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Sample records for proton fluence model

  1. Probability model for worst case solar proton event fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xapsos, M.A.; Summers, G.P.; Barth, J.L.; Stassinopoulos, E.G.; Burke, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects that solar proton events have on microelectronics and solar arrays are important considerations for spacecraft in geostationary orbits, polar orbits and on interplanetary missions. A predictive model of worst case solar proton event fluences is presented. It allows the expected worst case event fluence to be calculated for a given confidence level and for periods of time corresponding to space missions. The proton energy range is from >1 to >300 MeV, so that the model is useful for a variety of radiation effects applications. For each proton energy threshold, the maximum entropy principle is used to select the initial distribution of solar proton event fluences. This turns out to be a truncated power law, i.e., a power law for smaller event fluences that smoothly approaches zero at a maximum fluence. The strong agreement of the distribution with satellite data for the last three solar cycles indicates this description captures the essential features of a solar proton event fluence distribution. Extreme value theory is then applied to the initial distribution of events to obtain the model of worst case fluences

  2. A comparison of simple and realistic eye models for calculation of fluence to dose conversion coefficients in a broad parallel beam incident of protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakhaee, Mahmoud; Vejdani-Noghreiyan, Alireza; Ebrahimi-Khankook, Atiyeh

    2015-01-01

    Radiation induced cataract has been demonstrated among people who are exposed to ionizing radiation. To evaluate the deterministic effects of ionizing radiation on the eye lens, several papers dealing with the eye lens dose have been published. ICRP Publication 103 states that the lens of the eye may be more radiosensitive than previously considered. Detailed investigation of the response of the lens showed that there are strong differences in sensitivity to ionizing radiation exposure with respect to cataract induction among the tissues of the lens of the eye. This motivated several groups to look deeper into issue of the dose to a sensitive cell population within the lens, especially for radiations with low energy penetrability that have steep dose gradients inside the lens. Two sophisticated mathematical models of the eye including the inner structure have been designed for the accurate dose estimation in recent years. This study focuses on the calculations of the absorbed doses of different parts of the eye using the stylized models located in UF-ORNL phantom and comparison with the data calculated with the reference computational phantom in a broad parallel beam incident of protons with energies between 20 MeV and 10 GeV. The obtained results indicate that the total lens absorbed doses of reference phantom has good compliance with those of the more sensitive regions of stylized models. However, total eye absorbed dose of these models greatly differ with each other for lower energies. - Highlights: • The validation of reference data for the eye was studied for proton exposures. • Two real mathematical models of the eye were imported into the UF-ORNL phantom. • Fluence to dose conversion coefficients were calculated for different eye sections. • Obtained Results were compared with that of assessed by ICRP adult male phantom

  3. Database of episode-integrated solar energetic proton fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary D.; Adams, James H.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.

    2018-04-01

    A new database of proton episode-integrated fluences is described. This database contains data from two different instruments on multiple satellites. The data are from instruments on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP8) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) series. A method to normalize one set of data to one another is presented to create a seamless database spanning 1973 to 2016. A discussion of some of the characteristics that episodes exhibit is presented, including episode duration and number of peaks. As an example of what can be understood about episodes, the July 4, 2012 episode is examined in detail. The coronal mass ejections and solar flares that caused many of the fluctuations of the proton flux seen at Earth are associated with peaks in the proton flux during this episode. The reasoning for each choice is laid out to provide a reference for how CME and solar flares associations are made.

  4. Database of episode-integrated solar energetic proton fluences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Zachary D.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A new database of proton episode-integrated fluences is described. This database contains data from two different instruments on multiple satellites. The data are from instruments on the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-8 (IMP8 and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES series. A method to normalize one set of data to one another is presented to create a seamless database spanning 1973 to 2016. A discussion of some of the characteristics that episodes exhibit is presented, including episode duration and number of peaks. As an example of what can be understood about episodes, the July 4, 2012 episode is examined in detail. The coronal mass ejections and solar flares that caused many of the fluctuations of the proton flux seen at Earth are associated with peaks in the proton flux during this episode. The reasoning for each choice is laid out to provide a reference for how CME and solar flares associations are made.

  5. High-energy and high-fluence proton irradiation effects in silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Taylor, S.J.; Yang, M.; Matsuda, S.; Kawasaki, O.; Hisamatsu, T.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined proton irradiation damage in high-energy (1 endash 10 MeV) and high-fluence (approx-gt 10 13 cm -2 ) Si n + -p-p + structure space solar cells. Radiation testing has revealed an anomalous increase in short-circuit current I sc followed by an abrupt decrease and cell failure, induced by high-fluence proton irradiation. We propose a model to explain these phenomena by expressing the change in carrier concentration p of the base region as a function of the proton fluence in addition to the well-known model where the short-circuit current is decreased by minority-carrier lifetime reduction after irradiation. The reduction in carrier concentration due to majority-carrier trapping by radiation-induced defects has two effects. First, broadening of the depletion layer increases both the generation endash recombination current and also the contribution of the photocurrent generated in this region to the total photocurrent. Second, the resistivity of the base layer is increased, resulting in the abrupt decrease in the short circuit current and failure of the solar cells. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ∼0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ∼50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  7. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, H; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P; Shipley, D; Lühr, A; Bassler, N; Martinkovič, J; Dobrovodský, J; Rossomme, S; Thomas, R A S; Kacperek, A

    2013-05-21

    The conversion of absorbed dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to absorbed dose-to-water in a water phantom is performed by water to graphite stopping power ratios. If, however, the charged particle fluence is not equal at equivalent depths in graphite and water, a fluence correction factor, kfl, is required as well. This is particularly relevant to the derivation of absorbed dose-to-water, the quantity of interest in radiotherapy, from a measurement of absorbed dose-to-graphite obtained with a graphite calorimeter. In this work, fluence correction factors for the conversion from dose-to-graphite in a graphite phantom to dose-to-water in a water phantom for 60 MeV mono-energetic protons were calculated using an analytical model and five different Monte Carlo codes (Geant4, FLUKA, MCNPX, SHIELD-HIT and McPTRAN.MEDIA). In general the fluence correction factors are found to be close to unity and the analytical and Monte Carlo codes give consistent values when considering the differences in secondary particle transport. When considering only protons the fluence correction factors are unity at the surface and increase with depth by 0.5% to 1.5% depending on the code. When the fluence of all charged particles is considered, the fluence correction factor is about 0.5% lower than unity at shallow depths predominantly due to the contributions from alpha particles and increases to values above unity near the Bragg peak. Fluence correction factors directly derived from the fluence distributions differential in energy at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9964 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.2%. Fluence correction factors derived from a ratio of calculated doses at equivalent depths in water and graphite can be described by kfl = 0.9947 + 0.0024·zw-eq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.3%. These results are of direct relevance to graphite calorimetry in low-energy protons but given that the fluence

  8. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, G; De Angelis, L; Rit, S; Hansen, D; Belka, C; Bashkirov, V; Johnson, R P; Coutrakon, G; Schubert, K E; Schulte, R W; Parodi, K; Landry, G

    2017-07-12

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  9. A new Recoil Proton Telescope for energy and fluence measurement of fast neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebreton, Lena; Bachaalany, Mario [IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons), Cadarache Bat.159, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Husson, Daniel; Higueret, Stephane [IPHC / RaMsEs (Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien / Radioprotection et Mesures Environnementales), 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High Energy Neutron metrology Applications), is being developed at the IRSN / LMDN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete nucleaire / Laboratoire de Metrologie et de dosimetrie des neutrons) and aims at characterizing energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a Recoil Proton Telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5 to 20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50{sub m} thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for the proton tracking and a 3 mm thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. This first prototype used CMOS sensors called MIMOSTAR, initially developed for heavy ion physics. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of ten compared with conventional designs. The first prototype has already been done and was a successful study giving the results it offered in terms of energy and fluence measurements. For mono energetic beams going from 5 to 19 MeV, the telescope offered an energy resolution between 5 and 11% and fluence difference going from 5 to 7% compared to other home standards. A second and final prototype of the detector is being designed. It will hold upgraded CMOS sensors called FastPixN. These CMOS sensors are supposed to run 400 times faster than the older version and therefore give the telescope the ability to support neutron flux in the order of 107 to 108cm{sup 2}:s{sup 1}. The first prototypes results showed that a 50 m pixel size is enough for a precise scattering angle reconstruction. Simulations using MCNPX and GEANT4 are already in place for further improvements. A DeltaE diode will replace the third CMOS sensor and will be installed right before the silicon diode for a better recoil proton selection. The final prototype with

  10. Experimental and Monte Carlo studies of fluence corrections for graphite calorimetry in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourenço, Ana; Thomas, Russell; Bouchard, Hugo; Kacperek, Andrzej; Vondracek, Vladimir; Royle, Gary; Palmans, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning and double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary

  11. Experimental and Monte Carlo studies of fluence corrections for graphite calorimetry in low- and high-energy clinical proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenço, Ana, E-mail: am.lourenco@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Thomas, Russell; Bouchard, Hugo [Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Kacperek, Andrzej [National Eye Proton Therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom); Vondracek, Vladimir [Proton Therapy Center, Budinova 1a, Prague 8 CZ-180 00 (Czech Republic); Royle, Gary [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [Division of Acoustics and Ionising Radiation, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and Medical Physics Group, EBG MedAustron GmbH, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine fluence corrections necessary to convert absorbed dose to graphite, measured by graphite calorimetry, to absorbed dose to water. Fluence corrections were obtained from experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in low- and high-energy proton beams. Methods: Fluence corrections were calculated to account for the difference in fluence between water and graphite at equivalent depths. Measurements were performed with narrow proton beams. Plane-parallel-plate ionization chambers with a large collecting area compared to the beam diameter were used to intercept the whole beam. High- and low-energy proton beams were provided by a scanning and double scattering delivery system, respectively. A mathematical formalism was established to relate fluence corrections derived from Monte Carlo simulations, using the FLUKA code [A. Ferrari et al., “FLUKA: A multi-particle transport code,” in CERN 2005-10, INFN/TC 05/11, SLAC-R-773 (2005) and T. T. Böhlen et al., “The FLUKA Code: Developments and challenges for high energy and medical applications,” Nucl. Data Sheets 120, 211–214 (2014)], to partial fluence corrections measured experimentally. Results: A good agreement was found between the partial fluence corrections derived by Monte Carlo simulations and those determined experimentally. For a high-energy beam of 180 MeV, the fluence corrections from Monte Carlo simulations were found to increase from 0.99 to 1.04 with depth. In the case of a low-energy beam of 60 MeV, the magnitude of fluence corrections was approximately 0.99 at all depths when calculated in the sensitive area of the chamber used in the experiments. Fluence correction calculations were also performed for a larger area and found to increase from 0.99 at the surface to 1.01 at greater depths. Conclusions: Fluence corrections obtained experimentally are partial fluence corrections because they account for differences in the primary and part of the secondary

  12. Comprehensive fluence model for absolute portal dose image prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytyk, K.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) continue to be investigated as treatment verification tools, with a particular focus on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This verification could be accomplished through a comparison of measured portal images to predicted portal dose images. A general fluence determination tailored to portal dose image prediction would be a great asset in order to model the complex modulation of IMRT. A proposed physics-based parameter fluence model was commissioned by matching predicted EPID images to corresponding measured EPID images of multileaf collimator (MLC) defined fields. The two-source fluence model was composed of a focal Gaussian and an extrafocal Gaussian-like source. Specific aspects of the MLC and secondary collimators were also modeled (e.g., jaw and MLC transmission factors, MLC rounded leaf tips, tongue and groove effect, interleaf leakage, and leaf offsets). Several unique aspects of the model were developed based on the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the linear accelerator including (1) use of a non-Gaussian extrafocal fluence source function, (2) separate energy spectra used for focal and extrafocal fluence, and (3) different off-axis energy spectra softening used for focal and extrafocal fluences. The predicted energy fluence was then convolved with Monte Carlo generated, EPID-specific dose kernels to convert incident fluence to dose delivered to the EPID. Measured EPID data were obtained with an a-Si EPID for various MLC-defined fields (from 1x1 to 20x20 cm 2 ) over a range of source-to-detector distances. These measured profiles were used to determine the fluence model parameters in a process analogous to the commissioning of a treatment planning system. The resulting model was tested on 20 clinical IMRT plans, including ten prostate and ten oropharyngeal cases. The model predicted the open-field profiles within 2%, 2 mm, while a mean of 96.6% of pixels over all

  13. Probabilistic model for fluences and peak fluxes of solar energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nymmik, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The model is intended for calculating the probability for solar energetic particles (SEP), i.e., protons and Z=2-28 ions, to have an effect on hardware and on biological and other objects in the space. The model describes the probability for the ≥10 MeV/nucleon SEP fluences and peak fluxes to occur in the near-Earth space beyond the Earth magnetosphere under varying solar activity. The physical prerequisites of the model are as follows. The occurrence of SEP is a probabilistic process. The mean SEP occurrence frequency is a power-law function of solar activity (sunspot number). The SEP size (taken to be the ≥30 MeV proton fluence size) distribution is a power-law function within a 10 5 -10 11 proton/cm 2 range. The SEP event particle energy spectra are described by a common function whose parameters are distributed log-normally. The SEP mean composition is energy-dependent and suffers fluctuations described by log-normal functions in separate events

  14. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K; Hansen, D; Rit, S; Belka, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  15. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Jutland (Denmark); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes (France); Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  16. The virtual enhancements - solar proton event radiation (VESPER) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminalragia-Giamini, Sigiava; Sandberg, Ingmar; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Jiggens, Piers

    2018-02-01

    A new probabilistic model introducing a novel paradigm for the modelling of the solar proton environment at 1 AU is presented. The virtual enhancements - solar proton event radiation model (VESPER) uses the European space agency's solar energetic particle environment modelling (SEPEM) Reference Dataset and produces virtual time-series of proton differential fluxes. In this regard it fundamentally diverges from the approach of existing SPE models that are based on probabilistic descriptions of SPE macroscopic characteristics such as peak flux and cumulative fluence. It is shown that VESPER reproduces well the dataset characteristics it uses, and further comparisons with existing models are made with respect to their results. The production of time-series as the main output of the model opens a straightforward way for the calculation of solar proton radiation effects in terms of time-series and the pairing with effects caused by trapped radiation and galactic cosmic rays.

  17. Proton relativistic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author)

  18. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1996-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Fluence correction factors for graphite calorimetry in a low-energy clinical proton beam: I. Analytical and Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmans, Hugo; Al-Sulaiti, L; Andreo, P

    2013-01-01

    , is required as well. This is particularly relevant to the derivation of absorbed dose-to-water, the quantity of interest in radiotherapy, from a measurement of absorbed dose-to-graphite obtained with a graphite calorimeter. In this work, fluence correction factors for the conversion from dose...

  20. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  1. Energy loss, range and fluence distributions, total reaction and projectile fragment production cross sections for proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihver, L.; Kanai, T.

    1992-07-01

    We have developed a computer code for calculations of energy loss (dE/dx) and range distributions for heavy ions in any media. The results from our calculations are in very good agreement with previous calculations. We have developed semiempirical total reaction cross section formulae for proton-nucleus (with Z p ≤26) and nucleus-nucleus (with Z p and Z t ≤26) reactions. These formulae apply for incident energies above 15 MeV and 100 MeV/nucleon respectively. From the total reaction cross sections, we can calculate the mean free paths and the fluence distributions of protons and heavy ions in any media. We have compared all the calculated reaction cross sections and the mean free paths with experimental data, and the agreement is good. We have also constructed a procedure for calculating projectile fragment production cross sections, by scaling semiempirical proton-nucleus partial cross section systematics. The scaling is performed using a scaling parameter deduced from our reaction cross sections formulae, and additional enhancements factors. All products with atomic number ranging from that of the projectile (Z p ) down to Z=2 can be calculated. The agreement between the calculated cross sections and the experimental data is better than earlier published results. (author)

  2. The TL fluence response to heavy charged particles using the track interaction model and track structure information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Avila, O.

    2002-01-01

    The extended track interaction model, ETIM, has recently been proposed to explain the TLD-100 fluence response of peak 5 to heavy ions. This model includes the track structure information through the use of the luminescent-centre occupation probability obtained from radial dose distributions produced by the ions as they travel through the dosemeter. In this work an implementation of ETIM using Monte Carlo techniques is presented. The simulation was applied to calculate the response of peak 5 of both sensitised and normal TLD-100 crystals to 2.6 and 6.8 MeV 4 He ions. The simulation shows that the TL-fluence response has a strong dependence on ion energy, in disagreement with experimental observations. In spite of this, good agreement between the simulated TL-fluence response calculated for the 6.8 MeV 4 He radial distributions and the experimental data for the two energies was achieved. (author)

  3. Fluence determination by scattering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Albergo, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Pillon, M; Angarano, M M; Creanza, D; De Palma, M

    2000-01-01

    An alternative method to determine particle fluence is proposed, which is particularly suitable for irradiations with low-energy charged-particle beams. The fluence is obtained by measuring the elastic scattering produced by a composite thin target placed upstream of the sample. The absolute calibration is performed by comparison with the measured radioactivation of vanadium and copper samples. The composite thin target, made of aluminium, carbon and gold, allows not only the fluence to be measured, but also a continuous monitoring of the beam space distribution. Experimental results with a 27 MeV proton beam are reported and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. (7 refs).

  4. Experimental validation of a Monte Carlo proton therapy nozzle model incorporating magnetically steered protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S W; Polf, J; Archambault, L; Beddar, S; Bues, M; Ciangaru, G; Smith, A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo calculation model of a proton magnetic beam scanning delivery nozzle developed using the Geant4 toolkit. The Monte Carlo model was used to produce depth dose and lateral profiles, which were compared to data measured in the clinical scanning treatment nozzle at several energies. Comparisons were also made between measured and simulated off-axis profiles to test the accuracy of the model's magnetic steering. Comparison of the 80% distal dose fall-off values for the measured and simulated depth dose profiles agreed to within 1 mm for the beam energies evaluated. Agreement of the full width at half maximum values for the measured and simulated lateral fluence profiles was within 1.3 mm for all energies. The position of measured and simulated spot positions for the magnetically steered beams agreed to within 0.7 mm of each other. Based on these results, we found that the Geant4 Monte Carlo model of the beam scanning nozzle has the ability to accurately predict depth dose profiles, lateral profiles perpendicular to the beam axis and magnetic steering of a proton beam during beam scanning proton therapy.

  5. Rapid-relocation model for describing high-fluence retention of rare gases implanted in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmaack, K.

    2009-09-01

    It has been known for a long time that the maximum areal density of inert gases that can be retained in solids after ion implantation is significantly lower than expected if sputter erosion were the only limiting factor. The difference can be explained in terms of the idea that the trapped gas atoms migrate towards the surface in a series of detrapping-trapping events so that reemission takes place well before the receding surface has advanced to the original depth of implantation. Here it is shown that the fluence dependent shift and shape of implantation profiles, previously determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), can be reproduced surprisingly well by extending a simple retention model originally developed to account only for the effect of surface recession by sputtering ('sputter approximation'). The additional migration of inert gas atoms is formally included by introducing an effective shift parameter Yeff as the sum of the sputtering yield Y and a relocation efficiency Ψrel. The approach is discussed in detail for 145 keV Xe + implanted in Si at normal incidence. Yeff was found to increase with increasing fluence, to arrive at a maximum equivalent to about twice the sputtering yield. At the surface one needs to account for Xe depletion and the limited depth resolution of RBS. The (high-fluence) effect of implanted Xe on the range distributions is discussed on the basis of SRIM calculations for different definitions of the mean target density, including the case of volume expansion (swelling). To identify a 'range shortening' effect, the implanted gas atoms must be excluded from the definition of the depth scale. The impact-energy dependence of the relocation efficiency was derived from measured stationary Xe concentrations. Above some characteristic energy (˜20 keV for Ar, ˜200 keV for Xe), Y exceeds Ψrel. With decreasing energy, however, Ψrel increases rapidly. Below 2-3 keV more than 90% of the reemission of Ar and Xe is estimated

  6. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  7. Fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients for use in radiological protection of embryo and foetus against external exposure to protons from 100 MeV to 100 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.

    2006-01-01

    In the literature, no conversion coefficients are available for use in radiological protection of embryo and foetus against external exposure to protons. This study used the Monte Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to proton fields. Monoenergetic protons ranging from 100 MeV to 100 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal brain and body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months. Proton fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. (authors)

  8. Fluence map segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The lecture addressed the following topics: 'Interpreting' the fluence map; The sequencer; Reasons for difference between desired and actual fluence map; Principle of 'Step and Shoot' segmentation; Large number of solutions for given fluence map; Optimizing 'step and shoot' segmentation; The interdigitation constraint; Main algorithms; Conclusions on segmentation algorithms (static mode); Optimizing intensity levels and monitor units; Sliding window sequencing; Synchronization to avoid the tongue-and-groove effect; Accounting for physical characteristics of MLC; Importance of corrections for leaf transmission and offset; Accounting for MLC mechanical constraints; The 'complexity' factor; Incorporating the sequencing into optimization algorithm; Data transfer to the treatment machine; Interface between R and V and accelerator; and Conclusions on fluence map segmentation (Segmentation is part of the overall inverse planning procedure; 'Step and Shoot' and 'Dynamic' options are available for most TPS (depending on accelerator model; The segmentation phase tends to come into the optimization loop; The physical characteristics of the MLC have a large influence on final dose distribution; The IMRT plans (MU and relative dose distribution) must be carefully validated). (P.A.)

  9. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Fornacelli, Cristina [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Gomoiu, Ioana [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Lognoli, David [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Mohanu, Dan [National University of Art, Bucharest (Romania); Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’Applied Physics Institute-National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage-National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} to 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  10. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm2 to 1 mJ/cm2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  11. Study of the effects of low-fluence laser irradiation on wall paintings: Test measurements on fresco model samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Fornacelli, Cristina; Galeotti, Monica; Gomoiu, Ioana; Lognoli, David; Mohanu, Dan; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is widely applied in several fields as a diagnostic tool to characterise organic and inorganic materials and could be also exploited for non-invasive remote investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique. The latter relies on the use of a low-fluence pulsed UV laser and a telescope to carry out remote spectroscopy on a given target. A first step to investigate the applicability of this technique is to assess the effects of low-fluence laser radiation on wall paintings. This paper presents a study devoted to investigate the effects of pulsed UV laser radiation on a set of fresco model samples prepared using different pigments. To irradiate the samples we used a tripled-frequency Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength: 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns). We varied the laser fluence from 0.1 mJ/cm 2 to 1 mJ/cm 2 and the number of laser pulses from 1 to 500 shots. We characterised the investigated materials using several diagnostic and analytical techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy and ATR-FT-IR microscopy) to compare the surface texture and their composition before and after laser irradiation. Results open good prospects for a non-invasive investigation of wall paintings using the fluorescence lidar technique.

  12. Experimental tests of proton spin models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1989-01-01

    We have developed models for the spin-weighted quark and gluon distribution in a longitudinally polarized proton. The model parameters are determined from current algebra sum rules and polarized deep-inelastic scattering data. A number of different scenarios are presented for the fraction of spin carried the constituent parton distributions. A possible long-range experimental program is suggested for measuring various hard scattering processes using polarized lepton and proton beams. With the knowledge gained from these experiments, we can begin to understand the parton contributions to the proton spin. 28 refs., 5 figs

  13. A correction scheme for a simplified analytical random walk model algorithm of proton dose calculation in distal Bragg peak regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weiguang; Merchant, Thomas E.; Farr, Jonathan B.

    2016-10-01

    The lateral homogeneity assumption is used in most analytical algorithms for proton dose, such as the pencil-beam algorithms and our simplified analytical random walk model. To improve the dose calculation in the distal fall-off region in heterogeneous media, we analyzed primary proton fluence near heterogeneous media and propose to calculate the lateral fluence with voxel-specific Gaussian distributions. The lateral fluence from a beamlet is no longer expressed by a single Gaussian for all the lateral voxels, but by a specific Gaussian for each lateral voxel. The voxel-specific Gaussian for the beamlet of interest is calculated by re-initializing the fluence deviation on an effective surface where the proton energies of the beamlet of interest and the beamlet passing the voxel are the same. The dose improvement from the correction scheme was demonstrated by the dose distributions in two sets of heterogeneous phantoms consisting of cortical bone, lung, and water and by evaluating distributions in example patients with a head-and-neck tumor and metal spinal implants. The dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations were used as the reference. The correction scheme effectively improved the dose calculation accuracy in the distal fall-off region and increased the gamma test pass rate. The extra computation for the correction was about 20% of that for the original algorithm but is dependent upon patient geometry.

  14. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information

  15. Colour dielectric model of the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, P.K.; Pradhan, T.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the proton with its constituent quarks bound in a colour polarizable medium with dielectric constant varying as (a/r - b 2 ) from a fixed centre, is presented. The Dirac equation modified by the colour polarization is solved and the analytic expression for the wavefunction of the quarks obtained shows that quarks with higher energy lie closer to the fixed centre. The energy spectrum is equispaced without any continuum. A semiclassical approximation scheme yields closed orbits for quarks which have smaller size for higher energies and no orbits with size bigger than a certain maximum, thereby rendering the quarks permanently confined. The wavefunctions of the three quarks constituting the proton are used to calculate physical parameters of the proton such as its mass, charge radius and weak coupling constant which with suitable choice of the constants a and b appearing in the dielectric constant agree fairly well with experimental results. (author)

  16. Radiance and particle fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papiez, L.; Battista, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) has defined fluence in terms of the number of the radiation particles crossing a small sampling sphere. A second definition has been proposed in which the length of track segments contained within any sampling volume are used to calculate the incident fluence. This approach is often used in Monte Carlo simulations of individual particle tracks, allowing the fluence to be scored in small volumes of any shape. In this paper we stress that the second definition generalizes the classical (ICRU) concept of fluence. We also identify the assumptions inherent in the two definitions of fluence and prove their equivalence for the case of straight-line particle trajectories. (author)

  17. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Valentina, E-mail: v.raimondi@ifac.cnr.it [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla [Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry Department (DCCI) - University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cucci, Costanza [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Cuzman, Oana [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage - National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy); Galeotti, Monica [Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD), Firenze (Italy); Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello [‘Nello Carrara’ Applied Physics Institute - National Research Council of Italy (CNR-IFAC), Firenze (Italy); Tiano, Piero [Institute for the Conservation and Promotion of Cultural Heritage - National Research Council (CNR-ICVBC), Firenze (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A set of a secco model samples was prepared using white lead and four different organic binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). • The samples were irradiated with low-fluence UV laser pulses (0.1–1 mJ/cm{sup 2}). • The effects of laser irradiation were analysed by using different techniques. • The analysis did not point out changes due to low-fluence laser irradiation. • High fluence (88 mJ/cm{sup 2}) laser radiation instead yielded a chromatic change ascribed to the inorganic component. - Abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2}–1 mJ/cm{sup 2} on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and 1 mJ/cm{sup 2} and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after

  18. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Galeotti, Monica; Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A set of a secco model samples was prepared using white lead and four different organic binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). • The samples were irradiated with low-fluence UV laser pulses (0.1–1 mJ/cm 2 ). • The effects of laser irradiation were analysed by using different techniques. • The analysis did not point out changes due to low-fluence laser irradiation. • High fluence (88 mJ/cm 2 ) laser radiation instead yielded a chromatic change ascribed to the inorganic component. - Abstract: Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm 2 –1 mJ/cm 2 on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm 2 and 1 mJ/cm 2 and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after irradiation in the proposed

  19. Testing proton spin models with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    We review models for spin-weighted parton distributions in a proton. Sum rules involving the nonsinglet components of the structure function xg 1 p help narrow the range of parameters in these models. The contribution of the γ 5 anomaly term depends on the size of the integrated polarized gluon distribution and experimental predictions depend on its size. We have proposed three models for the polarized gluon distributions, whose range is considerable. These model distributions give an overall range is considerable. These model distributions give an overall range of parameters that can be tested with polarized beam experiments. These are discussed with regard to specific predictions for polarized beam experiments at energies typical of UNK

  20. Task-Driven Optimization of Fluence Field and Regularization for Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction in Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Grace J; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Stayman, J Webster

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a joint optimization of dynamic fluence field modulation (FFM) and regularization in quadratic penalized-likelihood reconstruction that maximizes a task-based imaging performance metric. We adopted a task-driven imaging framework for prospective designs of the imaging parameters. A maxi-min objective function was adopted to maximize the minimum detectability index ( ) throughout the image. The optimization algorithm alternates between FFM (represented by low-dimensional basis functions) and local regularization (including the regularization strength and directional penalty weights). The task-driven approach was compared with three FFM strategies commonly proposed for FBP reconstruction (as well as a task-driven TCM strategy) for a discrimination task in an abdomen phantom. The task-driven FFM assigned more fluence to less attenuating anteroposterior views and yielded approximately constant fluence behind the object. The optimal regularization was almost uniform throughout image. Furthermore, the task-driven FFM strategy redistribute fluence across detector elements in order to prescribe more fluence to the more attenuating central region of the phantom. Compared with all strategies, the task-driven FFM strategy not only improved minimum by at least 17.8%, but yielded higher over a large area inside the object. The optimal FFM was highly dependent on the amount of regularization, indicating the importance of a joint optimization. Sample reconstructions of simulated data generally support the performance estimates based on computed . The improvements in detectability show the potential of the task-driven imaging framework to improve imaging performance at a fixed dose, or, equivalently, to provide a similar level of performance at reduced dose.

  1. Modeling the Proton Radiation Belt With Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selesnick, R. S.; Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Li, X.

    2018-01-01

    An empirical model of the proton radiation belt is constructed from data taken during 2013-2017 by the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescopes on the Van Allen Probes satellites. The model intensity is a function of time, kinetic energy in the range 18-600 MeV, equatorial pitch angle, and L shell of proton guiding centers. Data are selected, on the basis of energy deposits in each of the nine silicon detectors, to reduce background caused by hard proton energy spectra at low L. Instrument response functions are computed by Monte Carlo integration, using simulated proton paths through a simplified structural model, to account for energy loss in shielding material for protons outside the nominal field of view. Overlap of energy channels, their wide angular response, and changing satellite orientation require the model dependencies on all three independent variables be determined simultaneously. This is done by least squares minimization with a customized steepest descent algorithm. Model uncertainty accounts for statistical data error and systematic error in the simulated instrument response. A proton energy spectrum is also computed from data taken during the 8 January 2014 solar event, to illustrate methods for the simpler case of an isotropic and homogeneous model distribution. Radiation belt and solar proton results are compared to intensities computed with a simplified, on-axis response that can provide a good approximation under limited circumstances.

  2. Foetal dose conversion coefficients for ICRP-compliant pregnant models from idealised proton exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, V.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-01-01

    Protection of pregnant women and their foetus against external proton irradiations poses a unique challenge. Assessment of foetal dose due to external protons in galactic cosmic rays and as secondaries generated in aircraft walls is especially important during high-altitude flights. This paper reports a set of fluence to absorbed dose conversion coefficients for the foetus and its brain for external monoenergetic proton beams of six standard configurations (the antero-posterior, the postero-anterior, the right lateral, the left lateral, the rotational and the isotropic). The pregnant female anatomical definitions at each of the three gestational periods (3, 6 and 9 months) are based on newly developed RPI-P series of models whose organ masses were matched within 1% with the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference values. Proton interactions and the transport of secondary particles were carefully simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle extended code (MCNPX) and the phantoms consisting of several million voxels at 3 mm resolution. When choosing the physics models in the MCNPX, it was found that the advanced Cascade-Exciton intranuclear cascade model showed a maximum of 9% foetal dose increase compared with the default model combination at intermediate energies below 5 GeV. Foetal dose results from this study are tabulated and compared with previously published data that were based on simplified anatomy. The comparison showed a strong dependence upon the source geometry, energy and gestation period: The dose differences are typically less than 20% for all sources except ISO where systematically 40-80% of higher doses were observed. Below 200 MeV, a larger discrepancy in dose was found due to the Bragg peak shift caused by different anatomy. The tabulated foetal doses represent the latest and most detailed study to date offering a useful set of data to improve radiation protection dosimetry against external protons. (authors)

  3. Proton-proton and neutron-proton bremsstrahlung in the potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, V.

    1993-11-01

    The nucleon-nucleon (NN) bremsstrahlung reaction is studied in the framework of a potential model. We investigate and explain the behavior of the most important corrections to the purely non-relativistic model considering only the external current; i.e. we include the relativistic spin correction, the one-body rescattering contribution and the Coulomb-effect, where it is needed. The important contribution of the two-body or meson-exchange current is treated in the soft-photon-approximation. In addition to the usual coplanar NNγ cross section we also study non-coplanar cross sections and spin observables like the analyzing power and spin correlation coefficients. It is shown that the behavior of the relativistic spin correction is governed by the 1 S 0 partial-wave state, is almost energy independent and reduces the NNγ cross section by roughly 20 - 30%. The one-body rescattering contribution enhances the ppγ cross section for the geometry of the last TRIUMF experiment by about 20% and thus almost compensates the effect of the relativistic spin corrections. The effects of each part of the NN interaction on the ppγ observables is studied in the coplanar geometry. We find that these effects depend on the proton scattering angles as well as on the considered observable. However, the tensor component of the NN interaction is important in all geometries. The comparison of different NN potential models yields that the NNγ reaction is not able to discriminate these potentials in their off-shell behavior, although the corresponding T-matrices deviate from each other off the energy shell. It is concluded that the occuring differences originate already from deviations on the energy shell or from the fact that the approximations made in the calculations for the two-body current are not of the same quality for all NN potential models. (orig.)

  4. Test measurements on a secco white-lead containing model samples to assess the effects of exposure to low-fluence UV laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Valentina; Andreotti, Alessia; Colombini, Maria Perla; Cucci, Costanza; Cuzman, Oana; Galeotti, Monica; Lognoli, David; Palombi, Lorenzo; Picollo, Marcello; Tiano, Piero

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence technique is widely used for diagnostic purposes in several applications and its use could be of advantage for non-invasive on-site characterisation of pigments or other compounds in wall paintings. However, it is well known that long-time exposure to UV and VIS radiation can cause damage to wall paintings. Several studies have investigated the effects of lighting, e.g., in museums: however, the effects of low-fluence laser radiation have not been studied much so far. This paper investigates the effects of UV laser radiation using fluences in the range of 0.1 mJ/cm2-1 mJ/cm2 on a set of a secco model samples prepared with lead white and different type of binders (animal glue and whole egg, whole egg, skimmed milk, egg-oil tempera). The samples were irradiated using a Nd:YAG laser (emission wavelength at 355 nm; pulse width: 5 ns) by applying laser fluences between 0.1 mJ/cm2 and 1 mJ/cm2 and a number of laser pulses between 1 and 500. The samples were characterised before and after laser irradiation by using several techniques (colorimetry, optical microscopy, fibre optical reflectance spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy Attenuated Total Reflectance microscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry), to detect variations in the morphological and physico-chemical properties. The results did not point out significant changes in the sample properties after irradiation in the proposed range of laser fluences.

  5. The proton's spin: A quark model perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic moments and g A /g V provide information on the correlations among quark spins and flavors in the proton. I compare this information with the deep inelastic polarized data from EMC which has been claimed to show that very little of the proton's spin is due to the quarks. The possibility that there is significant polarization of strange quarks within protons is discussed. 38 refs

  6. Risk-optimized proton therapy to minimize radiogenic second cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechner, Laura A; Eley, John G; Howell, Rebecca M

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy confers substantially lower predicted risk of second cancer compared with photon therapy. However, no previous studies have used an algorithmic approach to optimize beam angle or fluence-modulation for proton therapy to minimize those risks. The objectives of this study were...... to demonstrate the feasibility of risk-optimized proton therapy and to determine the combination of beam angles and fluence weights that minimizes the risk of second cancer in the bladder and rectum for a prostate cancer patient. We used 6 risk models to predict excess relative risk of second cancer. Treatment...

  7. Photoluminescence in large fluence radiation irradiated space silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Osamu; Matsuda, Sumio [National Space Development Agency of Japan, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Space Center; Tsukamoto, Kazuyoshi

    1997-03-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were carried out for silicon 50{mu}m BSFR space solar cells irradiated with 1MeV electrons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 16} e/cm{sup 2} and 10MeV protons with a fluence exceeding 1 x 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}. The results were compared with the previous result performed in a relative low fluence region, and the radiation-induced defects which cause anomalous degradation of the cell performance in such large fluence regions were discussed. As far as we know, this is the first report which presents the PL measurement results at 4.2K of the large fluence radiation irradiated silicon solar cells. (author)

  8. A model of quasi-free scattering with polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodoro, M.R.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative evaluation, based on a simple model for spin-free coplanar and asymmetric reaction in 16 O, for 215 MeV incoming polarized protons confirms the use of the strong effective polarization of the knocked-out proton by the spin-orbit coupling and of the strong dependence of free, medium energy, proton-proton cross section on the relative orientation of the proton spins. Effective polarizations, momentum distributions and correlation cross sections have been calculated for the 1p sub(1/2), 1 p sub(3/2) and 1s sub(1/2) states in 16 O, using protons totally polarized orthogonal to the scattering plane. Harmonic oscillator and square wells have been used to generate the bound state wave functions, whereas the optical potentials have been taken spin-independent and purely imaginary [pt

  9. Effect of 200 keV proton irradiation on the properties of methyl silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lixin; Xu Zhou; Wei Qiang; He Shiyu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of 200 keV proton irradiation on methyl silicone rubber were studied. The changes in surface morphology, mechanical properties, cross-linking density, glass transition temperature, infrared attenuated total reflection spectrum and mass spectrum indicated that, at lower fluence, the proton irradiation induced cross-linking, resulting in an increase in tensile strength and hardness of the methyl silicone rubber. However, at higher proton fluence, radiation-induced degradation, which decreased the tensile strength and hardness, became dominant. A macromolecular-network destruction model for silicone rubber irradiated with protons was proposed

  10. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartjes, F.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5 * 10 15 protons/cm 2 . The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 10 15 protons/cm 2 . A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels

  11. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartjes, F.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M

    1999-08-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5{sup *}10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels.

  12. Fluence dependent changes of erosion yields and surface morphology of the iron-tungsten model system: SDTrimSP-2D simulation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. von Toussaint

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different sample structures of an iron-tungsten model system (as a surrogate for reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels like EUROFER on the development of surface morphologies, tungsten surface enrichment and sputter yields under low-energy monoenergetic perpendicular 200 eV deuterium bombardment has been studied with SDTrimSP-2d simulations. Previous modeling studies considering diffusive effects also could reasonably reproduce and explain the experimental results for a large set of experimental parameters like temperature, flux and sample concentration. However, for settings with negligible Fe-W-interdiffusion the fluence needed for steady-state conditions differed between the experiments and the simulations. Thus, the main focus of the present study is directed towards the elucidation of this fluence mismatch. Comparison of one and two-dimensional simulation results reveal a strong dependency of the tungsten enrichment on the sample homogeneity and a significantly delayed reduction of the erosion yield due to a pronounced formation of surface structures from initially flat sample surfaces.

  13. Proton-neutron correlations in a broken-pair model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkermans, J.N.L.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis nuclear-structure calculations are reported which were performed with the broken-pair model. The model which is developed, is an extension of existing broken-pair models in so far that it includes both proton and neutron valence pairs. The relevant formalisms are presented. In contrast to the number-non-conserving model, a proton-neutron broken-pair model is well suited to study the correlations which are produced by the proton-neutron interaction. It is shown that the proton-neutron force has large matrix elements which mix the proton- with neutron broken-pair configurations. This occurs especially for Jsup(PI)=2 + and 3 - pairs. This property of the proton-neutron force is used to improve the spectra of single-closed shell nuclei, where particle-hole excitations of the closed shell are a special case of broken-pair configurations. Using Kr and Te isotopes it is demonstrated that the proton-neutron force gives rise to correlated pair structures, which remain remarkably constant with varying nucleon numbers. (Auth.)

  14. Neutron fluence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    For research reactor work dealing with such subjects as radiation effects on solids and such disciplines as radiochemistry and radiobiology, the radiation dose or neutron fluence is an essential parameter in evaluating results. Unfortunately it is very difficult to determine. Even when the measurements have been accurate, it is difficult to compare results obtained in different experiments because present methods do not always reflect the dependence of spectra or of different types of radiation on the induced processes. After considering the recommendations of three IAEA Panels, on 'In-pile dosimetry' held in July 1964, on 'Neutron fluence measurements' in October 1965, and on 'In-pile dosimetry' in November 1966, the Agency established a Working Group on Reactor Radiation Measurements. This group consisted of eleven experts from ten different Member States and two staff members of the Agency. In the measurement of energy absorbed by materials from neutrons and gamma rays, there are various reports and reviews scattered throughout the literature. The group, however, considered that the time was ripe for all relevant information to be evaluated and gathered together in the form of a practical guide, with the aim of promoting consistency in the measurement and reporting of reactor radiation. The group arranged for the material to be divided into two manuals, which are expected to be useful both for experienced workers and for beginners

  15. Modelling of a proton spot scanning system using MCNP6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardenfors, O; Gudowska, I; Dasu, A; Kopeć, M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to model the characteristics of a clinical proton spot scanning beam using Monte Carlo simulations with the code MCNP6. The proton beam was defined using parameters obtained from beam commissioning at the Skandion Clinic, Uppsala, Sweden. Simulations were evaluated against measurements for proton energies between 60 and 226 MeV with regard to range in water, lateral spot sizes in air and absorbed dose depth profiles in water. The model was also used to evaluate the experimental impact of lateral signal losses in an ionization chamber through simulations using different detector radii. Simulated and measured distal ranges agreed within 0.1 mm for R 90 and R 80 , and within 0.2 mm for R 50 . The average absolute difference of all spot sizes was 0.1 mm. The average agreement of absorbed dose integrals and Bragg-peak heights was 0.9%. Lateral signal losses increased with incident proton energy with a maximum signal loss of 7% for 226 MeV protons. The good agreement between simulations and measurements supports the assumptions and parameters employed in the presented Monte Carlo model. The characteristics of the proton spot scanning beam were accurately reproduced and the model will prove useful in future studies on secondary neutrons. (paper)

  16. Neural network model for proton-proton collision at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bakry, M.Y.; El-Metwally, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Developments in artificial intelligence (AI) techniques and their applications to physics have made it feasible to develop and implement new modeling techniques for high-energy interactions. In particular, AI techniques of artificial neural networks (ANN) have recently been used to design and implement more effective models. The primary purpose of this paper is to model the proton-proton (p-p) collision using the ANN technique. Following a review of the conventional techniques and an introduction to the neural network, the paper presents simulation test results using an p-p based ANN model trained with experimental data. The p-p based ANN model calculates the multiplicity distribution of charged particles and the inelastic cross section of the p-p collision at high energies. The results amply demonstrate the feasibility of such new technique in extracting the collision features and prove its effectiveness

  17. Radiation Environment Model of Protons and Heavier Ions at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Luz Maria Martinez; Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    We performed an in depth study of the methods used to review the geometric factors (GF) and sensitivity to charge particles of the Energetic Particle Detector instrument on board the Galileo Spacecraft. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to understand the interactions of electrons and ions (i. e., protons and alphas) with the sensitive regions of the instrument. The DC0 and B0 channels were studied with the intention of using them to update the jovian proton radiation model. The results proved that the B0 is a clean proton chanel without any concerns for contamination by heavier ions and electrons. In contrast, DC0 was found to be contaminated by electrons. Furthermore, we also found out that the B2 channel is a clean alpha particle channel (in other words, no contamination by electrons and/or protons).

  18. Modeling the electron-proton telescope on Solar Orbiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, Sebastian; Steinhagen, Jan; Kulkarni, S.R.; Tammen, Jan; Elftmann, Robert; Martin, Cesar; Ravanbakhsh, Ali; Boettcher, Stephan; Seimetz, Lars; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F. [Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The Electron Proton Telescope (EPT) is one of four sensors in the Energetic Particle Detector suite for Solar Orbiter. It investigates low energy electrons and protons of solar events in an energy range from 20 - 400 keV for electrons and 20 keV - 7 MeV for protons. It distinguishes electrons from protons using a magnet/foil technique with silicon detectors. There will be two EPT units, each with double-barreled telescopes, one looking sunwards/antisunwards and the other north/south. We set up a Monte Carlo model of EPT using the GEANT4 framework, which we can use to simulate interactions of energetic particles in the sensor. Here we present simulation results of the energy coverage for different ion species, and we study how it is possible to distinguish between them.

  19. Fluence to absorbed foetal dose conversion coefficients for photons in 50 keV-10 GeV calculated using RPI-P models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, V.; Xu, X.G.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation protection of pregnant females and the foetus against ionising radiation is of particular importance to radiation protection due to high foetal radiosensitivity. The only available set of foetal conversion coefficients for photons is based on stylised models of simplified anatomy. Using the RPI-P series of pregnant female and foetus models representing 3-, 6- and 9-month gestation, a set of new fluence to absorbed foetal dose conversion coefficients has been calculated. The RPI-P anatomical models were developed using novel 3D geometry modelling techniques. Organ masses were adjusted to agree within 1% with the ICRP reference data for a pregnant female. Monte Carlo dose calculations were carried out using the MCNPX and Penelope codes for external 50 keV-10 GeV photon beams of six standard configurations. The models were voxelised at 3-mm voxel resolution. Conversion coefficients were tabulated for the three gestational periods for the whole foetus and brain. Comparison with previously published data showed deviations up to 120% for the foetal doses at 50 keV. The discrepancy can be primarily ascribed to anatomical differences. Comparison with published data for five major mother organs is also provided for the 3-month model. Since the RPI-P models exhibit a high degree of anatomical realism, the reported dataset is recommended as a reference for radiation protection of the foetus against external photon exposure. (authors)

  20. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fengge; Miraoui, Abdellatif

    2013-01-01

    The fuel cell is a potential candidate for energy storage and conversion in our future energy mix. It is able to directly convert the chemical energy stored in fuel (e.g. hydrogen) into electricity, without undergoing different intermediary conversion steps. In the field of mobile and stationary applications, it is considered to be one of the future energy solutions.Among the different fuel cell types, the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has shown great potential in mobile applications, due to its low operating temperature, solid-state electrolyte and compactness.This book pre

  1. Dependence of two-proton radioactivity on nuclear pairing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Kortelainen, Markus; Pastore, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Sensitivity of two-proton emitting decay to nuclear pairing correlation is discussed within a time-dependent three-body model. We focus on the 6Be nucleus assuming α +p +p configuration, and its decay process is described as a time evolution of the three-body resonance state. For a proton-proton subsystem, a schematic density-dependent contact (SDDC) pairing model is employed. From the time-dependent calculation, we observed the exponential decay rule of a two-proton emission. It is shown that the density dependence does not play a major role in determining the decay width, which can be controlled only by the asymptotic strength of the pairing interaction. This asymptotic pairing sensitivity can be understood in terms of the dynamics of the wave function driven by the three-body Hamiltonian, by monitoring the time-dependent density distribution. With this simple SDDC pairing model, there remains an impossible trinity problem: it cannot simultaneously reproduce the empirical Q value, decay width, and the nucleon-nucleon scattering length. This problem suggests that a further sophistication of the theoretical pairing model is necessary, utilizing the two-proton radioactivity data as the reference quantities.

  2. Fluence to Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients for Evaluation of Accelerator Radiation Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ralph H.; Zeman, Gary H.

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of a set of conversion functions for the expression of neutron fluence measurements in terms of Effective Dose, E, is described. Four functions in analytical form are presented, covering the neutron energy range from 2.5 10-8 to 10+4 MeV, for the interpretation of fluence measurements in the typical irradiation conditions experienced around high-energy proton accelerators such as the Bevatron. For neutron energies below 200 MeV the analytical functions were modeled after the ISO and ROT conversion coefficients in ICRU 57. For neutron energies above 200 MeV, the analytical function was derived from an analysis of recent published data. Sample calculations using either the analytical expressions or the tabulated conversion coefficients from which the analytical expressions are derived show agreement to better than plus/minus 5%

  3. The Importance of Protons in Reactive Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of pH in aqueous chemistry is evident; yet, its role in reactive transport is complex. Consider a column flow experiment through silica glass beads. Take the column to be saturated and flowing with solution of a distinct pH. An instantaneous change in the influent solution pH can yield a breakthrough curve with both a rarefaction and shock component (composite wave). This behavior is unique among aqueous ions in transport and is more complex than intuition would tell. Analysis of the hyperbolic limit of this physical system can explain these first order transport phenomenon. This analysis shows that transport behavior is heavily dependent on the shape of the adsorption isotherm. Hence it is clear that accurate surface chemistry models are important in reactive transport. The proton adsorption isotherm has nonconstant concavity due to the proton's ability to partition into hydroxide. An eigenvalue analysis shows that an inflection point in the adsorption isotherm allows the development of composite waves. We use electrostatic surface complexation models to calculate realistic proton adsorption isotherms. Surface characteristics such as specific surface area, and surface site density were determined experimentally. We validate the model by comparison against silica glass bead flow through experiments. When coupled to surface complexation models, the transport equation captures the timing and behavior of breakthrough curves markedly better than with commonly used Langmuir assumptions. Furthermore, we use the adsorption isotherm to predict, a priori, the transport behavior of protons across pH composition space. Expansion of the model to multicomponent systems shows that proton adsorption can force composite waves to develop in the breakthrough curves of ions that would not otherwise exhibit such behavior. Given the abundance of reactive surfaces in nature and the nonlinearity of chemical systems, we conclude that building a greater understanding of

  4. Neural network and parton two fireball model for pseudo-rapidity distribution in proton-proton collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bakry, M.Y.

