields. The same planning objectives were used for both techniques. A risk adapted dose prescription to the PTV surface of 12.5-16.75 Gy x 3 was used. Results. The spared liver volume for IMPT was higher compared to IMRT in all 10 patients. At the highest prescription dose level, the median liver volume receiving less than 15 Gy was 1411 cm 3 for IMPT and 955 cm 3 for IMRT (p D 15 Gy > 700 cm 3 constraint. For the D mean = 15 Gy constraint, nine of 10 cases could be treated at the highest dose level using IMPT whereas with IMRT, only two cases met this constraint at the highest dose level and six at the lowest dose level. Conclusion. A considerable sparing of normal liver tissue can be obtained using proton-based SBRT for solitary liver tumours

  6. A basic characteristic of signal intensity in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Tsukasa

    2009-01-01

    For evaluation of the significance of signal intensity and contrast which determine the MR imaging quality, SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) were studied as their respective measures on the cross-talk artifact (CTA), partial volume effect (PVE), intensity of the fast spin echo (SE) imaging and contrast in the 3T field area (Con). The machine used was 3.0T Signa HDx (GE). CTA, the SNR-reducing coherence between neighboring slices at multi-slice imaging, was studied with a series of phantoms of 0.75-4 mm diameter acrylic pins in cupric sulfate solution with various imaging modes and slice numbers to calculate CNR and contrast (C) involving SNR factor. PVE, the determinant of the intensity depending on the mixture of different tissues within a voxel (slice thickness), was studied with similar phantoms to above with 1-12 mm thick slices and different slice gaps to obtain CNR and C. The intensity of fast SE image was studied with phantoms in a brain-equivalent 0.125 mM Gd solution of sealed water, 0.25-0.5mM Gd, butter, salad oil and detergent on magnetization transfer, J-coupling and diffusion. Con in the 3T machine was studied with the same phantoms as above on the image contrasts at the central and peripheral imaging areas and the intensity/contrast changes by different coils. Presented data of above examinations revealed the effects of characteristic of each environmental factor, and of which recognition was concluded necessary to exactly read the obtained images. (K.T.)

  7. Correlation of the antimicrobial activity of salicylaldehydes with broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton. Possible involvement of proton exchange processes in the antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Hannu; Kuure, Matti; Pelttari, Eila

    2015-03-06

    Certain substituted salicylaldehydes are potent antibacterial and antifungal agents and some of them merit consideration as potential chemotherapeutic agents against Candida infections, but their mechanism of action has remained obscure. We report here a distinct correlation between broadening of the NMR signal of the hydroxyl proton of salicylaldehydes and their activity against several types of bacteria and fungi. When proton NMR spectra of the compounds were determined using hexadeuterodimethylsulfoxide as solvent and the height of the OH proton signal was measured, using the signal of the aldehyde proton as an internal standard, it was discovered that a prerequisite of potent antimicrobial activity is that the proton signal is either unobservable or relatively very low, i.e. that it is extremely broadened. Thus, none of the congeners whose OH proton signal was high were potent antimicrobial agents. Some congeners that gave a very low OH signal were, however, essentially inactive against the microbes, indicating that although drastic broadening of the OH signal appears to be a prerequisite, also other (so far unknown) factors are needed for high antimicrobial activity. Because broadening of the hydroxyl proton signal is related to the speed of the proton exchange process(es) involving that proton, proton exchange may be involved in the mechanism of action of the compounds. Further studies are needed to analyze the relative importance of different factors (such as electronic effects, strength of the internal hydrogen bond, co-planarity of the ring and the formyl group) that determine the rates of those processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Proposal of experimental facilities for studies of nuclear data and radiation engineering in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, M; Nagai, Y; Ishibashi, K

    2003-01-01

    A proposal is given on the facilities and experiments in the Intense Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) relevant to the nuclear data and radiation engineering, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear transmutation, accelerator technology and space technology and so on. (3 refs).

  9. The JAERI-KEK joint project on high intensity proton accelerator and overview of nuclear transmutation experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yujiro

    2001-01-01

    A status of the JAERI/KEK joint project on High Intensity Proton Accelerator is overviewed. It is highlighted that Experimental facilities for development of the accelerator driven system (ADS) for nuclear transmutation technology is proposed under the project. (author)

  10. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  11. Investigation of L X-ray intensity ratios in Pt induced by proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Manpuneet; Kaur, Mandeep; Mohan, Harsh; Jain, Arvind Kumar; Singh, Parjit S.; Vohra, Neelam; Sharma, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    A survey of literature on L X-ray parameters inspires us for taking up the present investigation. These parameters are useful to study atomic properties. In view of this, we report L X-ray intensity ratios for Pt, namely, L ℓ / L α , L β / L α and L γ / L α with proton collisions over the energy range 260 - 400 keV with an interval of 20 keV. The intention of research presented in this paper is to explore their energy dependence and comparison with theoretical calculations. These analyses will yield a data in the low energy region which assist in better clarity of proton induced X-ray emission phenomenon

  12. Experimental results of beryllium exposed to intense high energy proton beam pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Butcher, M; Guinchard, M; Calviani, M; Losito, R; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, V; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, J; O'Dell, J

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as a material for beam windows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle production targets. With increasing beam intensities of future accelerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to reliably operate these components as well as avoid compromising particle production efficiency by limiting beam parameters. As a result, an exploratory experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility was carried out to take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several beryllium grades. The test matrix consisted of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. This paper outlines the experimental measurements, as well as findings from Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) work where different imaging techniques were used to analyze and co...

  13. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Zwaska, R.; Atherton, A.; Caretta, O.; Davenne,T.; Densham, C.; Fitton, M.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Roberts, S.; Kuksenko, V.; Butcher, M.; Calviani, M.; Guinchard, M.; Losito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  14. Examination of Beryllium Under Intense High Energy Proton Beam at CERN's HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Ammigan, K; Hurh, P; Zwaska, R; Atherton, A; Caretta, O; Davenne, t; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Loveridge, P; O'Dell, J; Roberts, S; Kuksenko, v; Butcher, M; Calviani, M; Guinchard, M; Losito, R

    2015-01-01

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as material for beam win- dows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle produc- tion targets. With increasing beam intensities of future ac- celerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to avoid compro- mising particle production efficiency by limiting beam pa- rameters. As a result, the planned experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility will take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several grades of beryllium. The test matrix will consist of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. Online instrumentations will acquire real time temperature, strain, and vibration data of the cylinders, while Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) of the discs will exploit advanced microstructural characteri- zation and imagin...

  15. Proton density differences in signal characteristics of multiple sclerosis plaques versus white matter lesions of small vessel disease and vasculitis on high-field strength MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyster, R.G.; Siegal, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines if variations in signal intensity characteristics on multi-spin-echo images obtained with a high-field-strength magnet can be useful in differentiating demyelinating plaques of multiple sclerosis from other pathologic white matter processes due to small vessel disease and vasculities. Using the first of two multi-spin-echo images obtained with a General Electric 1.5-T magnet, the investigators compared signal intensity characteristics in 30 patients with a firm clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis versus a control group of 30 patients with a known clinical history of small-vessel disease and vasculitis are isodense to gray matter on proton-density images

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of temporomandibular joint disk and posterior attachment in patients with internal derangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yeon Hwa; Cho, Bong Hae

    2001-01-01

    To analyze the possible association between magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of temporomandibular joint disk and posterior attachment, and the type and extent of disk displacement, disk donfiguration, effusion and clinical signs in patients with internal derangement. Magnetic resonance images of the 132 temporomandibular joints of 66 patients with temporomandibular joint displacement were analyzed. The clinical findings were obtained by retrospective review of the patients' records. The type and extent of disk displacement, disk configuration and effusion were evaluated on the proton density MR images. The signal intensity from the anterior band, posterior band and posterior attachment were measured on MR images. The associations between the type and extent of disk displacement, disk configuration, effusion and clinical signs and the MR signal intensity of disk and posterior attachment were statistically analyzed by student's t-test. Of 132 joints, 87 (65.9%) showed anterior disk displacement with reduction (ADR) and 45 (34.1%) showed anterior disk displacement without reduction (ADnR). This signals from posterior attachments were lower in joints with ADnR than those of ADR (p<0.05). The results showed statistically significant (p<0.05) association between the type and extent of disk displacement and disk configuration, and decreased signal intensity of posterior attachment. There were no statistical associations between pain, noise and limited mouth opening, and signal intensity of disk and posterior attachment. The average signal from posterior attachment was lower in joints with ADnR than that of ADR. The type and extent of disk displacement and disk configuration appeared to be correlated with the signal intensity from posterior attachment

  17. High intensity proton injector for facility of antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezov, R., E-mail: r.berezov@gsi.de; Brodhage, R.; Fils, J.; Hollinger, R.; Ivanova, V. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Tuske, O. [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ullmann, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The high current ion source with the low energy beam transport (LEBT) will serve as injector into the proton LINAC to provide primary proton beam for the production of antiprotons. The pulsed ion source developed and built in CEA/Saclay operates with a frequency of 2.45 GHz based on ECR plasma production with two coils with 87.5 mT magnetic field necessary for the electron cyclotron resonance. The compact LEBT consists of two solenoids with a maximum magnetic field of 500 mT including two integrated magnetic steerers to adjust the horizontal and vertical beam positions. The total length of the compact LEBT is 2.3 m and was made as short as possible to reduced emittance growth along the beam line. To measure ion beam intensity behind the pentode extraction system, between solenoids and at the end of the beam line, two current transformers and a Faraday cup are installed. To get information about the beam quality and position, the diagnostic chamber with different equipment will be installed between the two solenoids. This article reports the current status of the proton injector for the facility of antiproton and ion research.

  18. Beam Dynamics Studies for High-Intensity Beams in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082016; Benedikt, Michael

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the existence of the last missing piece of the Standard Model of particle physics (SM) was confirmed. However, even though very elegant, this theory is unable to explain, for example, the generation of neutrino masses, nor does it account for dark energy or dark matter. To shed light on some of these open questions, research in fundamental particle physics pursues two complimentary approaches. On the one hand, particle colliders working at the high-energy frontier, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), located in Geneva, Switzerland, are utilized to investigate the fundamental laws of nature. Alternatively, fixed target facilities require high-intensity beams to create a large flux of secondary particles to investigate, for example, rare particle decay processes, or to create neutrino beams. This thesis investigates limitations arising during the acceleration of high-intensity beams at the CERN Proton Synchrotro...

  19. Accelerator technical design report for high-intensity proton accelerator facility project, J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    This report presents the detail of the technical design of the accelerators for the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility Project, J-PARC. The accelerator complex comprises a 400-MeV room-temperature linac (600-MeV superconducting linac), 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), and a 50-GeV synchrotron (MR). The 400-MeV beam is injected to the RCS, being accelerated to 3 GEV. The 1-MW beam thus produced is guided to the Materials Life Science Experimental Facility, with both the pulsed spallation neutron source and muon source. A part of the beam is transported to the MR, which provides the 0.75-MW beam to either the Nuclear and Fundamental Particle Experimental Facility or the Neutrino Production Target. On the other hand, the beam accelerated to 600 MeV by the superconducting linac is used for the Nuclear Waster Transmutation Experiment. In this way, this facility is unique, being multipurpose one, including many new inventions and Research and Development Results. This report is based upon the accomplishments made by the Accelerator Group and others of the Project Team, which is organized on the basis of the Agreement between JAERI and KEK on the Construction and Research and Development of the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility. (author)

  20. High-intensity, subkolovolt x-ray calibration facility using a Cockroft--Walton proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckuck, R.W.; Gaines, J.L.; Ernst, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    Considerable need has arisen for the development of well-calibrated x-ray detectors capable of detecting photons with energies between 100 and 1000 electron-volts. This energy region is of significant interest since the x-ray emission from high-temperature (kT approximately 1.0 keV), laser-produced plasmas is predominantly in this range. A high-intensity, subkilovolt x-ray calibration source was developed which utilizes proton-induced inner-shell atomic fluorescence of low-Z elements. The high photon yields and low bremsstrahlung background associated with this phenomenon are ideally suited to provide an intense, nearly monoenergetic x-ray calibration source for detector development applications. The proton accelerator is a 3 mA, 300 kV Cockroft-Walton using a conventional rf hydrogen ion source. Seven remotely-selectable liquid-cooled targets capable of heat dissipation of 5 kW/cm 2 are used to provide characteristic x-rays with energies between 100 and 1000 eV. Source strengths are of the order of 10 13 to 10 14 photons/sec. A description of the facility is presented. Typical x-ray spectra (B-K, C-K, Ti-L, Fe-L and Cu-L) and flux values will be shown. Problems such as spectral contamination due to carbon buildup on the target and to backscattered particles are discussed

  1. ULTRA-LOW INTENSITY PROTON BEAMS FOR RADIATION RESPONSE RELATED EXPERIMENTS AT THE U-120M CYCLOTRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Matlocha

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The U-120M cyclotron at the Nuclear Physics Institute (NPI of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Rez is used for radiation hardness tests of electronics for high-energy physics experiments. These tests are usually carried out with proton fluxes of the order of 105–109 proton·cm−2·s−1. Some tests done for the upgrade of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment at CERN, however, required proton beam intensities several orders of magnitude lower. This paper presents a method which has been developed to achieve the proton beam flux of the order of 1 proton · cm−2·s−1. The method is mainly based on reduction of the discharge current in the cyclotron internal Penning type ion source. Influence of this new operation mode on the lifetime of ion source cathodes is discussed.

  2. Multifield Optimization Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors: A Translation to Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lewin, Jan S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Palmer, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Background: We report the first clinical experience and toxicity of multifield optimization (MFO) intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for patients with head and neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Fifteen consecutive patients with head and neck cancer underwent MFO-IMPT with active scanning beam proton therapy. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had comprehensive treatment extending from the base of the skull to the clavicle. The doses for chemoradiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 70 Gy and 66 Gy, respectively. The robustness of each treatment plan was also analyzed to evaluate sensitivity to uncertainties associated with variations in patient setup and the effect of uncertainties with proton beam range in patients. Proton beam energies during treatment ranged from 72.5 to 221.8 MeV. Spot sizes varied depending on the beam energy and depth of the target, and the scanning nozzle delivered the spot scanning treatment “spot by spot” and “layer by layer.” Results: Ten patients presented with SCC and 5 with adenoid cystic carcinoma. All 15 patients were able to complete treatment with MFO-IMPT, with no need for treatment breaks and no hospitalizations. There were no treatment-related deaths, and with a median follow-up time of 28 months (range, 20-35 months), the overall clinical complete response rate was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.1%-99.8%). Xerostomia occurred in all 15 patients as follows: grade 1 in 10 patients, grade 2 in 4 patients, and grade 3 in 1 patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients: grade 1 in 1 patient, grade 2 in 8 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. No patient experienced grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials.

  3. Generation of fast protons by interaction of modest laser intensities with H2O 'snow' nano-wire targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruner, Nir; Schleifer, Elad; Palchan, Tala; Pikuz, Sergey A.; Eisenmann, Shmuel; Botton, Mordechai; Gordon, Dan; Zigler, Arie

    2011-01-01

    We report on the generation of protons with energies of 5.5 MeV when irradiating an H 2 O nano-wire layer grown on a sapphire plate with an intensity of 5x10 17 W/cm 2 . A theoretical model is suggested in which plasma near the tip of the wire is subject to enhanced electrical fields and protons are accelerated to several MeVs.

  4. Sensitivity of intensity modulated proton therapy plans to changes in patient weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Rutz, Hans Peter; Timmerman, Beate; Goitein, Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study to investigate the sensitivity of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to changes in body weight occurring during the course of radiotherapy for patients treated in the sacral region. Materials and methods: During therapy, important weight gain and loss were observed for two patients treated to para-spinal tumors, which resulted in both patients being re-scanned and re-planned. Both patients were treated as part of their therapy, with a narrow-angle IMPT (NA-IMPT) plan delivering a 'dose hole' around the cauda equina (CE), which was mainly formed through modulation of Bragg peaks in depth. To investigate the impact of these weight changes on the proton range and delivered dose, the nominal fields were re-calculated on the new CT data sets. Results were analyzed by comparing these new plans with those originally delivered and by calculating changes in range and delivered doses in target volumes and normal tissues. Results: Maximum differences in proton range in the CE region of up to +8 mm and -13 mm, respectively, for the patient who gained weight and for the patient who lost weight, increased the maximum dose to the CE by only 2%. This indicates that both IMPT plans were relatively insensitive to substantial range uncertainties. Even greater differences in range (16 mm) in the planning target volume only slightly affected its dose homogeneity (differences in V 90% of 6% in the worst case). Nevertheless, some large undesired local dose differences were observed. Conclusions: We demonstrated, that, at least for the two analyzed cases, NA-IMPT plans are less sensitive to weight variations than one may expect. Still, we would advise to calculate new plans in case of substantial change in weight for patients treated in the sacral region, primarily due to the presence of new hot/cold area

  5. Improved Beam Angle Arrangement in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Treatment Planning for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wenhua; Lim, Gino J.; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, X. Ronald; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates potential gains of an improved beam angle arrangement compared to a conventional fixed gantry setup in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment for localized prostate cancer patients based on a proof of principle study. Materials and Methods: Three patients with localized prostate cancer retrospectively selected from our institution were studied. For each patient, IMPT plans were designed using two, three and four beam angles, respectively, obtained from a beam angle optimization algorithm. Those plans were then compared with ones using two lateral parallel-opposed beams according to the conventional planning protocol for localized prostate cancer adopted at our institution. Results: IMPT plans with two optimized angles achieved significant improvements in rectum sparing and moderate improvements in bladder sparing against those with two lateral angles. Plans with three optimized angles further improved rectum sparing significantly over those two-angle plans, whereas four-angle plans found no advantage over three-angle plans. A possible three-beam class solution for localized prostate patients was suggested and demonstrated with preserved dosimetric benefits because individually optimized three-angle solutions were found sharing a very similar pattern. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the potential of using an improved beam angle arrangement to better exploit the theoretical dosimetric benefits of proton therapy and provided insights of selecting quality beam angles for localized prostate cancer treatment

  6. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M.; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M.; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. Methods: The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. Results: The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK's interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. Conclusions: The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization.

  7. A fast optimization algorithm for multicriteria intensity modulated proton therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Craft, David; Madden, Thomas M; Zhang, Kewu; Kooy, Hanne M; Herman, Gabor T

    2010-09-01

    To describe a fast projection algorithm for optimizing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans and to describe and demonstrate the use of this algorithm in multicriteria IMPT planning. The authors develop a projection-based solver for a class of convex optimization problems and apply it to IMPT treatment planning. The speed of the solver permits its use in multicriteria optimization, where several optimizations are performed which span the space of possible treatment plans. The authors describe a plan database generation procedure which is customized to the requirements of the solver. The optimality precision of the solver can be specified by the user. The authors apply the algorithm to three clinical cases: A pancreas case, an esophagus case, and a tumor along the rib cage case. Detailed analysis of the pancreas case shows that the algorithm is orders of magnitude faster than industry-standard general purpose algorithms (MOSEK'S interior point optimizer, primal simplex optimizer, and dual simplex optimizer). Additionally, the projection solver has almost no memory overhead. The speed and guaranteed accuracy of the algorithm make it suitable for use in multicriteria treatment planning, which requires the computation of several diverse treatment plans. Additionally, given the low memory overhead of the algorithm, the method can be extended to include multiple geometric instances and proton range possibilities, for robust optimization.

  8. Experimental results of beryllium exposed to intense high energy proton beam pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Hartsell, B. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab; Butcher, M. [CERN; Guinchard, M. [CERN; Calviani, M. [CERN; Losito, R. [CERN; Roberts, S. [Culham Lab; Kuksenko, V. [Oxford U.; Atherton, A. [Rutherford; Caretta, O. [Rutherford; Davenne, T. [Rutherford; Densham, C. [Rutherford; Fitton, M. [Rutherford; Loveridge, J. [Rutherford; O' Dell, J. [Rutherford

    2017-02-10

    Beryllium is extensively used in various accelerator beam lines and target facilities as a material for beam windows, and to a lesser extent, as secondary particle production targets. With increasing beam intensities of future accelerator facilities, it is critical to understand the response of beryllium under extreme conditions to reliably operate these components as well as avoid compromising particle production efficiency by limiting beam parameters. As a result, an exploratory experiment at CERN’s HiRadMat facility was carried out to take advantage of the test facility’s tunable high intensity proton beam to probe and investigate the damage mechanisms of several beryllium grades. The test matrix consisted of multiple arrays of thin discs of varying thicknesses as well as cylinders, each exposed to increasing beam intensities. This paper outlines the experimental measurements, as well as findings from Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) work where different imaging techniques were used to analyze and compare surface evolution and microstructural response of the test matrix specimens.

  9. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  10. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  11. Design Considerations of Fast Kicker Systems for High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Sandberg, J.; Parson, W.M.; Walstrom, P.; Murray, M.M.; Cook, E.; Hartouni, E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the specific issues related to the design of the Fast Kicker Systems for high intensity proton accelerators. To address these issues in the preliminary design stage can be critical since the fast kicker systems affect the machine lattice structure and overall design parameters. Main topics include system architecture, design strategy, beam current coupling, grounding, end user cost vs. system cost, reliability, redundancy and flexibility. Operating experience with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron injection and extraction kicker systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory and their future upgrade is presented. Additionally, new conceptual designs of the extraction kicker for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge and the Advanced Hydrotest Facility at Los Alamos are discussed

  12. Final Report for 'Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.

    2009-01-01

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  13. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power in elliptical superconducting cavities for intense pulsed proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sang Ho Kim; Dong O Jeon; Sundeli, R

    2002-01-01

    In linacs for intense pulsed proton accelerators, the beam has a multiple time-structure, and each beam time-structure generates resonance. When a higher-order mode (HOM) is near these resonance frequencies, the induced voltage could be large and accordingly the resulting HOM power, too. In order to understand the effects of a complex beam time-structure on the mode excitations and the resulting HOM powers in elliptical superconducting cavities, analytic expressions are developed, with which the beam-induced voltage and corresponding power are explored, taking into account the properties of HOM frequency behavior in elliptical superconducting cavities. The results and understandings from this analysis are presented with the beam parameters of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) superconducting linac.

  14. The research of condensed matter physics by using intense proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoh, Yasuo

    1990-01-01

    The present article covers the application of intense protons to basic condensed matter physics. Major recent neutron scattering activities in condensed matter physics are first outlined, emphasizing the fact that the contribution of accelerator base science has a tremendous impact on this basic science. Application of spallation neutrons to condensed matter physics is discussed in relation to such subjects as high energy (epithermal) excitations and small angle neutron scattering. Then the specific subject of high Tc superconductor is addressed, focusing on how neutrons as well as muons provide experimental results that serve significantly in exploring the mechanism of exotic high Tc superconductivity. Techniques for neutron polarization must be developed in the future. The neutron spin reflectivity ratio has been shown to be a sensitive probe of surface depth profile of magnetization. Another new method is neutron depolarization to probe bulk magnetic induction throughout a slab which neutrons pass through. (N.K.)

  15. Suitability of cerebrospinal fluid as a signal-intensity reference on MRI: evaluation of signal-intensity variations in the lumbosacral dural sac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luoma, E.K.; Luukkonen, R.; Riihimaeki, H.A.; Raininko, R.; Manninen, H.I.; Nummi, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The suitability of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the lumbosacral dural sac as an internal signal-intensity reference was studied on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine using a surface coil and motion artefact suppression technique. A signal-intensity reference is needed when signal is compared between images, studies or subjects. Homogeneity of the CSF was estimated visually on T2-weighted images of 60 subjects at 1.5 T and of another 60 subjects at 0.1 T. Spines with a severely narrowed dural sac or marked scoliosis were excluded from the study to avoid partial volume effect. CSF was homogeneous in 82% and 73% of the examinations at 1.5 T and 0.1 T, respectively. The type and location of the local inhomogeneities did not relate to local narrowings of the dural sac. The signal intensity of CSF was measured in 108 examinations at 0.1 T after correcting the spatially-dependent signal-intensity nonuniformities with a phantom-based method. The signal-intensity difference between the CSF in the upper and lower lumbar dural sac was less than 10% in 73% of the examinations. The CSF in the lumbosacral dural sac can be a useful signal-intensity reference for estimation of the signal of the adjacent structures in patients without severe narrowing of the dural sac or marked scoliosis. It may contribute to assessing spinal disease processes. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs

  16. Experimental study of proton acceleration with ultra-high intensity, high contrast laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flacco, A.

    2008-07-01

    This thesis reports experimental work in the domain of laser-matter interaction to study the production of energetic proton beams. The ion beams accelerated by laser have been increasing in quality, in energy and in repeatability as laser technology keeps improving. The presence of the pedestal before the high peak laser pulse introduces many unknowns in the accelerating conditions that are created on the front and on the rear surface of the target. The first part of the experimental activities is focused to a better comprehension and the experimental validation of the interaction of a 'pedestal-like', moderate intensity, laser pulse on Aluminum targets. The developed interferometric technique proved to be reliable and produced a complete set of maps of the early stages of the plasma expansion. The reflectometry experiment stresses the importance of the quality of the metallic targets and underlines some obscure points on the behaviour of the rear surface of the illuminated foil. For instance the reflectometry measurements on the thicker targets are significantly different from what is foreseen by the simulations about the timescale of the shock break out. In the second part, the XPW laser pulse is used in ion acceleration from thin metal foils. The laser and target parameters are varied to put in evidence the dependence of the ion beam to the experimental condition. In conclusion I can say that first, during the variation of the target thickness, an optimum is put in evidence. Secondly, the correlation between the laser pulse duration and the proton cutoff energy is qualitatively different between thicker (15 μm) and thinner (1.5 μm, 3 μm) targets. For the first, an optimal pulse duration exists while for the seconds, no variation is found - in the searched space - from the monotonic decreasing of the cutoff energy with the peak intensity. The experimental results put however in evidence some points that are not completely understood. (A.C.)

  17. The Impact of Intrinsic Heavy Quark Distributions in the Proton on New Physics Searches at the High Intensity Frontier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broksky, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of an intense proton facility, at 'Project X' or elsewhere, will provide many new opportunities for searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. A Project X can serve a yet broader role in the search for new physics, and in this note we highlight the manner in which thus-enabled studies of the flavor structure of the proton, particularly of its intrinsic heavy quark content, facilitate other direct and indirect searches for new physics. Intrinsic heavy quarks in both light and heavy hadrons play a key role in searches for physics BSM with hadrons - and their study at the Intensity Frontier may prove crucial to establishing its existence.

  18. Introducing an on-line adaptive procedure for prostate image guided intensity modulate proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Westerly, D C; Mackie, T R

    2011-08-07

    With on-line image guidance (IG), prostate shifts relative to the bony anatomy can be corrected by realigning the patient with respect to the treatment fields. In image guided intensity modulated proton therapy (IG-IMPT), because the proton range is more sensitive to the material it travels through, the realignment may introduce large dose variations. This effect is studied in this work and an on-line adaptive procedure is proposed to restore the planned dose to the target. A 2D anthropomorphic phantom was constructed from a real prostate patient's CT image. Two-field laterally opposing spot 3D-modulation and 24-field full arc distal edge tracking (DET) plans were generated with a prescription of 70 Gy to the planning target volume. For the simulated delivery, we considered two types of procedures: the non-adaptive procedure and the on-line adaptive procedure. In the non-adaptive procedure, only patient realignment to match the prostate location in the planning CT was performed. In the on-line adaptive procedure, on top of the patient realignment, the kinetic energy for each individual proton pencil beam was re-determined from the on-line CT image acquired after the realignment and subsequently used for delivery. Dose distributions were re-calculated for individual fractions for different plans and different delivery procedures. The results show, without adaptive, that both the 3D-modulation and the DET plans experienced delivered dose degradation by having large cold or hot spots in the prostate. The DET plan had worse dose degradation than the 3D-modulation plan. The adaptive procedure effectively restored the planned dose distribution in the DET plan, with delivered prostate D(98%), D(50%) and D(2%) values less than 1% from the prescription. In the 3D-modulation plan, in certain cases the adaptive procedure was not effective to reduce the delivered dose degradation and yield similar results as the non-adaptive procedure. In conclusion, based on this 2D phantom

  19. Performance of 3-D architecture silicon sensors after intense proton irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, S I

    2001-01-01

    Silicon detectors with a three-dimensional architecture, in which the n- and p-electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have been successfully fabricated. The electrodes can be separated from each other by distances that are less than the substrate thickness, allowing short collection paths, low depletion voltages, and large current signals from rapid charge collection. While no special hardening steps were taken in this initial fabrication run, these features of three dimensional architectures produce an intrinsic resistance to the effects of radiation damage. Some performance measurements are given for detectors that are fully depleted and working after exposures to proton beams with doses equivalent to that from slightly more than ten years at the B-layer radius (50 mm) in the planned Atlas detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. (41 refs).

  20. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Jose V., E-mail: josev.mathew@gmail.com; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-11-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ∼16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ∼20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs. -- Highlights: • An improved permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) design with larger good field region is proposed. • We investigate four PMQ designs, including the widely used Halbach and bullet nosed designs. • Analytical calculations are backed by 2D as well as 3D numerical solvers, PANDIRA and RADIA. • The optimized 16 segment rectangular PMQ design is identified to exhibit the largest good field region. • The effect of easy axis orientation

  1. An improved permanent magnet quadrupole design with larger good field region for high intensity proton linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Jose V.; Rao, S.V.L.S.; Krishnagopal, S.; Singh, P.

    2013-01-01

    The Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA), being developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) will produce a 20 MeV, 30 mA, continuous wave (CW) proton beam. At these low velocities, space-charge forces dominate, and could lead to larger beam sizes and beam halos. Hence in the design of the focusing lattice of the LEHIPA drift tube linac (DTL) using permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs), a larger good field region is preferred. Here we study, using the two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) simulation codes PANDIRA and RADIA, four different types of cylindrical PMQ designs: 16-segment trapezoidal Halbach configuration, bullet-nosed geometry and 8- and 16-segment rectangular geometries. The trapezoidal Halbach geometry is used in a variety of accelerators since it provides very high field gradients in small bores, while the bullet-nosed geometry, which is a combination of the trapezoidal and rectangular designs, is used in some DTLs. This study shows that a larger good field region is possible in the 16-segment rectangular design as compared to the Halbach and bullet-nosed designs, making it more attractive for high-intensity proton linacs. An improvement in good-field region by ∼16% over the Halbach design is obtained in the optimized 16-segment rectangular design, although the field gradient is lower by ∼20%. Tolerance studies show that the rectangular segment PMQ design is substantially less sensitive to the easy axis orientation errors and hence will be a better choice for DTLs. -- Highlights: • An improved permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) design with larger good field region is proposed. • We investigate four PMQ designs, including the widely used Halbach and bullet nosed designs. • Analytical calculations are backed by 2D as well as 3D numerical solvers, PANDIRA and RADIA. • The optimized 16 segment rectangular PMQ design is identified to exhibit the largest good field region. • The effect of easy axis orientation

  2. First observations of intensity-dependent effects for transversely split beams during multiturn extraction studies at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Gilardoni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available During the commissioning of the CERN Proton Synchrotron multiturn extraction, tests with different beam intensities were performed in order to probe the behavior of resonance crossing in the presence of possible space charge effects. The initial beam intensity before transverse splitting was varied and the properties of the five beamlets obtained by crossing the fourth-order horizontal resonance were studied. A clear dependence of the beamlets’ parameters on the total beam intensity was found, which is the first direct observation of intensity-dependent effects for such a peculiar beam type. The experimental results are presented and discussed in detail in this paper.

  3. Calculated L-shell x-ray line intensities for proton and helium ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.; Harrigan, M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical L-shell X-ray line intensities have been calculated for proton and helium bombardment of atoms from nickel (Z 2 = 28) to curium (Z 2 = 96). The ionization cross sections for the three L subshells were obtained from the recent calculations by Cohen and Harrigan in the ECPSSR theory, which uses the plane-wave Born approximation (PWBA) with corrections for energy loss (E), Coulomb deflection (C), perturbed-stationary-state (PSS), and relativistic (R) effects. The fluorescence yields and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities were taken from M. O. Krause (Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 8, 307 (1979)) and the L-subshell emission rates from S. I. Salem, S. L. Panosian, and R. A. Krause (Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 14, 91 (1974)). The line intensities Ll, Lα, Leta, Lβ 1 to Lβ 6 , Lβ/sub 9,10/, and Lγ 1 to Lgg 6 are tabulated for selected ion energies from 0.2 to 10 MeV

  4. Pump-to-Signal Intensity Modulation Transfer in Saturated- Gain Fiber Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Lund-Hansen, Toke; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    The pump-to-signal intensity modulation transfer in saturated degenerate FOPAs is numerically investigated over the whole gain bandwidth. The intensity modulation transfer decreases and the OSNR improves when the amplifier operates in the saturation regime....

  5. Determination of signal intensity affected by Gaussian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blostein, Jeronimo J.; Bennun, Leonardo

    1999-01-01

    A methodology based on maximum likelihood criteria, to identify and quantify an arbitrary signal affected by Gaussian noise is shown. To use this methodology it is necessary to know the position in the spectrum where the signal of interest should appear, and the shape of the signal when the background is null or unappreciable. (author)

  6. Proton polarization in photo-excited aromatic molecule at room temperature enhanced by intense optical source and temperature control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, S., E-mail: sakaguchi@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Uesaka, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawahara, T. [Department of Physics, Toho University, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Ogawa, T. [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tang, L. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0001 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Urata, Y.; Wada, S. [RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, T. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Proton polarization in p-terphenyl at room-temperature is enhanced by a factor of 3. • Intense laser and temperature control are critically important for high polarization. • Optimization of time structure of laser pulse is effective for further improvement. -- Abstract: Proton polarization at room temperature, produced in a p-terphenyl crystal by using electron population difference in a photo-excited triplet state of pentacene, was enhanced by utilizing an intense laser with an average power of 1.5 W. It was shown that keeping the sample temperature below 300 K is critically important to prevent the rise of the spin–lattice relaxation rate caused by the laser heating. It is also reported that the magnitude of proton polarization strongly depends on the time structure of the laser pulse such as its width and the time interval between them.

  7. Effect of proton and electron-irradiation intensity on radiation-induced damages in silicon bioolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, Yu.A.; Gorin, B.M.; Kozhevnikov, V.P.; Mikhnovich, V.V.; Gusev, L.I.

    1981-01-01

    The increase of radiation-induced damages of bipolar n-p-n transistors 8-12 times with the irradiation intensity decrease by protons from 4.07x1010 to 2.5x107 cm-2 x c-1 has been found experimentally. damages of p-n-p transistors vary in the opposite way - they are decreased 2-3 times with the irradiation intensity decrease within the same limits. the dependence of damages on intansity of proton irradiation occurs at the dose rate by three orders less than it has been observed for electron irradiation. the results obtained are explained by the dependence of radiation defectoformation reactions on charge state of defects with account for the role of formation of disordering regions upon proton irradiation [ru

  8. A paradoxical signal intensity increase in fatty livers using opposed-phase gradient echo imaging with fat-suppression pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Voss, Stephan; Loeb Salsberg, Sandra; Krauel, Marta Ramon; Ludwig, David S.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in obese and overweight children, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become more prevalent in the pediatric population. Appreciating subtleties of magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity behavior from fatty livers under different imaging conditions thus becomes important to pediatric radiologists. We report an initially confusing signal behavior - increased signal from fatty livers when fat-suppression pulses are applied in an opposed-phase gradient echo imaging sequence - and seek to explain the physical mechanisms for this paradoxical signal intensity behavior. Abdominal MR imaging at 3 T with a 3-D volumetric interpolated breath-hold (VIBE) sequence in the opposed-phase condition (TR/TE 3.3/1.3 ms) was performed in five obese boys (14±2 years of age, body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex) with spectroscopically confirmed fatty livers. Two VIBE acquisitions were performed, one with and one without the use of chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse fat suppression. The ratios of fat-suppressed over non-fat-suppressed signal intensities were assessed in regions-of-interest (ROIs) in five tissues: subcutaneous fat, liver, vertebral marrow, muscle and spleen. The boys had spectroscopically estimated hepatic fat levels between 17% and 48%. CHESS pulse fat suppression decreased subcutaneous fat signals dramatically, by more than 85% within regions of optimal fat suppression. Fatty liver signals, in contrast, were elevated by an average of 87% with CHESS pulse fat suppression. Vertebral marrow signal was also significantly elevated with CHESS pulse fat suppression, while spleen and muscle signals demonstrated only small signal increases on the order of 10%. We demonstrated that CHESS pulse fat suppression actually increases the signal intensity from fatty livers in opposed-phase gradient echo imaging conditions. The increase can be attributed to suppression of one partner of the opposed-phase pair that normally contributes to the

  9. A paradoxical signal intensity increase in fatty livers using opposed-phase gradient echo imaging with fat-suppression pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Voss, Stephan [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Loeb Salsberg, Sandra; Krauel, Marta Ramon; Ludwig, David S. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-10-15

    With the increase in obese and overweight children, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become more prevalent in the pediatric population. Appreciating subtleties of magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity behavior from fatty livers under different imaging conditions thus becomes important to pediatric radiologists. We report an initially confusing signal behavior - increased signal from fatty livers when fat-suppression pulses are applied in an opposed-phase gradient echo imaging sequence - and seek to explain the physical mechanisms for this paradoxical signal intensity behavior. Abdominal MR imaging at 3 T with a 3-D volumetric interpolated breath-hold (VIBE) sequence in the opposed-phase condition (TR/TE 3.3/1.3 ms) was performed in five obese boys (14{+-}2 years of age, body mass index >95th percentile for age and sex) with spectroscopically confirmed fatty livers. Two VIBE acquisitions were performed, one with and one without the use of chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse fat suppression. The ratios of fat-suppressed over non-fat-suppressed signal intensities were assessed in regions-of-interest (ROIs) in five tissues: subcutaneous fat, liver, vertebral marrow, muscle and spleen. The boys had spectroscopically estimated hepatic fat levels between 17% and 48%. CHESS pulse fat suppression decreased subcutaneous fat signals dramatically, by more than 85% within regions of optimal fat suppression. Fatty liver signals, in contrast, were elevated by an average of 87% with CHESS pulse fat suppression. Vertebral marrow signal was also significantly elevated with CHESS pulse fat suppression, while spleen and muscle signals demonstrated only small signal increases on the order of 10%. We demonstrated that CHESS pulse fat suppression actually increases the signal intensity from fatty livers in opposed-phase gradient echo imaging conditions. The increase can be attributed to suppression of one partner of the opposed-phase pair that normally contributes to the

  10. Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Disease Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blanchard, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fuller, C. David [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Medical Physics Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohamed, Abdallah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Alexandria (Egypt); Morrison, William H.; Phan, Jack; Beadle, Beth M.; Skinner, Heath D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sturgis, Erich M. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hutcheson, Kate A. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe; Gillin, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: A single-institution prospective study was conducted to assess disease control and toxicity of proton therapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Disease control, toxicity, functional outcomes, and patterns of failure for the initial cohort of patients with oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) were prospectively collected in 2 registry studies at a single institution. Locoregional failures were analyzed by using deformable image registration. Results: Fifty patients with OPC treated from March 3, 2011, to July 2014 formed the cohort. Eighty-four percent were male, 50% had never smoked, 98% had stage III/IV disease, 64% received concurrent therapy, and 35% received induction chemotherapy. Forty-four of 45 tumors (98%) tested for p16 were positive. All patients received IMPT (multifield optimization to n=46; single-field optimization to n=4). No Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 4 or 5 toxicities were observed. The most common grade 3 toxicities were acute mucositis in 58% of patients and late dysphagia in 12%. Eleven patients had a gastrostomy (feeding) tube placed during therapy, but none had a feeding tube at last follow-up. At a median follow-up time of 29 months, 5 patients had disease recurrence: local in 1, local and regional in 1, regional in 2, and distant in 1. The 2-year actuarial overall and progression-free survival rates were 94.5% and 88.6%. Conclusions: The oncologic, toxicity, and functional outcomes after IMPT for OPC are encouraging and provide the basis for ongoing and future clinical studies.

  11. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula, E-mail: dgiantsoudi@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  12. SU-E-T-124: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Wu, H [IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Das, I [Indiana University- School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is known to be able to deliver more radiation dose to tumor while minimizing radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues. Proton therapy also provides superior dose distribution due to Bragg peak. Since both HDR and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) are beneficial for their quick dose drop off, our goal in this study is to compare the pace of dose gradient drop-off between HDR and IMPT plans based on the same CT image data-set. In addition, normal tissues sparing were also compared among HDR, IMPT and SBRT. Methods: Five cervical cancer cases treated with EBRT + HDR boost combination with Tandem and Ovoid applicator were used for comparison purpose. Original HDR plans with prescribed dose of 5.5 Gy x 5 fractions were generated and optimized. The 100% isodose line of HDR plans was converted to a dose volume, and treated as CTV for IMPT and SBRT planning. The same HDR CT scans were also used for IMPT plan and SBRT plan for direct comparison. The philosophy of the IMPT and SBRT planning was to create the same CTV coverage as HDR plans. All three modalities treatment plans were compared to each other with a set of predetermined criteria. Results: With similar target volume coverage in cervix cancer boost treatment, HDR provides a slightly sharper dose drop-off from 100% to 50% isodose line, averagely in all directions compared to IMPT. However, IMPT demonstrated more dose gradient drop-off at the junction of the target and normal tissues by providing more normal tissue sparing and superior capability to reduce integral dose. Conclusion: IMPT is capable of providing comparable dose drop-off as HDR. IMPT can be explored as replacement for HDR brachytherapy in various applications.

  13. Reoptimization of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plans Based on Linear Energy Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Botas, Pablo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Faculty of Physics, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Gorissen, Bram L.; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: We describe a treatment plan optimization method for intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) that avoids high values of linear energy transfer (LET) in critical structures located within or near the target volume while limiting degradation of the best possible physical dose distribution. Methods and Materials: To allow fast optimization based on dose and LET, a GPU-based Monte Carlo code was extended to provide dose-averaged LET in addition to dose for all pencil beams. After optimizing an initial IMPT plan based on physical dose, a prioritized optimization scheme is used to modify the LET distribution while constraining the physical dose objectives to values close to the initial plan. The LET optimization step is performed based on objective functions evaluated for the product of LET and physical dose (LET×D). To first approximation, LET×D represents a measure of the additional biological dose that is caused by high LET. Results: The method is effective for treatments where serial critical structures with maximum dose constraints are located within or near the target. We report on 5 patients with intracranial tumors (high-grade meningiomas, base-of-skull chordomas, ependymomas) in whom the target volume overlaps with the brainstem and optic structures. In all cases, high LET×D in critical structures could be avoided while minimally compromising physical dose planning objectives. Conclusion: LET-based reoptimization of IMPT plans represents a pragmatic approach to bridge the gap between purely physical dose-based and relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-based planning. The method makes IMPT treatments safer by mitigating a potentially increased risk of side effects resulting from elevated RBE of proton beams near the end of range.

  14. Linear Energy Transfer-Guided Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: Feasibility Study and Clinical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Craft, David; Niemierko, Andrzej; Trofimov, Alexei; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of linear energy transfer (LET) guided plan optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods and Materials: A multicriteria optimization (MCO) module was used to generate a series of Pareto-optimal IMPT base plans (BPs), corresponding to defined objectives, for 5 patients with head-and-neck cancer and 2 with pancreatic cancer. A Monte Carlo platform was used to calculate dose and LET distributions for each BP. A custom-designed MCO navigation module allowed the user to interpolate between BPs to produce deliverable Pareto-optimal solutions. Differences among the BPs were evaluated for each patient, based on dose–volume and LET–volume histograms and 3-dimensional distributions. An LET-based relative biological effectiveness (RBE) model was used to evaluate the potential clinical benefit when navigating the space of Pareto-optimal BPs. Results: The mean LET values for the target varied up to 30% among the BPs for the head-and-neck patients and up to 14% for the pancreatic cancer patients. Variations were more prominent in organs at risk (OARs), where mean LET values differed by a factor of up to 2 among the BPs for the same patient. An inverse relation between dose and LET distributions for the OARs was typically observed. Accounting for LET-dependent variable RBE values, a potential improvement on RBE-weighted dose of up to 40%, averaged over several structures under study, was noticed during MCO navigation. Conclusions: We present a novel strategy for optimizing proton therapy to maximize dose-averaged LET in tumor targets while simultaneously minimizing dose-averaged LET in normal tissue structures. MCO BPs show substantial LET variations, leading to potentially significant differences in RBE-weighted doses. Pareto-surface navigation, using both dose and LET distributions for guidance, provides the means for evaluating a large variety of deliverable plans and aids in

  15. Including robustness in multi-criteria optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Unkelbach, Jan; Trofimov, Alexei; Madden, Thomas; Kooy, Hanne; Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David

    2012-02-01

    We present a method to include robustness in a multi-criteria optimization (MCO) framework for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The approach allows one to simultaneously explore the trade-off between different objectives as well as the trade-off between robustness and nominal plan quality. In MCO, a database of plans each emphasizing different treatment planning objectives, is pre-computed to approximate the Pareto surface. An IMPT treatment plan that strikes the best balance between the different objectives can be selected by navigating on the Pareto surface. In our approach, robustness is integrated into MCO by adding robustified objectives and constraints to the MCO problem. Uncertainties (or errors) of the robust problem are modeled by pre-calculated dose-influence matrices for a nominal scenario and a number of pre-defined error scenarios (shifted patient positions, proton beam undershoot and overshoot). Objectives and constraints can be defined for the nominal scenario, thus characterizing nominal plan quality. A robustified objective represents the worst objective function value that can be realized for any of the error scenarios and thus provides a measure of plan robustness. The optimization method is based on a linear projection solver and is capable of handling large problem sizes resulting from a fine dose grid resolution, many scenarios, and a large number of proton pencil beams. A base-of-skull case is used to demonstrate the robust optimization method. It is demonstrated that the robust optimization method reduces the sensitivity of the treatment plan to setup and range errors to a degree that is not achieved by a safety margin approach. A chordoma case is analyzed in more detail to demonstrate the involved trade-offs between target underdose and brainstem sparing as well as robustness and nominal plan quality. The latter illustrates the advantage of MCO in the context of robust planning. For all cases examined, the robust optimization for

  16. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiasen; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100,000 spots with a target volume of ∼ 1000 cm(3) and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and

  17. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jiasen, E-mail: ma.jiasen@mayo.edu; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  18. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%–20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect. It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle

  19. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  20. Production of an intense source of micro-second proton pulses; Recherche d'une intense source de protons pulsee a la micro-seconde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmont, J L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-02-01

    In order to obtain micro-second proton pulses of 100 mA, we have built a duoplasmatron ion source and beam focusing equipment. The pulses of the ion-source were produced by a load discharge. The source operates as a hydrogen-thyratron. The particular geometry of the duoplasmatron was chosen in order that the ion emission be stable with a 10 A arc and with a gas-flow lower than 10 cm{sup 3}/h T.P.N. Studies of the beam showed preponderance of protons and the presence of heavy ions. The beam density is higher on the optic axis. (author) [French] Pour obtenir des impulsions d'une microseconde de 100 mA de protons, on a ete amene a construire une source 'duoplasmatron' et son optique de focalisation. La pulsation de la source a ete faite par decharge d'une ligne, la source fonctionnant elle-meme comme un thyratron a hydrogene. La geometrie de la source a ete etudiee pour que l'emission d'ions soit stable avec un arc de 10 amperes de crete et un debit de gaz de 10 cm{sup 3}/h T.P.N. Une analyse du faisceau a revele la preponderance des protons et l'existence d'ions lourds. La densite du faisceau est plus grande sur l'axe de l'optique.