    2000-01-01

    Pseudo-Rapidity distribution of created pions from proton-proton (p-p) interaction has been studied in the framework of artificial neural network (ANN) and the parton two fireball model (PTFM). The predicted distributions from the ANN based model and the parton two fireball model is compared with the corresponding experimental results. The ANN model has proved better matching for experimental data specially at high energies where the conventional two fireball model representation deteriorates

  5. SU-E-T-479: Development and Validation of Analytical Models Predicting Secondary Neutron Radiation in Proton Therapy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, J; Bonfrate, A; Donadille, L; Martinetti, F; Trompier, F; Clairand, I; De Olivera, A; Delacroix, S; Herault, J; Piau, S; Vabre, I

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Test and validation of analytical models predicting leakage neutron exposure in passively scattered proton therapy. Methods: Taking inspiration from the literature, this work attempts to build an analytical model predicting neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), within the local 75 MeV ocular proton therapy facility. MC simulations were first used to model H*(10) in the beam axis plane while considering a closed final collimator and pristine Bragg peak delivery. Next, MC-based analytical model was tested against simulation results and experimental measurements. The model was also expended in the vertical direction to enable a full 3D mapping of H*(10) inside the treatment room. Finally, the work focused on upgrading the literature model to clinically relevant configurations considering modulated beams, open collimators, patient-induced neutron fluctuations, etc. Results: The MC-based analytical model efficiently reproduced simulated H*(10) values with a maximum difference below 10%. In addition, it succeeded in predicting measured H*(10) values with differences <40%. The highest differences were registered at the closest and farthest positions from isocenter where the analytical model failed to faithfully reproduce the high neutron fluence and energy variations. The differences remains however acceptable taking into account the high measurement/simulation uncertainties and the end use of this model, i.e. radiation protection. Moreover, the model was successfully (differences < 20% on simulations and < 45% on measurements) extended to predict neutrons in the vertical direction with respect to the beam line as patients are in the upright seated position during ocular treatments. Accounting for the impact of beam modulation, collimation and the present of a patient in the beam path is far more challenging and conversion coefficients are currently being defined to predict stray neutrons in clinically representative treatment configurations. Conclusion

  6. Proton transport in a membrane protein channel: two-dimensional infrared spectrum modeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, C.; Knoester, J.; Jansen, T.L.Th.A.

    2012-01-01

    We model the two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectrum of a proton channel to investigate its applicability as a spectroscopy tool to study the proton transport process in biological systems. Proton transport processes in proton channels are involved in numerous fundamental biochemical reactions.

  7. Solar Activity from 2006 to 2014 and Short-term Forecasts of Solar Proton Events Using the ESPERTA Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberti, T.; Lepreti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, 87036, Rende (CS) (Italy); Laurenza, M.; Storini, M.; Consolini, G. [INAF-IAPS, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133, Roma (Italy); Cliver, E. W., E-mail: tommaso.alberti@unical.it, E-mail: monica.laurenza@iaps.inaf.it [National Solar Observatory, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-03-20

    To evaluate the solar energetic proton (SEP) forecast model of Laurenza et al., here termed ESPERTA, we computed the input parameters (soft X-ray (SXR) fluence and ∼1 MHz radio fluence) for all ≥M2 SXR flares from 2006 to 2014. This database is outside the 1995–2005 interval on which ESPERTA was developed. To assess the difference in the general level of activity between these two intervals, we compared the occurrence frequencies of SXR flares and SEP events for the first six years of cycles 23 (1996 September–2002 September) and 24 (2008 December–2014 December). We found a reduction of SXR flares and SEP events of 40% and 46%, respectively, in the latter period. Moreover, the numbers of ≥M2 flares with high values of SXR and ∼1 MHz fluences (>0.1 J m{sup −2} and >6 × 10{sup 5} sfu × minute, respectively) are both reduced by ∼30%. A somewhat larger percentage decrease of these two parameters (∼40% versus ∼30%) is obtained for the 2006–2014 interval in comparison with 1995–2005. Despite these differences, ESPERTA performance was comparable for the two intervals. For the 2006–2014 interval, ESPERTA had a probability of detection (POD) of 59% (19/32) and a false alarm rate (FAR) of 30% (8/27), versus a POD = 63% (47/75) and an FAR = 42% (34/81) for the original 1995–2005 data set. In addition, for the 2006–2014 interval the median (average) warning time was estimated to be ∼2 hr (∼7 hr), versus ∼6 hr (∼9 hr), for the 1995–2005 data set.

  8. Study of the proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies through eikonal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, Alvaro Favinha

    1995-01-01

    The proton-proton elastic scattering in the center of mass energy region 23 to 63 GeV is investigated through a multiple diffraction model. As an introduction to the subject, a detailed review of the fundamental basis of the Multiple Diffraction Formalism and a survey of the multiple diffraction models (geometrical) currently used are presented. The goal of this investigation is to reformulate one of these models, which makes use of an elementary (parton-parton) amplitude purely imaginary and is not able to predict the ρ-parameter (the ratio of the forward real and imaginary parts of the hadronic amplitude). Introducing a real part for the elementary amplitude proportional to the imaginary part, improvements in the formalism are obtained. It is shown that this new approach is able to reproduce all experimental data on differential and integrated cross sections (total, elastic and inelastic), but not the ρ-parameter as function of the energy. Then, starting from fitting of this parameter an overall reproduction of the physical observables is obtained, with the exception of the dip region (diffractive minimum in the differential cross section) overall description are also not firmly reached in all these models. Finally, alternatives to improve the results in a future research are suggested and discussed. (author)

  9. Study of the proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies through eikonal models; Estudo do espalhamento elastico proton-proton a altas energias atraves de modelos eiconais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, Alvaro Favinha

    1995-12-31

    The proton-proton elastic scattering in the center of mass energy region 23 to 63 GeV is investigated through a multiple diffraction model. As an introduction to the subject, a detailed review of the fundamental basis of the Multiple Diffraction Formalism and a survey of the multiple diffraction models (geometrical) currently used are presented. The goal of this investigation is to reformulate one of these models, which makes use of an elementary (parton-parton) amplitude purely imaginary and is not able to predict the {rho}-parameter (the ratio of the forward real and imaginary parts of the hadronic amplitude). Introducing a real part for the elementary amplitude proportional to the imaginary part, improvements in the formalism are obtained. It is shown that this new approach is able to reproduce all experimental data on differential and integrated cross sections (total, elastic and inelastic), but not the {rho}-parameter as function of the energy. Then, starting from fitting of this parameter an overall reproduction of the physical observables is obtained, with the exception of the dip region (diffractive minimum in the differential cross section) overall description are also not firmly reached in all these models. Finally, alternatives to improve the results in a future research are suggested and discussed. (author) 69 refs., 69 figs., 20 tabs.

  10. Modelling of proton and metal exchange in the alginate biopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Concetta; Gianguzza, Antonio; Piazzese, Daniela; Sammartano, Silvio

    2005-10-01

    Acid-base behaviour of a commercial sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed (Macrocystis pyrifera) has been investigated at different ionic strengths (0.1titration calorimetric data were expressed as a function of the dissociation degree (alpha) using different models (Henderson-Hasselbalch modified, Högfeldt three parameters and linear equations). The dependence on ionic strength of the protonation constants was taken into account by a modified specific interaction theory model. Differences among different media were explained in terms of the interaction between polyanion and metal cations of the supporting electrolytes. Quantitative information on the proton-binding capacity, together with the stabilities of different species formed, is reported. Protonation thermodynamic parameters, at alpha=0.5, are log K H=3.686+/-0.005, DeltaG 0=-21.04+/-0.03 kJ mol(-1), DeltaH 0=4.8+/-0.2 kJ mol(-1) and TDeltaS 0=35.7+/-0.3 kJ mol(-1), at infinite dilution. Protonation enthalpies indicate that the main contribution to proton binding arises from the entropy term. A strict correlation between DeltaG and TDeltaS was found, TDeltaS=-9.5-1.73 DeltaG. Results are reported in light of building up a chemical complexation model of general validity to explain the binding ability of naturally occurring polycarboxylate polymers and biopolymers. Speciation profiles of alginate in the presence of sodium and magnesium ions, naturally occurring cations in natural waters, are also reported.

  11. Phototransistor response under a neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Luiz A.P.; Barros, Fabio R.; Ursulino, Luciano C.; Silva Junior, Eronides F.; Antonio Filho, Joao

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to show some effects on a bipolar phototransistor after it has been under a neutron fluence. Unlike a transistor, a phototransistor is designed so that the collector has a large area and consequently it has a higher radiation detection probability. Then, it is possible to have a certain number of interactions so that any changes in the internal structure of the phototransistor can be observed after a neutron irradiation. If a phototransistor is under a certain spectra of neutron fluence the interaction depends on the cross section of the either silicon chip or its encapsulation, and recoil protons could be the charged particle responsible for changes in the semiconductor structure. Furthermore, neutron irradiation could give to the device a state of vanishing in its electrical characteristic which can be performed tracing the current versus voltage curve (I x V). The experimental arrangement basically consists of a photonic device, a neutron-gamma radiation source and a Flip-Flop electrometer second generation (EFF-2G). One of the main parameters of evaluation was the phototransistor dark current. In fact, the first results demonstrate that when the phototransistor is neutron irradiated there is a significant variation in its I x V characteristic curve. (author)

  12. A method for modeling laterally asymmetric proton beamlets resulting from collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Hyer, Daniel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Hill, Patrick M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Gao, Mingcheng; Laub, Steve; Pankuch, Mark [Division of Medical Physics, CDH Proton Center, 4455 Weaver Parkway, Warrenville, Illinois 60555 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method to model the 3D dose distribution of laterally asymmetric proton beamlets resulting from collimation. The model enables rapid beamlet calculation for spot scanning (SS) delivery using a novel penumbra-reducing dynamic collimation system (DCS) with two pairs of trimmers oriented perpendicular to each other. Methods: Trimmed beamlet dose distributions in water were simulated with MCNPX and the collimating effects noted in the simulations were validated by experimental measurement. The simulated beamlets were modeled analytically using integral depth dose curves along with an asymmetric Gaussian function to represent fluence in the beam’s eye view (BEV). The BEV parameters consisted of Gaussian standard deviations (sigmas) along each primary axis (σ{sub x1},σ{sub x2},σ{sub y1},σ{sub y2}) together with the spatial location of the maximum dose (μ{sub x},μ{sub y}). Percent depth dose variation with trimmer position was accounted for with a depth-dependent correction function. Beamlet growth with depth was accounted for by combining the in-air divergence with Hong’s fit of the Highland approximation along each axis in the BEV. Results: The beamlet model showed excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation data used as a benchmark. The overall passing rate for a 3D gamma test with 3%/3 mm passing criteria was 96.1% between the analytical model and Monte Carlo data in an example treatment plan. Conclusions: The analytical model is capable of accurately representing individual asymmetric beamlets resulting from use of the DCS. This method enables integration of the DCS into a treatment planning system to perform dose computation in patient datasets. The method could be generalized for use with any SS collimation system in which blades, leaves, or trimmers are used to laterally sharpen beamlets.

  13. A method for modeling laterally asymmetric proton beamlets resulting from collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Hyer, Daniel E.; Hill, Patrick M.; Gao, Mingcheng; Laub, Steve; Pankuch, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a method to model the 3D dose distribution of laterally asymmetric proton beamlets resulting from collimation. The model enables rapid beamlet calculation for spot scanning (SS) delivery using a novel penumbra-reducing dynamic collimation system (DCS) with two pairs of trimmers oriented perpendicular to each other. Methods: Trimmed beamlet dose distributions in water were simulated with MCNPX and the collimating effects noted in the simulations were validated by experimental measurement. The simulated beamlets were modeled analytically using integral depth dose curves along with an asymmetric Gaussian function to represent fluence in the beam’s eye view (BEV). The BEV parameters consisted of Gaussian standard deviations (sigmas) along each primary axis (σ x1 ,σ x2 ,σ y1 ,σ y2 ) together with the spatial location of the maximum dose (μ x ,μ y ). Percent depth dose variation with trimmer position was accounted for with a depth-dependent correction function. Beamlet growth with depth was accounted for by combining the in-air divergence with Hong’s fit of the Highland approximation along each axis in the BEV. Results: The beamlet model showed excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation data used as a benchmark. The overall passing rate for a 3D gamma test with 3%/3 mm passing criteria was 96.1% between the analytical model and Monte Carlo data in an example treatment plan. Conclusions: The analytical model is capable of accurately representing individual asymmetric beamlets resulting from use of the DCS. This method enables integration of the DCS into a treatment planning system to perform dose computation in patient datasets. The method could be generalized for use with any SS collimation system in which blades, leaves, or trimmers are used to laterally sharpen beamlets

  14. A method for modeling laterally asymmetric proton beamlets resulting from collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelover, Edgar; Wang, Dongxu; Hill, Patrick M.; Flynn, Ryan T.; Gao, Mingcheng; Laub, Steve; Pankuch, Mark; Hyer, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a method to model the 3D dose distribution of laterally asymmetric proton beamlets resulting from collimation. The model enables rapid beamlet calculation for spot scanning (SS) delivery using a novel penumbra-reducing dynamic collimation system (DCS) with two pairs of trimmers oriented perpendicular to each other. Methods: Trimmed beamlet dose distributions in water were simulated with MCNPX and the collimating effects noted in the simulations were validated by experimental measurement. The simulated beamlets were modeled analytically using integral depth dose curves along with an asymmetric Gaussian function to represent fluence in the beam’s eye view (BEV). The BEV parameters consisted of Gaussian standard deviations (sigmas) along each primary axis (σx1,σx2,σy1,σy2) together with the spatial location of the maximum dose (μx,μy). Percent depth dose variation with trimmer position was accounted for with a depth-dependent correction function. Beamlet growth with depth was accounted for by combining the in-air divergence with Hong’s fit of the Highland approximation along each axis in the BEV. Results: The beamlet model showed excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation data used as a benchmark. The overall passing rate for a 3D gamma test with 3%/3 mm passing criteria was 96.1% between the analytical model and Monte Carlo data in an example treatment plan. Conclusions: The analytical model is capable of accurately representing individual asymmetric beamlets resulting from use of the DCS. This method enables integration of the DCS into a treatment planning system to perform dose computation in patient datasets. The method could be generalized for use with any SS collimation system in which blades, leaves, or trimmers are used to laterally sharpen beamlets. PMID:25735287

  15. TH-CD-207B-09: Task-Driven Fluence Field Modulation Design for Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, G; Siewerdsen, J; Stayman, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: There has been increasing interest in integrating fluence field modulation (FFM) devices with diagnostic CT scanners for dose reduction purposes. Conventional FFM strategies, however, are often either based on heuristics or the analysis of filtered-backprojection (FBP) performance. This work investigates a prospective task-driven optimization of FFM for model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in order to improve imaging performance at the same total dose as conventional strategies. Methods: The task-driven optimization framework utilizes an ultra-low dose 3D scout as a patient-specific anatomical model and a mathematical formation of the imaging task. The MBIR method investigated is quadratically penalized-likelihood reconstruction. The FFM objective function uses detectability index, d’, computed as a function of the predicted spatial resolution and noise in the image. To optimize performance throughout the object, a maxi-min objective was adopted where the minimum d’ over multiple locations is maximized. To reduce the dimensionality of the problem, FFM is parameterized as a linear combination of 2D Gaussian basis functions over horizontal detector pixels and projection angles. The coefficients of these bases are found using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) algorithm. The task-driven design was compared with three other strategies proposed for FBP reconstruction for a calcification cluster discrimination task in an abdomen phantom. Results: The task-driven optimization yielded FFM that was significantly different from those designed for FBP. Comparing all four strategies, the task-based design achieved the highest minimum d’ with an 8–48% improvement, consistent with the maxi-min objective. In addition, d’ was improved to a greater extent over a larger area within the entire phantom. Conclusion: Results from this investigation suggests the need to re-evaluate conventional FFM strategies for MBIR. The task

  16. TH-CD-207B-09: Task-Driven Fluence Field Modulation Design for Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, G; Siewerdsen, J; Stayman, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There has been increasing interest in integrating fluence field modulation (FFM) devices with diagnostic CT scanners for dose reduction purposes. Conventional FFM strategies, however, are often either based on heuristics or the analysis of filtered-backprojection (FBP) performance. This work investigates a prospective task-driven optimization of FFM for model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in order to improve imaging performance at the same total dose as conventional strategies. Methods: The task-driven optimization framework utilizes an ultra-low dose 3D scout as a patient-specific anatomical model and a mathematical formation of the imaging task. The MBIR method investigated is quadratically penalized-likelihood reconstruction. The FFM objective function uses detectability index, d’, computed as a function of the predicted spatial resolution and noise in the image. To optimize performance throughout the object, a maxi-min objective was adopted where the minimum d’ over multiple locations is maximized. To reduce the dimensionality of the problem, FFM is parameterized as a linear combination of 2D Gaussian basis functions over horizontal detector pixels and projection angles. The coefficients of these bases are found using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) algorithm. The task-driven design was compared with three other strategies proposed for FBP reconstruction for a calcification cluster discrimination task in an abdomen phantom. Results: The task-driven optimization yielded FFM that was significantly different from those designed for FBP. Comparing all four strategies, the task-based design achieved the highest minimum d’ with an 8–48% improvement, consistent with the maxi-min objective. In addition, d’ was improved to a greater extent over a larger area within the entire phantom. Conclusion: Results from this investigation suggests the need to re-evaluate conventional FFM strategies for MBIR. The task

  17. Modeling Of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    The objective of this doctoral thesis was to develop reliable steady-state and transient component models suitable to asses-, develop- and optimize proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Several components in PEM fuel cell systems were characterized and modeled. The developed component...... cell systems. Consequences of indirectly fueling PEM stacks with hydrocarbons using reforming technology were investigated using a PEM stack model including CO poisoning kinetics and a transient Simulink steam reforming system model. Aspects regarding the optimization of PEM fuel cell systems...

  18. Bio-physical effects of scanned proton beams: measurements and models for discrete high dose rates scanning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De-Marzi, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop and optimize algorithms for intensity modulated proton therapy, taking into account the physical and biological pencil beam properties. A model based on the summation and fluence weighted division of the pencil beams has been used. A new parameterization of the lateral dose distribution has been developed using a combination of three Gaussian functions. The algorithms have been implemented into a treatment planning system, then experimentally validated and compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Some approximations have been made and validated in order to achieve reasonable calculation times for clinical purposes. In a second phase, a collaboration with Institut Curie radiobiological teams has been started in order to implement radiobiological parameters and results into the optimization loop of the treatment planning process. Indeed, scanned pencil beams are pulsed and delivered at high dose rates (from 10 to 100 Gy/s), and the relative biological efficiency of protons is still relatively unknown given the wide diversity of use of these beams: the different models available and their dependence with linear energy transfers have been studied. A good agreement between dose calculations and measurements (deviations lower than 3 % and 2 mm) has been obtained. An experimental protocol has been set in order to qualify pulsed high dose rate effects and preliminary results obtained on one cell line suggested variations of the biological efficiency up to 10 %, though with large uncertainties. (author) [fr

  19. Intrinsic uncoupling of mitochondrial proton pumps. 2. Modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, D; Zoratti, M; Azzone, G F; Caplan, S R

    1986-02-25

    The thermodynamic and kinetic properties associated with intrinsic uncoupling in a six-state model of a redox proton pump have been studied by computing the flow-force relations for different degrees of coupling. Analysis of these relations shows the regulatory influence of the thermodynamic forces on the extent and relative contributions of redox slip and proton slip. Inhibition has been introduced into the model in two different ways, corresponding to possible modes of action of experimental inhibitors. Experiments relating the rate of electron transfer to delta microH at static head upon progressive inhibition of the pumps have been simulated considering (1) the limiting case that the nonzero rate of electron transfer at static head is only due to intrinsic uncoupling (no leaks) and (2) the experimentally observed case that about 30% of the nonzero rate of electron transfer at static head is due to a constant proton leakage conductance in parallel with the pumps, the rest being due to intrinsic uncoupling. The same simulations have been performed for experiments in which the rate of electron transfer is varied by varying the substrate concentration rather than by using an inhibitor. The corresponding experimental results obtained by measuring delta microH and the rate of electron transfer at different succinate concentrations in rat liver mitochondria are presented. Comparison between simulated behavior and experimental results leads to the general conclusion that the typical relationship between rate of electron transfer and delta microH found in mitochondria at static head could certainly be a manifestation of some degree of intrinsic uncoupling in the redox proton pumps.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Recoil mixing in high-fluence ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littmark, U.; Hofer, W.O.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of recoil mixing on the collection and depth distribution of implanted projectiles during high-fluence irradiation of a random solid is investigated by model calculations based on a previously published transport theoretical approach to the general problem of recoil mixing. The most pronounced effects are observed in the maximum implantable amount of projectiles and in the critical fluence for saturation. Both values are significantly increased by recoil mixing. (Auth.)

  1. Absolute measurement and international intercomparison of 0.1-0.8 MeV monoenergetic neutron fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongchang; Lu Hanlin; Rong Chaofan

    1988-01-01

    The methods for absolute measurement of 0.1-18MeV monoenergetic neutron fluence rate are described. Which include proton recoil telescope, semicoducetor telescope, hydrogen filled proportional counter and associated particale method. A long counter used as secondary recent international intercomparison of neutron fluence rate organized by BIPM, and the results were given

  2. On the model-dependence of the relation between minimum-bias and inelastic proton-proton cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostapchenko, S.

    2011-01-01

    The model-dependence of the relation between the inelastic and various minimum-bias proton-proton cross sections is analyzed, paying a special attention to the sensitivity of minimum-bias triggers to diffractive collisions. Concentrating on the trigger selections of the ATLAS experiment, the measured cross sections are compared to predictions of a number of hadronic Monte Carlo models used in the cosmic ray field. It is demonstrated that the ATLAS results are able to discriminate between different models and between certain theoretical approaches for soft multi-particle production. On the other hand, the strong model-dependence of the selection efficiency of the minimum-bias triggers prevents one from inferring high mass diffraction rate from the discussed data. Moreover, the measured cross sections prove to be insensitive to the production of low mass diffractive states in proton-proton collisions. Consequently, a reliable determination of the total inelastic cross section requires forward proton tracking by a dedicated experiment.

  3. Deduction of solar neutron fluences from large gamma-ray flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimori, Masato; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kazuyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Solar neutron fluences from large gamma-ray flares are deduced from accelerated proton spectra and numbers derived from the gamma-ray observations. The deduced solar neutron fluences range from 1 to 200 neutrons cm -2 . The present result indicates a possibility that high sensitivity ground-based neutron monitors can detect solar neutron events, just as detected by the Jungfraujoch and Rome neutron monitors. (author)

  4. Analytical dose modeling for preclinical proton irradiation of millimetric targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanstalle, Marie; Constanzo, Julie; Karakaya, Yusuf; Finck, Christian; Rousseau, Marc; Brasse, David

    2018-01-01

    Due to the considerable development of proton radiotherapy, several proton platforms have emerged to irradiate small animals in order to study the biological effectiveness of proton radiation. A dedicated analytical treatment planning tool was developed in this study to accurately calculate the delivered dose given the specific constraints imposed by the small dimensions of the irradiated areas. The treatment planning system (TPS) developed in this study is based on an analytical formulation of the Bragg peak and uses experimental range values of protons. The method was validated after comparison with experimental data from the literature and then compared to Monte Carlo simulations conducted using Geant4. Three examples of treatment planning, performed with phantoms made of water targets and bone-slab insert, were generated with the analytical formulation and Geant4. Each treatment planning was evaluated using dose-volume histograms and gamma index maps. We demonstrate the value of the analytical function for mouse irradiation, which requires a targeting accuracy of 0.1 mm. Using the appropriate database, the analytical modeling limits the errors caused by misestimating the stopping power. For example, 99% of a 1-mm tumor irradiated with a 24-MeV beam receives the prescribed dose. The analytical dose deviations from the prescribed dose remain within the dose tolerances stated by report 62 of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements for all tested configurations. In addition, the gamma index maps show that the highly constrained targeting accuracy of 0.1 mm for mouse irradiation leads to a significant disagreement between Geant4 and the reference. This simulated treatment planning is nevertheless compatible with a targeting accuracy exceeding 0.2 mm, corresponding to rat and rabbit irradiations. Good dose accuracy for millimetric tumors is achieved with the analytical calculation used in this work. These volume sizes are typical in mouse

  5. Development of disease animal models using proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, K. H.; Kim, E. K.; Kim, H. R.; Seo, Y. W.

    2010-03-01

    To identify proper proton beam dose for mutant mouse development, total 7 times of proton beam were performed. There are too low incidence of mutation in pup mouse which were derived embryos radiated by 1Gy proton beam. Some mutation could be identified in pup mice which were derived embryos radiated by 1.5-2.5Gy proton beam. Mouse embryos irradiated with 1-10Gy of proton beam were inhibited in their in vitro development to 2 cell stage. There was no pups born from embryos which were irradiated with proton beam over 3 Gy. Early mouse development were greatly inhibited by proton beam irradiation of over 10Gy when cultured in vitro. In conclusion, it is efficient to irradiate mouse embryo with 1.5-2.5Gy of proton beam for development of mutant mice

  6. MOLECULAR VALIDATED MODEL FOR ADSORPTION OF PROTONATED DYE ON LDH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Braga

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydrotalcite-like compounds are anionic clays of scientific and technological interest for their use as ion exchange materials, catalysts and modified electrodes. Surface phenomenon are important for all these applications. Although conventional analytical methods have enabled progress in understanding the behavior of anionic clays in solution, an evaluation at the atomic scale of the dynamics of their ionic interactions has never been performed. Molecular simulation has become an extremely useful tool to provide this perspective. Our purpose is to validate a simplified model for the adsorption of 5-benzoyl-4-hydroxy-2-methoxy-benzenesulfonic acid (MBSA, a prototype molecule of anionic dyes, onto a hydrotalcite surface. Monte Carlo simulations were performed in the canonical ensemble with MBSA ions and a pore model of hydrotalcite using UFF and ClayFF force fields. The proposed molecular model has allowed us to reproduce experimental data of atomic force microscopy. Influences of protonation during the adsorption process are also presented.

  7. M-Theory Model-Building and Proton Stability

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Ellis, John; Faraggi, Alon E.

    1998-01-01

    We study the problem of baryon stability in M theory, starting from realistic four-dimensional string models constructed using the free-fermion formulation of the weakly-coupled heterotic string. Suitable variants of these models manifest an enhanced custodial gauge symmetry that forbids to all orders the appearance of dangerous dimension-five baryon-decay operators. We exhibit the underlying geometric (bosonic) interpretation of these models, which have a $Z_2 \\times Z_2$ orbifold structure similar, but not identical, to the class of Calabi-Yau threefold compactifications of M and F theory investigated by Voisin and Borcea. A related generalization of their work may provide a solution to the problem of proton stability in M theory.

  8. M-theory model-building and proton stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Faraggi, A.E.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX; Academy of Athens

    1997-09-01

    The authors study the problem of baryon stability in M theory, starting from realistic four-dimensional string models constructed using the free-fermion formulation of the weakly-coupled heterotic string. Suitable variants of these models manifest an enhanced custodial gauge symmetry that forbids to all orders the appearance of dangerous dimension-five baryon-decay operators. The authors exhibit the underlying geometric (bosonic) interpretation of these models, which have a Z 2 x Z 2 orbifold structure similar, but not identical, to the class of Calabi-Yau threefold compactifications of M and F theory investigated by Voisin and Borcea. A related generalization of their work may provide a solution to the problem of proton stability in M theory

  9. Fast Proton Titration Scheme for Multiscale Modeling of Protein Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Andre Azevedo Reis; Lund, Mikael; da Silva, Fernando Luís Barroso

    2010-10-12

    Proton exchange between titratable amino acid residues and the surrounding solution gives rise to exciting electric processes in proteins. We present a proton titration scheme for studying acid-base equilibria in Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations where salt is treated at the Debye-Hückel level. The method, rooted in the Kirkwood model of impenetrable spheres, is applied on the three milk proteins α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin, for which we investigate the net-charge, molecular dipole moment, and charge capacitance. Over a wide range of pH and salt conditions, excellent agreement is found with more elaborate simulations where salt is explicitly included. The implicit salt scheme is orders of magnitude faster than the explicit analog and allows for transparent interpretation of physical mechanisms. It is shown how the method can be expanded to multiscale modeling of aqueous salt solutions of many biomolecules with nonstatic charge distributions. Important examples are protein-protein aggregation, protein-polyelectrolyte complexation, and protein-membrane association.

  10. Isotopic dependence of GCR fluence behind shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Saganti, Premkumar; Hu, Xiaodong; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cleghorn, Timothy; Zeitlin, Cary; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the effects of the isotopic composition of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), nuclear fragmentation cross sections, and isotopic-grid on the solution to transport models used for shielding studies. Satellite measurements are used to describe the isotopic composition of the GCR. For the nuclear interaction data-base and transport solution, we use the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) and high-charge and energy (HZETRN) transport code, respectively. The QMSFRG model is shown to accurately describe existing fragmentation data including proper description of the odd-even effects as function of the iso-spin dependence on the projectile nucleus. The principle finding of this study is that large errors (±100%) will occur in the mass-fluence spectra when comparing transport models that use a complete isotopic-grid (∼170 ions) to ones that use a reduced isotopic-grid, for example the 59 ion-grid used in the HZETRN code in the past; however, less significant errors (<+/-20%) occur in the elemental-fluence spectra. Because a complete isotopic-grid is readily handled on small computer workstations and is needed for several applications studying GCR propagation and scattering, it is recommended that they be used for future GCR studies

  11. Modelling carcinogenesis after radiotherapy using Poisson statistics: implications for IMRT, protons and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Bleddyn [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bleddyn.Jones@rob.ox.ac.uk

    2009-06-01

    Current technical radiotherapy advances aim to (a) better conform the dose contours to cancers and (b) reduce the integral dose exposure and thereby minimise unnecessary dose exposure to normal tissues unaffected by the cancer. Various types of conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using x-rays can achieve (a) while charged particle therapy (CPT)-using proton and ion beams-can achieve both (a) and (b), but at greater financial cost. Not only is the long term risk of radiation related normal tissue complications important, but so is the risk of carcinogenesis. Physical dose distribution plans can be generated to show the differences between the above techniques. IMRT is associated with a dose bath of low to medium dose due to fluence transfer: dose is effectively transferred from designated organs at risk to other areas; thus dose and risk are transferred. Many clinicians are concerned that there may be additional carcinogenesis many years after IMRT. CPT reduces the total energy deposition in the body and offers many potential advantages in terms of the prospects for better quality of life along with cancer cure. With C ions there is a tail of dose beyond the Bragg peaks, due to nuclear fragmentation; this is not found with protons. CPT generally uses higher linear energy transfer (which varies with particle and energy), which carries a higher relative risk of malignant induction, but also of cell death quantified by the relative biological effect concept, so at higher dose levels the frank development of malignancy should be reduced. Standard linear radioprotection models have been used to show a reduction in carcinogenesis risk of between two- and 15-fold depending on the CPT location. But the standard risk models make no allowance for fractionation and some have a dose limit at 4 Gy. Alternatively, tentative application of the linear quadratic model and Poissonian statistics to chromosome breakage and cell kill simultaneously allows estimation of

  12. Proton nucleus collisions in the Landau hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence upon energy and the atomic number A for the multiplicities and the angular distributions of the relativistic secondaries is computed according to the hydrodynamic model for proton-nucleus collisions. Some different ways of converting the dependence upon tunnellength in nuclear matter into A dependence are discussed and a phenomenological model employed to exhibit the correlations to the fragmentation of the nucleus. The treatment is valid for arbitrary values of the velocity of sound c 0 in nuclear matter inside the range 0.2 0 0 around c 0 approximately 0.5 is preferred in a comparison to the presently available experimental data. This is the same range of values of the parameter for which the best agreement between theory and experiment occurs in the ISR range. (Auth.)

  13. Damage effects and mechanisms of proton irradiation on methyl silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.X.; He, Sh.Y.; Xu, Zh.; Wei, Q.

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed on the damage effects and mechanisms of proton irradiation with 150 keV energy to space-grade methyl silicone rubber. The changes in surface morphology, mechanical properties, infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectrum, mass spectrum and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrum (PYGC-MS) indicated that, under lower fluence, the proton radiation would induce cross-linking effect, resulting in an increase in tensile strengths and hardness of the methyl silicon rubber. However, under higher proton fluence, the radiation-induced degradation, which decreased the tensile strengths and hardness, became a dominant effect. A macromolecular-network destruction model for the silicone rubber radiated with the protons was proposed

  14. Modeling of Jovian Auroral Polar Ion and Proton Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, S. J.; Ozak, N. O.; Cravens, T.; Schultz, D. R.; Mauk, B.; Haggerty, D. K.; Young, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Auroral particle precipitation dominates the chemical and physical environment of the upper atmospheres and ionospheres of the outer planets. Precipitation of energetic electrons from the middle magnetosphere is responsible for the main auroral oval at Jupiter, but energetic electron, proton, and ion precipitation take place in the polar caps. At least some of the ion precipitation is associated with soft X-ray emission with about 1 GW of power. Theoretical modeling has demonstrated that the incident sulfur and oxygen ion energies must exceed about 0.5 MeV/nucleon (u) in order to produce the measured X-ray emission. In this work we present a model of the transport of magnetospheric oxygen ions as they precipitate into Jupiter's polar atmosphere. We have revised and updated the hybrid Monte Carlo model originally developed by Ozak et al., 2010 to model the Jovian X-ray aurora. We now simulate a wider range of incident oxygen ion energies (10 keV/u - 5 MeV/u) and update the collision cross-sections to model the ionization of the atmospheric neutrals. The polar cap location of the emission and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling both indicate the associated field-aligned currents must originate near the magnetopause or perhaps the distant tail. Secondary electrons produced in the upper atmosphere by ion precipitation could be accelerated upward to relativistic energies due to the same field-aligned potentials responsible for the downward ion acceleration. To further explore this, we simulate the effect of the secondary electrons generated from the heavy ion precipitation. We use a two-stream transport model that computes the secondary electron fluxes, their escape from the atmosphere, and characterization of the H2 Lyman-Werner band emission, including a predicted observable spectrum with the associated color ratio. Our model predicts that escaping electrons have an energy range from 1 eV to 6 keV, H2 band emission rates produced are on the order of 75 kR for an input

  15. Water equivalence of various materials for clinical proton dosimetry by experiment and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sulaiti, Leena; Shipley, David; Thomas, Russell; Kacperek, Andrzej; Regan, Patrick; Palmans, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    The accurate conversion of dose to various materials used in clinical proton dosimetry to dose-to-water is based on fluence correction factors, accounting for attenuation of primary protons and production of secondary particles due to non-elastic nuclear interactions. This work aims to investigate the depth dose distribution and the fluence correction with respect to water or graphite at water equivalent depths (WED) in different target materials relevant for dosimetry such as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), graphite, A-150, aluminium and copper at 60 and 200 MeV. This was done through a comparison between Monte Carlo simulation using MCNPX 2.5.0, analytical model calculations and experimental measurements at Clatterbridge Centre of Oncology (CCO) in a 60 MeV modulated and un-modulated proton beam. MCNPX simulations indicated small fluence corrections for all materials with respect to graphite and water in 60 and 200 MeV except for aluminium. The analytical calculations showed an increase in the fluence correction factor to a few percent for all materials with respect to water at 200 MeV. The experimental measurements for 60 MeV un-modulated beam indicated a good agreement with MCNPX. For the modulated beam the fluence correction factor was found to be decreasing below unity by up to few percent with depth for aluminium and copper but almost constant and unity for A-150.

  16. Molecular modeling of protonic acid doping of emeraldine base polyaniline for chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.A.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Ye, H.; Leung, S.Y.Y.; Zhang, G.

    2012-01-01

    We proposed a molecular modeling methodology to study the protonic acid doping of emeraldine base polyaniline which can used in gas detection. The commercial forcefield COMPASS was used for the polymer and protonic acid molecules. The molecular model, which is capable of representing the polyaniline

  17. Probabilistic Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Develop a Probabilistic Model for the Solar Energetic Particle Environment. Develop a tool to provide a reference solar particle radiation environment that: 1) Will not be exceeded at a user-specified confidence level; 2) Will provide reference environments for: a) Peak flux; b) Event-integrated fluence; and c) Mission-integrated fluence. The reference environments will consist of: a) Elemental energy spectra; b) For protons, helium and heavier ions.

  18. Modelling and validation of Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, A. K. M.; Basran, N.; Khan, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the outcome of a small scale fuel cell project. Fuel cell is an electrochemical device that converts energy from chemical reaction to electrical work. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the different types of fuel cell, which is more efficient, having low operational temperature and fast start up capability results in high energy density. In this study, a mathematical model of 1.2 W PEMFC is developed and simulated using MATLAB software. This model describes the PEMFC behaviour under steady-state condition. This mathematical modeling of PEMFC determines the polarization curve, power generated, and the efficiency of the fuel cell. Simulation results were validated by comparing with experimental results obtained from the test of a single PEMFC with a 3 V motor. The performance of experimental PEMFC is little lower compared to simulated PEMFC, however both results were found in good agreement. Experiments on hydrogen flow rate also been conducted to obtain the amount of hydrogen consumed to produce electrical work on PEMFC.

  19. Spectral fluence of neutrons generated by radiotherapeutic Linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Smoldasova, Jana; Vondracek, Vladimir; Farkasova, Estera; Ticha, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Spectral fluences of neutrons generated in the heads of the radiotherapeutic linacs Varian Clinac 2100 C/D and Siemens ARTISTE were measured by means of the Bonner spheres spectrometer whose active detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by an activation detector, i.e. a tablet made of pure manganese. Measurements with different collimator settings reveal an interesting dependence of neutron fluence on the area defined by the collimator jaws. The determined neutron spectral fluences were used to derive ambient dose equivalent rate along the treatment coach. To clarify at which components of the linac neutrons are mainly created, the measurements were complemented with MCNPX calculations based on a realistic model of the Varian Clinac. (authors)

  20. An S-N2-model for proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism of proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds is suggested. The transition is regarded as totally adiabatic. Two closest water molecules that move synchronously by hindered translation to and from the reaction complex are crucial. The water molecules induce...... a shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor and acceptor. Expressions for the activation barrier and kinetic hydrogen isotope effect are derived. The general scheme is illustrated with the use...... of model molecular potentials, and with reference to the excess proton conductivity in aqueous solution....

  1. Analysis and verification of a prediction model of solar energetic proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Zhong, Q.

    2017-12-01

    The solar energetic particle event can cause severe radiation damages near Earth. The alerts and summary products of the solar energetic proton events were provided by the Space Environment Prediction Center (SEPC) according to the flux of the greater than 10 MeV protons taken by GOES satellite in geosynchronous orbit. The start of a solar energetic proton event is defined as the time when the flux of the greater than 10 MeV protons equals or exceeds 10 proton flux units (pfu). In this study, a model was developed to predict the solar energetic proton events, provide the warning for the solar energetic proton events at least minutes in advance, based on both the soft X-ray flux and integral proton flux taken by GOES. The quality of the forecast model was measured against verifications of accuracy, reliability, discrimination capability, and forecast skills. The peak flux and rise time of the solar energetic proton events in the six channels, >1MeV, >5 MeV, >10 MeV, >30 MeV, >50 MeV, >100 MeV, were also simulated and analyzed.

  2. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A.

    2004-01-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centers with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The Centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV

  3. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A. [Torino Univ., Torino (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale; Bourhaleb, F. [TERA Foundation, Novara (Italy)] [and others

    2004-10-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centers with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The Centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV.

  4. On-Site Determination and Monitoring of Real-Time Fluence Delivery for an Operating UV Reactor Based on a True Fluence Rate Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Li, Wentao; Qiang, Zhimin; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2017-07-18

    At present, on-site fluence (distribution) determination and monitoring of an operating UV system represent a considerable challenge. The recently developed microfluorescent silica detector (MFSD) is able to measure the approximate true fluence rate (FR) at a fixed position in a UV reactor that can be compared with a FR model directly. Hence it has provided a connection between model calculation and real-time fluence determination. In this study, an on-site determination and monitoring method of fluence delivery for an operating UV reactor was developed. True FR detectors, a UV transmittance (UVT) meter, and a flow rate meter were used for fundamental measurements. The fluence distribution, as well as reduction equivalent fluence (REF), 10th percentile dose in the UV fluence distribution (F 10 ), minimum fluence (F min ), and mean fluence (F mean ) of a test reactor, was calculated in advance by the combined use of computational fluid dynamics and FR field modeling. A field test was carried out on the test reactor for disinfection of a secondary water supply. The estimated real-time REF, F 10 , F min , and F mean decreased 73.6%, 71.4%, 69.6%, and 72.9%, respectively, during a 6-month period, which was attributable to lamp output attenuation and sleeve fouling. The results were analyzed with synchronous data from a previously developed triparameter UV monitoring system and water temperature sensor. This study allowed demonstration of an accurate method for on-site, real-time fluence determination which could be used to enhance the security and public confidence of UV-based water treatment processes.

  5. Therapeutic study of proton beam in vascular disease animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, M. J.; Choi, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    We previously reported that proton beam inhibited angiogenic vessels in zebrafish and that proton induced cancer cell apoptosis via p53 induction as well as caspase-3 activity. In this study, we performed to identity the effect of candidate chemicals on the angiogenic inhibition in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish Flk1:EGFP transgenic fish). And we treated small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 cells with proton beam in combination with angiogenic inhibitors we found in this study. By the MTT assay, we performed cell viability assay with cancer cells and we investigated that HIF-1α induction by proton beam by the western blot analysis. We found novel anti-angiogenic chemicals from traditional herb. That is decursin, and glyceollins from the Angelica gigas, and soy bean. Decrusin and glyceollins inhibited VEGF- or bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and zebrafish microvessel development. Moreover, glyceollins inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α in a dose dependent manner. However, proton beam itself did not induce HIF-1α whereas it increased HIF-1α stability under hypoxia. Even proton beam induced cell death of A549 small cell lung carcinoma cells but the combination of decrusin or glyceollins did not increase the cancer cell death

  6. Therapeutic study of proton beam in vascular disease animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. M.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, M. J.; Choi, J. H. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We previously reported that proton beam inhibited angiogenic vessels in zebrafish and that proton induced cancer cell apoptosis via p53 induction as well as caspase-3 activity. In this study, we performed to identity the effect of candidate chemicals on the angiogenic inhibition in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish Flk1:EGFP transgenic fish). And we treated small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 cells with proton beam in combination with angiogenic inhibitors we found in this study. By the MTT assay, we performed cell viability assay with cancer cells and we investigated that HIF-1{alpha} induction by proton beam by the western blot analysis. We found novel anti-angiogenic chemicals from traditional herb. That is decursin, and glyceollins from the Angelica gigas, and soy bean. Decrusin and glyceollins inhibited VEGF- or bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and zebrafish microvessel development. Moreover, glyceollins inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1{alpha} in a dose dependent manner. However, proton beam itself did not induce HIF-1{alpha} whereas it increased HIF-1{alpha} stability under hypoxia. Even proton beam induced cell death of A549 small cell lung carcinoma cells but the combination of decrusin or glyceollins did not increase the cancer cell death

  7. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo

    2017-01-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D tis ) and dose-to-water (D w ). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the 125 I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  8. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: pacrisguian@gmail.com [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), University of Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D{sub tis}) and dose-to-water (D{sub w}). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the {sup 125}I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  9. Description of proton radioactivity using the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Sukumaran, Indu

    2017-09-01

    Half-life predictions have been performed for the proton emitters with Z >50 in the ground state and isomeric state using the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The agreement of the calculated values with the experimental data made it possible to predict some proton emissions that are not verified experimentally yet. For a comparison, the calculations also are performed using other theoretical models, such as the Gamow-like model of Zdeb et al. [Eur. Phys. J. A 52, 323 (2016), 10.1140/epja/i2016-16323-7], the semiempirical relation of Hatsukawa et al. [Phys. Rev. C 42, 674 (1990), 10.1103/PhysRevC.42.674], and the CPPM of Santhosh et al. [Pramana 58, 611 (2002)], 10.1007/s12043-002-0019-2. The Geiger-Nuttall law, originally observed for α decay, studied for proton radioactivity is found to work well provided it is plotted for the isotopes of a given proton emitter nuclide with the same ℓ value. The universal curve is found to be valid for proton radioactivity also as we obtained a single straight line for all proton emissions irrespective of the parents. Through the analysis of the experimentally measured half-lives of 44 proton emitters, the study revealed that the present systematic study lends support to a unified description for studying α decay, cluster radioactivity, and proton radioactivity.

  10. Public Dose Assessment Modeling from Skyshine by Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwambinga, S. A. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, S. J. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the skyshine dose by proton accelerator (230 MeV) has been evaluated. The amount of dose by skyshine is related to some influence factors which are emission angle (Height wall), the thickness of ceiling and distance from source to receptor (Human body). Empirical formula is made by using MCNPX code results. It can easily calculate and assess dose from skyshine by proton accelerator. The skyshine doses are calculated with MCNPX code and DCFs in ICRP 116. Thereafter, we made empirical formula which can calculate dose easily and be compared with the results of MCNPX. The maximum exposure point by skyshine is about 5 ∼ 10 m from source. Therefore, the licensee who wants to operate the proton accelerator must keep the appropriate distance from accelerator and set the fence to restrict the approach by the public. And, exposure doses by accelerator depend on operating time and proton beam intensities. Eq. (6) suggested in this study is just considered for mono energy proton accelerator. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the dose calculation to diverse proton energies. Radiations like neutron and photon generated by high energy proton accelerators over 10 MeV, are important exposure sources to be monitored to radiation workers and the public members near the facility. At that case, one of the exposure pathways to the public who are located in near the facility is skyshine. Neutrons and photons can be scattered by the atmosphere near the facility and exposed to public as scattered dose. All of the facilities using high energy radiation and NDI (Non-Destructive Inspection) which is tested at open field, skyshine dose must be taken into consideration. Skyshine dose is not related to the wall thickness of radiation shielding directly.

  11. Track structure model for damage to mammalian cell cultures during solar proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Katz, R.

    1992-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) occur infrequently and unpredictably, thus representing a potential hazard to interplanetary space missions. Biological damage from SPEs will be produced principally through secondary electron production in tissue, including important contributions due to delta rays from nuclear reaction products. We review methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of SPEs using a high energy proton model and the parametric cellular track model. Results of the model are presented for several of the historically largest flares using typical levels and body shielding.

  12. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco; Mourokh, Lev G

    2011-01-01

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  13. Electrostatic models of electron-driven proton transfer across a lipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Mourokh, Lev G [Department of Physics, Queens College, The City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    We present two models for electron-driven uphill proton transport across lipid membranes, with the electron energy converted to the proton gradient via the electrostatic interaction. In the first model, associated with the cytochrome c oxidase complex in the inner mitochondria membranes, the electrostatic coupling to the site occupied by an electron lowers the energy level of the proton-binding site, making proton transfer possible. In the second model, roughly describing the redox loop in a nitrate respiration of E. coli bacteria, an electron displaces a proton from the negative side of the membrane to a shuttle, which subsequently diffuses across the membrane and unloads the proton to its positive side. We show that both models can be described by the same approach, which can be significantly simplified if the system is separated into several clusters, with strong Coulomb interaction inside each cluster and weak transfer couplings between them. We derive and solve the equations of motion for the electron and proton creation/annihilation operators, taking into account the appropriate Coulomb terms, tunnel couplings, and the interaction with the environment. For the second model, these equations of motion are solved jointly with a Langevin-type equation for the shuttle position. We obtain expressions for the electron and proton currents and determine their dependence on the electron and proton voltage build-ups, on-site charging energies, reorganization energies, temperature, and other system parameters. We show that the quantum yield in our models can be up to 100% and the power-conversion efficiency can reach 35%.

  14. Proton Therapy Expansion Under Current United States Reimbursement Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstiens, John [Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Johnstone, Peter A.S., E-mail: pajohnst@iupui.edu [Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether all the existing and planned proton beam therapy (PBT) centers in the United States can survive on a local patient mix that is dictated by insurers, not by number of patients. Methods and Materials: We determined current and projected cancer rates for 10 major US metropolitan areas. Using published utilization rates, we calculated patient percentages who are candidates for PBT. Then, on the basis of current published insurer coverage policies, we applied our experience of what would be covered to determine the net number of patients for whom reimbursement is expected. Having determined the net number of covered patients, we applied our average beam delivery times to determine the total number of minutes needed to treat that patient over the course of their treatment. We then calculated our expected annual patient capacity per treatment room to determine the appropriate number of treatment rooms for the area. Results: The population of patients who will be both PBT candidates and will have treatments reimbursed by insurance is significantly smaller than the population who should receive PBT. Coverage decisions made by insurers reduce the number of PBT rooms that are economically viable. Conclusions: The expansion of PBT centers in the US is not sustainable under the current reimbursement model. Viability of new centers will be limited to those operating in larger regional metropolitan areas, and few metropolitan areas in the US can support multiple centers. In general, 1-room centers require captive (non–PBT-served) populations of approximately 1,000,000 lives to be economically viable, and a large center will require a population of >4,000,000 lives. In areas with smaller populations or where or a PBT center already exists, new centers require subsidy.

  15. Water versus DNA A new deal for proton transport modeling in biological matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, C; Quinto, M A; Monti, J M; Galassi, M E; Fojón, O A; Hanssen, J; Rivarola, R D; Week, P F

    2015-01-01

    Water vapor is a common surrogate of DNA for modeling the proton-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, self-consistent quantum mechanical modeling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. (paper)

  16. Study of elastic scattering of polarized proton with 6He by folding model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseri, Y.; Tanifuji, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Hiyama, E.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental data of the elastic scattering of 6 He with polarized proton target has been analyzed using a simple folding model. As we regard 6 He as three bodies consisting of 4 He+n+n, the potential between the proton and 6 He is obtained by folding the two potentials, one between a proton and 4 He and another between a proton and a neutron, with the density distribution of 6 He. Calculated results of both the differential cross section and the vector analyzing power reproduce the experimental data satisfactorily. It is shown that the vector analyzing power of the p- 6 He scattering is mainly due to the spin orbit interaction between the proton and 4 He. (S. Funahashi)

  17. Response of a biological model to a proton beam in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Juan A.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Debray, Mario E.; Kesque, Jose M.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Stoliar, Pablo A.; Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Vazquez, Monica E.

    2000-01-01

    Wistar rats were locally irradiated with proton beams. By means of a plastic wedge used as an energy degradator of variable thickness, dorsal portions of skin were irradiated at several tissue depths. This model was used to perform proton irradiations with different doses in both the plateau and the Bragg portions of the Bragg curve. The particular geometry of the wedge, in which the maximum thickness is greater than the proton range, yields a portion of unaffected tissue included in the irradiated area. Thus, it was possible to obtain a reference zone contiguous to the affected area in the same animal. SSNTD were used to establish the spatial configuration and the dose of the proton beams. This methodology allows isodose curve calculations along the different tissue depths which are in agreement with the biologic effects observed. Additionally, the scattering of protons on the shielding material, that affects specific areas of the tissue, is detected by the SSNTD. (author)

  18. A review of dosimetric and toxicity modeling of proton versus photon craniospinal irradiation for pediatrics medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Evangeline S Q; Barrett, Sarah A; Mullaney, Laura M

    2017-08-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) is the standard radiation therapy treatment for medulloblastoma. Conventional CSI photon therapy (Photon-CSI) delivers significant dose to surrounding normal tissue (NT). Research into pediatric CSI with proton therapy (Proton-CSI) has increased, with the aim of exploiting the potential to reduce NT dose and associated post-treatment complications. This review aims to compare treatment outcomes of pediatric medulloblastoma patients between Proton- and Photon-CSI treatments. A search and review of studies published between 1990 and 2016 comparing pediatric (2-18 years) medulloblastoma Proton- and Photon-CSI in three aspects - normal organ sparing and target coverage; normal organ dysfunction and second malignancy risks - was completed. Fifteen studies were selected for review and the results were directly compared. Proton-CSI reported improved out-of-field organ sparing while target coverage improvements were inconsistent. Normal organ dysfunction risks were predicted to be lower following Proton-CSI. Secondary malignancy risks (SMRs) were generally lower with Proton-CSI based on several different risk models. Proton-CSI conferred better treatment outcomes than Photon-CSI for pediatric medulloblastoma patients. This review serves to compare the current literature in the absence of long-term data from prospective studies.

  19. Anomalous effects in silicon solar cell irradiated by 1-MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B. E.

    1989-01-01

    Several silicon solar cells having thicknesses of approximately 63 microns, with and without back-surface fields (BSF), were irradiated with 1-MeV protons having fluences between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 12th sq cm. The irradiations were performed using both normal and isotropic incidence on the rear surfaces of the cells. It was observed that after irradiation with fluences greater than 10 to the 11th protons/sq cm, all BSF cells degraded at a faster rate than cells without BSF. The irradiation results are analyzed using a model in which irradiation-induced defects in the BSF region are taken into account. Tentatively, it is concluded that an increase in defect density due to the formation of aluminum and proton complexes in BSF cells is responsible for the higher-power loss in the BSF cells compared to the non-BSF cells.

  20. Leading Twist TMDs in a Light-Front Quark-Diquark Model for Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2018-05-01

    We present p_{\\perp } variation (fixed x) of the leading-twist T-even transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of a proton in a light-front quark-diquark model at μ ^2=2.4 and 20 GeV^2. The quark densities for unpolarized and transversely polarized proton are also presented. We observe a Soffer bound for TMDs in this model.

  1. The Quest for Evidence for Proton Therapy: Model-Based Approach and Precision Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reducing dose to normal tissues is the advantage of protons versus photons. We aimed to describe a method for translating this reduction into a clinically relevant benefit. Methods and Materials: Dutch scientific and health care governance bodies have recently issued landmark reports regarding generation of relevant evidence for new technologies in health care including proton therapy. An approach based on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models has been adopted to select patients who are most likely to experience fewer (serious) adverse events achievable by state-of-the-art proton treatment. Results: By analogy with biologically targeted therapies, the technology needs to be tested in enriched cohorts of patients exhibiting the decisive predictive marker: difference in normal tissue dosimetric signatures between proton and photon treatment plans. Expected clinical benefit is then estimated by virtue of multifactorial NTCP models. In this sense, high-tech radiation therapy falls under precision medicine. As a consequence, randomizing nonenriched populations between photons and protons is predictably inefficient and likely to produce confusing results. Conclusions: Validating NTCP models in appropriately composed cohorts treated with protons should be the primary research agenda leading to urgently needed evidence for proton therapy.

  2. Online measurement of fluence and position for protontherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, C.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cornelius, I.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Guérin, L.; La Rosa, A.; Luparia, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, F.; Meyroneinc, S.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2004-09-01

    Tumour therapy with proton beams has been used for several decades in many centres with very good results in terms of local control and overall survival. Typical pathologies treated with this technique are located in head and neck, eye, prostate and in general at big depths or close to critical organs. The Experimental Physics Department of the University of Turin and the local Section of INFN, in collaboration with INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud Catania and Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay Paris, have developed detector systems that allow the measurement of beam position and fluence, obtained in real time during beam delivery. The centre in Catania (CATANA: Centro di AdroTerapia ed Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) has been treating patients with eye pathologies since spring 2002 using a superconducting cyclotron accelerating protons up to 62 MeV.This kind of treatments need high-resolution monitor systems and for this reason we have developed a 256-strip segmented ionisation chamber, each strip being 400 μm wide, with a total sensitive area 13×13 cm2. The Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO) has been operational since 1991 and features a synchrocyclotron used for eye and head and neck tumours with proton beams up to 200 MeV. The monitor system has to work on a large surface and for this purpose we have designed a pixel-segmented ionisation chamber, each pixel being 5×5 mm2, for a total active area of 16×16 cm2. The results obtained with two prototypes of the pixel and strip chambers demonstrate that the detectors allow the measurement of fluence and centre of gravity as requested by clinical specifications.

  3. An analytical reconstruction model of the spread-out Bragg peak using laser-accelerated proton beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Jungao; Xu, Xiaohan; Lin, Chen; Ma, Wenjun; Lu, Haiyang; Zhao, Yanying; Lu, Yuanrong; Chen, Jia-Er; Yan, Xueqing

    2017-07-07

    With the development of laser technology, laser-driven proton acceleration provides a new method for proton tumor therapy. However, it has not been applied in practice because of the wide and decreasing energy spectrum of laser-accelerated proton beams. In this paper, we propose an analytical model to reconstruct the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) using laser-accelerated proton beams. Firstly, we present a modified weighting formula for protons of different energies. Secondly, a theoretical model for the reconstruction of SOBPs with laser-accelerated proton beams has been built. It can quickly calculate the number of laser shots needed for each energy interval of the laser-accelerated protons. Finally, we show the 2D reconstruction results of SOBPs for laser-accelerated proton beams and the ideal situation. The final results show that our analytical model can give an SOBP reconstruction scheme that can be used for actual tumor therapy.

  4. Experimental characterization and physical modelling of the dose distribution of scanned proton pencil beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroni, E; Scheib, S; Boehringer, T; Coray, A; Grossmann, M; Lin, S; Lomax, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present the pencil beam dose model used for treatment planning at the PSI proton gantry, the only system presently applying proton therapy with a beam scanning technique. The scope of the paper is to give a general overview on the various components of the dose model, on the related measurements and on the practical parametrization of the results. The physical model estimates from first physical principles absolute dose normalized to the number of incident protons. The proton beam flux is measured in practice by plane-parallel ionization chambers (ICs) normalized to protons via Faraday-cup measurements. It is therefore possible to predict and deliver absolute dose directly from this model without other means. The dose predicted in this way agrees very well with the results obtained with ICs calibrated in a cobalt beam. Emphasis is given in this paper to the characterization of nuclear interaction effects, which play a significant role in the model and are the major source of uncertainty in the direct estimation of the absolute dose. Nuclear interactions attenuate the primary proton flux, they modify the shape of the depth-dose curve and produce a faint beam halo of secondary dose around the primary proton pencil beam in water. A very simple beam halo model has been developed and used at PSI to eliminate the systematic dependences of the dose observed as a function of the size of the target volume. We show typical results for the relative (using a CCD system) and absolute (using calibrated ICs) dosimetry, routinely applied for the verification of patient plans. With the dose model including the nuclear beam halo we can predict quite precisely the dose directly from treatment planning without renormalization measurements, independently of the dose, shape and size of the dose fields. This applies also to the complex non-homogeneous dose distributions required for the delivery of range-intensity-modulated proton therapy, a novel therapy technique

  5. Neutron fluence measurement in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho L, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of present work is to determine the fluence of neutrons in nuclear facilities using two neutron detectors designed and built at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Mexico. The two neutron detectors are of the passive type, based on solid state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTD). One of the two neutron detectors was used to determine the fluence distribution of the ports at the nuclear research reactor TRIGA Mark III, which belongs to ININ. In these facilities is important to know the neutron fluence distribution characteristic to carried out diverse kind of research activities. The second neutron detector was employed in order to carry out environmental neutron surveillance. The detector has the property to separate the thermal, intermediate and fast components of the neutron fluence. This detector was used to measure the neutron fluence at hundred points around the primary container of the first Mexican Nuclear Power plant 'Laguna Verde'. This last detector was also used to determine the neutron fluence in some points of interest, around and inside a low scattering neutron room at the 'Centro de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes' of the ININ, to know the background neutron field produced by the neutron sources used there. The design of the two neutron detector and the results obtained for each of the surveying facilities, are described in this work. (Author)

  6. Evaluation of the influence of double and triple Gaussian proton kernel models on accuracy of dose calculations for spot scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Shusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Fujii, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Fujitaka, Shinichiro; Umezawa, Masumi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Hosaka, Masahiro; Yasui, Keisuke; Omachi, Chihiro; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The main purpose in this study was to present the results of beam modeling and how the authors systematically investigated the influence of double and triple Gaussian proton kernel models on the accuracy of dose calculations for spot scanning technique. The accuracy of calculations was important for treatment planning software (TPS) because the energy, spot position, and absolute dose had to be determined by TPS for the spot scanning technique. The dose distribution was calculated by convolving in-air fluence with the dose kernel. The dose kernel was the in-water 3D dose distribution of an infinitesimal pencil beam and consisted of an integral depth dose (IDD) and a lateral distribution. Accurate modeling of the low-dose region was important for spot scanning technique because the dose distribution was formed by cumulating hundreds or thousands of delivered beams. The authors employed a double Gaussian function as the in-air fluence model of an individual beam. Double and triple Gaussian kernel models were also prepared for comparison. The parameters of the kernel lateral model were derived by fitting a simulated in-water lateral dose profile induced by an infinitesimal proton beam, whose emittance was zero, at various depths using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The fitted parameters were interpolated as a function of depth in water and stored as a separate look-up table. These stored parameters for each energy and depth in water were acquired from the look-up table when incorporating them into the TPS. The modeling process for the in-air fluence and IDD was based on the method proposed in the literature. These were derived using MC simulation and measured data. The authors compared the measured and calculated absolute doses at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) under various volumetric irradiation conditions to systematically investigate the influence of the two types of kernel models on the dose calculations. The authors investigated the difference

  7. Model independent dispersion approach to proton Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caprini, I.; Radescu, E.E.

    1980-12-01

    The proton Compton scattering at low and intermediate energies is studied by means of a dispersion framework which exploits in an optimal way the (fixed momentum transfer) analyticity properties of the amplitudes in conjunction with the consequences of the (s-channel) unitarity. The mathematical background of the work consists of methods specific to boundary value problems for analytic vector-valued functions and interpolation theory. In comparison with previous related work, the external problems to be solved now are much more difficult because of the inclusion of the photoproduction input and also lead to additional computational complications. The lower bounds on the differential cross-section, obtained without any reference to subtractions and annihilation channel contributions, appear sufficiently restrictive to evidentiate rigorously some inconsistencies between results of single pion photoproduction multipole extractions and proton Compton scattering data. (author)

  8. Half-life calculation of one-proton emitters with a shell model potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, M. M.; Duarte, S. B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCT Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Teruya, N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba - UFPB Campus de Joao Pessoa, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa - PB (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    The accumulated amount of data for half-lives of proton emitters still remains a challenge to the ability of nuclear models to reproduce them consistently. These nuclei are far from beta stability line in a region where the validity of current nuclear models is not guaranteed. A nuclear shell model is introduced to the calculation of the nuclear barrier of less deformed proton emitters. The predictions using the proposed model are in good agreement with the data, with the advantage of have used only a single parameter in the model.

  9. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  10. Developing a forecast model of solar proton flux profiles for well-connected events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, E. Y.; Moon, Y. J.; Park, J.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a forecast model of solar proton flux profile (> 10 MeV channel) for well-connected events. Among 136 solar proton events (SPEs) from 1986 to 2006, we select 49 well-connected ones that are all associated with single X-ray flares stronger than M1 class and start to increase within four hours after their X-ray peak times. These events show rapid increments in proton flux. By comparing several empirical functions, we select a modified Weibull curve function to approximate a SPE flux profile, which is similar to the particle injection rate. The parameters (peak value, rise time and decay time) of this function are determined by the relationship between X-ray flare parameters (peak flux, impulsive time, and emission measure) and SPE parameters. For 49 well-connected SPEs, the linear correlation between the predicted proton peak flux and the observed proton peak fluxes is 0.65 with the RMS error of 0.55 pfu in the log10. In addition, we have developed another forecast model based on flare and CME parameters using 22 SPEs. The used CME parameters are linear speed and angular width. As a result, we find that the linear correlation between the predicted proton peak flux and the observed proton peak fluxes is 0.83 with the RMS error of 0.35 pfu in the log10. From the relationship between the model error and CME acceleration, we find that CME acceleration is also an important factor for predicting proton flux profiles.

  11. Three-dimensional RAMA fluence methodology benchmarking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S. P.; Carter, R. G.; Watkins, K. E.; Jones, D. B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the benchmarking of the RAMA Fluence Methodology software, that has been performed in accordance with U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.190. The RAMA Fluence Methodology has been developed by TransWare Enterprises Inc. through funding provided by the Electric Power Research Inst., Inc. (EPRI) and the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP). The purpose of the software is to provide an accurate method for calculating neutron fluence in BWR pressure vessels and internal components. The Methodology incorporates a three-dimensional deterministic transport solution with flexible arbitrary geometry representation of reactor system components, previously available only with Monte Carlo solution techniques. Benchmarking was performed on measurements obtained from three standard benchmark problems which include the Pool Criticality Assembly (PCA), VENUS-3, and H. B. Robinson Unit 2 benchmarks, and on flux wire measurements obtained from two BWR nuclear plants. The calculated to measured (C/M) ratios range from 0.93 to 1.04 demonstrating the accuracy of the RAMA Fluence Methodology in predicting neutron flux, fluence, and dosimetry activation. (authors)

  12. Proton transport model in the ionosphere. 2. Influence of magnetic mirroring and collisions on the angular redistribution in a proton beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galand

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of magnetic mirroring and elastic and inelastic scattering on the angular redistribution in a proton/hydrogen beam by using a transport code in comparison with observations. H-emission Doppler profiles viewed in the magnetic zenith exhibit a red-shifted component which is indicative of upward fluxes. In order to determine the origin of this red shift, we evaluate the influence of two angular redistribution sources which are included in our proton/hydrogen transport model. Even though it generates an upward flux, the redistribution due to magnetic mirroring effect is not sufficient to explain the red shift. On the other hand, the collisional angular scattering induces a much more significant red shift in the lower atmosphere. The red shift due to collisions is produced  by <1 -keV protons and is so small as to require an instrumental bandwidth <0.2 nm. This explains the absence of measured upward proton/hydrogen fluxes in the Proton I rocket data because no useable data concerning protons <1 keV are available. At the same time, our model agrees with measured ground-based H-emission Doppler profiles and suggests that previously reported red shift observations were due mostly to instrumental bandwidth broadening of the profile. Our results suggest that Doppler profile measurements with higher spectral resolution may enable us to quantify better the angular scattering in proton aurora.Key words. Auroral ionosphere · Particle precipitation

  13. Extended Lipkin-type models with residual proton-neutron interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, S.

    1999-01-01

    Extended Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) models for testing the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) and proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation (pnRPA) methods are developed taking into account explicitly the proton and neutron degrees of freedom. First, an extended LMG model for testing RPA is developed. The proton and neutron Hamiltonians are taken to be of the LMG form and, in addition, a residual proton-neutron interaction is included. Exact solutions in a SU(2) x SU(2) basis as well as the RPA solutions for the energy spectrum of the model Hamiltonian are obtained. Then, the behaviour of the first collective excited state is studied as a function of the interaction parameters of the model using the exact and RPA methods. Secondly, an extended LMG model for testing pnRPA method is developed. Besides the proton and neutron single particle terms two types of residual proton-neutron interactions, one simulating a particle-particle and the other a particle-hole interaction, are included in the model Hamiltonian, so that the model is exactly solvable in an isospin SU(2) x SU(2) basis. The exact and pnRPA spectra of the model Hamiltonian are calculated as a function of the model parameters and compared to each other. Furthermore, charge-changing operators simulating a nuclear beta decay and their action on eigenfunctions of the model Hamiltonian are defined, and transition amplitude of them are calculated using exact and pnRPA wave functions. The best agreement between the exact RPA-type calculations for spectra and transitions, was obtained when the correlated RPA ground state, instead of the uncorrelated HF ground state was employed and when both kinds of residual interactions (i.e. like- and unlike-particle two-body interactions) are included in the model Hamiltonians. (author)

  14. A Method to Simulate the Observed Surface Properties of Proton Irradiated Silicon Strip Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, Timo Hannu Tapani

    2014-01-01

    A defect model of Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD simulation package for the bulk properties of proton irradiated devices has been producing simulations closely matching to measurements of silicon strip detectors. However, the model does not provide the expected behavior due to the fluence increased surface damage. The solution requires an approach that does not affect the accurate bulk properties produced by the proton model, but only adds to it the required radiation induced properties close to the surface. These include the observed position dependency of the strip detector's...

  15. Divergence of Cs-137 sources fluence used in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vianello, E.A.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1998-01-01

    In this work the experimental determination of correction factor for fluence divergence (kln) of linear Cs-137 sources CDCS J4, with Farmer ionization chamber model 2571 in a central and perpendicular plan to source axis, for distances range from 1 to 7 cm., has been presented. The experimental results were compared to calculating by Kondo and Randolph (1960) isotropic theory and Bielajew (1990) anisotropic theory. (Author)

  16. Fluence-dependent sputtering yield of micro-architectured materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthes, Christopher S.R.; Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@ucla.edu; Li, Gary Z.; Matlock, Taylor S.; Goebel, Dan M.; Dodson, Chris A.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Sputtering yield is shown to be transient and heavily dependent on surface architecture. • Fabricated nano- and Microstructures cause geometric re-trapping of sputtered material, which leads to a self-healing mechanism. • Initially, the sputtering yield of micro-architectured Mo is approximately 1/2 the value as that of a planar surface. • The study demonstrates that the sputtering yield is a dynamic property, dependent on the surface structure of a material. • A developed phenomenological model mathematically describes the transient behavior of the sputtering yield as a function of plasma fluence. - Abstract: We present an experimental examination of the relationship between the surface morphology of Mo and its instantaneous sputtering rate as function of low-energy plasma ion fluence. We quantify the dynamic evolution of nano/micro features of surfaces with built-in architecture, and the corresponding variation in the sputtering yield. Ballistic deposition of sputtered atoms as a result of geometric re-trapping is observed, and re-growth of surface layers is confirmed. This provides a self-healing mechanism of micro-architectured surfaces during plasma exposure. A variety of material characterization techniques are used to show that the sputtering yield is not a fundamental property, but that it is quantitatively related to the initial surface architecture and to its subsequent evolution. The sputtering yield of textured molybdenum samples exposed to 300 eV Ar plasma is roughly 1/2 of the corresponding value for flat samples, and increases with ion fluence. Mo samples exhibited a sputtering yield initially as low as 0.22 ± 5%, converging to 0.4 ± 5% at high fluence. The sputtering yield exhibits a transient behavior as function of the integrated ion fluence, reaching a steady-state value that is independent of initial surface conditions. A phenomenological model is proposed to explain the observed transient sputtering phenomenon, and to

  17. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevestam, Goeran; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas; Tagziria, Hamid; Vanhavere, Filip; Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm -2 s -1 , where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm -2 s -1 , again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved

  18. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevestam, Goeran [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: goeran.loevestam@ec.europa.eu; Hult, Mikael; Fessler, Andreas; Gasparro, Joel; Kockerols, Pierre; Okkinga, Klaas [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Tagziria, Hamid [EC-JRC-Institute for the Protection and the Security of the Citizen (IPSC), Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy); Vanhavere, Filip [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Wieslander, J.S. Elisabeth [EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2009-01-15

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved.

  19. Microscopic models for proton transfer in water and strongly hydrogen-bonded complexes with a single-well proton potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism and formalism for proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds introduced recently [1], is applied to a proton transfer in liquid water. "Structural diffusion" of hydroxonium ions is regarded as totally adiabatic process, with synchronous hindered translation...... of two closest water molecules to and from the reaction complex as crucial steps. The water molecules induce a "gated" shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor in the double-well potential with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor...... and acceptor. The short-range and long-range proton transfer as "structural diffusion" of Zundel complexes is also considered. The theoretical formalism is illustrated with the use of Morse, exponential, and harmonic molecular potentials. This approach is extended to proton transfer in strongly hydrogen...

  20. SU-F-BRD-09: A Random Walk Model Algorithm for Proton Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W; Farr, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a random walk model algorithm for calculating proton dose with balanced computation burden and accuracy. Methods: Random walk (RW) model is sometimes referred to as a density Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In MC proton dose calculation, the use of Gaussian angular distribution of protons due to multiple Coulomb scatter (MCS) is convenient, but in RW the use of Gaussian angular distribution requires an extremely large computation and memory. Thus, our RW model adopts spatial distribution from the angular one to accelerate the computation and to decrease the memory usage. From the physics and comparison with the MC simulations, we have determined and analytically expressed those critical variables affecting the dose accuracy in our RW model. Results: Besides those variables such as MCS, stopping power, energy spectrum after energy absorption etc., which have been extensively discussed in literature, the following variables were found to be critical in our RW model: (1) inverse squared law that can significantly reduce the computation burden and memory, (2) non-Gaussian spatial distribution after MCS, and (3) the mean direction of scatters at each voxel. In comparison to MC results, taken as reference, for a water phantom irradiated by mono-energetic proton beams from 75 MeV to 221.28 MeV, the gamma test pass rate was 100% for the 2%/2mm/10% criterion. For a highly heterogeneous phantom consisting of water embedded by a 10 cm cortical bone and a 10 cm lung in the Bragg peak region of the proton beam, the gamma test pass rate was greater than 98% for the 3%/3mm/10% criterion. Conclusion: We have determined key variables in our RW model for proton dose calculation. Compared with commercial pencil beam algorithms, our RW model much improves the dose accuracy in heterogeneous regions, and is about 10 times faster than MC simulations

  1. Track etch parameters and annealing kinetics assessment of protons of low energy in CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, R.K.; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, B.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We calibrate CR-39 detector with very low energy protons. ► We establish linear relationship between track diameter and time/energy up to 200 keV. ► We determine activation energy of annealing using different models. ► We justify concept of single annealing activation energy in CR-39. - Abstract: In this paper threshold of the registration sensitivity of very low energy proton in CR-39 is investigated. Irradiation of CR-39 (poly-allyl-diglycol carbonate) was carried out with very low energy mono energetic protons of 20–60 keV from a mini proton accelerator. Nearly 10 4 /cm 2 fluence of protons was used. The variation of track diameter with etching time as well as proton energy response curve was carefully calibrated. The bulk and track etch rates were measured by using proton track diameters. Bulk etch rate was also measured by the thickness of removed surface layer. The thermal annealing of proton track at temperatures ranging from 100 to 200 °C in CR-39 was studied by several models. Activation energy of annealed CR-39 detectors was calculated by slope of track etch rate and temperature plot. The data of proton tracks of 200, 250 and 300 keV from 400 kV Van-de-Graaff accelerator was also used and compared with the track diameters of different energies of proton.

  2. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drury Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  3. Correlating Fast Fluence to dpa in Atypical Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Thomas H.

    2016-02-01

    Damage to a nuclear reactor's materials by high-energy neutrons causes changes in the ductility and fracture toughness of the materials. The reactor vessel and its associated piping's ability to withstand stress without brittle fracture are paramount to safety. Theoretically, the material damage is directly related to the displacements per atom (dpa) via the residual defects from induced displacements. However in practice, the material damage is based on a correlation to the high-energy (E > 1.0 MeV) neutron fluence. While the correlated approach is applicable when the material in question has experienced the same neutron spectrum as test specimens which were the basis of the correlation, this approach is not generically acceptable. Using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates transport codes, the energy dependent neutron flux is determined throughout the reactor structures and the reactor vessel. Results from the models provide the dpa response in addition to the high-energy neutron flux. Ratios of dpa to fast fluence are calculated throughout the models. The comparisons show a constant ratio in the areas of historical concern and thus the validity of the correlated approach to these areas. In regions above and below the fuel however, the flux spectrum has changed significantly. The correlated relationship of material damage to fluence is not valid in these regions without adjustment. An adjustment mechanism is proposed.

  4. Radiative proton-deuteron capture in a gauge invariant relativistic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korchin, AY; Van Neck, D; Scholten, O; Waroquier, M

    A relativistic model is developed for the description of the process p+dHe-3+gamma*. It is based on the impulse approximation, but is explicitly gauge invariant and Lorentz covariant. The model is applied to radiative proton-deuteron capture and electrodisintegration of He-3 nt intermediate

  5. A physical model of the proton radiation belts of Jupiter inside Europa’s orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nénon, Quentin; Sicard, Angelica; Kollmann, Peter

    2018-01-01

    A physical model of the Jovian trapped protons with kinetic energies higher than 1 MeV inward of the orbit of the icy moon Europa is presented. The model, named Salammbô, takes into account the radial diffusion process, the absorption effect of the Jovian moons, and the Coulomb collisions and cha...

  6. Model-based fault detection for proton exchange membrane fuel cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, an intelligent model-based fault detection (FD) is developed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) dynamic systems using an independent radial basis function (RBF) networks. The novelty is that this RBF networks is used to model the PEMFC dynamic systems and residuals are generated based ...

  7. Superconductivity in irradiated A-15 compounds at low fluences. I. Neutron-irradiated V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, R.; Caton, R.; Pande, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of the superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/ of single-crystal and polycrystalline V 3 Si was investigated as a function of low-fluence neutron irradiation. It is found that the initial degradation of T/sub c/ is sample-dependent, some specimens showing no degradation in T/sub c/ up to a fluence of 2 x 10 18 n/cm 2 . This and many other earlier observations on low-fluence behavior are explained in terms of a recently proposed model of radiation damage in A-15 compounds

  8. SU-F-T-138: Commissioning and Evaluating Dose Computation Models for a Dedicated Proton Line Scanning Beam Nozzle in Eclipse Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, P [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Proton and Radiation Therapy Center, Tao-yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Huang, H; Cai, S; Chen, H; Wu, S; Wu, T; Lee, S; Yeh, C; Wu, T [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Proton and Radiation Therapy Center, Tao-yuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, C [Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we present an effective method to derive low dose envelope of the proton in-air spot fluence at beam positions other than the isocenter to reduce amount of measurements required for planning commission. Also, we demonstrate commissioning and validation results of this method to the Eclipse treatment planning system (version 13.0.29) for a Sumitomo dedicated proton line scanning beam nozzle. Methods: The in-air spot profiles at five beam-axis positions (±200, ±100 and 0 mm) were obtained in trigger mode using a MP3 Water tank (PTW-Freiburg) and a pinpoint ionization chamber (model 31014, PTW-Freiburg). Low dose envelope (below 1% of the center dose) of the spot profile at isocenter was obtained by repeated point measurements to minimize dosimetry uncertainty. The double Gaussian (DG) model was used to fit and obtain optimal σ1, σ2 and their corresponding weightings through our in-house MATLAB (Mathworks) program. σ1, σ2 were assumed to expand linearly along the beam axis from a virtual source position calculated by back projecting fitted sigmas from the single Gaussian (SG) model. Absolute doses in water were validated using an Advanced Markus chamber at the depth of 2cm with Pristine Peak (BP) R90d ranging from 5–32 cm for 10×10 cm2 scanned fields. The field size factors were verified with square fields from 2 to 20 cm at 2cm and before BP depth. Results: The absolute dose outputs were found to be within ±3%. For field size factor, the agreement between calculated and measurement were within ±2% at 2cm and ±3% before BP, except for the field size below 2×2 cm2. Conclusion: The double Gaussian model was found to be sufficient for characterizing the Sumitomo dedicated proton line scanning nozzle. With our effective double Gaussian fitting method, we are able to save significant proton beam time with acceptable output accuracy.

  9. Incorporating the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence, into compensator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, P.J.; Hoban, P.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In this study we extended ideas developed by Faddegon and Pfalzner on the construction of patient specific compensating filters. Their research was essentially focused on formulating a general method for creating compensators using a 3D planning system. In their work Faddegon and Pfalzner utilized a simple attenuation model to convert transmission arrays into filter thickness arrays. The compensators constructed from these arrays produce the primary fluence required to give a uniform dose distribution at a specified depth. This technique does not account for local geometric variations hi compensator scattering conditions. Therefore we have devised a method to incorporate the effects of lateral spread of the primary fluence passing through the compensating filter. A 2D Gaussian kernel, generated from Monte Carlo measurements, was used to model the spread of the primary fluence in the compensating filter. A 'maximum likelihood' optimisation algorithm was employed to deconvolve the kernel from the desired primary fluence to produce a more realistic incident fluence and compensator thickness array. The CMS FOCUS planning system was used to generate transmission maps corresponding to the desired influence of the compensating filter. Two compensating filters were constructed for each map, one using the standard attenuation method and the other with our method. For each method, an assessment was made using film dosimetry, on the degree of correlation between the desired primary fluence and the primary fluence produced by the compensating filter. Our results indicate that for compensating filters which are relatively uniform in thickness, there is good agreement between desired and delivered fluence maps for both methods. For non-uniform compensating filters the attenuation method deviates more notably from the desired fluence map. As expected, both methods also show significant deviations around the edges of the filter. It is anticipated that the work done here

  10. Novel results on fluence dependence and annealing behavior of oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Lozano, M; Campabadal, F; Santander, J; Fonseca, L; Ullán, M; Moreno, A J D

    2002-01-01

    This work presents the latest results on electrical properties degradation of silicon radiation detectors manufactured at the Institut de Microelectronica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM) subjected to proton irradiation at CERN, Switzerland, for high-energy physics (HEP) applications. The evolution of full depletion voltage and leakage current with fluence as well as their annealing behavior with time were studied. The results obtained extend the previous understanding of the role played by technology and oxygenated material in hardening silicon radiation detectors. (15 refs).

  11. Novel results on fluence dependence and annealing behaviour of oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Lozano, M; Campabadal, F; Santander, J; Fonseca, L; Ullán, M; Moreno, A

    2002-01-01

    This work presents the latest results on electrical properties degradation of silicon radiation detectors manufactured at IMB-CNM (Institut de Microelectronica de Barcelona) subjected to proton irradiation at CERN for high energy physics applications. The evolution of full depletion voltage and leakage current with fluence, as well as their annealing behaviour with time, were studied. The results obtained extend the previous understanding of the role played by technology and oxygenated material in hardening silicon radiation detectors. (15 refs).

  12. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  13. A fluence device for precise radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, R.G.T.; Peak, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    An instrument is described which has been designed to ensure precise positioning of samples and sensing devices in three dimensions at all times during irradiation procedures. The system, which is both robust and sensitive, overcomes difficulties experienced when slight variations in the positioning of a sample under irradiation results in large changes in fluence. (UK)

  14. PRISM -- A tool for modelling proton energy deposition in semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldfield, M.K.; Underwood, C.I.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a description of, and test results from, a new PC based software simulation tool PRISM (Protons in Semiconductor Materials). The model describes proton energy deposition in complex 3D sensitive volumes of semiconductor materials. PRISM is suitable for simulating energy deposition in surface-barrier detectors and semiconductor memory devices, the latter being susceptible to Single-Event Upset (SEU) and Multiple-Bit Upset (MBU). The design methodology on which PRISM is based, together with the techniques used to simulate ion transport and energy deposition, are described. Preliminary test results used to analyze the PRISM model are presented

  15. A low earth orbit dynamic model for the proton anisotropy validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badavi, Francis F.

    2011-11-01

    Ionizing radiation measurements at low earth orbit (LEO) form the ideal tool for the experimental validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear transport code algorithms and nuclear reaction cross sections. Indeed, prior measurements on the space transportation system (STS; shuttle) have provided vital information impacting both the environmental models and the nuclear transport code development by requiring dynamic models of the LEO environment. Previous studies using computer aided design (CAD) models of the international space station (ISS) have demonstrated that the dosimetric prediction for a spacecraft at LEO requires the description of an environmental model with accurate anisotropic as well as dynamic behavior. This paper describes such a model for the trapped proton. The described model is a component of a suite of codes collectively named GEORAD (GEOmagnetic RADiation) which computes cutoff rigidity, trapped proton and trapped electron environments. The web version of GEORAD is named OLTARIS (On-line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space). GEORAD suite is applicable to radiation environment prediction at LEO, medium earth orbit (MEO) and geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) at quiet solar periods. GEORAD interest is in the study of long term effect of the trapped environment and therefore it does not account for any short term external field contribution due to solar activity. With the concentration of the paper on the LEO protons only, the paper presents the validation of the trapped proton model within GEORAD with reported measurements from the compact environment anomaly sensor (CEASE) science instrument package, flown onboard the tri-service experiment-5 (TSX-5) satellite during the period of June 2000 to July 2006. The spin stabilized satellite was flown in a 410 × 1710 km, 69° inclination elliptical orbit, allowing it to be exposed to a broad range of the LEO regime. The paper puts particular emphasize on the validation of the

  16. A quasilinear kinetic model for solar wind electrons and protons instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.

    2017-12-01

    In situ measurements confirm the anisotropic behavior in temperatures of solar wind species. These anisotropies associated with charge particles are observed to be relaxed. In collionless limit, kinetic instabilities play a significant role to reshape particles distribution. The linear analysis results are encapsulated in inverse relationship between anisotropy and plasma beta based observations fittings techniques, simulations methods, or solution of linearized Vlasov equation. Here amacroscopic quasilinear technique is adopted to confirm inverse relationship through solutions of set of self-consistent kinetic equations. Firstly, for a homogeneous and non-collisional medium, quasilinear kinetic model is employed to display asymptotic variations of core and halo electrons temperatures and saturations of wave energy densities for electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) instability sourced by, T⊥}>T{∥ . It is shown that, in (β ∥ , T⊥}/T{∥ ) phase space, the saturations stages of anisotropies associated with core and halo electrons lined up on their respective marginal stability curves. Secondly, for case of electrons firehose instability ignited by excessive parallel temperature i.e T⊥}>T{∥ , both electrons and protons are allowed to dynamically evolve in time. It is also observed that, the trajectories of protons and electrons at saturation stages in phase space of anisotropy and plasma beta correspond to proton cyclotron and firehose marginal stability curves, respectively. Next, the outstanding issue that most of observed proton data resides in nearly isotropic state in phase space is interpreted. Here, in quasilinear frame-work of inhomogeneous solar wind system, a set of self-consistent quasilinear equations is formulated to show a dynamical variations of temperatures with spatial distributions. On choice of different initial parameters, it is shown that, interplay of electron and proton instabilities provides an counter-balancing force to slow

  17. SU-F-T-143: Implementation of a Correction-Based Output Model for a Compact Passively Scattered Proton Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, S; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y; Ferreira, C; Islam, M; Lau, A; Jin, H [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Keeling, V [Carti, Inc., Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To commission and investigate the accuracy of an output (cGy/MU) prediction model for a compact passively scattered proton therapy system. Methods: A previously published output prediction model (Sahoo et al, Med Phys, 35, 5088–5097, 2008) was commissioned for our Mevion S250 proton therapy system. This model is a correction-based model that multiplies correction factors (d/MUwnc=ROFxSOBPF xRSFxSOBPOCFxOCRxFSFxISF). These factors accounted for changes in output due to options (12 large, 5 deep, and 7 small), modulation width M, range R, off-center, off-axis, field-size, and off-isocenter. In this study, the model was modified to ROFxSOBPFxRSFxOCRxFSFxISF-OCFxGACF by merging SOBPOCF and ISF for simplicity and introducing a gantry angle correction factor (GACF). To commission the model, outputs over 1,000 data points were taken at the time of the system commissioning. The output was predicted by interpolation (1D for SOBPF, FSF, and GACF; 2D for RSF and OCR) with inverse-square calculation (ISF-OCR). The outputs of 273 combinations of R and M covering total 24 options were measured to test the model. To minimize fluence perturbation, scattered dose from range compensator and patient was not considered. The percent differences between the predicted (P) and measured (M) outputs were calculated to test the prediction accuracy ([P-M]/Mx100%). Results: GACF was required because of up to 3.5% output variation dependence on the gantry angle. A 2D interpolation was required for OCR because the dose distribution was not radially symmetric especially for the deep options. The average percent differences were −0.03±0.98% (mean±SD) and the differences of all the measurements fell within ±3%. Conclusion: It is concluded that the model can be clinically used for the compact passively scattered proton therapy system. However, great care should be taken when the field-size is less than 5×5 cm{sup 2} where a direct output measurement is required due to substantial

  18. Technical Note: Using experimentally determined proton spot scanning timing parameters to accurately model beam delivery time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiajian; Tryggestad, Erik; Younkin, James E; Keole, Sameer R; Furutani, Keith M; Kang, Yixiu; Herman, Michael G; Bues, Martin

    2017-10-01

    To accurately model the beam delivery time (BDT) for a synchrotron-based proton spot scanning system using experimentally determined beam parameters. A model to simulate the proton spot delivery sequences was constructed, and BDT was calculated by summing times for layer switch, spot switch, and spot delivery. Test plans were designed to isolate and quantify the relevant beam parameters in the operation cycle of the proton beam therapy delivery system. These parameters included the layer switch time, magnet preparation and verification time, average beam scanning speeds in x- and y-directions, proton spill rate, and maximum charge and maximum extraction time for each spill. The experimentally determined parameters, as well as the nominal values initially provided by the vendor, served as inputs to the model to predict BDTs for 602 clinical proton beam deliveries. The calculated BDTs (T BDT ) were compared with the BDTs recorded in the treatment delivery log files (T Log ): ∆t = T Log -T BDT . The experimentally determined average layer switch time for all 97 energies was 1.91 s (ranging from 1.9 to 2.0 s for beam energies from 71.3 to 228.8 MeV), average magnet preparation and verification time was 1.93 ms, the average scanning speeds were 5.9 m/s in x-direction and 19.3 m/s in y-direction, the proton spill rate was 8.7 MU/s, and the maximum proton charge available for one acceleration is 2.0 ± 0.4 nC. Some of the measured parameters differed from the nominal values provided by the vendor. The calculated BDTs using experimentally determined parameters matched the recorded BDTs of 602 beam deliveries (∆t = -0.49 ± 1.44 s), which were significantly more accurate than BDTs calculated using nominal timing parameters (∆t = -7.48 ± 6.97 s). An accurate model for BDT prediction was achieved by using the experimentally determined proton beam therapy delivery parameters, which may be useful in modeling the interplay effect and patient throughput. The model may

  19. Interior point algorithms: guaranteed optimality for fluence map optimization in IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, Dionne M [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, ON M5S 3G8 (Canada); Glaser, Daniel [Division of Optimization and Systems Theory, Department of Mathematics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Romeijn, H Edwin [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2117 (United States); Dempsey, James F, E-mail: aleman@mie.utoronto.c, E-mail: romeijn@umich.ed, E-mail: jfdempsey@viewray.co [ViewRay, Inc. 2 Thermo Fisher Way, Village of Oakwood, OH 44146 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    One of the most widely studied problems of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning problem is the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem, the problem of determining the amount of radiation intensity, or fluence, of each beamlet in each beam. For a given set of beams, the fluences of the beamlets can drastically affect the quality of the treatment plan, and thus it is critical to obtain good fluence maps for radiation delivery. Although several approaches have been shown to yield good solutions to the FMO problem, these solutions are not guaranteed to be optimal. This shortcoming can be attributed to either optimization model complexity or properties of the algorithms used to solve the optimization model. We present a convex FMO formulation and an interior point algorithm that yields an optimal treatment plan in seconds, making it a viable option for clinical applications.

  20. Interior point algorithms: guaranteed optimality for fluence map optimization in IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, Dionne M; Glaser, Daniel; Romeijn, H Edwin; Dempsey, James F

    2010-01-01

    One of the most widely studied problems of the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning problem is the fluence map optimization (FMO) problem, the problem of determining the amount of radiation intensity, or fluence, of each beamlet in each beam. For a given set of beams, the fluences of the beamlets can drastically affect the quality of the treatment plan, and thus it is critical to obtain good fluence maps for radiation delivery. Although several approaches have been shown to yield good solutions to the FMO problem, these solutions are not guaranteed to be optimal. This shortcoming can be attributed to either optimization model complexity or properties of the algorithms used to solve the optimization model. We present a convex FMO formulation and an interior point algorithm that yields an optimal treatment plan in seconds, making it a viable option for clinical applications.

  1. Mathematical modeling of water mass balance for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Jaafar Sahari; Nik Suhaimi Mat Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. Water plays a critical role in PEMFC. The proton conductivity is increase with the water content. In order to achieve enough hydration, water is normally introduced into the cell externally by a variety of methods such as liquid injection, steam introduction, and humidification of reactants by passing them through humidifiers before entering the cell. In this paper, mathematical modeling of water mass balance for PEMFC at anode and cathode side are proposed by using external humidification and assume that steady state, constant pressure, constant temperature and gases distribution are uniform

  2. Hydration and Proton Conductivity of Ionomers: The Model Case of Sulfonated Aromatic Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauth, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.knauth@univ-amu.fr [Madirel (UMR 7246), CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, Marseille (France); Di Vona, Maria Luisa [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy)

    2014-11-06

    The hydration of proton-conducting ionomers is described in terms of a simplified model, where only osmotic and elastic contributions to the Gibbs free energy of hydration are considered. Although only two physically meaningful parameters are used – the deformation parameter, inversely proportional to the elastic modulus of the ionomer, and the free volume parameter – simulated hydration isotherms are in good agreement with the experiment. The proton mobility u inside the electrolyte solution of the ionomer is calculated from the proton conductivity determined at various hydration numbers. Its variation with the proton concentration c reveals the percolation threshold of hydrated nanometric channels and the tortuosity of the membrane. Above the percolation threshold, a power law u ~ c{sup −3} is observed, in agreement with the “universal” law for 3-dimensional percolation. The proton conductivity σ shows at 100°C a maximum of 0.2 S/cm at a hydration number ~90. The σ = f(c) plot allows to predict, which hydration conditions are necessary for a desired area specific resistance.

  3. Hydration and proton conductivity of ionomers: the model case of Sulfonated Aromatic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eKnauth

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The hydration of proton-conducting ionomers is described in terms of a simplified model, where only osmotic and elastic contributions to the Gibbs free energy of hydration are considered. Although only two physically meaningful parameters are used - the deformation parameter, inversely proportional to the elastic modulus of the ionomer, and the free volume parameter – simulated hydration isotherms are in good agreement with the experiment. The proton mobility u inside the electrolyte solution of the ionomer is calculated from the proton conductivity determined at various hydration numbers. Its variation with the proton concentration c reveals the percolation threshold of hydrated nanometric channels and the tortuosity of the membrane. Above the percolation threshold, a power law u ~ c-3 is observed, in agreement with the universal law for 3-dimensional percolation. The proton conductivity  shows at 100°C a maximum of 0.2 S/cm at a hydration number ~90. The  = f(c plot allows to predict which hydration conditions are necessary for a desired area specific resistance.

  4. A Physical Model of the Proton Radiation Belts of Jupiter inside Europa's Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nénon, Q.; Sicard, A.; Kollmann, P.; Garrett, H. B.; Sauer, S. P. A.; Paranicas, C.

    2018-05-01

    A physical model of the Jovian trapped protons with kinetic energies higher than 1 MeV inward of the orbit of the icy moon Europa is presented. The model, named Salammbô, takes into account the radial diffusion process, the absorption effect of the Jovian moons, and the Coulomb collisions and charge exchanges with the cold plasma and neutral populations of the inner Jovian magnetosphere. Preliminary modeling of the wave-particle interaction with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves near the moon Io is also performed. Salammbô is validated against in situ proton measurements of Pioneer 10, Pioneer 11, Voyager 1, Galileo Probe, and Galileo Orbiter. A prominent feature of the MeV proton intensity distribution in the modeled area is the 2 orders of magnitude flux depletion observed in MeV measurements near the orbit of Io. Our simulations reveal that this is not due to direct interactions with the moon or its neutral environment but results from scattering of the protons by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  5. Molecular modeling of the conductivity changes of the emeraldine base polyaniline due to protonic acid doping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.A.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Zhang, G.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular modeling strategy, which is capable of predicting the conductivity change of emeraldine base polyaniline polymer due to different degree of protonic acid doping. The method is comprised of two key steps: (1) generating the amorphous unit cells with given number of polymer

  6. Additive quark model and double scattering of pions and protons in deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.; Czyz, W.; Kisielewska, D.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the additive quark model is compatible with the data on double scattering of pions and protons in deuterium. The cross-section for interaction of the hadrons created in the first collision with the second nucleon of the target is determined to be 20-25 mb. (author)

  7. Radiative pion-proton scattering in the static Chew-Low model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho-Kim, Q.; Lavine, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a non-relativistic calculation of π +- -proton bremsstrahlung cross-sections at the pion laboratory kinetic energy of 298 MeV for backward photon angles are presented. The πp interaction is described by the static Chew-Low model. (Auth.)

  8. Radiative pion-proton scattering in the static Chew--Low model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho-Kim, Q.; Lavine, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a nonrelativistic calculation of π/sup +-/-proton bremsstrahlung cross sections at the pion laboratory kinetic energy of 298 MeV for backward photon angles is presented. The πp interaction is described by the static Chew-Low model

  9. A proton therapy model using discrete difference equations with an example of treating hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodine, Erin N; Monia, K Lars

    2017-08-01

    Proton therapy is a type of radiation therapy used to treat cancer. It provides more localized particle exposure than other types of radiotherapy (e.g., x-ray and electron) thus reducing damage to tissue surrounding a tumor and reducing unwanted side effects. We have developed a novel discrete difference equation model of the spatial and temporal dynamics of cancer and healthy cells before, during, and after the application of a proton therapy treatment course. Specifically, the model simulates the growth and diffusion of the cancer and healthy cells in and surrounding a tumor over one spatial dimension (tissue depth) and the treatment of the tumor with discrete bursts of proton radiation. We demonstrate how to use data from in vitro and clinical studies to parameterize the model. Specifically, we use data from studies of Hepatocellular carcinoma, a common form of liver cancer. Using the parameterized model we compare the ability of different clinically used treatment courses to control the tumor. Our results show that treatment courses which use conformal proton therapy (targeting the tumor from multiple angles) provides better control of the tumor while using lower treatment doses than a non-conformal treatment course, and thus should be recommend for use when feasible.

  10. An application of the Dipole Pomeron model to the pion-proton elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covolan, R.J.M.; Leite, E.E.; Montanha, J.; Soares, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Pomeron model is applied to the pion-proton elastic scattering aiming to describe the total and differential cross sections and the ρ ratio between the scattering amplitude real and imaginary parts. It is also discussed how far the present available experimental results lead to the necessity of adopting a (α 0 > 1) supercritical trajectory. (author). 3 refs., 4 figs

  11. Dynamic Model of the High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2009-01-01

    The present work involves the development of a model for predicting the dynamic temperature of a high temperature proton exchange membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. The model is developed to test different thermal control strategies before implementing them in the actual system. The test system co...... elements for start-up, heat conduction through stack insulation, cathode air convection, and heating of the inlet gases in the manifold. Various measurements are presented to validate the model predictions of the stack temperatures....