  1. A study on CT attenuation and MR signal intensity of protein solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joung Hae; Choi, Dae Seob; Kim, Soon; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Oh, Hyeon Hee; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Sung Woo; Chang, Kee Hyun; Chung, Jun Ho

    2001-01-01

    To correlate CT attenuation and MR signal intensity with concentration of protein solution. CT and MR examinations of a phantom containing bovine serum albumin solutions of various concentrations ranging from 0 to 55% were performed. CT Hounsfield units(HUs), MR signal intensities, and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of each albumin solution were measured, and CT HUs and MR signal intensities of the solutions were compared with those of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), white matter, and cortical gray matter. CT HU increased gradually with increasing albumin concentration. On T1-weighted images(T1WI), signal intensity increased with increasing albumin concentrations of up to 35% but then decreased. On T2-weighted images(T2Wl), gradually decreasing signal intensity and increasing albumin concentration were observed Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion-weighted images (DWls) showed that signal intensity peaked at a concentration of 10% and then gradually decreased. The ADC of the solution gradually decreased as concentration increased. Compared with those of normal brain structures, the CT HUs of solutions at concentrations of over 20% were higher than those of white and gray matter. At T1WI, the signal intensities of 10-45% solutions were similar to or higher than that of the gray matter. At T2Wl, the signal intensities of solutions above 25, 35, and 40% were lower than those of CSF, gray matter, and white matter, respectively. FLAIR images showed that the signal intensities of 5-35% solutions were higher than that of gray matter. The CT attenuation of albumin solution increased gradually with increasing concentration. MR signal intensities peaked at 35% concentration on T1WI and at 10% on FLAIR and DW images, respectively, and then gradually decreased. T2Wl and ADC map images showed gradually decreasing signal intensity and ADC as albumin concentration increased

  2. Proton Radiation Effects on Dark Signal Distribution of PPD CMOS Image Sensors: Both TID and DDD Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; Chen, Wei; Liu, Minbo; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun; Ma, Wuying; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2017-11-30

    Four-transistor (T) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) with four-megapixel resolution using 11µm pitch high dynamic range pixel were radiated with 3 MeV and 10MeV protons. The dark signal was measured pre- and post-radiation, with the dark signal post irradiation showing a remarkable increase. A theoretical method of dark signal distribution pre- and post-radiation is used to analyze the degradation mechanisms of the dark signal distribution. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental results. This research would provide a good understanding of the proton radiation effects on the CIS and make it possible to predict the dark signal distribution of the CIS under the complex proton radiation environments.

  3. Measurement of L X-ray intensity ratios in tantalum by proton and Si-ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braich, J.S.; Dhal, B.B.; Singh, B.P.; Padhi, H.C.; Khurana, C.S.; Verma, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Lι, Lβ 1,4,6 , Lβ 2,15,3 , Lγ 1 , Lγ 2,3,6 and Lγ 4,4' , X-ray intensities relative to the Lα, caused by the impact of protons of energy 1 to 4.6 MeV and Si-ions of 70 to 98 MeV on Ta targets, h ave been measured. The results show that the intensity ratios drop significantly for all transitions except Lγ 2,3,6 /Lα with Si-ions of the same energy/amu as compared to those of protons. The experimental results have been compared with those based on the ECPSSR theoretical values. From the energy shift and change in the intensity ratios of various transitions caused by Si-ion impact, the number of outer shell vacancies in the M, N and O-shells simultaneous to that of L-shell have been estimat ed. (orig.)

  4. A conceptual design of the DTL-SDTL for the JAERI high intensity proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ino, Hiroshi; Kabeya, Zenzaburo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Chishiro, Etsuji; Ouchi, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Mizumoto, Motoharu

    1998-08-01

    A high intensity proton linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average beam power of 8 MW has been proposed for the Neutron Science Project (NSP) at JAERI. This linac starts with radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, which is followed by a drift-tube linac (DTL), separated-type DTL (SDTL), and a superconducting structure. In this report, we focus on the DTL and SDTL part of the accelerator. The DTL accelerates the beam from 2 to 51 MeV, and SDTL accelerates the beam from 51 to 10 MeV. Since the main features of the requirement for the DTL-SDTL are high peak current ({approx}30 mA) and a high-duty factor ({approx}CW), the conceptual design should be determined not only based on the result of a beam-dynamics calculation, but by careful study of the cooling problems. The design processes of the DTL-SDTL and the matching sections (RFQ to DTL, CW-Pulse merge section, and SDTL to SCC) and the result of a heat transfer analysis of DTL are described. (author)

  5. Proton probing of ultra-thin foil dynamics in high intensity regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Aktan, Esin; Aurand, Bastian; Cerchez, Mirela; Willi, Oswald

    2017-10-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration has been enriched significantly over the past decade, thanks to the advanced laser technologies. Already, from 100s TW class systems, laser driven sources of particles and radiations are being considered in number of potential applications in science and medicine due to their unique properties. New physical effects unearthed at these systems may help understand and conduct successful experiments at several PW class multi-beam facilities with high rep rate systems, e.g. ELI. Here we present the first experimental results on ultra-thin foil dynamics irradiated by an ultra-high intensity (1020 W/cm2) , ultra-high contrast (10-12) laser pulse at ARCTURUS laser facility at HHU Duesseldorf. By employing the elegant proton probing technique it is observed that for the circular polarization of laser light, a 100nm thin target is pushed forward as a compressed layer due to the radiation pressure of light. Whereas, the linear polarization seems to decompress the target drastically. 2D particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the experimental findings. Our results confirm the previous simulation studies investigating the fundamental role played by light polarization, finite focus spot size effect and eventually electron heating including the oblique incidence at the target edges.

  6. Analysis of small-signal intensity modulation of semiconductor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computer simulation of the model is applied to 1.55-µm ... Semiconductor laser; small-signal modulation; modulation response; gain suppression. ... originates from intraband relaxation processes of charge carriers that extend for times as ...

  7. Proton-proton intensity interferometry: Space-time structure of the emitting zone in Ni+Ni collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolija, M.; Cindro, N.; Shapira, D.

    1995-01-01

    A brief description is given of the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss effect method for determining the space-time structure of the proton-emitting source in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In this context a measurement of exclusive p-p correlations from 58 Ni+ 58 Ni at 850 MeV is analyzed. The data served to study the directional dependence of the p-p correlation function and, for the first time, extract separately the source size and the particle-emission time

  8. Evaluation of signal intensity of various thyroid tissues on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Koichiro; Imanishi, Yoshimasa [St. Marianna Univ., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Igarashi, Ryuukou; Shinagawa, Toshihito

    2001-08-01

    Although normal thyroid mainly consists of thyroid follicles and has large amount of water in them, it shows low signal intensity on T2 weighted MR image. In this paper, we analysed the signal intensity of the thyroid in clinical cases and investigated the relationship between signal intensity and iodine concentration. In forty-one patients who have clinically suspected thyroid diseases, fifty-three MRI examinations of the neck and forty-three thyroid CT examinations were performed. The MR imaging of the neck was performed with T1 weighted image, T2 weighted image, and STIR image. Iodine concentration of the thyroid was measured by the CT software which was originally made by one of the authors (Y.I.). The signal intensity on T2 weighted image negatively correlated with iodine concentration, although there was no relationship between iodine concentration and its signal intensity on T1 weighted image. On T2 weighted image, the intensity of thyroid with high iodine concentration showed a low signal and that of thyroid with low iodine concentration presented a high signal. The thyroid with chronic thyroiditis showed higher signal intensity than normal thyroid and adenmatous goiter on T2 weighted image and STIR image. On T2 weighted image and STIR image, the signal intensity of any thyroid nodules were higher than that of normal thyroid. In addition, follicular adenoma and partially malignant nodules showed a higher signal intensity than thyroid carcinomas. According to previous reports, decreased iodine concentration in thyroid follicles represents decreased concentration of iodine-binding proteins in follicles as well as decreased volume of follicular content in the thyroid. On MR imaging, very high concentration of protein in water solution does not only cause shortening of T1 relaxation time but also shortening of T2 relaxation time resulting in low signal intensity. In the present study, our data seem to suggest that very high concentration of iodine

  9. Evaluation of signal intensity of various thyroid tissues on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Koichiro; Imanishi, Yoshimasa; Igarashi, Ryuukou; Shinagawa, Toshihito

    2001-01-01

    Although normal thyroid mainly consists of thyroid follicles and has large amount of water in them, it shows low signal intensity on T2 weighted MR image. In this paper, we analysed the signal intensity of the thyroid in clinical cases and investigated the relationship between signal intensity and iodine concentration. In forty-one patients who have clinically suspected thyroid diseases, fifty-three MRI examinations of the neck and forty-three thyroid CT examinations were performed. The MR imaging of the neck was performed with T1 weighted image, T2 weighted image, and STIR image. Iodine concentration of the thyroid was measured by the CT software which was originally made by one of the authors (Y.I.). The signal intensity on T2 weighted image negatively correlated with iodine concentration, although there was no relationship between iodine concentration and its signal intensity on T1 weighted image. On T2 weighted image, the intensity of thyroid with high iodine concentration showed a low signal and that of thyroid with low iodine concentration presented a high signal. The thyroid with chronic thyroiditis showed higher signal intensity than normal thyroid and adenmatous goiter on T2 weighted image and STIR image. On T2 weighted image and STIR image, the signal intensity of any thyroid nodules were higher than that of normal thyroid. In addition, follicular adenoma and partially malignant nodules showed a higher signal intensity than thyroid carcinomas. According to previous reports, decreased iodine concentration in thyroid follicles represents decreased concentration of iodine-binding proteins in follicles as well as decreased volume of follicular content in the thyroid. On MR imaging, very high concentration of protein in water solution does not only cause shortening of T1 relaxation time but also shortening of T2 relaxation time resulting in low signal intensity. In the present study, our data seem to suggest that very high concentration of iodine

  10. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  11. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

  12. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Zhang, X Z; Zhang, Z M; Zhao, H Y; He, Y; Zhao, H W

    2016-02-01

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  13. Enhanced target normal sheath acceleration of protons from intense laser interaction with a cone-tube target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser driven proton acceleration is proposed to be greatly enhanced by using a cone-tube target, which can be easily manufactured by current 3D-print technology. It is observed that energetic electron bunches are generated along the tube and accelerated to a much higher temperature by the combination of ponderomotive force and longitudinal electric field which is induced by the optical confinement of the laser field. As a result, a localized and enhanced sheath field is produced at the rear of the target and the maximum proton energy is about three-fold increased based on the two-dimentional particle-in-cell simulation results. It is demonstrated that by employing this advanced target scheme, the scaling of the proton energy versus the laser intensity is much beyond the normal target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA case.

  14. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.

    2016-02-01

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  15. Status of intense permanent magnet proton source for China-accelerator driven sub-critical system Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q., E-mail: wuq@impcas.ac.cn; Ma, H. Y.; Yang, Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhao, H. Y.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Two compact intense 2.45 GHz permanent magnet proton sources and their corresponding low energy beam transport (LEBT) system were developed successfully for China accelerator driven sub-critical system in 2014. Both the proton sources operate at 35 kV potential. The beams extracted from the ion source are transported by the LEBT, which is composed of two identical solenoids, to the 2.1 MeV Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). In order to ensure the safety of the superconducting cavities during commissioning, an electrostatic-chopper has been designed and installed in the LEBT line that can chop the continuous wave beam into a pulsed one. The minimum width of the pulse is less than 10 μs and the fall/rise time of the chopper is about 20 ns. The performance of the proton source and the LEBT, such as beam current, beam profile, emittance and the impact to RFQ injection will be presented.

  16. Basic design of shield blocks for a spallation neutron source under the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Katsuhiko; Maekawa, Fujio; Takada, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC), a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed as a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. Overall dimensions of a biological shield of the neutron source had been determined by evaluation of shielding performance by Monte Carlo calculations. This report describes results of design studies on an optimum dividing scheme in terms of cost and treatment and mechanical strength of shield blocks for the biological shield. As for mechanical strength, it was studied whether the shield blocks would be stable, fall down or move to a horizontal direction in case of an earthquake of seismic intensity of 5.5 (250 Gal) as an abnormal load. For ceiling shielding blocks being supported by both ends of the long blocks, maximum bending moment and an amount of maximum deflection of their center were evaluated. (author)

  17. Basic design of shield blocks for a spallation neutron source under the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, K; Takada, H

    2003-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC), a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed as a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. Overall dimensions of a biological shield of the neutron source had been determined by evaluation of shielding performance by Monte Carlo calculations. This report describes results of design studies on an optimum dividing scheme in terms of cost and treatment and mechanical strength of shield blocks for the biological shield. As for mechanical strength, it was studied whether the shield blocks would be stable, fall down or move to a horizontal direction in case of an earthquake of seismic intensity of 5.5 (250 Gal) as an abnormal load. For ceiling shielding blocks being supported by both ends of the long blocks, maximum bending moment and an amount of maximum deflection of their center were evaluated.

  18. A critical evaluation of worst case optimization methods for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksson, Albin; Bokrantz, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To critically evaluate and compare three worst case optimization methods that have been previously employed to generate intensity-modulated proton therapy treatment plans that are robust against systematic errors. The goal of the evaluation is to identify circumstances when the methods behave differently and to describe the mechanism behind the differences when they occur. Methods: The worst case methods optimize plans to perform as well as possible under the worst case scenario that can physically occur (composite worst case), the combination of the worst case scenarios for each objective constituent considered independently (objectivewise worst case), and the combination of the worst case scenarios for each voxel considered independently (voxelwise worst case). These three methods were assessed with respect to treatment planning for prostate under systematic setup uncertainty. An equivalence with probabilistic optimization was used to identify the scenarios that determine the outcome of the optimization. Results: If the conflict between target coverage and normal tissue sparing is small and no dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints are present, then all three methods yield robust plans. Otherwise, they all have their shortcomings: Composite worst case led to unnecessarily low plan quality in boundary scenarios that were less difficult than the worst case ones. Objectivewise worst case generally led to nonrobust plans. Voxelwise worst case led to overly conservative plans with respect to DVH constraints, which resulted in excessive dose to normal tissue, and less sharp dose fall-off than the other two methods. Conclusions: The three worst case methods have clearly different behaviors. These behaviors can be understood from which scenarios that are active in the optimization. No particular method is superior to the others under all circumstances: composite worst case is suitable if the conflicts are not very severe or there are DVH constraints whereas

  19. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes in the lumbar spine: a manifestation of facet degenerative joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.L.; Kaplan, P.A.; Dussault, R.G.; Anderson, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Signal intensity changes in lumbar pedicles, similar to those described in vertebral body endplates adjacent to degenerated discs, have been described as an ancillary sign of spondylolysis on MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pedicle marrow signal intensity changes also occur in association with facet degenerative joint disease.Design. Eighty-nine lumbar spine MRI examinations without spondylolysis were reviewed for marrow signal intensity changes in pedicles and vertebral bodies as well as for facet degenerative joint disease.Results. Five percent (46/890) of lumbar pedicles in 23 patients had marrow signal intensity changes. Ninety-one percent (42/46) of the abnormal pedicles had adjacent degenerative joint disease of the facets, while only 21% (189/890) of normal pedicles had adjacent facet degenerative joint disease (p<0.001). Eighty-nine percent (41/46) of the pedicles with marrow signal intensity changes had adjacent degenerative disc disease.Conclusions. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are not a specific sign of spondylolysis; they are commonly seen with adjacent facet degenerative joint disease in the absence of spondylolysis. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are probably a response to abnormal stresses related to abnormal motion or loading caused by the degenerative changes in the spinal segment. (orig.)

  20. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes in the lumbar spine: a manifestation of facet degenerative joint disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, J.L.; Kaplan, P.A.; Dussault, R.G.; Anderson, M.W. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. Signal intensity changes in lumbar pedicles, similar to those described in vertebral body endplates adjacent to degenerated discs, have been described as an ancillary sign of spondylolysis on MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pedicle marrow signal intensity changes also occur in association with facet degenerative joint disease.Design. Eighty-nine lumbar spine MRI examinations without spondylolysis were reviewed for marrow signal intensity changes in pedicles and vertebral bodies as well as for facet degenerative joint disease.Results. Five percent (46/890) of lumbar pedicles in 23 patients had marrow signal intensity changes. Ninety-one percent (42/46) of the abnormal pedicles had adjacent degenerative joint disease of the facets, while only 21% (189/890) of normal pedicles had adjacent facet degenerative joint disease (p<0.001). Eighty-nine percent (41/46) of the pedicles with marrow signal intensity changes had adjacent degenerative disc disease.Conclusions. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are not a specific sign of spondylolysis; they are commonly seen with adjacent facet degenerative joint disease in the absence of spondylolysis. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes are probably a response to abnormal stresses related to abnormal motion or loading caused by the degenerative changes in the spinal segment. (orig.)

  1. Analysis and software development for controlling RF signal generator proton cyclotron Decy-13 using DDS Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajitno

    2012-01-01

    Analysis and manufacture of computer programs for controlling the signal generator Radio Frequency (RF) proton cyclotron Decy-13 have been done. Signal generator uses a technique Direct Digital Synthesiser (DDS) which settings must be done with software. Signal generator consists of electronic modules which are: DDS, micro controller ATmega16, amplifier RF.dan ± 12 Vdc power supply. Function of the programs that have been made is to set the DDS module, namely: output frequency, step frequency and phase settings and displays the operating parameters of the DDS and the RF amplifier on the monitor screen. Computer programs created with Visual Basic and has been tested to control the RF signal generator to send data serially to the module ATmega16 and receives data to be displayed on the monitor screen. Testing sending and receiving data is done with a baudrate of 1200 bps to 19200 bps with perfect results. Computer programs that have been made equipped with a Human Machine Interface to provide values parameter input on the DDS operations. (author)

  2. MRI signal intensity as a maker of impairment in incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Hidefumi; Aoki, Haruhito; Hamabe, Masaki; Sasao, Yutaka; Miura, Takehiko

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries such as central cord syndrome may result in prolonged spasticity of the limbs, especially disabilities of the upper extremities, even if the patient is able to walk. In this study, relationship between cord impairment and clinical outcome was investigated using MRI. Results showed that small foci of low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted imaging combined with foci of high signal intensity in T 2 -weighted imaging in follow-up MRI are closely related to the severity of sequelae. Small foci of low signal intensity in T 1 -weighted imaging are considered in the literature to indicate myelomalacia or cyst formation with gliosis. (author)

  3. Consistency of neutron and proton capture intensity standards new relative intensities for 56Co, 66Ga decay and 35Cl(n,γ) reaction gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Z.; Belgya, T.

    2000-01-01

    The equivalence of efficiency determination procedures based on neutron and proton capture lines has been verified and the deviation of high-energy efficiency from linearity confirmed. The new, accurate relative intensities for 56 Co and 66 Ga extend the range of secondary radioactive standards up to 4.8 MeV. Extreme care has to be taken with any high-energy intensity value obtained in the past with the help of 56 Co and 66 Ga calibration sources, and corrections have to be made using the present data of high accuracy. Relative intensities have also been improved for the 35 Cl(n,γ) reaction, a useful secondary standard in a wide energy range, between 0.3-8.5 MeV. The new data are supported by other most recent measurements of a slightly lower precision

  4. SU-F-T-164: Investigation of PRESAGE Formulation On Signal Quenching in a Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M; Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The radiochromic polyurethane PRESAGE by Heuris Pharma has had limited applications with protons because of a dose response dependence on LET resulting in signal quenching in the Bragg peak. This is due to the radical initiator, a halocarbon, radically recombining in high-LET irradiations. This study investigated the use of alternative halocarbons at various chemical concentrations to determine their significance in signal quenching. Methods: PRESAGE was manufactured in-house and cast in small volume cuvettes (1×1×4cm^3). Several compositions were evaluated to determine the influence of the radical initiator component. Mixtures contained one of two halocarbons, chloroform or bromoform, at concentrations of 5%/10%/15%(w/w). A large volume, cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeter made following the mixture described by Heuris Pharma, 4cm(D)×8.5cm(H), was irradiated with 200-MeV protons to study regions of low- and high-LET along a 10cm spread out Bragg peak isodose profile. Depths corresponding to regions of low quenching ( 20%) were determined. These depths were used for cuvette placement in a solid water phantom. Samples of each formulation were placed at each depth and irradiated to doses between 0 and 10Gy. Results: The cuvettes indicated different levels of quenching for different radical initiator types, concentrations, and total doses. Chloroform formulations showed reduced quenching from 29%(5%-w/w) to 21%(15%-w/w) while bromoform reduced quenching from 27%(5%-w/w) to 17%(15%-w/w). The reduction in quenching was found to be non-linear with concentration of radical initiator. A quenching dose-dependency was also found that changed with formulation. In all cases, quenching was relatively consistent from 0–5Gy but increased at 10Gy. The quenching decreased as concentrations of radical initiator increased. Conclusion: The radical initiator component in PRESAGE is correlated with the signal quenching observed in proton irradiations and formulation adjustments

  5. SU-F-T-164: Investigation of PRESAGE Formulation On Signal Quenching in a Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, M; Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The radiochromic polyurethane PRESAGE by Heuris Pharma has had limited applications with protons because of a dose response dependence on LET resulting in signal quenching in the Bragg peak. This is due to the radical initiator, a halocarbon, radically recombining in high-LET irradiations. This study investigated the use of alternative halocarbons at various chemical concentrations to determine their significance in signal quenching. Methods: PRESAGE was manufactured in-house and cast in small volume cuvettes (1×1×4cm^3). Several compositions were evaluated to determine the influence of the radical initiator component. Mixtures contained one of two halocarbons, chloroform or bromoform, at concentrations of 5%/10%/15%(w/w). A large volume, cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeter made following the mixture described by Heuris Pharma, 4cm(D)×8.5cm(H), was irradiated with 200-MeV protons to study regions of low- and high-LET along a 10cm spread out Bragg peak isodose profile. Depths corresponding to regions of low quenching (<3%) and high quenching (>20%) were determined. These depths were used for cuvette placement in a solid water phantom. Samples of each formulation were placed at each depth and irradiated to doses between 0 and 10Gy. Results: The cuvettes indicated different levels of quenching for different radical initiator types, concentrations, and total doses. Chloroform formulations showed reduced quenching from 29%(5%-w/w) to 21%(15%-w/w) while bromoform reduced quenching from 27%(5%-w/w) to 17%(15%-w/w). The reduction in quenching was found to be non-linear with concentration of radical initiator. A quenching dose-dependency was also found that changed with formulation. In all cases, quenching was relatively consistent from 0–5Gy but increased at 10Gy. The quenching decreased as concentrations of radical initiator increased. Conclusion: The radical initiator component in PRESAGE is correlated with the signal quenching observed in proton irradiations and

  6. Nuclear design aspect of the Korean high intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jonghwa; Song, Tae-Yung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Yusong, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-11-01

    A plan to construct a high current proton accelerator has been proposed by KAERI. We are presenting the required nuclear design to support the project as well as a brief overview of the proposed proton accelerator. The target and core design is highlighted to show feasibility of incineration of minor actinides from the spent fuel of light water reactors. Radiation shielding and activation analyses are also important for the design and the license of the accelerator. (author)

  7. Improving comparability between microarray probe signals by thermodynamic intensity correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, G. M.; Wernersson, Rasmus; Juncker, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    different probes. It is therefore of great interest to correct for the variation between probes. Much of this variation is sequence dependent. We demonstrate that a thermodynamic model for hybridization of either DNA or RNA to a DNA microarray, which takes the sequence-dependent probe affinities...... determination of transcription start sites for a subset of yeast genes. In another application, we identify present/absent calls for probes hybridized to the sequenced Escherichia coli strain O157:H7 EDL933. The model improves the correct calls from 85 to 95% relative to raw intensity measures. The model thus...... makes applications which depend on comparisons between probes aimed at different sections of the same target more reliable....

  8. Direct UV written Michelson interferometer for RZ signal generation using phase-to-intensity modulation conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Geng, Yan; Zsigri, Beata

    2005-01-01

    An integrated Michelson delay interferometer structure making use of waveguide gratings as reflective elements is proposed and fabricated by direct ultraviolet writing. Successful return-to-zero alternate-mark-inversion signal generation using phase-to-intensity modulation conversion...

  9. Analytical incorporation of fractionation effects in probabilistic treatment planning for intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Niklas; Hennig, Philipp; Wieser, Hans-Peter; Bangert, Mark

    2018-04-01

    We show that it is possible to explicitly incorporate fractionation effects into closed-form probabilistic treatment plan analysis and optimization for intensity-modulated proton therapy with analytical probabilistic modeling (APM). We study the impact of different fractionation schemes on the dosimetric uncertainty induced by random and systematic sources of range and setup uncertainty for treatment plans that were optimized with and without consideration of the number of treatment fractions. The APM framework is capable of handling arbitrarily correlated uncertainty models including systematic and random errors in the context of fractionation. On this basis, we construct an analytical dose variance computation pipeline that explicitly considers the number of treatment fractions for uncertainty quantitation and minimization during treatment planning. We evaluate the variance computation model in comparison to random sampling of 100 treatments for conventional and probabilistic treatment plans under different fractionation schemes (1, 5, 30 fractions) for an intracranial, a paraspinal and a prostate case. The impact of neglecting the fractionation scheme during treatment planning is investigated by applying treatment plans that were generated with probabilistic optimization for 1 fraction in a higher number of fractions and comparing them to the probabilistic plans optimized under explicit consideration of the number of fractions. APM enables the construction of an analytical variance computation model for dose uncertainty considering fractionation at negligible computational overhead. It is computationally feasible (a) to simultaneously perform a robustness analysis for all possible fraction numbers and (b) to perform a probabilistic treatment plan optimization for a specific fraction number. The incorporation of fractionation assumptions for robustness analysis exposes a dose to uncertainty trade-off, i.e., the dose in the organs at risk is increased for a

  10. Robustness Recipes for Minimax Robust Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, Sebastian van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Perkó, Zoltán [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Heijmen, Ben [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lathouwers, Danny [Section of Nuclear Energy and Radiation Applications, Department of Radiation, Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Hoogeman, Mischa, E-mail: m.hoogeman@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: We aimed to derive a “robustness recipe” giving the range robustness (RR) and setup robustness (SR) settings (ie, the error values) that ensure adequate clinical target volume (CTV) coverage in oropharyngeal cancer patients for given gaussian distributions of systematic setup, random setup, and range errors (characterized by standard deviations of Σ, σ, and ρ, respectively) when used in minimax worst-case robust intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization. Methods and Materials: For the analysis, contoured computed tomography (CT) scans of 9 unilateral and 9 bilateral patients were used. An IMPT plan was considered robust if, for at least 98% of the simulated fractionated treatments, 98% of the CTV received 95% or more of the prescribed dose. For fast assessment of the CTV coverage for given error distributions (ie, different values of Σ, σ, and ρ), polynomial chaos methods were used. Separate recipes were derived for the unilateral and bilateral cases using one patient from each group, and all 18 patients were included in the validation of the recipes. Results: Treatment plans for bilateral cases are intrinsically more robust than those for unilateral cases. The required RR only depends on the ρ, and SR can be fitted by second-order polynomials in Σ and σ. The formulas for the derived robustness recipes are as follows: Unilateral patients need SR = −0.15Σ{sup 2} + 0.27σ{sup 2} + 1.85Σ − 0.06σ + 1.22 and RR=3% for ρ = 1% and ρ = 2%; bilateral patients need SR = −0.07Σ{sup 2} + 0.19σ{sup 2} + 1.34Σ − 0.07σ + 1.17 and RR=3% and 4% for ρ = 1% and 2%, respectively. For the recipe validation, 2 plans were generated for each of the 18 patients corresponding to Σ = σ = 1.5 mm and ρ = 0% and 2%. Thirty-four plans had adequate CTV coverage in 98% or more of the simulated fractionated treatments; the remaining 2 had adequate coverage in 97.8% and 97.9%. Conclusions: Robustness recipes were derived that can

  11. Efficiency of analytical and sampling-based uncertainty propagation in intensity-modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, N.; Hennig, P.; Wieser, H. P.; Bangert, M.

    2017-07-01

    The sensitivity of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans to uncertainties can be quantified and mitigated with robust/min-max and stochastic/probabilistic treatment analysis and optimization techniques. Those methods usually rely on sparse random, importance, or worst-case sampling. Inevitably, this imposes a trade-off between computational speed and accuracy of the uncertainty propagation. Here, we investigate analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) as an alternative for uncertainty propagation and minimization in IMPT that does not rely on scenario sampling. APM propagates probability distributions over range and setup uncertainties via a Gaussian pencil-beam approximation into moments of the probability distributions over the resulting dose in closed form. It supports arbitrary correlation models and allows for efficient incorporation of fractionation effects regarding random and systematic errors. We evaluate the trade-off between run-time and accuracy of APM uncertainty computations on three patient datasets. Results are compared against reference computations facilitating importance and random sampling. Two approximation techniques to accelerate uncertainty propagation and minimization based on probabilistic treatment plan optimization are presented. Runtimes are measured on CPU and GPU platforms, dosimetric accuracy is quantified in comparison to a sampling-based benchmark (5000 random samples). APM accurately propagates range and setup uncertainties into dose uncertainties at competitive run-times (GPU ≤slant {5} min). The resulting standard deviation (expectation value) of dose show average global γ{3% / {3}~mm} pass rates between 94.2% and 99.9% (98.4% and 100.0%). All investigated importance sampling strategies provided less accuracy at higher run-times considering only a single fraction. Considering fractionation, APM uncertainty propagation and treatment plan optimization was proven to be possible at constant time complexity

  12. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Kluge, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Cozzi, Luca, E-mail: lucozzi@iosi.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Köhler, Christhardt [Department of Gynecology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, Oliver [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany); Vanetti, Eugenio [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité University Hospital, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  13. Kβ/ Kα intensity ratios for X-ray production in 3d metals by gamma-rays and protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuinya, C. R.; Padhi, H. C.

    1994-04-01

    Systematic measurements of Kβ/ Kα intensity ratios for X-ray production in 3d metals have been carried out using γ-ray and fast proton ionization methods. The measured ratios from proton ionization experiments indicate production of multivacancies in the L shell giving rise to higher Kβ/ Kα ratios compared to the present γRF results and 2 MeV proton ionization results of Perujo et al. [Perujo A., Maxwell J. A., Teesdale W. J. and Cambell J. L. (1987) J. Phys. B: Atom. Molec. Phys.20, 4973]. This is consistent with the SCA model calculation which gives increased simultaneous K- and L-shell ionization at 4 MeV. The present results from γRF experiments are in close agreement with the 2 MeV proton ionization results of Perujo et al. (1987) and also with the theoretical calculation of jankowski and Polasik [Jankowski K. and Polasik M. (1989) J. Phys. B: Atom. Molec. Optic. Phys. 22, 2369] but the theoretical results of Scofield [Scofield J. H. (1974a) Atom. Data Nucl. Data Tables14, 12] are somewhat higher.

  14. Estimation of signal intensity for online measurement X-ray pinhole camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Jianjun; Liu Shenye; Yang Guohong; Yu Yanning

    2009-01-01

    The signal intensity was estimated for on-line measurement X-ray pinhole camera with CCD as measurement equipment. The X-ray signal intensity counts after the attenuation of thickness-varied Be filters and different material flat mirrors respectively were estimated using the energy spectrum of certain laser prototype and the quantum efficiency curve of PI-SX1300 CCD camera. The calculated results indicate that Be filters no thicker than 200 μm can only reduce signal intensity by one order of magnitude, and so can Au flat mirror with 3 degree incident angle, Ni, C and Si flat mirrors with 5 degree incident angle,but the signal intensity counts for both attenuation methods are beyond the saturation counts of the CCD camera. We also calculated the attenuation of signal intensity for different thickness Be filters combined with flat mirrors, indicates that the combination of Be filters with the thickness between 20 and 40 μm and Au flat mirror with 3 degree incident angle or Ni flat mirror with 5 degree incident angle is a good choice for the attenuation of signal intensity. (authors)

  15. MRI evaluation of cranial bone marrow signal intensity and thickness in chronic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Tulin; Agildere, A. Muhtesem; Oguzkurt, Levent; Barutcu, Ozlem; Kizilkilic, Osman; Kocak, Rikkat; Alp Niron, Emin

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim is to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for cranial bone marrow (CBM) signal intensity and thickness in patients with chronic anemia and compared these with findings in healthy subjects. We also investigated the relationships between CBM changes and age, type of anemia (hemolytic versus non-hemolytic), and severity of anemia. Methods: We quantitatively evaluated CBM signal intensity and thickness on images from 40 patients with chronic anemia (20 with congenital hemolytic anemia (HA) and 20 with acquired anemia) and compared these to findings in 28 healthy subjects. The intensity of CBM relative to scalp, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and muscle intensity was also investigated in patients and subjects in the control group. The sensitivity and specificity of CBM hypointense to GM and CBM hypointense to WM as markers of anemia were evaluated. Relationships between age and CBM thickness/intensity, and between anemia severity (hemoglobin (Hb) level) and CBM thickness/intensity were evaluated. Results: Cranial bone marrow signal intensity was lower in the chronic anemia patients than in the controls (P 0.05 for both). There were no correlations between age and CBM intensity or thickness, or between anemia severity and CBM intensity or thickness. Conclusion: Patients with chronic anemia exhibit lower CBM signal intensity on MRI than healthy subjects. Patients with hemolytic anemia have thicker CBM than patients with non-hemolytic anemia or healthy individuals. Decreased CBM intensity may indicate that the patient has anemia, and increased CBM thickness may specifically point to hemolytic anemia. These MRI findings may signal the need for further evaluation for the clinician

  16. Proton detection for signal enhancement in solid-state NMR experiments on mobile species in membrane proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Ritz, Emily [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada); Ahmed, Mumdooh A. M. [Suez University, The Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Bamm, Vladimir V.; Harauz, George [University of Guelph, Biophysics Interdepartmental Group (Canada); Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir, E-mail: vladizha@uoguelph.ca [University of Guelph, Department of Physics (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Direct proton detection is becoming an increasingly popular method for enhancing sensitivity in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Generally, these experiments require extensive deuteration of the protein, fast magic angle spinning (MAS), or a combination of both. Here, we implement direct proton detection to selectively observe the mobile entities in fully-protonated membrane proteins at moderate MAS frequencies. We demonstrate this method on two proteins that exhibit different motional regimes. Myelin basic protein is an intrinsically-disordered, peripherally membrane-associated protein that is highly flexible, whereas Anabaena sensory rhodopsin is composed of seven rigid transmembrane α-helices connected by mobile loop regions. In both cases, we observe narrow proton linewidths and, on average, a 10× increase in sensitivity in 2D insensitive nuclear enhancement of polarization transfer-based HSQC experiments when proton detection is compared to carbon detection. We further show that our proton-detected experiments can be easily extended to three dimensions and used to build complete amino acid systems, including sidechain protons, and obtain inter-residue correlations. Additionally, we detect signals which do not correspond to amino acids, but rather to lipids and/or carbohydrates which interact strongly with membrane proteins.

  17. Progress in the production of intense ion beams and the formation of proton layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakos, C.A.; Golden, J.; Marsh, S.J.; Mahaffey, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results on ion sources and the application of ion beams to the formation of proton layers and rings are presented. Ion beams have been produced on three different generators. Some results from the experiments performed on the Gamble 2 generator are presented. The Gamble 2 generator with coaxial anode-cathode configuration, hollow beam cross-section produces power levels of 0.6-1.2 MV with peak ion current of 200 kA. The number of protons in the beam 4x10 16 . Peak ion currents is excess 200 kA, energy 1 MeV, ion current density 1 kA/cm 2 . Magnetic field configuration to provide formation of strong proton layers is shown

  18. Focusing and transport of high-intensity multi-MeV proton bunches from a compact laser-driven source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Busold

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser ion acceleration provides for compact, high-intensity ion sources in the multi-MeV range. Using a pulsed high-field solenoid, for the first time high-intensity laser-accelerated proton bunches could be selected from the continuous exponential spectrum and delivered to large distances, containing more than 10^{9} particles in a narrow energy interval around a central energy of 9.4 MeV and showing ≤30  mrad envelope divergence. The bunches of only a few nanoseconds bunch duration were characterized 2.2 m behind the laser-plasma source with respect to arrival time, energy width, and intensity as well as spatial and temporal bunch profile.

  19. Focusing and transport of high-intensity multi-MeV proton bunches from a compact laser-driven source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busold, S.; Schumacher, D.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Frydrych, S.; Kroll, F.; Joost, M.; Al-Omari, H.; Blažević, A.; Zielbauer, B.; Hofmann, I.; Bagnoud, V.; Cowan, T. E.; Roth, M.

    2013-10-01

    Laser ion acceleration provides for compact, high-intensity ion sources in the multi-MeV range. Using a pulsed high-field solenoid, for the first time high-intensity laser-accelerated proton bunches could be selected from the continuous exponential spectrum and delivered to large distances, containing more than 109 particles in a narrow energy interval around a central energy of 9.4 MeV and showing ≤30mrad envelope divergence. The bunches of only a few nanoseconds bunch duration were characterized 2.2 m behind the laser-plasma source with respect to arrival time, energy width, and intensity as well as spatial and temporal bunch profile.

  20. SU-E-T-214: Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Passively Scattered Protons and Multi-Leaf Collimation: Prototype TPS and Dosimetry Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Parcerisa, D; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Intensity-modulated proton therapy is usually implemented with multi-field optimization of pencil-beam scanning (PBS) proton fields. However, at the view of the experience with photon-IMRT, proton facilities equipped with double-scattering (DS) delivery and multi-leaf collimation (MLC) could produce highly conformal dose distributions (and possibly eliminate the need for patient-specific compensators) with a clever use of their MLC field shaping, provided that an optimal inverse TPS is developed. Methods. A prototype TPS was developed in MATLAB. The dose calculation process was based on a fluence-dose algorithm on an adaptive divergent grid. A database of dose kernels was precalculated in order to allow for fast variations of the field range and modulation during optimization. The inverse planning process was based on the adaptive simulated annealing approach, with direct aperture optimization of the MLC leaves. A dosimetry study was performed on a phantom formed by three concentrical semicylinders separated by 5 mm, of which the inner-most and outer-most were regarded as organs at risk (OARs), and the middle one as the PTV. We chose a concave target (which is not treatable with conventional DS fields) to show the potential of our technique. The optimizer was configured to minimize the mean dose to the OARs while keeping a good coverage of the target. Results. The plan produced by the prototype TPS achieved a conformity index of 1.34, with the mean doses to the OARs below 78% of the prescribed dose. This Result is hardly achievable with traditional conformal DS technique with compensators, and it compares to what can be obtained with PBS. Conclusion. It is certainly feasible to produce IMPT fields with MLC passive scattering fields. With a fully developed treatment planning system, the produced plans can be superior to traditional DS plans in terms of plan conformity and dose to organs at risk

  1. MR imaging of lumbar spondylolysis: signal intensity change in the pars interarticularis and adjacent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Suk Whan; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun [Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To assess changes in MR signal intensity in the pars interarticularis and adjacent structures in patients with lumbar spondylolysis. The MR images of 36 patients with lumbar spondylolysis, confirmed by plain radiographs, were retrospectively analyzed. Using a 1.0T unit, we evaluated the signal intensity of a total of 216 parts interarticulares and adjacent structures from L3 to L5, as seen on sagittal images, and differences between areas with and without spondylolysis. The signal intensity of T1-and T2-weighted images was graded 0(more hypointense than spinal body), 1(as isointense as spinal body), 2(more hyperintense than spinal body and more hypointense than epidural fat), or 3(as isointense as epidural fat). Signal intensity change in endplates and degree of spondylolisthesis were analyzed, and the relationship between these factors was determined. Spondylolysis was noted at L5 in 61 cases, at L4 in 22, and of L3 in no case. In three cases spondylolysis was unilateral, and in the remainder it was bilateral. The degree of signal intensity was the same on T1-and T2-weighted images, and no case was grade 0. Eighty-six of 133 areas without spondylolysis were grade 1, 43 were grade 2, and four were grade 3. In 42 of 47 cases, signal intensity change was localized at pedicles. Among 83 areas with spondylolysis,on the other hand, nine were grade 1, 48 were grade 2, and 26 were grade 3. Signal intensity change was most commonly observed at the pars interarticularis, pedicle, and lamina(50/74)({rho}<0.001). Signal intensity change at the pars interarticularis and adjacent structures was accompanied in most cases by degenerative endplate change(10/11) and spondylolisthesis(11/13)({rho}<0.001). In patients with spondylolysis, signal intensity was frequently higher at the pars interarticularis and adjacent structures, and is thought to have a close relationship with degenerative endplate change and spondylolisthesis. Increases in signal intensity at the pars

  2. MR imaging of lumbar spondylolysis: signal intensity change in the pars interarticularis and adjacent structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Suk Whan; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun

    2001-01-01

    To assess changes in MR signal intensity in the pars interarticularis and adjacent structures in patients with lumbar spondylolysis. The MR images of 36 patients with lumbar spondylolysis, confirmed by plain radiographs, were retrospectively analyzed. Using a 1.0T unit, we evaluated the signal intensity of a total of 216 parts interarticulares and adjacent structures from L3 to L5, as seen on sagittal images, and differences between areas with and without spondylolysis. The signal intensity of T1-and T2-weighted images was graded 0(more hypointense than spinal body), 1(as isointense as spinal body), 2(more hyperintense than spinal body and more hypointense than epidural fat), or 3(as isointense as epidural fat). Signal intensity change in endplates and degree of spondylolisthesis were analyzed, and the relationship between these factors was determined. Spondylolysis was noted at L5 in 61 cases, at L4 in 22, and of L3 in no case. In three cases spondylolysis was unilateral, and in the remainder it was bilateral. The degree of signal intensity was the same on T1-and T2-weighted images, and no case was grade 0. Eighty-six of 133 areas without spondylolysis were grade 1, 43 were grade 2, and four were grade 3. In 42 of 47 cases, signal intensity change was localized at pedicles. Among 83 areas with spondylolysis,on the other hand, nine were grade 1, 48 were grade 2, and 26 were grade 3. Signal intensity change was most commonly observed at the pars interarticularis, pedicle, and lamina(50/74)(ρ<0.001). Signal intensity change at the pars interarticularis and adjacent structures was accompanied in most cases by degenerative endplate change(10/11) and spondylolisthesis(11/13)(ρ<0.001). In patients with spondylolysis, signal intensity was frequently higher at the pars interarticularis and adjacent structures, and is thought to have a close relationship with degenerative endplate change and spondylolisthesis. Increases in signal intensity at the pars interarticularis and

  3. Production of an intense source of micro-second proton pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmont, J.L.

    1965-02-01

    In order to obtain micro-second proton pulses of 100 mA, we have built a duoplasmatron ion source and beam focusing equipment. The pulses of the ion-source were produced by a load discharge. The source operates as a hydrogen-thyratron. The particular geometry of the duoplasmatron was chosen in order that the ion emission be stable with a 10 A arc and with a gas-flow lower than 10 cm 3 /h T.P.N. Studies of the beam showed preponderance of protons and the presence of heavy ions. The beam density is higher on the optic axis. (author) [fr

  4. A critical study of emittance measurements of intense low-energy proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1972-01-01

    The measurement of emittance in low energy proton beams suffers from two perturbing effects: 1) the neutralisation of the beam by backstreaming secondary electrons and 2) the space charge blowup of the beam sample between defining and analysing apparatus. An experimental study shows a significant change of the emittance orientation when bias is used to eliminate the secondary electrons. Biased and non-biased cases are also compared with computed dynamics including space charge. Criteria for the slit size and drift distance which make the space charge blow-up negligible are derived. In addition a transverse coherent oscillation of the proton beam, which was revealed the measurements, is discussed briefly. (11 refs).

  5. Proton radiography of intense-laser-irradiated wire-attached cone targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabuuchi, T.; Sawada, H.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F.N.; Batani, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Key, M.H.; Mackinnon, A.J.; McLean, H.S.; Patel, P.K.; Norreys, P.A.; Spindloe, C.; Stephens, R.B.; Wei, M.S.; Theobald, W.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of extreme electrostatic and magnetic fields are of interest for the study of high-energy-density plasmas. Results of proton deflectometry of cone-wire targets that are of interest to fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion are presented. (authors)

  6. Evaluating Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Relative to Passive Scattering Proton Therapy for Increased Vertebral Column Sparing in Craniospinal Irradiation in Growing Pediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Seco, Joao; Eaton, Bree R.; Simeone, F. Joseph; Kooy, Hanne; Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Adams, Judith; Paganetti, Harald; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: At present, proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for growing children is delivered to the whole vertebral body (WVB) to avoid asymmetric growth. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of delivering vertebral body sparing (VBS) versus WVB CSI with passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in growing children treated for medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Five plans were generated for medulloblastoma patients, who had been previously treated with CSI PS proton radiation therapy: (1) single posteroanterior (PA) PS field covering the WVB (PS-PA-WVB); (2) single PA PS field that included only the thecal sac in the target volume (PS-PA-VBS); (3) single PA IMPT field covering the WVB (IMPT-PA-WVB); (4) single PA IMPT field, target volume including thecal sac only (IMPT-PA-VBS); and (5) 2 posterior-oblique (−35°, +35°) IMPT fields, with the target volume including the thecal sac only (IMPT2F-VBS). For all cases, 23.4 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) was prescribed to 95% of the spinal canal. The dose, linear energy transfer, and variable-RBE-weighted dose distributions were calculated for all plans using the tool for particle simulation, version 2, Monte Carlo system. Results: IMPT VBS techniques efficiently spared the anterior vertebral bodies (AVBs), even when accounting for potential higher variable RBE predicted by linear energy transfer distributions. Assuming an RBE of 1.1, the V10 Gy(RBE) decreased from 100% for the WVB techniques to 59.5% to 76.8% for the cervical, 29.9% to 34.6% for the thoracic, and 20.6% to 25.1% for the lumbar AVBs, and the V20 Gy(RBE) decreased from 99.0% to 17.8% to 20.0% for the cervical, 7.2% to 7.6% for the thoracic, and 4.0% to 4.6% for the lumbar AVBs when IMPT VBS techniques were applied. The corresponding percentages for the PS VBS technique were higher. Conclusions: Advanced proton techniques can sufficiently reduce the dose to the vertebral

  7. Evaluating Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Relative to Passive Scattering Proton Therapy for Increased Vertebral Column Sparing in Craniospinal Irradiation in Growing Pediatric Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula, E-mail: dgiantsoudi@mgh.harvard.edu; Seco, Joao; Eaton, Bree R.; Simeone, F. Joseph; Kooy, Hanne; Yock, Torunn I.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Adams, Judith; Paganetti, Harald; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: At present, proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) for growing children is delivered to the whole vertebral body (WVB) to avoid asymmetric growth. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility and potential clinical benefit of delivering vertebral body sparing (VBS) versus WVB CSI with passively scattered (PS) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in growing children treated for medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Five plans were generated for medulloblastoma patients, who had been previously treated with CSI PS proton radiation therapy: (1) single posteroanterior (PA) PS field covering the WVB (PS-PA-WVB); (2) single PA PS field that included only the thecal sac in the target volume (PS-PA-VBS); (3) single PA IMPT field covering the WVB (IMPT-PA-WVB); (4) single PA IMPT field, target volume including thecal sac only (IMPT-PA-VBS); and (5) 2 posterior-oblique (−35°, +35°) IMPT fields, with the target volume including the thecal sac only (IMPT2F-VBS). For all cases, 23.4 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) was prescribed to 95% of the spinal canal. The dose, linear energy transfer, and variable-RBE-weighted dose distributions were calculated for all plans using the tool for particle simulation, version 2, Monte Carlo system. Results: IMPT VBS techniques efficiently spared the anterior vertebral bodies (AVBs), even when accounting for potential higher variable RBE predicted by linear energy transfer distributions. Assuming an RBE of 1.1, the V10 Gy(RBE) decreased from 100% for the WVB techniques to 59.5% to 76.8% for the cervical, 29.9% to 34.6% for the thoracic, and 20.6% to 25.1% for the lumbar AVBs, and the V20 Gy(RBE) decreased from 99.0% to 17.8% to 20.0% for the cervical, 7.2% to 7.6% for the thoracic, and 4.0% to 4.6% for the lumbar AVBs when IMPT VBS techniques were applied. The corresponding percentages for the PS VBS technique were higher. Conclusions: Advanced proton techniques can sufficiently reduce the dose to the vertebral

  8. Contribution of proton leak to oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle during intense exercise is very low despite large contribution at rest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Korzeniewski

    Full Text Available A computer model was used to simulate the dependence of protonmotive force (Δp, proton leak and phenomenological (involving proton leak ATP/O2 ratio on work intensity in skeletal muscle. Δp, NADH and proton leak decreased with work intensity. The contribution of proton leak to oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text] decreased from about 60% at rest to about 3 and 1% at moderate and heavy/severe exercise, respectively, while the ATP/O2 ratio increased from 2.1 to 5.5 and 5.7. A two-fold increase in proton leak activity or its decrease to zero decreased/increased the ATP/O2 ratio by only about 3 and 1% during moderate and heavy/severe exercise, respectively. The low contribution of proton leak to [Formula: see text] in intensively working skeletal muscle was mostly caused by a huge increase in ATP usage intensity during rest-to-work transition, while OXPHOS, and thus oxidative ATP supply and [Formula: see text] related to it, was mostly stimulated by high each-step activation (ESA of OXPHOS complexes. The contribution of proton leak to [Formula: see text] and ATP/O2 ratio in isolated mitochondria should not be directly extrapolated to working muscle, as mitochondria lack ESA, at least in the absence of Ca2+, and therefore [Formula: see text] cannot be elevated as much as in intact muscle.