  12. Risk-optimized proton therapy to minimize radiogenic second cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechner, Laura A.; Eley, John G.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Zhang, Rui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy confers substantially lower predicted risk of second cancer compared with photon therapy. However, no previous studies have used an algorithmic approach to optimize beam angle or fluence-modulation for proton therapy to minimize those risks. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate the feasibility of risk-optimized proton therapy and to determine the combination of beam angles and fluence weights that minimize the risk of second cancer in the bladder and rectum for a prostate cancer patient. We used 6 risk models to predict excess relative risk of second cancer. Treatment planning utilized a combination of a commercial treatment planning system and an in-house risk-optimization algorithm. When normal-tissue dose constraints were incorporated in treatment planning, the risk model that incorporated the effects of fractionation, initiation, inactivation, and repopulation selected a combination of anterior and lateral beams, which lowered the relative risk by 21% for the bladder and 30% for the rectum compared to the lateral-opposed beam arrangement. Other results were found for other risk models. PMID:25919133

  13. Study of proton-nucleus collisions at high energies based on the hydrodynamical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, N.; Weiner, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    We study proton-nucleus collisions at high energies using the one-dimensional hydrodynamical model of Landau with special emphasis on the effect of the size of the target nucleus and of the magnitude of velocity of sound of excited hadronic matter. We convert a collision problem of a proton and a nucleus with a spherical shape into that of a proton and a one-dimensional nuclear tunnel whose length is determined from the average impact parameter. By extending the methods developed by Milekhin and Emelyanov, we obtain the solutions of the hydrodynamical equations of proton-nucleus collisions for arbitrary target tunnel length and arbitrary velocity of sound. The connection between these solutions and observable physical quantities is established as in the work of Cooper, Frye, and Schonberg. Extensive numerical analyses are made at E/sub lab/ = 200 GeV and for the velocity of sound u = 1/√3 of a relativistic ideal Bose gas and u = 1/(7.5)/sup 1/2/ of an interacting Bose gas. In order to compare proton-nucleus collisions with proton-proton collisions, all the analyses are made in the equal-velocity frame. We find the following results. (1) In comparing the number of secondary particles produced in p-A collisions N/sub p/A with those in p-p collisions N/sub p/p, while most of the excess of N/sub p/A over N/sub p/p is concentrated in the backward rapidity region, there exists also an increase of N/sub p/A with A in the forward rapidity region. This result is at variance with the predictions of the energy-flux-cascade model and of the coherent-production model. (2) The excess energies are contained exclusively in the backward region. We also find evidence for new phenomena in proton-nucleus collisions. (3) The existence of an asymmetry of average energies of secondary particles between forward and backward regions, in particular, >> for larger nuclear targets. Thus, energetic particles are predominantly produced in the backward region

  14. Acceleration of 100 keV protons using a 5SDH-2 Pelletron

    CERN Document Server

    Hollerman, W A; Ruzycki, N

    1999-01-01

    The authors successfully accelerated a 100 keV proton beam using a model 5SDH-2 Pelletron accelerator, manufactured by National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). A pseudo-stable 1-2 nA beam was delivered on target with a net energy variation of less than 6%. However, the small terminal potential made it impossible to use standard stabilization techniques. Minor adjustments in terminal potential were required every 15 min to maintain beam current and energy. This level of stability is sufficient to deliver a proton fluence of 10 sup 1 sup 1 -10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2 to any desired target.

  15. Interministerial decree of 10 February 1988 fixing the derived limits of the air concentration and the annual intake limit and the values of the quality factor and the neutron fluence rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This decree establishes the derived concentration limits in the air and annual inhalation limits for the radioisotopes and the values of the quality factors and the conversion factors fluence/dose equivalent for neutrons and protons

  16. Biological effectiveness of high-energy protons - Target fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J.W.; Townsend, L.W.; Shinn, J.; Hajnal, F.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy protons traversing tissue produce local sources of high-linear-energy-transfer ions through nuclear fragmentation. The contribution of these target fragments to the biological effectiveness of high-energy protons using the cellular track model is examined. The effects of secondary ions are treated in terms of the production collision density using energy-dependent parameters from a high-energy fragmentation model. Calculations for mammalian cell cultures show that at high dose, at which intertrack effects become important, protons deliver damage similar to that produced by gamma rays, and with fragmentation the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons increases moderately from unity. At low dose, where sublethal damage is unimportant, the contribution from target fragments dominates, causing the proton effectiveness to be very different from that of gamma rays with a strongly fluence-dependent RBE. At high energies, the nuclear fragmentation cross sections become independent of energy. This leads to a plateau in the proton single-particle-action cross section, below 1 keV/micron, since the target fragments dominate. 29 refs

  17. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  18. submitter A model for the accurate computation of the lateral scattering of protons in water

    CERN Document Server

    Bellinzona, EV; Embriaco, A; Ferrari, A; Fontana, A; Mairani, A; Parodi, K; Rotondi, A; Sala, P; Tessonnier, T

    2016-01-01

    A pencil beam model for the calculation of the lateral scattering in water of protons for any therapeutic energy and depth is presented. It is based on the full Molière theory, taking into account the energy loss and the effects of mixtures and compounds. Concerning the electromagnetic part, the model has no free parameters and is in very good agreement with the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. The effects of the nuclear interactions are parametrized with a two-parameter tail function, adjusted on MC data calculated with FLUKA. The model, after the convolution with the beam and the detector response, is in agreement with recent proton data in water from HIT. The model gives results with the same accuracy of the MC codes based on Molière theory, with a much shorter computing time.

  19. Electrolyte effects in a model of proton discharge on charged electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Johannes; Kravchenko, Kateryna; Spohr, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    We report results on the influence of NaCl electrolyte dissolved in water on proton discharge reactions from aqueous solution to charged platinum electrodes. We have extended a recently developed combined proton transfer/proton discharge model on the basis of empirical valence bond theory to include NaCl solutions with several different concentrations of cations and anions, both stoichiometric (1:1) compositions and non-stoichiometric ones with an excess of cations. The latter solutions partially screen the electrostatic potential from the surface charge of the negatively charged electrode. 500-1000 trajectories of a discharging proton were integrated by molecular dynamics simulations until discharge occurred, or for at most 1.5 ns. The results show a strong dependence on ionic strength, but only a weak dependence on the screening behavior, when comparing stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric solutions. Overall, the Na+ cations exert a more dominant effect on the discharge reaction, which we argue is likely due to the very rigid arrangements of the cations on the negatively polarized electrode surface. Thus, our model predicts, for the given and very high negative surface charge densities, the fastest discharge reaction for pure water, but obviously cannot take into account the fact that such high charge densities are even more out of reach experimentally than for higher electrolyte concentrations.

  20. Dielectric properties of proton irradiated PES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Nilam; Singh, N.L.; Singh, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    Polyethersulfone films were irradiated with 3 MeV proton beam at fluences ranging from 10 13 to 10 15 ions/cm 2 . AC electrical properties of irradiated samples were studied in the frequency range 100 Hz to 1MHz by LCR meter. There is an exponential increase in conductivity with frequency but the effect of irradiation is not significant. The dielectric loss/constant are observed to change with fluence. (author)

  1. The fluence research of filter material for fast neutron fluence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiding

    2010-01-01

    When the fast neutron fluence is measured by radioactivation techniques in the nuclear reactor the fast neutron is also filtered a little by the thermal neutron filter material, and if the filter material thickness increase the filtered fast neutron increases therewith. For fast neutron fluenc measurement, there are only cadmium, boron and gadolinium three elements filtering fluence can be calculated ordinarily. In order to calculate the filtered fast neutron fluence of the all elements in the filter material, the many total cross sections of nuclides had checked out from nuclear cross section data library, converted them into the same energy group structure, then element's total cross section, compound's total cross section and multilayer filters' total cross section had calculated from these total cross sections with same energy group structure, a new cross section data library can be obtained lastly through merging these cross sections into the old cross section data library used for neutron fluence measurement. The calculation analysis indicates that the results of the unit 2 surveillance capsule U of DAYA Bay NPP and the unit 1 surveillance capsule A of the Second Nuclear Power Plant of Qinshan by considering the all elements subtracting iron are smaller about 1.5% and 2.6% respectively than the ones only to consider cadmium, boron. The old measured results accord with the new values under the measurement uncertainty, are reliable. The new results are more accuracy. (authors)

  2. A coupled RL and transport model for mixed-field proton irradiation of Al2O3:C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Jain, Mayank

    2008-01-01

    effects and inelastic hadronic scattering occur in proton therapy dosimetry. To investigate these aspects in relation to our system, we have combined simulation of particle transportation with a luminescence generation code based on track structure theory. The model was found to qualitatively reproduce...... the main features in experimental data from proton irradiations. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. Metal and proton toxicity to lake zooplankton: A chemical speciation based modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockdale, Anthony; Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen; Fott, Jan; Garmo, Øyvind A.; Hruska, Jakub; Keller, Bill; Löfgren, Stefan; Maberly, Stephen C.; Majer, Vladimir; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A.; Persson, Gunnar; Schartau, Ann-Kristin; Thackeray, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The WHAM-F TOX model quantifies the combined toxic effects of protons and metal cations towards aquatic organisms through the toxicity function (F TOX ), a linear combination of the products of organism-bound cation and a toxic potency coefficient for each cation. We describe the application of the model to predict an observable ecological field variable, species richness of pelagic lake crustacean zooplankton, studied with respect to either acidification or the impacts of metals from smelters. The fitted results give toxic potencies increasing in the order H + TOX to relate combined toxic effects of protons and metal cations towards lake crustacean zooplankton. • The fitted results give toxic potencies increasing in the order H + TOX model has been applied to field data for pelagic lake crustacean zooplankton. The fitted results give metal toxic potencies increasing in the order H + < Al < Cu < Zn < Ni

  4. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION MODEL OF ENERGETIC PROTON TRANSPORT THROUGH SELF-GENERATED ALFVEN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasiev, A.; Vainio, R., E-mail: alexandr.afanasiev@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-08-15

    A new Monte Carlo simulation model for the transport of energetic protons through self-generated Alfven waves is presented. The key point of the model is that, unlike the previous ones, it employs the full form (i.e., includes the dependence on the pitch-angle cosine) of the resonance condition governing the scattering of particles off Alfven waves-the process that approximates the wave-particle interactions in the framework of quasilinear theory. This allows us to model the wave-particle interactions in weak turbulence more adequately, in particular, to implement anisotropic particle scattering instead of isotropic scattering, which the previous Monte Carlo models were based on. The developed model is applied to study the transport of flare-accelerated protons in an open magnetic flux tube. Simulation results for the transport of monoenergetic protons through the spectrum of Alfven waves reveal that the anisotropic scattering leads to spatially more distributed wave growth than isotropic scattering. This result can have important implications for diffusive shock acceleration, e.g., affect the scattering mean free path of the accelerated particles in and the size of the foreshock region.

  5. Two-dimensional analytical model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jia Xing; Guo, Hang; Ye, Fang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a two-dimensional full cell analytical model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is developed. The analytical model describes electrochemical reactions on the anode and cathode catalyst layer, reactants diffusion in the gas diffusion layer, and gases flow in the gas channel, etc. The analytical solution is derived according to the basic physical equations. The performance predicted by the model is in good agreement with the experimental data. The results show that the polarization mainly occurs in the cathode side of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The anodic overpotential cannot be neglected. The hydrogen and oxygen concentrations decrease along the channel flow direction. The hydrogen and oxygen concentrations in the catalyst layer decrease with the current density. As predicted by the model, concentration polarization mainly occurs in the cathode side. - Highlights: • A 2D full cell analytical model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is developed. • The analytical solution is deduced according to the basic equations. • The anode overpotential is not so small that it cannot be neglected. • Species concentration distributions in the fuel cell is obtained and analyzed.

  6. Simple Regge pole model for Compton scattering of protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that by a phenomenological choice of the residue functions, the differential cross section for ν p → ν p, including the very recent measurements up to - t=4.3 (GeV/c) 2 , can be explained at all measured energies greater than 2 GeV with simple Regge pole model

  7. SU-E-T-549: Modeling Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons for Radiation Induced Brain Necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkovic, D; Peeler, C; Grosshans, D; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mohan, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons as a function of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) for induction of brain necrosis using clinical data. Methods: In this study, treatment planning information was exported from a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) and used to construct a detailed Monte Carlo model of the patient and the beam delivery system. The physical proton dose and LET were computed in each voxel of the patient volume using Monte Carlo particle transport. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study registered to the treatment planning CT was used to determine the region of the necrosis in the brain volume. Both, the whole brain and the necrosis volumes were segmented from the computed tomography (CT) dataset using the contours drawn by a physician and the corresponding voxels were binned with respect to dose and LET. The brain necrosis probability was computed as a function of dose and LET by dividing the total volume of all necrosis voxels with a given dose and LET with the corresponding total brain volume resulting in a set of NTCP-like curves (probability as a function of dose parameterized by LET). Results: The resulting model shows dependence on both dose and LET indicating the weakness of the constant RBE model for describing the brain toxicity. To the best of our knowledge the constant RBE model is currently used in all clinical applications which may Result in increased rate of brain toxicities in patients treated with protons. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to develop more accurate brain toxicity models for patients treated with protons and other heavy ions

  8. Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Reduces Side Effects in an In Vivo Mouse Ear Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.girst@unibw.de [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, Christoph; Reindl, Judith [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Siebenwirth, Christian [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Zlobinskaya, Olga [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Walsh, Dietrich W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Ilicic, Katarina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel [Research Unit Analytical Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Oberschleißheim (Germany); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy is a novel approach to minimize normal tissue damage in the entrance channel by spatial fractionation while keeping tumor control through a homogeneous tumor dose using beam widening with an increasing track length. In the present study, the dose distributions for homogeneous broad beam and minibeam irradiation sessions were simulated. Also, in an animal study, acute normal tissue side effects of proton minibeam irradiation were compared with homogeneous irradiation in a tumor-free mouse ear model to account for the complex effects on the immune system and vasculature in an in vivo normal tissue model. Methods and Materials: At the ion microprobe SNAKE, 20-MeV protons were administered to the central part (7.2 × 7.2 mm{sup 2}) of the ear of BALB/c mice, using either a homogeneous field with a dose of 60 Gy or 16 minibeams with a nominal 6000 Gy (4 × 4 minibeams, size 0.18 × 0.18 mm{sup 2}, with a distance of 1.8 mm). The same average dose was used over the irradiated area. Results: No ear swelling or other skin reactions were observed at any point after minibeam irradiation. In contrast, significant ear swelling (up to fourfold), erythema, and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation. Hair loss and the disappearance of sebaceous glands were only detected in the homogeneously irradiated fields. Conclusions: These results show that proton minibeam radiation therapy results in reduced adverse effects compared with conventional homogeneous broad-beam irradiation and, therefore, might have the potential to decrease the incidence of side effects resulting from clinical proton and/or heavy ion therapy.

  9. Anode partial flooding modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Model development and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Lei; Du, Shangfeng; Chen, Rui; Mamlouk, Mohamed; Scott, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A two-dimensional along-the-channel CFD (computational fluid dynamic) model, coupled with a two-phase flow model of liquid water and gas transport for a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell is described. The model considers non-isothermal operation and thus the non-uniform temperature distribution in the cell structure. Water phase-transfer between the vapour, liquid water and dissolved phase is modelled with the combinational transport mechanism through the membrane. Liquid water saturation is simulated inside the electrodes and channels at both the anode and cathode sides. Three types of models are compared for the HOR (hydrogen oxidation reaction) and ORR (oxygen reduction reaction) in catalyst layers, including Butler–Volmer (B–V), liquid water saturation corrected B–V and agglomerate mechanisms. Temperature changes in MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and channels due to electrochemical reaction, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer are analysed as a function of current density. Nonlinear relations of liquid water saturations with respect to current densities at both the anode and cathode are regressed. At low and high current densities, liquid water saturation at the anode linearly increases as a consequence of the linear increase of liquid water saturation at the cathode. In contrast, exponential relation is found to be more accurate at medium current densities. - Highlights: • A fully coupled 2D, along-the-channel, two-phase flow, non-isothermal, CFD model is developed. • Temperature rise due to electrochemical reactions, ohmic resistance and water phase-transfer is analysed. • Mathematical expressions of liquid water saturation against current density at anode and cathode are regressed. • Relationship between the liquid water saturation at anode and cathode is built.

  10. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  11. Shell model with several particles in the continuum: application to the two-proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotureau, J.

    2005-02-01

    The recent experimental results concerning nuclei at the limit of stability close to the drip-lines and in particular the two-proton emitters require a development of new methodologies to reliably calculate and understand properties of those exotic physical systems. In this work we have extended the Shell Model Embedded in the Continuum (SMEC) in order to describe the coupling with two particles in the scattering continuum. We have obtained a microscopic description of the two-proton emission that takes into account the antisymmetrization of the total wavefunction, the configuration mixing and the three-body asymptotics. We have studied the decay of the 1 2 - state in 18 Ne in two limiting cases: (i) a sequential emission of two protons through the correlated continuum of 17 F and (ii) emission of 2 He cluster that disintegrates because of the final state interaction (diproton emission). Independently of the choice of the effective interaction we have observed that the two-proton emission of the 1 2 - in 18 Ne is mainly a sequential process; the ratio between the widths of the diproton emission and the sequential decay does not exceed 8% in any case. (author)

  12. SU-E-T-521: Investigation of the Uncertainties Involved in Secondary Neutron/gamma Production in Geant4/MCNP6 Monte Carlo Codes for Proton Therapy Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzakhanian, L; Enger, S; Giusti, V

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A major concern in proton therapy is the production of secondary neutrons causing secondary cancers, especially in young adults and children. Most utilized Monte Carlo codes in proton therapy are Geant4 and MCNP. However, the default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 do not have suitable cross sections or physical models to properly handle secondary particle production in proton energy ranges used for therapy. In this study, default versions of Geant4 and MCNP6 were modified to better handle production of secondaries by adding the TENDL-2012 cross-section library. Methods: In-water proton depth-dose was measured at the “The Svedberg Laboratory” in Uppsala (Sweden). The proton beam was mono-energetic with mean energy of 178.25±0.2 MeV. The measurement set-up was simulated by Geant4 version 10.00 (default and modified version) and MCNP6. Proton depth-dose, primary and secondary particle fluence and neutron equivalent dose were calculated. In case of Geant4, the secondary particle fluence was filtered by all the physics processes to identify the main process responsible for the difference between the default and modified version. Results: The proton depth-dose curves and primary proton fluence show a good agreement between both Geant4 versions and MCNP6. With respect to the modified version, default Geant4 underestimates the production of secondary neutrons while overestimates that of gammas. The “ProtonInElastic” process was identified as the main responsible process for the difference between the two versions. MCNP6 shows higher neutron production and lower gamma production than both Geant4 versions. Conclusion: Despite the good agreement on the proton depth dose curve and primary proton fluence, there is a significant discrepancy on secondary neutron production between MCNP6 and both versions of Geant4. Further studies are thus in order to find the possible cause of this discrepancy or more accurate cross-sections/models to handle the nuclear

  13. IMRT fluence map editing to control hot and cold spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor Cook, J.; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Watson, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    Manually editing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fluence maps effectively controls hot and cold spots that the IMRT optimization cannot control. Many times, re-optimizing does not reduce the hot spots or increase the cold spots. In fact, re-optimizing only places the hot and cold spots in different locations. Fluence-map editing provides manual control of dose delivery and provides the best treatment plan possible. Several IMRT treatments were planned using the Varian Eclipse planning system. We compare the effects on dose distributions between fluence-map editing and re-optimization, discuss techniques for fluence-map editing, and analyze differences between fluence editing on one beam vs. multiple beams. When editing a beam's fluence map, it is essential to choose a beam that least affects dose to the tumor and critical structures. Editing fluence maps gives an advantage in treatment planning and provides controlled delivery of IMRT dose

  14. Modeling atmospheric effects of the September 1859 Solar Flare

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Brian; Jackman, Charles; Melott, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    We have modeled atmospheric effects, especially ozone depletion, due to a solar proton event which probably accompanied the extreme magnetic storm of 1-2 September 1859. We use an inferred proton fluence for this event as estimated from nitrate levels in Greenland ice cores. We present results showing production of odd nitrogen compounds and their impact on ozone. We also compute rainout of nitrate in our model and compare to values from ice core data.

  15. Application of the adjoint function methodology for neutron fluence determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighat, A.; Nanayakkara, B.; Livingston, J.; Mahgerefteh, M.; Luoma, J.

    1991-01-01

    In previous studies, the neutron fluence at a reactor pressure vessel has been estimated based on consolidation of transport theory calculations and experimental data obtained from in-vessel capsules and/or cavity dosimeters. Normally, a forward neutron transport calculation is performed for each fuel cycle and the neutron fluxes are integrated over the reactor operating time to estimate the neutron fluence. Such calculations are performed for a geometrical model which is composed of one-eighth (0 to 45 deg) of the reactor core and its surroundings; i.e., core barrel, thermal shield, downcomer, reactor vessel, cavity region, concrete wall, and instrumentation well. Because the model is large, transport theory calculations generally require a significant amount of computer memory and time; hence, more efficient methodologies such as the adjoint transport approach have been proposed. These studies, however, do not address the necessary sensitivity studies needed for adjoint function calculations. The adjoint methodology has been employed to estimate the activity of a cavity dosimeter and that of an in-vessel capsule. A sensitivity study has been performed on the mesh distribution used in and around the cavity dosimeter and the in-vessel capsule. Further, since a major portion of the detector response is due to the neutrons originated in the peripheral fuel assemblies, a study on the use of a smaller calculational model has been performed

  16. Proton-neutron sdg boson model and spherical-deformed phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Sugita, Michiaki

    1988-01-01

    The spherical-deformed phase transition in nuclei is described in terms of the proton-neutron sdg interacting boson model. The sdg hamiltonian is introduced to model the pairing + quadrupole interaction. The phase transition is reproduced in this framework as a function of the boson number in the Sm isotopes, while all parameters in the hamiltonian are kept constant at values reasonable from the shell-model point of view. The sd IBM is derived from this model through the renormalization of g-boson effects. (orig.)

  17. Proton-neutron sdg boson model and spherical-deformed phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Sugita, Michiaki

    1988-12-01

    The spherical-deformed phase transition in nuclei is described in terms of the proton-neutron sdg interacting boson model. The sdg hamiltonian is introduced to model the pairing+quadrupole interaction. The phase transition is reproduced in this framework as a function of the boson number in the Sm isotopes, while all parameters in the hamiltonian are kept constant at values reasonable from the shell-model point of view. The sd IBM is derived from this model through the renormalization of g-boson effects.

  18. Proton-neutron sdg boson model and spherical-deformed phase transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Sugita, Michiaki

    1988-12-15

    The spherical-deformed phase transition in nuclei is described in terms of the proton-neutron sdg interacting boson model. The sdg hamiltonian is introduced to model the pairing + quadrupole interaction. The phase transition is reproduced in this framework as a function of the boson number in the Sm isotopes, while all parameters in the hamiltonian are kept constant at values reasonable from the shell-model point of view. The sd IBM is derived from this model through the renormalization of g-boson effects.

  19. Production of excitons in grazing collisions of protons with LiF surfaces: An onion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, (C1428EGA) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    In this work we evaluate the production of excitons of a lithium fluoride crystal induced by proton impact in the intermediate and high energy regime (from 100 keV to 1 MeV). A simple model is proposed to account for the influence of the Coulomb grid of the target by dressing crystal ions to transform them in what we call onions. The excited states of these onions can be interpreted as excitons. Within this model, total cross section and stopping power are calculated by using the first Born and the continuum distorted-wave (CDW) eikonal initial-state (EIS) approximations. We found that between 7 and 30 excitons per incident proton are produced in grazing collisions with LiF surfaces, becoming a relevant mechanism of inelastic transitions.

  20. Water versus DNA: new insights into proton track-structure modelling in radiobiology and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C; Quinto, M A; Monti, J M; Galassi, M E; Weck, P F; Fojón, O A; Hanssen, J; Rivarola, R D

    2015-10-21

    Water is a common surrogate of DNA for modelling the charged particle-induced ionizing processes in living tissue exposed to radiations. The present study aims at scrutinizing the validity of this approximation and then revealing new insights into proton-induced energy transfers by a comparative analysis between water and realistic biological medium. In this context, a self-consistent quantum mechanical modelling of the ionization and electron capture processes is reported within the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state framework for both isolated water molecules and DNA components impacted by proton beams. Their respective probability of occurrence-expressed in terms of total cross sections-as well as their energetic signature (potential and kinetic) are assessed in order to clearly emphasize the differences existing between realistic building blocks of living matter and the controverted water-medium surrogate. Consequences in radiobiology and radiotherapy will be discussed in particular in view of treatment planning refinement aiming at better radiotherapy strategies.

  1. Forecasting E > 50-MeV Proton Events with the Proton Prediction System (PPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; White, S. M.; Ling, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    Forecasting solar energetic (E > 10 MeV) particle (SEP) events is an important element of space weather. While several models have been developed for use in forecasting such events, satellite operations are particularly vulnerable to higher-energy (> 50 MeV) SEP events. Here we validate one model, the proton prediction system (PPS), which extends to that energy range. We first develop a data base of E > 50-MeV proton events > 1.0 proton flux units (pfu) events observed on the GOES satellite over the period 1986 to 2016. We modify the PPS to forecast proton events at the reduced level of 1 pfu and run PPS for four different solar input parameters: (1) all > M5 solar X-ray flares; (2) all > 200 sfu 8800-MHz bursts with associated > M5 flares; (3) all > 500 sfu 8800-MHz bursts; and (4) all > 5000 sfu 8800-MHz bursts. For X-ray flare inputs the forecasted event peak intensities and fluences are compared with observed values. The validation contingency tables and skill scores are calculated for all groups and used as a guide to use of the PPS. We plot the false alarms and missed events as functions of solar source longitude.

  2. Model for nucleus-nucleus, hadron-nucleus and hadron-proton multiplicity distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, C.P.; Shyam, M.; Tuli, S.K.

    1986-07-01

    A model relating hadron-proton, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus multiplicity distributions is proposed and some interesting consequences are derived. The values of the parameters are the same for all the processes and are given by the QCD hypothesis of ''universal'' hadronic multiplicities which are found to be asymptotically independent of target and beam in hadronic and current induced reactions in particle physics. (author)

  3. LINEAR AND NONLINEAR VISCOELASTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANES AND STRESS MODELING FOR FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Patankar, Kshitish A

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation, the effect of temperature and humidity on the viscoelastic and fracture properties of proton exchange membranes (PEM) used in fuel cell applications was studied. Understanding and accurately modeling the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive properties of a PEM are important for making hygrothermal stress predictions in the cyclic temperature and humidity environment of operating fuel cells. In this study, Nafion® NRE 211, Gore-Select® 57, and Ion Power® N111...

  4. Strategic level proton therapy patient admission planning: a Markov decision process modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Ridvan; Zhang, Shengfan; Rainwater, Chase

    2017-06-01

    A relatively new consideration in proton therapy planning is the requirement that the mix of patients treated from different categories satisfy desired mix percentages. Deviations from these percentages and their impacts on operational capabilities are of particular interest to healthcare planners. In this study, we investigate intelligent ways of admitting patients to a proton therapy facility that maximize the total expected number of treatment sessions (fractions) delivered to patients in a planning period with stochastic patient arrivals and penalize the deviation from the patient mix restrictions. We propose a Markov Decision Process (MDP) model that provides very useful insights in determining the best patient admission policies in the case of an unexpected opening in the facility (i.e., no-shows, appointment cancellations, etc.). In order to overcome the curse of dimensionality for larger and more realistic instances, we propose an aggregate MDP model that is able to approximate optimal patient admission policies using the worded weight aggregation technique. Our models are applicable to healthcare treatment facilities throughout the United States, but are motivated by collaboration with the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (UFPTI).

  5. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  6. Basic features of proton-proton interactions at ultra-relativistic energies and RFT-based quark-gluon string model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrodin E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton-proton collisions at energies from √s = 200 GeV up to √s = 14 TeV are studied within the microscopic quark-gluon string model. The model is based on Gribov’s Reggeon Field Theory accomplished by string phenomenology. Comparison with experimental data shows that QGSM describes well particle yields, rapidity - and transverse momentum spectra, rise of mean 〈 pT 〉 and forward-backward multiplicity correlations. The latter arise in QGSM because of the addition of various processes with different mean multiplicities. The model also indicates fulfillment of extended longitudinal scaling and violation of Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling at LHC. The origin of both features is traced to short-range particle correlations in the strings. Predictions are made for √s = 14 TeV.

  7. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Modelling Using Moving Least Squares Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Tirnovan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cell, with low polluting emissions, is a great alternative to replace the traditional electrical power sources for automotive applications or for small stationary consumers. This paper presents a numerical method, for the fuel cell modelling, based on moving least squares (MLS. Experimental data have been used for developing an approximated model of the PEMFC function of the current density, air inlet pressure and operating temperature of the fuel cell. The method can be applied for modelling others fuel cell sub-systems, such as the compressor. The method can be used for off-line or on-line identification of the PEMFC stack.

  8. Expected neutrino fluence from short Gamma-Ray Burst 170817A and off-axis angle constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, D.; Heinze, J.; Winter, W.

    2018-05-01

    We compute the expected neutrino fluence from SGRB 170817A, associated with the gravitational wave event GW 170817, directly based on Fermi observations in two scenarios: structured jet and off-axis (observed) top-hat jet. While the expected neutrino fluence for the structured jet case is very small, large off-axis angles imply high radiation densities in the jet, which can enhance the neutrino production efficiency. In the most optimistic allowed scenario, the neutrino fluence can reach only 10-4 of the sensitivity of the neutrino telescopes. We furthermore demonstrate that the fact that gamma-rays can escape limits the baryonic loading (energy in protons versus photons) and the off-axis angle for the internal shock scenario. In particular, for a baryonic loading of 10, the off-axis angle is more strongly constrained by the baryonic loading than by the time delay between the gravitational wave event and the onset of the gamma-ray emission.

  9. Neutron fluence rate and energy spectrum in SPRR-300 reactor thermal column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Haifeng; Dai Junlong

    2006-01-01

    In order to modify the simple one-dimension model, the neutron fluence rate distribution calculated with ANISN code ws checked with that calculated with MCNP code. To modify the error caused by ignoring the neutron landscape orientation leaking, the reflector that can't be modeled in a simple one-dimension model was dealt by extending landscape orientation scale. On this condition the neutron fluence rate distribution and the energy spectrum in the thermal column of SPRR-300 reactor were calculated with one-dimensional code ANISN, and the results of Cd ratio are well accorded with the experimental results. The deviation between them is less than 5% and it isn't above 10% in one or two special positions. It indicates that neutron fluence rate distribution and energy spectrum in the thermal column can be well calculated with one-dimensional code ANISN. (authors)

  10. Monte Carlo study of radial energy deposition from primary and secondary particles for narrow and large proton beamlet source models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, Christopher R; Titt, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    In spot-scanning intensity-modulated proton therapy, numerous unmodulated proton beam spots are delivered over a target volume to produce a prescribed dose distribution. To accurately model field size-dependent output factors for beam spots, the energy deposition at positions radial to the central axis of the beam must be characterized. In this study, we determined the difference in the central axis dose for spot-scanned fields that results from secondary particle doses by investigating energy deposition radial to the proton beam central axis resulting from primary protons and secondary particles for mathematical point source and distributed source models. The largest difference in the central axis dose from secondary particles resulting from the use of a mathematical point source and a distributed source model was approximately 0.43%. Thus, we conclude that the central axis dose for a spot-scanned field is effectively independent of the source model used to calculate the secondary particle dose. (paper)

  11. A systematics of optical model compound nucleus formation cross sections for neutrons, proton, deuteron, 3He and alpha particle incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Toru

    2000-01-01

    Simple formulae to reproduce the optical model compound nucleus formation cross sections for neutron, proton, deuteron, triton, 3 He and alpha particles are presented for target nuclei of light to medium weight mass region. (author)

  12. The current status of model development of the electron and proton telescope for Solar Orbiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhagen, Jan; Kulkarni, S.R.; Tammen, Jan; Boden, Sebastian; Elftmann, Robert; Martin, Cesar; Ravanbakhsh, Ali; Boettcher, Stephan I.; Seimetz, Lars; Schuster, Bjoern; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Kiel (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    ESA's Solar Orbiter mission, scheduled for launch in January 2017, will study how the sun creates the inner heliosphere. Therefore, the spacecraft will perform in situ and remote sensing measurements of the sun on a high inclination orbit with a perihelion of about 60 solar radii, making it possible to observe the poles of the sun from nearby. The Energetic Particle Detector suite on-board of Solar Orbiter will measure particles of a wide energy range and from multiple directions. One of the important sensors of the EPD suite is the Electron Proton Telescope. It consists of two antiparallel telescopes with two silicon detectors respectively and is designed to detect electrons between 20 - 400 keV and protons from 20 keV to 7 MeV. EPT relies on a magnet/foil technique to discriminate between electrons and protons. Here, we present the testing of the Structural and Thermal Model, which has already been delivered to ASTRIUM for spacecraft level tests as well as the integration and testing of the Engineering Model, which already provides full electrical functionality.

  13. Synthetic Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (LGM2605 Protects Human Lung in an Ex Vivo Model of Proton Radiation Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Velalopoulou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for the treatment of thoracic malignancies has improved significantly by directing of the proton beam in higher doses on the targeted tumor while normal tissues around the tumor receive much lower doses. Nevertheless, exposure of normal tissues to protons is known to pose a substantial risk in long-term survivors, as confirmed by our work in space-relevant exposures of murine lungs to proton radiation. Thus, radioprotective strategies are being sought. We established that LGM2605 is a potent protector from radiation-induced lung toxicity and aimed in the current study to extend the initial findings of space-relevant, proton radiation-associated late lung damage in mice by looking at acute changes in human lung. We used an ex vivo model of organ culture where tissue slices of donor living human lung were kept in culture and exposed to proton radiation. We exposed donor human lung precision-cut lung sections (huPCLS, pretreated with LGM2605, to 4 Gy proton radiation and evaluated them 30 min and 24 h later for gene expression changes relevant to inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle arrest, and determined radiation-induced senescence, inflammation, and oxidative tissue damage. We identified an LGM2605-mediated reduction of proton radiation-induced cellular senescence and associated cell cycle changes, an associated proinflammatory phenotype, and associated oxidative tissue damage. This is a first report on the effects of proton radiation and of the radioprotective properties of LGM2605 on human lung.

  14. The d-bar - u-bar asymmetry of the proton in a pion cloud model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, J.; Christiansen, H.R.

    1999-03-01

    We study the d-bar - u-bar asymmetry of the proton in a model approach in which hadronic fluctuations of the nucleon are generated through gluon splitting and recombination mechanisms. Within this framework, it is shown that the d -u asymmetry of the proton is consistently described by including only nucleon fluctuations to |πN> and |πΔ> bound states. Predictions of the model closely agree with the recent experimental data of the E-866/Nu Sea Collaboration. (author)

  15. Modeling electrochemical performance in large scale proton exchange membrane fuel cell stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J H [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lalk, T R [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Appleby, A J [Center for Electrochemical Studies and Hydrogen Research, Texas Engineering Experimentation Station, Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The processes, losses, and electrical characteristics of a Membrane-Electrode Assembly (MEA) of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) are described. In addition, a technique for numerically modeling the electrochemical performance of a MEA, developed specifically to be implemented as part of a numerical model of a complete fuel cell stack, is presented. The technique of calculating electrochemical performance was demonstrated by modeling the MEA of a 350 cm{sup 2}, 125 cell PEMFC and combining it with a dynamic fuel cell stack model developed by the authors. Results from the demonstration that pertain to the MEA sub-model are given and described. These include plots of the temperature, pressure, humidity, and oxygen partial pressure distributions for the middle MEA of the modeled stack as well as the corresponding current produced by that MEA. The demonstration showed that models developed using this technique produce results that are reasonable when compared to established performance expectations and experimental results. (orig.)

  16. A neutron source of variable fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, Guy; Demichel, Pascal; Prigent, Yvon; Riche, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns a variable fluence neutron source, like those that use in the known way a reaction between a radioactive emitter and a target, particularly of type (α,n). The emitter being in powder form lies in a carrier fluid forming the target, inside a closed containment. Facilities are provided to cause the fluidisation of the emitter by the carrier fluid in the containment. The fluidisation of the emitting powder is carried out by a booster with blades, actuated from outside by a magnetic coupling. The powder emitter is a α emitter selected in the group of curium, plutonium, thorium, actinium and americium oxides and the target fluid is formed of compounds of light elements selected from the group of beryllium, boron, fluorine and oxygen 18. The target fluid is a gas used under pressure or H 2 O water highly enriched in oxygen 18 [fr

  17. Modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance based on semi-empirical equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. Sadiq [Babylon Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Babylon (Iraq)

    2005-08-01

    Using semi-empirical equations for modeling a proton exchange membrane fuel cell is proposed for providing a tool for the design and analysis of fuel cell total systems. The focus of this study is to derive an empirical model including process variations to estimate the performance of fuel cell without extensive calculations. The model take into account not only the current density but also the process variations, such as the gas pressure, temperature, humidity, and utilization to cover operating processes, which are important factors in determining the real performance of fuel cell. The modelling results are compared well with known experimental results. The comparison shows good agreements between the modeling results and the experimental data. The model can be used to investigate the influence of process variables for design optimization of fuel cells, stacks, and complete fuel cell power system. (Author)

  18. Studies for improvement of WWER-440 neutron fluence determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, Kr.; Belousov, S.; Apostolov, T.

    2001-01-01

    For assessment of radiation embrittlement and prediction of reactor vessel lifetime with reasonable conservatism a 'best estimated' neutron fluence is necessary. New studies purposed to improve the fluence determination are presented: 1) study on the reliability of multigroup presentation of the neutron cross sections, and 2) impact of negative gradient of reactor power in the periphery assemblies on the neutron fluence evaluation. The results of these studies are base for improvement of neutron fluence determination methodology applied by the INRNE, BAS at Kozloduy NPP. (author)

  19. The Meteoroid Fluence at Mars Due to Comet Siding Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Althea V.

    2014-01-01

    Long-period comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) is headed for a close encounter with Mars on 2014 Oct 19. A collision between the comet and the planet has been ruled out, but the comets coma may envelop Mars and its man-made satellites. We present an analytic model of the dust component of cometary comae that describes the spatial distribution of cometary dust and meteoroids and their size distribution. If the coma reaches Mars, we estimate a total incident particle fluence on the planet and its satellites of 0.01 particles per square meter. We compare our model with numerical simulations, data from past comet missions, and recent Siding Spring observations.

  20. GUT scale threshold corrections in a complete supersymmetric SO(10) model: αs(MZ) versus proton lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, V.; Raby, S.

    1996-01-01

    We show that one-loop GUT scale threshold corrections to gauge couplings are a significant constraint on the GUT symmetry-breaking sector of the theory. The one-loop threshold corrections relate the prediction for α s (M Z ) to the proton lifetime. We have calculated these corrections in a new complete SO(10) SUSY GUT. The results are consistent with the low-energy measurement of α s (M Z ). We have also calculated the proton lifetime and branching ratios in this model. We show that proton decay rates provide a powerful test for theories of fermion masses. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Monte Carlo and analytical model predictions of leakage neutron exposures from passively scattered proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Zhang, Rui; Newhauser, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stray neutron radiation is of concern after radiation therapy, especially in children, because of the high risk it might carry for secondary cancers. Several previous studies predicted the stray neutron exposure from proton therapy, mostly using Monte Carlo simulations. Promising attempts to develop analytical models have also been reported, but these were limited to only a few proton beam energies. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model to predict leakage neutron equivalent dose from passively scattered proton beams in the 100-250-MeV interval.Methods: To develop and validate the analytical model, the authors used values of equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) predicted with Monte Carlo simulations. The authors also characterized the behavior of the mean neutron radiation-weighting factor, w R , as a function of depth in a water phantom and distance from the beam central axis.Results: The simulated and analytical predictions agreed well. On average, the percentage difference between the analytical model and the Monte Carlo simulations was 10% for the energies and positions studied. The authors found that w R was highest at the shallowest depth and decreased with depth until around 10 cm, where it started to increase slowly with depth. This was consistent among all energies.Conclusion: Simple analytical methods are promising alternatives to complex and slow Monte Carlo simulations to predict H/D values. The authors' results also provide improved understanding of the behavior of w R which strongly depends on depth, but is nearly independent of lateral distance from the beam central axis

  2. TH-A-19A-05: Modeling Physics Properties and Biologic Effects Induced by Proton and Helium Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleei, R; Titt, U; Peeler, C; Guan, F; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Currently, proton and carbon ions are used for cancer treatment. More recently, other light ions including helium ions have shown interesting physical and biological properties. The purpose of this work is to study the biological and physical properties of helium ions (He-3) in comparison to protons. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations with FLUKA, GEANT4 and MCNPX were used to calculate proton and He-3 dose distributions in water phantoms. The energy spectra of proton and He-3 beams were calculated with high resolution for use in biological models. The repair-misrepairfixation (RMF) model was subsequently used to calculate the RBE. Results: The proton Bragg curve calculations show good agreement between the three general purpose Monte Carlo codes. In contrast, the He-3 Bragg curve calculations show disagreement (for the magnitude of the Bragg peak) between FLUKA and the other two Monte Carlo codes. The differences in the magnitude of the Bragg peak are mainly due to the discrepancy in the secondary fragmentation cross sections used by the codes. The RBE for V79 cell lines is about 0.96 and 0.98 at the entrance of proton and He-3 ions depth dose respectively. The RBE increases to 1.06 and 1.59 at the Bragg peak of proton and He-3 ions. The results demonstrated that LET, microdosimetric parameters (such as dose-mean lineal energy) and RBE are nearly constant along the plateau region of Bragg curve, while all parameters increase within the Bragg peak and at the distal edge for both proton and He-3 ions. Conclusion: The Monte Carlo codes should revise the fragmentation cross sections to more accurately simulate the physical properties of He-3 ions. The increase in RBE for He-3 ions is higher than for proton beams at the Bragg peak.

  3. A simple electric circuit model for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarou, Stavros; Pyrgioti, Eleftheria; Alexandridis, Antonio T.

    A simple and novel dynamic circuit model for a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell suitable for the analysis and design of power systems is presented. The model takes into account phenomena like activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and mass transport effect present in a PEM fuel cell. The proposed circuit model includes three resistors to approach adequately these phenomena; however, since for the PEM dynamic performance connection or disconnection of an additional load is of crucial importance, the proposed model uses two saturable inductors accompanied by an ideal transformer to simulate the double layer charging effect during load step changes. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed model its dynamic performance under load step changes is simulated. Experimental results coming from a commercial PEM fuel cell module that uses hydrogen from a pressurized cylinder at the anode and atmospheric oxygen at the cathode, clearly verify the simulation results.

  4. Fluence-compensated down-scattered neutron imaging using the neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, D. T., E-mail: casey21@llnl.gov; Munro, D. H.; Grim, G. P.; Landen, O. L.; Spears, B. K.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Field, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Volegov, P. L.; Merrill, F. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility is used to observe the primary ∼14 MeV neutrons from the hotspot and down-scattered neutrons (6-12 MeV) from the assembled shell. Due to the strong spatial dependence of the primary neutron fluence through the dense shell, the down-scattered image is convolved with the primary-neutron fluence much like a backlighter profile. Using a characteristic scattering angle assumption, we estimate the primary neutron fluence and compensate the down-scattered image, which reveals information about asymmetry that is otherwise difficult to extract without invoking complicated models.

  5. Model synthetic complexes of the hydrogenase with different protonation sites; Complexes synthetiques modeles de l'hydrogenase avec differents sites de protonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capon, J.F.; Gloaguen, F.; Morvan, D.; Schollhammer, Ph.; Talarmin, J.; Yaouanc, J.J. [Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, UMR CNRS 6521, Chimie, Electrochimie Moleculaires et Chimie Analytique, Faculte des Sciences, 29 - Brest (France)

    2005-07-01

    The data obtained until now seem to indicate that the hydrogen production by hydrogenases induces a proton-hydride coupling. In taking the structures of theses enzymes active sites (determined by X-ray diffraction) as a basis, it can be thought that this proton-hydride coupling is facilitated by the juxtaposition of two protonation sites, the metallic center M and the basic group of an E ligand of the coordination sphere. Contrarily to the supposed running of the hydrogenases enzymes, the homogeneous catalysts of the protons reduction, described in the literature, present a reactivity which is either on an alone metallic site or on a metal-metal bond. This work deals then with the preparation of complexes having two juxtaposed protonation sites. Some iron dinuclear compounds have been synthesized and their properties studied. (O.M.)

  6. An Analytical Model of Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose for Passively-Scattered Proton Radiotherapy and Validation with Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Farah, Jad [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Service de Dosimétrie Externe, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-05-18

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation.

  7. An Analytical Model of Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose for Passively-Scattered Proton Radiotherapy and Validation with Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne; Farah, Jad

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation

  8. An analytical model of leakage neutron equivalent dose for passively-scattered proton radiotherapy and validation with measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne; Farah, Jad

    2015-05-18

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose  at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation.

  9. Electromagnetic polarisabilities of the proton in an independent particle potential model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, N.; Panda, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the proton including the valence quark as well as pion dressing effects in an independent quark model with an effective scalar-vector harmonic potential which renders the solvability of relativistic Dirac equations for confined quarks, and has in fact acted as an alternative to the cloudy bag model (CBM). This model which has been applied successfully to a variety of hadronic problems is also observed here to yield the electromagnetic polarisabilities of the proton satisfactorily without any free parameters. The electric and magnetic polarisabilities, including valence quark core and pion cloud effects, obtained here as anti α P =14.074.10 -4 fm 3 and anti β P =3.155.10 -4 fm 3 , are well within the uncertainties of their experimental measurements of (10.9±2.2±1.4).10 -4 fm 3 and (3.3±2.2±1.4).10 -4 fm 3 , respectively and are also in agreement with other model estimations. (orig.)

  10. Electromagnetic polarisabilities of the proton in an independent particle potential model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N [Utkal Univ., Bhubaneswer (India). P.G. Dept. of Phys.; Dash, B K [Utkal Univ., Bhubaneswer (India). P.G. Dept. of Phys.; Das, P [Department of Physics, Kendrapara College, Kendrapara-754211 (India); Panda, A R [Department of Physics, Kendrapara College, Kendrapara-754211 (India)

    1996-08-19

    We consider the electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the proton including the valence quark as well as pion dressing effects in an independent quark model with an effective scalar-vector harmonic potential which renders the solvability of relativistic Dirac equations for confined quarks, and has in fact acted as an alternative to the cloudy bag model (CBM). This model which has been applied successfully to a variety of hadronic problems is also observed here to yield the electromagnetic polarisabilities of the proton satisfactorily without any free parameters. The electric and magnetic polarisabilities, including valence quark core and pion cloud effects, obtained here as anti {alpha}{sub P}=14.074.10{sup -4} fm{sup 3} and anti {beta}{sub P}=3.155.10{sup -4} fm{sup 3}, are well within the uncertainties of their experimental measurements of (10.9{+-}2.2{+-}1.4).10{sup -4} fm{sup 3} and (3.3{+-}2.2{+-}1.4).10{sup -4} fm{sup 3}, respectively and are also in agreement with other model estimations. (orig.).