  9. Grading diffuse gliomas without intense contrast enhancement by amide proton transfer MR imaging: comparisons with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togao, Osamu; Hiwatashi, Akio; Yamashita, Koji; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Keupp, Jochen [Philips Research, Hamburg (Germany); Yoshimoto, Koji; Kuga, Daisuke; Iihara, Koji [Kyushu University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yoneyama, Masami [Philips Electronics Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Iwaki, Toru [Kyushu University, Department of Neuropathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Takahashi, Masaya [Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate whether amide proton transfer (APT) MR imaging can differentiate high-grade gliomas (HGGs) from low-grade gliomas (LGGs) among gliomas without intense contrast enhancement (CE). This retrospective study evaluated 34 patients (22 males, 12 females; age 36.0 ± 11.3 years) including 20 with LGGs and 14 with HGGs, all scanned on a 3T MR scanner. Only tumours without intense CE were included. Two neuroradiologists independently performed histogram analyses to measure the 90th-percentile (APT{sub 90}) and mean (APT{sub mean}) of the tumours' APT signals. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) were also measured. The parameters were compared between the groups with Student's t-test. Diagnostic performance was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The APT{sub 90} (2.80 ± 0.59 % in LGGs, 3.72 ± 0.89 in HGGs, P = 0.001) and APT{sub mean} (1.87 ± 0.49 % in LGGs, 2.70 ± 0.58 in HGGs, P = 0.0001) were significantly larger in the HGGs compared to the LGGs. The ADC and rCBV values were not significantly different between the groups. Both the APT{sub 90} and APT{sub mean} showed medium diagnostic performance in this discrimination. APT imaging is useful in discriminating HGGs from LGGs among diffuse gliomas without intense CE. (orig.)

  10. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  11. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: emmazhang103@gmail.com [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir [BEST Cyclotron Inc (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN–LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  12. Clinical significance of the globus pallidus signal intensity ratio in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasa, Motoh; Kawamura, Noriko; Hiranuma, Kiyohiko [Kuwana Municipal Hospital, Mie (Japan)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of the globus pallidus signal intensity ratio for the subclinical detection of hepatic encephalopathy. This study comprised 25 patients with liver cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy. There was a high frequency (56%) of patients exhibiting increased signal in the globus pallidus. The pallidal signal was related to the severity of the liver disease. The auditory brain stem reaction was not correlated with the pallidal intensity and laboratory parameters. During the follow-up study, 3 out of 5 patients presenting overt hepatic encephalopathy showed strong pallidal signals. The results of this investigation suggest that abnormal globus pallidus signal may constitute a useful method for the subclinical detection of hepatic encepalopathy. (author)

  13. Clinical significance of the globus pallidus signal intensity ratio in patients with liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasa, Motoh; Kawamura, Noriko; Hiranuma, Kiyohiko

    1996-01-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of the globus pallidus signal intensity ratio for the subclinical detection of hepatic encephalopathy. This study comprised 25 patients with liver cirrhosis without overt hepatic encephalopathy. There was a high frequency (56%) of patients exhibiting increased signal in the globus pallidus. The pallidal signal was related to the severity of the liver disease. The auditory brain stem reaction was not correlated with the pallidal intensity and laboratory parameters. During the follow-up study, 3 out of 5 patients presenting overt hepatic encephalopathy showed strong pallidal signals. The results of this investigation suggest that abnormal globus pallidus signal may constitute a useful method for the subclinical detection of hepatic encepalopathy. (author)

  14. Prediction of SEP Peak Proton Intensity Based on CME Speed, Direction and Observations of Associated Solar Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, I. G.; Mays, M. L.; Thompson, B. J.; Kwon, R.; Frechette, B. P.

    2017-12-01

    We assess whether a formula obtained by Richardson et al. (Solar Phys., 289, 3059, 2014; DOI 10.1007/s11207-014-0524-8) relating the intensity of 14-24 MeV protons in a solar energetic particle event at 1 AU to the solar event location and the speed of the associated coronal mass ejection (CME), may be used to "predict" the intensity of a solar energetic particle event. Starting with a subset of several hundred CMEs in the CCMC/SWRC DONKI real-time database (http://kauai.ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov/DONKI/) selected without consideration of whether they were associated with SEP events, we first use the CME speed and direction to predict the proton intensity at Earth or the STEREO spacecraft using this formula. Since most of these CMEs were not in fact associated with SEP events, many "false alarms" result. We then examine whether considering other phenomena which may accompany the CMEs, such as the X-ray flare intensity and the properties of type II and type III radio emissions, may help to reduce the false alarm rate. We also use CME parameters calculated from an ellipsoidal shell fit to multi-spacecraft CME shock observations for a smaller number of events to predict the SEP intensity. We calculate skill scores for each case and assess whether the Richardson et al. (2014) formula, using additional observations to reduce the false alarm rate, has any potential as a SEP prediction tool, assuming that the required observations could be acquired sufficiently rapidly following the onset of the related solar event/CME.

  15. A New High-intensity Proton Irradiation Facility at the CERN PS East Area

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, B; Lima, P; Matli, E; Moll, M; Ravotti, F

    2014-01-01

    and IRRAD2), were heavily and successfully used for irradiation of particle detectors, electronic components and materials since 1992. These facilities operated with particle bursts - protons with momentum of 24GeV/c - delivered from the PS accelerator in “spills” of about 400ms (slow extraction). With the increasing demand of irradiation experiments, these facilities suffered from a number of restrictions such as the space availability, the maximum achievable particle flux and several access constraints. In the framework of the AIDA project, an upgrade of these facilities has been realized during the CERN long shutdown (LS1). While the new proton facility (IRRAD) will continue to be mainly devoted to the radiation hardness studies for the High Energy Physics (HEP) experimental community, the new mixed-field facility (CHARM) will mainly host irradiation experiments for the validation of electronic systems used in a...

  16. Quenching-free fluorescence signal from plastic-fibres in proton dosimetry: understanding the influence of Čerenkov radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeppe Brage; Almhagen, Erik; Nyström, Håkan

    2018-01-01

    The origin of photons emitted in optical fibres under proton irradiation has been attributed to either entirely Čerenkov radiation or light consisting of fluorescence with a substantial amount of Čerenkov radiation. The source of the light emission is assessed in order to understand why the signal...... from optical fibres irradiated with protons is reportedly quenching-free. The present study uses the directional emittance of Čerenkov photons in 12 MeV and 20 MeV electron beams to validate a Monte Carlo model for simulating the emittance and transmission of Čerenkov radiation in optical fibres. We...

  17. Using high-intensity laser-generated energetic protons to radiograph directly driven implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P.; Sangster, T. C.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Patel, P.

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of petawatt-class lasers with kilojoule-picosecond pulses, such as OMEGA EP [L. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005), 10.1364/OPN.16.7.000030], provides a new diagnostic capability to study inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Specifically, petawatt OMEGA EP pulses have been used to backlight OMEGA implosions with energetic proton beams generated through the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. This allows time-resolved studies of the mass distribution and electromagnetic field structures in ICF and HED plasmas. This principle has been previously demonstrated using Vulcan to backlight six-beam implosions [A. J. Mackinnon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 045001 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.045001]. The TNSA proton backlighter offers better spatial and temporal resolution but poorer spatial uniformity and energy resolution than previous D3He fusion-based techniques [C. Li et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E725 (2006), 10.1063/1.2228252]. A target and the experimental design technique to mitigate potential problems in using TNSA backlighting to study full-energy implosions is discussed. The first proton radiographs of 60-beam spherical OMEGA implosions using the techniques discussed in this paper are presented. Sample radiographs and suggestions for troubleshooting failed radiography shots using TNSA backlighting are given, and future applications of this technique at OMEGA and the NIF are discussed.

  18. Using high-intensity laser-generated energetic protons to radiograph directly driven implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P.; Sangster, T. C.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Patel, P.

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of petawatt-class lasers with kilojoule-picosecond pulses, such as OMEGA EP [L. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)], provides a new diagnostic capability to study inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Specifically, petawatt OMEGA EP pulses have been used to backlight OMEGA implosions with energetic proton beams generated through the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. This allows time-resolved studies of the mass distribution and electromagnetic field structures in ICF and HED plasmas. This principle has been previously demonstrated using Vulcan to backlight six-beam implosions [A. J. Mackinnon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 045001 (2006)]. The TNSA proton backlighter offers better spatial and temporal resolution but poorer spatial uniformity and energy resolution than previous D 3 He fusion-based techniques [C. Li et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E725 (2006)]. A target and the experimental design technique to mitigate potential problems in using TNSA backlighting to study full-energy implosions is discussed. The first proton radiographs of 60-beam spherical OMEGA implosions using the techniques discussed in this paper are presented. Sample radiographs and suggestions for troubleshooting failed radiography shots using TNSA backlighting are given, and future applications of this technique at OMEGA and the NIF are discussed.

  19. Beam commission of the high intensity proton source developed at INFN-LNS for the European Spallation Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Miraglia, A.; Leonardi, O.; Castro, G.; Torrisi, G.; Mascali, D.; Mazzaglia, M.; Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Calabrese, G.; Caruso, A.; Chines, F.; Gallo, G.; Longhitano, A.; Manno, G.; Marletta, S.; Maugeri, A.; Passarello, S.; Pastore, G.; Seminara, A.; Spartà, A.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2017-07-01

    At the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS) the beam commissioning of the high intensity Proton Source for the European Spallation Source (PS-ESS) started in November 2016. Beam stability at high current intensity is one of the most important parameter for the first steps of the ongoing commissioning. Promising results were obtained since the first source start with a 6 mm diameter extraction hole. The increase of the extraction hole to 8 mm allowed improving PS-ESS performances and obtaining the values required by the ESS accelerator. In this work, extracted beam current characteristics together with Doppler shift and emittance measurements are presented, as well as the description of the next phases before the installation at ESS in Lund.

  20. Parenchymal signal intensity in 3-T body MRI of dogs with hematopoietic neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Daniel A; Sharkey, Leslie C; Steward, Susan M; Bahr, Katherine L; Henson, Michael S; Ito, Daisuke; O'Brien, Timothy D; Jessen, Carl R; Husbands, Brian D; Borgatti, Antonella; Modiano, Jaime F

    2013-04-01

    We performed a preliminary study involving 10 dogs to assess the applicability of body MRI for staging of canine diffuse hematopoietic neoplasia. T1-weighted (before and after intravenous gadolinium), T2-weighted, in-phase, out-of-phase, and short tau inversion recovery pulse sequences were used. By using digital region of interest (ROI) and visual comparison techniques, relative parenchymal organ (medial iliac lymph nodes, liver, spleen, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla) signal intensity was quantified as less than, equal to, or greater than that of skeletal muscle in 2 clinically normal young adult dogs and 10 dogs affected with either B-cell lymphoma (n = 7) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 3). Falciform fat and urinary bladder were evaluated to provide additional perspective regarding signal intensity from the pulse sequences. Dogs with nonfocal disease could be distinguished from normal dogs according to both the visual and ROI signal-intensity relationships. In normal dogs, liver signal intensity on the T2-weighted sequence was greater than that of skeletal muscle by using either the visual or ROI approach. However in affected dogs, T2-weighted liver signal intensity was less than that of skeletal muscle by using either the ROI approach (10 of 10 dogs) or the visual approach (9 of 10 dogs). These findings suggest that the comparison of relative signal intensity among organs may have merit as a research model for infiltrative parenchymal disease (ROI approach) or metabolic effects of disease; this comparison may have practical clinical applicability (visual comparison approach) as well.

  1. Can We Advance Proton Therapy for Prostate? Considering Alternative Beam Angles and Relative Biological Effectiveness Variations When Comparing Against Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Tracy, E-mail: tunderwood@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Moteabbed, Maryam; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: For prostate treatments, robust evidence regarding the superiority of either intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy is currently lacking. In this study we investigated the circumstances under which proton therapy should be expected to outperform IMRT, particularly the proton beam orientations and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) assumptions. Methods and Materials: For 8 patients, 4 treatment planning strategies were considered: (A) IMRT; (B) passively scattered standard bilateral (SB) proton beams; (C) passively scattered anterior oblique (AO) proton beams, and (D) AO intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). For modalities (B)-(D) the dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distributions were simulated using the TOPAS Monte Carlo platform and RBE was calculated according to 3 different models. Results: Assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1, our implementation of IMRT outperformed SB proton therapy across most normal tissue metrics. For the scattered AO proton plans, application of the variable RBE models resulted in substantial hotspots in rectal RBE weighted dose. For AO IMPT, it was typically not possible to find a plan that simultaneously met the tumor and rectal constraints for both fixed and variable RBE models. Conclusion: If either a fixed RBE of 1.1 or a variable RBE model could be validated in vivo, then it would always be possible to use AO IMPT to dose-boost the prostate and improve normal tissue sparing relative to IMRT. For a cohort without rectum spacer gels, this study (1) underlines the importance of resolving the question of proton RBE within the framework of an IMRT versus proton debate for the prostate and (2) highlights that without further LET/RBE model validation, great care must be taken if AO proton fields are to be considered for prostate treatments.

  2. Signal height in silicon pixel detectors irradiated with pions and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohe, T.; Acosta, J.; Bean, A.; Dambach, S.; Erdmann, W.; Langenegger, U.; Martin, C.; Meier, B.; Radicci, V.; Sibille, J.; Trueb, P.

    2010-01-01

    Pixel detectors are used in the innermost part of multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and are therefore exposed to the highest fluences of ionising radiation, which in this part of the detectors consists mainly of charged pions. The radiation hardness of the detectors has been tested thoroughly up to the fluences expected at the LHC. In case of an LHC upgrade the fluence will be much higher and it is not yet clear up to which radii the present pixel technology can be used. To establish such a limit, pixel sensors of the size of one CMS pixel readout chip (PSI46V2.1) have been bump bonded and irradiated with positive pions up to 6x10 14 n eq /cm 2 at PSI and with protons up to 5x10 15 n eq /cm 2 . The sensors were taken from production wafers of the CMS barrel pixel detector. They use n-type DOFZ material with a resistance of about 3.7kΩcm and an n-side read out. As the performance of silicon sensors is limited by trapping, the response to a Sr-90 source was investigated. The highly energetic beta-particles represent a good approximation to minimum ionising particles. The bias dependence of the signal for a wide range of fluences will be presented.

  3. Database proton NMR chemical shifts for RNA signal assignment and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Shawn; Heng Xiao [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Johnson, Bruce A., E-mail: bruce@onemoonscientific.com [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Summers, Michael F., E-mail: summers@hhmi.umbc.edu [University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank contains NMR chemical shift depositions for 132 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of residues that reside within A-form helical regions of these RNAs. The analysis focused on the central base pair within a stretch of three adjacent base pairs (BP triplets), and included both Watson-Crick (WC; G:C, A:U) and G:U wobble pairs. Chemical shift values were included for all 4{sup 3} possible WC-BP triplets, as well as 137 additional triplets that contain one or more G:U wobbles. Sequence-dependent chemical shift correlations were identified, including correlations involving terminating base pairs within the triplets and canonical and non-canonical structures adjacent to the BP triplets (i.e. bulges, loops, WC and non-WC BPs), despite the fact that the NMR data were obtained under different conditions of pH, buffer, ionic strength, and temperature. A computer program (RNAShifts) was developed that enables convenient comparison of RNA {sup 1}H NMR assignments with database predictions, which should facilitate future signal assignment/validation efforts and enable rapid identification of non-canonical RNA structures and RNA-ligand/protein interaction sites.

  4. Hemorrhagic brain metastases with high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, H.; Abe, O.; Aoki, S.; Masumoto, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Kunimatsu, A; Hayashi, N.; Ohtomo, K. [Graduate School of Medicine, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging has been applicable to the differential diagnosis of abscesses and necrotic or cystic brain tumors. However, restricted water diffusion is not necessarily specific for brain abscess. We describe ring-enhancing metastases of lung carcinoma characterized by high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. The signal pattern probably reflected intralesional hemorrhage. The present report adds to the growing literature regarding the differential diagnosis of ring-enhancing brain lesions.

  5. A proton-driven, intense, subcritical, fission neutron source for radioisotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jongen, Y. [Chemin du Cyclotron, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    1995-10-01

    {sup 99m}Tc, the most frequently used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, is distributed as {sup 99}Mo=>{sup 99m}Tc generators. {sup 99}Mo is a fission product of {sup 235}U. To replace the aging nuclear reactors used today for this production, the author proposes to use a spallation neutron source, with neutron multiplication by fission. A 150 MeV, H{sup {minus}} cyclotron can produce a 225 kW proton beam with 50% total system energy efficiency. The proton beam would hit a molten lead target, surrounded by a water moderator and a graphite reflector, producing around 0.96 primary neutron per proton. The primary spallation neutrons, moderated, would strike secondary targets containing a subcritical amount of {sup 235}U. The assembly would show a k{sub eff} of 0.8, yielding a fivefold neutron multiplication. The thermal neutron flux at the targets location would be 2 {times} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}.s, resulting in a fission power of 500 to 750 kW. One such system could supply the world demand in {sup 99}Mo, as well as other radioisotopes. Preliminary indications show that the cost would be lower than the cost of a commercial 10 MW isotope production reactor. The cost of operation, of disposal of radiowaste and of decommissioning should be significantly lower as well. Finally, the non-critical nature of the system would make it more acceptable for the public than a nuclear reactor and should simplify the licensing process.

  6. Adjuvant intensity-modulated proton therapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma. A comparison with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and a spot size variation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorentini, S. [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia (ATreP), Trento (Italy); Padova Univ. (Italy). Medical Physics School; Amichetti, M.; Fellin, F.; Schwarz, M. [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia (ATreP), Trento (Italy); Spiazzi, L. [Brescia Hospital (Italy). Medical Physics Dept.; Tonoli, S.; Magrini, S.M. [Brescia Hospital (Italy). Radiation Oncology Dept.

    2012-03-15

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the state-of-the-art treatment for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The goal of this work was to assess whether intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) could further improve the dosimetric results allowed by IMRT. We re-planned 7 MPM cases using both photons and protons, by carrying out IMRT and IMPT plans. For both techniques, conventional dose comparisons and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) analysis were performed. In 3 cases, additional IMPT plans were generated with different beam dimensions. IMPT allowed a slight improvement in target coverage and clear advantages in dose conformity (p < 0.001) and dose homogeneity (p = 0.01). Better organ at risk (OAR) sparing was obtained with IMPT, in particular for the liver (D{sub mean} reduction of 9.5 Gy, p = 0.001) and ipsilateral kidney (V{sub 20} reduction of 58%, p = 0.001), together with a very large reduction of mean dose for the contralateral lung (0.2 Gy vs 6.1 Gy, p = 0.0001). NTCP values for the liver showed a systematic superiority of IMPT with respect to IMRT for both the esophagus (average NTCP 14% vs. 30.5%) and the ipsilateral kidney (p = 0.001). Concerning plans obtained with different spot dimensions, a slight loss of target coverage was observed along with sigma increase, while maintaining OAR irradiation always under planning constraints. Results suggest that IMPT allows better OAR sparing with respect to IMRT, mainly for the liver, ipsilateral kidney, and contralateral lung. The use of a spot dimension larger than 3 x 3 mm (up to 9 x 9 mm) does not compromise dosimetric results and allows a shorter delivery time.

  7. Generation of fast protons by interaction of modest laser intensities with H{sub 2}O 'snow' nano-wire targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruner, Nir, E-mail: nir.bruner@mail.huji.ac.il [Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Schleifer, Elad; Palchan, Tala [Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Pikuz, Sergey A. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Eisenmann, Shmuel; Botton, Mordechai [Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Gordon, Dan [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Zigler, Arie [Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2011-10-11

    We report on the generation of protons with energies of 5.5 MeV when irradiating an H{sub 2}O nano-wire layer grown on a sapphire plate with an intensity of 5x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. A theoretical model is suggested in which plasma near the tip of the wire is subject to enhanced electrical fields and protons are accelerated to several MeVs.

  8. New model for gain control of signal intensity to object distance in echolocating bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørum, Ulrik; Brinkløv, Signe; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    Echolocating bats emit ultrasonic calls and listen for the returning echoes to orient and localize prey in darkness. The emitted source level, SL (estimated signal intensity 10 cm from the mouth), is adjusted dynamically from call to call in response to sensory feedback as bats approach objects. ...

  9. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroide, N; Bousson, V; Mambre, L; Vicaut, E; Laredo, J D; Kubis, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients.

  10. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroide, N.; Mambre, L.; Kubis, Nathalie [Service de Physiologie Clinique-Explorations Fonctionnelles, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); Bousson, V.; Laredo, J.D. [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); Radiologie Osteo-articulaire, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Vicaut, E. [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); URC, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2014-09-26

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients. (orig.)

  11. IMF control of cusp proton emission intensity and dayside convection: implications for component and anti-parallel reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We study a brightening of the Lyman-a emission in the cusp which occurred in response to a short-lived south-ward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF during a period of strongly enhanced solar wind plasma concentration. The cusp proton emission is detected using the SI-12 channel of the FUV imager on the IMAGE spacecraft. Analysis of the IMF observations recorded by the ACE and Wind spacecraft reveals that the assumption of a constant propagation lag from the upstream spacecraft to the Earth is not adequate for these high time-resolution studies. The variations of the southward IMF component observed by ACE and Wind allow for the calculation of the ACE-to-Earth lag as a function of time. Application of the derived propagation delays reveals that the intensity of the cusp emission varied systematically with the IMF clock angle, the relationship being particularly striking when the intensity is normalised to allow for the variation in the upstream solar wind proton concentration. The latitude of the cusp migrated equatorward while the lagged IMF pointed southward, confirming the lag calculation and indicating ongoing magnetopause reconnection. Dayside convection, as monitored by the SuperDARN network of radars, responded rapidly to the IMF changes but lagged behind the cusp proton emission response: this is shown to be as predicted by the model of flow excitation by Cowley and Lockwood (1992. We use the numerical cusp ion precipitation model of Lockwood and Davis (1996, along with modelled Lyman-a emission efficiency and the SI-12 instrument response, to investigate the effect of the sheath field clock angle on the acceleration of ions on crossing the dayside magnetopause. This modelling reveals that the emission commences on each reconnected field line 2–2.5 min after it is opened and peaks 3–5 min after it is opened. We discuss how comparison of the Lyman-a intensities with oxygen emissions observed simultaneously by the SI-13

  12. IMF control of cusp proton emission intensity and dayside convection: implications for component and anti-parallel reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available We study a brightening of the Lyman-a emission in the cusp which occurred in response to a short-lived south-ward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF during a period of strongly enhanced solar wind plasma concentration. The cusp proton emission is detected using the SI-12 channel of the FUV imager on the IMAGE spacecraft. Analysis of the IMF observations recorded by the ACE and Wind spacecraft reveals that the assumption of a constant propagation lag from the upstream spacecraft to the Earth is not adequate for these high time-resolution studies. The variations of the southward IMF component observed by ACE and Wind allow for the calculation of the ACE-to-Earth lag as a function of time. Application of the derived propagation delays reveals that the intensity of the cusp emission varied systematically with the IMF clock angle, the relationship being particularly striking when the intensity is normalised to allow for the variation in the upstream solar wind proton concentration. The latitude of the cusp migrated equatorward while the lagged IMF pointed southward, confirming the lag calculation and indicating ongoing magnetopause reconnection. Dayside convection, as monitored by the SuperDARN network of radars, responded rapidly to the IMF changes but lagged behind the cusp proton emission response: this is shown to be as predicted by the model of flow excitation by Cowley and Lockwood (1992. We use the numerical cusp ion precipitation model of Lockwood and Davis (1996, along with modelled Lyman-a emission efficiency and the SI-12 instrument response, to investigate the effect of the sheath field clock angle on the acceleration of ions on crossing the dayside magnetopause. This modelling reveals that the emission commences on each reconnected field line 2–2.5 min after it is opened and peaks 3–5 min after it is opened. We discuss how comparison of the Lyman-

  13. MR signal intensity of the perirolandic cirtex in the neonate and infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korogi, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Sumi, M.; Hirai, T,; Sakamoto, Y.; Ikushima, I.; Miyayama, H.

    1996-01-01

    Our purpose was to study the magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity of the perirolandic gyri perinatally and to correlate it with the histological findings in formalin-fixed brains, focusing on myelination. MRI of 20 neurologically normal neonates and infants, of 37-64 weeks postconception (PCA), were studied retrospectively. We reviewed four formalin-fixed brains of infants 37-46 weeks PCA microscopically. The posterior cortex of the precentral gyrus (P-PRE) and the anterior cortex of the postcentral gyrus (A-PST) had different signal intensity form the adjacent surrounding cortex. On T1-weighted images P-PRE and A-PST gave higher signal 41-44 weeks PCA; on T2-weighted images, they gave lower signal 37-51 weeks PCA. Histological examination revealed very little myelination of the nerve fibres within both the P-PRE and the A-PST, while considerable myelination was present in the internal capsule and central corona radiata. The changes in signal intensity in the perirolandic gyri may reflect not only the degree of myelination but also the more advanced development of the nerve cells, associated with rapid proliferation and formation of oligodendroglial cells, synapses and dendrites. They could be another important landmark for brain maturation. (orig.)

  14. Development of residual gas ionization profile monitor for high intensity proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Y; Hirose, E; Ieiri, M; Igarashi, Y; Inaba, S; Katoh, Y; Minakawa, M; Noumi, H; Saitó, M; Suzuki, Y; Takahashi, H; Takasaki, M; Tanaka, K; Toyoda, A; Yamada, Y; Yamanoi, Y; Watanabe, H

    2006-01-01

    Nondestructive beam profile monitor utilizing ionizations of residual gas has been developed for continuous monitoring of 3?0(J-PARC). Knock-on electrons produced in the ionizations of residual gas vacuumed to 1 Pa are collected with a uniform electric field applied between electrodes. Applying a uniform electric field parallel to the electric field is essential to reduce diffusion of electrons crossing over magnetic flux. A prototype monitor has been constructed and installed in EP2-C beam line at KEK 12 GeV proton synchrotron (12 Ge V-PS). The profiles measured with the present monitor agree with the ones measured with the existing destructive profile monitor. The present monitor shows sufficient performances as a candidate of the profile monitor at J-PARC. In the present article, the working principle of the present monitor, the results of test experiments, and further developments are described in detail.

  15. Lumber intervertebral disk; Correlation with the signal intensity of magnetic resonance imaging and the histological changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Ryusei; Takahashi, Sadao; Ando, Tadashi; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Hiranuma, Kenji; Kanazawa, Yousuke; Konishi, Seiji; Eguchi, Masanobu; Tanioka, Hisaya (KantoRosai Hospital, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    We studied to provide precise correlations between the intensity of MRI signals and the degenerative changes of the nucleus pulposes of the L4/5 intervertebral disk herniations. 23 cases with the L4/5 intervertebral disk herniations having surgical treatment were examined using Magnetom H 15 (1.5 tesla) with surface coil. The images were obtained with T2 images (long TR (1000{approx}1600 msec), TE (60{approx}90 msec)). The intensity was measured using FUJI densitometer FD 101 at the lumber vertebral body and the intervertebral disk. We calculated the L4/5 intervertebral disk degeneration ratio (determined by comparing the modified L4/5 MR signal intensity with the modified L2/3 MR signal itensity). Histological changes were examined in the cellular components of the nucleus pulposus (such as the number of the nucleus cells, nucleus cell nesting and HE stainability of the nucleus cell) and the matrics substance (such as fibrillation, hyaline degeneration and granular degeneration). Histochemical studies were performed using Scott's Method (AB-0.4 M MgCl{sub 2} Alcinophilia, AB-09 M, MgCl{sub 2} Alcinophilia) to investigate glycosaminoglycans of the nucleus pulposus. We compared the histological and histochemical changes with the MR L4/5 intervetebral disk degeneration ratio. The decreasing MRI signal intensity of the nucleous pulposus was (1) corresponded to the pathological changes such as the increasing number of the cell nesting, fibrillation and hyaline degeneration of the nucleus polposus. (2) corresponded to the decrease in the total glycosaminoglycans of the nucleus pulposus. (3) corresponded to the early stage of degeneration of the nucleus polposus, but in aging when all levels of intervertebral disk degeneration appeared, we could not know the degree of the disk degeneration from the signal intensity of MRI. (J.P.N.).

  16. Thick target benchmark test for the code used in the design of high intensity proton accelerator project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Harada, Masatoshi

    2003-01-01

    In the neutronics design for the JAERI and KEK Joint high intensity accelerator facilities, transport codes of NMTC/JAM, MCNPX and MARS are used. In order to confirm the predict ability for these code, it is important to compare with the experiment result. For the validation of the source term of neutron, the calculations are compared with the experimental spectrum of neutrons produced from thick target, which are carried out at LANL and KEK. As for validation of low energy incident case, the calculations are compared with experiment carried out at LANL, in which target of C, Al, Fe, and 238 U are irradiated with 256-MeV protons. By the comparison, it is found that both NMTC/JAM and MCNPX show good agreement with the experiment within by a factor of 2. MARS shows good agreement for C and Al target. MARS, however, gives rather underestimation for all targets in the neutron energy region higher than 30 MeV. For the validation high incident energy case, the codes are compared with the experiment carried out at KEK. In this experiment, W and Pb targets are bombarded with 0.5- and 1.5-GeV protons. Although slightly disagreement exists, NMTC/JAM, MCNPX and MARS are in good agreement with the experiment within by a factor of 2. (author)

  17. Study on bulk shielding for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Maekawa, F; Takada, H; Teshigawara, M; Watanabe, N

    2002-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed in a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. This report describes results of a study on bulk shielding performance of a biological shield for the spallation neutron source by means of a Monte Carlo calculation method, that is important in terms of radiation safety and cost reduction. A shielding configuration was determined as a reference case by considering preliminary studies and interaction with other components, then shielding thickness that was required to achieve a target dose rate of 1 mu Sv/h was derived. Effects of calculation conditions such as shielding materials and dimensions on the shielding performance was investigated by changing those parameters. By taking all the results and design margins into account, a shielding configuration that was identified as the most appropriate was finally determined as follows. An iron shield regi...

  18. Electromagnetic design of a β=0.4 superconducting spoke resonator for a high intensity proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, Abhishek; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Here we present electromagnetic design simulations of a superconducting single-spoke resonator with a geometrical beta of 0.4 and operating at 325 MHz for a high intensity proton linac (HIPL). The spoke equatorial and base parameters were optimized to minimize the peak electric and peak magnetic fields and maximize the shunt impedance, while keeping the same resonant frequency. Variation of the surface magnetic fields was investigated as a function of the spoke base shape, and it was found that an elliptical profile is preferred over a circular or racecourse profile with E peak /E acc =4.71, E peak /E acc =4.33 (mT/(MV/m)) and R/Q=272 Ω. (author)

  19. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  20. Development of bunch shape monitor for high-intensity beam on the China ADS proton LINAC Injector II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangyu; Wu, Junxia; Du, Ze; Zhang, Yong; Xue, Zongheng; Xie, Hongming; Wei, Yuan; Jing, Long; Jia, Huan

    2018-05-01

    The development, performance, and testing of the longitudinal bunch shape monitor, namely, the Fast Faraday Cup (FFC), are presented in this paper. The FFC is an invasive instrument controlled by a stepper motor, and its principle of operation is based on a strip line structure. The longitudinal bunch shape was determined by sampling a small part of the beam hitting the strip line through a 1-mm hole. The rise time of the detector reached 24 ps. To accommodate experiments that utilize high-intensity beams, the materials of the bunch shape monitor were chosen to sustain high temperatures. Water cooling was also integrated in the detector system to enhance heat transfer and prevent thermal damage. We also present an analysis of the heating caused by the beam. The bunch shape monitor has been installed and commissioned at the China ADS proton LINAC Injector II.

  1. Relative signal intensity changes of frontal and occipital white matters on T 2 weighted axial MR image : correlation with age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Me; Kim, Seung Cheol

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess relative signal intensity changes in frontal and occipital white matter with age, as seen on T 2 weighted axial MR images. Thirty eight normal adults (20-29 years old) and 114 children (0-11 years old) were investigated. All had nonspecific neurologic symptoms and their MR images, obtained using a 1.5 T system (Signa, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, U.S.A.), appeared to be normal. The signal intensities of frontal and occipital white matter were evaluated on T2 weighted axial images at the level of the foramen of Monro. When the signal intensity of white matter was higher than that of gray matter, grade 0 was assigned; when the opposite situation pertained, this was graded I - III. Grade I indicated that the signal intensity of occipital white matter was lower than that of frontal white matter; grade II, that the signal intensity of white matter of both lobes was similar. When the signal intensity of frontal white matter was lower than that of occipital age, and by one year after 2 years of age, and then determined grade according to age, age distribution according to grade, and the ages at which signal intensities were similar to those of adults. On T2-weighted MR images, the signal intensity of frontal white matter ultimately shows a lower signal intensity than that of occipital white matter. (author). 11 refs., 6 figs

  2. Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C.; Bluett, Jaques; Chen, Yi Pei; Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E.; Liao, Zhongxing; Li, Heng; Mohan, Radhe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dose–volume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dose–volume histogram indices (mean ± SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% ± 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% ± 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 ± 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 ± 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential

  3. Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Bluett, Jaques [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Yi Pei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe, E-mail: rmohan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dose–volume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dose–volume histogram indices (mean ± SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% ± 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% ± 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 ± 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 ± 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential

  4. TU-EF-304-07: Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Song, T; Wu, Z; Liu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is increasingly used in proton therapy. For IMPT optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) is desired for spots dose calculations because of its high accuracy, especially in cases with a high level of heterogeneity. It is also preferred in biological optimization problems due to the capability of computing quantities related to biological effects. However, MC simulation is typically too slow to be used for this purpose. Although GPU-based MC engines have become available, the achieved efficiency is still not ideal. The purpose of this work is to develop a new optimization scheme to include GPU-based MC into IMPT. Methods: A conventional approach using MC in IMPT simply calls the MC dose engine repeatedly for each spot dose calculations. However, this is not the optimal approach, because of the unnecessary computations on some spots that turned out to have very small weights after solving the optimization problem. GPU-memory writing conflict occurring at a small beam size also reduces computational efficiency. To solve these problems, we developed a new framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculations and plan optimizations. At each dose calculation step, the particles were sampled from different spots altogether with Metropolis algorithm, such that the particle number is proportional to the latest optimized spot intensity. Simultaneously transporting particles from multiple spots also mitigated the memory writing conflict problem. Results: We have validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one prostate case. The total computation time of our method was ∼5–6 min on one NVIDIA GPU card, including both spot dose calculation and plan optimization, whereas a conventional method naively using the same GPU-based MC engine were ∼3 times slower. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel optimization workflow is developed. The high efficiency makes it attractive for clinical

  5. TU-EF-304-07: Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing, Beijing (China); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Song, T [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Wu, Z; Liu, Y [Tsinghua University, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) is increasingly used in proton therapy. For IMPT optimization, Monte Carlo (MC) is desired for spots dose calculations because of its high accuracy, especially in cases with a high level of heterogeneity. It is also preferred in biological optimization problems due to the capability of computing quantities related to biological effects. However, MC simulation is typically too slow to be used for this purpose. Although GPU-based MC engines have become available, the achieved efficiency is still not ideal. The purpose of this work is to develop a new optimization scheme to include GPU-based MC into IMPT. Methods: A conventional approach using MC in IMPT simply calls the MC dose engine repeatedly for each spot dose calculations. However, this is not the optimal approach, because of the unnecessary computations on some spots that turned out to have very small weights after solving the optimization problem. GPU-memory writing conflict occurring at a small beam size also reduces computational efficiency. To solve these problems, we developed a new framework that iteratively performs MC dose calculations and plan optimizations. At each dose calculation step, the particles were sampled from different spots altogether with Metropolis algorithm, such that the particle number is proportional to the latest optimized spot intensity. Simultaneously transporting particles from multiple spots also mitigated the memory writing conflict problem. Results: We have validated the proposed MC-based optimization schemes in one prostate case. The total computation time of our method was ∼5–6 min on one NVIDIA GPU card, including both spot dose calculation and plan optimization, whereas a conventional method naively using the same GPU-based MC engine were ∼3 times slower. Conclusion: A fast GPU-based MC dose calculation method along with a novel optimization workflow is developed. The high efficiency makes it attractive for clinical

  6. Spot-scanning beam proton therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy for ipsilateral head and neck malignancies: A treatment planning comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandula, Shravan; Zhu, Xiaorong; Garden, Adam S.; Gillin, Michael; Rosenthal, David I.; Ang, Kie-Kian; Mohan, Radhe; Amin, Mayankkumar V.; Garcia, John A.; Wu, Richard; Sahoo, Narayan; Frank, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck malignancies can have side effects that impede quality of life. Theoretically, proton therapy can reduce treatment-related morbidity by minimizing the dose to critical normal tissues. We evaluated the feasibility of spot-scanning proton therapy for head and neck malignancies and compared dosimetry between those plans and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Plans from 5 patients who had undergone IMRT for primary tumors of the head and neck were used for planning proton therapy. Both sets of plans were prepared using computed tomography (CT) scans with the goals of achieving 100% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV) and 95% to the planning TV (PTV) while maximizing conformity to the PTV. Dose-volume histograms were generated and compared, as were conformity indexes (CIs) to the PTVs and mean doses to the organs at risk (OARs). Both modalities in all cases achieved 100% of the dose to the CTV and 95% to the PTV. Mean PTV CIs were comparable (0.371 IMRT, 0.374 protons, p = 0.953). Mean doses were significantly lower in the proton plans to the contralateral submandibular (638.7 cGy IMRT, 4.3 cGy protons, p = 0.002) and parotid (533.3 cGy IMRT, 48.5 cGy protons, p = 0.003) glands; oral cavity (1760.4 cGy IMRT, 458.9 cGy protons, p = 0.003); spinal cord (2112.4 cGy IMRT, 249.2 cGy protons, p = 0.002); and brainstem (1553.52 cGy IMRT, 166.2 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Proton plans also produced lower maximum doses to the spinal cord (3692.1 cGy IMRT, 2014.8 cGy protons, p = 0.034) and brainstem (3412.1 cGy IMRT, 1387.6 cGy protons, p = 0.005). Normal tissue V 10 , V 30 , and V 50 values were also significantly lower in the proton plans. We conclude that spot-scanning proton therapy can significantly reduce the integral dose to head and neck critical structures. Prospective studies are underway to determine if this reduced dose translates to improved quality of life

  7. Envelope model for passive magnetic focusing of an intense proton or ion beam propagating through thin foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lund

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion beams (including protons with low emittance and high space-charge intensity can be propagated with normal incidence through a sequence of thin metallic foils separated by vacuum gaps of order the characteristic transverse beam extent to transport/collimate the beam or to focus it to a small transverse spot. Energetic ions have sufficient range to pass through a significant number of thin foils with little energy loss or scattering. The foils reduce the (defocusing radial electric self-field of the beam while not altering the (focusing azimuthal magnetic self-field of the beam, thereby allowing passive self-beam focusing if the magnetic field is sufficiently strong relative to the residual electric field. Here we present an envelope model developed to predict the strength of this passive (beam generated focusing effect under a number of simplifying assumptions including relatively long pulse duration. The envelope model provides a simple criterion for the necessary foil spacing for net focusing and clearly illustrates system focusing properties for either beam collimation (such as injecting a laser-produced proton beam into an accelerator or for magnetic pinch focusing to a small transverse spot (for beam driven heating of materials. An illustrative example is worked for an idealization of a recently performed laser-produced proton-beam experiment to provide guidance on possible beam focusing and collimation systems. It is found that foils spaced on the order of the characteristic transverse beam size desired can be employed and that envelope divergence of the initial beam entering the foil lens must be suppressed to limit the total number of foils required to practical values for pinch focusing. Relatively modest proton-beam current at 10 MeV kinetic energy can clearly demonstrate strong magnetic pinch focusing achieving a transverse rms extent similar to the foil spacing (20–50  μm gaps in beam propagation distances of tens of mm

  8. The key physics and technology issues in the intense-beam proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Shinian; Fang Shouxian

    2002-01-01

    Beam power is required to raise one order in the next generation spallation neutron source. There are still some physics and technology difficulties need to be overcome, even though no fatal obstacle exists due to the rapid development of the technology in intense-beam accelerator in recent years. Therefore, it is highly demanded to clarify the key issues and to lunch an R and D program to break through the technological barriers before author start to build the expansive machine. The new technological challenge arises from the high beam current, the high accelerator power and the high demand on the reliability and stability of the accelerator operation. The author will discuss these issues and the means to resolve them, as well as the state of the art in a few of major technological disciplines. Finally, the choice the framework of intense-beam accelerator is discussed

  9. Development of an intense O-15 radioactive ion beam using low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Lapi, S; Zyuzin, A Yu; D'Auria, J M

    2003-01-01

    The production of copious quantities of sup 1 sup 5 O, (half-life = 122.2 s) for astrophysical applications has been a source of concern at TRIUMF and ISAC for some time. An sup 1 sup 5 O beam is needed for two experiments ( sup 1 sup 5 O(alpha,gamma) sup 1 sup 9 Ne and sup 1 sup 5 O( sup 6 Li,d) sup 1 sup 9 Ne) at ISAC. The beam flux required for these experiments is extremely high, (between 10 sup 9 and 10 sup 1 sup 1 sup 1 sup 5 O/s) and thus high efficiencies at all steps in the process will be required. Difficulties arise due to the fact that oxygen is very reactive chemically and thus is difficult to extract from a thick spallation target. The possibility of using one of the small cyclotrons on site (TR13, CP42 or TR30) for the production of this isotope ( sup 1 sup 5 O) has been discussed. This production approach will involve the use of low energy protons to interact with a nitrogen gas target via the sup 1 sup 5 N(p,n) sup 1 sup 5 O reaction, which is accessible with attainable particle energies usin...

  10. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Simos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have been studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×10^{20}  p/cm^{2}. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (∼5×10^{18}

  11. Effect of the luminol signal enhancer on the chemiluminescence intensity and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Yanli; Yu Fei; Yu Songcheng; Wu Yongjun; Zhang Hongquan; Qu Lingbo

    2012-01-01

    The novel p-phenol derivatives, 4-(1-imidazolyl)-phenol, 4-hydroxybiphenyl, 4-hydroxy-4′-iodobiphenyl were employed as highly potent signal enhancers of luminol-hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) chemiluminescence (CL) system. The CL reaction conditions were optimized, and the enhancement characteristics of these enhancers were compared with each other. The employment of these molecules greatly affected important assay parameters. Practically, the use of a novel enhancer, even a slightly change of the structure (or concentration) of 4-substituted phenol derivative, could affect assay properties quite dramatically. Furthermore, the use of different enhancers in the luminol–H 2 O 2 –HRP system can affect not only the intensity of the CL signal, which is well known, but also its kinetics. The experiment data indicated that the stronger intensity was combined with a more rapid decrease of the CL signal. - Highlights: ► 4-IMP, 4-BIP and HIOP take on different signal enhancement and light kinetics. ► The employment of 4-BIP resulted in a significant improvement of the detection limit. ► The magnitude of the signal enhancement was about 2.5-fold in the same system.

  12. MR imaging of degenerative lumbar disc disease emphasizing on signal intensity changes in vertebral body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Keiko; Ida, Masahiro; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shimpei

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 400 patients with degenerative disc disease. Signal changes and their sites in the vertebral body were classified and referred to narrowing of the intervertebral disc space. MR findings were compared with those of plain roentgenograms of the lumbar spine. Signal changes in the vertebral body were noted in 83 cases (102 vertebral bodies). Low-intensity abnormality on both T1- and T2-weighted images (WI) was the most common finding, and was most frequently seen at the end plate and/or the angle. These changes were correlated with narrowing of the disc space and osteosclerosis on the plain roentgenogram of the lumbar spine. Signal changes occasionally occurred in the inner region of the vertebral body, and these lesions tended to show a high-intensity abnormality on T1-WI. We conclude that signal changes in degenerative disc disease are not specific, but are sometimes difficult to distinguish from the signal changes in other conditions such as spinal tumor or bone marrow disorder. (author)

  13. Pump-To-Signal Intensity Modulation Transfer Characteristics in FOPAs: Modulation Frequency and Saturation Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Cristofori, Valentina; Lund-Hansen, Toke

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive study of pump- to-signal intensity modulation transfer (IMT) in single-pump fiber optic parametric amplifiers (FOPAs). In particular, the IMT is studied for the first time for high-frequency fluctuations of the pump as well as in the saturated gain regime. The IMT...... cut-off frequency in typical single-pump FOPAs is around 100–200 GHz. The possibilities to shift this frequency based on dispersion and nonlinearities involved in the parametric gain are discussed. The severe IMT to the signal at low modulation frequencies can be suppressed by more than 50...

  14. Bone marrow sparing in intensity modulated proton therapy for cervical cancer: Efficacy and robustness under range and setup uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; McGuire, Sarah; Gross, Brandie; Bhatia, Sudershan; Mott, Sarah; Buatti, John; Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study evaluates the potential efficacy and robustness of functional bone marrow sparing (BMS) using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for cervical cancer, with the goal of reducing hematologic toxicity. Material and methods: IMPT plans with prescription dose of 45 Gy were generated for ten patients who have received BMS intensity-modulated X-ray therapy (IMRT). Functional bone marrow was identified by 18 F-flourothymidine positron emission tomography. IMPT plans were designed to minimize the volume of functional bone marrow receiving 5–40 Gy while maintaining similar target coverage and healthy organ sparing as IMRT. IMPT robustness was analyzed with ±3% range uncertainty errors and/or ±3 mm translational setup errors in all three principal dimensions. Results: In the static scenario, the median dose volume reductions for functional bone marrow by IMPT were: 32% for V 5Gy , 47% for V 10Gy , 54% for V 20Gy , and 57% for V 40Gy , all with p < 0.01 compared to IMRT. With assumed errors, even the worst-case reductions by IMPT were: 23% for V 5Gy , 37% for V 10Gy , 41% for V 20Gy , and 39% for V 40Gy , all with p < 0.01. Conclusions: The potential sparing of functional bone marrow by IMPT for cervical cancer is significant and robust under realistic systematic range uncertainties and clinically relevant setup errors

  15. Bone Marrow Sparing in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Cervical Cancer: Efficacy and Robustness under Range and Setup Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; McGuire, Sarah; Gross, Brandie; Bhatia, Sudershan; Mott, Sarah; Buatti, John; Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study evaluates the potential efficacy and robustness of functional bone marrow sparing (BMS) using intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for cervical cancer, with the goal of reducing hematologic toxicity. Material and Methods IMPT plans with prescription dose of 45 Gy were generated for ten patients who have received BMS intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMRT). Functional bone marrow was identified by 18F-flourothymidine positron emission tomography. IMPT plans were designed to minimize the volume of functional bone marrow receiving 5–40 Gy while maintaining similar target coverage and healthy organ sparing as IMRT. IMPT robustness was analyzed with ±3% range uncertainty errors and/or ±3mm translational setup errors in all three principal dimensions. Results In the static scenario, the median dose volume reductions for functional bone marrow by IMPT were: 32% for V5GY, 47% for V10Gy, 54% for V20Gy, and 57% for V40Gy, all with p<0.01 compared to IMRT. With assumed errors, even the worst-case reductions by IMPT were: 23% for V5Gy, 37% for V10Gy, 41% for V20Gy, and 39% for V40Gy, all with p<0.01. Conclusions The potential sparing of functional bone marrow by IMPT for cervical cancer is significant and robust under realistic systematic range uncertainties and clinically relevant setup errors. PMID:25981130

  16. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  17. Correlation of histological examination of meniscus with MR images; Focused on high signal intensity of the meniscus not caused by definite meniscal tear and impact on MR diagnosis of tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chun Ai; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, In Hwan; Lee, Ju Hong; Jang, Kyu Yun; Lee, Sang Yong [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To document the causes of high signal intensity of the meniscus which is not caused by definite meniscal tears on MR imaging, through correlation with histological examination. For the correlation between the MR image and histology, we obtained prospectively 31 meniscal specimens from 21 patients. Proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo MR images were used. Minimal tear, thinning of the lamellar layer, degeneration of the central layer, and radial tie fibers were detected upon histological examination, and were correlated with the corresponding MR images. Minimal tear of the lamellar layer was seen in 60 zones out of 100 slides. On MR images, 29 (48.3%) of these 60 zones had high signal intensity. Thinning of the lamellar layer was seen in 24 zones, with 7 (29.2%) having high signal intensity. 57 central zones showed degenerative change in the central layer and high signal intensity on all corresponding MR images. Radial tie fibers in the central layer appeared as high signal intensity areas. Minimal tear and thinning of the lamellar layer, degeneration and radial tie fibers of the central layer of the meniscus cause high signal intensity on MR images.

  18. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: First Comparative Results of Patient-Reported Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sio, Terence T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Lin, Huei-Kai; Shi, Qiuling [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cleeland, Charles S. [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, J. Jack; Hernandez, Mike [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Blanchard, Pierre; Thaker, Nikhil G.; Phan, Jack; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Fuller, C. David [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mendoza, Tito R. [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xin Shelley [Department of Symptom Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: We hypothesized that patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) would have lower symptom burdens, as measured by patient-reported outcome (PRO) surveys, than patients treated with intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for oropharyngeal cancer from 2006 to 2015 through prospective registries with concurrent chemotherapy and IMPT or chemotherapy and IMRT and completed the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer (MDASI-HN) module at various times before treatment (baseline), during treatment (acute phase), within the first 3 months after treatment (subacute phase), and afterward (chronic phase). Individual symptoms and the top 5 and top 11 most severe symptoms were summarized and compared between the radiation therapy modalities. Results: PRO data were collected and analyzed from 35 patients treated with chemotherapy and IMPT and from 46 treated with chemotherapy and IMRT. The baseline symptom burdens were similar between both groups. The overall top 5 symptoms were food taste problems (mean score 4.91 on a 0-10 scale), dry mouth (4.49), swallowing/chewing difficulties (4.26), lack of appetite (4.08), and fatigue (4.00). Among the top 11 symptoms, changes in taste and appetite during the subacute and chronic phases favored IMPT (all P<.048). No differences in symptom burden were detected between modalities during the acute and chronic phases by top-11 symptom scoring. During the subacute phase, the mean (±standard deviation) top 5 MDASI scores were 5.15 ± 2.66 for IMPT versus 6.58 ± 1.98 for IMRT (P=.013). Conclusions: According to the MDASI-HN, symptom burden was lower among the IMPT patients than among the IMRT patients during the subacute recovery phase after treatment. A prospective randomized clinical trial is underway to define the value of IMPT for the management of head and neck tumors.

  19. Dosimetric advantages of intensity-modulated proton therapy for oropharyngeal cancer compared with intensity-modulated radiation: A case-matched control analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kocak-Uzel, Esengul [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Beykent University, Istanbul (Turkey); Feng, Lei [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thaker, Nikhil G.; Blanchard, Pierre; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Garden, Adam S. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A potential advantage of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) over intensity-modulated (photon) radiation therapy (IMRT) in the treatment of oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) is lower radiation dose to several critical structures involved in the development of nausea and vomiting, mucositis, and dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to quantify doses to critical structures for patients with OPC treated with IMPT and compare those with doses on IMRT plans generated for the same patients and with a matched cohort of patients actually treated with IMRT. In this study, 25 patients newly diagnosed with OPC were treated with IMPT between 2011 and 2012. Comparison IMRT plans were generated for these patients and for additional IMRT-treated controls extracted from a database of patients with OPC treated between 2000 and 2009. Cases were matched based on the following criteria, in order: unilateral vs bilateral therapy, tonsil vs base of tongue primary, T-category, N-category, concurrent chemotherapy, induction chemotherapy, smoking status, sex, and age. Results showed that the mean doses to the anterior and posterior oral cavity, hard palate, larynx, mandible, and esophagus were significantly lower with IMPT than with IMRT comparison plans generated for the same cohort, as were doses to several central nervous system structures involved in the nausea and vomiting response. Similar differences were found when comparing dose to organs at risks (OARs) between the IMPT cohort and the case-matched IMRT cohort. In conclusion, these findings suggest that patients with OPC treated with IMPT may experience fewer and less severe side effects during therapy. This may be the result of decreased beam path toxicities with IMPT due to lower doses to several dysphagia, odynophagia, and nausea and vomiting–associated OARs. Further study is needed to evaluate differences in long-term disease control and chronic toxicity between patients with OPC treated with IMPT in comparison to

  20. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: First Comparative Results of Patient-Reported Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sio, Terence T.; Lin, Huei-Kai; Shi, Qiuling; Gunn, G. Brandon; Cleeland, Charles S.; Lee, J. Jack; Hernandez, Mike; Blanchard, Pierre; Thaker, Nikhil G.; Phan, Jack; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Morrison, William H.; Fuller, C. David; Mendoza, Tito R.; Mohan, Radhe; Wang, Xin Shelley; Frank, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that patients with oropharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) would have lower symptom burdens, as measured by patient-reported outcome (PRO) surveys, than patients treated with intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for oropharyngeal cancer from 2006 to 2015 through prospective registries with concurrent chemotherapy and IMPT or chemotherapy and IMRT and completed the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory for Head and Neck Cancer (MDASI-HN) module at various times before treatment (baseline), during treatment (acute phase), within the first 3 months after treatment (subacute phase), and afterward (chronic phase). Individual symptoms and the top 5 and top 11 most severe symptoms were summarized and compared between the radiation therapy modalities. Results: PRO data were collected and analyzed from 35 patients treated with chemotherapy and IMPT and from 46 treated with chemotherapy and IMRT. The baseline symptom burdens were similar between both groups. The overall top 5 symptoms were food taste problems (mean score 4.91 on a 0-10 scale), dry mouth (4.49), swallowing/chewing difficulties (4.26), lack of appetite (4.08), and fatigue (4.00). Among the top 11 symptoms, changes in taste and appetite during the subacute and chronic phases favored IMPT (all P<.048). No differences in symptom burden were detected between modalities during the acute and chronic phases by top-11 symptom scoring. During the subacute phase, the mean (±standard deviation) top 5 MDASI scores were 5.15 ± 2.66 for IMPT versus 6.58 ± 1.98 for IMRT (P=.013). Conclusions: According to the MDASI-HN, symptom burden was lower among the IMPT patients than among the IMRT patients during the subacute recovery phase after treatment. A prospective randomized clinical trial is underway to define the value of IMPT for the management of head and neck tumors.

  1. Numerical modelling of the pump-to-signal relative intensity noise ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An accurate numerical model to investigate the pump-to-signal relative intensity noise (RIN) transfer in two-pump fibre optical parametric amplifiers (2-P FOPAs) for low modulation frequencies is presented. Compared to other models in the field, this model takes into account the fibre loss, pump depletion as well as the gain ...

  2. MR imaging of renal cell carcinoma: associations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings.

    OpenAIRE

    Yabuki, Takayuki; Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsushima, Tomoyasu; Shirasaki, Yoshinori; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the MR characteristics of renal cell carcinomas against histologic findings and to assess the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings. Fifty-four patients (56 lesions) were examined by MR imaging and then underwent partial or radical nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis of all lesions was renal cell carcinoma. All MR examinations were performed as dynamic studies using the same 1.5-T scanner. MR characteristics ...

  3. Study of a power coupler for superconducting RF cavities used in high intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souli, M.

    2007-07-01

    The coaxial power coupler needed for superconducting RF cavities used in the high energy section of the EUROTRANS driver should transmit 150 kW (CW operation) RF power to the protons beam. The calculated RF and dielectric losses in the power coupler (inner and outer conductor, RF window) are relatively high. Consequently, it is necessary to design very carefully the cooling circuits in order to remove the generated heat and to ensure stable and reliable operating conditions for the coupler cavity system. After calculating all type of losses in the power coupler, we have designed and validated the inner conductor cooling circuit using numerical simulations results. We have also designed and optimized the outer conductor cooling circuit by establishing its hydraulic and thermal characteristics. Next, an experiment dedicated to study the thermal interaction between the power coupler and the cavity was successfully performed at CRYOHLAB test facility. The critical heat load Qc for which a strong degradation of the cavity RF performance was measured leading to Q c in the range 3 W-5 W. The measured heat load will be considered as an upper limit of the residual heat flux at the outer conductor cold extremity. A dedicated test facility was developed and successfully operated for measuring the performance of the outer conductor heat exchanger using supercritical helium as coolant. The test cell used reproduces the realistic thermal boundary conditions of the power coupler mounted on the cavity in the cryo-module. The first experimental results have confirmed the excellent performance of the tested heat exchanger. The maximum residual heat flux measured was 60 mW for a 127 W thermal load. As the RF losses in the coupler are proportional to the incident RF power, we can deduce that the outer conductor heat exchanger performance is continued up to 800 kW RF power. Heat exchanger thermal conductance has been identified using a 2D axisymmetric thermal model by comparing

  4. Appearance of low signal intensity lines in MRI of silicone breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroman, P W; Rolland, C; Dufour, M; Grondin, P; Guidoin, R G

    1996-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of five explanted mammary prostheses were obtained with a 1.5 T GE Signa system using a conventional spin-echo pulse sequence, in order to investigate the low-intensity curvilinear lines which may be observed in MR images of silicone gel-filled breast implants under pressure from fibrous capsules. MR images showed ellipsoid prostheses, often containing multiple low-intensity curvilinear lines which in some cases presented an appearance very similar to that of the linguine sign. Upon opening the fibrous capsules, however, all of the prostheses were found to be completely intact demonstrating that the appearance of multiple low signal intensity curvilinear lines in MR images of silicone gel-filled prostheses is not necessarily a sign of prosthesis rupture. The MR image features which are specific to the linguine sign must be more precisely defined.

  5. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; van Dijk, Lisanne V; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I; Sasai, Keisuke; Van't Veld, Aart A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Korevaar, Erik W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans

  6. Feasibility of Pencil Beam Scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy in Breath-hold for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Munck Af Rosenschold, Per; Perrin, Rosalind

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the feasibility of treating patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pencil beam scanned intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in breath-hold. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifteen NSCLC patients who had previously received 66 Gy in 33 fractions wi...

  7. TH-C-BRD-12: Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plan Can Eliminate Junction Shifts for Craniospinal Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, L; Jiang, S; Li, Y; Wang, X; Li, H; Zhu, X; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D; Zhang, X; Lim, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) technique is the commonly used radiotherapy technique for craniospinal irradiation (CSI). However, PSPT involves many numbers of junction shifts applied over the course of treatment to reduce the cold and hot regions caused by field mismatching. In this work, we introduced a robust planning approach to develop an optimal and clinical efficient techniques for CSI using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) so that junction shifts can essentially be eliminated. Methods: The intra-fractional uncertainty, in which two overlapping fields shift in the opposite directions along the craniospinal axis, are incorporated into the robust optimization algorithm. Treatment plans with junction sizes 3,5,10,15,20,25 cm were designed and compared with the plan designed using the non-robust optimization. Robustness of the plans were evaluated based on dose profiles along the craniospinal axis for the plans applying 3 mm intra-fractional shift. The dose intra-fraction variations (DIV) at the junction are used to evaluate the robustness of the plans. Results: The DIVs are 7.9%, 6.3%, 5.0%, 3.8%, 2.8% and 2.2%, for the robustly optimized plans with junction sizes 3,5,10,15,20,25 cm. The DIV are 10% for the non-robustly optimized plans with junction size 25 cm. The dose profiles along the craniospinal axis exhibit gradual and tapered dose distribution. Using DIVs less than 5% as maximum acceptable intrafractional variation, the overlapping region can be reduced to 10 cm, leading to potential reduced number of the fields. The DIVs are less than 5% for 5 mm intra-fractional shifts with junction size 25 cm, leading to potential no-junction-shift for CSI using IMPT. Conclusion: This work is the first report of the robust optimization on CSI based on IMPT. We demonstrate that robust optimization can lead to much efficient carniospinal irradiation by eliminating the junction shifts

  8. A Robust Dynamic Heart-Rate Detection Algorithm Framework During Intense Physical Activities Using Photoplethysmographic Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Song

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic accurate heart-rate (HR estimation using a photoplethysmogram (PPG during intense physical activities is always challenging due to corruption by motion artifacts (MAs. It is difficult to reconstruct a clean signal and extract HR from contaminated PPG. This paper proposes a robust HR-estimation algorithm framework that uses one-channel PPG and tri-axis acceleration data to reconstruct the PPG and calculate the HR based on features of the PPG and spectral analysis. Firstly, the signal is judged by the presence of MAs. Then, the spectral peaks corresponding to acceleration data are filtered from the periodogram of the PPG when MAs exist. Different signal-processing methods are applied based on the amount of remaining PPG spectral peaks. The main MA-removal algorithm (NFEEMD includes the repeated single-notch filter and ensemble empirical mode decomposition. Finally, HR calibration is designed to ensure the accuracy of HR tracking. The NFEEMD algorithm was performed on the 23 datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup Database. The average estimation errors were 1.12 BPM (12 training datasets, 2.63 BPM (10 testing datasets and 1.87 BPM (all 23 datasets, respectively. The Pearson correlation was 0.992. The experiment results illustrate that the proposed algorithm is not only suitable for HR estimation during continuous activities, like slow running (13 training datasets, but also for intense physical activities with acceleration, like arm exercise (10 testing datasets.

  9. Impact of resonance decays on critical point signals in net-proton fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, Marcus; Schaefer, Thomas [North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Nahrgang, Marlene [SUBATECH, UMR 6457, Universite de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, IN2P3/CNRS, Nantes (France); Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States); Bass, Steffen A. [Duke University, Department of Physics, Durham, NC (United States)

    2017-04-15

    The non-monotonic beam energy dependence of the higher cumulants of net-proton fluctuations is a widely studied signature of the conjectured presence of a critical point in the QCD phase diagram. In this work we study the effect of resonance decays on critical fluctuations. We show that resonance effects reduce the signatures of critical fluctuations, but that for reasonable parameter choices critical effects in the net-proton cumulants survive. The relative role of resonance decays has a weak dependence on the order of the cumulants studied with a slightly stronger suppression of critical effects for higher-order cumulants. (orig.)

  10. Kinetic description of electron-proton instability in high-intensity proton linacs and storage rings based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald C. Davidson

    1999-05-01

    electrons is negligibly small. We introduce the ion plasma frequency squared defined by ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}=4πn[over ^]_{b}Z_{b}^{2}e^{2}/γ_{b}m_{b}, and the fractional charge neutralization defined by f=n[over ^]_{e}/Z_{b}n[over ^]_{b}, where n[over ^]_{b} and n[over ^]_{e} are the characteristic ion and electron densities. The equilibrium and stability analysis is carried out for arbitrary normalized beam intensity ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/ω_{βb}^{0^{2}}, and arbitrary fractional charge neutralization f, consistent with radial confinement of the beam particles. For the moderately high beam intensities envisioned in the proton linacs and storage rings for the Accelerator for Production of Tritium and the Spallation Neutron Source, the normalized beam intensity is typically ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/ω_{βb}^{0^{2}}≲ 0.1. For heavy ion fusion applications, however, the transverse beam emittance is very small, and the space-charge-dominated beam intensity is much larger, with ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/ω_{βb}^{0^{2}}≲ 2γ_{b}^{2}. The stability analysis shows that the instability growth rate Imω increases with increasing normalized beam intensity ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/ω_{βb}^{0^{2}} and increasing fractional charge neutralization f. In addition, the instability is strongest (largest growth rate for perturbations with azimuthal mode number ℓ=1, corresponding to a simple (dipole transverse displacement of the beam ions and the background electrons. For the case of overlapping step-function density profiles for the beam ions and background electrons, corresponding to monoenergetic ions and electrons, a key result is that there is no threshold in beam intensity ω[over ^]_{pb}^{2}/ω_{βb}^{0^{2}} or fractional charge neutralization f for the onset of instability. Finally, for the case of continuously varying density profiles with parabolic profile shape, a semiquantitative estimate is made of the effects of the corresponding spread in (depressed betatron frequency on stability

  11. A conceptual design of the RF system for the NSP high intensity proton accelerator at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chishiro, Etsuji; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Touchi, Yutaka; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Takado, Hiroshi; Sawada, Junichi

    1999-03-01

    JAERI has been proposing the Neutron Science Project which aims at exploring the fields of basic science and nuclear technology using a high power spallation neutron source. The neutron source will be driven by a high intensity linear accelerator with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average beam current of 5.33 mA and beam power of 8 MW. The RF system for the accelerator consists of a high-energy accelerator part and a low energy accelerator part. The maximum RF power requirements at the high and low energy accelerator parts are 25 MW and 8.3 MW, respectively. In this report, we describe the conceptual design of the RF system. In the low energy accelerator part, we estimated the requirement for the high-power amplifier tube and made the basis design for RF components. In the high energy accelerator part, we studied the effect of tuning errors, Lorentz forces and microphonics in the superconducting cavity. We calculated the klystron efficiency and supply power in the arrangement of where one klystron distributes the RF power to four cavities. We also considered an IOT RF system. Finally, we describe the electrical capacity and quantity of cooling water in the RF system. (author)

  12. NIST mixed stain study 3: signal intensity balance in commercial short tandem repeat multiplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duewer, David L; Kline, Margaret C; Redman, Janette W; Butler, John M

    2004-12-01

    Short-tandem repeat (STR) allelic intensities were collected from more than 60 forensic laboratories for a suite of seven samples as part of the National Institute of Standards and Technology-coordinated 2001 Mixed Stain Study 3 (MSS3). These interlaboratory challenge data illuminate the relative importance of intrinsic and user-determined factors affecting the locus-to-locus balance of signal intensities for currently used STR multiplexes. To varying degrees, seven of the eight commercially produced multiplexes used by MSS3 participants displayed very similar patterns of intensity differences among the different loci probed by the multiplexes for all samples, in the hands of multiple analysts, with a variety of supplies and instruments. These systematic differences reflect intrinsic properties of the individual multiplexes, not user-controllable measurement practices. To the extent that quality systems specify minimum and maximum absolute intensities for data acceptability and data interpretation schema require among-locus balance, these intrinsic intensity differences may decrease the utility of multiplex results and surely increase the cost of analysis.

  13. Improving the Molecular Ion Signal Intensity for In Situ Liquid SIMS Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Ding, Yuanzhao; Yu, Jiachao; Hua, Xin; Evans, James E; Yu, Xiaofei; Lao, David B; Heldebrant, David J; Nune, Satish K; Cao, Bin; Bowden, Mark E; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Xue-Lin; Zhu, Zihua

    2016-12-01

    In situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enabled by system for analysis at the liquid vacuum interface (SALVI) has proven to be a promising new tool to provide molecular information at solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. However, the initial data showed that useful signals in positive ion spectra are too weak to be meaningful in most cases. In addition, it is difficult to obtain strong negative molecular ion signals when m/z>200. These two drawbacks have been the biggest obstacle towards practical use of this new analytical approach. In this study, we report that strong and reliable positive and negative molecular signals are achievable after optimizing the SIMS experimental conditions. Four model systems, including a 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU)-base switchable ionic liquid, a live Shewanella oneidensis biofilm, a hydrated mammalian epithelia cell, and an electrolyte popularly used in Li ion batteries were studied. A signal enhancement of about two orders of magnitude was obtained in comparison with non-optimized conditions. Therefore, molecular ion signal intensity has become very acceptable for use of in situ liquid SIMS to study solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Energy and CKT dependence of proton induced L subshell X-ray intensity ratios in elements 57≤Z≤92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakkar, Rohit; Sharma, Babita; Allawadhi, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    The dependence of L subshell X-ray intensity ratios on incident proton energy and the CK transitions has been investigated in elements 57≤Z≤92. The intensity ratio I(L α )/I(L l ) neither shows variation with energy nor any dependence on the CK transitions. In general, the ratios I(L α )/I(L β ) and I(L α )/I(L γ ), first increase with incident proton energy, attain a maximum value, then start decreasing and attain an almost constant value after a particular energy (ranging from about 4.6 MeV for La to 5.8 MeV for U). A comparison has been made among the intensity ratios evaluated using three different sets of parameters. A maximum difference of about 18% has been observed among the different values

  15. SU-E-T-07: 4DCT Robust Optimization for Esophageal Cancer Using Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, L [Proton Therapy Center, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Yu, J; Zhu, X; Li, H; Zhang, X [Proton Therapy Center, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Li, Y [Proton Therapy Center, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Varian Medical Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Lim, G [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 4DCT robust optimization method to reduce the dosimetric impact from respiratory motion in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for esophageal cancer. Methods: Four esophageal cancer patients were selected for this study. The different phases of CT from a set of 4DCT were incorporated into the worst-case dose distribution robust optimization algorithm. 4DCT robust treatment plans were designed and compared with the conventional non-robust plans. Result doses were calculated on the average and maximum inhale/exhale phases of 4DCT. Dose volume histogram (DVH) band graphic and ΔD95%, ΔD98%, ΔD5%, ΔD2% of CTV between different phases were used to evaluate the robustness of the plans. Results: Compare to the IMPT plans optimized using conventional methods, the 4DCT robust IMPT plans can achieve the same quality in nominal cases, while yield a better robustness to breathing motion. The mean ΔD95%, ΔD98%, ΔD5% and ΔD2% of CTV are 6%, 3.2%, 0.9% and 1% for the robustly optimized plans vs. 16.2%, 11.8%, 1.6% and 3.3% from the conventional non-robust plans. Conclusion: A 4DCT robust optimization method was proposed for esophageal cancer using IMPT. We demonstrate that the 4DCT robust optimization can mitigate the dose deviation caused by the diaphragm motion.

  16. 3-dimensional shielding design for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Masaya; Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Evaluation of shielding performance for a 1 MW spallation neutron source facility in the Materials and Life Science Facility being constructed in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC) is important from a viewpoint of radiation safety and optimization of arrangement of components. This report describes evaluated results for the shielding performance with modeling three-dimensionally whole structural components including gaps between them in detail. A Monte Carlo calculation method with MCNPX2.2.6 code and LA-150 library was adopted. Streaming and void effects, optimization of shield for cost reduction and optimization of arrangement of structures such as shutters were investigated. The streaming effects were investigated quantitatively by changing the detailed structure of components and gap widths built into the calculation model. Horizontal required shield thicknesses were ranged from about 6.5 m to 7.5 m as a function of neutron beam line angles. A shutter mechanism for a horizontal neutron reflectometer that was directed downward was devised, and it was shown that the shielding performance of the shutter was acceptable. An optimal biological shield configuration was finally determined according to the calculated results. (author)

  17. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Arun [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  18. Design study on large-scale mercury loop for engineering test of target of high-intensity proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Haga, Katsuhiro; Aita, Hideki; Sekita, Kenji; Sudo, Yukio; Koiso, Kohji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Takahashi, Hiromichi.

    1997-03-01

    A heavy liquid-metal target has been proposed as a representative target of a 5MW-scale neutron source for a neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator. In the report, about mercury considered to be the best material of the heavy liquid-metal target, its properties needed for the design were formulated, and results of research on mercury treatment and of evaluation of heat removal performance on the basis of generating heat obtained by a numerical calculation of a spallation reaction were presented. From these results, a 1.5MW-scale mercury loop which equals to that for the first stage operation of the neutron science program of JAERI was designed conceptually for obtaining design data of the mercury target, and basic flow diagram of the loop and specifications of components were decided: diameter of pipelines flowing mercury at the velocity below 1m/s, power of an electro-magnet pump and structure of a cooler. Through the design, engineering problems were made clear such as selection and development of mercury-resistant materials and optimization of the loop and components for decreasing mercury inventory. (author)

  19. Arterial spin-labeling assessment of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity as a predictor of histologic grade of astrocytic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtner, J; Schöpf, V; Schewzow, K; Kasprian, G; Weber, M; Woitek, R; Asenbaum, U; Preusser, M; Marosi, C; Hainfellner, J A; Widhalm, G; Wolfsberger, S; Prayer, D

    2014-03-01

    Pulsed arterial spin-labeling is a noninvasive MR imaging perfusion method performed with the use of water in the arterial blood as an endogenous contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to determine the inversion time with the largest difference in normalized intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas. Thirty-three patients with gliomas, histologically classified as low-grade (n = 7) or high-grade astrocytomas (n = 26) according to the World Health Organization brain tumor classification, were included. A 3T MR scanner was used to perform pulsed arterial spin-labeling measurements at 8 different inversion times (370 ms, 614 ms, 864 ms, 1114 ms, 1364 ms, 1614 ms, 1864 ms, and 2114 ms). Normalized intratumoral signal intensity was calculated, which was defined by the signal intensity ratio of the tumor and the contralateral normal brain tissue for all fixed inversion times. A 3-way mixed ANOVA was used to reveal potential differences in the normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas. The difference in normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas obtained the most statistically significant results at 370 ms (P = .003, other P values ranged from .012-.955). The inversion time by which to differentiate high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas by use of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity was 370 ms in our study. The normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values at this inversion time mainly reflect the labeled intra-arterial blood bolus and therefore could be referred to as normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity. Our data indicate that the use of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values allows differentiation between low-grade and high-grade astrocytomas and thus may serve as a new, noninvasive marker for astrocytoma grading.

  20. Application of random numbers at computerized simulation of proton magnetic resonance signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Populyakh, S.N.; Sapiga, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    One calculated numerically spectra of proton magnetic resonance of water molecules diffusing along the regular positions in a natrolite. One reached adequate conformity of the experimental and the calculated spectra within wide temperature range including a transition region. To ensure calculations one used generators of the pseudorandom Markov sequences. The numerical analysis, in particular, has shown that at the binary Markov process the time period when physical value remains unchanged is described by the random value with exponential distribution [ru

  1. Brain MRI findings of welders : high signal intensity in T1WI secondary to manganese exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. W.; Lim, M. A.; Shon, M. Y.; Lee, S. H.; Ha, D. G.; Kwon, K. R.; Kim, S. S.; Hong, Y. S.; Lee, Y. H. [Sunlin Presbyterian Hospital, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, H. K. [Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the clinical and brain MRI findings of welders and to determine the utility of MRI in the assessment of occupational manganese exposure. All welders complained of fatigue, headache, anorexia, and decreased libido. The palmomental reflex was positive in five (28%), Myerson`s sign in four (22%), and intention tremor in three (17%). Mean blood Mn was 5.18 (range, 1.77-9.34) {mu}g/dl, mean urine Mn was 5.84 (range, 1.07 -22) {mu}g/l, serum Fe was elevated in one welder, and serum Cd in two. T1WI of brain MRI revealed high signal intensities in the globus pallidus, the putamen, the substantia nigra, the tectum, the caudate nucleus, the subthalamic nucleus, the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. These intensities correlated closely with blood Mn levels, suggesting their potential role in estimating the accumulation of Mn in the brain. (author). 25 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  2. Magnetic resonance angiography signal intensity as a marker of hemodynamic impairment in intracranial arterial stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyi Leng

    Full Text Available Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS is the predominant cause of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack in Asia. Change of signal intensities (SI across an ICAS on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA may reflect its hemodynamic severity.In-patients with a symptomatic single ICAS detected on 3D time-of-flight MRA were recruited from 2 hospitals. Baseline and 1-year follow-up data were collected. Signal intensity ratio (SIR [ =  (mean post-stenotic SI -mean background SI/(mean pre-stenotic SI - mean background SI] was evaluated on baseline MRA to represent change of SIs across an ICAS. Acute infarct volume was measured on baseline diffusion-weighted images (DWI. Relationships between SIR and baseline characteristics as well as 1y outcomes were evaluated.Thirty-six subjects (86.1% males, mean age 55.0 were recruited. Overall, mean SIR was 0.84±0.23. Mean SIRs were not significantly different between the 23 (63.9% anatomically severe stenoses and the 13 (36.1% anatomically moderate stenoses (0.80±0.23 versus 0.92±0.21, p = 0.126. SIR was significantly, linearly and negatively correlated to acute infarct volume on DWI (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.471, p = 0.011. Two patients (5.6% had recurrent ischemic strokes at 1y, not related to SIR values.Change of signal intensities across an ICAS on MRA may reflect its hemodynamic and functional severity. Future studies are warranted to further verify the relationships between this index and prognosis of patients with symptomatic ICAS.

  3. Enhanced NMR signal detection of imino protons in RNA molecules containing 3' dangling nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amborski, Andrew N.; Johnson, Philip E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for improving the quality of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra involving exchangeable protons near the base of the stem of RNA hairpin molecules. NMR spectra of five different RNA hairpins were compared. These hairpins consisted of a native RNA structure and four molecules each having different unpaired, or dangling, nucleotides at the 3' end. NMR experiments were acquired in water for each construct and the quality of the imino proton spectral regions were examined. The imino resonances near the base of the stem of the wild type RNA structure were not observed due to breathing motions. However, a significant increase in spectral quality for molecules with dangling 3' adenosine or guanosine nucleotides was observed, with imino protons detected in these constructs that were not observed in the wild type construct. A modest improvement in spectral quality was seen for the construct with a 3' unpaired uridine, whereas no significant improvement was observed for a 3' unpaired cytidine. This improvement in NMR spectral quality mirrors the increased thermodynamic stability observed for 3' unpaired nucleotides which is dependant on the stacking interactions of these nucleotides against the base of the stem. The use of a dangling 3' adenosine nucleotide represents an easy method to significantly improve the quality of NMR spectra of RNA molecules

  4. MR imaging of the biliary tract with Gd-EOB-DTPA: Effect of liver function on signal intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takao, Hidemasa, E-mail: takaoh-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Akai, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Taku [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Kiryu, Shigeru [Department of Radiology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 74-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Watanabe, Yasushi [Department of Radiological Technology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Imamura, Hiroshi [Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 3-1-3 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8431 (Japan); Akahane, Masaaki; Yoshioka, Naoki [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Kokudo, Norihiro [Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery Division, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Ohtomo, Kuni [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Objective: To quantitatively evaluate the signal intensity of the biliary tract in gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and to investigate the effect of liver function on the signal intensity of the biliary tract. Materials and methods: A total of 32 patients with and without chronic liver disease (normal liver group, n = 15; chronic liver disease group, n = 17) were included in this study. All patients were prospectively enrolled for evaluation of known or suspected focal liver lesions. In the chronic liver disease group, the etiologies were chronic hepatitis C virus infection (n = 12) and chronic hepatitis B virus infection (n = 5). The median Child-Pugh score was 5 (range, 5-7). Each patient received the standard dose of Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.025 mmol/kg of body weight). Post-contrast T1-weighted MR images were obtained at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Maximum signal intensities (SIs) of the right and left hepatic ducts, common hepatic duct, and common bile duct were measured. Relative signal intensity was calculated as follows: relative SI = maximum SI{sub bileduct}/mean SI{sub muscle}. Serum albumin level, serum total bilirubin level, prothrombin time, indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (ICG-R15), and estimated glomerular filtration rate were entered into regression analysis. Results: The signal intensity of the bile duct reached a peak 30 min after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA. The mean relative signal intensity of the right and left hepatic ducts at the peak time point was not significantly different between the two groups, while increase in signal intensity was delayed in the chronic liver disease group. The mean relative signal intensity of the common hepatic duct and that of the common bile duct at the peak time point were significantly different between the two groups (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, P = 0.03, respectively). Stepwise regression

  5. MR imaging of the biliary tract with Gd-EOB-DTPA: Effect of liver function on signal intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Hidemasa; Akai, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Taku; Kiryu, Shigeru; Watanabe, Yasushi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Akahane, Masaaki; Yoshioka, Naoki; Kokudo, Norihiro; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To quantitatively evaluate the signal intensity of the biliary tract in gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and to investigate the effect of liver function on the signal intensity of the biliary tract. Materials and methods: A total of 32 patients with and without chronic liver disease (normal liver group, n = 15; chronic liver disease group, n = 17) were included in this study. All patients were prospectively enrolled for evaluation of known or suspected focal liver lesions. In the chronic liver disease group, the etiologies were chronic hepatitis C virus infection (n = 12) and chronic hepatitis B virus infection (n = 5). The median Child-Pugh score was 5 (range, 5-7). Each patient received the standard dose of Gd-EOB-DTPA (0.025 mmol/kg of body weight). Post-contrast T1-weighted MR images were obtained at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA. Maximum signal intensities (SIs) of the right and left hepatic ducts, common hepatic duct, and common bile duct were measured. Relative signal intensity was calculated as follows: relative SI = maximum SI bileduct /mean SI muscle . Serum albumin level, serum total bilirubin level, prothrombin time, indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (ICG-R15), and estimated glomerular filtration rate were entered into regression analysis. Results: The signal intensity of the bile duct reached a peak 30 min after administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA. The mean relative signal intensity of the right and left hepatic ducts at the peak time point was not significantly different between the two groups, while increase in signal intensity was delayed in the chronic liver disease group. The mean relative signal intensity of the common hepatic duct and that of the common bile duct at the peak time point were significantly different between the two groups (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, P = 0.03, respectively). Stepwise regression analysis

  6. Change in signal intensity on MRI of fat in the head of markedly emaciated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Sakai, K.

    2001-01-01

    The amount of fat in various parts of the body decreases in emaciated patients, but responds differently to disease processes. The order of disappearance of fat in various parts of the head has rarely been studied with MRI. We imaged ten patients with anorexia nervosa and one cachectic patient with a psychiatric disorder with a 1.5 T imager. Signal intensities of bone marrow of the skull, subcutaneous tissue, and orbits were assessed on T1- and T2-weighted images, and correlated with the body mass index (BMI) and haemoglobin concentration (Hb). On T1-weighted images, five patients (BMI 15.6-17.8 kg/m 2 , mean 16.6 kg/m 2 ; Hb 10.1-14.2 g/dl, mean 13.8 g/dl) showed the normal pattern of fat. One (BMI 13.6 kg/m 2 , Hb 10.4 g/dl) lost the high signal of bone marrow, but high signal of subcutaneous tissue and the orbits was preserved. High signal from bone marrow and subcutaneous tissue disappeared in three patients (BMI 11.5-13.5 kg/m 2 , mean 12.5 kg/m 2 ; Hb 7.9-9.7 g/dl, mean 8.7 g/dl), but orbital high signal was preserved. The remaining two patients (BMI 9.3 and 13.5 kg/m 2 , mean 11.5 kg/m 2 ; Hb 7.6 and 8.9 g/dl, mean 8.3 g/dl) showed complete loss of high signal from fat in the head. The order of disappearance of fat (bone marrow, subcutaneous fat, then orbits) correlated with both BMI and Hb. Atrophy of bone marrow was demonstrated on T2-weighted images in five patients with BMI 13.5 kg/m 2 or less, and Hb 9.7 g/dl or less. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation and mitigation of the interplay effects for intensity modulated proton therapy for lung cancer in a clinical setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardar, Laleh; Li, Yupeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Li; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Lim, Gino; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of interplay effects for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans for lung cancer in the clinical setting. The secondary aim was to explore the technique of iso-layered re-scanning for mitigating these interplay effects. Methods and Materials Single-fraction 4D dynamic dose without considering re-scanning (1FX dynamic dose) was used as a metric to determine the magnitude of dosimetric degradation caused by 4D interplay effects. The 1FX dynamic dose was calculated by simulating the machine delivery processes of proton spot scanning on moving patient described by 4D computed tomography (4DCT) during the IMPT delivery. The dose contributed from an individual spot was fully calculated on the respiratory phase corresponding to the life span of that spot, and the final dose was accumulated to a reference CT phase by using deformable image registration. The 1FX dynamic dose was compared with the 4D composite dose. Seven patients with various tumor volumes and motions were selected. Results The CTV prescription coverage for the 7 patients were 95.04%, 95.38%, 95.39%, 95.24%, 95.65%, 95.90%, and 95.53%, calculated with use of the 4D composite dose, and were 89.30%, 94.70%, 85.47%, 94.09%, 79.69%, 91.20%, and 94.19% with use of the 1FX dynamic dose. For the 7 patients, the CTV coverage, calculated by using single-fraction dynamic dose, were 95.52%, 95.32%, 96.36%, 95.28%, 94.32%, 95.53%, and 95.78%, using maximum MU limit value of 0.005. In other words, by increasing the number of delivered spots in each fraction, the degradation of CTV coverage improved up to 14.6%. Conclusions Single-fraction 4D dynamic dose without re-scanning was validated as a surrogate to evaluate the interplay effects for IMPT for lung cancer in the clinical setting. The interplay effects can be potentially mitigated by increasing the number of iso-layered re-scanning in each fraction delivery. PMID:25407877

  8. Evaluation and mitigation of the interplay effects of intensity modulated proton therapy for lung cancer in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardar, Laleh; Li, Yupeng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Li; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D; Lim, Gino; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the interplay effects of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans for lung cancer in the clinical setting. The secondary aim was to explore the technique of isolayered rescanning to mitigate these interplay effects. A single-fraction 4-dimensional (4D) dynamic dose without considering rescanning (1FX dynamic dose) was used as a metric to determine the magnitude of dosimetric degradation caused by 4D interplay effects. The 1FX dynamic dose was calculated by simulating the machine delivery processes of proton spot scanning on a moving patient, described by 4D computed tomography during IMPT delivery. The dose contributed from an individual spot was fully calculated on the respiratory phase that corresponded to the life span of that spot, and the final dose was accumulated to a reference computed tomography phase by use of deformable image registration. The 1FX dynamic dose was compared with the 4D composite dose. Seven patients with various tumor volumes and motions were selected for study. The clinical target volume (CTV) prescription coverage for the 7 patients was 95.04%, 95.38%, 95.39%, 95.24%, 95.65%, 95.90%, and 95.53% when calculated with the 4D composite dose and 89.30%, 94.70%, 85.47%, 94.09%, 79.69%, 91.20%, and 94.19% when calculated with the 1FX dynamic dose. For these 7 patients, the CTV coverage calculated by use of a single-fraction dynamic dose was 95.52%, 95.32%, 96.36%, 95.28%, 94.32%, 95.53%, and 95.78%, with a maximum monitor unit limit value of 0.005. In other words, by increasing the number of delivered spots in each fraction, the degradation of CTV coverage improved up to 14.6%. A single-fraction 4D dynamic dose without rescanning was validated as a surrogate to evaluate the interplay effects of IMPT for lung cancer in the clinical setting. The interplay effects potentially can be mitigated by increasing the amount of isolayered rescanning in each fraction delivery.

  9. Beam configuration selection for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy in cervical cancer using Pareto front comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Schoot, A J A J; Visser, J; van Kesteren, Z; Janssen, T M; Rasch, C R N; Bel, A

    2016-02-21

    The Pareto front reflects the optimal trade-offs between conflicting objectives and can be used to quantify the effect of different beam configurations on plan robustness and dose-volume histogram parameters. Therefore, our aim was to develop and implement a method to automatically approach the Pareto front in robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning. Additionally, clinically relevant Pareto fronts based on different beam configurations will be derived and compared to enable beam configuration selection in cervical cancer proton therapy. A method to iteratively approach the Pareto front by automatically generating robustly optimized IMPT plans was developed. To verify plan quality, IMPT plans were evaluated on robustness by simulating range and position errors and recalculating the dose. For five retrospectively selected cervical cancer patients, this method was applied for IMPT plans with three different beam configurations using two, three and four beams. 3D Pareto fronts were optimized on target coverage (CTV D(99%)) and OAR doses (rectum V30Gy; bladder V40Gy). Per patient, proportions of non-approved IMPT plans were determined and differences between patient-specific Pareto fronts were quantified in terms of CTV D(99%), rectum V(30Gy) and bladder V(40Gy) to perform beam configuration selection. Per patient and beam configuration, Pareto fronts were successfully sampled based on 200 IMPT plans of which on average 29% were non-approved plans. In all patients, IMPT plans based on the 2-beam set-up were completely dominated by plans with the 3-beam and 4-beam configuration. Compared to the 3-beam set-up, the 4-beam set-up increased the median CTV D(99%) on average by 0.2 Gy and decreased the median rectum V(30Gy) and median bladder V(40Gy) on average by 3.6% and 1.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates a method to automatically derive Pareto fronts in robust IMPT planning. For all patients, the defined four-beam configuration was found optimal

  10. Beam configuration selection for robust intensity-modulated proton therapy in cervical cancer using Pareto front comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Schoot, A J A J; Visser, J; Van Kesteren, Z; Rasch, C R N; Bel, A; Janssen, T M

    2016-01-01

    The Pareto front reflects the optimal trade-offs between conflicting objectives and can be used to quantify the effect of different beam configurations on plan robustness and dose-volume histogram parameters. Therefore, our aim was to develop and implement a method to automatically approach the Pareto front in robust intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning. Additionally, clinically relevant Pareto fronts based on different beam configurations will be derived and compared to enable beam configuration selection in cervical cancer proton therapy. A method to iteratively approach the Pareto front by automatically generating robustly optimized IMPT plans was developed. To verify plan quality, IMPT plans were evaluated on robustness by simulating range and position errors and recalculating the dose. For five retrospectively selected cervical cancer patients, this method was applied for IMPT plans with three different beam configurations using two, three and four beams. 3D Pareto fronts were optimized on target coverage (CTV D 99% ) and OAR doses (rectum V 30Gy ; bladder V 40Gy ). Per patient, proportions of non-approved IMPT plans were determined and differences between patient-specific Pareto fronts were quantified in terms of CTV D 99% , rectum V 30Gy and bladder V 40Gy to perform beam configuration selection. Per patient and beam configuration, Pareto fronts were successfully sampled based on 200 IMPT plans of which on average 29% were non-approved plans. In all patients, IMPT plans based on the 2-beam set-up were completely dominated by plans with the 3-beam and 4-beam configuration. Compared to the 3-beam set-up, the 4-beam set-up increased the median CTV D 99% on average by 0.2 Gy and decreased the median rectum V 30Gy and median bladder V 40Gy on average by 3.6% and 1.3%, respectively. This study demonstrates a method to automatically derive Pareto fronts in robust IMPT planning. For all patients, the defined four-beam configuration was found optimal in

  11. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Organ-at-Risk Exposure and a Low-Gradient Junctioning Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoker, Joshua B.; Grant, Jonathan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Pidikiti, Rajesh; Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare field junction robustness and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) during craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to conventional passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients, 5 adult and 5 pediatric patients, previously treated with PSPT-based CSI were selected for comparison. Anterior oblique cranial fields, using a superior couch rotation, and posterior spinal fields were used for IMPT planning. To facilitate low-gradient field junctioning along the spine, the inverse-planning IMPT technique was divided into 3 stages. Dose indices describing target coverage and normal tissue dose, in silico error modeling, and film dosimetry were used to assess plan quality. Results: Field junction robustness along the spine was improved using the staged IMPT planning technique, reducing the worst case impact of a 4-mm setup error from 25% in PSPT to <5% of prescription dose. This was verified by film dosimetry for clinical delivery. Exclusive of thyroid dose in adult patients, IMPT plans demonstrated sparing of organs at risk as good or better than PSPT. Coverage of the cribriform plate for pediatric (V95% [percentage of volume of the target receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose]; 87 ± 11 vs 92 ± 7) and adult (V95%; 94 ± 7 vs 100 ± 1) patients and the clinical target in pediatric (V95%; 98 ± 2 vs 100 ± 1) and adult (V95%; 100 ± 1 vs 100 ± 1) patients for PSPT and IMPT plans, respectively, were comparable or improved. For adult patients, IMPT target dose inhomogeneity was increased, as determined by heterogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). IMPT lowered maximum spinal cord dose, improved spinal dose homogeneity, and reduced exposure to other OARs. Conclusions: IMPT has the potential to improve CSI plan quality and the homogeneity of intrafractional dose at match lines. The IMPT approach developed may also simplify treatments and reduce

  12. SU-F-T-196: Hypo-Fractionation with Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Unilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, S; Park, S [McLaren Proton Therapy Center, Karmanos Cancer Institute at McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI (United States); Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Zhang, Y [University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Liberty Township, OH (United States); Pokharel [21st Century Oncology, Estero, FL (United States); Cheng, C [Vantage Oncology, West Hills, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of hypo-fractionated intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer patients based on proton collaborative group (PCG)-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol criteria. Methods: A total of five unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer cases were included in this retrospective study. For each case, IMPT plans were generated for treatment to be delivered with 7.6 Gy[RBE] per fraction in 5 fractions per week for a total dose of 38 Gy(RBE). Each plan was generated using two anterior-oblique beams and one lateral beam. Treatment plans were optimized with an objective meeting PCG-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol criteria: (i) planning target volume (PTV): D99.5% > 36.1 Gy[RBE], (ii) rectum: V24 < 35%, V33.6 < 10%, (iii) bladder: V39 < 8 cc, and (iv) femoral head: V23 < 1cc. Results: All five cases satisfied PTV D99.5% (average=36.82 Gy[RBE]; range, 36.36–37.13 Gy[RBE]). PTV D95% ranged from 36.66 Gy[RBE] to 38.65 Gy[RBE] and PTV V100 ranged from 95.47% to 97.95%. For the rectum, V24 was less than 35% (average=14.07 Gy[RBE]; range, 6.22–18.42%, whereas V33.6 Gy[RBE] was less than 10% (average=6.83; range, 3.06 – 9.15%). Rectal mean dose ranged from 4.22 Gy[RBE] to 9.97 Gy[RBE]. For the bladder, V39 was found to be less than 8 cc (average=3.69 cc; range, 0.19–7.68 cc). Bladder mean dose ranged from 4.22 Gy[RBE] to 18.83 Gy[RBE]. For the femoral head, V23 was 0 in all five cases. Conclusion: All five unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer IMPT plans generated with one lateral and two anterior-oblique beams satisfied the dosimetric criteria of PCG-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol.