  11. Evolution of calculation models for the proton-therapy dose planning software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This work was achieved in collaboration between the Institut Curie Proton-therapy Center of Orsay (ICPO), the DOSIsoft company and the CREATIS laboratory, in order to develop a new dose calculation model for the new ICPO treatment room. A new accelerator and gantry room from the IBA company were installed during the up-grade project of the proton-therapy center, with the intention of enlarging the cancer localizations treated at ICPO. Developing a package of methods and new dose calculation algorithms to adapt them to the new specific characteristics of the delivered beams by the IBA system is the first goal of this PhD work. They all aim to be implemented in the DOSIsoft treatment planning software, Isogray. First, the double scattering technique is treated in taking into account major differences between the IBA system and the ICPO fixed beam lines passive system. Secondly, a model is explored for the scanned beams modality. The second objective of this work is improving the Ray-Tracing and Pencil-Beam dose calculation models already in use. For the double scattering and uniform scanning techniques, the patient personalized collimator at the end of the beam line causes indeed a patient dose distribution contamination. A reduction method of that phenomenon was set up for the passive beam system. An analytical model was developed which describes the contamination function with parameters validated through Monte-Carlo simulations on the GATE platform. It allows us to apply those methods to active scanned beams. (author) [fr

  12. Evolution of dose calculation models for proton-therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This work was achieved in collaboration between the Institut Curie proton-therapy Center of Orsay (ICPO), the DOSIsoft company and the CREATIS laboratory, in order to develop a new dose calculation model for the new ICPO treatment room. A new accelerator and gantry room from the IBA company were installed during the up-grade project of the proton-therapy center, with the intention of enlarging the cancer localizations treated at ICPO. Developing a package of methods and new dose calculation algorithms to adapt them to the new specific characteristics of the delivered beams by the IBA system is the first goal of this PhD work. They all aim to be implemented in the DOSIsoft treatment planning software, Isogray. First, the double scattering technique is treated in taking into account major differences between the IBA system and the ICPO fixed beam lines passive system. Secondly, a model is explored for the scanned beams modality. The second objective of this work is improving the Ray-Tracing and Pencil-Beam dose calculation models already in use. For the double scattering and uniform scanning techniques, the patient personalized collimator at the end of the beam line causes indeed a patient dose distribution contamination. A reduction method of that phenomenon was set up for the passive beam system. An analytical model was developed which describes the contamination function with parameters validated through Monte-Carlo simulations on the GATE platform. It allows us to apply those methods to active scanned beams [fr

  13. Pickup Protons: Comparisons using the Three-Dimensional MHD HHMS-PI model and Ulysses SWICS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Detman, Thomas; Gloecker, George; Gloeckler, Christine; Dryer, Murray; Sun, Wei; Intriligator, James; Deehr, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We report the first comparisons of pickup proton simulation results with in situ measurements of pickup protons obtained by the SWICS instrument on Ulysses. Simulations were run using the three dimensional (3D) time-dependent Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System with Pickup Protons (HHMS-PI). HHMS-PI is an MHD solar wind model, expanded to include the basic physics of pickup protons from neutral hydrogen that drifts into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium. We use the same model and input data developed by Detman et al. (2011) to now investigate the pickup protons. The simulated interval of 82 days in 2003 2004, includes both quiet solar wind (SW) and also the October November 2003 solar events (the Halloween 2003 solar storms). The HHMS-PI pickup proton simulations generally agree with the SWICS measurements and the HHMS-PI simulated solar wind generally agrees with SWOOPS (also on Ulysses) measurements. Many specific features in the observations are well represented by the model. We simulated twenty specific solar events associated with the Halloween 2003 storm. We give the specific values of the solar input parameters for the HHMS-PI simulations that provide the best combined agreement in the times of arrival of the solar-generated shocks at both ACE and Ulysses. We show graphical comparisons of simulated and observed parameters, and we give quantitative measures of the agreement of simulated with observed parameters. We suggest that some of the variations in the pickup proton density during the Halloween 2003 solar events may be attributed to depletion of the inflowing local interstellar medium (LISM) neutral hydrogen (H) caused by its increased conversion to pickup protons in the immediately preceding shock.

  14. An Efficient Computational Model to Predict Protonation at the Amide Nitrogen and Reactivity along the C–N Rotational Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Roman; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    N-protonation of amides is critical in numerous biological processes, including amide bonds proteolysis and protein folding, as well as in organic synthesis as a method to activate amide bonds towards unconventional reactivity. A computational model enabling prediction of protonation at the amide bond nitrogen atom along the C–N rotational pathway is reported. Notably, this study provides a blueprint for the rational design and application of amides with a controlled degree of rotation in synthetic chemistry and biology. PMID:25766378

  15. Surface damage on polycrystalline β-SiC by xenon ion irradiation at high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillet, J.; Gavarini, S.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Garnier, V.; Peaucelle, C.; Jaurand, X.; Duranti, A.; Bernard, C.; Rapegno, R.; Cardinal, S.; Escobar Sawa, L.; De Echave, T.; Lanfant, B.; Leconte, Y.

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline β-silicon carbide (β-SiC) pellets were prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). These were implanted at room temperature with 800 keV xenon at ion fluences of 5.1015 and 1.1017 cm-2. Microstructural modifications were studied by electronic microscopy (TEM and SEM) and xenon profiles were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). A complete amorphization of the implanted area associated with a significant oxidation is observed for the highest fluence. Large xenon bubbles formed in the oxide phase are responsible of surface swelling. No significant gas release has been measured up to 1017 at.cm-2. A model is proposed to explain the different steps of the oxidation process and xenon bubbles formation as a function of ion fluence.

  16. Radiotherapy Proton Interactions in Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschalk, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    A survey of physics useful to proton radiotherapy, centered on stopping, scattering and hard scatters: 1. Introduction 2. The fundamental formula dose = fluence x mass stopping power. Practical units, comments on effective stopping power. 3. Range: experimental definition, Beth-Bloch CSDA theory, range-energy tables and approximations, range straggling. 4. Multiple Coulomb Scattering: suggested reading, elements of Moliere theory, the Gaussian approximation, scattering power. 5. Hard scatters...

  17. Optical model analysis for 30MeV polarized proton elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, D.-L.; Swiniarski, R. de.

    1977-05-01

    The proton elastic scattering cross sections and analyzing powers at 30MeV have been used to derive optical model parameters for ten elements from 10 B to 32 S. A set of average geometrical parameters (rsub(o)=1.10fm, rsub(LS)=1.0fm and asub(I)=0.60fm) is found to give good fits to the entire data, the other geometrical parameters being rsub(I)=(1.35+-0.15)fm, asub(o)=(0.75+-0.10)fm and asub(LS)=(0.35+-0.07)fm. The dynamical parameters with fixed geometry are presented

  18. 1/N expansion in the interacting boson model. II. The neutron-proton degree of freedon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuyucak, S.; Morrison, I.

    1989-01-01

    The 1/N expansion method is used to study the neutron-proton degree of freedom in a general boson model. Employing a standard IBM-2 hamiltonian, analytic expressions for energies and electromagnetic transition rates are derived both for the symmetric and mixed-symmetry states. A formalism for F-spin analysis is developed. Effects of the g-boson and F-spin breaking in various quantities are discussed. The method is not restricted to dynamic symmetries and allows for explicit breaking of the F-spin symmetry. Thus, the formulae derived here should be useful for systematic analysis of deformed nuclei in realistic situations. 42 refs., 13 figs

  19. Performance prediction of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using the ANFIS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vural, Yasemin; Ingham, Derek B.; Pourkashanian, Mohamed [Centre for Computational Fluid Dynamics, University of Leeds, Houldsworth Building, LS2 9JT Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    In this study, the performance (current-voltage curve) prediction of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is performed for different operational conditions using an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). First, ANFIS is trained with a set of input and output data. The trained model is then tested with an independent set of experimental data. The trained and tested model is then used to predict the performance curve of the PEMFC under various operational conditions. The model shows very good agreement with the experimental data and this indicates that ANFIS is capable of predicting fuel cell performance (in terms of cell voltage) with a high accuracy in an easy, rapid and cost effective way for the case presented. Finally, the capabilities and the limitations of the model for the application in fuel cells have been discussed. (author)

  20. SUSY simplified models at 14, 33, and 100 TeV proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Timothy; Golling, Tobias; Hance, Mike; Henrichs, Anna; Howe, Kiel; Loyal, Joshua; Padhi, Sanjay; Wacker, Jay G.

    2014-01-01

    Results are presented for a variety of SUSY Simplified Models at the 14 TeV LHC as well as a 33 and 100 TeV proton collider. Our focus is on models whose signals are driven by colored production. We present projections of the upper limit and discovery reach in the gluino-neutralino (for both light and heavy flavor decays), squark-neutralino, and gluino-squark Simplified Model planes. Depending on the model a jets + E T miss , mono-jet, or same-sign di-lepton search is applied. The impact of pileup is explored. This study utilizes the Snowmass backgrounds and combined detector. Assuming 3000/,fb −1 of integrated luminosity, a gluino that decays to light flavor quarks can be discovered below 2.3 TeV at the 14 TeV LHC and below 11 TeV at a 100 TeV machine

  1. Analysis and optimization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell using modeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre Valdés, Ing. Raciel de la; García Parra, MSc. Lázaro Roger; González Rodríguez, MSc. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional, non-isothermal and steady-state model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell using Computational Fluid Dynamic techniques, specifically ANSYS FLUENT 14.5. It's considered multicomponent diffusion and two-phasic flow. The model was compared with experimental published data and with another model. The operation parameters: reactants pressure and temperature, gases flow direction, gas diffusion layer and catalyst layer porosity, reactants humidification and oxygen concentration are analyzed. The model allows the fuel cell design optimization taking in consideration the channels dimensions, the channels length and the membrane thickness. Furthermore, fuel cell performance is analyzed working with SPEEK membrane, an alternative electrolyte to Nafion. In order to carry on membrane material study, it's necessary to modify the expression that describes the electrolyte ionic conductivity. It's found that the device performance has got a great sensibility to pressure, temperature, reactant humidification and oxygen concentration variations. (author)

  2. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Heister, Arno; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Novgorodova, Olga; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarli, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Cheng, Tongguang; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Kaplan, Steven; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb$^{-1}$ for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model $\\mathrm{Z'_{SSM}}$ resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired $\\mathrm{Z'_{\\psi}}$ lighter than 2.57 TeV and Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are als...

  3. A DATA-DRIVEN ANALYTIC MODEL FOR PROTON ACCELERATION BY LARGE-SCALE SOLAR CORONAL SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozarev, Kamen A. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (United States); Schwadron, Nathan A. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory ’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  4. A framework for implementation of organ effect models in TOPAS with benchmarks extended to proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Méndez, J; Faddegon, B; Perl, J; Schümann, J; Paganetti, H; Shin, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a framework for modeling organ effects within TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation), a wrapper of the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit that facilitates particle therapy simulation. The DICOM interface for TOPAS was extended to permit contour input, used to assign voxels to organs. The following dose response models were implemented: The Lyman–Kutcher–Burman model, the critical element model, the population based critical volume model, the parallel-serial model, a sigmoid-based model of Niemierko for normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability (TCP), and a Poisson-based model for TCP. The framework allows easy manipulation of the parameters of these models and the implementation of other models.As part of the verification, results for the parallel-serial and Poisson model for x-ray irradiation of a water phantom were compared to data from the AAPM Task Group 166. When using the task group dose-volume histograms (DVHs), results were found to be sensitive to the number of points in the DVH, with differences up to 2.4%, some of which are attributable to differences between the implemented models. New results are given with the point spacing specified. When using Monte Carlo calculations with TOPAS, despite the relatively good match to the published DVH’s, differences up to 9% were found for the parallel-serial model (for a maximum DVH difference of 2%) and up to 0.5% for the Poisson model (for a maximum DVH difference of 0.5%). However, differences of 74.5% (in Rectangle1), 34.8% (in PTV) and 52.1% (in Triangle) for the critical element, critical volume and the sigmoid-based models were found respectively.We propose a new benchmark for verification of organ effect models in proton therapy. The benchmark consists of customized structures in the spread out Bragg peak plateau, normal tissue, tumor, penumbra and in the distal region. The DVH’s, DVH point spacing, and results of the organ effect models are

  5. Two-proton emission half-lives in the effective liquid drop model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gonçalves

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Half-life for two-proton radioactivity of emitter nuclides of mass number A<70 has been calculated by using a phenomenological, effective liquid drop model (eldm which has been applied successfully to one-proton radioactivity, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity and cold fission processes. Following this approach, we estimate half-life values for several 2p-emitted nuclides and compare our results with predictions from other models, as well as the existing data in the literature, specifically the cases for 16Ne, 19Mg, 45Fe, 48Ni, 54Zn and 67Kr parent nuclei. It is seen that the eldm version adapted to deal with 2p-decay process reproduces the available experimental data quite satisfactorily, asserting that shell corrections and pairing effects for the ground state nucleus have been well incorporated into the model via the experimental mass excess values. The present estimates for half-lives show a number of nuclei with detectable 2p-emission mode, which predictions may serve as indicators for further experimental investigations.

  6. Vectorial and plane energy fluences - useful concepts in radiation physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, C.A.

    1977-06-01

    The vectorial physical quantities describing the radiation field are defined in this report. The use of these quantities is rare in the radiation dosimetry literature since a knowledge of the directions of motion of the ionizing particle is often uninteresting when determining absorbed doses. However the plane energy fluence rate is a useful quantity in cases with plane irradiation geometries. The plane energy fluence rate is closely related to the vectorial energy fluence rate. The backscattering properties of a medium can be expressed in terms either of its albedo or its reflection-coefficient (backscatter-coefficient). These quantities are discussed in order to derive useful relations between the plane energy fluence and the energy fluence at points on an extended plane surface. Examples are also given of erroneous use of energy fluence instead of vectorial or plane energy fluence. The examples are taken from roentgen diagnostic examinations. To prevent further mistakes it could be valuable if the quantities of vectorial and plane fluences were introduced in text books in radiation dosimetry. Awaiting for this, this report may hopefully be useful. (E.R.)

  7. Towards Achieving the Full Clinical Potential of Proton Therapy by Inclusion of LET and RBE Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Bleddyn [Gray Laboratory, CRUK/MRC Oxford Oncology Institute, The University of Oxford, ORCRB-Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-17

    Despite increasing use of proton therapy (PBT), several systematic literature reviews show limited gains in clinical outcomes, with publications mostly devoted to recent technical developments. The lack of randomised control studies has also hampered progress in the acceptance of PBT by many oncologists and policy makers. There remain two important uncertainties associated with PBT, namely: (1) accuracy and reproducibility of Bragg peak position (BPP); and (2) imprecise knowledge of the relative biological effect (RBE) for different tissues and tumours, and at different doses. Incorrect BPP will change dose, linear energy transfer (LET) and RBE, with risks of reduced tumour control and enhanced toxicity. These interrelationships are discussed qualitatively with respect to the ICRU target volume definitions. The internationally accepted proton RBE of 1.1 was based on assays and dose ranges unlikely to reveal the complete range of RBE in the human body. RBE values are not known for human (or animal) brain, spine, kidney, liver, intestine, etc. A simple efficiency model for estimating proton RBE values is described, based on data of Belli et al. and other authors, which allows linear increases in α and β with LET, with a gradient estimated using a saturation model from the low LET α and β radiosensitivity parameter input values, and decreasing RBE with increasing dose. To improve outcomes, 3-D dose-LET-RBE and bio-effectiveness maps are required. Validation experiments are indicated in relevant tissues. Randomised clinical studies that test the invariant 1.1 RBE allocation against higher values in late reacting tissues, and lower tumour RBE values in the case of radiosensitive tumours, are also indicated.

  8. Towards Achieving the Full Clinical Potential of Proton Therapy by Inclusion of LET and RBE Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Bleddyn

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing use of proton therapy (PBT), several systematic literature reviews show limited gains in clinical outcomes, with publications mostly devoted to recent technical developments. The lack of randomised control studies has also hampered progress in the acceptance of PBT by many oncologists and policy makers. There remain two important uncertainties associated with PBT, namely: (1) accuracy and reproducibility of Bragg peak position (BPP); and (2) imprecise knowledge of the relative biological effect (RBE) for different tissues and tumours, and at different doses. Incorrect BPP will change dose, linear energy transfer (LET) and RBE, with risks of reduced tumour control and enhanced toxicity. These interrelationships are discussed qualitatively with respect to the ICRU target volume definitions. The internationally accepted proton RBE of 1.1 was based on assays and dose ranges unlikely to reveal the complete range of RBE in the human body. RBE values are not known for human (or animal) brain, spine, kidney, liver, intestine, etc. A simple efficiency model for estimating proton RBE values is described, based on data of Belli et al. and other authors, which allows linear increases in α and β with LET, with a gradient estimated using a saturation model from the low LET α and β radiosensitivity parameter input values, and decreasing RBE with increasing dose. To improve outcomes, 3-D dose-LET-RBE and bio-effectiveness maps are required. Validation experiments are indicated in relevant tissues. Randomised clinical studies that test the invariant 1.1 RBE allocation against higher values in late reacting tissues, and lower tumour RBE values in the case of radiosensitive tumours, are also indicated

  9. Proton scattering from unstable nuclei 20O, 30S, 34Ar: experimental study and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Elias

    2000-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic proton scattering from the unstable nuclei 20 O, 30 S and 34 Ar were measured in inverse kinematics at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds. Secondary beams of 20 O at 43 MeV/A, 30 S at 53 MeV/A and 34 Ar at 47 MeV/A impinged on a (CH 2 ) n target. Recoiling protons were detected in the silicon strip array MUST. Energies and angular distributions of the first 2 + and 3 - states were measured. A phenomenological analysis yields values of the deformation parameters β 2 and β 3 of 0.55 (6) and 0.35 (5) for 20 O, 0.32 (3) and 0.22 (4) for 30 S, 0.27 (2) and 0.39 (3) for 34 Ar, respectively, and allows the extraction of the ratio of neutron to proton transition matrix elements (M n /M p )/(N/Z) for 2 + states: 2.35 (37) for 20 O, 0.93 (20) for 30 S and 1.35 (28) for 34 Ar. Therefore the proton rich nuclei 30 S and 34 Ar show a 2 + excitation of isoscalar character whereas the excitation of 20 O is of isovector character. In order to perform a microscopic analysis of the data, we have developed a QRPA model, using three Skyrme interaction: SIII, SG2, SLy4. This model reproduces measured B(EL) values for the oxygen, sulfur and argon isotopic chains, whereas RPA calculations, which do not take pairing into account, underestimate these values. In the case of the QRPA model the energies of the first 2 + state are overestimated by about 1 MeV, but the evolution along the isotopic chains is well reproduced. (M n /M p )/(N/Z) ratios for the first 2 + state deduced from the microscopic analysis using QRPA are 1.98 for 20 O, 1.05 for 30 S and 1.00 for 34 Ar, in agreement with the conclusions of the phenomenological analysis. However important discrepancies are observed between the two types of analysis for other isotopes, in particular neutron rich argon and sulfur nuclei. (author)

  10. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE 0 and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E 0 and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE 0 )/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm 2 parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm 3 size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy straggling if step size is not

  11. An integral test of FLUKA nuclear models with 160 MeV proton beams in multi-layer Faraday cups

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, I; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Mairani, A

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are useful tools to simulate the complex processes of proton beam interactions with matter. In proton therapy, nuclear reactions influence the dose distribution. Therefore, the validation of nuclear models adopted in MC codes is a critical requisite for their use in this field. A simple integral test can be performed using a multi-layer Faraday cup (MLFC). This method allows separation of the nuclear and atomic interaction processes, which are responsible for secondary particle emission and the finite primary proton range, respectively. In this work, the propagation of 160 MeV protons stopping in two MLFCs made of polyethylene and copper has been simulated by the FLUKA MC code. The calculations have been performed with and without secondary electron emission and transport, as well as charge sharing in the dielectric layers. Previous results with other codes neglected those two effects. The impact of this approximation has been investigated and found to be relevant only in the proximity ...

  12. Passive detectors for neutron fluence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of neutron activation detectors (slow neutron detectors and threshold detectors) and fission track detectors for radiological protection purposes, principally in criticality dosimetry, dosimetry of pulsed accelerators and calibration of neutron fluxes is discussed. References are given to compilations of cross sections. For the determination of the activity induced, either beta ray or gamma ray counting may be used. For beta-ray counting, thin foils are usually necessary which result in low neutron sensitivity. When fission track detectors are used, it is necessary to know the efficiency of track registration. Alternatively, a detector-counter system may be calibrated by exposure to a known flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Usually, the sensitivity of activation detectors is low because small foils are used. For criticality dosimetry, calibration work and shielding studies on accelerators, low sensitivity is acceptable. However, there are some instances where, by the use of long integration times, or very large quantities of detector material with gamma ray detection, neutron fluences in operational areas have been measured. (author)

  13. Comparison of sources of exit fluence variation for IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, Joseph K; Gordon, J James; Wang Song; Siebers, Jeffrey V; Clews, Luke; Greer, Peter B

    2009-01-01

    The fluence exiting a patient during beam delivery can be used as treatment delivery quality assurance, either by direct comparison with expected exit fluences or by backprojection to reconstruct the patient dose. Multiple possible sources of measured exit fluence deviations exist, including changes in the beam delivery and changes in the patient anatomy. The purpose of this work is to compare the deviations caused by these sources. Machine delivery-related variability is measured by acquiring multiple dosimetric portal images (DPIs) of several test fields without a patient/phantom in the field over a time period of 2 months. Patient anatomy-related sources of fluence variability are simulated by computing transmission DPIs for a prostate patient using the same incident fluence for 11 different computed tomography (CT) images of the patient anatomy. The standard deviation (SD) and maximum deviation of the exit fluence, averaged over 5 mm x 5 mm square areas, is calculated for each test set. Machine delivery fluence SDs as large as 1% are observed for a sample patient field and as large as 2.5% for a picket-fence dMLC test field. Simulations indicate that day-to-day patient anatomy variations induce exit fluence SDs as large as 3.5%. The largest observed machine delivery deviations are 4% for the sample patient field and 7% for the picket-fence field, while the largest difference for the patient anatomy-related source is 8.5%. Since daily changes in patient anatomy can result in substantial exit fluence deviations, care should be taken when applying fluence back-projection to ensure that such deviations are properly attributed to their source. (note)

  14. Atomic mixing effects on high fluence Ge implantation into Si at 40 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras-Marti, A.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.; Peon-Fernandez, J.; Rodriguez-Vidal, M.; Tognetti, N.P.; Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Armour, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Ion implanted profiles of 40 keV Ge + into Si at fluences ranging from approx. equal to 10 15 ions/cm 2 up to saturation have been measured using the RBS technique. The profiles compare well with the predictions of an analytical model encompasing sputter erosion plus atomic relocation. (orig.)

  15. The Weak Charge of the Proton. A Search For Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacEwan, Scott J. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2015-05-01

    The Qweak experiment, which completed running in May of 2012 at Jefferson Laboratory, has measured the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at four-momentum transfer Q2 =0.025 (GeV/c)2 in order to provide the first direct measurement of the proton's weak charge, QWp. The Standard Model makes firm predictions for the weak charge; deviations from the predicted value would provide strong evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Using an 89% polarized electron beam at 145 microA scattering from a 34.4 cm long liquid hydrogen target, scattered electrons were detected using an array of eight fused-silica detectors placed symmetric about the beam axis. The parity-violating asymmetry was then measured by reversing the helicity of the incoming electrons and measuring the normalized difference in rate seen in the detectors. The low Q2 enables a theoretically clean measurement; the higher-order hadronic corrections are constrained using previous parity-violating electron scattering world data. The experimental method will be discussed, with recent results constituting 4% of our total data and projections of our proposed uncertainties on the full data set.

  16. SU-F-J-187: The Statistical NTCP and TCP Models in the Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, S [Princeton Radiation Oncology, Princeton Radiation Oncology (United States); Frometa, T [Theoretical and Computational Methods Working Group of IMAG, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Pyakuryal, A [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Sio, T [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Piseaux, R [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Acosta, S [Provincial Hospital of Santiago de Cuba, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Ocana, K [Faculty of Electrics of the University of Oriente, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The statistical models (SM) are typically used as a subjective description of a population for which there is only limited sample data, and especially in cases where the relationship between variables is known. The normal tissue complications and tumor control are frequently stochastic effects in the Radiotherapy (RT). Based on probabilistic treatments, it recently has been formulated new NTCP and TCP models for the RT. Investigating the particular requirements for their clinical use in the proton therapy (PT) is the goal of this work. Methods: The SM can be used as phenomenological or mechanistic models. The former way allows fitting real data and getting theirparameters. In the latter one, we should do efforts for determining the parameters through the acceptable estimations, measurements, and/or simulation experiments. Experimental methodologies for determination of the parameters have been developed from the fraction cells surviving the proton irradiation curves in tumor and OAR, and precise RBE models are used for calculating the variable of effective dose. As the executions of these methodologies have a high costs, so we have developed computer tools enable to perform simulation experiments as complement to limitations of the real ones. Results: The requirements for the use of the SM in the PT, such as validation and improvement of the elaborated and existent methodologies for determining the SM parameters and effective dose respectively, were determined. Conclusion: The SM realistically simulates the main processes in the PT, and for this reason these can be implemented in this therapy, which are simples, computable and they have other advantages over some current models. It has been determined some negative aspects for some currently used probabilistic models in the RT, like the LKB NTCP and others derived from logistic functions; which can be improved with the proposed methods in this study.

  17. A fully microscopic model of 200 MeV proton-12C elastic and inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karataglidis, S.; Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.; de Swiniarski, R.

    1996-01-01

    An effective two nucleon (NN) interaction in the nuclear medium is defined from an accurate mapping of the NN g matrices obtained by solving the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equations for infinite nuclear matter. That effective interaction is used in a fully microscopic calculation of the nonlocal effective proton- 12 C interaction from which are obtained predictions of the differential cross section and analysing power for 200 MeV elastic scattering. The relative motion wave functions so found are used as the distorted waves in a distorted wave approximation (DWA) study of select inelastic scattering events. The effective NN interaction is used as the transition operator in those calculations. The relevant nuclear spectroscopy for the elastic and DWA (p, p') calculations is found from a full (0 + 2) ℎω shell model evaluation of the positive parity states while a restricted (1 + 3)ℎω has been used to give the negative parity states. Results are compared with those of the 0p-shell model of Cohen and Kurath or with those based upon axially symmetric, projected Hartree-Fock calculations. The diverse structure model wave functions are assessed by using them in calculations to compare with measured longitudinal, transverse electric and transverse magnetic form factors from electron scattering to many of the excited states of 12 C. Using those models of the structure of 12 C in the completely microscopic model of the elastic and inelastic scattering of 200 MeV protons, good fits have been found to the cross section and analysing power data. 50 refs., 3 tabs., 20 figs

  18. Accelerating parameter identification of proton exchange membrane fuel cell model with ranking-based differential evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Wenyin; Cai, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Parameter identification of PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell model is a very active area of research. Generally, it can be treated as a numerical optimization problem with complex nonlinear and multi-variable features. DE (differential evolution), which has been successfully used in various fields, is a simple yet efficient evolutionary algorithm for global numerical optimization. In this paper, with the objective of accelerating the process of parameter identification of PEM fuel cell models and reducing the necessary computational efforts, we firstly present a generic and simple ranking-based mutation operator for the DE algorithm. Then, the ranking-based mutation operator is incorporated into five highly-competitive DE variants to solve the PEM fuel cell model parameter identification problems. The main contributions of this work are the proposed ranking-based DE variants and their application to the parameter identification problems of PEM fuel cell models. Experiments have been conducted by using both the simulated voltage–current data and the data obtained from the literature to validate the performance of our approach. The results indicate that the ranking-based DE methods provide better results with respect to the solution quality, the convergence rate, and the success rate compared with their corresponding original DE methods. In addition, the voltage–current characteristics obtained by our approach are in good agreement with the original voltage–current curves in all cases. - Highlights: • A simple and generic ranking-based mutation operator is presented in this paper. • Several DE (differential evolution) variants are used to solve the parameter identification of PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cells) model. • Results show that our method accelerates the process of parameter identification. • The V–I characteristics are in very good agreement with experimental data

  19. Fluence inhomogeneities due to a ripple filter induced Moiré effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbæk, Toke Printz; Brons, Stephan; Naumann, Jakob; Ackermann, Benjamin; Horn, Julian; Latzel, Harald; Scheloske, Stefan; Galonska, Michael; Bassler, Niels; Zink, Klemens; Weber, Uli

    2015-02-07

    At particle therapy facilities with pencil beam scanning, the implementation of a ripple filter (RiFi) broadens the Bragg peak, so fewer energy steps from the accelerator are required for a homogeneous dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV). However, sharply focusing the scanned pencil beams at the RiFi plane by ion optical settings can lead to a Moiré effect, causing fluence inhomogeneities at the isocenter. This has been experimentally proven at the Heidelberg Ionenstrahl-Therapiezentrum (HIT), Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany. 150 MeV u(-1) carbon-12 ions are used for irradiation with a 3 mm thick RiFi. The beam is focused in front of and as close to the RiFi plane as possible. The pencil beam width is estimated to be 0.78 mm at a 93 mm distance from the RiFi. Radiographic films are used to obtain the fluence profile 30 mm in front of the isocenter, 930 mm from the RiFi. The Monte Carlo (MC) code SHIELD-HIT12A is used to determine the RiFi-induced inhomogeneities in the fluence distribution at the isocenter for a similar setup, pencil beam widths at the RiFi plane ranging from σχ(RiFi to 1.2 mm and for scanning step sizes ranging from 1.5 to 3.7 mm. The beam application and monitoring system (BAMS) used at HIT is modelled and simulated. When the width of the pencil beams at the RiFi plane is much smaller than the scanning step size, the resulting inhomogeneous fluence distribution at the RiFi plane interfers with the inhomogeneous RiFi mass distribution and fluence inhomogeneity can be observed at the isocenter as large as an 8% deviation from the mean fluence. The inverse of the fluence ripple period at the isocenter is found to be the difference between the inverse of the RiFi period and the inverse of the scanning step size. We have been able to use MC simulations to reproduce the spacing of the ripple stripes seen in films irradiated at HIT. Our findings clearly indicate that pencil beams sharply focused near the RiFi plane result in

  20. Proton radiation damage assessment of a CCD for use in a Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, J.P.D.; Mason, J.; Leese, M.; Patel, M.; Hathi, B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the radiation environment and radiation damage analysis performed for the Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery (NOMAD) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVIS) channel launched onboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) in 2016. The aim of the instrument is to map the temporal and spatial variation of trace gases such as ozone and dust/cloud aerosols in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument consists of a set of two miniature telescope viewing optics which allow for selective input onto the optical bench, where an e2v technologies CCD30-11 will be used as the detector. A Geometry Description Markup Language model of the spacecraft and instrument box was created and through the use of ESA's SPace ENVironment Information System (SPENVIS) an estimate of the 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence was made at a number of radiation sensitive regions within NOMAD, including that of the CCD30-11 which is the focus of this paper. The end of life 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence at the charge coupled device was estimated to be 4.7 × 10 9 protons.cm −2 ; three devices were irradiated at different levels up a 10 MeV equivalent fluence of 9.4 × 10 9 protons.cm −2 . The dark current, charge transfer inefficiency, charge storage, and cosmetic quality of the devices was investigated pre- and post-irradiation, determining that the devices will continue to provide excellent science throughout the mission.

  1. Extended wave-packet model to calculate energy-loss moments of protons in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archubi, C. D.; Arista, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we introduce modifications to the wave-packet method proposed by Kaneko to calculate the energy-loss moments of a projectile traversing a target which is represented in terms of Gaussian functions for the momentum distributions of electrons in the atomic shells. These modifications are introduced using the Levine and Louie technique to take into account the energy gaps corresponding to the different atomic levels of the target. We use the extended wave-packet model to evaluate the stopping power, the energy straggling, the inverse mean free path, and the ionization cross sections for protons in several targets, obtaining good agreements for all these quantities on an extensive energy range that covers low-, intermediate-, and high-energy regions. The extended wave-packet model proposed here provides a method to calculate in a very straightforward way all the significant terms of the inelastic interaction of light ions with any element of the periodic table.

  2. A review on the performance and modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucetta, A., E-mail: abirboucetta@yahoo.fr; Ghodbane, H., E-mail: h.ghodbane@mselab.org; Bahri, M., E-mail: m.bahri@mselab.org [Department of Electrical Engineering, MSE Laboratory, Mohamed khider Biskra University (Algeria); Ayad, M. Y., E-mail: ayadmy@gmail.com [R& D, Industrial Hybrid Vehicle Applications (France)

    2016-07-25

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC), are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternative to conventional energy conversion for various applications in stationary power plants, portable power device and transportation. PEM fuel cells provide low operating temperature and high-energy efficiency with near zero emission. A PEM fuel cell is a multiple distinct parts device and a series of mass, energy, transport through gas channels, electric current transport through membrane electrode assembly and electrochemical reactions at the triple-phase boundaries. These processes play a decisive role in determining the performance of the Fuel cell, so that studies on the phenomena of gas flows and the performance modelling are made deeply. This paper gives a comprehensive overview of the state of the art on the Study of the phenomena of gas flow and performance modelling of PEMFC.

  3. The long-term variability of cosmic ray protons in the heliosphere: A modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Potgieter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Galactic cosmic rays are charged particles created in our galaxy and beyond. They propagate through interstellar space to eventually reach the heliosphere and Earth. Their transport in the heliosphere is subjected to four modulation processes: diffusion, convection, adiabatic energy changes and particle drifts. Time-dependent changes, caused by solar activity which varies from minimum to maximum every ∼11 years, are reflected in cosmic ray observations at and near Earth and along spacecraft trajectories. Using a time-dependent compound numerical model, the time variation of cosmic ray protons in the heliosphere is studied. It is shown that the modeling approach is successful and can be used to study long-term modulation cycles.

  4. Final Report for 'Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.

    2009-01-01

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  5. Flow field bipolar plates in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Analysis & modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahraman, Huseyin; Orhan, Mehmet F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Covers a comprehensive review of available flow field channel configurations. • Examines the main design considerations and limitations for a flow field network. • Explores the common materials and material properties used for flow field plates. • Presents a case study of step-by-step modeling for an optimum flow field design. - Abstract: This study investigates flow fields and flow field plates (bipolar plates) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. In this regard, the main design considerations and limitations for a flow field network have been examined, along with a comprehensive review of currently available flow field channel configurations. Also, the common materials and material properties used for flow field plates have been explored. Furthermore, a case study of step-by-step modeling for an optimum flow field design has been presented in-details. Finally, a parametric study has been conducted with respect to many design and performance parameters in a flow field plate.

  6. Multi-dimensional modeling of CO poisoning effects on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Hyun Chul; Lee, Kwan Soo; Um, Suk Kee

    2008-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), which is preferentially absorbed on the platinum catalyst layer of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), is extremely detrimental to cell performance. Essentially, the carbon monoxide absorption diminishes the cell's performance by blocking and reducing the number of catalyst sites available for the hydrogen oxidation reaction. In order to obtain a full understanding of CO poisoning characteristics and remediate CO-poisoned PEMFCs, a CO poisoning numerical model is developed and incorporated into a fully three-dimensional electrochemical and transport coupled PEMFC model. By performing CFD numerical simulations, this paper clearly demonstrates the CO poisoning mechanisms and characteristics of PEMFCs. The predictive capability for CO poisoning effects enables us to find major contributors to CO tolerance in a PEMFC and thus successfully integrate CO-resistant fuel cell systems

  7. Fluence complexity for IMRT field and simplification of IMRT verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanushova, Tereza; Vondarchek, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) requires dosimetric verification of each patient’s plan, which is time consuming. This work deals with the idea of minimizing the number of fields for control, or even replacing plan verification by machine quality assurance (QA). We propose methods for estimation of fluence complexity in an IMRT field based on dose gradients and investigate the relation between results of gamma analysis and this quantity. If there is a relation, it might be possible to only verify the most complex field of a plan. We determine the average fluence complexity in clinical fields and design a test fluence corresponding to this amount of complexity which might be used in daily QA and potentially replace patient-related verification. Its applicability is assessed in clinical practice. The relation between fluence complexity and results of gamma analysis has been confirmed for plans but not for single fields. There is an agreement between the suggested test fluence and clinical fields in the average gamma parameter. A critical value of average gamma has been specified for the test fluence as a criterion for distinguishing between poorly and well deliverable plans. It will not be possible to only verify the most complex field of a plan but verification of individual plans could be replaced by a morning check of the suggested test fluence, together with a well-established set of QA tests. (Author)

  8. Evolution of a beam dynamics model for the transport line in a proton therapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoglio, V.; Adelmann, A.; Baumgarten, C.; Frey, M.; Gerbershagen, A.; Meer, D.; Schippers, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    During the conceptual design of an accelerator or beamline, first-order beam dynamics models are essential for studying beam properties. However, they can only produce approximate results. During commissioning, these approximate results are compared to measurements, which will rarely coincide if the model does not include the relevant physics. It is therefore essential that this linear model is extended to include higher-order effects. In this paper, the effects of particle-matter interaction have been included in the model of the transport lines in the proton therapy facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland. The first-order models of these beamlines provide an approximated estimation of beam size, energy loss and transmission. To improve the performance of the facility, a more precise model was required and has been developed with opal (Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library), a multiparticle open source beam dynamics code. In opal, the Monte Carlo simulations of Coulomb scattering and energy loss are performed seamless with the particle tracking. Beside the linear optics, the influence of the passive elements (e.g., degrader, collimators, scattering foils, and air gaps) on the beam emittance and energy spread can be analyzed in the new model. This allows for a significantly improved precision in the prediction of beam transmission and beam properties. The accuracy of the opal model has been confirmed by numerous measurements.

  9. Modelling the induction of cell death and chromosome damage by therapeutic protons

    CERN Document Server

    Carante, M P

    2015-01-01

    A two-parameter biophysical model cal led BIANCA (BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations), which assumes a pivotal role for DNA cluster damage and for “lethal” chromosome aberrations, was applied to calculate cell death and chromosome aberrations for normal and radio-resistant cells along a 62-MeV eye melanoma proton beam. The yield of DNA “Cluster Lesions” and the probability for a chromosome fragment of not being rejoined with any partne r were adjustable parameters. In line with other works, the beam effectiveness at inducing both biological endpoints was found to increase with increasing depth, and high levels of damage were found also beyond the dose fall-off, due to the higher biological effectiveness of low-energy protons. This implies that assuming a constant RBE along the whole SOBP, as is currently done in clinical practice, may be sub-optimal, also implying a possible underestimation of normal tissue damage. Furthermore, the calculations suggested that fo...

  10. Effect of hydrogen on mechanical fluence during storage in dry; Efecto del hidrogeno en la fluencia mecanica durante el almacenamiento en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2011-07-01

    One of the challenges in the field of the mechanical fluence modeling is to include the effect of hydrogen as an additional hardening factor associated with reactor irradiation. For this it is necessary to identify the weight of each variable in the factor hardening of the classical laws of mechanics fluence.

  11. Modeling and operation optimization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system for maximum efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, In-Su; Park, Sang-Kyun; Chung, Chang-Bock

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system is operationally optimized. • A constrained optimization problem is formulated to maximize fuel cell efficiency. • Empirical and semi-empirical models for most system components are developed. • Sensitivity analysis is performed to elucidate the effects of major operating variables. • The optimization results are verified by comparison with actual operation data. - Abstract: This paper presents an operation optimization method and demonstrates its application to a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system. A constrained optimization problem was formulated to maximize the efficiency of a fuel cell system by incorporating practical models derived from actual operations of the system. Empirical and semi-empirical models for most of the system components were developed based on artificial neural networks and semi-empirical equations. Prior to system optimizations, the developed models were validated by comparing simulation results with the measured ones. Moreover, sensitivity analyses were performed to elucidate the effects of major operating variables on the system efficiency under practical operating constraints. Then, the optimal operating conditions were sought at various system power loads. The optimization results revealed that the efficiency gaps between the worst and best operation conditions of the system could reach 1.2–5.5% depending on the power output range. To verify the optimization results, the optimal operating conditions were applied to the fuel cell system, and the measured results were compared with the expected optimal values. The discrepancies between the measured and expected values were found to be trivial, indicating that the proposed operation optimization method was quite successful for a substantial increase in the efficiency of the fuel cell system.

  12. The impact of MCS models and EFAC values on the dose simulation for a proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Kuan; Chiang, Bing-Hao; Lee, Chung-Chi; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Hong, Ji-Hong; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2017-01-01

    The Multiple Coulomb Scattering (MCS) model plays an important role in accurate MC simulation, especially for small field applications. The Rossi model is used in MCNPX 2.7.0, and the Lewis model in Geant4.9.6.p02. These two models may generate very different angular and spatial distributions in small field proton dosimetry. Beside angular and spatial distributions, step size is also an important issue that causes path length effects. The Energy Fraction (EFAC) value can be used in MCNPX 2.7.0 to control step sizes of MCS. In this study, we use MCNPX 2.7.0, Geant4.9.6.p02, and one pencil beam algorithm to evaluate the effect of dose deposition because of different MCS models and different EFAC values in proton disequilibrium situation. Different MCS models agree well with each other under a proton equilibrium situation. Under proton disequilibrium situations, the MCNPX and Geant4 results, however, show a significant deviation (up to 43%). In addition, the path length effects are more significant when EFAC is equal to 0.917 and 0.94 in small field proton dosimetry, and using a 0.97 EFAC value is the best for both accuracy and efficiency - Highlights: • MCS and EFAC are important in accurate MC simulation for proton pencil beams. • Bragg curves of MCNPX and Geant4 have a dose deviation up to 43%. • Lateral profiles from MCNPX is wider than those from Geant4. • Large EFAC caused path length effect, but no effects on lateral profiles. • 0.97 EFAC value is the best for both accuracy and efficiency.

  13. WE-AB-209-10: Optimizing the Delivery of Sequential Fluence Maps for Efficient VMAT Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, D [Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); Balvert, M [Tilburg University, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an optimization model and solution approach for computing MLC leaf trajectories and dose rates for high quality matching of a set of optimized fluence maps to be delivered sequentially around a patient in a VMAT treatment. Methods: We formulate the fluence map matching problem as a nonlinear optimization problem where time is discretized but dose rates and leaf positions are continuous variables. For a given allotted time, which is allocated across the fluence maps based on the complexity of each fluence map, the optimization problem searches for the best leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the original fluence maps are closely recreated. Constraints include maximum leaf speed, maximum dose rate, and leaf collision avoidance, as well as the constraint that the ending leaf positions for one map are the starting leaf positions for the next map. The resulting model is non-convex but smooth, and therefore we solve it by local searches from a variety of starting positions. We improve solution time by a custom decomposition approach which allows us to decouple the rows of the fluence maps and solve each leaf pair individually. This decomposition also makes the problem easily parallelized. Results: We demonstrate method on a prostate case and a head-and-neck case and show that one can recreate fluence maps to high degree of fidelity in modest total delivery time (minutes). Conclusion: We present a VMAT sequencing method that reproduces optimal fluence maps by searching over a vast number of possible leaf trajectories. By varying the total allotted time given, this approach is the first of its kind to allow users to produce VMAT solutions that span the range of wide-field coarse VMAT deliveries to narrow-field high-MU sliding window-like approaches.

  14. Accuracy of helium accumulation fluence monitor for fast reactor dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-03-01

    A helium (He) accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM) has been developed for fast reactor dosimetry. In order to evaluate the measurement accuracy of neutron fluence by the HAFM method, the HAFMs of enriched boron (B) and beryllium (Be) were irradiated in the Fast Neutron Source Reactor `YAYOI`. The number of He atoms produced in the HAFMs were measured and compared with the calculated values. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that the neutron fluence could be measured within 5 % by the HAFM method, and that met the required accuracy for fast reactor dosimetry. (author)

  15. Sci-Thur AM: Planning - 04: Evaluation of the fluence complexity, solution quality, and run efficiency produced by five fluence parameterizations implemented in PARETO multiobjective radiotherapy treatment planning software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, H; Fiege, J; McCurdy, B; Potrebko, P; Cull, A

    2012-07-01

    PARETO (Pareto-Aware Radiotherapy Evolutionary Treatment Optimization) is a novel multiobjective treatment planning system that performs beam orientation and fluence optimization simultaneously using an advanced evolutionary algorithm. In order to reduce the number of parameters involved in this enormous search space, we present several methods for modeling the beam fluence. The parameterizations are compared using innovative tools that evaluate fluence complexity, solution quality, and run efficiency. A PARETO run is performed using the basic weight (BW), linear gradient (LG), cosine transform (CT), beam group (BG), and isodose-projection (IP) methods for applying fluence modulation over the projection of the Planning Target Volume in the beam's-eye-view plane. The solutions of each run are non-dominated with respect to other trial solutions encountered during the run. However, to compare the solution quality of independent runs, each run competes against every other run in a round robin fashion. Score is assigned based on the fraction of solutions that survive when a tournament selection operator is applied to the solutions of the two competitors. To compare fluence complexity, a modulation index, fractal dimension, and image gradient entropy are calculated for the fluence maps of each optimal plan. We have found that the LG method results in superior solution quality for a spine phantom, lung patient, and cauda equina patient. The BG method produces solutions with the highest degree of fluence complexity. Most methods result in comparable run times. The LG method produces superior solution quality using a moderate degree of fluence modulation. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. INC Model interpretation of the proton induced residual nuclide production cross sections below 2 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divadeenam, M.; Ward, T.E.; Spergel, M.S.; Lakatos, S.; Manche, E.P.

    1991-01-01

    For the purposes of interpreting the abundances of various isotopes in meteorites or on lunar and planetary surfaces exposed to fragmentation by cosmic rays, Webber et al. recently reported the measured total elemental and isotopic cross sections with heavy ions as projectiles on H, He, and C targets with beam energies of 0.33 - 1.7 GeV/nucleon. We employ the INC model to predict the fragmentation of the heavy ions in a hydrogen target with the inverse reaction process: proton bombardment of a heavy-ion nucleus leading to spallation products. Charge-changing and mass-changing cross sections are calculated for proton bombardment of an 56 Fe target with beam energies ranging from 0.33 to 1.88 GeV. Total Z-changing and A-changing cross sections in the energy range 0.6 to 1.88 GeV are in excellent agreement with the corresponding experimental data of Webber et al. and Westfall at al., while the agreement below 0.6 GeV proton energy is not as good. The general trend of the Z-changing cross sections are reproduced by the model calculations at each proton incident energy. The interaction of 200-MeV protons with synthetic Stony Meteorite samples was undertaken to explain radionuclide production in a cosmic-ray environment. The BNL Linac 200-MeV-proton beam was used to irradiate synthetic Stony Meteorites to simulate cosmic-ray exposures corresponding to 6.4 and 16.4 million years. Each irradiated sample was analyzed with the help of a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for long-lived radioisotopes. The intranuclear cascade code HETC was employed to simulate the 200-MeV proton bombardment on the meteorite samples to predict the radionuclides 7 Be, 22 Na, 46 Mn, and 56 Co produced in the experimental investigation

  17. Search for dijet resonances in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV and constraints on dark matter and other models

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Dvornikov, Oleg; Makarenko, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Zykunov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Ruan, Manqi; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Alexakhin, Vadim; Bunin, Pavel; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Danilov, Mikhail; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; 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Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; 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    2017-06-10

    A search is presented for narrow resonances decaying to dijet final states in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= $ 13 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 12.9 fb$^{-1}$. The dijet mass spectrum is well described by a smooth parameterization and no significant evidence for the production of new particles is observed. Upper limits at 95% confidence level are reported on the production cross section for narrow resonances with masses above 0.6 TeV. In the context of specific models, the limits exclude string resonances with masses below 7.4 TeV, scalar diquarks below 6.9 TeV, axigluons and colorons below 5.5 TeV, excited quarks below 5.4 TeV, color-octet scalars below 3.0 TeV, $\\mathrm{ W^{+} } ' $ bosons below 2.7 TeV, $\\mathrm{ Z }'$ bosons below 2.1 TeV and between 2.3 and 2.6 TeV, and RS gravitons below 1.9 TeV. These extend previous limits in the dijet channel. Vector and axial-vector mediators in a simplified model of interactions between quarks and dark matter are excluded below...

  18. EM Transition Sum Rules Within the Framework of sdg Proton-Neutron Interacting Boson Model, Nuclear Pair Shell Model and Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yumin

    1997-07-01

    By the techniques of the Wick theorem for coupled clusters, the no-energy-weighted electromagnetic sum-rule calculations are presented in the sdg neutron-proton interacting boson model, the nuclear pair shell model and the fermion-dynamical symmetry model. The project supported by Development Project Foundation of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Doctoral Education Fund of National Education Committee, Fundamental Research Fund of Southeast University

  19. Baryon production in proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.M.; Werner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by the recent rapidity spectra of baryons and antibaryons in pp collisions at 158 GeV and the Ω-bar/Ω ratio discussion, we reviewed string formation mechanism and some string models. This investigation told us how color strings are formed in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions

  20. Using adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezazadeh, S.; Mirzaee, I.; Mehrabi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used for modeling proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance using some numerically investigated and compared with those to experimental results for training and test data. In this way, current density I (A/cm 2 ) is modeled to the variation of pressure at the cathode side P C (atm), voltage V (V), membrane thickness (mm), Anode transfer coefficient α an , relative humidity of inlet fuel RH a and relative humidity of inlet air RH c which are defined as input (design) variables. Then, we divided these data into train and test sections to do modeling. We instructed ANFIS network by 80% of numerical validated data. 20% of primary data which had been considered for testing the appropriateness of the models was entered ANFIS network models and results were compared by three statistical criterions. Considering the results, it is obvious that our proposed modeling by ANFIS is efficient and valid and it can be expanded for more general states

  1. Using adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezazadeh, S.; Mirzaee, I. [Urmia Univ., Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehrabi, M. [University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, an adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used for modeling proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance using some numerically investigated and compared with those to experimental results for training and test data. In this way, current density I (A/cm{sup 2}) is modeled to the variation of pressure at the cathode side P{sup C} (atm), voltage V (V), membrane thickness (mm), Anode transfer coefficient {alpha}{sup an}, relative humidity of inlet fuel RH{sup a} and relative humidity of inlet air RH{sup c} which are defined as input (design) variables. Then, we divided these data into train and test sections to do modeling. We instructed ANFIS network by 80% of numerical validated data. 20% of primary data which had been considered for testing the appropriateness of the models was entered ANFIS network models and results were compared by three statistical criterions. Considering the results, it is obvious that our proposed modeling by ANFIS is efficient and valid and it can be expanded for more general states.