  13. Development of a 130-mA, 75-kV high voltage column for high-intensity dc proton injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Arvin, A.; Hansborough, L.; Hodgkins, D.; Meyer, E.; Schneider, J.D.; Stevens, R.R. Jr.; Zaugg, T.

    1997-01-01

    A reliable high-voltage (HV) column has been developed for dc proton injectors with applications to high-intensity cw linacs. The HV column is coupled with a microwave-driven plasma generator to produce a 75-keV, 110-mA dc proton beam. Typical proton fraction from this source is 85--90%, requiring the HV column and accelerating electrodes to operate with a 130-mA hydrogen-ion beam current. A glow-discharge, which was caused by the ion source axial magnetic field, was initially observed in the HV column. This problem was solved by scaling the electron production processes, the magnetic field, and the HV column pressure into a favorable regime. A subsequent 168 hour reliability run on the 75-keV injector showed that the ion source (plasma generator and HV column) has >98% beam availability

  14. In contrast to BOLD: signal enhancement by extravascular water protons as an alternative mechanism of endogenous fMRI signal change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figley, Chase R; Leitch, Jordan K; Stroman, Patrick W

    2010-10-01

    Despite the popularity and widespread application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in recent years, the physiological bases of signal change are not yet fully understood. Blood oxygen level-dependant (BOLD) contrast - attributed to local changes in blood flow and oxygenation, and therefore magnetic susceptibility - has become the most prevalent means of functional neuroimaging. However, at short echo times, spin-echo sequences show considerable deviations from the BOLD model, implying a second, non-BOLD component of signal change. This has been dubbed "signal enhancement by extravascular water protons" (SEEP) and is proposed to result from proton-density changes associated with cellular swelling. Given that such changes are independent of magnetic susceptibility, SEEP may offer new and improved opportunities for carrying out fMRI in regions with close proximity to air-tissue and/or bone-tissue interfaces (e.g., the prefrontal cortex and spinal cord), as well as regions close to large blood vessels, which may not be ideally suited for BOLD imaging. However, because of the interdisciplinary nature of the literature, there has yet to be a thorough synthesis, tying together the various and sometimes disparate aspects of SEEP theory. As such, we aim to provide a concise yet comprehensive overview of SEEP, including recent and compelling evidence for its validity, its current applications and its future relevance to the rapidly expanding field of functional neuroimaging. Before presenting the evidence for a non-BOLD component of endogenous functional contrast, and to enable a more critical review for the nonexpert reader, we begin by reviewing the fundamental principles underlying BOLD theory. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MR imaging of renal cell carcinoma. Associations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuki, Takayuki; Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsushima, Tomoyasu; Shirasaki, Yoshinori; Hiraki, Yoshio [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the MR characteristics of renal cell carcinomas against histologic findings and to assess the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings. Fifty-four patients (56 lesions) were examined by MR imaging and then underwent partial or radical nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis of all lesions was renal cell carcinoma. All MR examinations were performed as dynamic studies using the same 1.5-T scanner. MR characteristics were compared against pathologic findings after resection, and the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings were then assessed. A significant correlation was observed between tumor grade and tumor enhancement, with G3 lesions tending to show little enhancement. Regardless of the histologic classification, G3 tumors were found to contain highly heterotypic cancer cells and very few vessels by histopathologic examination. No significant correlations were noted between the other MR characteristics and pathologic findings. Renal cell carcinomas showing little enhancement tend to be highly malignant lesions based on the pathologic findings. Special consideration is required for these tumors with regard to the selection of surgical intervention and follow-up observation. (author)

  16. MR imaging of renal cell carcinoma. Associations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabuki, Takayuki; Togami, Izumi; Kitagawa, Takahiro; Sasai, Nobuya; Tsushima, Tomoyasu; Shirasaki, Yoshinori; Hiraki, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the MR characteristics of renal cell carcinomas against histologic findings and to assess the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings. Fifty-four patients (56 lesions) were examined by MR imaging and then underwent partial or radical nephrectomy. The pathologic diagnosis of all lesions was renal cell carcinoma. All MR examinations were performed as dynamic studies using the same 1.5-T scanner. MR characteristics were compared against pathologic findings after resection, and the correlations among signal intensity, tumor enhancement, and pathologic findings were then assessed. A significant correlation was observed between tumor grade and tumor enhancement, with G3 lesions tending to show little enhancement. Regardless of the histologic classification, G3 tumors were found to contain highly heterotypic cancer cells and very few vessels by histopathologic examination. No significant correlations were noted between the other MR characteristics and pathologic findings. Renal cell carcinomas showing little enhancement tend to be highly malignant lesions based on the pathologic findings. Special consideration is required for these tumors with regard to the selection of surgical intervention and follow-up observation. (author)

  17. Primary Study about Intensity Signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hoon; Gang, Seo Gon; Kim, Jeong In; Lee, Byung Il [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance(EPR) dosimetry system using human tooth has been well introduced as one of the efficient tool to evaluate radiation exposure. But, EPR dosimetry, even in the case of classical in vitro EPR system using tooth sample(measured molars), was regarded as having big signal fluctuation. One of reason for such difficulty in getting accurate intensity was the big effect of organic materials mixed in enamel part of teeth samples. They are mainly caused by the adaptation process of system itself to the movement of measured human subject. Generally, when we measured human teeth in vivo, five of six teeth spectrum were gathered and averaged for real evaluation. The these spectrum are measured under very different environment like angle of external magnet making magnetic filed with teeth(incisor). Random movement of these signals should be considered in different view point to understand and compare each EPR in vivo EPR spectrum. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation. But, in overall view, the EPR signal, especially at no irradiation level, is almost same for every measurement trial which is mainly composed of big noise and very small signal from real free radicals. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation.

  18. Primary Study about Intensity Signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in vivo Tooth Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hoon; Gang, Seo Gon; Kim, Jeong In; Lee, Byung Il

    2017-01-01

    The signal of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance(EPR) dosimetry system using human tooth has been well introduced as one of the efficient tool to evaluate radiation exposure. But, EPR dosimetry, even in the case of classical in vitro EPR system using tooth sample(measured molars), was regarded as having big signal fluctuation. One of reason for such difficulty in getting accurate intensity was the big effect of organic materials mixed in enamel part of teeth samples. They are mainly caused by the adaptation process of system itself to the movement of measured human subject. Generally, when we measured human teeth in vivo, five of six teeth spectrum were gathered and averaged for real evaluation. The these spectrum are measured under very different environment like angle of external magnet making magnetic filed with teeth(incisor). Random movement of these signals should be considered in different view point to understand and compare each EPR in vivo EPR spectrum. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation. But, in overall view, the EPR signal, especially at no irradiation level, is almost same for every measurement trial which is mainly composed of big noise and very small signal from real free radicals. The peak to peak value of obtained five or six in vivo EPR system to get averaged value for final quantity of free radicals in hydroxy apatite crystal construction in enamel part of human teeth looks so randomly changed without regulation.

  19. Quantification of Parkinson Tremor Intensity Based On EMG Signal Analysis Using Fast Orthogonal Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rezghian Moghadam

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The tremor injury is one of the common symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The patients suffering from Parkinson's disease have difficulty in controlling their movements owing to tremor. The intensity of the disease can be determined through specifying the range of intensity values of involuntary tremor in Parkinson patients. The level of disease in patients is determined through an empirical range of 0-5. In the early stages of Parkinson, resting tremor can be very mild and intermittent. So, diagnosing the levels of disease is difficult but important since it has only medication therapy. The aim of this study is to quantify the intensity of tremor by the analysis of electromyogram signal. The solution proposed in this paper is to employ a polynomial function model to estimate the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS value. The algorithm of Fast Orthogonal Search (FOS, which is based on identification of orthogonal basic functions, was utilized for model identification. In fact, some linear and nonlinear features extracted from wrist surface electromyogram signal were considered as the input of the model identified by FOS, and the model output was the UPDRS value. In this research, the proposed model was designed based on two different structures which have been called the single structure and parallel structure. The efficiency of designed models with different structures was evaluated. The evaluation results using K-fold cross validation approach showed that the proposed model with a parallel structure could determine the tremor severity of the Parkinson's disease with accuracy of 99.25% ±0.41, sensitivity of 97.17% ±1.9 and specificity of 99.72% ±0.18.

  20. Induced radioactivity studies of the shielding and beamline equipment of the high intensity proton accelerator facility at PSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otiougova Polina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI is the largest national research center in Switzerland. Its multidisciplinary research is dedicated to a wide ↓eld in natural science and technology as well as particle physics. The High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility (HIPA has been in operation at PSI since 1974. It includes an 870 keV Cockroft-Walton pre-accelerator, a 72 MeV injector cyclotron as well as a 590 MeV ring cyclotron. The experimental facilities, the meson production graphite targets, Target E and Target M, and the spallation target stations (SINQ and UCN are used for material research and particle physics. In order to ful↓ll the request of the regulatory authorities and to be reported to the regulators, the expected radioactive waste and nuclide inventory after an anticipated ↓nal shutdown in the far future has to be estimated. In this contribution, calculations for the 20 m long beamline between Target E and the 590 MeV beam dump of HIPA are presented. The ↓rst step in the calculations was determining spectra and spatial particle distributions around the beamlines using the Monte-Carlo particle transport code MCNPX2.7.0 [1]. To perform the analysis of the MCNPX output and to determine the radionuclide inventory as well as the speci↓c activity of the nuclides, an activation script [2] using the FISPACT10 code with the cross sections from the European Activation File (EAF2010 [3] was applied. The speci↓c activity values were compared to the currently existing Swiss exemption limits (LE [4] as well as to the Swiss liberation limits (LL [5], becoming e↑ective in the near future. The obtained results were used to estimate the total volume of the radioactive waste produced at HIPA and have to be reported to the Swiss regulatory authorities. The comparison of the performed calculations to measurements is discussed as well.

  1. Using a Reduced Spot Size for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Potentially Improves Salivary Gland-Sparing in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Tara A. van de, E-mail: t.a.van.de.water@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lomax, Antony J. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Bijl, Hendrik P.; Schilstra, Cornelis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hug, Eugen B. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether intensity-modulated proton therapy with a reduced spot size (rsIMPT) could further reduce the parotid and submandibular gland dose compared with previously calculated IMPT plans with a larger spot size. In addition, it was investigated whether the obtained dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). Methods: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal cancer were included in a comparative treatment planning study. Both IMPT plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal PTV. IMPT and rsIMPT used identical three-field beam arrangements. In the IMPT plans, the parotid and submandibular salivary glands were spared as much as possible. rsIMPT plans used identical dose-volume objectives for the parotid glands as those used by the IMPT plans, whereas the objectives for the submandibular glands were tightened further. NTCPs were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Target coverage was similar for both IMPT techniques, whereas rsIMPT clearly improved target conformity. The mean doses in the parotid glands and submandibular glands were significantly lower for three-field rsIMPT (14.7 Gy and 46.9 Gy, respectively) than for three-field IMPT (16.8 Gy and 54.6 Gy, respectively). Hence, rsIMPT significantly reduced the NTCP of patient-rated xerostomia and parotid and contralateral submandibular salivary flow dysfunction (27%, 17%, and 43% respectively) compared with IMPT (39%, 20%, and 79%, respectively). In addition, mean dose values in the sublingual glands, the soft palate and oral cavity were also decreased. Obtained dose and NTCP reductions varied per patient. Conclusions: rsIMPT improved sparing of the salivary glands and reduced NTCP for xerostomia and parotid and submandibular salivary dysfunction, while maintaining similar target coverage results. It is expected that rsIMPT improves quality

  2. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem

  3. Analysis of high signal intensities of nontumorous conditions of corpus callosum on magnetic resonance T2-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Moo Song; Kim, Chul Min; Chung, Chun Phil

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate high signal intensity of nontumorous conditions of corpus callosum on T2-weighted MR images. Forty nine patients with nontumorous high signal intensities involving corpus callosum on sagittal T2-weighted image were retrospectively analyzed. Nontumorous condition of corpus callosum were diffuse axonal injury (DAI, 19 cases), cerebral infarctions (16 cases), multiple sclerosis (MS, 5 cases), Wilson's disease (2 cases) and hydrocephalus (7 cases) that were diagnosed by clinical and MR findings. Numbers, configuration, involved thickness and sites of high signal intensities of corpus callosum were analyzed. DAI and infarctions showed either single or multiple lesions. MS and hydrocephalus showed multiple lesions, but Wilson's diseases showed single lesion. In DAI, infarctions and MS the lesions involved any part of corpus callosum, splenium in Wilson's disease, and all parts of corpus callosum in hydrocephalus. Wilson's disease showed only partial thickness involvement, and others involved partial or full thickness of corpus callosum. Configuration of high signal intensity was linear in most cases of hydrocephalus, and oval in Wilson's disease, and oval and confluent in MS, and variable in DAI and infarctions. High signal intensities of nontumorous conditions of corpus callosum revealed variable findings, and therefore, analysis of nontumorous high signal intensities of corpus callosum is not made by only MR findings but by conjuction with clinical aspects

  4. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates tooth movement via activation of the BMP-2 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xue

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to determine the underlying mechanism of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS induced alveolar bone remodeling and the role of BMP-2 expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model. Orthodontic appliances were placed between the homonymy upper first molars and the upper central incisors in rats under general anesthesia, followed by daily 20-min LIPUS or sham LIPUS treatment beginning at day 0. Tooth movement distances and molecular changes were evaluated at each observation point. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to detect HGF (Hepatocyte growth factor/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathways and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL expression by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. At day 3, LIPUS had no effect on the rat orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2-induced alveolar bone remodeling. However, beginning at day 5 and for the following time points, LIPUS significantly increased orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression compared with the control group. The qRT-PCR and Western blot data in vitro and in vivo to study BMP-2 expression were consistent with the immunohistochemistry observations. The present study demonstrates that LIPUS promotes alveolar bone remodeling by stimulating the HGF/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model, and LIPUS increased BMP-2 expression via Runx2 regulation.

  5. All possible lightest supersymmetric particles in proton hexality violating minimal supergravity models and their signals at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grab, Sebastian

    2009-08-01

    The most widely studied supersymmetric scenario is the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with more than a hundred free parameters. However for detailed phenomenological studies, the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model, a restricted and well-motivated framework for the MSSM, is more convenient. In this model, lepton- and baryon-number violating interactions are suppressed by a discrete symmetry, R-parity or proton-hexality, to keep the proton stable. However, it is sufficient to forbid only lepton- or baryon-number violation. We thus extend mSUGRA models by adding a proton-hexality violating operator at the grand unification scale. This can change the supersymmetric spectrum leading on the one hand to a sneutrino, smuon or squark as the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). On the other hand, a wide parameter region is reopened, where the scalar tau (stau) is the LSP. We investigate in detail the conditions leading to non-neutralino LSP scenarios. We take into account the restrictions from neutrino masses, the muon anomalous magnetic moment, b→sγ, and other precision measurements. We furthermore investigate existing restrictions from direct searches at LEP, the Tevatron, and the CERN p anti p collider. It is vital to know the nature of the LSP, since supersymmetric particles normally cascade decay down to the LSP at collider experiments. We present typical LHC signatures for sneutrino LSP scenarios. Promising signatures are high-p T muons and jets, like-sign muon events and detached vertices from long lived taus. We also classify the stau LSP decays and describe their dependence on the mSUGRA parameters. We then exploit our results for resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We find novel signatures with like-sign muon and three- and four-muon final states. Finally, we perform a detailed analysis for single slepton production in association with a single top quark. We show that the signal can be distinguished from the background at the LHC

  6. Determination of intensity and energy spectrum of neutrons by bombardment of thallium-203 thick target and its copper substrate with 28.5 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajiloo, N.; Raisali, Gh.; Hamidi, S.; Aslani, Gh.

    2007-01-01

    In this research we have determined neutrons spectrum and the intensity that produced from thallium target bombardment. We have applied SRIM and ALICE computer codes to thallium target and its copper substrate for 145 μA of 28.5 MeV incident proton beam from cyclotron Cyclone30. Because of the energy degradation of protons while passing through the thallium target and its copper substrate, the average energy of protons in different depths has been calculated by using SRIM computer code. Then, by applying ALICE computer code for each sub-layer, the neutron production cross sections and their energy spectrum have been calculated to determine the total neutron intensity and spectrum. Using the calculated neutron intensity of 1.22x10 13 n/s as the source, the equivalent dose rate at the distance 6 meters from the target has been calculated by MCNP computer code and the result has been compared with the measured value. The Pb 201 activity has also been calculated as 13.5 Curies. The measured Pb 201 activity by Curie meter CAPINTEC CRC-712 is 13.1 Ci which is in reasonable agreement with the calculated value, bearing in mind the uncertainties in the proposed models and the measurements

  7. A method for quantifying intervertebral disc signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Masaki; Abe, Hitoshi; Amaya, Kenji; Matsumoto, Hideo; Yanaihara, Hisashi; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantification of intervertebral disc degeneration based on intensity of the nucleus pulposus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often uses the mean intensity of the region of interest (ROI) within the nucleus pulposus. However, the location and size of ROI have varied in different reports, and none of the reported methods can be considered fully objective. Purpose To develop a more objective method of establishing ROIs for quantitative evaluation of signal intensity in the nucleus pulposus using T2-weighted MRI. Material and Methods A 1.5-T scanner was used to obtain T2-weighted mid-sagittal images. A total of 288 intervertebral discs from 48 patients (25 men, 23 women) were analyzed. Mean age was 47.4 years (range, 17-69 years). All discs were classified into five grades according to Pfirrmann et al. Discs in grades I and II were defined as bright discs, and discs in grades IV and V were defined as dark discs. Eight candidate methods of ROI determination were devised. The method offering the highest degree of discrimination between bright and dark discs was investigated among these eight methods. Results The method with the greatest degree of discrimination was as follows. The quadrangle formed by anterior and posterior edges of the upper and lower end plates in contact with the intervertebral disc to be measured was defined as the intervertebral area. A shape similar to the intervertebral area but with one-quarter the area was drawn. The geometrical center of the shape was matched to the center of intensity, and this shape was then used as the ROI. Satisfactory validity and reproducibility were obtained using this method. Conclusion The present method offers adequate discrimination and could be useful for longitudinal tracking of intervertebral disc degeneration with sufficient reproducibility

  8. A method for quantifying intervertebral disc signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, Masaki [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitasato Univ. Kitasato Inst. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Hitoshi [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitasato Univ. Kitasato Inst. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: hit-abe@insti.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Amaya, Kenji [Graduate School of Information Science and Engineering, Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Matsumoto, Hideo [Inst. for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yanaihara, Hisashi [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Kitasato Univ. Kitasato Inst. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nishiwaki, Yuji [Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health, Toho Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Background Quantification of intervertebral disc degeneration based on intensity of the nucleus pulposus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often uses the mean intensity of the region of interest (ROI) within the nucleus pulposus. However, the location and size of ROI have varied in different reports, and none of the reported methods can be considered fully objective. Purpose To develop a more objective method of establishing ROIs for quantitative evaluation of signal intensity in the nucleus pulposus using T2-weighted MRI. Material and Methods A 1.5-T scanner was used to obtain T2-weighted mid-sagittal images. A total of 288 intervertebral discs from 48 patients (25 men, 23 women) were analyzed. Mean age was 47.4 years (range, 17-69 years). All discs were classified into five grades according to Pfirrmann et al. Discs in grades I and II were defined as bright discs, and discs in grades IV and V were defined as dark discs. Eight candidate methods of ROI determination were devised. The method offering the highest degree of discrimination between bright and dark discs was investigated among these eight methods. Results The method with the greatest degree of discrimination was as follows. The quadrangle formed by anterior and posterior edges of the upper and lower end plates in contact with the intervertebral disc to be measured was defined as the intervertebral area. A shape similar to the intervertebral area but with one-quarter the area was drawn. The geometrical center of the shape was matched to the center of intensity, and this shape was then used as the ROI. Satisfactory validity and reproducibility were obtained using this method. Conclusion The present method offers adequate discrimination and could be useful for longitudinal tracking of intervertebral disc degeneration with sufficient reproducibility.

  9. GeneChip microarrays-signal intensities, RNA concentrations and probe sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, Hans; Preibisch, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    GeneChip microarrays consist of hundreds of thousands of oligonucleotide probes. The transformation of their signal intensities into RNA transcript concentrations requires the knowledge of the response function of the measuring device. We analysed the 'apparatus' function of perfect match (PM) and mismatched (MM) oligonucleotide probes of GeneChip microarrays after changes of the target concentration using the results of a spiked-in experiment. In agreement with previous studies we found that a competitive two-species Langmuir-adsorption model describes the probe intensities well. Each PM and MM probe is characterized by two hybridization constants which specify the propensity of the probe to bind specific and non-specific transcripts. The affinity for non-specific hybridization is on average equal for PM and MM. The purine-pyrimidine asymmetry of base pair interaction strengths, however, causes a characteristic PM-MM intensity difference, the sign of which depends on the middle base of the probe. The affinity for specific hybridization of the PM exceeds that of the MM on average by nearly one order of magnitude because the central mismatched base only weakly contributes to the stability of the probe/target duplexes. For the first time we differentiate between the free energy parameters related to the 64 possible middle-triples of DNA/RNA oligomer duplexes with a central Watson-Crick pairing and a central mismatched pairing. Both the PM and MM probes respond to the concentration of specific transcripts, which can be estimated from the PM and MM probe intensities using the Langmuir-model. The analysis of the PM-MM intensity difference provides at least no loss of accuracy and precision of the estimated concentration compared with the PM-only estimates which in turn outperform the MM-only estimates. The results show that the processing of the PM-MM intensity difference requires the consideration of a background term due to non-specific hybridization, which is

  10. Treatment planning study comparing proton therapy, RapidArc and intensity modulated radiation therapy for a synchronous bilateral lung cancer case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to perform a treatment planning study on a synchronous bilateral non-small cell lung cancer case using three treatment modalities: uniform scanning proton therapy, RapidArc, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Methods: The maximum intensity projection (MIP images obtained from the 4 dimensional-computed tomography (4DCT scans were used for delineation of tumor volumes in the left and right lungs. The average 4D-CT was used for the treatment planning among all three modalities with identical patient contouring and treatment planning goal. A proton therapy plan was generated in XiO treatment planning system (TPS using 2 fields for each target. For a comparative purpose, IMRT and RapidArc plans were generated in Eclipse TPS. Treatment plans were generated for a total dose of 74 CGE or Gy prescribed to each planning target volume (PTV (left and right with 2 CGE or Gy per fraction. In IMRT and RapidArc plans, normalization was done based on PTV coverage values in proton plans. Results: The mean PTV dose deviation from the prescription dose was lower in proton plan (within 3.4%, but higher in IMRT (6.5% to 11.3% and RapidArc (3.8% to 11.5% plans. Proton therapy produced lower mean dose to the total lung, heart, and esophagus when compared to IMRT and RapidArc. The relative volume of the total lung receiving 20, 10, and 5 CGE or Gy (V20, V10, and V5, respectively were lower using proton therapy than using IMRT, with absolute differences of 9.71%, 22.88%, and 39.04%, respectively. The absolute differences in the V20, V10, and V5 between proton and RapidArc plans were 4.84%, 19.16%, and 36.8%, respectively, with proton therapy producing lower dosimetric values. Conclusion: Based on the results presented in this case study, uniform scanning proton therapy has a dosimetric advantage over both IMRT and RapidArc for a synchronous bi-lateral NSCLC, especially for the normal lung tissue, heart, and

  11. Commissioning of the ECR ion source of the high intensity proton injector of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuske, O.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Fils, J.; Gauthier, Y.

    2018-05-01

    The CEA at Saclay is in charge of developing and building the ion source and the low energy line of the proton linac of the FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) accelerator complex located at GSI (Darmstadt) in Germany. The FAIR facility will deliver stable and rare isotope beams covering a huge range of intensities and beam energies for experiments in the fields of atomic physics, plasma physics, nuclear physics, hadron physics, nuclear matter physics, material physics, and biophysics. A significant part of the experimental program at FAIR is dedicated to antiproton physics that requires an ultimate number 7 × 1010 cooled pbar/h. The high-intensity proton beam that is necessary for antiproton production will be delivered by a dedicated 75 mA/70 MeV proton linac. A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source will deliver a 100 mA H+ beam pulsed at 4 Hz with an energy of 95 keV. A 2 solenoids low energy beam transport line allows the injection of the proton beam into the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) within an acceptance of 0.3π mm mrad (norm. rms). An electrostatic chopper system located between the second solenoid and the RFQ is used to cut the beam macro-pulse from the source to inject 36 μs long beam pulses into the RFQ. At present time, a Ladder-RFQ is under construction at the University of Frankfurt. This article reports the first beam measurements obtained since mid of 2016. Proton beams have been extracted from the ECR ion source and analyzed just after the extraction column on a dedicated diagnostic chamber. Emittance measurements as well as extracted current and species proportion analysis have been performed in different configurations of ion source parameters, such as magnetic field profile, radio frequency power, gas injection, and puller electrode voltage.

  12. Change in signal intensity on MRI of fat in the head of markedly emaciated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Sakai, K. [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ito, J.; Tokiguchi, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Niigata Univ. (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    The amount of fat in various parts of the body decreases in emaciated patients, but responds differently to disease processes. The order of disappearance of fat in various parts of the head has rarely been studied with MRI. We imaged ten patients with anorexia nervosa and one cachectic patient with a psychiatric disorder with a 1.5 T imager. Signal intensities of bone marrow of the skull, subcutaneous tissue, and orbits were assessed on T1- and T2-weighted images, and correlated with the body mass index (BMI) and haemoglobin concentration (Hb). On T1-weighted images, five patients (BMI 15.6-17.8 kg/m{sup 2}, mean 16.6 kg/m{sup 2}; Hb 10.1-14.2 g/dl, mean 13.8 g/dl) showed the normal pattern of fat. One (BMI 13.6 kg/m{sup 2}, Hb 10.4 g/dl) lost the high signal of bone marrow, but high signal of subcutaneous tissue and the orbits was preserved. High signal from bone marrow and subcutaneous tissue disappeared in three patients (BMI 11.5-13.5 kg/m{sup 2}, mean 12.5 kg/m{sup 2}; Hb 7.9-9.7 g/dl, mean 8.7 g/dl), but orbital high signal was preserved. The remaining two patients (BMI 9.3 and 13.5 kg/m{sup 2}, mean 11.5 kg/m{sup 2}; Hb 7.6 and 8.9 g/dl, mean 8.3 g/dl) showed complete loss of high signal from fat in the head. The order of disappearance of fat (bone marrow, subcutaneous fat, then orbits) correlated with both BMI and Hb. Atrophy of bone marrow was demonstrated on T2-weighted images in five patients with BMI 13.5 kg/m{sup 2} or less, and Hb 9.7 g/dl or less. (orig.)

  13. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru, E-mail: wa@mbe.nifty.com [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  14. Differential Bystander Signaling Between Radioresistant Chondrosarcoma Cells and Fibroblasts After X-Ray, Proton, Iron Ion and Carbon Ion Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatsuki, Masaru; Magpayo, Nicole; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chondrosarcoma is well known as a radioresistant tumor, but the mechanisms underlying that resistance are still unclear. The bystander effect is well documented in the field of radiation biology. We investigated the bystander response induced by X-rays, protons, carbon ions, and iron ions in chondrosarcoma cells using a transwell insert co-culture system that precludes physical contact between targeted and bystander cells. Methods and Materials: Human chondrosarcoma cells were irradiated with 0.1-, 0.5-, 1-, and 2-Gy X-rays, protons, carbon ions or iron ions using a transwell insert co-culture system. Formation of micronuclei and p53 binding protein 1 staining in bystander and irradiated cells were analyzed and bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells, and normal human skin fibroblasts was investigated. Results: In this study, we show that the fraction of cells with DNA damages in irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed dose-dependent increases with all beams. However, the fraction of cells with DNA damages in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells did not show any change from the levels in control cells. In the bystander signaling between mixed cultures of chondrosarcoma cells and fibroblasts, the amount of micronucleus formation in all bystander chondrosarcoma cells co-cultured with irradiated fibroblasts were the same as the levels for control cells. However, all bystander fibroblasts co-cultured with irradiated chondrosarcoma cells showed significant increases in the fraction of micronucleated cells compared to the rate of control cells. Conclusions: We conclude that chondrosarcoma cells in the transwell insert co-culture system could release bystander stimulations but could not develop bystander responses.

  15. Commissioning of a compact laser-based proton beam line for high intensity bunches around 10 MeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Busold

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first results of experiments with a new laser-based proton beam line at the GSI accelerator facility in Darmstadt. It delivers high current bunches at proton energies around 9.6 MeV, containing more than 10^{9} particles in less than 10 ns and with tunable energy spread down to 2.7% (ΔE/E_{0} at FWHM. A target normal sheath acceleration stage serves as a proton source and a pulsed solenoid provides for beam collimation and energy selection. Finally a synchronous radio frequency (rf field is applied via a rf cavity for energy compression at a synchronous phase of -90  deg. The proton bunch is characterized at the end of the very compact beam line, only 3 m behind the laser matter interaction point, which defines the particle source.

  16. Commissioning of a compact laser-based proton beam line for high intensity bunches around 10Â MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busold, S.; Schumacher, D.; Deppert, O.; Brabetz, C.; Kroll, F.; Blažević, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Roth, M.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the first results of experiments with a new laser-based proton beam line at the GSI accelerator facility in Darmstadt. It delivers high current bunches at proton energies around 9.6 MeV, containing more than 109 particles in less than 10 ns and with tunable energy spread down to 2.7% (ΔE/E0 at FWHM). A target normal sheath acceleration stage serves as a proton source and a pulsed solenoid provides for beam collimation and energy selection. Finally a synchronous radio frequency (rf) field is applied via a rf cavity for energy compression at a synchronous phase of -90 deg. The proton bunch is characterized at the end of the very compact beam line, only 3 m behind the laser matter interaction point, which defines the particle source.

  17. SU-D-304-04: Pre-Clinical Feasibility Study for Intensity Modulated Grid Proton Therapy (IMgPT) Using a Newly Developed Delivery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiamas, P; Moskvin, V; Shin, J; Axente, M; Pirlepesov, F; Krasin, M; Merchant, T; Farr, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to characterize and evaluate intensity-modulated proton grid therapy (IMgPT) using a clinical proton beam. Methods: A TOPAS MC model of a new developmental mode (pre-clinical) of the Hitachi proton therapy system (PROBEAT) was used for simulation and characterization of proton grid therapy. TOPAS simulations of different energy ranges, depths and spot separation distances were performed. LET spectra for various energies and depths were produced with FLUKA MC code for evaluation potential interplay between planning parameters and their effect on the characterization of areas (valley) between spots. IMgPT planning aspects (spot spacing, skin dose, peak-to-valley ratios, beam selection, etc.) were evaluated for different phantom and patient cases. Raysearch software (v4.51) was used to perform the evaluation. Results: Calculated beam peak-to-valley ratios scenarios showed strong energy and depth dependence with ratios to be larger for higher energies and shallower depths. Peak-to-valley ratios for R90 range and for spot spacing of 1cm varied from 30% (E = 221.3 MeV, depth 30.6 cm) to 80% (E = 70.3 MeV, depth 4 cm). LET spectra calculations showed spectral hardening with depth, which might potential increase, spot separation distance and improve peak-to-valley ratios. IMgPT optimization, using constant spot spacing, showed skin dose reduction between peak regions of dose due to the irradiation of less skin. Single beam for bulky shallower tumors might be a potential candidate for proton grid therapy. Conclusions: Proton grid therapy using a clinical beam is a promising technique that reduces skin dose between peak regions of dose and may be suitable for the treatment of shallow tumors. IMgPT may be considered for use when bystander effects in off peak regions would be appropriate

  18. SU-D-304-04: Pre-Clinical Feasibility Study for Intensity Modulated Grid Proton Therapy (IMgPT) Using a Newly Developed Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiamas, P; Moskvin, V; Shin, J; Axente, M; Pirlepesov, F; Krasin, M; Merchant, T; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to characterize and evaluate intensity-modulated proton grid therapy (IMgPT) using a clinical proton beam. Methods: A TOPAS MC model of a new developmental mode (pre-clinical) of the Hitachi proton therapy system (PROBEAT) was used for simulation and characterization of proton grid therapy. TOPAS simulations of different energy ranges, depths and spot separation distances were performed. LET spectra for various energies and depths were produced with FLUKA MC code for evaluation potential interplay between planning parameters and their effect on the characterization of areas (valley) between spots. IMgPT planning aspects (spot spacing, skin dose, peak-to-valley ratios, beam selection, etc.) were evaluated for different phantom and patient cases. Raysearch software (v4.51) was used to perform the evaluation. Results: Calculated beam peak-to-valley ratios scenarios showed strong energy and depth dependence with ratios to be larger for higher energies and shallower depths. Peak-to-valley ratios for R90 range and for spot spacing of 1cm varied from 30% (E = 221.3 MeV, depth 30.6 cm) to 80% (E = 70.3 MeV, depth 4 cm). LET spectra calculations showed spectral hardening with depth, which might potential increase, spot separation distance and improve peak-to-valley ratios. IMgPT optimization, using constant spot spacing, showed skin dose reduction between peak regions of dose due to the irradiation of less skin. Single beam for bulky shallower tumors might be a potential candidate for proton grid therapy. Conclusions: Proton grid therapy using a clinical beam is a promising technique that reduces skin dose between peak regions of dose and may be suitable for the treatment of shallow tumors. IMgPT may be considered for use when bystander effects in off peak regions would be appropriate.

  19. Acute toxicity in comprehensive head and neck radiation for nasopharynx and paranasal sinus cancers: cohort comparison of 3D conformal proton therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Mark W.; Liu, Yuan; Moore, Michael G.; Johnstone, Peter A. S.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate acute toxicity endpoints in a cohort of patients receiving head and neck radiation with proton therapy or intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Forty patients received comprehensive head and neck radiation including bilateral cervical nodal radiation, given with or without chemotherapy, for tumors of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses, any T stage, N0-2. Fourteen received comprehensive treatment with proton therapy, and 26 were treated with IMRT, either comprehensively or matched to proton therapy delivered to the primary tumor site. Toxicity endpoints assessed included g-tube dependence at the completion of radiation and at 3 months after radiation, opioid pain medication requirement compared to pretreatment normalized as equivalent morphine dose (EMD) at completion of treatment, and at 1 and 3 months after radiation. In a multivariable model including confounding variables of concurrent chemotherapy and involved nodal disease, comprehensive head and neck radiation therapy using proton therapy was associated with a lower opioid pain requirement at the completion of radiation and a lower rate of gastrostomy tube dependence by the completion of radiation therapy and at 3 months after radiation compared to IMRT. Proton therapy was associated with statistically significant lower mean doses to the oral cavity, esophagus, larynx, and parotid glands. In subgroup analysis of 32 patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy, there was a statistically significant correlation with a greater opioid pain medication requirement at the completion of radiation and both increasing mean dose to the oral cavity and to the esophagus. Proton therapy was associated with significantly reduced radiation dose to assessed non-target normal tissues and a reduced rate of gastrostomy tube dependence and opioid pain medication requirements. This warrants further evaluation in larger studies, ideally with patient-reported toxicity outcomes and quality of life

  20. Potential Benefits of Scanned Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Versus Advanced Photon Therapy With Regard to Sparing of the Salivary Glands in Oropharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water, Tara A. van de; Lomax, Antony J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Jong, Marije E. de; Schilstra, Cornelis; Hug, Eugen B.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that scanned intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) results in a significant dose reduction to the parotid and submandibular glands as compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with photons (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. In addition, we investigated whether the achieved dose reductions would theoretically translate into a reduction of salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with N0 oropharyngeal carcinoma were used. The intensity-modulated plans delivered simultaneously 70 Gy to the boost planning target volume (PTV2) and 54 Gy to the elective nodal areas (PTV1). The 3D-CRT technique delivered sequentially 70 Gy and 46 Gy to PTV2 and PTV1, respectively. Normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for salivary dysfunction and xerostomia. Results: Planning target volume coverage results were similar for IMPT and IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton therapy clearly improved the conformity. The 3D-CRT results were inferior to these results. The mean dose to the parotid glands by 3D-CRT (50.8 Gy), IMRT (25.5 Gy), and IMPT (16.8 Gy) differed significantly. For the submandibular glands no significant differences between IMRT and IMPT were found. The dose reductions obtained with IMPT theoretically translated into a significant reduction in normal tissue complication probability. Conclusion: Compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT, IMPT improved sparing of the organs at risk, while keeping similar target coverage results. The dose reductions obtained with IMPT vs. IMRT and 3D-CRT varied widely per individual patient. Intensity-modulated proton therapy theoretically translated into a clinical benefit for most cases, but this requires clinical validation.

  1. Discoscopic Findings of High Signal Intensity Zones on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Sugiura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old man underwent radiofrequency thermal annuloplasty (TA with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (PED under local anesthesia for chronic low back pain. His diagnosis was discogenic pain with a high signal intensity zone (HIZ in the posterior corner of the L4-5 disc. Flexion pain was sporadic, and steroid injection was given twice for severe pain. After the third episode of strong pain, PED and TA were conducted. The discoscope was inserted into the posterior annulus and revealed a migrated white nucleus pulposus which was stained blue. Then, after moving the discoscope to the site of the HIZ, a migrated slightly red nucleus pulposus was found, suggesting inflammation and/or new vessels penetrating the mass. After removing the fragment, the HIZ site was ablated by TA. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the discoscopic findings of HIZ of the lumbar intervertebral disc.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the supraspinatus tendon: The significance of signal intensity alterations at the 'critical zone'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.O.

    1998-01-01

    A pictorial essay of normal and abnormal appearances of the supraspinatus tendon is presented. An increased signal intensity within the supraspinatus tendon on short TE sequences is not necessarily abnormal. Increased signal seen within the tendon on modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) units is often due to a phenomenon known as the 'magic angle' effect. Only when supraspinatus tendon signal intensity is greater than that of muscle on long TE (T2) sequences should it be considered to be abnormal. The physical basis for the magic angle effect is outlined and a pictorial essay demonstrating the practical implications of this effect is presented. A comparison is made to signal intensity changes seen with partial and complete tears of the supraspinatus tendon. Correlation is made with important morphologic features of partial or complete tears. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Proton Therapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Relapse of Prostate Cancer Following Cryosurgery or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzman, Adam L.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Letter, Haley P.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Henderson, Randal H.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after cryosurgery (CS) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging problem for which optimal management is unknown. Proton therapy (PT) may offer advantages over other local therapeutic options. This article reviews a single institution's experience using PT for salvage of local recurrent disease after HIFU or CS. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 21 consecutive patients treated with salvage PT following a local recurrence of prostate cancer after CS (n=12) or HIFU (n=9) between January 2007 and July 2014. Patients were treated to a median dose of 74 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range: 74-82 Gy[RBE]) and 8 patients received androgen deprivation therapy with radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated for quality of life (QOL) by using the Expanded Prostate Index Composite questionnaire and toxicity by using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment, every 6 months for 2 years after treatment, and then annually. Results: Median follow-up was 37 months (range: 6-95 months). The 3-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 77%. The 3-year grade 3 toxicity rate was 17%; however, 2 of these patients had pre-existing grade 3 GU toxicities from their HIFU/CRYO prior to PT. At 1 year, bowel summary, urinary incontinence, and urinary obstructive QOL scores declined, but only the bowel QOL score at 12 months met the minimally important difference threshold. Conclusions: PT achieved a high rate of bPFS with acceptable toxicity and minimal changes in QOL scores compared with baseline pre-PT functions. Although most patients have done fairly well, the study size is small, follow-up is short, and early results suggest that outcomes with PT for salvage after HIFU or CS failure are inferior to outcomes with PT given in the de novo setting with respect to disease control, toxicity, and QOL.

  4. Impact of Spot Size and Spacing on the Quality of Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plans for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenbin; Schild, Steven E; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Zhongxing; Korte, Shawn; Shen, Jiajian; Ding, Xiaoning; Hu, Yanle; Kang, Yixiu; Keole, Sameer R; Sio, Terence T; Wong, William W; Sahoo, Narayan; Bues, Martin; Liu, Wei

    2018-06-01

    To investigate how spot size and spacing affect plan quality, robustness, and interplay effects of robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for lung cancer. Two robustly optimized IMPT plans were created for 10 lung cancer patients: first by a large-spot machine with in-air energy-dependent large spot size at isocenter (σ: 6-15 mm) and spacing (1.3 σ), and second by a small-spot machine with in-air energy-dependent small spot size (σ: 2-6 mm) and spacing (5 mm). Both plans were generated by optimizing radiation dose to internal target volume on averaged 4-dimensional computed tomography scans using an in-house-developed IMPT planning system. The dose-volume histograms band method was used to evaluate plan robustness. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effects with randomized starting phases for each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped phase-to-phase via deformable image registration, and doses were scored using in-house-developed software. Dose-volume histogram indices, including internal target volume dose coverage, homogeneity, and organs at risk (OARs) sparing, were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Compared with the large-spot machine, the small-spot machine resulted in significantly lower heart and esophagus mean doses, with comparable target dose coverage, homogeneity, and protection of other OARs. Plan robustness was comparable for targets and most OARs. With interplay effects considered, significantly lower heart and esophagus mean doses with comparable target dose coverage and homogeneity were observed using smaller spots. Robust optimization with a small spot-machine significantly improves heart and esophagus sparing, with comparable plan robustness and interplay effects compared with robust optimization with a large-spot machine. A small-spot machine uses a larger number of spots to cover the same tumors compared with a large

  5. Induced radioactivity studies of the shielding and beamline equipment of the high intensity proton accelerator facility at PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otiougova, Polina; Bergmann, Ryan; Kiselev, Daniela; Talanov, Vadim; Wohlmuther, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) is the largest national research center in Switzerland. Its multidisciplinary research is dedicated to a wide ↓eld in natural science and technology as well as particle physics. The High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facility (HIPA) has been in operation at PSI since 1974. It includes an 870 keV Cockroft-Walton pre-accelerator, a 72 MeV injector cyclotron as well as a 590 MeV ring cyclotron. The experimental facilities, the meson production graphite targets, Target E and Target M, and the spallation target stations (SINQ and UCN) are used for material research and particle physics. In order to ful↓ll the request of the regulatory authorities and to be reported to the regulators, the expected radioactive waste and nuclide inventory after an anticipated ↓nal shutdown in the far future has to be estimated. In this contribution, calculations for the 20 m long beamline between Target E and the 590 MeV beam dump of HIPA are presented. The ↓rst step in the calculations was determining spectra and spatial particle distributions around the beamlines using the Monte-Carlo particle transport code MCNPX2.7.0 [1]. To perform the analysis of the MCNPX output and to determine the radionuclide inventory as well as the speci↓c activity of the nuclides, an activation script [2] using the FISPACT10 code with the cross sections from the European Activation File (EAF2010) [3] was applied. The speci↓c activity values were compared to the currently existing Swiss exemption limits (LE) [4] as well as to the Swiss liberation limits (LL) [5], becoming e↑ective in the near future. The obtained results were used to estimate the total volume of the radioactive waste produced at HIPA and have to be reported to the Swiss regulatory authorities. The comparison of the performed calculations to measurements is discussed as well. Note to the reader: the pdf file has been changed on September 22, 2017.

  6. Exploratory Study of 4D versus 3D Robust Optimization in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei, E-mail: Liu.Wei@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Yu-Hui [Division of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Wen, Zhifei [Department of Radiation Physics, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shen, Jiajian; Stoker, Joshua B.; Ding, Xiaoning; Hu, Yanle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Herman, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Vargas, Carlos; Keole, Sameer; Wong, William; Bues, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of uncertainties and interplay on 3-dimensional (3D) and 4D robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans for lung cancer in an exploratory methodology study. Methods and Materials: IMPT plans were created for 11 nonrandomly selected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases: 3D robustly optimized plans on average CTs with internal gross tumor volume density overridden to irradiate internal target volume, and 4D robustly optimized plans on 4D computed tomography (CT) to irradiate clinical target volume (CTV). Regular fractionation (66 Gy [relative biological effectiveness; RBE] in 33 fractions) was considered. In 4D optimization, the CTV of individual phases received nonuniform doses to achieve a uniform cumulative dose. The root-mean-square dose-volume histograms (RVH) measured the sensitivity of the dose to uncertainties, and the areas under the RVH curve (AUCs) were used to evaluate plan robustness. Dose evaluation software modeled time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) indices comparing CTV coverage, homogeneity, and normal tissue sparing were evaluated using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: 4D robust optimization plans led to smaller AUC for CTV (14.26 vs 18.61, respectively; P=.001), better CTV coverage (Gy [RBE]) (D{sub 95%} CTV: 60.6 vs 55.2, respectively; P=.001), and better CTV homogeneity (D{sub 5%}-D{sub 95%} CTV: 10.3 vs 17.7, resspectively; P=.002) in the face of uncertainties. With interplay effect considered, 4D robust optimization produced plans with better target coverage (D{sub 95%} CTV: 64.5 vs 63.8, respectively; P=.0068), comparable target homogeneity, and comparable normal tissue protection. The benefits from 4D robust optimization were most obvious for the 2 typical stage III lung cancer patients. Conclusions: Our exploratory methodology study showed

  7. A Prospective Comparison of the Effects of Interfractional Variations on Proton Therapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, Maryam, E-mail: mmoteabbed@partners.org; Trofimov, Alexei; Sharp, Gregory C.; Wang, Yi; Zietman, Anthony L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the impact of interfractional setup and anatomic variations on proton therapy (PT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with low-risk or intermediate-risk prostate cancer randomized to receive passive-scattering PT (n=10) and IMRT (n=10) were selected. For both modalities, clinical treatment plans included 50.4 Gy(RBE) to prostate and proximal seminal vesicles, and prostate-only boost to 79.2 Gy(RBE) in 1.8 Gy(RBE) per fraction. Implanted fiducials were used for prostate localization and endorectal balloons were used for immobilization. Patients in PT and IMRT arms received weekly computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) scans, respectively. The planned dose was recalculated on each weekly image, scaled, and mapped onto the planning CT using deformable registration. The resulting accumulated dose distribution over the entire treatment course was compared with the planned dose using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and γ analysis. Results: The target conformity index remained acceptable after accumulation. The largest decrease in the average prostate D{sub 98} was 2.2 and 0.7 Gy for PT and IMRT, respectively. On average, the mean dose to bladder increased by 3.26 ± 7.51 Gy and 1.97 ± 6.84 Gy for PT and IMRT, respectively. These values were 0.74 ± 2.37 and 0.56 ± 1.90 for rectum. Differences between changes in DVH indices were not statistically significant between modalities. All volume indices remained within the protocol tolerances after accumulation. The average pass rate for the γ analysis, assuming tolerances of 3 mm and 3%, for clinical target volume, bladder, rectum, and whole patient for PT/IMRT were 100/100, 92.6/99, 99.2/100, and 97.2/99.4, respectively. Conclusion: The differences in target coverage and organs at risk dose deviations for PT and IMRT were not statistically significant under the guidelines of this protocol.

  8. Proton Therapy as Salvage Treatment for Local Relapse of Prostate Cancer Following Cryosurgery or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzman, Adam L. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Hoppe, Bradford S., E-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Letter, Haley P.; Bryant, Curtis; Nichols, Romaine C.; Henderson, Randal H.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Williams, Christopher R. [Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after cryosurgery (CS) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging problem for which optimal management is unknown. Proton therapy (PT) may offer advantages over other local therapeutic options. This article reviews a single institution's experience using PT for salvage of local recurrent disease after HIFU or CS. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 21 consecutive patients treated with salvage PT following a local recurrence of prostate cancer after CS (n=12) or HIFU (n=9) between January 2007 and July 2014. Patients were treated to a median dose of 74 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE]; range: 74-82 Gy[RBE]) and 8 patients received androgen deprivation therapy with radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated for quality of life (QOL) by using the Expanded Prostate Index Composite questionnaire and toxicity by using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment, every 6 months for 2 years after treatment, and then annually. Results: Median follow-up was 37 months (range: 6-95 months). The 3-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 77%. The 3-year grade 3 toxicity rate was 17%; however, 2 of these patients had pre-existing grade 3 GU toxicities from their HIFU/CRYO prior to PT. At 1 year, bowel summary, urinary incontinence, and urinary obstructive QOL scores declined, but only the bowel QOL score at 12 months met the minimally important difference threshold. Conclusions: PT achieved a high rate of bPFS with acceptable toxicity and minimal changes in QOL scores compared with baseline pre-PT functions. Although most patients have done fairly well, the study size is small, follow-up is short, and early results suggest that outcomes with PT for salvage after HIFU or CS failure are inferior to outcomes with PT given in the de novo setting with respect to disease control, toxicity, and QOL.

  9. Pulse-coupled neural nets: translation, rotation, scale, distortion, and intensity signal invariance for images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J L

    1994-09-10

    The linking-field neural network model of Eckhorn et al. [Neural Comput. 2, 293-307 (1990)] was introduced to explain the experimentally observed synchronous activity among neural assemblies in the cat cortex induced by feature-dependent visual activity. The model produces synchronous bursts of pulses from neurons with similar activity, effectively grouping them by phase and pulse frequency. It gives a basic new function: grouping by similarity. The synchronous bursts are obtained in the limit of strong linking strengths. The linking-field model in the limit of moderate-to-weak linking characterized by few if any multiple bursts is investigated. In this limit dynamic, locally periodic traveling waves exist whose time signal encodes the geometrical structure of a two-dimensional input image. The signal can be made insensitive to translation, scale, rotation, distortion, and intensity. The waves transmit information beyond the physical interconnect distance. The model is implemented in an optical hybrid demonstration system. Results of the simulations and the optical system are presented.

  10. Laser polarization dependence of proton emission from a thin foil target irradiated by a 70 fs, intense laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumi, A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Li, Z.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Kado, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Mori, M.; Bulanov, S.V.; Esirkepov, T.; Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Noda, A.; Nakamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    A study of proton emission from a 3-μm-thick Ta foil target irradiated by p-, s-, and circularly polarized laser pulses with respect to the target plane has been carried out. Protons with energies up to 880 keV were observed in the target normal direction under the irradiation by the p-polarized laser pulse, which yielded the highest efficiency for proton emission. In contrast, s- and circularly polarized laser pulses gave the maximum energies of 610 and 680 keV, respectively. The difference in the maximum energy between the p- and s-polarized cases was associated with the difference between the sheath fields estimated from electron spectra

  11. Detection of the sulfhydryl groups in proteins with slow hydrogen exchange rates and determination of their proton/deuteron fractionation factors using the deuterium-induced effects on the 13C(beta) NMR signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Jee, JunGoo; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2010-05-05

    A method for identifying cysteine (Cys) residues with sulfhydryl (SH) groups exhibiting slow hydrogen exchange rates has been developed for proteins in aqueous media. The method utilizes the isotope shifts of the C(beta) chemical shifts induced by the deuteration of the SH groups. The 18.2 kDa E. coli peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase b (EPPIb), which was selectively labeled with [3-(13)C;3,3-(2)H(2)]Cys, showed much narrower line widths for the (13)C(beta) NMR signals, as compared to those of the proteins labeled with either [3-(13)C]Cys or (3R)-[3-(13)C;3-(2)H]Cys. The (13)C(beta) signals of the two Cys residues of EPPIb, i.e. Cys-31 and Cys-121, labeled with [3-(13)C;3,3-(2)H(2)]Cys, split into four signals in H(2)O/D(2)O (1:1) at 40 degrees C and pH 7.5, indicating that the exchange rates of the side-chain SH's and the backbone amides are too slow to average the chemical shift differences of the (13)C(beta) signals, due to the two- and three-bond isotope shifts. By virtue of the well-separated signals, the proton/deuteron fractional factors for both the SH and amide groups of the two Cys residues in EPPIb could be directly determined, as approximately 0.4-0.5 for [SD]/[SH] and 0.9-1.0 for [ND]/[NH], by the relative intensities of the NMR signals for the isotopomers. The proton NOE's of the two slowly exchanging SH's were clearly identified in the NOESY spectra and were useful for the determining the local structure of EPPIb around the Cys residues.

  12. All possible lightes supersymmetric particles in proton hexality violating minimal supergravity models and their signals at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grab, Sebastian

    2009-08-15

    The most widely studied supersymmetric scenario is the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with more than a hundred free parameters. However for detailed phenomenological studies, the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model, a restricted and well-motivated framework for the MSSM, is more convenient. In this model, lepton- and baryon-number violating interactions are suppressed by a discrete symmetry, R-parity or proton-hexality, to keep the proton stable. However, it is sufficient to forbid only lepton- or baryon-number violation. We thus extend mSUGRA models by adding a proton-hexality violating operator at the grand unification scale. This can change the supersymmetric spectrum leading on the one hand to a sneutrino, smuon or squark as the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). On the other hand, a wide parameter region is reopened, where the scalar tau (stau) is the LSP. We investigate in detail the conditions leading to non-neutralino LSP scenarios. We take into account the restrictions from neutrino masses, the muon anomalous magnetic moment, b{yields}s{gamma}, and other precision measurements. We furthermore investigate existing restrictions from direct searches at LEP, the Tevatron, and the CERN p anti p collider. It is vital to know the nature of the LSP, since supersymmetric particles normally cascade decay down to the LSP at collider experiments. We present typical LHC signatures for sneutrino LSP scenarios. Promising signatures are high-p{sub T} muons and jets, like-sign muon events and detached vertices from long lived taus. We also classify the stau LSP decays and describe their dependence on the mSUGRA parameters. We then exploit our results for resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We find novel signatures with like-sign muon and three- and four-muon final states. Finally, we perform a detailed analysis for single slepton production in association with a single top quark. We show that the signal can be distinguished from the background

  13. Influence of Signal Intensity Non-Uniformity on Brain Volumetry Using an Atlas-Based Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takao, Hidemasa; Kunimatsu, Akira; Mori, Harushi

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have reported pre-processing effects for brain volumetry; however, no study has investigated whether non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) correction processing results in reduced system dependency when using an atlas-based method. To address this shortcoming, the present study assessed whether N3 correction processing provides reduced system dependency in atlas-based volumetry. Contiguous sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were obtained from 21 healthy participants, by using five magnetic resonance protocols. After image preprocessing using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 5 software, we measured the structural volume of the segmented images with the WFU-PickAtlas software. We applied six different bias-correction levels (Regularization 10, Regularization 0.0001, Regularization 0, Regularization 10 with N3, Regularization 0.0001 with N3, and Regularization 0 with N3) to each set of images. The structural volume change ratio (%) was defined as the change ratio (%) = (100 X[measured volume - mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols] / mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols) for each bias-correction level. A low change ratio was synonymous with lower system dependency. The results showed that the images with the N3 correction had a lower change ratio compared with those without the N3 correction. The present study is the first atlas-based volumetry study to show that the precision of atlas-based volumetry improves when using N3-corrected images. Therefore, correction for signal intensity non-uniformity is strongly advised for multi-scanner or multi-site imaging trials.

  14. Influence of signal intensity non-uniformity on brain volumetry using an atlas-based method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Miyati, Tosiaki; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Takao, Hidemasa; Hayashi, Naoto; Kurosu, Tomomi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Yamashita, Fumio; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Aoki, Shigeki; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have reported pre-processing effects for brain volumetry; however, no study has investigated whether non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) correction processing results in reduced system dependency when using an atlas-based method. To address this shortcoming, the present study assessed whether N3 correction processing provides reduced system dependency in atlas-based volumetry. Contiguous sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were obtained from 21 healthy participants, by using five magnetic resonance protocols. After image preprocessing using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 5 software, we measured the structural volume of the segmented images with the WFU-PickAtlas software. We applied six different bias-correction levels (Regularization 10, Regularization 0.0001, Regularization 0, Regularization 10 with N3, Regularization 0.0001 with N3, and Regularization 0 with N3) to each set of images. The structural volume change ratio (%) was defined as the change ratio (%) = (100 × [measured volume - mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols] / mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols) for each bias-correction level. A low change ratio was synonymous with lower system dependency. The results showed that the images with the N3 correction had a lower change ratio compared with those without the N3 correction. The present study is the first atlas-based volumetry study to show that the precision of atlas-based volumetry improves when using N3-corrected images. Therefore, correction for signal intensity non-uniformity is strongly advised for multi-scanner or multi-site imaging trials.

  15. Influence of Signal Intensity Non-Uniformity on Brain Volumetry Using an Atlas-Based Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takao, Hidemasa; Kunimatsu, Akira; Mori, Harushi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); and others

    2012-07-15

    Many studies have reported pre-processing effects for brain volumetry; however, no study has investigated whether non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) correction processing results in reduced system dependency when using an atlas-based method. To address this shortcoming, the present study assessed whether N3 correction processing provides reduced system dependency in atlas-based volumetry. Contiguous sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were obtained from 21 healthy participants, by using five magnetic resonance protocols. After image preprocessing using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 5 software, we measured the structural volume of the segmented images with the WFU-PickAtlas software. We applied six different bias-correction levels (Regularization 10, Regularization 0.0001, Regularization 0, Regularization 10 with N3, Regularization 0.0001 with N3, and Regularization 0 with N3) to each set of images. The structural volume change ratio (%) was defined as the change ratio (%) = (100 X[measured volume - mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols] / mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols) for each bias-correction level. A low change ratio was synonymous with lower system dependency. The results showed that the images with the N3 correction had a lower change ratio compared with those without the N3 correction. The present study is the first atlas-based volumetry study to show that the precision of atlas-based volumetry improves when using N3-corrected images. Therefore, correction for signal intensity non-uniformity is strongly advised for multi-scanner or multi-site imaging trials.

  16. CERN News: Selection of the type of superconducting coil for the Omega project; New intensity records at the proton synchrotron; Progress with the Spiral Reader film measuring equipment; New technique at transition energy on the proton synchrotron; CERN Courier 10th anniversary; Equipment travelling from and to Serpukhov

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    CERN News: Selection of the type of superconducting coil for the Omega project; New intensity records at the proton synchrotron; Progress with the Spiral Reader film measuring equipment; New technique at transition energy on the proton synchrotron; CERN Courier 10th anniversary; Equipment travelling from and to Serpukhov

  17. Proton and gamma -Rays Irradiation-Induced Dark Current Random Telegraph Signal in a 0.18-mu{{m}} CMOS Image Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E.; Nuns, T.; Virmontois, C.; David, J.-P.; Gilard, O.

    2013-08-01

    The dark current random telegraph signal (RTS) behavior has been studied in a five-transistor-per-pixel (5T) pinned photodiode 0.18-μm COTS active pixel sensor (APS). Several devices, irradiated using protons and gamma rays, have been studied in order to assess the ionizing and displacement damage effects. The influence of the proton energy, fluence, ionizing dose and applied bias during irradiation on the number of RTS pixels, the number of discrete levels, maximum transition amplitude, and mean switching time constants is investigated.

  18. MRI investigation of normal fetal lung maturation using signal intensities on different imaging sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Hoermann, Marcus; Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Csapo, Bence; Mittermayer, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    To purpose of this paper is to study the relation between normal lung maturation signal and changes in intensity ratios (SIR) and to determine which magnetic resonance imaging sequence provides the strongest correlation of normal lung SIs with gestational age. 126 normal singleton pregnancies (20-37 weeks) were examined with a 1.5 Tesla unit. Mean SIs for lungs, liver, and gastric fluid were assessed on six different sequences, and SIRs of lung/liver (LLSIR) and lung/gastric fluid (LGSIR) were correlated with gestational age for each sequence. To evaluate the feasibility of SIRs in the prediction of the state of the lung maturity, accuracy of the predicted SIRs (D*) was measured by calculating relative residuals (D*-D)/D for each sequence. LLSIRs showed significant changes in every sequence (p<0.05), while LGSIRs only on two sequences. Significant differences were shown for the mean of absolute residuals for both LLSIRs (p<0.001) and for LGSIRs (p=0.003). Relative residuals of LLSIRs were significantly smaller on T1-weighted sequence, whereas they were significantly higher for LGSIRs on FLAIR sequence. Fetal liver seems to be adequate reference for the investigation of lung maturation. T1-weighted sequence was the most accurate for the measurement of the lung SIs; thus, we propose to determine LLSIR on T1-weighted sequence when evaluating lung development. (orig.)

  19. Appearances of diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) on MR imaging following preterm birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, Anthony R.; Smith, Michael F.; Rigby, Alan S.; Wallis, Lauren I.; Whitby, Elspeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse damage to the periventricular white matter has recently been suggested to be a cause of the cognitive deficits seen following preterm birth. It is unclear whether this form of injury can be visualised on MR imaging, but one group has described diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) as a possible form of diffuse white matter injury. This finding is dependant on window imaging and the subjective assessment of the reviewer, but little data have been published on the degree of subjectivity on its appearance among raters. To assess the subjectivity of DEHSI on conventional and ultrafast T2-weighted MR imaging following preterm birth. An observational study of 40 preterm infants who had MR imaging of the brain around term-equivalent age, including conventional fast spin-echo (FSE) and ultrafast single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) T2-weighted sequences in the axial plane. Images were anonymised and scored twice by four observers for the presence of DEHSI. Inter- and intra-observer agreement were calculated. Sixty-five percent of conventional and 100% of the ultrafast images were of diagnostic quality. DEHSI was noted in between 0% and 69.2% of conventional images and 27.5-90% of the ultrafast images. Inter- and intra-observer agreement ranged from none to moderate. The visual appearances of DEHSI on conventional FSE and ultrafast SSFSE T2-W images are highly subjective, limiting its clinical application. (orig.)

  20. MR imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma. Correlation of metal content and signal intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, H.; Onitsuka, H.; Kanazawa, Y.; Matsumata, T.; Hayashi, T.; Kaneko, K.; Fukaya, T.; Tateshi, Y.; Adachi, E.; Masuda, K.

    1995-01-01

    In order to clarify the factors contributing to the signal intensities (SIs) of HCC on T1-weighted images, the amount of water, lipid, copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn) was determined in HCC and surrounding hepatic parenchyma of 13 patients. The relationships among these findings, the histopathologic findings, and the SIs of T1-weighted images were evaluated. Among the 13 HCC, 3 had a high SI, 5 were isointense, and 5 had a low SI on T1-weighted images compared to the surrounding hepatic parenchyma. The paramagnetic ions which contributed to the SI patterns were assumed to be Cu in HCC (38.0±62.4 μg/g ww), and Fe in the liver (61.1±42.4 μg/g ww) and HCC (40.0±34.3 μg/g ww). In 8 HCC with high- or isointensity, 2 were grades I, 5 were grade II, and one was grade III according to the Edmondson-Steiner's histopathologic classification. It is concluded that the SI patterns alone can not be a sign of low grade malignancy because of the existence of Fe in livers and HCC. (orig.)

  1. MRI investigation of normal fetal lung maturation using signal intensities on different imaging sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Hoermann, Marcus; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Csapo, Bence [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Obstetrics and Gyneocology, Vienna (Austria); Mittermayer, Christoph [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pediatrics, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    To purpose of this paper is to study the relation between normal lung maturation signal and changes in intensity ratios (SIR) and to determine which magnetic resonance imaging sequence provides the strongest correlation of normal lung SIs with gestational age. 126 normal singleton pregnancies (20-37 weeks) were examined with a 1.5 Tesla unit. Mean SIs for lungs, liver, and gastric fluid were assessed on six different sequences, and SIRs of lung/liver (LLSIR) and lung/gastric fluid (LGSIR) were correlated with gestational age for each sequence. To evaluate the feasibility of SIRs in the prediction of the state of the lung maturity, accuracy of the predicted SIRs (D*) was measured by calculating relative residuals (D*-D)/D for each sequence. LLSIRs showed significant changes in every sequence (p<0.05), while LGSIRs only on two sequences. Significant differences were shown for the mean of absolute residuals for both LLSIRs (p<0.001) and for LGSIRs (p=0.003). Relative residuals of LLSIRs were significantly smaller on T1-weighted sequence, whereas they were significantly higher for LGSIRs on FLAIR sequence. Fetal liver seems to be adequate reference for the investigation of lung maturation. T1-weighted sequence was the most accurate for the measurement of the lung SIs; thus, we propose to determine LLSIR on T1-weighted sequence when evaluating lung development. (orig.)

  2. Signal intensity of lanthanum carbonate on magnetic resonance images: phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Awai, Kazuo; Komi, Masanori; Morita, Kosuke; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yanaga, Yumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Date, Shuji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate (LC) is used to treat hyperphosphatemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the signal intensity (SI) of LC on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of phantoms. LC tablets were thoroughly ground and mixed with distilled water or edible agar (0.05, 0.25, 0.5, and 2.5 mg/ml) in plastic bottles. Four intact tablets were placed in plastic bottles that did or did not contain distilled water or agar. Two radiologists consensually evaluated T1- and T2-weighted images (WIs) obtained with 1.5- and 3.0-T MRI systems for the SI of unground and ground tablets. On T1- and T2WI, the SIs of the LC suspensions and the solvents alone were similar; the SIs of unground tablets alone and of the air were also similar. Unground tablets in phantoms filled with solvent exhibited lower SI than the solvent. Ground tablets in suspension were not visualized on MRI or computed tomography. These results remained unchanged regardless of differences in magnetic field strength or the solvent used. Ground LC had no contrast enhancement effect on T1WI; on T2WI it did not affect the SI of the solvent. Unground LC tablets may be visualized as a "filling defect" on MRI.

  3. Signal intensity of lanthanum carbonate on magnetic resonance images. Phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Awai, Kazuo; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yanaga, Yumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Date, Shuji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Komi, Masanori; Morita, Kosuke

    2011-01-01

    Lanthanum carbonate (LC) is used to treat hyperphosphatemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the signal intensity (SI) of LC on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of phantoms. LC tablets were thoroughly ground and mixed with distilled water or edible agar (0.05, 0.25, 0.5, and 2.5 mg/ml) in plastic bottles. Four intact tablets were placed in plastic bottles that did or did not contain distilled water or agar. Two radiologists consensually evaluated T1- and T2-weighted images (WIs) obtained with 1.5- and 3.0-T MRI systems for the SI of unground and ground tablets. On T1- and T2WI, the SIs of the LC suspensions and the solvents alone were similar; the SIs of unground tablets alone and of the air were also similar. Unground tablets in phantoms filled with solvent exhibited lower SI than the solvent. Ground tablets in suspension were not visualized on MRI or computed tomography. These results remained unchanged regardless of differences in magnetic field strength or the solvent used. Ground LC had no contrast enhancement effect on T1WI; on T2WI it did not affect the SI of the solvent. Unground LC tablets may be visualized as a 'filling defect' on MRI. (author)

  4. Appearances of diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) on MR imaging following preterm birth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Anthony R. [Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neonatology, Jessop Wing, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); University of Sheffield, Department of Academic Radiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Smith, Michael F. [Sheffield Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neonatology, Jessop Wing, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Rigby, Alan S. [University of Hull, Postgraduate Medical Centre, Castle Hill Hospital, East Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Wallis, Lauren I.; Whitby, Elspeth H. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Diffuse damage to the periventricular white matter has recently been suggested to be a cause of the cognitive deficits seen following preterm birth. It is unclear whether this form of injury can be visualised on MR imaging, but one group has described diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) as a possible form of diffuse white matter injury. This finding is dependant on window imaging and the subjective assessment of the reviewer, but little data have been published on the degree of subjectivity on its appearance among raters. To assess the subjectivity of DEHSI on conventional and ultrafast T2-weighted MR imaging following preterm birth. An observational study of 40 preterm infants who had MR imaging of the brain around term-equivalent age, including conventional fast spin-echo (FSE) and ultrafast single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) T2-weighted sequences in the axial plane. Images were anonymised and scored twice by four observers for the presence of DEHSI. Inter- and intra-observer agreement were calculated. Sixty-five percent of conventional and 100% of the ultrafast images were of diagnostic quality. DEHSI was noted in between 0% and 69.2% of conventional images and 27.5-90% of the ultrafast images. Inter- and intra-observer agreement ranged from none to moderate. The visual appearances of DEHSI on conventional FSE and ultrafast SSFSE T2-W images are highly subjective, limiting its clinical application. (orig.)

  5. DeVelopment of the high-intensity polarized H- source with proton charge exchange on sodium optically oriented atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenskij, A.N.; Kokhanovskij, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of experimental study on the source of polarized H - ions at polarized electron capture by proton from optically oriented sodium atoms are presented. Circular-polarized dye laser radiation with lamp pumping is used for polarization of highly dense sodium vapors in the pulsed mode. A facility for polarization measurement in the ion source is described. Dependence of the counting rate of metastables for the right and left circular radiation polarization in respect to wave length is presented. The results of measuring the degree of polarization under change of sodium density are revealed. The measurements have disclosed that obtaining of high polarization degree at 20-30% charge exchange effectiveness is possible but large radiation power is required. Use of a dense charge exchange target provides high effectiveness of hte whole polarization process. Yield of polarized H - ions can approach 10 μA/1 mA of the initial proton current

  6. Transient global amnesia: increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, M.; Sakamoto, S.; Ishii, K. [Division of Neuroimaging Research, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders (Japan); Imamura, T.; Kazui, H.; Mori, E. [Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We report on a patient with pure transient global amnesia (TGA) whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a small region of increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). DWI was sensitive and useful for evaluating the early stage of TGA and might help to explain the pathophysiology of TGA. (orig.)

  7. Transient global amnesia: increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, M.; Sakamoto, S.; Ishii, K.; Imamura, T.; Kazui, H.; Mori, E.

    2002-01-01

    We report on a patient with pure transient global amnesia (TGA) whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a small region of increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). DWI was sensitive and useful for evaluating the early stage of TGA and might help to explain the pathophysiology of TGA. (orig.)

  8. Mis-segmentation in voxel-based morphometry due to a signal intensity change in the putamen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Miyati, Tosiaki; Aoki, Shigeki; Gomi, Tsutomu; Takeda, Tohoru

    2017-12-01

    The aims of this study were to demonstrate an association between changes in the signal intensity of the putamen on three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WI) and mis-segmentation, using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) 8 toolbox. The sagittal 3D-T1WIs of 22 healthy volunteers were obtained for VBM analysis using the 1.5-T MR scanner. We prepared five levels of 3D-T1WI signal intensity (baseline, same level, background level, low level, and high level) in regions of interest containing the putamen. Groups of smoothed, spatially normalized tissue images were compared to the baseline group using a paired t test. The baseline was compared to the other four levels. In all comparisons, significant volume changes were observed around and outside the area that included the signal intensity change. The present study demonstrated an association between a change in the signal intensity of the putamen on 3D-T1WI and changed volume in segmented tissue images.

  9. In vitro study of relationship between signal intensity and gadolinium-DTPA concentration at high magnetic field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, D.; Williams, M.; Allen, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    Although gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) has been used as a contrast material in MRI, it is known that the contrast enhancement effect is not uniform for high concentrations of Gd-DTPA. In order to evaluate the proper pulse sequences for dynamic MRI in aqueous solutions of Gd-DTPA, blood samples and melanoma cells, the signal intensity for several concentrations of Gd-DTPA were measured under inversion recovery T 1 -weighted) at high magnetic field strength (7.0 Tesla). For aqueous solutions of Gd-DTPA, signal intensity correlated linearly with the concentration of Gd-DTPA between 0 mmol/L and 4 mmol/L. Using blood and melanoma cells, signal intensity correlated non-linearly with the concentration of Gd-DTPA between 0 mmol/L and 1.5 mmol/L. For concentrations of more than 4 mmol/L in aqueous solutions of Gd-DTPA, 1 mmol/L in blood and 1.5 mmol/L in melanoma, signal intensity decreased with increased Gd-DTPA concentration. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  10. Dosimetric comparison to the heart and cardiac substructure in a large cohort of esophageal cancer patients treated with proton beam therapy or Intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Xu, Cai; Yang, Jinzhong; Komaki, Ritsuko; Lin, Steven H

    2017-10-01

    To compare heart and cardiac substructure radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with mid- to distal esophageal cancer who received chemoradiation therapy. We identified 727 esophageal cancer patients who received IMRT (n=477) or PBT (n=250) from March 2004 to December 2015. All patients were treated to 50.4Gy with IMRT or to 50.4 cobalt Gray equivalents with PBT. IMRT and PBT dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the whole heart, atria, ventricles, and four coronary arteries were compared. For PBT patients, passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT; n=237) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT; n=13) DVHs were compared. Compared with IMRT, PBT resulted in significantly lower mean heart dose (MHD) and heart V5, V10, V20, V30, and V40as well as lower radiation exposure to the four chambers and four coronary arteries. Compared with PSPT, IMPT resulted in significantly lower heart V20, V30, and V40 but not MHD or heart V5 or V10. IMPT also resulted in significantly lower radiation doses to the left atrium, right atrium, left main coronary artery, and left circumflex artery, but not the left ventricle, right ventricle, left anterior descending artery, or right coronary artery. Factors associated with lower MHD included PBT (Pheart and cardiac substructures than IMRT. Long-term studies are necessary to determine how this cardiac sparing effect impacts the development of coronary artery disease and other cardiac complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Uterine Artery Embolization for Symptomatic Fibroids with High Signal Intensity on T2-Weighted MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Suyon; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Myung Su; Lee, Mu Sook; Park, Sung Il; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of uterine artery embolization (UAE) for treating symptomatic fibroids with high signal intensity (SI) on magnetic resonance (MR) T2-weighted imaging (T2WI). A total of 537 cases, consisting of 14 patients with high SI fibroids on T2WI (T2 high group), were retrospectively included and compared with 28 randomly selected patients with low SI fibroids on T2WI (control group). High SI of a predominant fibroid on T2WI was defined as having the same or higher SI than the myometrium. Patient ages ranged from 28 to 52 years (mean, 38.1 years). All patients underwent MRI before and after UAE. Predominant fibroid and uterine volumes were calculated with MR images. Symptom status in terms of menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea was scored on a scale of 0-10, with 0 being no symptoms and 10 being the baseline, or initial symptoms. Of the patients in the T2 high group, 13 out of 14 (92.9%) patients demonstrated complete necrosis of the predominant fibroids. The mean volume reduction rates of the predominant fibroids in the T2 high group was 61.7% at three months after UAE, which was significantly higher than the volume reduction rates of 42.1% noted in the control group (p < 0.05). Changes in symptom scores for menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea after UAE (baseline score minus follow-up score) were 4.9 and 7.5 in T2 high group and they were 5.0 and 7.7 in control group, suggesting a significant resolution of symptoms (p < 0.01) in both groups but no significant difference between the two groups. UAE is effective for uttering fibroids showing high SI on T2WI. The mean volume reduction rate of the predominant fibroids three months after UAE was greater in the T2 high group than in the control group.

  12. Uterine Artery Embolization for Symptomatic Fibroids with High Signal Intensity on T2-Weighted MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Suyon; Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Myung Su; Lee, Mu Sook; Park, Sung Il; Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Do Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of uterine artery embolization (UAE) for treating symptomatic fibroids with high signal intensity (SI) on magnetic resonance (MR) T2-weighted imaging (T2WI). A total of 537 cases, consisting of 14 patients with high SI fibroids on T2WI (T2 high group), were retrospectively included and compared with 28 randomly selected patients with low SI fibroids on T2WI (control group). High SI of a predominant fibroid on T2WI was defined as having the same or higher SI than the myometrium. Patient ages ranged from 28 to 52 years (mean, 38.1 years). All patients underwent MRI before and after UAE. Predominant fibroid and uterine volumes were calculated with MR images. Symptom status in terms of menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea was scored on a scale of 0-10, with 0 being no symptoms and 10 being the baseline, or initial symptoms. Of the patients in the T2 high group, 13 out of 14 (92.9%) patients demonstrated complete necrosis of the predominant fibroids. The mean volume reduction rates of the predominant fibroids in the T2 high group was 61.7% at three months after UAE, which was significantly higher than the volume reduction rates of 42.1% noted in the control group (p < 0.05). Changes in symptom scores for menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea after UAE (baseline score minus follow-up score) were 4.9 and 7.5 in T2 high group and they were 5.0 and 7.7 in control group, suggesting a significant resolution of symptoms (p < 0.01) in both groups but no significant difference between the two groups. UAE is effective for uttering fibroids showing high SI on T2WI. The mean volume reduction rate of the predominant fibroids three months after UAE was greater in the T2 high group than in the control group.

  13. Neuropsychological significance of areas of high signal intensity on brain MRIs of children with neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B D; Slopis, J M; Schomer, D; Jackson, E F; Levy, B M

    1996-06-01

    Of children with neurofibromatosis (NF), 40% have a cognitive or learning impairment. Approximately 60% also have anomalous areas of high signal intensity on T2-weighted brain MRIs. The association of these hyperintensities and neuropsychological status is not fully understood. We administered a battery of neuropsychological tests and a standard clinical MRI to determine the impact of hyperintensity presence, number, and location on cognitive status in 84 children (8 to 16 years) with NF type 1. These children underwent standard clinical MRI using a GE 1.5-tesla scanner (except one child who was examined with a 1.0-tesla scanner). We conducted three types of analyses: Hyperintensity presence or absence.-Scores of children with (55%) and without hyperintensities (45%) were compared using t tests. No statistically significant differences between groups in intellectual functioning or any neuropsychological variable were found. Number of hyperintensities-The number of hyperintensity locations per child ranged from one to five (mean = 2.22). Pearson correlations revealed no significant association between the number of hyperintensities and neuropsychological performance. Location of hyperintensities-In four of the five locations studied, no statistically significant differences were found between scores of children with a hyperintensity in an area and those with one elsewhere. However, mean scores for IQ, Memory, Motor, Distractibility, and Attention domains for children with hyperintensities in the thalamus were significantly lower than scores for those with hyperintensities elsewhere. These results suggest that the simple presence or absence of hyperintensities, or their total number, is not as important as their anatomic location for detecting their relationship with neuropsychological status. Taking location into account, hyperintensities in the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, brainstem, or cerebellum seem to have no impact on neuropsychological functioning

  14. Amplification of the Signal Intensity of Fluorescence-Based Fiber-Optic Biosensors Using a Fabry-Perot Resonator Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chang Hsieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent biosensors have been widely used in biomedical applications. To amplify the intensity of fluorescence signals, this study developed a novel structure for an evanescent wave fiber-optic biosensor by using a Fabry-Perot resonator structure. An excitation light was coupled into the optical fiber through a laser-drilled hole on the proximal end of the resonator. After entering the resonator, the excitation light was reflected back and forth inside the resonator, thereby amplifying the intensity of the light in the fiber. Subsequently, the light was used to excite the fluorescent molecules in the reactive region of the sensor. The experimental results showed that the biosensor signal was amplified eight-fold when the resonator reflector was formed using a 92% reflective coating. Furthermore, in a simulation, the biosensor signal could be amplified 20-fold by using a 99% reflector.

  15. Fast protection circuit for 1 MW Klystron based RF system of Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrotriya, Sandip; Shiju, A.; Patel, N.R.; Pande, Manjiri; Singh, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the details of a hardwired protection circuit designed and developed for 1 MW Klystron based Radio Frequency (RF) System. The hardwired protection circuit protects the klystron from fault conditions occurring in high power DC supplies, other bias supplies and inside the klystron itself. Fast response of the order of 1-2 microseconds is necessary in case of critical signals for the protection of such a high power system. The system needs to handle around 10 critical signals comprising of optical signals and different digital signals. In case of malfunction in the existing controller based interlock and protection system, klystron will be protected by this hardwired protection circuit. The hardwired circuit will provide redundant protection and protect the klystron from damage. This circuit and controller based protection system are operating in parallel. This paper describes details of a purely hardwired protection circuit developed for critical signals for achieving reliability and faster response time requirements of the RF system. (author)

  16. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  17. Assessment of the signal intensity distribution pattern within the unruptured cerebral aneurysms using color-coded 3D MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Toru; Omi, Megumi; Ohsako, Chika

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the interaction between the MR signal intensity distribution pattern and bleb formation/deformation of the aneurysmal dome, fifty cases of the unruptured cerebral aneurysms were investigated with the color-coded 3D MR angiography. Patterns were categorized into central-type, neck-type and peripheral-type according to the distribution of MR signals with low-, moderate- and high signal intensity areas. Imaging analysis revealed the significant relationship (P<0.02) of the peripheral-type aneurysms to the bleb formation and deformation of the dome, compared with those of central- and neck-type. Additionally, peripheral-type signal intensity distribution pattern was shown with aneurysms harboring relatively large dome size and lateral-type growth including internal carotid aneurysms. Prospective analysis of intraaneurysmal flow pattern with the color-coded 3D MR angiography may provide patient-specific analysis of intraaneurysmal flow status in relation to the morphological change of the corresponding aneurysmal dome in the management of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (author)

  18. SU-E-T-33: A Feasibility-Seeking Algorithm Applied to Planning of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: A Proof of Principle Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, S; Casiraghi, M; Dou, T; Schulte, R; Censor, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of feasibility-seeking cyclic orthogonal projections to the field of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) inverse planning. Feasibility of constraints only, as opposed to optimization of a merit function, is less demanding algorithmically and holds a promise of parallel computations capability with non-cyclic orthogonal projections algorithms such as string-averaging or block-iterative strategies. Methods: A virtual 2D geometry was designed containing a C-shaped planning target volume (PTV) surrounding an organ at risk (OAR). The geometry was pixelized into 1 mm pixels. Four beams containing a subset of proton pencil beams were simulated in Geant4 to provide the system matrix A whose elements a-ij correspond to the dose delivered to pixel i by a unit intensity pencil beam j. A cyclic orthogonal projections algorithm was applied with the goal of finding a pencil beam intensity distribution that would meet the following dose requirements: D-OAR < 54 Gy and 57 Gy < D-PTV < 64.2 Gy. The cyclic algorithm was based on the concept of orthogonal projections onto half-spaces according to the Agmon-Motzkin-Schoenberg algorithm, also known as ‘ART for inequalities’. Results: The cyclic orthogonal projections algorithm resulted in less than 5% of the PTV pixels and less than 1% of OAR pixels violating their dose constraints, respectively. Because of the abutting OAR-PTV geometry and the realistic modelling of the pencil beam penumbra, complete satisfaction of the dose objectives was not achieved, although this would be a clinically acceptable plan for a meningioma abutting the brainstem, for example. Conclusion: The cyclic orthogonal projections algorithm was demonstrated to be an effective tool for inverse IMPT planning in the 2D test geometry described. We plan to further develop this linear algorithm to be capable of incorporating dose-volume constraints into the feasibility-seeking algorithm

  19. Study and optimization of a LINAC drift tube for high intensity proton acceleration; Etude et optimisation d'un LINAC a tubes de glissement pour acceleration de forts courants de protons en continu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernaudin, P.E

    2002-09-01

    High intensity proton accelerators lead to specific problems related to the need to limit beam losses. The problem is more acute in the low energy part (up to 20 MeV) where the beam transport is the most difficult. The drift tube linac (DTL) remains the reference structure for energies of a few MeV to a few dozens MeV despite the arising of some new cavity types. This thesis purpose is to design such a DTL for a high intensity proton accelerator. Until now, no such continuous wave cavity has ever been operated. To ensure the viability of such an accelerator, a short four cells prototype is designed, built and tested under nominal RF conditions. This prototype is fully representative of a complete machine except for its length. The design complexity comes from the combination of RF electromagnetism, thermal exchanges, mechanics, ultra-vacuum engineering and manufacturing constraints. More specifically, the electromagnets alignment is a primary factor, and reliability, despite being usually of secondary importance in particles accelerator science, is here a major concern considering potential industrial applications of this machine. The prototype design includes the cavity itself, but also quadrupole electromagnets whose feasibility is a limiting factor, considering the very small space available to them. Two different magnet types and associated drift tubes are studied and manufactured, to be tested in the prototype cavity. The experimental part is focused on mechanical and thermal aspects. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also checked. As a conclusion of this thesis, technical and conceptual improvements as suggested by the manufacturing and experimental phases are presented, to be implemented in a complete cavity. (author)

  20. Intensive monitoring of new drugs based on first prescription signals from pharmacists : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Grootheest, AC; Groote, JK; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    Background Intensive monitoring can be a valuable tool in the early detection of adverse drug reactions, especially of new drugs. Aim of this pilot study was to investigate the practical possibilities of a system of intensive monitoring, using the pharmacy computer system to detect the first

  1. Orientation-dependent changes in MR signal intensity of articular cartilage: a manifestation of the ``magic angle`` effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, F.K.; Bolze, X.; Felsenberg, D.; Wolf, K.J. [Department of Radiology, Benjamin Franklin University Hospital, Free University Berlin, D-12200 Berlin (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Objective: To study magnetic resonance (MR) imaging pattern of normal hyaline articular cartilage in the knee joint with regard to the contribution of the ``magic angle`` effect to the MR signal. Design. Thirty-two healthy volunteers were imaged in a standard supine position in a 1.5-T unit using spin echo and gradient echo sequences. Nine volunteers were reimaged with the knee flexed. The signal behavior of the hyaline cartilage of the femoral condyles was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The extended and flexed positions of the nine volunteers were compared. Results. A superficial and a deep hyperintense layer and a hypointense middle cartilage layer were observed. Segments of increased signal intensity were visible along the condyles; a magic angle effect on signal intensity was evident in the hypointense middle layer with both gradient echo and spin echo images. Conclusion. The MR signal behavior of hyaline cartilage is influenced by the alignment of the collagen fibers within the cartilage in relation to the magnetic field. Failure to recognize this effect may lead to inaccurate diagnosis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 17 refs.

  2. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  3. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc

  4. Intensity modulated proton therapy and its sensitivity to treatment uncertainties 2: the potential effects of inter-fraction and inter-field motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, A J

    2008-01-01

    Simple tools for studying the effects of inter-fraction and inter-field motions on intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans have been developed, and have been applied to both 3D and distal edge tracking (DET) IMPT plans. For the inter-fraction motion, we have investigated the effects of misaligned density heterogeneities, whereas for the inter-field motion analysis, the effects of field misalignment on the plans have been assessed. Inter-fraction motion problems have been analysed using density differentiated error (DDE) distributions, which specifically show the additional problems resulting from misaligned density heterogeneities for proton plans. Likewise, for inter-field motion, we present methods for calculating motion differentiated error (MDE) distributions. DDE and MDE analysis of all plans demonstrate that the 3D approach is generally more robust to both inter-fraction and inter-field motions than the DET approach, but that strong in-field dose gradients can also adversely affect a plan's robustness. An important additional conclusion is that, for certain IMPT plans, even inter-fraction errors cannot necessarily be compensated for by the use of a simple PTV margins, implying that more sophisticated tools need to be developed for uncertainty management and assessment for IMPT treatments at the treatment planning level

  5. Moderator/collimator for a proton/deuteron linac to produce a high-intensity, high-quality thermal neutron beam for neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; Imel, G.R.; McMichael, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    Reactor based high resolution neutron radiography facilities are able to deliver a well-collimated (L/D ≥100) thermal flux of 10 6 n/cm 2 ·sec to an image plane. This is well in excess of that achievable with the present accelerator based systems such as sealed tube D-T sources, Van der Graaff's, small cyclotrons, or low duty factor linacs. However, continuous wave linacs can accelerate tens of milliamperes of protons to 2.5 to 4 MeV. The MCNP code has been used to analyze target/moderator configurations that could be used with Argonne's Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL). These analyses have shown that ACWL could be modified to generate a neutron beam that has a high intensity and is of high quality

  6. High signal intensity of anterior pituitary gland on T1-weighted MR imaging in normal postpartum women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Soon; Yang, Hak Seok; Chung, In Bai

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the signal intensity and size of anterior pituitary gland in postpartum women, and to compare with those of control group. In 34 postpartum women (18-43 years, mean: 27 years) and another 35 control nonpregnant women (20-29 years, mean: 24 years), midsagittal T1-weighted MR images were obtained. The signal intensity and height of the anterior pituitary gland were compared between the post-partum and normal control groups. In postpartum women, the signal intensity of the anterior pituitary gland relative to the pons was higher than that of the control group. Pituitary gland height of postpartum women was higher (5-11. 8mm, mean 8.18 ± 1.8mm) than that of control group (2-9mm, mean: 6.2 ± 1.7mm). It is concluded that the hyperintensity of the anterior pituitary gland on T1-weighted image is a normal finding in postpartum women, which is useful in differentiation from pituitary abnormality

  7. Appearance of high signal intensity and gadolinium-DTPA contrast enhancement in hypertrophied myocardium by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamada, Naoaki; Nagata, Seiki

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the potential role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating myocardial tissue characterization in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). ECG-gated MRI images were acquired in 32 HCM patients and 30 patients with hypertensive heart disease (HHD), using a 1.5 T superconducting magnet system. The thickened areas were depicted as high signal intensities in the septum of 12 HCM patients (38%) and the endocardium of 5 HHD patients (17%). Echocardiography revealed that MRI appearance of high signal intensity was associated with more thickened myocardial wall. For evaluable 16 patients receiving i.v. injection of Gd-DTPA in a dose of 0.1 mM/kg, enhancement effects were observed in 10 patients (63%). High signal intensity appearing in the hypertrophied myocardium, as well as contrast enhancement, may not be characteristic of HCM, but reflect the likelihood of myocardial degeneration associated with the hypertrophied myocardium. Although MRI may not be capable of differentiating tissue characterization in HCM from that in HHD, it may provide different information about tissue characterization in the hypertrophied myocardium from that obtained by other techniques. (N.K.)

  8. The impact of the amount of intracellular SPIO on MR signal intensity during in vivo tracking of macrophage homing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Yoon; Lee, Jin Seong; Kang, Ju Hee; Sohn, Jin Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Woo, Chul Woong

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether the amount of intracellular superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in macrophages influences MR signal intensity during in vivo celluar tracking. Peritoneal macrophages harvested from thioglycolate-treated mice were labeled with SPIO using concentrations of 112, 56, and 28 μ gFe/ml, and different incubation times of 3h, 6h, 12h, 24h and 48h, respectively. The iron concentration was quantified with the use of absorption spectrophotometry. Each group of macrophages labeled with different concentrations of SPIO was intravenously injected into 18 mice, after inoculation with S. aureus to the thigh. The relative signal intensity (SI) of the abscess wall (SI of the abscess wall/SI of muscle) was measured on MR and was analyzed by the use of the Kruskal-Wallis test. A higher concentration of SPIO in the labeling solution and a longer incubation time resulted in a higher concentration of SPIO in the macrophages. The relative SI of the abscess wall (0.63 for 112 μ gFe/mL; 0.67 for 56 μ gFe/ml; 0.89 for 28 μ gFe/mL) significantly decreased with an increase of SPIO concentration (κ 2 = 10.53, ρ < 0.005). The amount of intracellular SPIO influences the MR signal intensity by the susceptibility effect and it is recommended to use sufficient iron-oxide label as long as it dose not affect cellular function and viability

  9. High signal intensity of anterior pituitary gland on T1-weighted MR imaging in normal postpartum women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Soon; Yang, Hak Seok; Chung, In Bai [Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the signal intensity and size of anterior pituitary gland in postpartum women, and to compare with those of control group. In 34 postpartum women (18-43 years, mean: 27 years) and another 35 control nonpregnant women (20-29 years, mean: 24 years), midsagittal T1-weighted MR images were obtained. The signal intensity and height of the anterior pituitary gland were compared between the post-partum and normal control groups. In postpartum women, the signal intensity of the anterior pituitary gland relative to the pons was higher than that of the control group. Pituitary gland height of postpartum women was higher (5-11. 8mm, mean 8.18 {+-} 1.8mm) than that of control group (2-9mm, mean: 6.2 {+-} 1.7mm). It is concluded that the hyperintensity of the anterior pituitary gland on T1-weighted image is a normal finding in postpartum women, which is useful in differentiation from pituitary abnormality.

  10. Sterilization of proteinaceous food additives by irradiation. Temperature dependent changes in intensity of ESR signals generated by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Kazushi; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Higashimura, Yutaka; Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko; Tada, Mikiro

    1999-01-01

    Thaumatin, egg white and soybean protein were selected as samples of proteinous food additives, and changes in the intensity of signals appearing in them after they had been irradiated with electron beams were measured by ESR. It was found by such measurement that the positions of signals of thaumatin and soy proteins are nearly the same. Changes in the intensity of radicals in thaumatin calculated on the basis of the coefficients of the respective approximations obtained by using thaumatin which had been irradiated and then stored at 4degC, 25degC, 37degC and 60degC showed that there is a temperature range to determine the remaining of such radicals (inner: 19.7degC, outer: 15.23degC) and that such radicals tend to decrease straight line-wise. It was confirmed that the intensity of signals in the protein powder such thaumatin and soy protein would not be affected at the storage condition below 15degC. (author)

  11. High signal intensity lesion in basal ganglia on MR imaging: correlation with portal-systemic encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yun Ju; Choi, Sun Jeong; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Sun Hee; Chung, Chun Phil; Kim, Yang Sook [Maryknoll Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-15

    To evaluate of the relationship between basal ganglia lesion and portal-systemic encephalopathy, eleven patients who had clinically proved liver cirrhosis with superior mesenteric vein larger than 10mm in diameter on ultrasonogram underwent brain MR imaging. No evidence of clinical or neuropsychiatric disturbance was observed in any patient at the time of the MR examination. Brain MR imaging revealed basal ganglia lesion characterized by bilateral, symmetric, high signal intensity without edema or mass effect on spin echo T1-weighted images in nine patients which included three patients with the past history of portal-systemic encephalopathy. It was concluded that excepted in the circumstances of other causes of the high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images such as fat, methemoglobin, melanin, neurofibromatosis, dense calcification, and parenteral nutrition, bilateral and symmetric high signal intensity lesion in basal ganglia would be a useful MR finding of subclinical portal-systemic encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis patients with no clinical or neuropsychiatric symptoms and larger than 10mm in diameter of superior mesenteric vein in ultrasonography.