  2. Process modeling of the impedance characteristics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezaei Niya, Seyed Mohammad; Phillips, Ryan K.; Hoorfar, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The impedance of the PEM fuel cell is analytically calculated. • The measured impedances are presented for different operating conditions. • The high frequency arc in the measured Nyquist plot is related to the anode. • The intermediate frequency arc is related to the cathode. • The low frequency arc and high frequency resistance are related to the membrane. - Abstract: A complete process modeling of the impedance characteristics of the proton exchange membrane fuel cells is presented. The impedance of the cell is determined analytically and the resultant equivalent circuit is calculated. The model predictions are then compared against the measured impedances in different current densities, operating temperatures and anode and cathode relative humidities. It is shown that the model predicts the Nyquist plots in all different operating conditions extremely well. Next, the trends observed in the Nyquist plots reported in the literature are compared against the model predictions. The result of this comparison confirms the accuracy of the model. Using the verified model, various arcs in the Nyquist plots are separated and related to the fuel cell physical parameters.

  3. [Two-dimensional model of a double-well potential: proton transfer when a hydrogen bond is deformed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, P M

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy cross-section profile along a hydrogen bond may contain two minima in certain conditions; it is so-called a double well potential. The H-bond double well potential is essential for proton transfer along this hydrogen bond. We have considered the two-dimensional model of such double well potential in harmonic approximation, and we have also investigated the proton tunneling in it. In real environments thermal motion of atoms or conformational changes may cause reorientation and relative shift of molecule fragment forming the hydrogen bond and, as a result, the hydrogen bond isdeformed. This deformation is liable to change the double well potential form and, hence, the probability of the proton tunneling is changed too. As it is shown the characteristic time of proton tunneling is essentially increased by even small relative shift of heavy atoms forming the H-bond and also rotational displacement of covalent bond generated by one of heavy atoms and the proton (hydrogen atom). However, it is also shown, at the certain geometry of the H-bond deformation the opposite effect occurred, i.e., the characteristic time is not increased and even decreased. Notice that such its behavior arises from two-dimensionality of potential wells; this and other properties of our model are discussed in detail.

  4. An improved simulation routine for modelling coherent high-energy proton interactions with bent crystals

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2210072; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano

    The planes in crystalline solids can constrain the directions that charged particles take as they pass through. Physicists can use this "channelling" property of crystals to steer particle beams. In a bent crystal, for example, channelled particles follow the bend and can change their direction. Experiments are being carried out to study in detail this phenomenon. The UA9 collaboration is using high energy protons and heavy ions beams from the SPS accelerator at CERN to verify the possibility of using bent crystals as primary collimators in high energy hadron colliders like the LHC. Simulations have been developed to model the coherent interaction with crystal planes. The goal of the thesis is indeed to analyze the data and develop an improved simulation routine to better describe the data’s subtleties, in particular the transition between the volume reflection and amorphous modes of beam interaction with the crystal.

  5. Study of beta-delayed neutron with proton-neutron QRPA plus statistical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Futoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    β-delayed neutron is known to be important for safety operation of nuclear reactor and prediction of elemental abundance after freeze-out of r-process. A lot of researches on it have been performed. However, the experimental data are far from complete since the lifetime of most of the relevant nuclei is so short that one cannot measure in a high efficiency. In order to estimate half-lives and delayed neutron emission probabilities of unexplored nuclei, we developed a new theoretical method which combines a proton-neutron quasi-particle random-phase-approximation and the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. The present method reproduces experimentally known β-decay half-lives within a factor of 10 and about 40% of within a factor of 2. However it fails to reproduce delayed neutron emission probabilities. We discuss the problems and remedy for them to be made in future. (author)

  6. New results for antiproton-proton elastic scattering and various theoretical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal-e-Aleem; Saleem, M.; Yodh, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The most recent measurements of the ratio ρ of the real and imaginary parts of the forward-scattering amplitudes at 0.546 TeV, the total and elastic differential cross sections at 0.546 and 1.8 TeV for proton-antiproton scattering, are compared to the predictions of the generalized Chou-Yang and other theoretical models. For 1.8 TeV, the presence or absence of the break near -t∼0.15 (GeV/c) 2 and of the dip in the vicinity of 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 are also discussed in the light of various predictions. The possibility of a further rise of the ratio ρ at 1.8 TeV is also probed

  7. Double Polarized Neutron-Proton Scattering and Meson-Exchange Nucleon-Nucleon Potential Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichle, B.W.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Seely, M.L.; Walston, J.R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W.S.; Raichle, B.W.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Seely, M.L.; Walston, J.R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W.S.; Penttilae, S.I.; Hoffmann, G.W.

    1999-01-01

    We report on polarized beam - polarized target measurements of the spin-dependent neutron-proton total cross-section differences in longitudinal and transverse geometries (Δσ L and Δσ T , respectively) between E n =5 and 20MeV. Single-parameter phase-shift analyses were performed to extract the phase-shift mixing parameter var-epsilon 1 , which characterizes the strength of the nucleon-nucleon tensor interaction at low energies. Consistent with the trend of previous determinations at E n =25 and 50MeV, our values for var-epsilon 1 imply a stronger tensor force than predicted by meson-exchange nucleon-nucleon potential models and nucleon-nucleon phase-shift analyses. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  8. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  9. Poster - 52: Smoothing constraints in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) fluence map optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGeachy, Philip; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Zinchenko, Yuriy; Khan, Rao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has recently shown dosimetric improvement in comparison to conventional IMRT. That said, the degree of smoothness of resulting fluence maps (FMs) has yet to be investigated and could impact the deliverability of XMRT. This study looks at investigating FM smoothness and imposing smoothing constraint in the fluence map optimization. Methods: Smoothing constraints were modeled in the XMRT algorithm with the sum of positive gradient (SPG) technique. XMRT solutions, with and without SPG constraints, were generated for a clinical prostate scan using standard dosimetric prescriptions, constraints, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement. The smoothness, with and without SPG constraints, was assessed by looking at the absolute and relative maximum SPG scores for each fluence map. Dose volume histograms were utilized when evaluating impact on the dose distribution. Results: Imposing SPG constraints reduced the absolute and relative maximum SPG values by factors of up to 5 and 2, respectively, when compared with their non-SPG constrained counterparts. This leads to a more seamless conversion of FMS to their respective MLC sequences. This improved smoothness resulted in an increase to organ at risk (OAR) dose, however the increase is not clinically significant. Conclusions: For a clinical prostate case, there was a noticeable improvement in the smoothness of the XMRT FMs when SPG constraints were applied with a minor increase in dose to OARs. This increase in OAR dose is not clinically meaningful.

  10. Poster - 52: Smoothing constraints in Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT) fluence map optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGeachy, Philip; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Zinchenko, Yuriy; Khan, Rao [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CAN, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CAN, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CAN, Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Modulated Photon Radiotherapy (XMRT), which simultaneously optimizes photon beamlet energy (6 and 18 MV) and fluence, has recently shown dosimetric improvement in comparison to conventional IMRT. That said, the degree of smoothness of resulting fluence maps (FMs) has yet to be investigated and could impact the deliverability of XMRT. This study looks at investigating FM smoothness and imposing smoothing constraint in the fluence map optimization. Methods: Smoothing constraints were modeled in the XMRT algorithm with the sum of positive gradient (SPG) technique. XMRT solutions, with and without SPG constraints, were generated for a clinical prostate scan using standard dosimetric prescriptions, constraints, and a seven coplanar beam arrangement. The smoothness, with and without SPG constraints, was assessed by looking at the absolute and relative maximum SPG scores for each fluence map. Dose volume histograms were utilized when evaluating impact on the dose distribution. Results: Imposing SPG constraints reduced the absolute and relative maximum SPG values by factors of up to 5 and 2, respectively, when compared with their non-SPG constrained counterparts. This leads to a more seamless conversion of FMS to their respective MLC sequences. This improved smoothness resulted in an increase to organ at risk (OAR) dose, however the increase is not clinically significant. Conclusions: For a clinical prostate case, there was a noticeable improvement in the smoothness of the XMRT FMs when SPG constraints were applied with a minor increase in dose to OARs. This increase in OAR dose is not clinically meaningful.

  11. Calculation of fluence rate distributions in a pre design clinical facility for BNCT at the LFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, T.T.J.M.; Freudenreich, W.E.

    1995-12-01

    In a previous study [1], it was demonstrated that the creation of a thermal neutron facility for clinical BNCT in the LFR is feasible. Monte Carlo calculations had shown that the neutron fluence rates and gamma dose rates at the detector position of a model representing a first outline of a clinical facility met all requirements that are necessary for clinical BNCT. In order to gain more information about the neutron fluence rates at several positions, a second step is required. Calculations have been performed for the free beam and for a tumour bearing phantom at 5 cm and 10 cm distance from the irradiation window. Due to thermalization and back scattering, the thermal fluence rates in the tumour at 5 and 10 cm distance from the bismuth shield appeared to be approximately twice as high as the thermal fluence rates in the free beam at the corresponding positions of 5 to 6 cm and 10 to 11 cm from the irradiation window. (orig.)

  12. Fast pencil beam dose calculation for proton therapy using a double-Gaussian beam model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim eda Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly conformal dose distributions produced by scanned proton pencil beams are more sensitive to motion and anatomical changes than those produced by conventional radiotherapy. The ability to calculate the dose in real time as it is being delivered would enable, for example, online dose monitoring, and is therefore highly desirable. We have previously described an implementation of a pencil beam algorithm running on graphics processing units (GPUs intended specifically for online dose calculation. Here we present an extension to the dose calculation engine employing a double-Gaussian beam model to better account for the low-dose halo. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy running on a GPU. We employ two different parametrizations for the halo dose, one describing the distribution of secondary particles from nuclear interactions found in the literature and one relying on directly fitting the model to Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams in water. Despite the large width of the halo contribution, we show how in either case the second Gaussian can be included whilst prolonging the calculation of the investigated plans by no more than 16%, or the calculation of the most time-consuming energy layers by about 25%. Further, the calculation time is relatively unaffected by the parametrization used, which suggests that these results should hold also for different systems. Finally, since the implementation is based on an algorithm employed by a commercial treatment planning system, it is expected that with adequate tuning, it should be able to reproduce the halo dose from a general beam line with sufficient accuracy.

  13. Analytical linear energy transfer model including secondary particles: calculations along the central axis of the proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsolat, F; De Marzi, L; Mazal, A; Pouzoulet, F

    2016-01-01

    In proton therapy, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) depends on various types of parameters such as linear energy transfer (LET). An analytical model for LET calculation exists (Wilkens’ model), but secondary particles are not included in this model. In the present study, we propose a correction factor, L sec , for Wilkens’ model in order to take into account the LET contributions of certain secondary particles. This study includes secondary protons and deuterons, since the effects of these two types of particles can be described by the same RBE-LET relationship. L sec was evaluated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the GATE/GEANT4 platform and was defined by the ratio of the LET d distributions of all protons and deuterons and only primary protons. This method was applied to the innovative Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS) delivery systems and L sec was evaluated along the beam axis. This correction factor indicates the high contribution of secondary particles in the entrance region, with L sec values higher than 1.6 for a 220 MeV clinical pencil beam. MC simulations showed the impact of pencil beam parameters, such as mean initial energy, spot size, and depth in water, on L sec . The variation of L sec with these different parameters was integrated in a polynomial function of the L sec factor in order to obtain a model universally applicable to all PBS delivery systems. The validity of this correction factor applied to Wilkens’ model was verified along the beam axis of various pencil beams in comparison with MC simulations. A good agreement was obtained between the corrected analytical model and the MC calculations, with mean-LET deviations along the beam axis less than 0.05 keV μm −1 . These results demonstrate the efficacy of our new correction of the existing LET model in order to take into account secondary protons and deuterons along the pencil beam axis. (paper)

  14. Precise modelling of the eye for proton therapy of intra-ocular tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobler, B.; Bendl, R. [Medizinische Physik, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mails: b.dobler@dkfz-heidelberg.de; barbara.dobler@gmx.de; r.bendl@dkfz-heidelberg.de

    2002-02-21

    A new method is described that allows precise modelling of organs at risk and target volume for radiation therapy of intra-ocular tumours. The aim is to optimize the dose distribution and thus to reduce normal tissue complication probability. A geometrical 3D model based on elliptic shapes was developed that can be used for multimodal model-based segmentation of 3D patient data. The tumour volume cannot be clearly identified in CT and MR data, whereas the tumour outline can be discriminated very precisely in fundus photographs. Therefore, a multimodal 2D fundus diagram was developed, which allows us to correlate and display simultaneously information extracted from the eye model, 3D data and the fundus photograph. Thus, the connection of fundus diagram and 3D data is well-defined and the 3D volume can be calculated directly from the tumour outline drawn onto the fundus photograph and the tumour height measured by ultrasound. The method allows the calculation of a precise 3D eye model of the patient, including the different structures of the eye as well as the tumour volume. The method was developed as part of the new 3D treatment planning system OCTOPUS for proton therapy of ocular tumours within a national research project together with the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin. (author)

  15. Fast fluence measurement for JOYO irradiation field using niobium dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikara

    2004-03-01

    Neutron fluence and spectrum are key parameters in various irradiation tests and material surveillance tests so they need to be evaluated accurately. The reactor dosimetry test has been conducted by the multiple foil activation method, and a niobium dosimeter has been developed for measurement of fast neutron fluence in the experimental fast reactor JOYO. The inelastic scattering reaction of 93 Nb has a low threshold energy, about 30 keV, and the energy distribution of reaction cross section is similar to the displacement cross section for iron. Therefore, a niobium dosimeter is suitable for evaluation of the fast neutron fluence and the displacement per atom for iron. Moreover, a niobium dosimeter is suited to measure neutron fluence in long-term irradiation test because 93 Nb, which is produced by the reaction, has a long half-life (16.4 years). This study established a high precision measurement technique using the niobium reaction rate. The effect of self-absorption was decreased by the solution and evaporation to dryness of niobium dosimeter. The dosimeter weight was precisely measured using the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. This technique was applied to JOYO dosimetry. The fast neutron fluences (E > 0.1 MeV) found by measuring the reaction rate in the niobium dosimeter were compared with the values evaluated using the multiple foil activation method. The ratio of measured fast neutron fluences by means of niobium dosimeter and multiple foil activation method range from 0.97 to 1.03 and agree within the experimental uncertainty. The measurement errors of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeter range from 4.5% (fuel region) to 10.1% (in-vessel storage rack). As a result of this study, the high precision measurement of fast neutron fluence by niobium dosimeters was confirmed. The accuracy of fast reactor dosimetry will be improved by application of niobium dosimeters to the irradiation tests in the JOYO MK-III core. (author)

  16. Neutron dosimetry intercomparison run for verification of the neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penev, I.; Kinova, L.

    2001-01-01

    For the neutron fluence verification the intercomparison runs Balakovo and KORPUS have been carried out. The participation in the international intercomparison runs shows that in order to more precisely verify the calculated values of the neutron fluence more intercomparison exercises are necessary. Due to such exercises the results improved after calibration of Nb performed and are in a very good agreement with RIIAR results in spite of the different approaches in the determination of its activity

  17. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  18. Proton Beam Writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajta, I.; Szilasi, S.Z.; Csige, I.; Baradacs, E.

    2005-01-01

    flow channel, which were also implanted at the same irradiation. During the porous Si formation we developed the sample 6-8 μm deeper than the implanting ion range damaged the crystal. Due to the isotropic nature of the porous Si etching, the thick sidewall blocks are still connected to the crystal while the thin membranes detached from the bottom, and they are only connected to one of the sidewalls. The other construction utilized the goniometer facility mounted on the microbeam chamber, we implanted the samples at 40 degrees tilt, and developed the samples not as deep as the ion range. This way both the sidewalls and the membranes are attached to the bottom of the sample. The SEM images of the samples showed that both of these types of valves can be actively working, however, the thickness of the moving membrane requires extremely large force according to the fluidic tests. In order to achieve a successful demonstration of the functionality, the membrane rigidity should be reduced by decreasing the wall thickness. Reduction of optimal fluence by CO 2 treatment after exposure and vacuum effects in proton beam micromachining of CR-39 CR-39 has been shown to be a suitable material as a thick resist for Proton Beam Writing [5]. These samples are normally used to detect single alpha particles in normal air conditions. However, to use this material as proton or alpha micromachinable resists, we need to irradiate the samples in vacuum. In this work, we investigated the effects of vacuum on the micromachinable properties of CR-39. Our investigations proved that there were no drawbacks of the vacuum storage of the samples, so we concluded that CR-39 is a suitable material as a PBM resist in this respect, too. Another part of the current work concentrated on the effect of post-irradiaton CO 2 treatment of the samples. Such a treatment increased the radiation sensitivity of CR-39, i.e. decreased the necessary optimal ion fluence. We have found that approximately 60% of fluence

  19. Leading coordinate analysis of reaction pathways in proton chain transfer: Application to a two-proton transfer model for the green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Sufan; Smith, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    The 'leading coordinate' approach to computing an approximate reaction pathway, with subsequent determination of the true minimum energy profile, is applied to a two-proton chain transfer model based on the chromophore and its surrounding moieties within the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using an ab initio quantum chemical method, a number of different relaxed energy profiles are found for several plausible guesses at leading coordinates. The results obtained for different trial leading coordinates are rationalized through the calculation of a two-dimensional relaxed potential energy surface (PES) for the system. Analysis of the 2-D relaxed PES reveals that two of the trial pathways are entirely spurious, while two others contain useful information and can be used to furnish starting points for successful saddle-point searches. Implications for selection of trial leading coordinates in this class of proton chain transfer reactions are discussed, and a simple diagnostic function is proposed for revealing whether or not a relaxed pathway based on a trial leading coordinate is likely to furnish useful information

  20. Search for Standard Model H→τ"+τ"- decays in the lepton-hadron final state in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruthmann, Nils

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents a search for Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson decays to a pair of τ leptons in the lepton-hadron final state with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The analysis is based on proton-proton collision data recorded during Run 1 of the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb"-"1 and 20.3 fb"-"1 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, respectively. Background events from various SM processes contribute to the selected event sample at a high rate. Their contribution is efficiently separated from the expected Higgs boson signal by using boosted decision trees (BDT) in two analysis categories, which are enriched in events emerging from vector boson fusion and gluon fusion processes. The expected number of events from background processes is modelled using data-driven estimation techniques. The signal contribution is measured using a maximum likelihood fit of the BDT output distributions. An excess of events over the expected level of background events is found and corresponds to an observed (expected) significance of 2.3(2.4) standard deviations at a Higgs boson mass hypothesis of 125 GeV. The signal strength normalised to the Standard Model expectation is measured to be 0.98"+"0"."5_-_0_._5. A combined analysis of all τ-τ final states rejects the background-only hypothesis at a level of 4.5 standard deviations at m_H=125 GeV, while a significance of 3.5 standard deviations is expected. This provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to tau leptons. The measured normalised signal strength of 1.4"+"0"."4"3_-_0_._3_7 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.

  1. Solar proton events and their effect on space systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquille, C.

    1994-01-01

    Solar protons present a major problem to space systems because of the ionisation and displacement effects which arise from their interaction with matter. This is likely to become a greater problem in the future due to the use of more sensitive electronic components and the proposed expansion of manned activities in space. An outline is provided of the physical processes associated with individual solar events, the solar activity cycle and the transport of solar particles between the Sun and the Earth. The problems of predicting solar event fluences, both over short- and long-term periods, are discussed. The currently available solar proton event models used for long-term forecasting are briefly reviewed, and the advantages and deficiencies of each model are investigated. Predictions using the models are compared to measurements made by the GOES-7 satellite during the rising phase of the current solar cycle. These measurements are also used to illustrate the sensitivity of the models to the choice of confidence level and to the spectral form used for extrapolation over the solar proton energy range. (author)

  2. A Method to Simulate the Observed Surface Properties of Proton Irradiated Silicon Strip Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00335524; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichhorn, T.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.

    2015-04-23

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. To upgrade the tracker to required performance level, extensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. A defect model of Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD simulation package for the bulk properties of proton irradiated devices has been producing simulations closely matching with measurements of silicon strip detectors. However, the model does not provide expected behavior due to the fluence increased surface damage. The solution requires an approach that does not affect the accurate bulk properties produced by the proton model, but only adds to it the required radiation induced properties close to the surface. These include the observed position dependency of the strip detector's charge collec...

  3. Investigation of high-energy-proton effects in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Todosow, M.

    1997-01-01

    Specimens of 1100 aluminum were exposed to several fluences of 23.5-GeV protons at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Although this energy is above those currently being proposed for spallation-neutron applications, the results can be viewed as indicative of trends and other microstructural evolution with fluence that take place with high-energy proton exposures such as those associated with an increasing ratio of gas generation to dpa. TEM investigation showed significantly larger bubble size and lower density of bubbles compared with lower-energy proton results. Additional testing showed that the tensile strength increased with fluence as expected, but the microhardness decreased, a result for which an intepretation is still under investigation

  4. Contact behavior modelling and its size effect on proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Diankai; Peng, Linfa; Yi, Peiyun; Lai, Xinmin; Janßen, Holger; Lehnert, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Contact behavior between the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and bipolar plate (BPP) is of significant importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Most current studies on contact behavior utilize experiments and finite element modelling and focus on fuel cells with graphite BPPs, which lead to high costs and huge computational requirements. The objective of this work is to build a more effective analytical method for contact behavior in fuel cells and investigate the size effect resulting from configuration alteration of channel and rib (channel/rib). Firstly, a mathematical description of channel/rib geometry is outlined in accordance with the fabrication of metallic BPP. Based on the interface deformation characteristic and Winkler surface model, contact pressure between BPP and GDL is then calculated to predict contact resistance and GDL porosity as evaluative parameters of contact behavior. Then, experiments on BPP fabrication and contact resistance measurement are conducted to validate the model. The measured results demonstrate an obvious dependence on channel/rib size. Feasibility of the model used in graphite fuel cells is also discussed. Finally, size factor is proposed for evaluating the rule of size effect. Significant increase occurs in contact resistance and porosity for higher size factor, in which channel/rib width decrease.

  5. Exact boson mappings for nuclear neutron (proton) shell-model algebras having SU(3) subalgebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonatsos, D.; Klein, A.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the commutation relations of the fermion pair operators of identical nucleons coupled to spin zero are given for the general nuclear major shell in LST coupling. The associated Lie algebras are the unitary symplectic algebras Sp(2M). The corresponding multipole subalgebras are the unitary algebras U(M), which possess SU(3) subalgebras. Number conserving exact boson mappings of both the Dyson and hermitian form are given for the nuclear neutron (proton) s--d, p--f, s--d--g, and p--f--h shells, and their group theoretical structure is emphasized. The results are directly applicable in the case of the s--d shell, while in higher shells the experimentally plausible pseudo-SU(3) symmetry makes them applicable. The final purpose of this work is to provide a link between the shell model and the Interacting Boson Model (IBM) in the deformed limit. As already implied in the work of Draayer and Hecht, it is difficult to associate the boson model developed here with the conventional IBM model. The differences between the two approaches (due mainly to the effects of the Pauli principle) as well as their physical implications are extensively discussed

  6. Comparison of Geant4 multiple Coulomb scattering models with theory for radiotherapy protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Anastasia; Gottschalk, Bernard; Sauerwein, Wolfgang

    2017-07-06

    Usually, Monte Carlo models are validated against experimental data. However, models of multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) in the Gaussian approximation are exceptional in that we have theories which are probably more accurate than the experiments which have, so far, been done to test them. In problems directly sensitive to the distribution of angles leaving the target, the relevant theory is the Molière/Fano/Hanson variant of Molière theory (Gottschalk et al 1993 Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 74 467-90). For transverse spreading of the beam in the target itself, the theory of Preston and Koehler (Gottschalk (2012 arXiv:1204.4470)) holds. Therefore, in this paper we compare Geant4 simulations, using the Urban and Wentzel models of MCS, with theory rather than experiment, revealing trends which would otherwise be obscured by experimental scatter. For medium-energy (radiotherapy) protons, and low-Z (water-like) target materials, Wentzel appears to be better than Urban in simulating the distribution of outgoing angles. For beam spreading in the target itself, the two models are essentially equal.

  7. Description of spectrum and electromagnetic transitions in 94Mo through the proton-neutron interacting boson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, ChengFu; Zhang, DaLi

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the properties of low-lying states in 94Mo within the framework of the proton-neutron interacting boson model (IBM-2), with special focus on the characteristics of mixed-symmetry states. We calculated level energies and M1 and E2 transition strengths. The IBM-2 results agree with the available quantitative and qualitative experimental data on 94Mo. The properties of mixed-symmetry states can be well described by IBM-2 given that the energy of the d proton boson is different from that of the neutron boson, especially for the transition of B( M1; 4 2 + → 4 1 + ).

  8. Challenging the standard model by high-precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S.; Mooser, A.; Nagahama, H.; Sellner, S.; Smorra, C.

    2018-03-01

    The BASE collaboration investigates the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons, such as charge-to-mass ratios and magnetic moments, using advanced cryogenic Penning trap systems. In recent years, we performed the most precise measurement of the magnetic moments of both the proton and the antiproton, and conducted the most precise comparison of the proton-to-antiproton charge-to-mass ratio. In addition, we have set the most stringent constraint on directly measured antiproton lifetime, based on a unique reservoir trap technique. Our matter/antimatter comparison experiments provide stringent tests of the fundamental charge-parity-time invariance, which is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This article reviews the recent achievements of BASE and gives an outlook to our physics programme in the ELENA era. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  9. Challenging the standard model by high-precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S; Mooser, A; Nagahama, H; Sellner, S; Smorra, C

    2018-03-28

    The BASE collaboration investigates the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons, such as charge-to-mass ratios and magnetic moments, using advanced cryogenic Penning trap systems. In recent years, we performed the most precise measurement of the magnetic moments of both the proton and the antiproton, and conducted the most precise comparison of the proton-to-antiproton charge-to-mass ratio. In addition, we have set the most stringent constraint on directly measured antiproton lifetime, based on a unique reservoir trap technique. Our matter/antimatter comparison experiments provide stringent tests of the fundamental charge-parity-time invariance, which is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This article reviews the recent achievements of BASE and gives an outlook to our physics programme in the ELENA era.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'. © 2018 The Authors.

  10. Ringhals unit 3 and 4 - Fluence determination in a historic and future perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, E.L. [Primary Systems Inspection and Repair, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Rouden, J. [Material and Analytical Services, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Efsing, P. [Materials Mechanics, Research and Nuclear Development, Vattenfall/Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text of document follows: The Ringhals site is situated on the Swedish southwest coastline. At the site, there are four operating nuclear power plants. Historically, the Swedish policy has been that the nuclear power plants were to be closed in 2010. The present position is to operate the units until their technical and economic lifetime has run out. The units shall be maintained and invested in to ensure a lifetime of at least 50 years, but the actions taken shall not limit the time to this date. When the initial surveillance capsules were evaluated, it was noted that the material properties of the weld material of unit 3 and 4 showed some deviations from the expected behaviour. Currently there is an extensive project running for re-evaluating the embrittlement situation from a long-term operating perspective. One part of the project is aimed at more accurately determining the fluence levels of the reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The basis for the early evaluations of the dosimeters in the surveillance capsules and the corresponding fluence evaluation had an operating lifetime of 25 years as a target value. Therefore, the accuracy and refinement of the measurement and calculation were taken to be good enough to suit this life span. Looking back at the results from the dosimetry measurements there are a few discrepancies. Some of the dosimeters were disintegrated and some measurements had comparatively large uncertainties. When starting this project there were some re-evaluations done with the old fluence prediction model. For every new run and refinement there appeared new difficulties, and the decision was to start the evaluation from scratch. Then there are two questions remaining regarding the fluence: What is the current fluence level? What will the resulting fluence be after 60 years of operation, when we have up-rated output power of both reactors? This paper aims to describe the view of the fluence evaluation

  11. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Meyerhof, D.; Vlahovich, S.

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus. (authors)

  12. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Meyerhof, Dorothy; Vlahovich, Slavica

    2004-01-01

    A problem of concern in radiation protection is the exposure of pregnant women to ionising radiation, because of the high radiosensitivity of the embryo and fetus. External neutron exposure is of concern when pregnant women travel by aeroplane. Dose assessments for neutrons frequently rely on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. While neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for adults are recommended in International Commission on Radiological Protection publications and International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements reports, conversion coefficients for embryos and fetuses are not given in the publications. This study undertakes Monte Carlo calculations to determine the mean absorbed doses to the embryo and fetus when the mother is exposed to neutron fields. A new set of mathematical models for the embryo and fetus has been developed at Health Canada and is used together with mathematical phantoms of a pregnant female developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Monoenergetic neutrons from 1 eV to 10 MeV are considered in this study. The irradiation geometries include antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO) geometries. At each of these standard irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the fetal brain and body are calculated; for the embryo at 8 weeks and the fetus at 3, 6 or 9 months. Neutron fluence-to-absorbed dose conversion coefficients are derived for the four age groups. Neutron fluence-to-equivalent dose conversion coefficients are given for the AP irradiations which yield the highest radiation dose to the fetal body in the neutron energy range considered here. The results indicate that for neutrons <10 MeV more protection should be given to pregnant women in the first trimester due to the higher absorbed dose per unit neutron fluence to the fetus.

  13. Modeling and simulation of the dynamic behavior of portable proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, C.

    2005-07-01

    In order to analyze the operational behavior, a mathematical model of planar self-breathing fuel cells is developed and validated in Chapter 3 of this thesis. The multicomponent transport of the species is considered as well as the couplings between the transport processes of heat, charge, and mass and the electrochemical reactions. Furthermore, to explain the oxygen mass transport limitation in the porous electrode of the cathode side an agglomerate model for the oxygen reduction reaction is developed. In Chapter 4 the important issue of liquid water generation and transport in PEMFCs is addressed. One of the major tasks when operating this type of fuel cell is avoiding the complete flooding of the PEMFC during operation. A one-dimensional and isothermal model is developed that is based on a coupled system of partial differential equations. The model contains a dynamic and two-phase description of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The mass transport in the gas phase and in the liquid phase is considered as well as the phase transition between liquid water and water vapor. The transport of charges and the electrochemical reactions are part of the model. Flooding effects that are caused by liquid water accumulation are described by this model. Moreover, the model contains a time-dependent description of the membrane that accounts for Schroeder's paradox. The model is applied to simulate cyclic voltammograms. Chapter 5 is focused on the dynamic investigation of PEMFC stacks. Understanding the dynamic behavior of fuel cell stacks is important for the operation and control of fuel cell stacks. Using the single cell model of Chapter 3 and the dynamic model of Chapter 4 as basis, a mathematical model of a PEMFC stack is developed. However, due to the complexity of a fuel cell stack, the spatial resolution and dynamic description of the liquid water transport are not accounted for. These restrictions allow for direct comparison between the solution variables of

  14. BPW34 Commercial p-i-n Diodes for High-Level 1-MeV Neutron Equivalent Fluence Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Ravotti, F; Moll, M; Saigne, F

    2008-01-01

    The BPW34 p-i-n diode was characterized at CERN in view of its utilization as radiation monitor at the LHC to cover the broad 1-MeV neutron equivalent fluence (Phieq) range expected for the LHC machine and experiments during operation. Electrical measurements for both forward and reverse bias were used to characterize the device and to understand its behavior under irradiation. When the device is powered forward, a sensitivity to fast hadrons for Phieq > 2 times1012 cm-2 has been observed. With increasing particle fluences the forward I- V characteristics of the diode shifts towards higher voltages. At Phieq > 3times1013 cm-2, the forward characteristic starts to bend back assuming a thyristor-like behavior. An explanation for this phenomenon is given in this article. Finally, detailed radiation-response curves for the forward bias-operation and annealing studies of the diode's forward voltage are presented for proton, neutron and gamma irradiation.

  15. Simulating demand for innovative radiotherapies: An illustrative model based on carbon ion and proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommier, Pascal; Lievens, Yolande; Feschet, Fabien; Borras, Josep M.; Baron, Marie Helene; Shtiliyanova, Anastasiya; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Innovative therapies are not only characterized by major uncertainties regarding clinical benefit and cost but also the expected recruitment of patients. An original model was developed to simulate patient recruitment to a costly particle therapy by varying layout of the facility and patient referral (one vs. several countries) and by weighting the treated indication by the expected benefit of particle therapy. Material and methods: A multi-step probabilistic spatial model was used to allocate patients to the optimal treatment strategy and facility taking into account the estimated therapeutic gain from the new therapy for each tumour type, the geographical accessibility of the facilities and patient preference. Recruitment was simulated under different assumptions relating to the demand and supply. Results: Extending the recruitment area, reducing treatment capacity, equipping all treatment rooms with a carbon ion gantry and inclusion of proton protocols in carbon ion facilities led to an increased proportion of indications with the highest expected benefit. Assuming the existence of a competing carbon ions facility, lower values of therapeutic gain, and a greater unwillingness of patients to travel for treatment increased the proportion of indications with low expected benefit. Conclusions: Modelling patient recruitment may aid decision-making when planning new and expensive treatments.

  16. Bag-model analyses of proton-antiproton scattering and atomic bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberg, M.A.; Freedman, R.A.; Henley, E.M.; Hwang, W.P.; Seckel, D.; Wilets, L.

    1983-01-01

    We study proton-antiproton (pp-bar ) scattering using the static real potential of Bryan and Phillips outside a cutoff radius rsub0 and two different shapes for the imaginary potential inside a radius R*. These forms, motivated by bag models, are a one-gluon-annihilation potential and a simple geometric-overlap form. In both cases there are three adjustable parameters: the effective bag radius R*, the effective strong coupling constant αsubssup*, and rsub0. There is also a choice for the form of the real potential inside the cutoff radius rsub0. Analysis of the pp-bar scattering data in the laboratory-momentum region 0.4--0.7 GeV/c yields an effective nucleon bag radius R* in the range 0.6--1.1 fm, with the best fit obtained for R* = 0.86 fm. Arguments are presented that the deduced value of R* is likely to be an upper bound on the isolated nucleon bag radius. The present results are consistent with the range of bag radii in current bag models. We have also used the resultant optical potential to calculate the shifts and widths of the sup3Ssub1 and sup1Ssub0 atomic bound states of the pp-bar system. For both states we find upward (repulsive) shifts and widths of about 1 keV. We find no evidence for narrow, strongly bound pp-bar states in our potential model

  17. Optics Studies for the CERN Proton Synchrotron Machine Linear and Nonlinear Modelling using Beam Based Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cappi, R; Martini, M; Métral, Elias; Métral, G; Steerenberg, R; Müller, A S

    2003-01-01

    The CERN Proton Synchrotron machine is built using combined function magnets. The control of the linear tune as well as the chromaticity in both planes is achieved by means of special coils added to the main magnets, namely two pole-face-windings and one figure-of-eight loop. As a result, the overall magnetic field configuration is rather complex not to mention the saturation effects induced at top-energy. For these reasons a linear model of the PS main magnet does not provide sufficient precision to model particle dynamics. On the other hand, a sophisticated optical model is the key element for the foreseen intensity upgrade and, in particular, for the novel extraction mode based on adiabatic capture of beam particles inside stable islands in transverse phase space. A solution was found by performing accurate measurement of the nonlinear tune as a function of both amplitude and momentum offset so to extract both linear and nonlinear properties of the lattice. In this paper the measurement results are present...

  18. An analytical model and parametric study of electrical contact resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhiliang; Wang, Shuxin; Zhang, Lianhong [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Hu, S. Jack [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    This paper presents an analytical model of the electrical contact resistance between the carbon paper gas diffusion layers (GDLs) and the graphite bipolar plates (BPPs) in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The model is developed based on the classical statistical contact theory for a PEM fuel cell, using the same probability distributions of the GDL structure and BPP surface profile as previously described in Wu et al. [Z. Wu, Y. Zhou, G. Lin, S. Wang, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 182 (2008) 265-269] and Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Results show that estimates of the contact resistance compare favorably with experimental data by Zhou et al. [Y. Zhou, G. Lin, A.J. Shih, S.J. Hu, J. Power Sources 163 (2007) 777-783]. Factors affecting the contact behavior are systematically studied using the analytical model, including the material properties of the two contact bodies and factors arising from the manufacturing processes. The transverse Young's modulus of chopped carbon fibers in the GDL and the surface profile of the BPP are found to be significant to the contact resistance. The factor study also sheds light on the manufacturing requirements of carbon fiber GDLs for a better contact performance in PEM fuel cells. (author)

  19. Two modified versions of the speciation code PHREEQE for modelling macromolecule-proton/cation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    There is a growing need to consider the influence of organic macromolecules on the speciation of ions in natural waters. It is recognized that a simple discrete ligand approach to the binding of protons/cations to organic macromolecules is not appropriate to represent heterogeneities of binding site distributions. A more realistic approach has been incorporated into the speciation code PHREEQE which retains the discrete ligand approach but modifies the binding intensities using an electrostatic (surface complexation) model. To allow for different conformations of natural organic material two alternative concepts have been incorporated: it is assumed that (a) the organic molecules form rigid, impenetrable spheres, and (b) the organic molecules form flat surfaces. The former concept will be more appropriate for molecules in the smaller size range, while the latter will be more representative for larger size molecules or organic surface coatings. The theoretical concept is discussed and the relevant changes to the standard PHREEQE code are explained. The modified codes are called PHREEQEO-RS and PHREEQEO-FS for the rigid-sphere and flat-surface models respectively. Improved output facilities for data transfer to other computers, e.g. the Macintosh, are introduced. Examples where the model is tested against literature data are shown and practical problems are discussed. Appendices contain listings of the modified subroutines GAMMA and PTOT, an example input file and an example command procedure to run the codes on VAX computers

  20. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  1. Charged particle mutagenesis at low dose and fluence in mouse splenic T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygoryev, Dmytro [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Gauny, Stacey [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lasarev, Michael; Ohlrich, Anna [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kronenberg, Amy [Biological Systems and Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Turker, Mitchell S., E-mail: turkerm@ohsu.edu [Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Molecular and Medical Genetics, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Densely ionizing forms of space radiation induce mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence. • Large interstitial deletions and discontinuous LOH patterns are radiation signature mutations. • Space radiation mutagenesis suggests a cancer risk from deep space travel. - Abstract: High-energy heavy charged particles (HZE ions) found in the deep space environment can significantly affect human health by inducing mutations and related cancers. To better understand the relation between HZE ion exposure and somatic mutation, we examined cell survival fraction, Aprt mutant frequencies, and the types of mutations detected for mouse splenic T cells exposed in vivo to graded doses of densely ionizing {sup 48}Ti ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 107 keV/μm), {sup 56}Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET = 151 keV/μm) ions, or sparsely ionizing protons (1 GeV, LET = 0.24 keV/μm). The lowest doses for {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions were equivalent to a fluence of approximately 1 or 2 particle traversals per nucleus. In most cases, Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated mice were not significantly increased relative to the controls for any of the particles or doses tested at the pre-determined harvest time (3–5 months after irradiation). Despite the lack of increased Aprt mutant frequencies in the irradiated splenocytes, a molecular analysis centered on chromosome 8 revealed the induction of radiation signature mutations (large interstitial deletions and complex mutational patterns), with the highest levels of induction at 2 particles nucleus for the {sup 48}Ti and {sup 56}Fe ions. In total, the results show that densely ionizing HZE ions can induce characteristic mutations in splenic T cells at low fluence, and that at least a subset of radiation-induced mutant cells are stably retained despite the apparent lack of increased mutant frequencies at the time of harvest.

  2. A phenomenological biological dose model for proton therapy based on linear energy transfer spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørvik, Eivind; Thörnqvist, Sara; Stokkevåg, Camilla H; Dahle, Tordis J; Fjaera, Lars Fredrik; Ytre-Hauge, Kristian S

    2017-06-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons varies with the radiation quality, quantified by the linear energy transfer (LET). Most phenomenological models employ a linear dependency of the dose-averaged LET (LET d ) to calculate the biological dose. However, several experiments have indicated a possible non-linear trend. Our aim was to investigate if biological dose models including non-linear LET dependencies should be considered, by introducing a LET spectrum based dose model. The RBE-LET relationship was investigated by fitting of polynomials from 1st to 5th degree to a database of 85 data points from aerobic in vitro experiments. We included both unweighted and weighted regression, the latter taking into account experimental uncertainties. Statistical testing was performed to decide whether higher degree polynomials provided better fits to the data as compared to lower degrees. The newly developed models were compared to three published LET d based models for a simulated spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) scenario. The statistical analysis of the weighted regression analysis favored a non-linear RBE-LET relationship, with the quartic polynomial found to best represent the experimental data (P = 0.010). The results of the unweighted regression analysis were on the borderline of statistical significance for non-linear functions (P = 0.053), and with the current database a linear dependency could not be rejected. For the SOBP scenario, the weighted non-linear model estimated a similar mean RBE value (1.14) compared to the three established models (1.13-1.17). The unweighted model calculated a considerably higher RBE value (1.22). The analysis indicated that non-linear models could give a better representation of the RBE-LET relationship. However, this is not decisive, as inclusion of the experimental uncertainties in the regression analysis had a significant impact on the determination and ranking of the models. As differences between the models were

  3. Comparison of embrittlement trend curves to high fluence surveillance results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, A.S.; Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the regulatory justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessels (RPV) for long term operation, use is made of predictive formulas (also called trend curves) to evaluate the RPV embrittlement (expressed in terms of RTNDT shifts) in function of fluence, chemical composition and in some cases temperature, neutron flux or product form. It has been shown recently that some of the existing or proposed trend curves tend to underpredict high dose embrittlement. Due to the scarcity of representative surveillance data at high dose, some test reactor results were used in these evaluations and raise the issue of representativeness of the accelerated test reactor irradiations (dose rate effects). In Belgium the surveillance capsules withdrawal schedule was modified in the nineties in order to obtain results corresponding to 60 years of operation or more with the initial surveillance program. Some of these results are already available and offer a good opportunity to test the validity of the predictive formulas at high dose. In addition, advanced surveillance methods are used in Belgium like the Master Curve, increased tensile tests, and microstructural investigations. These techniques made it possible to show the conservatism of the regulatory approach and to demonstrate increased margins, especially for the first generation units. In this paper the surveillance results are compared to different predictive formulas, as well as to an engineering hardening model developed at SCK.CEN. Generally accepted property-to-property correlations are critically revisited. Conclusions are made on the reliability and applicability of the embrittlement trend curves. (authors)

  4. SU-F-T-540: Comprehensive Fluence Delivery Optimization with Multileaf Collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weppler, S; Villarreal-Barajas, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Center, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); McGeachy, P [Department of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Khan, R [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf sequencing is performed via commercial black-box implementations, on which a user has limited to no access. We have developed an explicit, generic MLC sequencing model to serve as a tool for future investigations of fluence map optimization, fluence delivery optimization, and rotational collimator delivery methods. Methods: We have developed a novel, comprehensive model to effectively account for a variety of transmission and penumbra effects previously treated on an ad hoc basis in the literature. As the model is capable of quantifying a variety of effects, we utilize the asymmetric leakage intensity across each leaf to deliver fluence maps with pixel size smaller than the narrowest leaf width. Developed using linear programming and mixed integer programming formulations, the model is implemented using state of the art open-source solvers. To demonstrate the versatility of the algorithm, a graphical user interface (GUI) was developed in MATLAB capable of accepting custom leaf specifications and transmission parameters. As a preliminary proof-ofconcept, we have sequenced the leaves of a Varian 120 Leaf Millennium MLC for five prostate cancer patient fields and one head and neck field. Predetermined fluence maps have been processed by data smoothing methods to obtain pixel sizes of 2.5 cm{sup 2}. The quality of output was analyzed using computer simulations. Results: For the prostate fields, an average root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.82 and gamma (0.5mm/0.5%) of 91.4% were observed compared to RMSE and gamma (0.5mm/0.5%) values of 7.04 and 34.0% when the leakage considerations were omitted. Similar results were observed for the head and neck case. Conclusion: A model to sequence MLC leaves to optimality has been proposed. Future work will involve extensive testing and evaluation of the method on clinical MLCs and comparison with black-box leaf sequencing algorithms currently used by commercial treatment planning systems.

  5. Modelling porous active layer electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells; Modelisation des couches actives d'electrodes volumiques de piles a combustible a membrane echangeuse de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bultel, Yann

    1997-07-01

    This work focusses on the modeling of mass, charge and heat transfer in the active layers of the volume electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). A first part describes the structure of fuel cells and the physico-chemical processes taking place at the electrodes. An analysis of the classical models encountered in the literature shows that they all assume that the electro-catalysts is uniformly distributed in a plane or in volume. In a second part, the modeling of mass and charge transport phenomena has been carried out with a numerical calculation software which uses the finite-elements method and which allows to take into consideration the discrete distribution of the catalyst in nano-particulates. The simulations show the limitations of the catalyst use because of the diffusion and ionic ohmic drop both at the electrolyte and particulates scale. In order to improve the modeling of PEMFC fuel cells, the classical models have been modified to consider these local contributions. They require only simple numerical methods, like the finite-differences one. When applied to the oxygen reduction at the cathode or to the hydrogen oxidation at the anode, these models allow to determine the kinetics parameters (exchange current densities and slopes of the Tafel lines) after correction of the active layer diffusion. A modeling of the heat transfers at the active layers scale is proposed. The model takes into account the convective heat transfers between the solid phases and the gas, the electro-osmosis water transfer, and the generation of heat by joule effect and by the electrochemical reactions. Finally, the last chapter presents a study of the reaction mechanisms in the case of porous electrodes using the impedances method. Numerical and analytical models have been developed to calculate the electrode impedances and are applied to the study of oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation. (J.S.)

  6. An integral test of FLUKA nuclear models with 160 MeV proton beams in multi-layer Faraday cups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, I; Ferrari, A; Mairani, A; Parodi, K; Paganetti, H; Sala, P

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) codes are useful tools to simulate the complex processes of proton beam interactions with matter. In proton therapy, nuclear reactions influence the dose distribution. Therefore, the validation of nuclear models adopted in MC codes is a critical requisite for their use in this field. A simple integral test can be performed using a multi-layer Faraday cup (MLFC). This method allows separation of the nuclear and atomic interaction processes, which are responsible for secondary particle emission and the finite primary proton range, respectively. In this work, the propagation of 160 MeV protons stopping in two MLFCs made of polyethylene and copper has been simulated by the FLUKA MC code. The calculations have been performed with and without secondary electron emission and transport, as well as charge sharing in the dielectric layers. Previous results with other codes neglected those two effects. The impact of this approximation has been investigated and found to be relevant only in the proximity of the Bragg peak. Longitudinal charge distributions computed with FLUKA with both approaches have been compared with experimental data from the literature. Moreover, the contribution of different processes to the measurable signal has been addressed. A thorough analysis of the results has demonstrated that the nuclear and electromagnetic models of FLUKA reproduce the two sets of experimental data reasonably well.

  7. Fluence scan: an unexplored property of a laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupsky, Jaromir; Hajkova, Vera; Burian, Tomas; Juha, Libor; Polcar, Tomas; Gaudin, Jerome; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Yabashi, Makina; Sobierajski, Ryszard; Krzywinski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We present an extended theoretical background of so-called fluence scan (f-scan or F-scan) method, which is frequently being used for offline characterization of focused short-wavelength (EUV, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray) laser beams [J. Chalupsky et al., Opt. Express 18, 27836 (2010)]. The method exploits ablative imprints in various solids to visualize iso-fluence beam contours at different fluence and/or clip levels. An f-scan curve (clip level as a function of the corresponding iso-fluence contour area) can be generated for a general non-Gaussian beam. As shown in this paper, fluence scan encompasses important information about energy distribution within the beam profile, which may play an essential role in laser-matter interaction research employing intense non-ideal beams. Here we for the first time discuss fundamental properties of the f-scan function and its inverse counterpart (if-scan). Furthermore, we extensively elucidate how it is related to the effective beam area, energy distribution, and to the so called Liu's dependence [J.M. Liu, Opt. Lett. 7, 196 (1982)]. A new method of the effective area evaluation based on weighted inverse f-scan fit is introduced and applied to real data obtained at the SCSS (SPring-8 Compact SASE Source) facility. (authors)

  8. Proton irradiation effects on organic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, T.; Sasuga, T.; Kawakami, W.; Hagiwara, M.; Kohno, I.; Kamitsubo, H.

    1987-01-01

    Organic polymer films(100 μm thickness) of polyethylene, polypropylene, polyethyleneterephtalate, and polyethersulfone were irradiated by protons of 8 MeV using a cyclotron, and their radiation effects were investigated by the changes of mechanical properties. In order to irradiate protons uniformly over wide area of polymer films, specimens were scanned during proton irradiation using a special apparatus. The absorbed dose was measured by CTA and RCD film dosimeters, and can be determined that 1 μC/cm 2 of 8 MeV proton fluence is equivalent to 54 kGy. For polyethylene and polypropylene, there was no significant difference between proton and electron irradiation for same doses. However, for polyethersulfone the decay of mechanical property was observed to be less than that of irradiation by electron. (author)

  9. Dosimetric And Fluence Measurements At Hadron Facilities For LHC Radiation Damage Studies

    CERN Document Server

    León-Florián, E

    2001-01-01

    Dosimetry plays an essential role in experiments assessing radiation damage and hardness for the components of detectors to be operated at the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics), Geneva, Switzerland. Dosimetry is used both for calibration of the radiation fields and estimate of fluences and doses during the irradiation tests. The LHC environment will result in a complex radiation field composed of hadrons (mainly neutrons, pions and protons) and photons, each having an energy spectrum ranging from a few keV to several hundreds of MeV or several GeV, even. In this thesis, are exposed the results of measurements of particle fluences and doses at different hadron irradiation facilities: SARA, πE1-PSI and ZT7PS used for testing the radiation hardness of materials and equipment to be used in the future experiments at LHC. These measurements are applied to the evaluation of radiation damage inflicted to various semiconductors (such as silicon) and electronics ...