  12. High signal intensity lesion in basal ganglia on MR imaging: correlation with portal-systemic encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yun Ju; Choi, Sun Jeong; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Sun Hee; Chung, Chun Phil; Kim, Yang Sook

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate of the relationship between basal ganglia lesion and portal-systemic encephalopathy, eleven patients who had clinically proved liver cirrhosis with superior mesenteric vein larger than 10mm in diameter on ultrasonogram underwent brain MR imaging. No evidence of clinical or neuropsychiatric disturbance was observed in any patient at the time of the MR examination. Brain MR imaging revealed basal ganglia lesion characterized by bilateral, symmetric, high signal intensity without edema or mass effect on spin echo T1-weighted images in nine patients which included three patients with the past history of portal-systemic encephalopathy. It was concluded that excepted in the circumstances of other causes of the high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images such as fat, methemoglobin, melanin, neurofibromatosis, dense calcification, and parenteral nutrition, bilateral and symmetric high signal intensity lesion in basal ganglia would be a useful MR finding of subclinical portal-systemic encephalopathy in liver cirrhosis patients with no clinical or neuropsychiatric symptoms and larger than 10mm in diameter of superior mesenteric vein in ultrasonography

  13. Sterilization of proteinaceous food additives by irradiation. Temperature dependent changes in intensity of ESR signals generated by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaue, Kazushi; Murata, Yoshiyuki [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama Univ., Okayama (Japan); Higashimura, Yutaka [San-Ei Gen F.F.I., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko [National Food Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tada, Mikiro [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1999-09-01

    Thaumatin, egg white and soybean protein were selected as samples of proteinous food additives, and changes in the intensity of signals appearing in them after they had been irradiated with electron beams were measured by ESR. It was found by such measurement that the positions of signals of thaumatin and soy proteins are nearly the same. Changes in the intensity of radicals in thaumatin calculated on the basis of the coefficients of the respective approximations obtained by using thaumatin which had been irradiated and then stored at 4degC, 25degC, 37degC and 60degC showed that there is a temperature range to determine the remaining of such radicals (inner: 19.7degC, outer: 15.23degC) and that such radicals tend to decrease straight line-wise. It was confirmed that the intensity of signals in the protein powder such thaumatin and soy protein would not be affected at the storage condition below 15degC. (author)

  14. Unusual signal intensity of congenital pulmonary airway malformation on fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owada, Keiho; Miyazaki, Osamu; Nosaka, Shunsuke [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, Kentaro [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Pathology, Tokyo (Japan); Sago, Haruhiko [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Perinatal Medicine and Maternal Care, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) is classified into pathologically different types. These types are sometimes distinguishable by fetal lung MRI and are usually observed as higher-signal lesions on T2-weighted images than normal lung. We describe a case of unusual CPAM resembling neoplasms, with a lower signal than is found in normal lung. Histopathology showed a large number of mucogenic cells but found no evidence that could explain this feature on fetal MRI. An unusual low-signal mass associated with a pulmonary cyst in fetal lung on MRI may suggest an unusual type 1 CPAM. (orig.)

  15. Unusual signal intensity of congenital pulmonary airway malformation on fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owada, Keiho; Miyazaki, Osamu; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Kentaro; Sago, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) is classified into pathologically different types. These types are sometimes distinguishable by fetal lung MRI and are usually observed as higher-signal lesions on T2-weighted images than normal lung. We describe a case of unusual CPAM resembling neoplasms, with a lower signal than is found in normal lung. Histopathology showed a large number of mucogenic cells but found no evidence that could explain this feature on fetal MRI. An unusual low-signal mass associated with a pulmonary cyst in fetal lung on MRI may suggest an unusual type 1 CPAM. (orig.)

  16. Clinical significance of subchondral cortical signal intensities in osteoarthritis of knee joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Eijiro; Torisu, Takehiko; Nakamura, Taro; Masumi, Shogo [Oita Medical Univ., Hazama (Japan); Tomari, Kazuhide; Asao, Tunenori; Takagi, Kazuhiro

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abnormal intensity in medial femoral condyle on MR imaging in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Eighty knees of fifty-eight patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were underwent plain radiography and MR imaging. According to the extension of the abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted images in medial femoral chondyle, all cases were classified into four types (no exist: 30.0%, small: 30.0%, middle: 30.0%, large: 10.0%). The extension of the abnormal low intensity was closely related to radiographic stage and femoral tibial angle. After radiological examination, in thirteen knees, the biopsy of the abnormal low intensity area on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging was performed at the time of total knee arthroplasty. Pathological examination revealed that the causative factor of abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging in the medial femoral condyle was trabecular hypertrophy. Our results suggest that the abnormal low intensity on T{sub 1} weighted MR imaging reflects the loading force. (author)

  17. Clinical significance of subchondral cortical signal intensities in osteoarthritis of knee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Eijiro; Torisu, Takehiko; Nakamura, Taro; Masumi, Shogo; Tomari, Kazuhide; Asao, Tunenori; Takagi, Kazuhiro.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abnormal intensity in medial femoral condyle on MR imaging in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Eighty knees of fifty-eight patients with osteoarthritis of the knee were underwent plain radiography and MR imaging. According to the extension of the abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted images in medial femoral chondyle, all cases were classified into four types (no exist: 30.0%, small: 30.0%, middle: 30.0%, large: 10.0%). The extension of the abnormal low intensity was closely related to radiographic stage and femoral tibial angle. After radiological examination, in thirteen knees, the biopsy of the abnormal low intensity area on T 1 weighted MR imaging was performed at the time of total knee arthroplasty. Pathological examination revealed that the causative factor of abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted MR imaging in the medial femoral condyle was trabecular hypertrophy. Our results suggest that the abnormal low intensity on T 1 weighted MR imaging reflects the loading force. (author)

  18. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received ≥60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998–2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient’s preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0–4 (T1), 5–8 (T2), and 9–12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy

  19. Previously unreported intense absorption band and the pK/sub A/ of protonated triplet methylene blue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, T.; Osif, T.L.; Lichtin, N.N.

    1979-01-01

    Excitation by a Q-switched giant ruby laser (1.2 joule output at 694 nm, approx. 50 nsec flash) of 2-10 ..mu..M solutions of methylene blue in water, 30% ethanol in water or 50 v/v% water - CH/sub 3/CN at pH values in the range 2.0 - 9.3 converted the dye essentially completely to its T/sub 1/ state. The absorption spectrum of T/sub 1/ dye was measured in different media at pH 2.0 and 8.2 by kinetic spectrophotometry. Previously reported T-T absorption in the violet in acidic and alkaline solutions and in the near infrared in alkaline solution was confirmed. Values found for these absorptions in the present work with 30% ethanol in water as solvent are lambda/sub max/ approx. 370 nm, epsilon/sub max/ approx. 13,200 M/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/ at pH 2 and lambda/sub max/ approx. 420 nm, epsilon/sub max/ approx. 9,000 M/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/, lambda/sub max/ approx. 840 nm, epsilon/sub max/ approx. 20,000 M/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/ at pH 8.2. Long-wavelength T-T absorption in acidic solution is reported here for the first time: lambda/sub max/ approx. 680 nm, epsilon/sub max/ approx. 19,000 M/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/ in 30% ethanol in water at pH 2. Observation of a pH-independent isobestic point approx. 720 nm confirms that the long-wavelength absorptions are due to different protonated states of the same species, MB/sup +/(T/sub 1/) and MBH/sup 2 +/(T/sub 1/). The pK/sub A/ of MBH/sup 2 +/(T/sub 1/) in water was determined from the dependence on pH of absorption at 700 and 825 nm to be 7.1/sub 4/ +- .1 and from the kinetics of decay of triplet absorption to be 7.2. The specific rate of protonation of MB/sup +/(T/sub 1/) by H/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup -/ in water at pH 4.4 was found to be 4.5 +- .4 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ sec/sup -1/.

  20. Intensive removal of signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) from rivers increases numbers and taxon richness of macroinvertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, Tom P; Poole, Alison E; Evans, Laura C; Bradley, David C; Macdonald, David W

    2014-02-01

    Invasive species are a major cause of species extinction in freshwater ecosystems, and crayfish species are particularly pervasive. The invasive American signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus has impacts over a range of trophic levels, but particularly on benthic aquatic macroinvertebrates. Our study examined the effect on the macroinvertebrate community of removal trapping of signal crayfish from UK rivers. Crayfish were intensively trapped and removed from two tributaries of the River Thames to test the hypothesis that lowering signal crayfish densities would result in increases in macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness. We removed 6181 crayfish over four sessions, resulting in crayfish densities that decreased toward the center of the removal sections. Conversely in control sections (where crayfish were trapped and returned), crayfish density increased toward the center of the section. Macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness were inversely correlated with crayfish densities. Multivariate analysis of the abundance of each taxon yielded similar results and indicated that crayfish removals had positive impacts on macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness but did not alter the composition of the wider macroinvertebrate community. Synthesis and applications: Our results demonstrate that non-eradication-oriented crayfish removal programmes may lead to increases in the total number of macroinvertebrates living in the benthos. This represents the first evidence that removing signal crayfish from riparian systems, at intensities feasible during control attempts or commercial crayfishing, may be beneficial for a range of sympatric aquatic macroinvertebrates.

  1. Abnormalities of hippocampal signal intensity in patients with familial mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coan A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE is associated with hippocampal atrophy and hippocampal signal abnormalities. In our series of familial MTLE (FMTLE, we found a high proportion of hippocampal abnormalities. To quantify signal abnormalities in patients with FMTLE we studied 152 individuals (46 of them asymptomatic with FMTLE. We used NIH-Image® for volumetry and signal quantification in coronal T1 inversion recovery and T2 for all cross-sections of the hippocampus. Values diverging by 2 or more SD from the control mean were considered abnormal. T2 hippocampal signal abnormalities were found in 52% of all individuals: 54% of affected subjects and 48% of asymptomatic subjects. T1 hippocampal signal changes were found in 34% of all individuals: 42.5% of affected subjects and 15% of asymptomatic subjects. Analysis of the hippocampal head (first three slices revealed T2 abnormalities in 73% of all individuals (74% of affected subjects and 72% of asymptomatic subjects and T1 abnormalities in 59% (67% of affected subjects and 41% of asymptomatic subjects. Affected individuals had smaller volumes than controls (P < 0.0001. There was no difference in hippocampal volumes between asymptomatic subjects and controls, although 39% of asymptomatic patients had hippocampal atrophy. Patients with an abnormal hippocampal signal (133 individuals had smaller ipsilateral volume, but no linear correlation could be determined. Hippocampal signal abnormalities in FMTLE were more frequently found in the hippocampal head in both affected and asymptomatic family members, including those with normal volumes. These results indicate that subtle abnormalities leading to an abnormal hippocampal signal in FMTLE are not necessarily related to seizures and may be determined by genetic factors.

  2. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Further Reduces Normal Tissue Exposure During Definitive Therapy for Locally Advanced Distal Esophageal Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Palmer, Matthew B.; Riley, Beverly A.; Mayankkumar, Amin V.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Likhacheva, Anna; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hofstetter, Wayne L. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ajani, Jaffer A. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously found that {<=} 75% of treatment failures after chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer appear within the gross tumor volume and that intensity-modulated (photon) radiotherapy (IMRT) might allow dose escalation to the tumor without increasing normal tissue toxicity. Proton therapy might allow additional dose escalation, with even lower normal tissue toxicity. In the present study, we compared the dosimetric parameters for photon IMRT with that for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unresectable, locally advanced, distal esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Four plans were created for each of 10 patients. IMPT was delivered using anteroposterior (AP)/posteroanterior beams, left posterior oblique/right posterior oblique (LPO/RPO) beams, or AP/LPO/RPO beams. IMRT was delivered with a concomitant boost to the gross tumor volume. The dose was 65.8 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume in 28 fractions. Results: Relative to IMRT, the IMPT (AP/posteroanterior) plan led to considerable reductions in the mean lung dose (3.18 vs. 8.27 Gy, p < .0001) and the percentage of lung volume receiving 5, 10, and 20 Gy (p {<=} .0006) but did not reduce the cardiac dose. The IMPT LPO/RPO plan also reduced the mean lung dose (4.9 Gy vs. 8.2 Gy, p < .001), the heart dose (mean cardiac dose and percentage of the cardiac volume receiving 10, 20, and 30 Gy, p {<=} .02), and the liver dose (mean hepatic dose 5 Gy vs. 14.9 Gy, p < .0001). The IMPT AP/LPO/RPO plan led to considerable reductions in the dose to the lung (p {<=} .005), heart (p {<=} .003), and liver (p {<=} .04). Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, IMPT for distal esophageal cancer lowered the dose to the heart, lung, and liver. The AP/LPO/RPO beam arrangement was optimal for sparing all three organs. The dosimetric benefits of protons will need to be tailored to each patient according to their specific cardiac and pulmonary risks. IMPT for

  3. Optimizing signal intensity correction during evaluation of hepatic parenchymal enhancement on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI: Comparison of three methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, Minori; Hyodo, Tomoko; Murakami, Takamichi; Okada, Masahiro; Uto, Tatsuro; Hori, Masatoshi; Miyati, Tosiaki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Signal intensity is often used to evaluate hepatic enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA in the hepatobiliary phase. •Comparison of uncorrected signal intensity with T 1 value revealed signal intensity instability. •Measurement of uncorrected liver SI or SNR often yields erroneous results on late-phase gadoxetate MRI due to shimming and other optimization techniques. •Signal intensity corrected by scale and rescale slope from DICOM data gave comparable results. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare signal intensity (SI) correction using scale and rescale slopes with SI correction using SIs of spleen and muscle for quantifying multiphase hepatic contrast enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA by assessing their correlation with T 1 values generated from Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequence data (ER-T 1 ). Materials and methods: Thirty patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this prospective clinical study. For each patient, breath-hold T 1 -weighted fat-suppressed three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequences (e-THRIVE) were acquired before and 2 (first phase), 10 (second phase), and 20 min (third phase) after intravenous Gd-EOB-DTPA. Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequences were acquired before and 1.5 (first phase), 8 (second phase), and 18 min (third phase) postcontrast. The liver parenchyma enhancement ratios (ER) of each phase were calculated using the SI from e-THRIVE sequences (ER-SI) and the T 1 values generated from LL-TFE sequence data (ER-T 1 ) respectively. ER-SIs were calculated in three ways: (1) comparing with splenic SI (ER-SI-s), (2) comparing with muscle SI (ER-SI-m), (3) using scale and rescale slopes obtained from DICOM headers (ER-SI-c), to eliminate the effects of receiver gain and scaling. For each of the first, second and third phases, correlation and agreement were assessed between each ER-SI and ER-T 1 . Results: In the first phase, all ER-SIs correlated weakly with ER-T 1 . In the second

  4. Contraction-induced changes in skeletal muscle Na(+), K(+) pump mRNA expression - importance of exercise intensity and Ca(2+)-mediated signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Kusuhara, K; Hellsten, Ylva

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To investigate if exercise intensity and Ca(2+) signalling regulate Na(+), K(+) pump mRNA expression in skeletal muscle. Methods: The importance of exercise intensity was evaluated by having trained and untrained humans perform intense intermittent and prolonged exercise. The import...

  5. Is courtship intensity a signal of male parental care in Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Ken; Knight, Richard L.; Skagen, Susan Knight

    1987-01-01

    We studied Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) behavior in marsh and prairie habitats to determine whether courting males provide cues of their nest defense, whether females prefer males that defend nests vigorously, and whether male nest defense affects nest success. We found no evidence that courtship behavior provides cues of male nest defense, or that females prefer males that court intensely. We found evidence that females nesting in marshes prefer males that defend nests intensely, but no evidence that intensely defending males in the prairie habitat achieve high nest success. We found differences, however, between marsh and prairie habitats that suggest a coarse-grained relationship between male parental quality and female choice of mate in this species.

  6. Correlation between neurohypophyseal vasopressin content and signal intensity on T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance images. An experimental study of vasopressin depletion model using dehydrated rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Hiroaki; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Ikeda, Koshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa [Kansai Medical Univ., Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan); Fujisawa, Ichiro

    1998-06-01

    We investigated the correlation between the signal intensity on T{sub 1}-weighted MR images and vasopressin (VP) content in the posterior pituitary lobe. Fourteen rabbits were studied. There were 12 water-deprived rabbits (48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 hours: 2 each) and 2 controls. Sagittal T{sub 1}-weighted SE (spin-echo) MR images were obtained before and after dehydration. The signal intensity ratio of the posterior pituitary lobe to the pons was correlated with the VP content in the posterior lobe as measured by radioimmunoassay. Before water deprivation, high signal intensity in the posterior lobe was demonstrated clearly in all 14 rabbits. After water deprivation, the hyperintense signal gradually decreased and became indistinguishable from anterior lobe in four animals. The mean signal intensity ratio before water deprivation was 1.55{+-}0.12 (mean{+-}SD) and after water deprivation, gradually decreased over time and reached to 1.19 after 168 hours of water deprivation. Pituitary VP content and concentration decreased in parallel with the signal intensity ratio of the posterior pituitary. Significantly correlation was observed between the signal intensity ratio and VP concentration of posterior pituitary (r=0.809, p<0.001) . In conclusion, the results indicate that the signal intensity ratio on T{sub 1}-weighted image may reflect a indicator of pituitary VP content and thus may enable evaluation of disorders of water metabolism. (author)

  7. An analytical method to simulate the H I 21-cm visibility signal for intensity mapping experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Anjan Kumar; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Marthi, Visweshwar Ram

    2018-01-01

    Simulations play a vital role in testing and validating H I 21-cm power spectrum estimation techniques. Conventional methods use techniques like N-body simulations to simulate the sky signal which is then passed through a model of the instrument. This makes it necessary to simulate the H I distribution in a large cosmological volume, and incorporate both the light-cone effect and the telescope's chromatic response. The computational requirements may be particularly large if one wishes to simulate many realizations of the signal. In this paper, we present an analytical method to simulate the H I visibility signal. This is particularly efficient if one wishes to simulate a large number of realizations of the signal. Our method is based on theoretical predictions of the visibility correlation which incorporate both the light-cone effect and the telescope's chromatic response. We have demonstrated this method by applying it to simulate the H I visibility signal for the upcoming Ooty Wide Field Array Phase I.

  8. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  9. Signal intensity analysis and optimization for in vivo imaging of Cherenkov and excited luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRochelle, Ethan P. M.; Shell, Jennifer R.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2018-04-01

    During external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in vivo Cherenkov optical emissions can be used as a dosimetry tool or to excite luminescence, termed Cherenkov-excited luminescence (CEL) with microsecond-level time-gated cameras. The goal of this work was to develop a complete theoretical foundation for the detectable signal strength, in order to provide guidance on optimization of the limits of detection and how to optimize near real time imaging. The key parameters affecting photon production, propagation and detection were considered and experimental validation with both tissue phantoms and a murine model are shown. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental data indicate that the detection level is near a single photon-per-pixel for the detection geometry and frame rates commonly used, with the strongest factor being the signal decrease with the square of distance from tissue to camera. Experimental data demonstrates how the SNR improves with increasing integration time, but only up to the point where the dominance of camera read noise is overcome by stray photon noise that cannot be suppressed. For the current camera in a fixed geometry, the signal to background ratio limits the detection of light signals, and the observed in vivo Cherenkov emission is on the order of 100×  stronger than CEL signals. As a result, imaging signals from depths  <15 mm is reasonable for Cherenkov light, and depths  <3 mm is reasonable for CEL imaging. The current investigation modeled Cherenkov and CEL imaging of two oxygen sensing phosphorescent compounds, but the modularity of the code allows for easy comparison of different agents or alternative cameras, geometries or tissues.

  10. Increased T2 signal intensity in the distal clavicle: incidence and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorella, D.; Helms, C.A.; Speer, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. The objectives of the current study were (1) to quantify the incidence of increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle and (2) to assess the clinical significance of this finding in patients with chronic acromioclavicular (AC) joint pain.Design and patients. Eight patients (five male and three female, 15-41 years of age) with disabling shoulder pain localized to the AC joint and marked increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle are presented. These eight patients underwent MR examination over a 25 month period (August 1996 to September 1998). The dictated reports of all shoulder MR examinations conducted over this same time period were reviewed retrospectively for the presence of signal abnormality in the distal cla-vicle. Clinical data and, in five patients, findings at shoulder arthroscopy or open surgery, were correlated with the results of MR imaging. One patient underwent arthroscopy on both shoulders.Results. The selected eight patients each presented clinically with disabling shoulder pain localized to the AC joint. One patient is presented twice, as both shoulders were symptomatic (n=9). Plain film examination (9/9) failed to indicate a structural cause of shoulder pain in any of the patients. MR examination demonstrated abnormally increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle in all nine cases and no other cause for AC joint pain. Three patients responded to a course of conservative therapy. Six experienced refractory pain despite conservative therapy. Resection of the distal clavicle was performed in five of the six cases. All patients who underwent resection of the distal clavicle experienced complete resolution of AC joint pain. A retrospective review of the dictated reports for all shoulder MR imaging examinations performed at out institution over a 25 month period (August 1996 to September 1998; n=761) demonstrated a 12.5% incidence of abnormally increased T2 signal in the distal clav-icle.Conclusions. Increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle

  11. Increased T2 signal intensity in the distal clavicle: incidence and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorella, D.; Helms, C.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Speer, K.P. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. The objectives of the current study were (1) to quantify the incidence of increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle and (2) to assess the clinical significance of this finding in patients with chronic acromioclavicular (AC) joint pain.Design and patients. Eight patients (five male and three female, 15-41 years of age) with disabling shoulder pain localized to the AC joint and marked increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle are presented. These eight patients underwent MR examination over a 25 month period (August 1996 to September 1998). The dictated reports of all shoulder MR examinations conducted over this same time period were reviewed retrospectively for the presence of signal abnormality in the distal cla-vicle. Clinical data and, in five patients, findings at shoulder arthroscopy or open surgery, were correlated with the results of MR imaging. One patient underwent arthroscopy on both shoulders.Results. The selected eight patients each presented clinically with disabling shoulder pain localized to the AC joint. One patient is presented twice, as both shoulders were symptomatic (n=9). Plain film examination (9/9) failed to indicate a structural cause of shoulder pain in any of the patients. MR examination demonstrated abnormally increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle in all nine cases and no other cause for AC joint pain. Three patients responded to a course of conservative therapy. Six experienced refractory pain despite conservative therapy. Resection of the distal clavicle was performed in five of the six cases. All patients who underwent resection of the distal clavicle experienced complete resolution of AC joint pain. A retrospective review of the dictated reports for all shoulder MR imaging examinations performed at out institution over a 25 month period (August 1996 to September 1998; n=761) demonstrated a 12.5% incidence of abnormally increased T2 signal in the distal clav-icle.Conclusions. Increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle

  12. Analysis of expiration gas in intensive care patients with SIRS/sepsis using proton-transfer-reaction-mass-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodrogi, F.B.M.

    2003-11-01

    In 1971, Pauling and co-workers were the first to detect volatile organic compounds (VOC) in human breath. Since then, a number of technical applications for breath gas analyses have been designed and processed, among them gas chromatography and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Due to this technical progress it is meanwhile possible to correlate different kinds and stages of diseases with measurable changes in the patient's VOC profile. The aim of the present study was to investigate the composition of VOC in exhaled air of patients with sepsis via PTR-MS. To isolate distinct volatile organic compounds that may serve as clinical markers for the onset, the progress, as well as the outcome of the disease, the results obtained from septic patients were compared with two different control groups: 25 healthy, non-smoking volunteers enrolled in the day-case-surgery and 25 post-operative in-patients residing in post-anaesthetic care units (PACU). PTR-MS is capable to analyze VOC according to their molecular weight with a range between 21-230 Da. A total of 210 different masses has been detected in the present study. 54 masses were significantly different in exhaled air of septic patients as compared to healthy controls as well as post-operative patients. Among them, mass 69 representing isoprene might be of special interest for the diagnosis of sepsis. Although no exact biochemical properties of isoprene have been described to date, it is known that isoprene synthesis is increased in plants following exposure to oxidative stress. Chronic, systemic infectious diseases like sepsis are accompanied by the production of reactive oxygen species, indicating that isoprene might be increased in the course of sepsis, too. In the present study, isoprene values were markedly higher in septic patients as compared to PACU residents (3.3-fold increase in mean value) and to healthy volunteers (2.2-fold increase in mean value). In addition (and in contrast to other VOC

  13. G-stack modulated probe intensities on expression arrays - sequence corrections and signal calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasold Mario

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The brightness of the probe spots on expression microarrays intends to measure the abundance of specific mRNA targets. Probes with runs of at least three guanines (G in their sequence show abnormal high intensities which reflect rather probe effects than target concentrations. This G-bias requires correction prior to downstream expression analysis. Results Longer runs of three or more consecutive G along the probe sequence and in particular triple degenerated G at its solution end ((GGG1-effect are associated with exceptionally large probe intensities on GeneChip expression arrays. This intensity bias is related to non-specific hybridization and affects both perfect match and mismatch probes. The (GGG1-effect tends to increase gradually for microarrays of later GeneChip generations. It was found for DNA/RNA as well as for DNA/DNA probe/target-hybridization chemistries. Amplification of sample RNA using T7-primers is associated with strong positive amplitudes of the G-bias whereas alternative amplification protocols using random primers give rise to much smaller and partly even negative amplitudes. We applied positional dependent sensitivity models to analyze the specifics of probe intensities in the context of all possible short sequence motifs of one to four adjacent nucleotides along the 25meric probe sequence. Most of the longer motifs are adequately described using a nearest-neighbor (NN model. In contrast, runs of degenerated guanines require explicit consideration of next nearest neighbors (GGG terms. Preprocessing methods such as vsn, RMA, dChip, MAS5 and gcRMA only insufficiently remove the G-bias from data. Conclusions Positional and motif dependent sensitivity models accounts for sequence effects of oligonucleotide probe intensities. We propose a positional dependent NN+GGG hybrid model to correct the intensity bias associated with probes containing poly-G motifs. It is implemented as a single-chip based calibration

  14. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  15. 100-MeV proton beam intensity measurement by Au activation analysis using {sup 197}Au(p, pn){sup 196}Au and {sup 197}Au(p, p3n){sup 194}Au reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Nam-Suk; Oh, Joo-Hee [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee-Seock, E-mail: lee@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The proton beam intensity of a 100-MeV proton linac at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) was measured by an Au activation analysis using {sup 197}Au(p, pn){sup 196}Au and {sup 197}Au(p, p3n){sup 194}Au reactions to determine the accuracy and precision of beam intensity measurement using Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of Au, Al foils and Pb plates. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in Au foils were obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The FLUKA code was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of protons onto the front surface of Au foils located at three different depth points of the target and also to investigate the condition of incident beam on the target. A good agreement was found between the beam intensity measurements using the activation analysis method at three different depth points of the target. An excellent agreement was also observed between the beam intensity measurements using the Au activation analysis method and the dosimetry method using Gafchromic film.

  16. TH-CD-209-05: Impact of Spot Size and Spacing On the Quality of Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W; Ding, X; Hu, Y; Shen, J; Korte, S; Bues, M; Schild, S; Wong, W; Chang, J; Liao, Z; Sahoo, N; Herman, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how spot size and spacing affect plan quality, especially, plan robustness and the impact of interplay effect, of robustly-optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans for lung cancer. Methods: Two robustly-optimized IMPT plans were created for 10 lung cancer patients: (1) one for a proton beam with in-air energy dependent large spot size at isocenter (σ: 5–15 mm) and spacing (1.53σ); (2) the other for a proton beam with small spot size (σ: 2–6 mm) and spacing (5 mm). Both plans were generated on the average CTs with internal-gross-tumor-volume density overridden to irradiate internal target volume (ITV). The root-mean-square-dose volume histograms (RVH) measured the sensitivity of the dose to uncertainties, and the areas under RVH curves were used to evaluate plan robustness. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped from phase to phase via deformable image registration to score doses. Dose-volume-histogram indices including ITV coverage, homogeneity, and organs-at-risk (OAR) sparing were compared using Student-t test. Results: Compared to large spots, small spots resulted in significantly better OAR sparing with comparable ITV coverage and homogeneity in the nominal plan. Plan robustness was comparable for ITV and most OARs. With interplay effect considered, significantly better OAR sparing with comparable ITV coverage and homogeneity is observed using smaller spots. Conclusion: Robust optimization with smaller spots significantly improves OAR sparing with comparable plan robustness and similar impact of interplay effect compare to larger spots. Small spot size requires the use of larger number of spots, which gives optimizer more freedom to render a plan more robust. The ratio between spot size and spacing was found to be more relevant to determine plan

  17. TH-CD-209-05: Impact of Spot Size and Spacing On the Quality of Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Plans for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W; Ding, X; Hu, Y; Shen, J; Korte, S; Bues, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Schild, S; Wong, W [Mayo Clinic AZ, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Chang, J [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao, Z; Sahoo, N [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Herman, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how spot size and spacing affect plan quality, especially, plan robustness and the impact of interplay effect, of robustly-optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans for lung cancer. Methods: Two robustly-optimized IMPT plans were created for 10 lung cancer patients: (1) one for a proton beam with in-air energy dependent large spot size at isocenter (σ: 5–15 mm) and spacing (1.53σ); (2) the other for a proton beam with small spot size (σ: 2–6 mm) and spacing (5 mm). Both plans were generated on the average CTs with internal-gross-tumor-volume density overridden to irradiate internal target volume (ITV). The root-mean-square-dose volume histograms (RVH) measured the sensitivity of the dose to uncertainties, and the areas under RVH curves were used to evaluate plan robustness. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped from phase to phase via deformable image registration to score doses. Dose-volume-histogram indices including ITV coverage, homogeneity, and organs-at-risk (OAR) sparing were compared using Student-t test. Results: Compared to large spots, small spots resulted in significantly better OAR sparing with comparable ITV coverage and homogeneity in the nominal plan. Plan robustness was comparable for ITV and most OARs. With interplay effect considered, significantly better OAR sparing with comparable ITV coverage and homogeneity is observed using smaller spots. Conclusion: Robust optimization with smaller spots significantly improves OAR sparing with comparable plan robustness and similar impact of interplay effect compare to larger spots. Small spot size requires the use of larger number of spots, which gives optimizer more freedom to render a plan more robust. The ratio between spot size and spacing was found to be more relevant to determine plan

  18. LM-OSL signals from some insulators: an analysis of the dependency of the detrapping probability on stimulation light intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulur, E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals from various insulators including quartz, Al2O3 : C, BeO and NaCl have been studied using the linear modulation OSL (LM-OSL) technique. LM-OSL is based on the linear increase of the stimulation light power from zero to a maximum during the measurement...... is not always correct. The initial decay rates of the blue (similar to 470 nm) light stimulated constant power OSL decay curves were examined to test the relation between the detrapping rates and the stimulation light intensity. In SiO2, Al2O3 : C and BeO a linear relation between the detrapping rates....... The resultant OSL curve initially increases and then decays after reaching a maximum, The analysis of LM-OSL data usually assumes a linear relationship between the detrapping rate and the stimulation light intensity. However, experiments carried out using various insulators have shown that this assumption...

  19. Pixel signal intensity analysis of anterior cruciate ligament grafts in knees with and without intercondylar roof impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, S.M.; Berns, G.S.; Farley, T.E.; Clark, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines if intercondylar roof (IR) impingement produces quantitative, regionalized, and time-dependent differences in the pixel signal intensity (PSI) of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts. Patients with hamstring autografts were placed into two groups: inpinged (n = 14) and unimpinged (n = 18). MR images were obtained at 3, 6, 9, and over 12 months after operation in the unimpinged group and at 22 months in the impinged group. The PSI was measured along the proximal, middle, and distal thirds of the graft. The PSI was greater in the impinged knees in the distal (P < .008) and middle thirds (P < .009) of the graft, but there was no difference in the proximal third. In the unimpinged group, the signal in all three zones did not change from 3 to 12 months after operation. The tibial tunnel placement was more anterior in the impinged knees (P < .001). Stability (P < .012) and knee extension (P < .003) were better in the unimpinged knees

  20. Fluid Signal Intensity That Mimicked A Supraspinatus Tendon Tear In A Subacromial Injected Shoulder: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Tae Eun; Shin, Hyun Woong [Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Subacromial steroid injections are a common procedure for treating shoulder pain. Several studies have reported on the difficulty of performing an accurate injection into the subacromial bursa, as well as the injected material infiltrated into other regional structures even when an accurate injection was done into the subacromial space. These misplacements, and especially in the rotator cuff, creates high signal intensity on T2WI that can mimic a rotator cuff tear. Bergman and Fredericson found that the bursal and extrabursal fluid is resolved or decreased 3 days after the injection, so they recommended a 3-day delay after the shoulder injection before performing MRI to prevent misinterpretation of the signal changes. We report here on a case of a false fullthickness tear of the supraspinatus tendon on MRI one month after subacromial injection, and the supraspinatus tendon turned out to be intact on the follow up ultrasonography and arthroscopic examination

  1. Integrated beam orientation and scanning-spot optimization in intensity-modulated proton therapy for brain and unilateral head and neck tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenbo; O'Connor, Daniel; Nguyen, Dan; Yu, Victoria Y; Ruan, Dan; Dong, Lei; Sheng, Ke

    2018-04-01

    Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) is the state-of-the-art method of delivering proton radiotherapy. Previous research has been mainly focused on optimization of scanning spots with manually selected beam angles. Due to the computational complexity, the potential benefit of simultaneously optimizing beam orientations and spot pattern could not be realized. In this study, we developed a novel integrated beam orientation optimization (BOO) and scanning-spot optimization algorithm for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). A brain chordoma and three unilateral head-and-neck patients with a maximal target size of 112.49 cm 3 were included in this study. A total number of 1162 noncoplanar candidate beams evenly distributed across 4π steradians were included in the optimization. For each candidate beam, the pencil-beam doses of all scanning spots covering the PTV and a margin were calculated. The beam angle selection and spot intensity optimization problem was formulated to include three terms: a dose fidelity term to penalize the deviation of PTV and OAR doses from ideal dose distribution; an L1-norm sparsity term to reduce the number of active spots and improve delivery efficiency; a group sparsity term to control the number of active beams between 2 and 4. For the group sparsity term, convex L2,1-norm and nonconvex L2,1/2-norm were tested. For the dose fidelity term, both quadratic function and linearized equivalent uniform dose (LEUD) cost function were implemented. The optimization problem was solved using the Fast Iterative Shrinkage-Thresholding Algorithm (FISTA). The IMPT BOO method was tested on three head-and-neck patients and one skull base chordoma patient. The results were compared with IMPT plans created using column generation selected beams or manually selected beams. The L2,1-norm plan selected spatially aggregated beams, indicating potential degeneracy using this norm. L2,1/2-norm was able to select spatially separated beams and achieve

  2. Correlation of non-mass-like abnormal MR signal intensity with pathological findings surrounding pediatric osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrouha, Karim Z.; Haidar, Rachid; Saghieh, Said; Musallam, Khaled M.; Samra, Alexis Bou; Tawil, Ayman; Chakhachiro, Zaher; Abdallah, Abeer; Khoury, Nabil J.; Saab, Raya; Muwakkit, Samar; Abboud, Miguel R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the role of MRI in interpreting abnormal signals within bones and soft tissues adjacent to tumor bulk of osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma in a pediatric population by correlating MR findings with histopathology. Thirty patients met the inclusion criteria, which included (1) osteosarcoma or Ewing's sarcoma, (2) MR studies no more than 2 months prior to surgery, (3) presence of abnormal MR signal surrounding the tumor bulk, (4) pathological material from resected tumor. The patients received standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Using grid maps on gross pathology specimens, the abnormal MR areas around the tumor were matched with the corresponding grid sections. Histopathology slides of these sections were then analyzed to determine the nature of the regions of interest. The MR/pathological correlation was evaluated using Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher's exact test. Twenty-seven patients had osteosarcoma and three patients had Ewing's sarcoma. Of the studied areas, 17.4% were positive for tumor (viable or necrotic). There was no statistically significant correlation between areas positive for tumor and age, gender, signal extent and intensity on MRI, or tissue type. There was, however, a statistically significant correlation between presence of tumor and the appearance of abnormal soft tissue signals. A feathery appearance correlated with tumor-negative areas whereas a bulky appearance correlated with tumor-positive regions. MR imaging is helpful in identifying the nature of abnormal signal areas surrounding bone sarcomas that are more likely to be tumor-free, particularly when the signal in the soft tissues surrounding the tumor is feathery and edema-like in appearance. (orig.)

  3. Correlation between neurohypophyseal vasopressin content and signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. An experimental study of vasopressin depletion model using dehydrated rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Hiroaki; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Ikeda, Koshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Fujisawa, Ichiro

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the signal intensity on T 1 -weighted MR images and vasopressin (VP) content in the posterior pituitary lobe. Fourteen rabbits were studied. There were 12 water-deprived rabbits (48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 hours: 2 each) and 2 controls. Sagittal T 1 -weighted SE (spin-echo) MR images were obtained before and after dehydration. The signal intensity ratio of the posterior pituitary lobe to the pons was correlated with the VP content in the posterior lobe as measured by radioimmunoassay. Before water deprivation, high signal intensity in the posterior lobe was demonstrated clearly in all 14 rabbits. After water deprivation, the hyperintense signal gradually decreased and became indistinguishable from anterior lobe in four animals. The mean signal intensity ratio before water deprivation was 1.55±0.12 (mean±SD) and after water deprivation, gradually decreased over time and reached to 1.19 after 168 hours of water deprivation. Pituitary VP content and concentration decreased in parallel with the signal intensity ratio of the posterior pituitary. Significantly correlation was observed between the signal intensity ratio and VP concentration of posterior pituitary (r=0.809, p 1 -weighted image may reflect a indicator of pituitary VP content and thus may enable evaluation of disorders of water metabolism. (author)

  4. Is there a single spot size and grid for intensity modulated proton therapy? Simulation of head and neck, prostate and mesothelioma cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widesott, Lamberto; Lomax, Antony J.; Schwarz, Marco [AtreP, Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, 38122 Trento (Italy); Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); AtreP, Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia, 38122 Trento (Italy)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the quality of dose distributions in real clinical cases for different dimensions of scanned proton pencil beams. The distance between spots (i.e., the grid of delivery) is optimized for each dimension of the pencil beam. Methods: The authors vary the {sigma} of the initial Gaussian size of the spot, from {sigma}{sub x} = {sigma}{sub y} = 3 mm to {sigma}{sub x} = {sigma}{sub y} = 8 mm, to evaluate the impact of the proton beam size on the quality of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans. The distance between spots, {Delta}x and {Delta}y, is optimized on the spot plane, ranging from 4 to 12 mm (i.e., each spot size is coupled with the best spot grid resolution). In our Hyperion treatment planning system (TPS), constrained optimization is applied with respect to the organs at risk (OARs), i.e., the optimization tries to satisfy the dose objectives in the planning target volume (PTV) as long as all planning objectives for the OARs are met. Three-field plans for a nasopharynx case, two-field plans for a prostate case, and two-field plans for a malignant pleural mesothelioma case are considered in our analysis. Results: For the head and neck tumor, the best grids (i.e., distance between spots) are 5, 4, 6, 6, and 8 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. {sigma} {<=} 5 mm is required for tumor volumes with low dose and {sigma}{<=} 4 mm for tumor volumes with high dose. For the prostate patient, the best grid is 4, 4, 5, 5, and 5 mm for {sigma} = 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. Beams with {sigma} > 3 mm did not satisfy our first clinical requirement that 95% of the prescribed dose is delivered to more than 95% of prostate and proximal seminal vesicles PTV. Our second clinical requirement, to cover the distal seminal vesicles PTV, is satisfied for beams as wide as {sigma} = 6 mm. For the mesothelioma case, the low dose PTV prescription is well respected for all values of {sigma}, while there is loss of high dose PTV coverage

  5. Assessment of lung development in isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia using signal intensity ratios on fetal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Herold, Christian; Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Csapo, Bence

    2010-01-01

    To investigate developmental changes in the apparently unaffected contralateral lung by using signal intensity ratios (SIR) and lung volumes (LV), and to search for correlation with clinical outcome. Twenty-five fetuses (22-37 weeks' gestation) were examined. Lung/liver signal intensity ratios (LLSIR) were assessed on T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences for both lungs, then together with LV compared with age-matched controls of 91 fetuses by using the U test. Differences in LLSIRs and lung volumes were correlated with neonatal outcomes. LLSIRs in fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) were significantly higher in both lungs on T1-weighted images and significantly lower on T2-weighted images, compared with normals (p < 0.05), increasing on T2-weighted imaging and decreasing on T1-weighted imaging during gestation. Total LV were significantly smaller in the CDH group than in controls (p < 0.05). No significant differences in LLSIR of the two lungs were found. Outcomes correlated significantly with total LV, but not with LLSIR. Changes in LLSIR seem to reflect developmental impairment in CDH; however, they provide no additional information in predicting outcome. LV remains the best indicator on fetal MR imaging of neonatal survival in isolated, left-sided CDH. (orig.)

  6. Preoperative diagnosis of breast diseases by dynamic MR mammography. Cut off point establishment for signal intensity ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Juji; Nagata, Takayasu; Kawagoe, Hajime; Tachibana, Susumu; Kajima, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Mutsuo; Uno, Takashi; Shimokawa, Kuniyasu.

    1997-01-01

    We have revealed that a dynamic study of the breast using MR imaging technique can estimate objectively benign-malignant differentiative diagnosis. Subjects were 41 cases of breast lesion, including 13 cases of breast cancer, 21 cases of mastopathy, six cases of fibroadenoma and one case of intraductal papillomatosis and the results of them were investigated in comparison with histopathological diagnosis. As so the method, we drew up time-signal intensity ratio curve plotting signal intensity ratio at each 30 second of dynamic MR mammography after Gd-DTPA administration. We found a especially high significant difference between cancer and mastopathy, within 90 second after Gd-DTPA administration (p=0.0000). Still more, we established cut off point concerning with establishment of 95% confidence interval, that is, at 30 second after Gd-DTPA administration of point equivalent 1.53 at 60 second equivalent 2.00, at 90 second equivalent 2.47, and about this estimating maneuver using the cut off point we named Dynamic ratio method. We can estimate preoperatively not only benign-malignant differentiative diagnosis with breast tumor, but also neighboring infiltration and lymph node metastasis of breast cancer using this Dynamic ratio method. Over again, Dynamic ratio method provides fine information to preoperative decision of resecting region for breast conserving surgery. The efficiency of this method is sensitivity=92.3%, specificity=89.3% and positive predictive value=80.0%. (author)

  7. Preoperative diagnosis of breast diseases by dynamic MR mammography. Cut off point establishment for signal intensity ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Juji; Nagata, Takayasu; Kawagoe, Hajime; Tachibana, Susumu; Kajima, Toshihiko; Hoshino, Mutsuo [Ibi General Hospital, Gifu (Japan); Uno, Takashi; Shimokawa, Kuniyasu

    1997-12-01

    We have revealed that a dynamic study of the breast using MR imaging technique can estimate objectively benign-malignant differentiative diagnosis. Subjects were 41 cases of breast lesion, including 13 cases of breast cancer, 21 cases of mastopathy, six cases of fibroadenoma and one case of intraductal papillomatosis and the results of them were investigated in comparison with histopathological diagnosis. As so the method, we drew up time-signal intensity ratio curve plotting signal intensity ratio at each 30 second of dynamic MR mammography after Gd-DTPA administration. We found a especially high significant difference between cancer and mastopathy, within 90 second after Gd-DTPA administration (p=0.0000). Still more, we established cut off point concerning with establishment of 95% confidence interval, that is, at 30 second after Gd-DTPA administration of point equivalent 1.53 at 60 second equivalent 2.00, at 90 second equivalent 2.47, and about this estimating maneuver using the cut off point we named Dynamic ratio method. We can estimate preoperatively not only benign-malignant differentiative diagnosis with breast tumor, but also neighboring infiltration and lymph node metastasis of breast cancer using this Dynamic ratio method. Over again, Dynamic ratio method provides fine information to preoperative decision of resecting region for breast conserving surgery. The efficiency of this method is sensitivity=92.3%, specificity=89.3% and positive predictive value=80.0%. (author)

  8. Assessment of lung development in isolated congenital diaphragmatic hernia using signal intensity ratios on fetal MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Herold, Christian; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Centre of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Csapo, Bence [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Obstetrics and Gyneocology, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-04-15

    To investigate developmental changes in the apparently unaffected contralateral lung by using signal intensity ratios (SIR) and lung volumes (LV), and to search for correlation with clinical outcome. Twenty-five fetuses (22-37 weeks' gestation) were examined. Lung/liver signal intensity ratios (LLSIR) were assessed on T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences for both lungs, then together with LV compared with age-matched controls of 91 fetuses by using the U test. Differences in LLSIRs and lung volumes were correlated with neonatal outcomes. LLSIRs in fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) were significantly higher in both lungs on T1-weighted images and significantly lower on T2-weighted images, compared with normals (p < 0.05), increasing on T2-weighted imaging and decreasing on T1-weighted imaging during gestation. Total LV were significantly smaller in the CDH group than in controls (p < 0.05). No significant differences in LLSIR of the two lungs were found. Outcomes correlated significantly with total LV, but not with LLSIR. Changes in LLSIR seem to reflect developmental impairment in CDH; however, they provide no additional information in predicting outcome. LV remains the best indicator on fetal MR imaging of neonatal survival in isolated, left-sided CDH. (orig.)

  9. Direct measurement of the signal intensity of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for preoperative grading and treatment guidance for brain gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chun Wu

    2012-11-01

    Conclusion: The proposed method – direct measuring of tumor signal intensity of DWI on PACS monitors – is feasible for grading gliomas in clinical neuro-oncology imaging services and has a high level of reliability and reproducibility.

  10. Optimizing signal intensity correction during evaluation of hepatic parenchymal enhancement on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRI: Comparison of three methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Minori, E-mail: onoda@radt.med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Kinki University Hospital, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan); Hyodo, Tomoko, E-mail: neneth@m.ehime-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Murakami, Takamichi, E-mail: murakami@med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro, E-mail: okada777@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Uto, Tatsuro, E-mail: chuho@med.kindai.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Kinki University Hospital, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka 589-8511 (Japan); Hori, Masatoshi, E-mail: mhori@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki, E-mail: ramiyati@mhs.mp.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Signal intensity is often used to evaluate hepatic enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA in the hepatobiliary phase. •Comparison of uncorrected signal intensity with T{sub 1} value revealed signal intensity instability. •Measurement of uncorrected liver SI or SNR often yields erroneous results on late-phase gadoxetate MRI due to shimming and other optimization techniques. •Signal intensity corrected by scale and rescale slope from DICOM data gave comparable results. -- Abstract: Objective: To compare signal intensity (SI) correction using scale and rescale slopes with SI correction using SIs of spleen and muscle for quantifying multiphase hepatic contrast enhancement with Gd-EOB-DTPA by assessing their correlation with T{sub 1} values generated from Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequence data (ER-T{sub 1}). Materials and methods: Thirty patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in this prospective clinical study. For each patient, breath-hold T{sub 1}-weighted fat-suppressed three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequences (e-THRIVE) were acquired before and 2 (first phase), 10 (second phase), and 20 min (third phase) after intravenous Gd-EOB-DTPA. Look-Locker turbo-field-echo (LL-TFE) sequences were acquired before and 1.5 (first phase), 8 (second phase), and 18 min (third phase) postcontrast. The liver parenchyma enhancement ratios (ER) of each phase were calculated using the SI from e-THRIVE sequences (ER-SI) and the T{sub 1} values generated from LL-TFE sequence data (ER-T{sub 1}) respectively. ER-SIs were calculated in three ways: (1) comparing with splenic SI (ER-SI-s), (2) comparing with muscle SI (ER-SI-m), (3) using scale and rescale slopes obtained from DICOM headers (ER-SI-c), to eliminate the effects of receiver gain and scaling. For each of the first, second and third phases, correlation and agreement were assessed between each ER-SI and ER-T{sub 1}. Results: In the first phase, all ER-SIs correlated

  11. High intensity signal of the posterior pituitary. A study with horizontal direction of frequency-encoding and fat suppression MR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the consistency of fat in the high intensity signals of the normal neurohypophysis and to differentiate the high signal of posterior pituitary from that of dorsum sella. Sagittal SE T1-weighted images with frequency encoding in the horizontal direction were used in order to differentiate the high signal of posterior pituitary and dorsum sella by the vertically-oriented chemical shift artifact. Material and methods: The sellae of 46 normal volunteers were imaged with a commercially available fat suppression technique and SE sequences with frequency encoding in vertical (25 cases) and horizontal (21 cases) axes. Results: The high signal intensity was absent in 9% of the normal volunteers with no predilection to any specific age group. None of the cases with posterior pituitary high intensity signals showed suppression of the signal with fat suppression technique. A fat suppression technique was helpful in documenting the hyperintensity in 7% of normal volunteers. Nineteen of the 21 (90%) cases with high signal intensity were detected by routine SE T1-weighted images, whereas 18 of the 19 (95%) cases were detected by imaging with frequency encoding in the horizontal direction. Conclusion: The high signal does not indicate the presence of fat. Fat suppression technique and a horizontal direction of frequency encoding help in differentiating the high signal of the neurohypophysis from that of dorsum sella. (orig.)