  10. Shell model with several particles in the continuum: application to the two-proton decay; Modele en couches avec plusieurs particules dans le continuum: description de la radioactivite deux protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotureau, J

    2005-02-15

    The recent experimental results concerning nuclei at the limit of stability close to the drip-lines and in particular the two-proton emitters require a development of new methodologies to reliably calculate and understand properties of those exotic physical systems. In this work we have extended the Shell Model Embedded in the Continuum (SMEC) in order to describe the coupling with two particles in the scattering continuum. We have obtained a microscopic description of the two-proton emission that takes into account the antisymmetrization of the total wavefunction, the configuration mixing and the three-body asymptotics. We have studied the decay of the 1{sub 2}{sup -} state in {sup 18}Ne in two limiting cases: (i) a sequential emission of two protons through the correlated continuum of {sup 17}F and (ii) emission of {sup 2}He cluster that disintegrates because of the final state interaction (diproton emission). Independently of the choice of the effective interaction we have observed that the two-proton emission of the 1{sub 2}{sup -} in {sup 18}Ne is mainly a sequential process; the ratio between the widths of the diproton emission and the sequential decay does not exceed 8% in any case. (author)

  11. Modeling the impact of preflushing on CTE in proton irradiated CCD-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrick, R. H.

    2002-04-01

    A software model is described that performs a "real world" simulation of the operation of several types of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based detectors in order to accurately predict the impact that high-energy proton radiation has on image distortion and modulation transfer function (MTF). The model was written primarily to predict the effectiveness of vertical preflushing on the custom full frame CCD-based detectors intended for use on the proposed Kepler Discovery mission, but it is capable of simulating many other types of CCD detectors and operating modes as well. The model keeps track of the occupancy of all phosphorous-silicon (P-V), divacancy (V-V) and oxygen-silicon (O-V) defect centers under every CCD electrode over the entire detector area. The integrated image is read out by simulating every electrode-to-electrode charge transfer in both the vertical and horizontal CCD registers. A signal level dependency on the capture and emission of signal is included and the current state of each electrode (e.g., barrier or storage) is considered when distributing integrated and emitted signal. Options for performing preflushing, preflashing, and including mini-channels are available on both the vertical and horizontal CCD registers. In addition, dark signal generation and image transfer smear can be selectively enabled or disabled. A comparison of the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) data measured on the Hubble space telescope imaging spectrometer (STIS) CCD with the CTE extracted from model simulations of the STIS CCD show good agreement.

  12. Investigation of neutron fluence using fluence monitors for irradiation test at WWR-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, N.K.; Takemoto, N.

    2013-01-01

    Irradiation test of a Si ingot is planned using WWR-K in Institute of Nuclear Physics Republic of Kazakhstan (INP RK) to develop an irradiation technology for Si semiconductor production by Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) method in the framework of an international cooperation between INP RK and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Japan. It is possible to irradiate the Si ingot of 6 inch in diameter at the K-23 irradiation channel in the WWR-K. The preliminary irradiation test using 4 Al ingots was performed to evaluate the actual neutronic irradiation field at the K-23 channel in the WWR-K. Each Al ingot has the same dimension as the Si ingot, and 15 fluence monitors are equipped in it. Iron wire and aluminum-cobalt wire are inserted into them, and it is possible to evaluate both fast and thermal neutron fluxes by measurement of these radiation activities after irradiation. This report described the results of the preliminary irradiation test and the neutronic calculations by Monte Carlo method in order to evaluate the neutronic irradiation field in the irradiation position for the silicon ingot at the channel in the WWR-K. (authors)

  13. Percolation-fission model study of the fragment mass distribution for the 1 GeV proton induced reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuma, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Tetsuo; Sasa, Toshinobu

    2005-01-01

    The 1 GeV proton induced reaction on 208 Pb targets is analyzed by using the percolation model combined with the Atchison fission model. The fragment mass distribution and the isotopic production cross sections obtained from our model are compared with the experimental data. The trends of the fragment mass distribution for the 1 GeV proton induced reaction can be reproduced by our calculation in some degree. The order of magnitude for the calculated isotopic production cross sections at the calculated peak positions is similar to that of the experimental peak values. The calculated peak positions of the isotopic production cross sections are shifted to the heavier region than those of the experimental data. (author)

  14. Fluence dependence of disorder depth profiles in Pb implanted Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulides, C.E.; Kadhim, N.J.; Carter, G.

    1980-01-01

    The total, depth integrated disorder, induced by Pb implantation into Si at room temperature, initially increases rapidly with implantation fluence and then reaches a quasi saturation level where the increase with fluence is slow. Measurements of the depth distributions of the disorder, using high resolution low angle exit Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling analysis, suggest that the quasi saturation results from overlapping of disordered zones generated deep in the tail of the disorder-depth profiles. The depth of the disordered solid-crystal boundary, xsub(D), increases with ion fluence PHI, according to the relation xsub(D) = x bar + f(PHI).σ, where x bar is the most probable projected depth and σ the projected standard deviation of disorder generation. It is shown that this relationship is consistent with an approximately Gaussian depth distribution of disorder production. (author)

  15. Safety factors for neutron fluences in NPP safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demekhin, V.L.; Bukanov, V.N.; Il'kovich, V.V.; Pugach, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with global practice and a number of existing regulations, the use of conservative approach is required for the calculations related to nuclear safety assessment of NPP. It implies the need to consider the determination of neutron fluence errors that is rather complicated. It is proposed to carry out the consideration by the way of multiplying the neutron fluences obtained with transport calculations by safety factors. The safety factor values are calculated by the developed technique based on the theory of errors, features of the neutron transport calculation code and the results obtained with the code. It is shown that the safety factor value is equal 1.18 with the confidence level of not less than 0.95 for the majority of VVER-1000 reactor places where neutron fluences are determined by MCPV code, and its maximum value is 1.25

  16. The irradiation creep characteristics of graphite to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Cundy, M.; Kleist, G.

    1988-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have massive blocks of graphite with thermal and neutron-flux gradients causing high internal stresses. Thermal stresses are transient; however, stresses generated by differential growth due to neutron damage continue to increase with time. Fortunately, graphite also experiences creep under irradiation allowing relaxation of stresses to nominally safe levels. Because of complexity of irradiation creep experiments, data demonstrating this phenomenon are generally limited to fairly low fluences compared to the overall fluences expected in most reactors. Notable exceptions have been experiments at 300/degree/C and 500/degree/C run at Petten under tension and compression creep stresses to fluences greater than 4 /times/ 10 26 (E > 50 keV) neutrons/m 2 . This study complements the previous results by extending the irradiation temperature to 900/degree/C. 2 refs., 3 figs

  17. Validation of nuclear models in Geant4 using the dose distribution of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, David C; Paganetti, Harald; Makarova, Anastasia; Gottschalk, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    A proton pencil beam is associated with a surrounding low-dose envelope, originating from nuclear interactions. It is important for treatment planning systems to accurately model this envelope when performing dose calculations for pencil beam scanning treatments, and Monte Carlo (MC) codes are commonly used for this purpose. This work aims to validate the nuclear models employed by the Geant4 MC code, by comparing the simulated absolute dose distribution to a recent experiment of a 177 MeV proton pencil beam stopping in water. Striking agreement is observed over five orders of magnitude, with both the shape and normalisation well modelled. The normalisations of two depth dose curves are lower than experiment, though this could be explained by an experimental positioning error. The Geant4 neutron production model is also verified in the distal region. The entrance dose is poorly modelled, suggesting an unaccounted upstream source of low-energy protons. Recommendations are given for a follow-up experiment which could resolve these issues. (note)

  18. Variation of the Moyer Model Parameter, H0, with primary proton energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.L.; Stevenson, G.R.; Thomas, R.H.; Thomas, S.V.

    1982-08-01

    Experimental values of the Moyer Model Parameter H 0 were summarized and presented as a function of proton energy, E/sub p/. The variation of H 0 (E/sup p/) with E/sup p/ was studied by regression analysis. Regression Analysis of the data under log-log transformation gave a best value for the exponent m of 0.77 +- 0.26, but a t-test did not reject m = 1 (p +- 20%). Since m = 1 was not excluded, and a Fisher's F-test did not exclude linearity, a linear regression analysis was performed. A line passing through the origin was not rejected (Student's t-test, p = 30%) and has the equation: H 0 (E/sup p/ = (1.61 +- 0.19) x 10 -13 Sv.m 2 /GeV to be compared with a value of (1.65 +- 0.21) x 10 -13 Sv.m 2 /GeV published by Stevenson et al

  19. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Benchmark Tests in Three Spatial Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the aging alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. This test effort marks the final phase of a 5-yr development program that began under the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, transitioned into the Next Generation Launch Technologies (NGLT) Program, and continued under Constellation Systems in the Exploration Technology Development Program. Initially, the engineering model (EM) powerplant was evaluated with respect to its performance as compared to acceptance tests carried out at the manufacturer. This was to determine the sensitivity of the powerplant performance to changes in test environment. In addition, a series of tests were performed with the powerplant in the original standard orientation. This report details the continuing EM benchmark test results in three spatial orientations as well as extended duration testing in the mission profile test. The results from these tests verify the applicability of PEM fuel cells for future NASA missions. The specifics of these different tests are described in the following sections.

  20. Shock loads induced on metal structures by LHC proton beams: modelling of thermo-mechanical effects

    CERN Document Server

    Peroni, L; Dallocchio, A; Bertarelli, A

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the numerical simulations of the LHC high energy particle beam impact against a metal structure are performed using the commercial FEM code LS-DYNA. The evaluation of thermal loads on the hit material is performed using a statistical code, called FLUKA, based on the Monte-Carlo method, which returns an energy map on a particular geometry (taking into account all the particles in the cascade generated by the interaction between the proton beam and the target). The FLUKA results are then used as input for thermo-structural studies. The first step of this work is the validation of the numerical procedure on a simple geometry for two different materials (copper and tungsten) and constitutive material models. In particular, the high energy particle impact is examined on a facially irradiated cylindrical bar: the beam hits the component directly on the centre of the basis. Then the final step is the study of the impact on a real structure with an energy beam of 5 TeV (the next target in the energy val...

  1. Monitoring benzene formation from benzoate in model systems by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Märk, Tilmann D.; Gasperi, Flavia

    2008-08-01

    The presence of benzene in food and in particular in soft drinks has been reported in several studies and should be considered in fundamental investigations about formation of this carcinogen compound as well as in quality control. Proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) has been used here for rapid, direct quantification of benzene and to monitor its formation in model systems related to the use of benzoate, a common preservative, in presence of ascorbic acid: a widespread situation that yields benzene in, e.g., soft drinks and fruit juices. Firstly, we demonstrate here that PTR-MS allows a rapid determination of benzene that is in quantitative agreement with independent solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography (SPME/GC) analysis. Secondly, as a case study, the effect of different sugars (sucrose, fructose and glucose) on benzene formation is investigated indicating that they inhibit its formation and that this effect is enhanced for reducing sugars. The sugar-induced inhibition of benzene formation depends on several parameters (type and concentration of sugar, temperature, time) but can be more than 80% in situations that can be expected in the storage of commercial soft drinks. This is consistent with the reported observations of higher benzene concentrations in sugar-free soft drinks.

  2. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Pengzhan, E-mail: lipengzhan@ciae.ac.cn; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-21

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328–0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328–0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation. - Highlights: • A model cavity is designed to verify the trimming algorithm of frequency modulation. • The RF frequency is expressed by fitting approximation and Maclaurin series. • The variable capacitor of the cavity works as a function of time. • The trimming formula for blade radius is found by discretization in time domain. • The amendment solution helps to reduce the frequency error.

  3. Nickel Foil as Transmutation Detector for Neutron Fluence Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klupák Vít

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation detectors are very often used for determination of the neutron fluence in reactor dosimetry. However, there are few disadvantages concerning these detectors; it is the demand of the knowledge of the irradiation history and a loss of information due to a radioactive decay in time. Transmutation detectors TMD could be a solution in this case. The transmutation detectors are materials in which stable or long-lived nuclides are produced by nuclear reactions with neutrons. From a measurement of concentration of these nuclides, neutron fluence can be evaluated regardless of the cooling time.

  4. RAMA Methodology for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villescas, G.; Corchon, F.

    2013-01-01

    he neutron fluence plays an important role in the study of the structural integrity of the reactor vessel after a certain time of neutron irradiation. The NRC defined in the Regulatory Guide 1.190, the way must be estimated neutron fluence, including uncertainty analysis of the validation process (creep uncertainty is ? 20%). TRANSWARE Enterprises Inc. developed a methodology for calculating the neutron flux, 1,190 based guide, known as RAMA. Uncertainty values obtained with this methodology, for about 18 vessels, are less than 10%.

  5. The development report of an intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zongbing; Wei Ying

    1996-10-01

    An intelligent neutron fluence integration monitor is introduced. It is used to measure the received neutron fluence of the monocrystalline silicon in reactor radiation channel. The significance of study and specifications of the instrument are briefly described. The emphasis is on the working principle, structure and characteristics of the instrument is intelligent due to use of monolithic microcomputer. It has many advantages proved in the actual practice, such as powerful function, high accuracy, diversity of application, high level automatization, easy to operate, high reliability, etc. After using this instrument the monocrystalline silicon radiation technology is improved and the efficiency of production is raised. (1 fig.)

  6. Modeling and simulation of a proton beam space-charge neutralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleury, Xavier

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to understand and to model the build-up of a plasma in the low-energy beam transport line of a proton accelerator. This plasma is generated by the beam, which ionizes the residual gas remaining in this low-energy section. By neutralizing the space-charge of the beam, the plasma modifies its transport, thus, to control the beam, it is necessary to study this phenomenon. In this work, we consider a continuous beam and we take interest in the stationary states of the plasma. We first restrict the description of the plasma to a plane perpendicular to the beam, by assuming that the beam and the plasma are longitudinally invariant. The build-up of the plasma is first described with a kinetic model where binary collisions are neglected, based on the Vlasov-Poisson system with source terms which take into account ionization. We prove mathematically that this system has no stationary solution, by using appropriate subsets of the phase-space that we call trapping-sets. Yet, measurements show that the plasma evolves towards a steady state. To account for this evolution, we modify the source terms of the model. The resulting model is solved by a particle-in-cell method, and the results are compared to the measurements. Then, we show that binary collisions between plasma electrons and beam ions or gas molecules help to maintain the equilibrium of the plasma. In the last part of the thesis, we use hydrodynamic models to investigate more easily the coupling between transversal and longitudinal effects. The preliminary study of a one-dimensional model enables to find the behaviour of the transverse potential of the plasma. Finally, a two-dimensional model of the transport of the beam when it is neutralized by the plasma is solved numerically, which shows that the longitudinal electric field should play an important role in the set-up of the equilibrium of the plasma. (author) [fr

  7. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement and comparisons with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.; Kolibal, J.G.

    1985-10-01

    Realistic calculations of the neutron and γ-ray fluences in the TFTR diagnostic basement have been carried out with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models. Comparisons with measurements show that the results are well within the experimental uncertainties

  8. A Monte Carlo pencil beam scanning model for proton treatment plan simulation using GATE/GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grevillot, L; Freud, N; Sarrut, D [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Bertrand, D; Dessy, F, E-mail: loic.grevillot@creatis.insa-lyon.fr [IBA, B-1348, Louvain-la Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-08-21

    This work proposes a generic method for modeling scanned ion beam delivery systems, without simulation of the treatment nozzle and based exclusively on beam data library (BDL) measurements required for treatment planning systems (TPS). To this aim, new tools dedicated to treatment plan simulation were implemented in the Gate Monte Carlo platform. The method was applied to a dedicated nozzle from IBA for proton pencil beam scanning delivery. Optical and energy parameters of the system were modeled using a set of proton depth-dose profiles and spot sizes measured at 27 therapeutic energies. For further validation of the beam model, specific 2D and 3D plans were produced and then measured with appropriate dosimetric tools. Dose contributions from secondary particles produced by nuclear interactions were also investigated using field size factor experiments. Pristine Bragg peaks were reproduced with 0.7 mm range and 0.2 mm spot size accuracy. A 32 cm range spread-out Bragg peak with 10 cm modulation was reproduced with 0.8 mm range accuracy and a maximum point-to-point dose difference of less than 2%. A 2D test pattern consisting of a combination of homogeneous and high-gradient dose regions passed a 2%/2 mm gamma index comparison for 97% of the points. In conclusion, the generic modeling method proposed for scanned ion beam delivery systems was applicable to an IBA proton therapy system. The key advantage of the method is that it only requires BDL measurements of the system. The validation tests performed so far demonstrated that the beam model achieves clinical performance, paving the way for further studies toward TPS benchmarking. The method involves new sources that are available in the new Gate release V6.1 and could be further applied to other particle therapy systems delivering protons or other types of ions like carbon.

  9. Magnetic collimation and metal foil filtering for electron range and fluence modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phaisangittisakul, N.; D'Souza, W.D.; Ma Lijun

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the use of magnetically collimated electron beams together with metal filters for electron fluence and range modulation. A longitudinal magnetic field collimation method was developed to reduce skin dose and to improve the electron beam penumbra. Thin metal foils were used to adjust the energies of magnetically collimated electrons. The effects for different types of foils such as Al, Be, Cu, Pb, and Ti were studied using Monte Carlo calculations. An empirical pencil beam dose calculation model was developed to calculate electron dose distributions under magnetic collimation and foil modulation. An optimization method was developed to produce conformal dose distributions for simulated targets such as a horseshoe-shaped target. Our results show that it is possible to produce an electron depth dose enhancement peak using similar techniques of producing a spread-out Bragg peak. In conclusion, our study demonstrates new aspects of using magnetic collimation and foil filtration for producing fluence and range modulated electron dose distributions

  10. Test of GEANT3 and GEANT4 nuclear models for 160 MeV protons stopping in CH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, H.; Gottschalk, B.

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used for many problems in proton radiation therapy, some of which are sensitive to the nuclear interaction model. The available models have been little tested in the regime of interest, namely in their ability to predict the secondary particle yield, including their angle and energy, when 70-250 MeV protons stop in various materials. The present study provides one such test in carbon, complementing a previous one in copper. Using a multilayer Faraday cup we have measured the projected range distribution of charged nuclear secondaries from 160 MeV protons stopping in polyethylene (CH 2 ). To test the popular GEANT Monte Carlo we have simulated the experiment with GEANT3 using the 'Gheisha' (default) and 'Fluka' models and with GEANT4.5 using the 'low-energy' and 'precompound' models. The GEANT3/Fluka and GEANT4/precompound simulations agree moderately well with the observed range distribution. The data are given in a convenient form for testing other Monte Carlo programs

  11. Mathematical Modeling Analysis and Optimization of Key Design Parameters of Proton-Conductive Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A proton-conductive solid oxide fuel cell (H-SOFC has the advantage of operating at higher temperatures than a PEM fuel cell, but at lower temperatures than a SOFC. This study proposes a mathematical model for an H-SOFC in order to simulate the performance and optimize the flow channel designs. The model analyzes the average mass transfer and species’ concentrations in flow channels, which allows the determination of an average concentration polarization in anode and cathode gas channels, the proton conductivity of electrolyte membranes, as well as the activation polarization. An electrical circuit for the current and proton conduction is applied to analyze the ohmic losses from an anode current collector to a cathode current collector. The model uses relatively less amount of computational time to find the V-I curve of the fuel cell, and thus it can be applied to compute a large amount of cases with different flow channel dimensions and operating parameters for optimization. The modeling simulation results agreed satisfactorily with the experimental results from literature. Simulation results showed that a relatively small total width of flow channel and rib, together with a small ratio of the rib’s width versus the total width, are preferable for obtaining high power densities and thus high efficiency.

  12. Fast Radio Bursts’ Recipes for the Distributions of Dispersion Measures, Flux Densities, and Fluences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niino, Yuu

    2018-05-01

    We investigate how the statistical properties of dispersion measure (DM) and apparent flux density/fluence of (nonrepeating) fast radio bursts (FRBs) are determined by unknown cosmic rate density history [ρ FRB(z)] and luminosity function (LF) of the transient events. We predict the distributions of DMs, flux densities, and fluences of FRBs taking account of the variation of the receiver efficiency within its beam, using analytical models of ρ FRB(z) and LF. Comparing the predictions with the observations, we show that the cumulative distribution of apparent fluences suggests that FRBs originate at cosmological distances and ρ FRB increases with redshift resembling the cosmic star formation history (CSFH). We also show that an LF model with a bright-end cutoff at log10 L ν (erg s‑1 Hz‑1) ∼ 34 are favored to reproduce the observed DM distribution if ρ FRB(z) ∝ CSFH, although the statistical significance of the constraints obtained with the current size of the observed sample is not high. Finally, we find that the correlation between DM and flux density of FRBs is potentially a powerful tool to distinguish whether FRBs are at cosmological distances or in the local universe more robustly with future observations.

  13. Commissioning of a proton-recoil spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, J.C.; Faught, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of neutron fluence spectra in fields from bare and heavy-water-moderated 252 Cf were made with a commercially available proton-recoil spectrometer (PRS) that covers 50 keV to 4.5 MeV. Data obtained from these measurements were compared with data from Bonner sphere spectrometry, Monte Carlo simulation and the open literature. Alterations to the input data file used in unfolding recoil-proton pulse-height distributions were made. Understanding the reasons for these changes and considering the effects of some of the results in an appreciation of the significance of parameters used in the unfolding. An uncertainty of 10% is estimated for values of fluence and ambient dose equivalent for the energy region covered by this PRS. (author)

  14. Phase-Space Density Analyses of the AE-8 Trapped Electron and the AP-8 Trapped Proton Model Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayton, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    The AE-8 trapped electron and the AP-8 trapped proton models are used to examine the L-shell variation of phase-space densities for sets of transverse (or 1st) invariants, μ, and geometrical invariants, K (related to the first two adiabatic invariants). The motivation for this study is twofold: first, to discover the functional dependence of the phase-space density upon the invariants; and, second, to explore the global structure of the radiation belts within this context. Variation due to particle rest mass is considered as well. The overall goal of this work is to provide a framework for analyzing energetic particle data collected by instruments on Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft that fly through the most intense region of the radiation belt. For all considered values of μ and K, and for 3.5 R E E , the AE-8 electron phase-space density increases with increasing L; this trend--the expected one for a population diffusing inward from an external source--continues to L = 7.5 R E for both small and large values of K but reverses slightly for intermediate values of K. The AP-8 proton phase-space density exhibits μ-dependent local minima around L = 5 R E . Both AE-8 and AP-8 exhibit critical or cutoff values for the invariants beyond which the flux and therefore the phase-space density vanish. For both electrons and protons, these cutoff values vary systematically with magnetic moment and L-shell and are smaller than those estimated for the atmospheric loss cone. For large magnetic moments, for both electrons and protons, the K-dependence of the phase-space density is exponential, with maxima at the magnetic equator (K = 0) and vanishing beyond a cutoff value, K c . Such features suggest that momentum-dependent trapping boundaries, perhaps drift-type loss cones, serve as boundary conditions for trapped electrons as well as trapped protons

  15. SU-E-T-547: Modeling Biological Response to Proton Irradiation and Evaluating Its Potential Clinical Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleei, R; Peeler, C; Guan, F; Patel, D; Titt, U; Mirkovic, D; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [Departments of Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In addition to physical uncertainties, proton therapy may also be associated with biologic uncertainties. Currently a generic RBE value of 1.1 is used for treatment planning. In this work the effects of variable RBE, in comparison to a fixed RBE, were evaluated by calculating the effective dose for proton treatments. Methods: The repair misrepair fixation (RMF) model was used to calculate variable proton RBEs. The RBE weighted spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose in water phantom was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation and compared to 1.1 weighted SOBP dose. A head and neck proton treatment was used to evaluate the potential effects, by comparing the head and neck treatment plan computed with a commercial treatment planning system that incorporates fixed RBE of 1.1 and a Monte Carlo treatment planning system that incorporates variable RBE. Results: RBE calculations along the depth of SOBP showed that the RBE at the entrance is approximately 1 and reaches 1.1 near the center of the SOBP. However, in distal regions the RBE rises to higher values (up to 3.5 depending on the cell type). Comparison of commercial treatment plans using a fixed RBE of 1.1 and Monte Carlo using variable RBE showed noticeable differences in the effective dose distributions. Conclusion: The comparison of the treatment planning with fixed and variable RBE shows that using commercial treatment planning systems that incorporate fixed RBE (1.1) could Result in overestimation of the effective dose to part of head and neck target volumes, while underestimating the effective dose to the normal tissue beyond the tumor. The accurate variable RBE as a function of proton beam energy in patient should be incorporated in treatment planning to improve the accuracy of effective dose calculation.

  16. The pathway for serial proton supply to the active site of nitrogenase: enhanced density functional modeling of the Grotthuss mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, Ian

    2015-11-07

    Nitrogenase contains a well defined and conserved chain of water molecules leading to the FeMo cofactor (FeMo-co, an [Fe7MoCS9] cluster with bidentate chelation of Mo by homocitrate) that is the active site where N2 and other substrates are sequentially hydrogenated using multiple protons and electrons. The function of this chain is proposed to be a proton wire, serially translocating protons to triply-bridging S3B of FeMo-co, where, concomitant with electron transfer to FeMo-co, an H atom is generated on S3B. Density functional simulations of this proton translocation mechanism are reported here, using a large 269-atom model that includes all residues hydrogen bonded to and surrounding the water chain, and likely to influence proton transfer: three carboxylate O atoms of obligatory homocitrate are essential. The mechanism involves the standard two components of the Grotthuss mechanism, namely H atom slides that shift H3O(+) from one water site to the next, and HOH molecular rotations that convert backward (posterior) OH bonds in the water chain to forward (anterior) OH bonds. The topography of the potential energy surface for each of these steps has been mapped. H atom slides pass through very short (ca. 2.5 Å) O-H-O hydrogen bonds, while HOH rotations involve the breaking of O-HO hydrogen bonds, and the occurrence of long (up to 3.6 Å) separations between contiguous water molecules. Both steps involve low potential energy barriers, chain, occurring as ripples. These characteristics of the 'Grotthuss two-step', coupled with a buffering ability of two carboxylate O atoms of homocitrate, and combined with density functional characterisation of the final proton slide from the ultimate water molecule to S3B (including electron addition), have been choreographed into a complete mechanism for serial hydrogenation of FeMo-co. The largest potential barrier is estimated to be 14 kcal mol(-1). These results are discussed in the context of reactivity data for nitrogenase

  17. Importance of channel coupling for very large angle proton-nucleus scattering and the failure of the optical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, R.D.; Sparrow, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of inelastic channels in proton-nucleus scattering grows with momentum transfer, q, so that for large q coupled channels are required. This happens when the elastic and inelastic cross sections become comparable. We incorporate these ideas in a simple analytic framework to explain the large angle p- 208 Pb elastic scattering data at 800 MeV for which standard optical model calculations have failed completely

  18. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  19. submitter Variable RBE in proton therapy: comparison of different model predictions and their influence on clinical-like scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Giulia; Cabal, Gonzalo; Bauer, Julia; Tessonnier, Thomas; Frey, Kathrin; Debus, Jürgen; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Background: In proton radiation therapy a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 is usually assumed. However, biological experiments have evidenced RBE dependencies on dose level, proton linear energy transfer (LET) and tissue type. This work compares the predictions of three of the main radio-biological models proposed in the literature by Carabe-Fernandez, Wedenberg, Scholz and coworkers. Methods: Using the chosen models, a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) as well as two exemplary clinical cases (single field and two fields) for cranial proton irradiation, all delivered with state-of-the-art pencil-beam scanning, have been analyzed in terms of absorbed dose, dose-averaged LET $(LET_D)$, RBE-weighted dose $(D_{RBE})$ and biological range shift distributions. Results: In the systematic comparison of RBE predictions by the three models we could show different levels of agreement depending on $(α/β) x$ and LET values. The SOBP study emphasizes the variation of LET D and RBE not only as a functi...

  20. Prediction of the Response of the Commercial BPW34FS Silicon p-i-n Diode Used as Radiation Monitoring Sensors up to Very High Fluences

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, J; Glaser, M; Moll, M; Dusseau, L

    2010-01-01

    The effect of radiation damage on Silicon p-i-n diodes has been studied. I-V characteristics of BPW34FS silicon p-i-n diodes irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons up to 6.3 x 10(15) n(eq)/cm(2) have been measured and analyzed. A parameterization predicting the radiation response in the fluence range relevant for the use of the diodes as radiation monitors in Super-LHC experiments is presented.

  1. Development and characterization of multi-sensory fluence rate probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Lilge, Lothar

    2006-01-01

    Multi-sensory fluence rate probes (MSPs) yield several simultaneous measurements of photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment light fluence from a single interstitial probe. Fluorescent sensors are embedded at desired positions along the axis of the optical fibre. A single fluorescence emission spectrum is obtained and decomposed using a partial least squares (PLS)-based analysis to yield the fluence at each sensor's location. The responsivity, linearity and possible photodegradation of each fluorophore chosen for the MSPs were evaluated using single-sensor probes. The performance of two- and three-sensor MSPs was evaluated experimentally. Individual fluorescence spectra collected from each sensor on the MSP were used to construct the training set necessary for the PLS-based analysis. The MSPs' responsivity, spatial resolution and accuracy were evaluated relative to a single scattering-tip detector. Three-fluorophore MSPs permitted three simultaneous measurements of the fluence rate gradient in a tissue-like phantom, with an average accuracy of 6.7%. No appreciable photodegradation or cross-talk was observed

  2. Nonlocal ultrafast magnetization dynamics in the high fluence limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, K.C.; Malinowski, G.; Dalla Longa, F.; Koopmans, B.

    2011-01-01

    In order to explain a number of recent experimental observations of laser-induced femtosecond demagnetization in the large fluence limit, we discuss the consequences of a recently proposed nonlocal approach. A microscopic description of spin flip scattering is implemented in an effective three

  3. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomà, C; Meer, D; Safai, S; Lorentini, S

    2014-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences—of the order of 3%—were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth—i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers—rather than cylindrical chambers—for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. (paper)

  4. Variable RBE in proton therapy: comparison of different model predictions and their influence on clinical-like scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannini, Giulia; Böhlen, Till; Cabal, Gonzalo; Bauer, Julia; Tessonnier, Thomas; Frey, Kathrin; Debus, Jürgen; Mairani, Andrea; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In proton radiation therapy a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 is usually assumed. However, biological experiments have evidenced RBE dependencies on dose level, proton linear energy transfer (LET) and tissue type. This work compares the predictions of three of the main radio-biological models proposed in the literature by Carabe-Fernandez, Wedenberg, Scholz and coworkers. Using the chosen models, a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) as well as two exemplary clinical cases (single field and two fields) for cranial proton irradiation, all delivered with state-of-the-art pencil-beam scanning, have been analyzed in terms of absorbed dose, dose-averaged LET (LET D ), RBE-weighted dose (D RBE ) and biological range shift distributions. In the systematic comparison of RBE predictions by the three models we could show different levels of agreement depending on (α/β) x and LET values. The SOBP study emphasizes the variation of LET D and RBE not only as a function of depth but also of lateral distance from the central beam axis. Application to clinical-like scenario shows consistent discrepancies from the values obtained for a constant RBE of 1.1, when using a variable RBE scheme for proton irradiation in tissues with low (α/β) x , regardless of the model. Biological range shifts of 0.6– 2.4 mm (for high (α/β) x ) and 3.0 – 5.4 mm (for low (α/β) x ) were found from the fall-off analysis of individual profiles of RBE-weighted fraction dose along the beam penetration depth. Although more experimental evidence is needed to validate the accuracy of the investigated models and their input parameters, their consistent trend suggests that their main RBE dependencies (dose, LET and (α/β) x ) should be included in treatment planning systems. In particular, our results suggest that simpler models based on the linear-quadratic formalism and LET D might already be sufficient to reproduce important RBE dependencies for re-evaluation of plans optimized with

  5. Proton transfer events in GFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Donato, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.G.W.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton

  6. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  7. Development of a Secondary Neutron Fluence Standard at GELINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyse, Jan; Eykens, Roger; Moens, Andre; Plompen, Arjan J.M.; Schillebeeckx, Peter; Wynants, Ruud; Anastasiou, Maria

    2013-06-01

    The MetroFission project, a Joint Research Project within the European Metrology Research Program, aims at addressing a number of metrological problems involved in the design of proposed Generation IV nuclear reactors. One of the objectives of this multidisciplinary project is the improvement of neutron cross section measurement techniques in order to arrive at uncertainties as required for the design and safety assessment of new generation power plants and fuel cycles. This objective is in line with the 'Uncertainty and target accuracy assessment for innovative systems using recent covariance data evaluations' published by a working party of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency in 2008. These requests are often very challenging, being at or beyond the state-of-the-art in neutron measurements, which is set by self-normalizing methods and the neutron data standards used at laboratories where the data are measured. A secondary neutron fluence standard has been developed and calibrated at the neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA of the JRC's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). It consists of a flux monitor, a reference ionization chamber containing a 10 B layer and a 235 U layer, and a parallel plate ionization chamber with 8 well characterized 235 U deposits. These devices are used to determine the neutron fluence, based on the well-known neutron induced fission reaction on 235 U. All deposits have been prepared and characterized at the IRMM target preparation lab. The secondary fluence standard at the GELINA facility can be used for reliable determination of the efficiency of fluence measurement devices used in neutron data measurements at IRMM and elsewhere. It is an essential tool to reliably calibrate fluence normalization devices used in neutron time-of-flight cross section measurements. (authors)

  8. Fluence compensated photoacoustic tomography in small animals (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Altaf; Pool, Martin; Daoudi, Khalid; de Vries, Liesbeth G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-03-01

    Light fluence inside turbid media can be experimentally mapped by measuring ultrasonically modulated light (Acousto-optics). To demonstrate the feasibility of fluence corrected Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, we have realized a tri-modality (i.e. photoacoustic, acousto-optic and ultrasound) tomographic small animal imaging system. Wherein PA imaging provides high resolution map of absorbed optical energy density, Acousto-optics yields the fluence distribution map in the corresponding PA imaging plane and Ultrasound provides morphological information. Further, normalization of the PA image with the acousto-optically measured fluence map results in an image that directly represents the optical absorption. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is commonly found overexpressed in human cancers, among which breast cancers, resulting in a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Identification of HER2-expression is clinically relevant, because cancers overexpressing this marker are amenable to HER2-directed therapies, among which antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Here, we investigate the feasibility and advantage of acousto-optically assisted fluence compensated PA imaging over PA imaging alone in visualizing and quantifying HER2 expression. For this experiment, nude mice were xenografted with human breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and BT474 (both HER2 overexpressing), as well as HER2-negative MDA-MB-231. To visualize HER2 expression in these mice, HER2 monoclonal antibody pertuzumab (Perjeta®, Roche), was conjugated to near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW (800CW, LICOR Biosciences) at a ratio of 1∶2 antibody to 800CW. When xenograft tumors measured ≥ 100 mm3, mice received 100 µg 800CW-pertuzumab intravenously. Three days post injection, mice were scanned for fluorescence signal with an IVIS scanner. After fluorescence scans, mice were euthanized and imaged in our PA tomographic imaging system.

  9. A Method for Medical Diagnosis Based on Optical Fluence Rate Distribution at Tissue Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Omnia; El-Azab, Jala; Al-Saeed, Tarek A; Hassan, Mahmoud F; Solouma, Nahed H

    2017-09-20

    Optical differentiation is a promising tool in biomedical diagnosis mainly because of its safety. The optical parameters' values of biological tissues differ according to the histopathology of the tissue and hence could be used for differentiation. The optical fluence rate distribution on tissue boundaries depends on the optical parameters. So, providing image displays of such distributions can provide a visual means of biomedical diagnosis. In this work, an experimental setup was implemented to measure the spatially-resolved steady state diffuse reflectance and transmittance of native and coagulated chicken liver and native and boiled breast chicken skin at 635 and 808 nm wavelengths laser irradiation. With the measured values, the optical parameters of the samples were calculated in vitro using a combination of modified Kubelka-Munk model and Bouguer-Beer-Lambert law. The estimated optical parameters values were substituted in the diffusion equation to simulate the fluence rate at the tissue surface using the finite element method. Results were verified with Monte-Carlo simulation. The results obtained showed that the diffuse reflectance curves and fluence rate distribution images can provide discrimination tools between different tissue types and hence can be used for biomedical diagnosis.

  10. A Method for Medical Diagnosis Based on Optical Fluence Rate Distribution at Tissue Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omnia Hamdy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Optical differentiation is a promising tool in biomedical diagnosis mainly because of its safety. The optical parameters’ values of biological tissues differ according to the histopathology of the tissue and hence could be used for differentiation. The optical fluence rate distribution on tissue boundaries depends on the optical parameters. So, providing image displays of such distributions can provide a visual means of biomedical diagnosis. In this work, an experimental setup was implemented to measure the spatially-resolved steady state diffuse reflectance and transmittance of native and coagulated chicken liver and native and boiled breast chicken skin at 635 and 808 nm wavelengths laser irradiation. With the measured values, the optical parameters of the samples were calculated in vitro using a combination of modified Kubelka-Munk model and Bouguer-Beer-Lambert law. The estimated optical parameters values were substituted in the diffusion equation to simulate the fluence rate at the tissue surface using the finite element method. Results were verified with Monte-Carlo simulation. The results obtained showed that the diffuse reflectance curves and fluence rate distribution images can provide discrimination tools between different tissue types and hence can be used for biomedical diagnosis.

  11. Experimental measurement of proton penetration in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaing, C.; Baruch, P.; Picard, C.

    1974-01-01

    After proton implantation in silicon at high fluence, hydrogen precipitation in bubbles is induced by annealing. The stresses are so high that blister formation and peeling occur, leaving flat bottomed pits, with a depth equal to the projected proton range R(p). In this way R(p) was measured between 200 and 600keV, and compared with already published values, and with values computed through LSS (Lindhard, Scharff, and Schiott) theory, using a correct electronic stopping power. A table of ranges and standard deviations, computed in this way is given. The agreement with experimental results is excellent [fr

  12. Equivalence of displacement radiation damage in superluminescent diodes induced by protons and heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lan, Mujie; Xiao, Liyi [Center of Micro-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Jianchun; Ding, Dongfa [Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-electronic Technology Co.Ltd, Beijing 100854 (China); Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-11

    The degradation of optical power for superluminescent diodes is in situ measured under exposures of protons with various energies (170 keV, 3 MeV and 5 MeV), and 25 MeV carbon ions for several irradiation fluences. Experimental results show that the optical power of the SLDs decreases with increasing fluence. The protons with lower energies cause more degradation in the optical power of SLDs than those with higher energies at a given fluence. Compared to the proton irradiation with various energies, the 25 MeV carbon ions induce more severe degradation to the optical power. To characterize the radiation damage of the SLDs, the displacement doses as a function of chip depth in the SLDs are calculated by SRIM code for the protons and carbon ions. Based on the irradiation testing and calculation results, an approach is given to normalize the equivalence of displacement damage induced by various charged particles in SLDs.

  13. Systematic analysis of neutron yields from thick targets bombarded by heavy ions and protons with moving source model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takashi; Kurosawa, Tadahiro; Nakamura, Takashi E-mail: nakamura@cyric.tohoku.ac.jp

    2002-03-21

    A simple phenomenological analysis using the moving source model has been performed on the neutron energy spectra produced by bombarding thick targets with high energy heavy ions which have been systematically measured at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) facility (located in Chiba, Japan) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). For the bombardment of both heavy ions and protons in the energy region of 100-500 MeV per nucleon, the moving source model incorporating the knock-on process could be generally successful in reproducing the measured neutron spectra within a factor of two margin of accuracy. This phenomenological analytical equation is expressed having several parameters as functions of atomic number Z{sub p}, mass number A{sub p}, energy per nucleon E{sub p} for projectile, and atomic number Z{sub T}, mass number A{sub T} for target. By inputting these basic data for projectile and target into this equation we can easily estimate the secondary neutron energy spectra at an emission angle of 0-90 deg. for bombardment with heavy ions and protons in the aforementioned energy region. This method will be quite useful to estimate the neutron source term in the neutron shielding design of high energy proton and heavy ion accelerators.

  14. Chemical changes in PMMA as a function of depth due to proton beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilasi, S.Z.; Huszank, R.; Szikra, D.; Vaczi, T.; Rajta, I.; Nagy, I.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Chemical changes were investigated as a function of depth in proton irradiated PMMA → The depth profile of numerous functional groups was determined along the depth → The degree of chemical modification strongly depends on the LET of protons → At low-fluences the zone of maximal modification is restricted to the Bragg peak → At higher fluences the zone of max. modification extends towards the sample surface. - Abstract: In this work we determined depth profiles of the chemical change in PMMA irradiated with 2 MeV protons by infrared spectroscopic and micro-Raman measurements. The measurements were carried out on 10 μm thin stacked foil samples using an infrared spectrometer in universal attenuated total reflectance (UATR) and transmission modes; while the thick samples were analyzed with a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer. The depth profiles of the changes formed due to the various delivered fluences were compared to each other. The measurements show the strong dependence of the degree of modification on the energy transfer from the decelerating protons. Depth profiles reveal that at the fluences applied in this work the entire irradiated volume suffered some chemical modifications. In case of low-fluence samples the zone of maximal modification is restricted only to the Bragg peak, but with increasing fluences the region of maximal modification extends towards the sample surface.

  15. Proton microbeam irradiation effects on PtBA polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microbeam irradiation effects on poly-tert-butyl-acrylate (PtBA) polymer using 2.0 MeV proton microbeam are reported. Preliminary results on pattern formation on PtBA are carried out as a function of fluence. After writing the pattern, a thin layer of Ge is deposited. Distribution of Ge in pristine and ion beam patterned surface ...

  16. Radiation shielding for 250 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awschalom, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is targetted at personnel who have the responsibility of designing the radiation shielding against neutron fluences created when protons interact with matter. Shielding of walls and roofs are discussed, as well as neutron dose leakage through labyrinths. Experimental data on neutron flux attenuation are considered, as well as some calculations using the intranuclear cascade calculations and parameterizations

  17. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X George

    2008-01-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided

  18. Technical Note: Validation of halo modeling for proton pencil beam spot scanning using a quality assurance test pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Liyong, E-mail: linl@uphs.upenn.edu; Huang, Sheng; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D.; McDonough, James E.; Ainsley, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the utility of a comprehensive test pattern in validating calculation models that include the halo component (low-dose tails) of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) spots. Such a pattern has been used previously for quality assurance purposes to assess spot shape, position, and dose. Methods: In this study, a scintillation detector was used to measure the test pattern in air at isocenter for two proton beam energies (115 and 225 MeV) of two IBA universal nozzles (UN #1 and UN #2). Planar measurements were compared with calculated dose distributions based on the weighted superposition of location-independent (UN #1) or location-dependent (UN #2) spot profiles, previously measured using a pair-magnification method and between two nozzles. Results: Including the halo component below 1% of the central dose is shown to improve the gamma-map comparison between calculation and measurement from 94.9% to 98.4% using 2 mm/2% criteria for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #1. In contrast, including the halo component below 1% of the central dose does not improve the gamma agreement for the 115 MeV proton beam of UN #2, due to the cutoff of the halo component at off-axis locations. When location-dependent spot profiles are used for calculation instead of spot profiles at central axis, the gamma agreement is improved from 98.0% to 99.5% using 2 mm/2% criteria. The two nozzles clearly have different characteristics, as a direct comparison of measured data shows a passing rate of 89.7% for the 115 MeV proton beam. At 225 MeV, the corresponding gamma comparisons agree better between measurement and calculation, and between measurements in the two nozzles. Conclusions: In addition to confirming the primary component of individual PBS spot profiles, a comprehensive test pattern is useful for the validation of the halo component at off-axis locations, especially for low energy protons.

  19. Application of the NICADonnan model for proton, copper and uranyl binding to humic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, T.; Nagasaki, S.; Tanaka, S.; Koopal, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Humic acids are natural organic materials that play an important role in the migration of heavy metal and actinide ions in aquatic and soil systems. In the present study, the binding of protons, copper ions and uranyl ions to the purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) is investigated and the results are

  20. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Juan A.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Debray, Mario E.; Kesque, Jose M.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Stoliar, Pablo A.; Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Vazquez, Monica E.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Somacal, Hector; Valda, Alejandro; Canevas, S.; Ruffolo, M.; Tasat, D.R.; Muhlmann, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  1. Determination of photon fluence spectra from a 60Co therapy unit based on PENELOPE and MCNP simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, Andreas; Hranitzky, Christian; Stadtmann, Hannes; Maringer, Franz Josef

    2011-01-01

    Photon fluence spectra of the Seibersdorf Labor/BEV Picker 60 Co therapy unit were calculated using two generally recognised Monte Carlo codes, PENELOPE-2006 and MCNP5. The complexity of the simulation model was increased in three steps (from a pure source capsule and a simplified model using rotational symmetry to a realistic model of the facility). Photon fluence spectra of both codes generally agree within their statistical standard uncertainties for the case of identical geometry set-up and particle transport parameter settings. Resulting total fluence values were about 0.3% higher for MCNP as compared to PENELOPE. The verification of the simulated photon fluence spectra was based upon depth-dose measurements in water performed with a PTW 31003 ionisation chamber and a thick-walled chamber type CC01. The depth-dose curve calculated with PENELOPE agreed with the curve obtained from measurements within 0.4% across the available depth region in the 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom. The comparison of measured and simulated beam quality indices (TPR 20,10 ) revealed deviations of less than 0.2%.

  2. Neutron Fluence and Energy Reconstruction with the LNE-IRSN/MIMAC Recoil Detector MicroTPC at 27 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Querre, Ph. [Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety - IRSN, site of Cadarache, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Guillaudin, O.; Muraz, J.F.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie - LPSCCNRSIN2P3/ UJF/INP, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), designated by the French Metrology Institute (LNE) for neutron metrology, is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: microTPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 5 MeV with a primary procedure. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulation of the detector response. The μTPC is a new reliable detector able to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without unfolding procedure or prior neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The microTPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27 keV and 144 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector response simulation. This work

  3. Neutron fluence and energy reconstruction with the IRSN recoil detector μ-TPC at 27 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, D.; Lebreton, L.; Richer, J.P. [IRSN, PRP-HOM, SDE, LMDN, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Guillaudin, O.; Riffard, Q.; Santos, D. [CNRS/IN2P3-UJF-INPG, LPSC, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-07-01

    The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), associated to the French Metrology Institute (LNE), is developing a time projection chamber using a Micromegas anode: μ-TPC. This work is carried out in collaboration with the Laboratory of Subatomic Physics and Cosmology (LPSC). The aim is to characterize with a primary procedure the energy distribution of neutron fluence in the energy range 8 keV - 1 MeV. The time projection chambers are gaseous detectors, which are able to measure charged particles energy and to reconstruct their track if a pixelated anode is used. In our case, the gas is used as a (n, p) converter in order to detect neutrons down to few keV. Coming from elastic collisions with neutrons, recoil protons lose a part of their kinetic energy by ionizing the gas. The ionization electrons are drifted toward a pixelated anode (2D projection), read at 50 MHz by a self-triggered electronic system to obtain the third track dimension. The neutron energy is reconstructed event by event thanks to proton scattering angle and proton energy measurements. The scattering angle is deduced from the 3D track. The proton energy is obtained by charge collection measurements, knowing the ionization quenching factor (i.e. the part of proton kinetic energy lost by ionizing the gas). The fluence is calculated thanks to the detected events number and the simulated detector response. The μ-TPC is a new reliable detector which enables to measure energy distribution of the neutron fluence without deconvolution or neutron calibration contrary to usual gaseous counters. The μ-TPC is still being developed and measurements have been carried out at the AMANDE facility, with neutrons energies going from 8 keV to 565 keV. After the context and the μ-TPC working principle presentation, measurements of the neutron energy and fluence at 27.2 keV, 144 keV and 565 keV are shown and compared to the complete detector simulation. This work shows the first direct

  4. The activation method for determining neutron spectra and fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogel, J.; Vespalec, R.

    1980-01-01

    3 mm thick foils of 4 and 17 mm in diameter were used for measurements. NaI scintillation detectors 45 mm in diameter by 50 mm thick and 40 mm in diameter by 1 mm thick, and a Ge-Li spectrometer of 53 cm 3 in volume were used for gamma detection. A photopeak or a certain part of the integral spectrum was measured for each radionuclide. Computer code PIKAR was applied in automatic calculation of a simple gamma spectrum obtained using the semiconductor spectrometer. The FACT code was used for calculating foil activity. Codes SAND II and RFSP were used for neutron spectra unfolding. Ge-Li detector spectrometry was used for determining neutron fluence. Code FLUE was used for determining the mean value of neutron flux density and fluence. (J.P.)