  12. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsuya; Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van; Takegawa, Hideki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki; Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru; Saito, Anneyuko I.; Sasai, Keisuke; Veld, Aart A. van't; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Korevaar, Erik W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D_2 − D_9_8, where D_2 and D_9_8 are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to 98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects have limited impact on target coverage, dose homogeneity, and

  13. Prospective Preference Assessment of Patients' Willingness to Participate in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Anand; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Paly, Jonathan J.; Halpern, Scott D.; Bruner, Deborah W.; Christodouleas, John P.; Coen, John J.; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate patients’ willingness to participate (WTP) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with proton beam therapy (PBT) for prostate cancer (PCa). Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study in which we prospectively enrolled patients with clinically localized PCa. We used purposive sampling to ensure a diverse sample based on age, race, travel distance, and physician. Patients participated in a semi-structured interview in which they reviewed a description of a hypothetical RCT, were asked open-ended and focused follow-up questions regarding their motivations for and concerns about enrollment, and completed a questionnaire assessing characteristics such as demographics and prior knowledge of IMRT or PBT. Patients’ stated WTP was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale. Results: Forty-six eligible patients (33 white, 13 black) were enrolled from the practices of eight physicians. We identified 21 factors that impacted patients’ WTP, which largely centered on five major themes: altruism/desire to compare treatments, randomization, deference to physician opinion, financial incentives, and time demands/scheduling. Most patients (27 of 46, 59%) stated they would either “definitely” or “probably” participate. Seventeen percent (8 of 46) stated they would “definitely not” or “probably not” enroll, most of whom (6 of 8) preferred PBT before their physician visit. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of patients indicated high WTP in a RCT comparing IMRT and PBT for PCa.

  14. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.; Kwon, S.

    2001-01-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within ±0.5% and ±0.5 o [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin

  15. Prospects for future proton studies at HRIBF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, C.R.; Batchelder, J. C.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; Grzywacz, R.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; McConnell, J.W.; Toth, K.S.; Rykaczewski, K.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2000-01-01

    Great progress has been made in the last 20 years in the study of proton emission from unstable nuclei, but the prospects for additional strides in the next several years are bright. The present main limitations on the study of proton radioactivity are related to the inability to produce copious quantities of nuclides beyond the proton drip line, and the difficulty of measuring proton radioactivity of a mass-separated nucleus in the first few microseconds of its existence. At the Holifield Facility we will attack the second of these limitations by using new signal processing CAMAC modules DGF-4C. Digitizing of the preamplifier signals should enable the analysis of a proton decay occurring at times even less than 1 microsecond after an implant in a strip detector. In the same process, the threshold energy at which we can make measurements will be lowered. These two things will hopefully enable the measurement of lower-energy, but faster decays of isotopes in the 100 Sn region and below. For the latter region, the proton decays crucial for a rp-process scenario are of particular interest (e.g. 69 Br decay). Secondly, for very short-lived species, we plan to make measurements (without residue separation) at points much closer to the target, thus reducing the flight time between the target and detector. As more intense radioactive beams become available, eg. 56 Ni, we will utilize these to produce more neutron-deficient nuclides by use of colder reactions than is possible with stable beams. In some cases where delayed proton emitters are present in the same isobaric chain, the use of the cold reactions with radioactive beams can provide purer samples of the isotope of interest, with a reduction in background from the delayed proton emitters in the same mass chain

  16. Relationship between signal intensity of blood flow in the pulmonary artery obtained by magnetic resonance imaging and results of right cardiac catheterization in patients with pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuguchi, Yasutoshi; Nagao, Keiichi; Kouno, Norihiro; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Okita, Shinya; Tojima, Hirokazu; Okada, Osamu; Kuriyama, Takayuki [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo

    1992-08-01

    Electrocardiogram-gated spin-echo magnetic resonance (MR) images of the chest were obtained in five normal controls and 35 patients with pulmonary disease (11 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 6 pulmonary thromboembolism, 5 primary pulmonary hypertension, 4 interstitial pulmonary disease, 4 pulmonary hypertension with disturbance of portal circulation, and 5 other diseases) who underwent right cardiac catheterization. In transverse images at the level of the right main pulmonary artery (rPA) and sagittal images at the level through the midsternal line and the spinal cord, the signal intensity of blood flow in the rPA was quantitatively evaluated, and the correlations with the MR signal intensity of intravascular flow and the parameters of hemodynamics were studied. In diastole MR images of both normal controls and patients mostly showed a significant signal and visible flow images. In systolic MR images, the mean values of hemodynamic parameters (mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), pulmonary arteriolar resistance (PAR), and cardiac index (CI)) were abnormal in patients with significant signal intensity of flow compared with those in patients without sufficient MR signal. The signal intensity was not correlated with mPAP; however, it significantly increased as PAR increased, and it increased as CI decreased both in diastole and in systole. Especially in systole, there was good correlation between the signal intensity in transverse MR images and CI and between signal intensity in sagittal MR images and PAR . These results suggest that the signal intensity of blood flow in the rPA on MR images can be used as an index of the severity of right heart failure associated with pulmonary disease. MR imaging is a useful modality to evaluate pulmonary circulation disturbance because of its ability to assess blood flow in the pulmonary artery noninvasively without interference from other structures such as bone and normal lung. (J.P.N.).

  17. Low intensity exercise prevents disturbances in rat cardiac insulin signaling and endothelial nitric oxide synthase induced by high fructose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanišić, Jelena; Korićanac, Goran; Ćulafić, Tijana; Romić, Snježana; Stojiljković, Mojca; Kostić, Milan; Pantelić, Marija; Tepavčević, Snežana

    2016-01-15

    Increase in fructose consumption together with decrease in physical activity contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome and consequently cardiovascular diseases. The current study examined the preventive role of exercise on defects in cardiac insulin signaling and function of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in fructose fed rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, sedentary fructose (received 10% fructose for 9 weeks) and exercise fructose (additionally exposed to low intensity exercise) groups. Concentration of triglycerides, glucose, insulin and visceral adipose tissue weight were determined to estimate metabolic syndrome development. Expression and/or phosphorylation of cardiac insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and eNOS were evaluated. Fructose overload increased visceral adipose tissue, insulin concentration and homeostasis model assessment index. Exercise managed to decrease visceral adiposity and insulin level and to increase insulin sensitivity. Fructose diet increased level of cardiac PTP1B and pIRS1 (Ser307), while levels of IR and ERK1/2, as well as pIRS1 (Tyr 632), pAkt (Ser473, Thr308) and pERK1/2 were decreased. These disturbances were accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. Exercise managed to prevent most of the disturbances in insulin signaling caused by fructose diet (except phosphorylation of IRS1 at Tyr 632 and phosphorylation and protein expression of ERK1/2) and consequently restored function of eNOS. Low intensity exercise could be considered as efficient treatment of cardiac insulin resistance induced by fructose diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exercise-intensity dependent alterations in plasma redox status do not reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Trewin, Adam; Levinger, Itamar; Shaw, Christopher S; Stepto, Nigel K

    2018-04-01

    Redox homeostasis and redox-sensitive protein signaling play a role in exercise-induced adaptation. The effects of sprint-interval exercise (SIE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE), on post-exercise plasma redox status are unclear. Furthermore, whether post-exercise plasma redox status reflects skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling is unknown. In a randomized crossover design, eight healthy adults performed a cycling session of HIIE (5×4min at 75% W max ), SIE (4×30s Wingate's), and CMIE work-matched to HIIE (30min at 50% of W max ). Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and catalase activity were measured immediately post, 1h, 2h and 3h post-exercise. Plasma redox status biomarkers were correlated with phosphorylation of skeletal muscle p38-MAPK, JNK, NF-κB, and IκBα protein content immediately and 3h post-exercise. Plasma catalase activity was greater with SIE (56.6±3.8Uml -1 ) compared to CMIE (42.7±3.2, pexercise plasma TBARS and SOD activity significantly (pexercise protocol. A significant positive correlation was detected between plasma catalase activity and skeletal muscle p38-MAPK phosphorylation 3h post-exercise (r=0.40, p=0.04). No other correlations were detected (all p>0.05). Low-volume SIE elicited greater post-exercise plasma catalase activity compared to HIIE and CMIE, and greater H 2 O 2 compared to CMIE. Plasma redox status did not, however, adequately reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. MRI of the normal brain from early childhood to middle age. Pt. 2. Age dependence of signal intensity changes on T2-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autti, T.; Raininko, R.; Vanhanen, S.L.; Kallio, M.; Santavuori, P.

    1994-01-01

    We examined 66 healthy volunteers aged 4 to 50 years by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the signal intensity was measured on T2-weighted images in numerous sites and correlated with age and sex. Using distilled water and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as references on each slice, we calculated the signal intensities of the brain structures. Calculated ratios between structures did not change with age, except for those of the globus pallidus and thalamus, in which the signal intensities decreased more rapidly. The signal intensities of other brain structures changed equally but this could not be discerned visually and quantitative measurements were required. The signal intensities in the white and deep grey matter decreased rapidly in the first decade and then gradually to reach a plateau after the age of 18 years. Maturation of the brain thus seems to continue until near the end of the second decade of life. No sex differences were found. Quantitative analysis requires intensity references. The CSF in the tips of the frontal horns seems to be as reliable as an external fluid reference for intensity, and can be used in routine examinations provided the frontal horns are large enough to avoid partial volume effect. (orig.)

  20. RapidArc, intensity modulated photon and proton techniques for recurrent prostate cancer in previously irradiated patients: a treatment planning comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C; Miralbell, Raymond; Wang, Hui; Cozzi, Luca; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Khan, Haleem G; Ratib, Osman; Rouzaud, Michel; Vees, Hansjoerg; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    A study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs (RA) and intensity modulation (with photons, IMRT, or protons, IMPT) radiation therapy (RT) for patients with recurrent prostate cancer after RT. Plans for RA, IMRT and IMPT were optimized for 7 patients. Prescribed dose was 56 Gy in 14 fractions. The recurrent gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined on 18 F-fluorocholine PET/CT scans. Plans aimed to cover at least 95% of the planning target volume with a dose > 50.4 Gy. A maximum dose (D Max ) of 61.6 Gy was allowed to 5% of the GTV. For the urethra, D Max was constrained to 37 Gy. Rectal D Median was < 17 Gy. Results were analyzed using Dose-Volume Histogram and conformity index (CI 90 ) parameters. Tumor coverage (GTV and PTV) was improved with RA (V 95% 92.6 ± 7.9 and 83.7 ± 3.3%), when compared to IMRT (V 95% 88.6 ± 10.8 and 77.2 ± 2.2%). The corresponding values for IMPT were intermediate for the GTV (V 95% 88.9 ± 10.5%) and better for the PTV (V 95% 85.6 ± 5.0%). The percentages of rectal and urethral volumes receiving intermediate doses (35 Gy) were significantly decreased with RA (5.1 ± 3.0 and 38.0 ± 25.3%) and IMPT (3.9 ± 2.7 and 25.1 ± 21.1%), when compared to IMRT (9.8 ± 5.3 and 60.7 ± 41.7%). CI 90 was 1.3 ± 0.1 for photons and 1.6 ± 0.2 for protons. Integral Dose was 1.1 ± 0.5 Gy*cm 3 *10 5 for IMPT and about a factor three higher for all photon's techniques. RA and IMPT showed improvements in conformal avoidance relative to fixed beam IMRT for 7 patients with recurrent prostate cancer. IMPT showed further sparing of organs at risk

  1. SU-E-T-452: Impact of Respiratory Motion On Robustly-Optimized Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy to Treat Lung Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W; Schild, S; Bues, M; Liao, Z; Sahoo, N; Park, P; Li, H; Li, Y; Li, X; Shen, J; Anand, A; Dong, L; Zhu, X; Mohan, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We compared conventionally optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans against the worst-case robustly optimized treatment plans for lung cancer. The comparison of the two IMPT optimization strategies focused on the resulting plans' ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set-up, inherent proton range uncertainty, and dose perturbation caused by respiratory motion. Methods: For each of the 9 lung cancer cases two treatment plans were created accounting for treatment uncertainties in two different ways: the first used the conventional Method: delivery of prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV) that is geometrically expanded from the internal target volume (ITV). The second employed the worst-case robust optimization scheme that addressed set-up and range uncertainties through beamlet optimization. The plan optimality and plan robustness were calculated and compared. Furthermore, the effects on dose distributions of the changes in patient anatomy due to respiratory motion was investigated for both strategies by comparing the corresponding plan evaluation metrics at the end-inspiration and end-expiration phase and absolute differences between these phases. The mean plan evaluation metrics of the two groups were compared using two-sided paired t-tests. Results: Without respiratory motion considered, we affirmed that worst-case robust optimization is superior to PTV-based conventional optimization in terms of plan robustness and optimality. With respiratory motion considered, robust optimization still leads to more robust dose distributions to respiratory motion for targets and comparable or even better plan optimality [D95% ITV: 96.6% versus 96.1% (p=0.26), D5% - D95% ITV: 10.0% versus 12.3% (p=0.082), D1% spinal cord: 31.8% versus 36.5% (p =0.035)]. Conclusion: Worst-case robust optimization led to superior solutions for lung IMPT. Despite of the fact that robust optimization did not explicitly

  2. T2-weighted high-intensity signals in the basal ganglia as an interesting image finding in Unverricht-Lundborg disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korja, Miikka; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Soilu-Hänninen, Merja; Magaudda, Adriana; Marttila, Reijo; Genton, Pierre; Parkkola, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a search for white matter changes (WMCs) in 13 Unverricht-Lundborg disease patients and compared the prevalence of WMCs in these patients to age-matched long-term epileptics and healthy controls. ULD patients had significantly more T2-weighted high-intensity signals on MRI than control subjects, due to the increased prevalence of these signals in the basal ganglia. Interestingly, ULD patients with the basal ganglia changes were overweight. Basal ganglia T2-weighted high-intensity signals are novel findings in ULD. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Leptomeningeal high signal intensity (ivy sign) on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) MR images in moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Hirokazu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 1608582 (Japan)]. E-mail: hirokazu_fujiwara@ybb.ne.jp; Momoshima, Suketaka [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 1608582 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Sachio [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 1608582 (Japan)

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: There are a few reports on leptomeningeal high signal intensity (LMHI: ivy sign) on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images in moyamoya disease, but the feature of this finding has not been completely understood. The purpose of this study was to characterize LMHI on FLAIR images in moyamoya disease and to assess usefulness of this finding in the diagnosis of moyamoya disease in conventional MR imaging. Material and methods: MR imaging of 28 patients with moyamoya disease was retrospectively reviewed. The grade of LMHI on FLAIR images was classified as 'absent,' 'minimal,' 'moderate' and 'marked.' Fifty-four hemispheres of 28 patients (2 patients had unilateral disease) were assessed for the frequency of visualization and distribution of LMHI. The correlations between LMHI on FLAIR images, moyamoya vessels on T1- and T2-weighted images and MR angiography findings were also analyzed. Results: Moderate and marked LMHI was seen in 31 out of 54 hemispheres (57%). LMHI was seen more prominently in the frontal and parietal lobes than in the temporal and occipital lobes. Although there was a tendency for LMHI on FLAIR images to be prominent in groups with moderate and marked moyamoya vessels on T1- and T2-weighted images, there was no significant correlation. More prominent LMHI was observed in the hemispheres in which cortical branches of the middle cerebral arteries were poorly visualized on MR angiography. Conclusion: Leptomeningeal high signal intensity (ivy sign) on FLAIR images is predominantly seen in the frontal and parietal lobes. Because this sign can be seen in patients with unremarkable moyamoya vessels, LMHI is a useful sign in conventional MR imaging for the diagnosis of moyamoya disease.

  4. Four-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations demonstrating how the extent of intensity-modulation impacts motion effects in proton therapy lung treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Grassberger, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare motion effects in intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) lung treatments with different levels of intensity modulation.Methods: Spot scanning IMPT treatment plans were generated for ten lung cancer patients for 2.5Gy(RBE) and 12Gy(RBE) fractions and two distinct energy-dependent spot sizes (σ∼8–17 mm and ∼2–4 mm). IMPT plans were generated with the target homogeneity of each individual field restricted to 20% ). These plans were compared to full IMPT (IMPT full ), which had no restriction on the single field homogeneity. 4D Monte Carlo simulations were performed upon the patient 4DCT geometry, including deformable image registration and incorporating the detailed timing structure of the proton delivery system. Motion effects were quantified via comparison of the results of the 4D simulations (4D-IMPT 20% , 4D-IMPT full ) with those of a 3D Monte Carlo simulation (3D-IMPT 20% , 3D-IMPT full ) upon the planning CT using the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), V 95 and D 1 -D 99 . The effects in normal lung were quantified using mean lung dose (MLD) and V 90% .Results: For 2.5Gy(RBE), the mean EUD for the large spot size is 99.9%± 2.8% for 4D-IMPT 20% compared to 100.1%± 2.9% for 4D-IMPT full . The corresponding values are 88.6%± 8.7% (4D-IMPT 20% ) and 91.0%± 9.3% (4D-IMPT full ) for the smaller spot size. The EUD value is higher in 69.7% of the considered deliveries for 4D-IMPT full . The V 95 is also higher in 74.7% of the plans for 4D-IMPT full , implying that IMPT full plans experience less underdose compared to IMPT 20% . However, the target dose homogeneity is improved in the majority (67.8%) of plans for 4D-IMPT 20% . The higher EUD and V 95 suggests that the degraded homogeneity in IMPT full is actually due to the introduction of hot spots in the target volume, perhaps resulting from the sharper in-target dose gradients. The greatest variations between the IMPT 20% and IMPT full deliveries are observed for patients with the

  5. Is There an Advantage in Designing Adapted, Patient-Specific PTV Margins in Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Therapy for Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Góra, Joanna; Stock, Markus; Lütgendorf-Caucig, Carola; Georg, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate robust margin strategies in intensity modulated proton therapy to account for interfractional organ motion in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: For 9 patients, one planning computed tomography (CT) scan and daily and weekly cone beam CTs (CBCTs) were acquired and coregistered. The following planning target volume (PTV) approaches were investigated: a clinical target volume (CTV) delineated on the planning CT (CTV ct ) plus 10-mm margin (PTV 10mm ); a reduced PTV (PTV Red ): CTV ct plus 5 mm in the left-right (LR) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 8 mm in the inferior-superior (IS) directions; and a PTV Hull method: the sum of CTV ct and CTVs from 5 CBCTs from the first week plus 3 mm in the LR and IS directions and 5 mm in the AP direction. For each approach, separate plans were calculated using a spot-scanning technique with 2 lateral fields. Results: Each approach achieved excellent target coverage. Differences were observed in volume receiving 98% of the prescribed dose (V 98% ) where PTV Hull and PTV Red results were superior to the PTV 10mm concept. The PTV Hull approach was more robust to organ motion. The V 98% for CTVs was 99.7%, whereas for PTV Red and PTV 10mm plans, V 98% was 98% and 96.1%, respectively. Doses to organs at risk were higher for PTV Hull and PTV 10mm plans than for PTV Red , but only differences between PTV 10mm and PTV Red were significant. Conclusions: In terms of organ sparing, the PTV 10mm method was inferior but not significantly different from the PTV Red and PTV Hull approaches. PTV Hull was most insensitive to target motion

  6. Assessment of organ dose reduction and secondary cancer risk associated with the use of proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of neuroblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji, Hiroshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Schneider, Uwe; Ishida, Yuji; Konno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Haruo; Kase, Yuki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Ogawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    To compare proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in terms of their organ doses and ability to cause secondary cancer in normal organs. Five patients (median age, 4 years; range, 2–11 years) who underwent PBT for retroperitoneal neuroblastoma were selected for treatment planning simulation. Four patients had stage 4 tumors and one had stage 2A tumor, according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System. Two patients received 36 Gy, two received 21.6 Gy, and one received 41.4 Gy of radiation. The volume structures of these patients were used for simulations of CRT and IMRT treatment. Dose–volume analyses of liver, stomach, colon, small intestine, pancreas, and bone were performed for the simulations. Secondary cancer risks in these organs were calculated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) model, which took into account the rates of cell killing, repopulation, and the neutron dose from the treatment machine. In all evaluated organs, the mean dose in PBT was 20–80% of that in CRT. IMRT also showed lower mean doses than CRT for two organs (20% and 65%), but higher mean doses for the other four organs (110–120%). The risk of secondary cancer in PBT was 24–83% of that in CRT for five organs, but 121% of that in CRT for pancreas. The risk of secondary cancer in IMRT was equal to or higher than CRT for four organs (range 100–124%). Low radiation doses in normal organs are more frequently observed in PBT than in IMRT. Assessments of secondary cancer risk showed that PBT reduces the risk of secondary cancer in most organs, whereas IMRT is associated with a higher risk than CRT

  7. SU-F-T-205: Effectiveness of Robust Treatment Planning to Account for Inter- Fractional Variation in Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X; Zhang, J; Qin, A; Liang, J; Zhou, J; Yan, D; Chen, P; Krauss, D; Ding, X [Beaumont Health Systeml, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential benefits of robust optimization in intensity modulated proton therapy(IMPT) treatment planning to account for inter-fractional variation for Head Neck Cancer(HNC). Methods: One patient with bilateral HNC previous treated at our institution was used in this study. Ten daily CBCTs were selected. The CT numbers of the CBCTs were corrected by mapping the CT numbers from simulation CT via Deformable Image Registration. The planning target volumes(PTVs) were defined by a 3mm expansion from clinical target volumes(CTVs). The prescription was 70Gy, 54Gy to CTV1, CTV2, and PTV1, PTV2 for robust optimized(RO) and conventionally optimized(CO) plans respectively. Both techniques were generated by RayStation with the same beam angles: two anterior oblique and two posterior oblique angles. The similar dose constraints were used to achieve 99% of CTV1 received 100% prescription dose while kept the hotspots less than 110% of the prescription. In order to evaluate the dosimetric result through the course of treatment, the contours were deformed from simulation CT to daily CBCTs, modified, and approved by a radiation oncologist. The initial plan on the simulation CT was re-replayed on the daily CBCTs followed the bony alignment. The target coverage was evaluated using the daily doses and the cumulative dose. Results: Eight of 10 daily deliveries with using RO plan achieved at least 95% prescription dose to CTV1 and CTV2, while still kept maximum hotspot less than 112% of prescription compared with only one of 10 for the CO plan to achieve the same standards. For the cumulative doses, the target coverage for both RO and CO plans was quite similar, which was due to the compensation of cold and hot spots. Conclusion: Robust optimization can be effectively applied to compensate for target dose deficit caused by inter-fractional target geometric variation in IMPT treatment planning.

  8. Increase in tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities in advanced head-and-neck cancer for dose-escalated intensity-modulated photon and proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika eJakobi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Presently used radio-chemotherapy regimens result in moderate local control rates for patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. Dose escalation (DE may be an option to improve patient outcome, but may also increase the risk of toxicities in healthy tissue. The presented treatment planning study evaluated the feasibility of two DE levels for advanced HNSCC patients, planned with either intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMXT or proton therapy (IMPT.Materials and Methods:For 45 HNSCC patients, IMXT and IMPT treatment plans were created including DE via a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB in the high-risk volume, while maintaining standard fractionation with 2 Gy per fraction in the remaining target volume. Two DE levels for the SIB were compared: 2.3 Gy and 2.6 Gy. Treatment plan evaluation included assessment of tumor control probabilities (TCP and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP.Results:An increase of approximately 10% in TCP was estimated between the DE levels. A pronounced high-dose rim surrounding the SIB volume was identified in IMXT treatment. Compared to IMPT, this extra dose slightly increased the TCP values and to a larger extent the NTCP values. For both modalities, the higher DE level led only to a small increase in NTCP values (mean differences < 2% in all models, except for the risk of aspiration, which increased on average by 8% and 6% with IMXT and IMPT, respectively, but showed a considerable patient dependence. Conclusions:Both DE levels appear applicable to patients with IMXT and IMPT since all calculated NTCP values, except for one, increased only little for the higher DE level. The estimated TCP increase is of relevant magnitude. The higher DE schedule needs to be investigated carefully in the setting of a prospective clinical trial, especially regarding toxicities caused by high local doses that lack a sound dose response description, e.g., ulcers.

  9. Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated and Proton Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthan, Anju; Pruttivarasin, Narin; Davies, Diane; Taylor, Douglas C. A.; Pawar, Vivek; Bijlani, Akash; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Chen, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publicly available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Results: Compared to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy (PT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost-effective in 75% and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75% and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusion: Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  10. Comparative cost-effectiveness of stereotactic body radiation therapy versus intensity-modulated and proton radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju eParthan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the cost-effectiveness of several external beam radiation treatment modalities for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer.Methods. A lifetime Markov model incorporated the probabilities of experiencing treatment-related long-term toxicity or death. Toxicity probabilities were derived from published sources using meta-analytical techniques. Utilities and costs in the model were obtained from publically available secondary sources. The model calculated quality-adjusted life expectancy and expected lifetime cost per patient, and derived ratios of incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY gained between treatments. Analyses were conducted from both a payer and societal perspectives. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed.Results. Compared to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and proton beam therapy (PT, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT was less costly and resulted in more QALYs. Sensitivity analyses showed that the conclusions in the base-case scenario were robust with respect to variations in toxicity and cost parameters consistent with available evidence. At a threshold of $50,000/QALY, SBRT was cost effective in 75%, and 94% of probabilistic simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, from a payer perspective. From a societal perspective, SBRT was cost-effective in 75%, and 96% of simulations compared to IMRT and PT, respectively, at a threshold of $50,000/QALY. In threshold analyses, SBRT was less expensive with better outcomes compared to IMRT at toxicity rates 23% greater than the SBRT base-case rates. Conclusions. Based on the assumption that each treatment modality results in equivalent long-term efficacy, SBRT is a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved quality-adjusted survival compared to IMRT and PT for the treatment of localized prostate cancer.

  11. Prospective Preference Assessment of Patients' Willingness to Participate in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Proton Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Anand [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A.; Paly, Jonathan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Halpern, Scott D. [Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Center for Bioethics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Christodouleas, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Coen, John J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate patients' willingness to participate (WTP) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with proton beam therapy (PBT) for prostate cancer (PCa). Methods and Materials: We undertook a qualitative research study in which we prospectively enrolled patients with clinically localized PCa. We used purposive sampling to ensure a diverse sample based on age, race, travel distance, and physician. Patients participated in a semi-structured interview in which they reviewed a description of a hypothetical RCT, were asked open-ended and focused follow-up questions regarding their motivations for and concerns about enrollment, and completed a questionnaire assessing characteristics such as demographics and prior knowledge of IMRT or PBT. Patients' stated WTP was assessed using a 6-point Likert scale. Results: Forty-six eligible patients (33 white, 13 black) were enrolled from the practices of eight physicians. We identified 21 factors that impacted patients' WTP, which largely centered on five major themes: altruism/desire to compare treatments, randomization, deference to physician opinion, financial incentives, and time demands/scheduling. Most patients (27 of 46, 59%) stated they would either 'definitely' or 'probably' participate. Seventeen percent (8 of 46) stated they would 'definitely not' or 'probably not' enroll, most of whom (6 of 8) preferred PBT before their physician visit. Conclusions: A substantial proportion of patients indicated high WTP in a RCT comparing IMRT and PBT for PCa.

  12. Limited Impact of Setup and Range Uncertainties, Breathing Motion, and Interplay Effects in Robustly Optimized Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Tatsuya [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Widder, Joachim; Dijk, Lisanne V. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Takegawa, Hideki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko; Takashina, Masaaki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Usui, Keisuke; Kurokawa, Chie; Sugimoto, Satoru [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Anneyuko I. [Department of Radiology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sasai, Keisuke [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Veld, Aart A. van' t; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Korevaar, Erik W., E-mail: e.w.korevaar@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of setup and range uncertainties, breathing motion, and interplay effects using scanning pencil beams in robustly optimized intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Three-field IMPT plans were created using a minimax robust optimization technique for 10 NSCLC patients. The plans accounted for 5- or 7-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties. The robustness of the IMPT nominal plans was evaluated considering (1) isotropic 5-mm setup errors with ±3% range uncertainties; (2) breathing motion; (3) interplay effects; and (4) a combination of items 1 and 2. The plans were calculated using 4-dimensional and average intensity projection computed tomography images. The target coverage (TC, volume receiving 95% of prescribed dose) and homogeneity index (D{sub 2} − D{sub 98}, where D{sub 2} and D{sub 98} are the least doses received by 2% and 98% of the volume) for the internal clinical target volume, and dose indexes for lung, esophagus, heart and spinal cord were compared with that of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. Results: The TC and homogeneity index for all plans were within clinical limits when considering the breathing motion and interplay effects independently. The setup and range uncertainties had a larger effect when considering their combined effect. The TC decreased to <98% (clinical threshold) in 3 of 10 patients for robust 5-mm evaluations. However, the TC remained >98% for robust 7-mm evaluations for all patients. The organ at risk dose parameters did not significantly vary between the respective robust 5-mm and robust 7-mm evaluations for the 4 error types. Compared with the volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, the IMPT plans showed better target homogeneity and mean lung and heart dose parameters reduced by about 40% and 60%, respectively. Conclusions: In robustly optimized IMPT for stage III NSCLC, the setup and range

  13. Intensity Modulated Proton and Photon Therapy for Early Prostate Cancer With or Without Transperineal Injection of a Polyethylen Glycol Spacer: A Treatment Planning Comparison Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Damien C., E-mail: damien.weber@unige.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Zilli, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Vallee, Jean Paul [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond [Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Medical Physics Unit, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Rectal toxicity is a serious adverse effect in early-stage prostate cancer patients treated with curative radiation therapy (RT). Injecting a spacer between Denonvilliers' fascia increases the distance between the prostate and the anterior rectal wall and may thus decrease the rectal radiation-induced toxicity. We assessed the dosimetric impact of this spacer with advanced delivery RT techniques, including intensity modulated RT (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and intensity modulated proton beam RT (IMPT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were simulated for RT with or without spacer. Plans were computed for IMRT, VMAT, and IMPT using the Eclipse treatment planning system using both computed tomography spacer+ and spacer- data sets. Prostate {+-} seminal vesicle planning target volume [PTV] and organs at risk (OARs) dose-volume histograms were calculated. The results were analyzed using dose and volume metrics for comparative planning. Results: Regardless of the radiation technique, spacer injection decreased significantly the rectal dose in the 60- to 70-Gy range. Mean V{sub 70Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} with IMRT, VMAT, and IMPT planning were 5.3 {+-} 3.3%/13.9 {+-} 10.0%, 3.9 {+-} 3.2%/9.7 {+-} 5.7%, and 5.0 {+-} 3.5%/9.5 {+-} 4.7% after spacer injection. Before spacer administration, the corresponding values were 9.8 {+-} 5.4% (P=.012)/24.8 {+-} 7.8% (P=.012), 10.1 {+-} 3.0% (P=.002)/17.9 {+-} 3.9% (P=.003), and 9.7 {+-} 2.6% (P=.003)/14.7% {+-} 2.7% (P=.003). Importantly, spacer injection usually improved the PTV coverage for IMRT. With this technique, mean V{sub 70.2Gy} (P=.07) and V{sub 74.1Gy} (P=0.03) were 100 {+-} 0% to 99.8 {+-} 0.2% and 99.1 {+-} 1.2% to 95.8 {+-} 4.6% with and without Spacer, respectively. As a result of spacer injection, bladder doses were usually higher but not significantly so. Only IMPT managed to decrease the rectal dose after spacer injection for all dose levels, generally with no

  14. Measurement of profile and intensity of proton beam by an integrating current transformer and a segmented parallel-plate ion chamber for the AGS-spallation target experiment (ASTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takada, Hiroshi

    2001-03-01

    Profile and intensity of proton beams incident to a mercury target were measured for the experiments under AGS-spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. Protons of 1.94, 12 and 24 GeV energy were measured for a temperature, pressure wave and neutronics in the mercury target. For the beam profile measurement, segmented parallel-plate ion chamber (CHIDORI) was used as the online detector. Imaging plates (IP) were also used for the profile measurement with aluminum activation foils as the image converter. An integrating current transformer (ICT) and activation method by Cu foil were used for the measurement of beam intensity. The beam profile obtained by CHIDORI gives a good agreement with the results with the IP. The beam intensity obtained by ICT agrees with the data obtained by the activation technique within ±3% for 12 and 24 GeV cases. Furthermore, these results show in good agreement with those obtained by the monitor of segmented wire ionization chamber (SWIC) and secondary emission chamber (SEC) installed by the AGS team. Therefore, a reliable beam monitor technique was established, so that the analysis of the experiment such as temperature and pressure wave can be normalized by the number of incident protons. (author)

  15. Significant reduction of normal tissue dose by proton radiotherapy compared with three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Stage I or Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Zhang Xiaodong; Wang Xiaochun; Kang Yixiu; Riley, Beverly C.; Bilton, Stephen C.; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare dose-volume histograms (DVH) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by photon or proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Dose-volume histograms were compared between photon, including three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and proton plans at doses of 66 Gy, 87.5 Gy in Stage I (n = 10) and 60-63 Gy, and 74 Gy in Stage III (n 15). Results: For Stage I, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 31.8%, 24.6%, and 15.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 66 Gy, whereas they were 13.4%, 12.3%, and 10.9%, respectively, with proton with dose escalation to 87.5 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) (p = 0.002). For Stage III, the mean total lung V5, V10, and V20 were 54.1%, 46.9%, and 34.8%, respectively, for photon 3D-CRT with 63 Gy, whereas they were 39.7%, 36.6%, and 31.6%, respectively, for proton with dose escalation to 74 CGE (p = 0.002). In all cases, the doses to lung, spinal cord, heart, esophagus, and integral dose were lower with proton therapy even compared with IMRT. Conclusions: Proton treatment appears to reduce dose to normal tissues significantly, even with dose escalation, compared with standard-dose photon therapy, either 3D-CRT or IMRT

  16. Intensity-modulated proton therapy, volumetric-modulated arc therapy, and 3D conformal radiotherapy in anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma. A dosimetric comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeberg, S.; Debus, J. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Harrabi, S.B.; Bougatf, N.; Rieber, J.; Koerber, S.A.; Herfarth, K.; Rieken, S. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bernhardt, D.; Syed, M.; Sprave, T.; Mohr, A. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Abdollahi, A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, T. [Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, S.E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institut fuer Innovative Radiotherapie (iRT), Department of Radiation Sciences (DRS), Neuherberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The prognosis for high-grade glioma (HGG) patients is poor; thus, treatment-related side effects need to be minimized to conserve quality of life and functionality. Advanced techniques such as proton radiation therapy (PRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) may potentially further reduce the frequency and severity of radiogenic impairment. We retrospectively assessed 12 HGG patients who had undergone postoperative intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). VMAT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were generated and optimized for comparison after contouring crucial neuronal structures important for neurogenesis and neurocognitive function. Integral dose (ID), homogeneity index (HI), and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC) were calculated from dose statistics. Toxicity data were evaluated. Target volume coverage was comparable for all three modalities. Compared to 3D-CRT and VMAT, PRT showed statistically significant reductions (p < 0.05) in mean dose to whole brain (-20.2 %, -22.7 %); supratentorial (-14.2 %, -20,8 %) and infratentorial (-91.0 %, -77.0 %) regions; brainstem (-67.6 %, -28.1 %); pituitary gland (-52.9 %, -52.5 %); contralateral hippocampus (-98.9 %, -98.7 %); and contralateral subventricular zone (-62.7 %, -66.7 %, respectively). Fatigue (91.7 %), radiation dermatitis (75.0 %), focal alopecia (100.0 %), nausea (41.7 %), cephalgia (58.3 %), and transient cerebral edema (16.7 %) were the most common acute toxicities. Essential dose reduction while maintaining equal target volume coverage was observed using PRT, particularly in contralaterally located critical neuronal structures, areas of neurogenesis, and structures of neurocognitive functions. These findings were supported by preliminary clinical results confirming the safety and feasibility of PRT in HGG. (orig.) [German] Die Prognose bei ''High-grade''-Gliomen (HGG) ist infaust. Gerade bei diesen Patienten sollten therapieassoziierte Nebenwirkungen minimiert werden

  17. The use the a high intensity neutrino beam from the ESS proton linac for measurement of neutrino CP violation and mass hierarchy

    CERN Document Server

    Baussan, E.; Ekelof, T.; Martinez, E.Fernandez; Ohman, H.; Vassilopoulos, N.

    2012-01-01

    It is proposed to complement the ESS proton linac with equipment that would enable the production, concurrently with the production of the planned ESS beam used for neutron production, of a 5 MW beam of 10$^{23}$ 2.5 GeV protons per year in microsecond short pulses to produce a neutrino Super Beam, and to install a megaton underground water Cherenkov detector in a mine to detect $\

  18. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound is effective for progressive-stage lumbar spondylolysis with MRI high-signal change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiji; Togawa, Daisuke; Mihara, Yuki; Murata, Hideyuki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the treatment effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on progressive-stage spondylolysis. Spondylolysis is a stress fracture of the pars interarticularis. Based on the results of computed tomography, spondylolysis was classified into three categories: early, progressive, and terminal. Bone healing was prolonged or not obtained in progressive-stage spondylolysis. The progression of spondylolysis to nonunion has been associated with an increased incidence of spondylolisthesis. To prevent these clinical conditions, achieving bony healing of the spondylolysis site should be the goal of treatment. 15 consecutive pediatric patients with progressive-stage spondylolysis (defects) with MRI high-signal change were analyzed. Nine patients were treated conservative treatment including avoidance of any sport activity and the use of a brace during treatment (conventional). Six patients were treated using LIPUS everyday during treatment in addition to conservative treatment. Approximately every 1.5 months, bone healing was evaluated via CT. Cases that retained defects after 4.5 months were defined as nonunion. Two patients dropped out during the study period. A total of 13 patients (mean 14.6 ± 2.5 years) from the database met with 19 interarticularis defects. The bone union rate in LIPUS group was significantly higher than that in conventional group (66.7 vs. 10.0%, p = 0.020). The treatment period to bone union was 3.8 months and 2.7 ± 0.3 months in conventional and LIPUS groups. This study revealed that LIPUS treatment might be effective for bone union in patients with progressive-stage spondylolysis with MRI high-signal change. 4.

  19. SU-E-T-574: Novel Chance-Constrained Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Planning to Account for Range and Patient Setup Uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Y; Liang, J; Liu, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We propose to apply a probabilistic framework, namely chanceconstrained optimization, in the intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning subject to range and patient setup uncertainties. The purpose is to hedge against the influence of uncertainties and improve robustness of treatment plans. Methods: IMPT plans were generated for a typical prostate patient. Nine dose distributions are computed — the nominal one and one each for ±5mm setup uncertainties along three cardinal axes and for ±3.5% range uncertainty. These nine dose distributions are supplied to the solver CPLEX as chance constraints to explicitly control plan robustness under these representative uncertainty scenarios with certain probability. This probability is determined by the tolerance level. We make the chance-constrained model tractable by converting it to a mixed integer optimization problem. The quality of plans derived from this method is evaluated using dose-volume histogram (DVH) indices such as tumor dose homogeneity (D5% – D95%) and coverage (D95%) and normal tissue sparing like V70 of rectum, V65, and V40 of bladder. We also compare the results from this novel method with the conventional PTV-based method to further demonstrate its effectiveness Results: Our model can yield clinically acceptable plans within 50 seconds. The chance-constrained optimization produces IMPT plans with comparable target coverage, better target dose homogeneity, and better normal tissue sparing compared to the PTV-based optimization [D95% CTV: 67.9 vs 68.7 (Gy), D5% – D95% CTV: 11.9 vs 18 (Gy), V70 rectum: 0.0 % vs 0.33%, V65 bladder: 2.17% vs 9.33%, V40 bladder: 8.83% vs 21.83%]. It also simultaneously makes the plan more robust [Width of DVH band at D50%: 2.0 vs 10.0 (Gy)]. The tolerance level may be varied to control the tradeoff between plan robustness and quality. Conclusion: The chance-constrained optimization generates superior IMPT plan compared to the PTV-based optimization with

  20. TH-CD-209-04: Fuzzy Robust Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Planning to Account for Range and Patient Setup Uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Y; Bues, M; Schild, S; Liu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We propose to apply a robust optimization model based on fuzzy-logic constraints in the intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning subject to range and patient setup uncertainties. The purpose is to ensure the plan robustness under uncertainty and obtain the best trade-off between tumor dose coverage and organ-at-risk(OAR) sparing. Methods: Two IMPT plans were generated for 3 head-and-neck cancer patients: one used the planning target volume(PTV) method; the other used the fuzzy robust optimization method. In the latter method, nine dose distributions were computed - the nominal one and one each for ±3mm setup uncertainties along three cardinal axes and for ±3.5% range uncertainty. For tumors, these nine dose distributions were explicitly controlled by adding hard constraints with adjustable parameters. For OARs, fuzzy constraints that allow the dose to vary within a certain range were used so that the tumor dose distribution was guaranteed by minimum compromise of that of OARs. We rendered this model tractable by converting the fuzzy constraints to linear constraints. The plan quality was evaluated using dose-volume histogram(DVH) indices such as tumor dose coverage(D95%), homogeneity(D5%-D95%), plan robustness(DVH band at D95%), and OAR sparing like D1% of brain and D1% of brainstem. Results: Our model could yield clinically acceptable plans. The fuzzy-logic robust optimization method produced IMPT plans with comparable target dose coverage and homogeneity compared to the PTV method(unit: Gy[RBE]; average[min, max])(CTV D95%: 59 [52.7, 63.5] vs 53.5[46.4, 60.1], CTV D5% - D95%: 11.1[5.3, 18.6] vs 14.4[9.2, 21.5]). It also generated more robust plans(CTV DVH band at D95%: 3.8[1.2, 5.6] vs 11.5[6.2, 16.7]). The parameters of tumor constraints could be adjusted to control the tradeoff between tumor coverage and OAR sparing. Conclusion: The fuzzy-logic robust optimization generates superior IMPT with minimum compromise of OAR sparing. This research

  1. TH-CD-209-04: Fuzzy Robust Optimization in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Planning to Account for Range and Patient Setup Uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Y; Bues, M; Schild, S; Liu, W [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We propose to apply a robust optimization model based on fuzzy-logic constraints in the intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) planning subject to range and patient setup uncertainties. The purpose is to ensure the plan robustness under uncertainty and obtain the best trade-off between tumor dose coverage and organ-at-risk(OAR) sparing. Methods: Two IMPT plans were generated for 3 head-and-neck cancer patients: one used the planning target volume(PTV) method; the other used the fuzzy robust optimization method. In the latter method, nine dose distributions were computed - the nominal one and one each for ±3mm setup uncertainties along three cardinal axes and for ±3.5% range uncertainty. For tumors, these nine dose distributions were explicitly controlled by adding hard constraints with adjustable parameters. For OARs, fuzzy constraints that allow the dose to vary within a certain range were used so that the tumor dose distribution was guaranteed by minimum compromise of that of OARs. We rendered this model tractable by converting the fuzzy constraints to linear constraints. The plan quality was evaluated using dose-volume histogram(DVH) indices such as tumor dose coverage(D95%), homogeneity(D5%-D95%), plan robustness(DVH band at D95%), and OAR sparing like D1% of brain and D1% of brainstem. Results: Our model could yield clinically acceptable plans. The fuzzy-logic robust optimization method produced IMPT plans with comparable target dose coverage and homogeneity compared to the PTV method(unit: Gy[RBE]; average[min, max])(CTV D95%: 59 [52.7, 63.5] vs 53.5[46.4, 60.1], CTV D5% - D95%: 11.1[5.3, 18.6] vs 14.4[9.2, 21.5]). It also generated more robust plans(CTV DVH band at D95%: 3.8[1.2, 5.6] vs 11.5[6.2, 16.7]). The parameters of tumor constraints could be adjusted to control the tradeoff between tumor coverage and OAR sparing. Conclusion: The fuzzy-logic robust optimization generates superior IMPT with minimum compromise of OAR sparing. This research

  2. SU-F-BRD-01: A Novel 4D Robust Optimization Mitigates Interplay Effect in Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W; Shen, J; Stoker, J; Bues, M; Schild, S; Wong, W; Chang, J; Liao, Z; Wen, Z; Sahoo, N; Herman, M; Mohan, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the impact of interplay effect on 3D and 4D robustly optimized intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans to treat lung cancer. Methods: Two IMPT plans were created for 11 non-small-cell-lung-cancer cases with 6–14 mm spots. 3D robust optimization generated plans on average CTs with the internal gross tumor volume density overridden to deliver 66 CGyE in 33 fractions to the internal target volume (ITV). 4D robust optimization generated plans on 4D CTs with the delivery of prescribed dose to the clinical target volume (CTV). In 4D optimization, the CTV of individual 4D CT phases received non-uniform doses to achieve a uniform cumulative dose. Dose evaluation software was developed to model time-dependent spot delivery to incorporate interplay effect with randomized starting phases of each field per fraction. Patient anatomy voxels were mapped from phase to phase via deformable image registration to score doses. Indices from dose-volume histograms were used to compare target coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal-tissue sparing. DVH indices were compared using Wilcoxon test. Results: Given the presence of interplay effect, 4D robust optimization produced IMPT plans with better target coverage and homogeneity, but slightly worse normal tissue sparing compared to 3D robust optimization (unit: Gy) [D95% ITV: 63.5 vs 62.0 (p=0.014), D5% - D95% ITV: 6.2 vs 7.3 (p=0.37), D1% spinal cord: 29.0 vs 29.5 (p=0.52), Dmean total lung: 14.8 vs 14.5 (p=0.12), D33% esophagus: 33.6 vs 33.1 (p=0.28)]. The improvement of target coverage (D95%,4D – D95%,3D) was related to the ratio RMA3/(TVx10−4), with RMA and TV being respiratory motion amplitude (RMA) and tumor volume (TV), respectively. Peak benefit was observed at ratios between 2 and 10. This corresponds to 125 – 625 cm3 TV with 0.5-cm RMA. Conclusion: 4D optimization produced more interplay-effect-resistant plans compared to 3D optimization. It is most effective when respiratory motion is modest

  3. Comparison of linear and nonlinear programming approaches for "worst case dose" and "minmax" robust optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghian, Maryam; Cao, Wenhua; Liu, Wei; Kardar, Laleh; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Mohan, Radhe; Lim, Gino

    2017-03-01

    Robust optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) takes uncertainties into account during spot weight optimization and leads to dose distributions that are resilient to uncertainties. Previous studies demonstrated benefits of linear programming (LP) for IMPT in terms of delivery efficiency by considerably reducing the number of spots required for the same quality of plans. However, a reduction in the number of spots may lead to loss of robustness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance in terms of plan quality and robustness of two robust optimization approaches using LP and nonlinear programming (NLP) models. The so-called "worst case dose" and "minmax" robust optimization approaches and conventional plan