  5. Determination of fast neutron fluence at WWER-1000 pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenta, V. et al.

    1989-01-01

    The influence function method is an effective tool making it possible, by means of tabulated values to rapidly perform three-dimensional calculations of fast neutron fluences for various reactor core loadings and for various nuclear power plant units. The procedure for determining the spatial dependence of the fast neutron fluences in a WWER-1000 pressure vessel is described. For this, the reactor core is divided into sufficiently fine volume elements within which the neutron source can be regarded as coordinate-independent. The influence functions point to a substantial role of sources lying at the reactor core periphery. In WWER-1000 reactors, only 1 or 2 rows of peripheral assemblies are important. The influence function method makes possible a rapid and easy determination of preconditions for the assessment of the residual lifetime of the pressure vessel based on the actual reactor core loadings. (Z.M.). 7 figs., 8 refs

  6. Statistical analysis on the fluence factor of surveillance test data of Korean nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyeong Geun; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Bong Sang; Lim, Sang Yeob; Kwon, Jun Hyun [Nuclear Materials Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The transition temperature shift (TTS) of the reactor pressure vessel materials is an important factor that determines the lifetime of a nuclear power plant. The prediction of the TTS at the end of a plant’s lifespan is calculated based on the equation of Regulatory Guide 1.99 revision 2 (RG1.99/2) from the US. The fluence factor in the equation was expressed as a power function, and the exponent value was determined by the early surveillance data in the US. Recently, an advanced approach to estimate the TTS was proposed in various countries for nuclear power plants, and Korea is considering the development of a new TTS model. In this study, the TTS trend of the Korean surveillance test results was analyzed using a nonlinear regression model and a mixed-effect model based on the power function. The nonlinear regression model yielded a similar exponent as the power function in the fluence compared with RG1.99/2. The mixed-effect model had a higher value of the exponent and showed superior goodness of fit compared with the nonlinear regression model. Compared with RG1.99/2 and RG1.99/3, the mixed-effect model provided a more accurate prediction of the TTS.

  7. A new expression for determination of fluences from a spherical moderator neutron source for the calibration of spherical neutron measuring devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshnoodi, M.; Sohrabi, M.

    1997-01-01

    A new expression modifying the inverse square law for determination of neutron fluences from spherical moderator neutron sources is reported. The formalism is based on the neutron fluence at a point outside the moderator as the summation of fluxes of two groups of neutrons: direct neutrons from the central region of the moderator, and moderated neutrons which, to a first approximation, are scattered from the outermost layers of the spherical moderator. The expression has been further developed for spherical neutron measuring devices with an appropriate geometry factor which corrects the reading of the device for non-uniform irradiation of the detector. The combination of the new fluence function and those of the air and room scattered components introduce a calibration model. The fluence relationship obtained for moderated sources may conveniently be used for calculating the more rapid change of neutron dose at close distances than that which is based on the inverse square dependence. (author)

  8. All possible lightest supersymmetric particles in proton hexality violating minimal supergravity models and their signals at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grab, Sebastian

    2009-08-01

    The most widely studied supersymmetric scenario is the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with more than a hundred free parameters. However for detailed phenomenological studies, the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model, a restricted and well-motivated framework for the MSSM, is more convenient. In this model, lepton- and baryon-number violating interactions are suppressed by a discrete symmetry, R-parity or proton-hexality, to keep the proton stable. However, it is sufficient to forbid only lepton- or baryon-number violation. We thus extend mSUGRA models by adding a proton-hexality violating operator at the grand unification scale. This can change the supersymmetric spectrum leading on the one hand to a sneutrino, smuon or squark as the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). On the other hand, a wide parameter region is reopened, where the scalar tau (stau) is the LSP. We investigate in detail the conditions leading to non-neutralino LSP scenarios. We take into account the restrictions from neutrino masses, the muon anomalous magnetic moment, b→sγ, and other precision measurements. We furthermore investigate existing restrictions from direct searches at LEP, the Tevatron, and the CERN p anti p collider. It is vital to know the nature of the LSP, since supersymmetric particles normally cascade decay down to the LSP at collider experiments. We present typical LHC signatures for sneutrino LSP scenarios. Promising signatures are high-p T muons and jets, like-sign muon events and detached vertices from long lived taus. We also classify the stau LSP decays and describe their dependence on the mSUGRA parameters. We then exploit our results for resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We find novel signatures with like-sign muon and three- and four-muon final states. Finally, we perform a detailed analysis for single slepton production in association with a single top quark. We show that the signal can be distinguished from the background at the LHC

  9. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL; Predota, M. [University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile ({alpha}-TiO{sub 2}) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 {angstrom} of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4 {+-} 0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pH{sub znpc} values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pH{sub znpc} value of the rutile (110) surface at 25 C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8 {+-} 0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic

  10. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machesky, Michael L.; Predota, M.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2008-01-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile (α-TiO 2 ) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 (angstrom) of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4 ± 0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pH znpc values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pH znpc value of the rutile (110) surface at 25 C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8 ± 0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic strength. Additionally, the H

  11. High energy proton irradiation effects on SiC Schottky rectifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, S.; Kim, Jihyun; Ren, F.; Chung, G.Y.; MacMillan, M.F.; Dwivedi, R.; Fogarty, T.N.; Wilkins, R.; Allums, K.K.; Abernathy, C.R.; Pearton, S.J.; Williams, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    4H-SiC Schottky rectifiers with dielectric overlap edge termination were exposed to 40 MeV protons at fluences from 5x10 7 -5x10 9 cm -2 . The reverse breakdown voltage decreased from ∼500 V in unirradiated devices to ∼-450 V after the highest proton dose. The reverse leakage current at -250 V was approximately doubled under these conditions. The forward current at -2 V decreased by ∼1% (fluence of 5x10 7 cm -2 ) to ∼42% (fluence of 5x10 9 cm -2 ), while the current at lower biases was increased due to the introduction of defect centers. The ideality factor, on-state resistance, and forward turn-on voltage showed modest increases for fluences of ≤5x10 8 cm -2 , but were more strongly affected (increase of 40%-75%) at the highest dose employed

  12. Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Bassler, Niels

    assumptions in a variety of detectors. The library also includes simple particle transportation or can be interfaced to external transport codes. We applied our code to RL and OSL data from fiber-coupled Al2O3:C-detectors in a proton (nominal energies 10 MeV to 60 MeV) and a carbon beam (270 MeV/u). Results...

  13. Proton irradiation effects on gallium nitride-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Aditya P.

    Proton radiation effects on state-of-the-art gallium nitride-based devices were studied using Schottky diodes and high electron-mobility transistors. The device degradation was studied over a wide range of proton fluences. This study allowed for a correlation between proton irradiation effects between different types of devices and enhanced the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiation damage in GaN-based devices. Proton irradiation causes reduced carrier concentration and increased series resistance and ideality factor in Schottky diodes. 1.0-MeV protons cause greater degradation than 1.8-MeV protons because of their higher non-ionizing energy loss. The displacement damage in Schottky diodes recovers during annealing. High electron-mobility transistors exhibit extremely high radiation tolerance, continuing to perform up to a fluence of ˜1014 cm-2 of 1.8-MeV protons. Proton irradiation creates defect complexes in the thin-film structure. Decreased sheet carrier mobility due to increased carrier scattering and decreased sheet carrier density due to carrier removal by the defect centers are the primary damage mechanisms. Interface disorder at either the Schottky or the Ohmic contact plays a relatively unimportant part in overall device degradation in both Schottky diodes and high electron-mobility transistors.

  14. Challenging the Standard Model: High-Precision Comparisons of the Fundamental Properties of Protons and Antiprotons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE-CERN) at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility is aiming at high-precision comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons, such as charge-to-mass ratios, magnetic moments and lifetimes. Such experiments provide sensitive tests of the fundamental charge-parity-time invariance in the baryon sector. BASE was approved in 2013 and has measured since then, utilizing single-particle multi-Penning-trap techniques, the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio with a fractional precision of 69 p.p.t. [1], as well as the antiproton magnetic moment with fractional precisions of 0.8 p.p.m. and 1.5 p.p.b., respectively [2]. At our matter companion experiment BASE-Mainz, we have performed proton magnetic moment measurements with fractional uncertainties of 3.3 p.p.b. [3] and 0.3 p.p.b. [4]. By combining the data of both experiments we provide a baryon-magnetic-moment based CPT test gpbar/gp = 1.000 000 000 2(15), which improves the uncertainty of p...

  15. Proton scattering from unstable nuclei {sup 20}O, {sup 30}S, {sup 34}Ar: experimental study and models; Diffusion de protons sur les noyaux instables {sup 20}O, {sup 30}S, {sup 34}Ar: etude experimentale et developpement de modeles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Elias [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS - IN2P3, Universite Paris - Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2000-01-28

    Elastic and inelastic proton scattering from the unstable nuclei {sup 20}O, {sup 30}S and {sup 34}Ar were measured in inverse kinematics at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds. Secondary beams of {sup 20}O at 43 MeV/A, {sup 30}S at 53 MeV/A and {sup 34}Ar at 47 MeV/A impinged on a (CH{sub 2}){sub n} target. Recoiling protons were detected in the silicon strip array MUST. Energies and angular distributions of the first 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} states were measured. A phenomenological analysis yields values of the deformation parameters {beta}{sub 2} and {beta}{sub 3} of 0.55 (6) and 0.35 (5) for {sup 20}O, 0.32 (3) and 0.22 (4) for {sup 30}S, 0.27 (2) and 0.39 (3) for {sup 34}Ar, respectively, and allows the extraction of the ratio of neutron to proton transition matrix elements (M{sub n}/M{sub p})/(N/Z) for 2{sup +} states: 2.35 (37) for {sup 20}O, 0.93 (20) for {sup 30}S and 1.35 (28) for {sup 34}Ar. Therefore the proton rich nuclei {sup 30}S and {sup 34}Ar show a 2{sup +} excitation of isoscalar character whereas the excitation of {sup 20}O is of isovector character. In order to perform a microscopic analysis of the data, we have developed a QRPA model, using three Skyrme interaction: SIII, SG2, SLy4. This model reproduces measured B(EL) values for the oxygen, sulfur and argon isotopic chains, whereas RPA calculations, which do not take pairing into account, underestimate these values. In the case of the QRPA model the energies of the first 2{sup +} state are overestimated by about 1 MeV, but the evolution along the isotopic chains is well reproduced. (M{sub n}/M{sub p})/(N/Z) ratios for the first 2{sup +} state deduced from the microscopic analysis using QRPA are 1.98 for {sup 20}O, 1.05 for {sup 30}S and 1.00 for {sup 34}Ar, in agreement with the conclusions of the phenomenological analysis. However important discrepancies are observed between the two types of analysis for other isotopes, in particular neutron rich argon and sulfur nuclei. (author)

  16. Two proton decay in 12O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, M.; Singh, U.K.; Jain, S.K.; Saxena, G.; Kaushik, M.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity was observed experimentally in the decay of 45 Fe, 54 Zn and 48 Ni. From then many theoretical studies of one and two-proton radioactivity have been carried out within the framework of different models including RMF+BCS approach for medium mass region. Towards light mass region proton-proton correlations were observed in two-proton decay of 19 Mg and 16 Ne. Recently, different mechanism of two-proton emission from proton-rich nuclei 23 Al and 22 Mg has been investigated and transition from direct to sequential two-proton decay in sd shell nuclei is observed. Encouraged with these recent studies of two proton emission in light mass nuclei, we have applied our RMF+BCS approach for the study of two proton emission in light mass region and in this paper we present our result of two proton emission in 12 O

  17. Review of inelastic proton-proton reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston

    1973-01-01

    The most important new results on inelastic proton-proton scattering obtained with the new machines, I.S.R. and N.A.L., are: (1) The inelastic cross-section increases monotonically with energy from threshold to 1500 GeV/c. Above 6 GeV/c the energy variation has a s /sup +0.04/ behaviour. (2) Scaling is observed at I.S.R. energies in pion production. Confirmation is obtained of the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation. (3) The results are in general, consistent with the two-component model-one class of events being produced by diffraction dissociation and the other by a short-range-order process (e.g. the multiperipheral model). (4) There are indications that the protons have a granular structure; this from observation of secondaries of large transverse momenta. (33 refs).

  18. Phase-Space Density Analyses of the AE-8 Trapped Electron and the AP-8 Trapped Proton Model Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.E. Cayton

    2005-08-12

    The AE-8 trapped electron and the AP-8 trapped proton models are used to examine the L-shell variation of phase-space densities for sets of transverse (or 1st) invariants, {mu}, and geometrical invariants, K (related to the first two adiabatic invariants). The motivation for this study is twofold: first, to discover the functional dependence of the phase-space density upon the invariants; and, second, to explore the global structure of the radiation belts within this context. Variation due to particle rest mass is considered as well. The overall goal of this work is to provide a framework for analyzing energetic particle data collected by instruments on Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft that fly through the most intense region of the radiation belt. For all considered values of {mu} and K, and for 3.5 R{sub E} < L < 6.5 R{sub E}, the AE-8 electron phase-space density increases with increasing L; this trend--the expected one for a population diffusing inward from an external source--continues to L = 7.5 R{sub E} for both small and large values of K but reverses slightly for intermediate values of K. The AP-8 proton phase-space density exhibits {mu}-dependent local minima around L = 5 R{sub E}. Both AE-8 and AP-8 exhibit critical or cutoff values for the invariants beyond which the flux and therefore the phase-space density vanish. For both electrons and protons, these cutoff values vary systematically with magnetic moment and L-shell and are smaller than those estimated for the atmospheric loss cone. For large magnetic moments, for both electrons and protons, the K-dependence of the phase-space density is exponential, with maxima at the magnetic equator (K = 0) and vanishing beyond a cutoff value, K{sub c}. Such features suggest that momentum-dependent trapping boundaries, perhaps drift-type loss cones, serve as boundary conditions for trapped electrons as well as trapped protons.

  19. Phase-Space Density Analysis of the AE-8 Traped Electron and the AP-8 Trapped Proton Model Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Cayton

    2005-08-01

    The AE-8 trapped electron and the AP-8 trapped proton models are used to examine the L-shell variation of phase-space densities for sets of transverse (or 1st) invariants, {mu}, and geometrical invariants, K (related to the first two adiabatic invariants). The motivation for this study is twofold: first, to discover the functional dependence of the phase-space density upon the invariants; and, second, to explore the global structure of the radiation belts within this context. Variation due to particle rest mass is considered as well. The overall goal of this work is to provide a framework for analyzing energetic particle data collected by instruments on Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft that fly through the most intense region of the radiation belt. For all considered values of {mu} and K, and for 3.5 R{sub E} < L < 6.5 R{sub E}, the AE-8 electron phase-space density increases with increasing L; this trend--the expected one for a population diffusing inward from an external source--continues to L = 7.5 R{sub E} for both small and large values of K but reverses slightly for intermediate values of K. The AP-8 proton phase-space density exhibits {mu}-dependent local minima around L = 5 R{sub E}. Both AE-8 and AP-8 exhibit critical or cutoff values for the invariants beyond which the flux and therefore the phase-space density vanish. For both electrons and protons, these cutoff values vary systematically with magnetic moment and L-shell and are smaller than those estimated for the atmospheric loss cone. For large magnetic moments, for both electrons and protons, the K-dependence of the phase-space density is exponential, with maxima at the magnetic equator (K = 0) and vanishing beyond a cutoff value, K{sub c}. Such features suggest that momentum-dependent trapping boundaries, perhaps drift-type loss cones, serve as boundary conditions for trapped electrons as well as trapped protons.

  20. The impact of different Monte Carlo models on the cross section measurement of top-pair production at 7 TeV proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Claudius

    2010-09-01

    High energy proton-proton collisions lead to a large amount of secondary particles to be measured in a detector. A final state containing top quarks is of particular interest. But top quarks are only produced in a small fraction of the collisions. Hence, criteria must be defined to separate events containing top quarks from the background. From detectors, we record signals, for example hits in the tracker system or deposits in the calorimeters. In order to obtain the momentum of the particles, we apply algorithms to reconstruct tracks in space. More sophisticated algorithms are needed to identify the flavour of quarks, such as b-tagging. Several steps are needed to test these algorithms. Collision products of proton-proton events are generated using Monte Carlo techniques and their passage through the detector is simulated. After that, the algorithms are applied and the signal efficiency and the mistagging rate can be obtained. There are, however, many different approaches and algorithms realized in programs, so the question arises if the choice of the Monte Carlo generator influences the measured quantities. In this thesis, two commonly used Monte Carlo generators, SHERPA and MadGraph/MadEvent, are compared and the differences in the selection efficiency of semimuonic tt events are estimated. In addition, the distributions of kinematic variables are shown. A special chapter about the matching of matrix elements with parton showers is included. The main algorithms, CKKW for SHERPA and MLM for MadGraph/MadEvent, are introduced.

  1. The impact of different Monte Carlo models on the cross section measurement of top-pair production at 7 TeV proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Claudius

    2012-04-15

    High energy proton-proton collisions lead to a large amount of secondary particles to be measured in a detector. A final state containing top quarks is of particular interest. But top quarks are only produced in a small fraction of the collisions. Hence, criteria must be defined to separate events containing top quarks from the background. From detectors, we record signals, for example hits in the tracker system or deposits in the calorimeters. In order to obtain the momentum of the particles, we apply algorithms to reconstruct tracks in space. More sophisticated algorithms are needed to identify the flavour of quarks, such as b-tagging. Several steps are needed to test these algorithms. Collision products of proton-proton events are generated using Monte Carlo techniques and their passage through the detector is simulated. After that, the algorithms are applied and the signal efficiency and the mistagging rate can be obtained. There are, however, many different approaches and algorithms realized in programs, so the question arises if the choice of the Monte Carlo generator influences the measured quantities. In this thesis, two commonly used Monte Carlo generators, SHERPA and MadGraph/MadEvent, are compared and the differences in the selection efficiency of semimuonic tt events are estimated. In addition, the distributions of kinematic variables are shown. A special chapter about the matching of matrix elements with parton showers is included. The main algorithms, CKKW for SHERPA and MLM for MadGraph/MadEvent, are introduced.

  2. Envelope model for passive magnetic focusing of an intense proton or ion beam propagating through thin foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lund

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion beams (including protons with low emittance and high space-charge intensity can be propagated with normal incidence through a sequence of thin metallic foils separated by vacuum gaps of order the characteristic transverse beam extent to transport/collimate the beam or to focus it to a small transverse spot. Energetic ions have sufficient range to pass through a significant number of thin foils with little energy loss or scattering. The foils reduce the (defocusing radial electric self-field of the beam while not altering the (focusing azimuthal magnetic self-field of the beam, thereby allowing passive self-beam focusing if the magnetic field is sufficiently strong relative to the residual electric field. Here we present an envelope model developed to predict the strength of this passive (beam generated focusing effect under a number of simplifying assumptions including relatively long pulse duration. The envelope model provides a simple criterion for the necessary foil spacing for net focusing and clearly illustrates system focusing properties for either beam collimation (such as injecting a laser-produced proton beam into an accelerator or for magnetic pinch focusing to a small transverse spot (for beam driven heating of materials. An illustrative example is worked for an idealization of a recently performed laser-produced proton-beam experiment to provide guidance on possible beam focusing and collimation systems. It is found that foils spaced on the order of the characteristic transverse beam size desired can be employed and that envelope divergence of the initial beam entering the foil lens must be suppressed to limit the total number of foils required to practical values for pinch focusing. Relatively modest proton-beam current at 10 MeV kinetic energy can clearly demonstrate strong magnetic pinch focusing achieving a transverse rms extent similar to the foil spacing (20–50  μm gaps in beam propagation distances of tens of mm

  3. Note: A monoenergetic proton backlighter for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rygg, J. R.; LePape, S.; Bachmann, B.; Khan, S. F.; Sayre, D. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Lahmann, B. J.; Petrasso, R. D.; Sio, H. W. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Craxton, R. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Kong, Y. Z.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Rinderknecht, H. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rosenberg, M. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A monoenergetic, isotropic proton source suitable for proton radiography applications has been demonstrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A deuterium and helium-3 gas-filled glass capsule was imploded with 39 kJ of laser energy from 24 of NIF’s 192 beams. Spectral, spatial, and temporal measurements of the 15-MeV proton product of the {sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction reveal a bright (10{sup 10} protons/sphere), monoenergetic (ΔE/E = 4%) spectrum with a compact size (80 μm) and isotropic emission (∼13% proton fluence variation and <0.4% mean energy variation). Simultaneous measurements of products produced by the D(d,p)T and D(d,n){sup 3}He reactions also show 2 × 10{sup 10} isotropically distributed 3-MeV protons.

  4. Photocarrier radiometry for predicting the degradation of electrical parameters of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P. [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, J.Y., E-mail: ljywlj@hit.edu.cn [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Robotics and System (HIT), Harbin 150001 (China); Yuan, H.M.; Oliullah, Md.; Wang, F. [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Y., E-mail: songpengkevin@126.com [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); State Key Laboratory of Robotics and System (HIT), Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-09-15

    In this study, the monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams at various fluences is investigated. A one-dimensional two-layer carrier density wave model has been developed to estimate the minority carrier lifetime of n-region and p-region of the non-irradiated c-Si solar cell by best fitting with the experimental photocarrier radiometry (PCR) signal (the amplitude and the phase). Furthermore, the lifetime is used to determine the initial defect density of the quasi-neutral region (QNR) of the solar cell to predict its I–V characteristics. The theoretically predicted short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}), and open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of the non-irradiated samples are in good agreement with experiment. Then a three-region defect distribution model for the c-Si solar cell irradiated by proton beams is carried out to describe the defect density distribution according to Monte Carlo simulation results and the initial defect density of the non-irradiated sample. Finally, we find that the electrical measurements of J{sub sc} and V{sub oc} of the solar cells irradiated at different fluences using 100 KeV proton beams are consistent with the PCR predicting results.

  5. Photocarrier radiometry for predicting the degradation of electrical parameters of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, P.; Liu, J.Y.; Yuan, H.M.; Oliullah, Md.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams at various fluences is investigated. A one-dimensional two-layer carrier density wave model has been developed to estimate the minority carrier lifetime of n-region and p-region of the non-irradiated c-Si solar cell by best fitting with the experimental photocarrier radiometry (PCR) signal (the amplitude and the phase). Furthermore, the lifetime is used to determine the initial defect density of the quasi-neutral region (QNR) of the solar cell to predict its I–V characteristics. The theoretically predicted short-circuit current density (J_s_c), and open-circuit voltage (V_o_c) of the non-irradiated samples are in good agreement with experiment. Then a three-region defect distribution model for the c-Si solar cell irradiated by proton beams is carried out to describe the defect density distribution according to Monte Carlo simulation results and the initial defect density of the non-irradiated sample. Finally, we find that the electrical measurements of J_s_c and V_o_c of the solar cells irradiated at different fluences using 100 KeV proton beams are consistent with the PCR predicting results.

  6. Analysis of Proton Induced Material Damage Using the DPA Cross-sections Based on NRT and BCA-MD Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-O; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The level of radiation induced material damage is mainly quantified by using the unit of Displacements Per Atom (DPA), and particularly, the displacement cross-section is used for characterizing/analyzing the radiation damage from incident neutrons and charged particles. Not long ago, the standard Norgett-Robinson-Torrens (NRT) model had been applied to produce the nuclear data due to its simplicity and implementation in commonly used codes, such as NJOY and MCNP codes. However, the evaluations based on NRT model represent the severe disagreement with experimental data and more accurate calculations. Hence, the evaluations with existing and new nuclear data are performed/compared in this study. It is assumed that a high energy proton beam is directly moved to the target, and a series of calculations are performed by using MCNPX code. The proton induced material damage is evaluated by using the displacement cross-sections, and the effect of nuclear data on the evaluation is specifically analyzed with MCNPX code. First, there is significant difference between the nuclear data from existing and new models, and the new evaluated data is generally lower than the existing one. Second, the position of maximum DPA is slightly differed with the position of maximum energy deposition, and the evaluation using new evaluated data is lower about 2 times than the other.

  7. Fast neutron fluence evaluation of the smart reactor pressure vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.Y.; Kim, K.S.; Kim, H.Y.; Lee, C.C.; Zee, S.Q.

    2007-01-01

    In Korea, the design of an advanced integral reactor system called SMART has been developed by KAERI to supply energy for seawater desalination as well as an electricity generation. A fast neutron fluence distribution at the SMART reactor pressure vessel was evaluated to confirm the integrity of the vessel by using the GEOSHIELD code. The GEOSHIELD code was developed by KAERI in order to prepare an input list including a geometry modeling of the DORT code and to process results from the DORT code output list. Results by a GEOSHIELD code processing and by a manual processing of the DORT show a good agreement. (author)

  8. Variability in fluence and spectrum of high-energy photon bursts produced by lightning leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Celestin , Sebastien; Xu , Wei; Pasko , Victor P.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we model the production and acceleration of thermal runaway electrons during negative corona flash stages of stepping lightning leaders and the corresponding terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) or negative cloud-to-ground (−CG) lightning-produced X-ray bursts in a unified fashion. We show how the source photon spectrum and fluence depend on the potential drop formed in the lightning leader tip region during corona flash and how the X-ray burst spectrum ...

  9. Development and Validation of a Simple Analytical Model of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (Pemfc) in a Fork-Lift Truck Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseinzadeh, Elham; Rokni, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a general proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) model has been developed in order to investigate the balance of plant of a fork-lift truck thermodynamically. The model takes into account the effects of pressure losses, water crossovers, humidity aspects, and voltage overpotent......In this study, a general proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) model has been developed in order to investigate the balance of plant of a fork-lift truck thermodynamically. The model takes into account the effects of pressure losses, water crossovers, humidity aspects, and voltage...

  10. D-region electron density and effective recombination coefficients during twilight – experimental data and modelling during solar proton events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Osepian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of electron density in the lower D-region (below 70 km altitude are rarely made. This applies both with regard to measurements by ground-based facilities and by sounding rockets, and during both quiet conditions and conditions of energetic electron precipitation. Deep penetration into the atmosphere of high-energy solar proton fluxes (during solar proton events, SPE produces extra ionisation in the whole D-region, including the lower altitudes, which gives favourable conditions for accurate measurements using ground-based facilities. In this study we show that electron densities measured with two ground-based facilities at almost the same latitude but slightly different longitudes, provide a valuable tool for validation of model computations. The two techniques used are incoherent scatter of radio waves (by the EISCAT 224 MHz radar in Tromsø, Norway, 69.6° N, 19.3° E, and partial reflection of radio-waves (by the 2.8 MHz radar near Murmansk, Russia, 69.0° N, 35.7° E. Both radars give accurate electron density values during SPE, from heights 57–60 km and upward with the EISCAT radar and between 55–70 km with the partial reflection technique. Near noon, there is little difference in the solar zenith angle between the two locations and both methods give approximately the same values of electron density at the overlapping heights. During twilight, when the difference in solar zenith angles increases, electron density values diverge. When both radars are in night conditions (solar zenith angle >99° electron densities at the overlapping altitudes again become equal. We use the joint measurements to validate model computations of the ionospheric parameters f+, λ, αeff and their variations during solar proton events. These parameters are important characteristics of the lower ionosphere structure which cannot be determined by other methods.

  11. Search for beyond the standard model physics in events with two leptons of the same sign, missing transverse momentum, and jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 13~\\mathrm{TeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A data sample of events from proton-proton collisions with two isolated same-sign leptons, missing transverse momentum, and jets is studied in a search for signatures of new physics phenomena by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC. The integrated luminosity of the data set is $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ and the center-of-mass energy of the collisions is $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$. The properties of the events are well described by the expectations from the standard model processes. Exclusion limits at $95\\%$ confidence level are set on the pair production of gluinos, squarks, and same-sign top quarks, as well as top quark associated production of a heavy scalar or pseudoscalar boson decaying to top quarks, and on the standard model production of events with four top quarks. Additionally, model-independent limits in several topological regions are provided, allowing for further interpretations of the results.

  12. Physico-chemical modification of polyethersulphone induced by high energy proton, C+ and Ne6+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinodh Kumar, S.; Biswavarathi, V.; Jal, P.; Dey, K.; Krishna, J.B.M.; Saha, A.

    2004-01-01

    Polyehersulphone (PES) was irradiated with 4 MeV proton, 3.6 MeV C + and 145 MeV Ne 6+ ions at different ion fluences. The ion induced spectral changes were analyzed by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. The increase in optical absorption, which shifts gradually from near UV to the visible region with increase in fluence for the three different types of bombarding ions was observed. A significant loss in fluorescence intensity with increase in fluence for three different ions was observed. (author)

  13. Epitaxial silicon detectors for particle tracking-Radiation tolerance at extreme hadron fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, Gunnar; Dolenc, Irena; Fretwurst, Eckhart; Hoenniger, Frank; Kramberger, Gregor; Moll, Michael; Nossarzewska, Elsbieta; Pintilie, Ioana; Roeder, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Diodes processed on n-type epitaxial silicon with a thickness of 25, 50 and 75 μm had been irradiated with reactor neutrons and high-energy protons (24 GeV/c) up to integrated fluences of Φ eq =10 16 cm -2 . Systematic experiments on radiation-induced damage effects revealed the following results: in contrast to standard and oxygen-enriched float zone (FZ) silicon devices no space charge sign inversion was observed after irradiation. It is shown that the radiation-generated concentration of deep acceptors, dominating the behavior of n-type FZ diodes, is compensated by creation of shallow donors. Thus a positive space charge is maintained throughout the irradiation up to the highest fluence and even during prolonged elevated-temperature annealing cycles. Defect analysis studies using thermally stimulated current measurements attribute the effect to a damage-induced shallow donor at E C -0.23 eV. It is argued that, as in the case of thermal donors, oxygen dimers, out diffusing from the Cz substrate during the diode processing, are responsible precursers. Results from extensive annealing experiments at elevated temperatures are verified by comparison with prolonged room-temperature annealing. These results showed that in contrast to FZ detectors, which always have to be cooled, room-temperature storage during beam off periods of future elementary particle physics experiments would even be beneficial for n-type epi-silicon detectors. A dedicated experiment at CERN-PS had successfully proven this expectation. It was verified, that in such a scenario the depletion voltage for the epi-detector could always be kept at a moderate level throughout the full S-LHC operation (foreseen upgrade of the large hadron collider). Practically no difference with respect to FZ-silicon devices was found in the damage-induced bulk generation current. The charge trapping measured with 90 Sr electrons (mip's) is also almost identical to what was expected. A charge collection efficiency of

  14. Epitaxial silicon detectors for particle tracking-Radiation tolerance at extreme hadron fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, Gunnar [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany)]. E-mail: gunnar.lindstroem@desy.de; Dolenc, Irena [Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 100 (Slovenia); Fretwurst, Eckhart [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Hoenniger, Frank [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, 22761 (Germany); Kramberger, Gregor [Jozef Stefan Institute, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, 100 (Slovenia); Moll, Michael [CERN, Geneva, 1211 (Switzerland); Nossarzewska, Elsbieta [ITME, Institute for Electronocs Materials Technology, Warsaw, 01919 (Poland); Pintilie, Ioana [National Institute of Materials Physics, Bucharest, 077125 (Romania); Roeder, Ralf [CiS Institute for Microsensors gGmbH, Erfurt, 99099 (Germany)

    2006-11-30

    Diodes processed on n-type epitaxial silicon with a thickness of 25, 50 and 75 {mu}m had been irradiated with reactor neutrons and high-energy protons (24 GeV/c) up to integrated fluences of {phi} {sub eq}=10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. Systematic experiments on radiation-induced damage effects revealed the following results: in contrast to standard and oxygen-enriched float zone (FZ) silicon devices no space charge sign inversion was observed after irradiation. It is shown that the radiation-generated concentration of deep acceptors, dominating the behavior of n-type FZ diodes, is compensated by creation of shallow donors. Thus a positive space charge is maintained throughout the irradiation up to the highest fluence and even during prolonged elevated-temperature annealing cycles. Defect analysis studies using thermally stimulated current measurements attribute the effect to a damage-induced shallow donor at E {sub C}-0.23 eV. It is argued that, as in the case of thermal donors, oxygen dimers, out diffusing from the Cz substrate during the diode processing, are responsible precursers. Results from extensive annealing experiments at elevated temperatures are verified by comparison with prolonged room-temperature annealing. These results showed that in contrast to FZ detectors, which always have to be cooled, room-temperature storage during beam off periods of future elementary particle physics experiments would even be beneficial for n-type epi-silicon detectors. A dedicated experiment at CERN-PS had successfully proven this expectation. It was verified, that in such a scenario the depletion voltage for the epi-detector could always be kept at a moderate level throughout the full S-LHC operation (foreseen upgrade of the large hadron collider). Practically no difference with respect to FZ-silicon devices was found in the damage-induced bulk generation current. The charge trapping measured with {sup 90}Sr electrons (mip's) is also almost identical to what was expected

  15. Influence of proton irradiation on the photochromism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I. J.; Kim, D. E.; Kim, N. Y.

    2007-04-01

    The experimental results regarding on the reaction rate, spectral resolution and sensitivity of the absorption spectra of reactants and products, and their stability show that spirooxazines are among photochromic compounds studied best suited to the objective of this study. Because chloroform, polystyrene and PMMA are nearly not affected by the proton beam in the fluence range of 1x10 10 ions/cm 2 ∼ 2x10 14 ions/cm 2 , it is deduced that these matrices can be usable for the study of the radiochromic reaction mechanism. Although, due to the differences in the stopping power of the matrix, the fluence value that the radiochromic reaction onsets was different from matrix to matrix, the reaction mechanism was similar in general. As the ion fluence increases, a series reaction proceeds. Here, B is the species absorbing at 450-480 nm and the fluorescent species C absorbs at 380 nm. The reaction rate constant were determined from the dependence of the absorbance on ion fluence. The aging effects were observed in the polymer matrices

  16. Cyclic voltammetry modeling of proton transport effects on redox charge storage in conductive materials: application to a TiO2 mesoporous film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Balland, V; Limoges, B; Costentin, C

    2017-07-21

    Cyclic voltammetry is a particularly useful tool for characterizing charge accumulation in conductive materials. A simple model is presented to evaluate proton transport effects on charge storage in conductive materials associated with a redox process coupled with proton insertion in the bulk material from an aqueous buffered solution, a situation frequently encountered in metal oxide materials. The interplay between proton transport inside and outside the materials is described using a formulation of the problem through introduction of dimensionless variables that allows defining the minimum number of parameters governing the cyclic voltammetry response with consideration of a simple description of the system geometry. This approach is illustrated by analysis of proton insertion in a mesoporous TiO 2 film.

  17. Calculation of neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors for extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.D.; Harty, R.; McDonald, J.C.; Tanner, J.E.

    1993-04-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a standard for the performance testing of personnel extremity dosimeters for the US Department of Energy. Part of this effort requires the calculation of neutron fluence-to-dose conversion factors for finger and wrist extremities. This study focuses on conversion factors for two types of extremity models: namely the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom (as specified in the draft standard for performance testing of extremity dosimeters) and more realistic extremity models composed of tissue-and-bone. Calculations for each type of model are based on both bare and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf sources. The results are then tabulated and compared with whole-body conversion factors. More appropriate energy-averaged quality factors for the extremity models have also been computed from the neutron fluence in 50 equally spaced energy bins with energies from 2.53 x 10 -8 to 15 MeV. Tabulated results show that conversion factors for both types of extremity phantom are 15 to 30% lower than the corresponcung whole-body phantom conversion factors for 252 Cf neutron sources. This difference in extremity and whole-body conversion factors is attributable to the proportionally smaller amount of back-scattering that occurs in the extremity phantoms compared with whole-body phantoms

  18. Fast neutron fluence calculations as support for a BWR pressure vessel and internals surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, Marco A.; Palacios-Hernandez, Javier C.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, Javier; Xolocostli-Munguia, J. Vicente; Gomez-Torres, Armando M.

    2010-01-01

    Materials surveillance programs are required to detect and prevent degradation of safety-related structures and components of a nuclear power reactor. In this work, following the directions in the Regulatory Guide 1.190, a calculational methodology is implemented as additional support for a reactor pressure vessel and internals surveillance program for a BWR. The choice of the neutronic methods employed was based on the premise of being able of performing all the expected future survey calculations in relatively short times, but without compromising accuracy. First, a geometrical model of a typical BWR was developed, from the core to the primary containment, including jet pumps and all other structures. The methodology uses the Synthesis Method to compute the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution. In the methodology, the code CORE-MASTER-PRESTO is used as the three-dimensional core simulator; SCALE is used to generate the fine-group flux spectra of the components of the model and also used to generate a 47 energy-groups job cross section library, collapsed from the 199-fine-group master library VITAMIN-B6; ORIGEN2 was used to compute the isotopic densities of uranium and plutonium; and, finally, DORT was used to calculate the two-dimensional and one-dimensional neutron flux distributions required to compute the synthesized three-dimensional neutron flux. Then, the calculation of fast neutron fluence was performed using the effective full power time periods through six operational fuel cycles of two BWR Units and until the 13th cycle for Unit 1. The results showed a maximum relative difference between the calculated-by-synthesis fast neutron fluxes and fluences and those measured by Fe, Cu and Ni dosimeters less than 7%. The dosimeters were originally located adjacent to the pressure vessel wall, as part of the surveillance program. Results from the computations of peak fast fluence on pressure vessel wall and specific weld locations on the core shroud are

  19. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  20. Construction and validation of a homology model of the human voltage-gated proton channel hHV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulleperuma, Kethika; Smith, Susan M E; Morgan, Deri; Musset, Boris; Holyoake, John; Chakrabarti, Nilmadhab; Cherny, Vladimir V; DeCoursey, Thomas E; Pomès, Régis

    2013-04-01

    The topological similarity of voltage-gated proton channels (H(V)1s) to the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of other voltage-gated ion channels raises the central question of whether H(V)1s have a similar structure. We present the construction and validation of a homology model of the human H(V)1 (hH(V)1). Multiple structural alignment was used to construct structural models of the open (proton-conducting) state of hH(V)1 by exploiting the homology of hH(V)1 with VSDs of K(+) and Na(+) channels of known three-dimensional structure. The comparative assessment of structural stability of the homology models and their VSD templates was performed using massively repeated molecular dynamics simulations in which the proteins were allowed to relax from their initial conformation in an explicit membrane mimetic. The analysis of structural deviations from the initial conformation based on up to 125 repeats of 100-ns simulations for each system reveals structural features consistently retained in the homology models and leads to a consensus structural model for hH(V)1 in which well-defined external and internal salt-bridge networks stabilize the open state. The structural and electrostatic properties of this open-state model are compatible with proton translocation and offer an explanation for the reversal of charge selectivity in neutral mutants of Asp(112). Furthermore, these structural properties are consistent with experimental accessibility data, providing a valuable basis for further structural and functional studies of hH(V)1. Each Arg residue in the S4 helix of hH(V)1 was replaced by His to test accessibility using Zn(2+) as a probe. The two outermost Arg residues in S4 were accessible to external solution, whereas the innermost one was accessible only to the internal solution. Both modeling and experimental data indicate that in the open state, Arg(211), the third Arg residue in the S4 helix in hH(V)1, remains accessible to the internal solution and is located near the

  1. Computational Laboratory Astrophysics to Enable Transport Modeling of Protons and Hydrogen in Stellar Winds, the ISM, and other Astrophysical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David

    As recognized prominently by the APRA program, interpretation of NASA astrophysical mission observations requires significant products of laboratory astrophysics, for example, spectral lines and transition probabilities, electron-, proton-, or heavy-particle collision data. Availability of these data underpin robust and validated models of astrophysical emissions and absorptions, energy, momentum, and particle transport, dynamics, and reactions. Therefore, measured or computationally derived, analyzed, and readily available laboratory astrophysics data significantly enhances the scientific return on NASA missions such as HST, Spitzer, and JWST. In the present work a comprehensive set of data will be developed for the ubiquitous proton-hydrogen and hydrogen-hydrogen collisions in astrophysical environments including ISM shocks, supernova remnants and bubbles, HI clouds, young stellar objects, and winds within stellar spheres, covering the necessary wide range of energy- and charge-changing channels, collision energies, and most relevant scattering parameters. In addition, building on preliminary work, a transport and reaction simulation will be developed incorporating the elastic and inelastic collision data collected and produced. The work will build upon significant previous efforts of the principal investigators and collaborators, will result in a comprehensive data set required for modeling these environments and interpreting NASA astrophysical mission observations, and will benefit from feedback from collaborators who are active users of the work proposed.

  2. Changes in optical properties of polystyrene thin films by proton beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Hyun; Jung, Jin Mook; Choi, Jae Hak [Dept. of of Polymer Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chan Hee; Hwang, In Tae; Shin, Jun Hwa [Research Division for Industry and Environment, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, changes in optical properties of polystyrene (PS) thin films by proton irradiation were investigated. PS thin films were irradiated with 150 keV proton ions at fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 15} to 1 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. The chemical structures and optical properties of proton beam-irradiated PS thin films were investigated by using a FT-IR spectrometer, an UVvis spectrophotometer, a photoluminescence (PL) and a fluorescence microscope. The results of the chemical structure analysis revealed that chemical functional groups, such as OH, C=O, and C=C, were formed in the PS films due to the oxidation and formation of carbon clusters by proton beam irradiation. The PL emission was generated and gradually red-shifted with an increasing fluence due to the higher formation of sp2 carbon clusters by proton beam irradiation. The highest PL intensity was obtained at a fluence of 5×10{sup 15} ions cm{sup -2}. The optical band gap of PS calculated by using a Tauc’s plot decreased with increasing the fluence due to the formation of sp2 carbon clusters by proton beam irradiation.

  3. Modeling and optimization for proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack using aging and challenging P systems based optimization algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shipin; Chellali, Ryad; Lu, Xiaohua; Li, Lijuan; Bo, Cuimei

    2016-01-01

    Accurate models of PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cells are of great significance for the analysis and the control for power generation. We present a new semi-empirical model to predict the voltage outputs of PEM fuel cell stacks. We also introduce a new estimation method, called AC-POA (aging and challenging P systems based optimization algorithm) allowing deriving the parameters of the semi-empirical model. In our model, the cathode inlet pressure is selected as an additional factor to modify the expression of concentration over-voltage V con for traditional Amphlett's PEM fuel cell model. In AC-POA, the aging-mechanism inspired object updating rule is merged in existing P system. We validate through experiments the effectiveness of AC-POA and the fitting accuracy of our model. Modeling comparison results show that the predictions of our model are the best in terms of fitting to actual sample data. - Highlights: • Presented a p c -based modificatory semi-empirical model for PEMFC stack. • Introduced a new aging inspired improved parameter estimation algorithm, AC-POA. • Validated the effectiveness of the AC-POA and the new model. • Remodeled the practical PEM fuel cell system.

  4. Proton transfer events in GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Stuart, Thomas Cohen; Kennis, John T M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-09-28

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton transfer through a 'proton-wire', formed by the chromophore (the proton donor), water molecule W22, Ser205 and Glu222 (the acceptor), on a picosecond time scale. To obtain a more refined view of this process, we have used a combined approach of time resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy and visible pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to resolve with atomic resolution how and how fast protons move through this wire. Our results indicate that absorption of light by GFP induces in 3 ps (10 ps in D(2)O) a shift of the equilibrium positions of all protons in the H-bonded network, leading to a partial protonation of Glu222 and to a so-called low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) for the chromophore's proton, giving rise to dual emission at 475 and 508 nm. This state is followed by a repositioning of the protons on the wire in 10 ps (80 ps in D(2)O), ultimately forming the fully deprotonated chromophore and protonated Glu222.

  5. Investigating multi-objective fluence and beam orientation IMRT optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrebko, Peter S.; Fiege, Jason; Biagioli, Matthew; Poleszczuk, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Radiation Oncology treatment planning requires compromises to be made between clinical objectives that are invariably in conflict. It would be beneficial to have a ‘bird’s-eye-view’ perspective of the full spectrum of treatment plans that represent the possible trade-offs between delivering the intended dose to the planning target volume (PTV) while optimally sparing the organs-at-risk (OARs). In this work, the authors demonstrate Pareto-aware radiotherapy evolutionary treatment optimization (PARETO), a multi-objective tool featuring such bird’s-eye-view functionality, which optimizes fluence patterns and beam angles for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. The problem of IMRT treatment plan optimization is managed as a combined monolithic problem, where all beam fluence and angle parameters are treated equally during the optimization. To achieve this, PARETO is built around a powerful multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called Ferret, which simultaneously optimizes multiple fitness functions that encode the attributes of the desired dose distribution for the PTV and OARs. The graphical interfaces within PARETO provide useful information such as: the convergence behavior during optimization, trade-off plots between the competing objectives, and a graphical representation of the optimal solution database allowing for the rapid exploration of treatment plan quality through the evaluation of dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions. PARETO was evaluated for two relatively complex clinical cases, a paranasal sinus and a pancreas case. The end result of each PARETO run was a database of optimal (non-dominated) treatment plans that demonstrated trade-offs between the OAR and PTV fitness functions, which were all equally good in the Pareto-optimal sense (where no one objective can be improved without worsening at least one other). Ferret was able to produce high quality solutions even though a large number of parameters

  6. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  7. Theoretical modeling of yields for proton-induced reactions on natural and enriched molybdenum targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celler, A; Hou, X; Bénard, F; Ruth, T

    2011-09-07

    Recent acute shortage of medical radioisotopes prompted investigations into alternative methods of production and the use of a cyclotron and ¹⁰⁰Mo(p,2n)(99m)Tc reaction has been considered. In this context, the production yields of (99m)Tc and various other radioactive and stable isotopes which will be created in the process have to be investigated, as these may affect the diagnostic outcome and radiation dosimetry in human studies. Reaction conditions (beam and target characteristics, and irradiation and cooling times) need to be optimized in order to maximize the amount of (99m)Tc and minimize impurities. Although ultimately careful experimental verification of these conditions must be performed, theoretical calculations can provide the initial guidance allowing for extensive investigations at little cost. We report the results of theoretically determined reaction yields for (99m)Tc and other radioactive isotopes created when natural and enriched molybdenum targets are irradiated by protons. The cross-section calculations were performed using a computer program EMPIRE for the proton energy range 6-30 MeV. A computer graphical user interface for automatic calculation of production yields taking into account various reaction channels leading to the same final product has been created. The proposed approach allows us to theoretically estimate the amount of (99m)Tc and its ratio relative to (99g)Tc and other radioisotopes which must be considered reaction contaminants, potentially contributing to additional patient dose in diagnostic studies.

  8. Viscosity of bound water and model of proton relaxation in fine-dispersed substances at the presence of adsorbed paramagnetic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedodeev, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    A microviscosity model of proton relaxation in pure liquids and in solutions of paramagnetic ions is examined. It is shown that the influence of adsorbed paramagnetic centers on proton relaxation in finely dispersed substances is significantly weaker than in solutions. A 'two-phase' relaxation model is used in determining the parameters of the bound liquid (water) using nuclear magnetic resonance data. The relations obtained with the model are used to compute the viscosity of water in clay. The value is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained by other methods

  9. Viscosity of bound water and model of proton relaxation in fine-dispersed substances at the presence of adsorbed paramagnetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedodeev, V I

    1975-09-01

    A microviscosity model of proton relaxation in pure liquids and in solutions of paramagnetic ions is examined. It is shown that the influence of adsorbed paramagnetic centers on proton relaxation in finely dispersed substances is significantly weaker than in solutions. A 'two-phase' relaxation model is used in determining the parameters of the bound liquid (water) using nuclear magnetic resonance data. The relations obtained with the model are used to compute the viscosity of water in clay. The value is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained by other methods.

  10. Fundamental radiological and geometric performance of two types of proton beam modulated discrete scanning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, J B; Dessy, F; De Wilde, O; Bietzer, O; Schönenberg, D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare and contrast the measured fundamental properties of two new types of modulated proton scanning systems. This provides a basis for clinical expectations based on the scanned beam quality and a benchmark for computational models. Because the relatively small beam and fast scanning gave challenges to the characterization, a secondary purpose was to develop and apply new approaches where necessary to do so. The following performances of the proton scanning systems were investigated: beamlet alignment, static in-air beamlet size and shape, scanned in-air penumbra, scanned fluence map accuracy, geometric alignment of scanning system to isocenter, maximum field size, lateral and longitudinal field uniformity of a 1 l cubic uniform field, output stability over time, gantry angle invariance, monitoring system linearity, and reproducibility. A range of detectors was used: film, ionization chambers, lateral multielement and longitudinal multilayer ionization chambers, and a scintillation screen combined with a digital video camera. Characterization of the scanned fluence maps was performed with a software analysis tool. The resulting measurements and analysis indicated that the two types of delivery systems performed within specification for those aspects investigated. The significant differences were observed between the two types of scanning systems where one type exhibits a smaller spot size and associated penumbra than the other. The differential is minimum at maximum energy and increases inversely with decreasing energy. Additionally, the large spot system showed an increase in dose precision to a static target with layer rescanning whereas the small spot system did not. The measured results from the two types of modulated scanning types of system were consistent with their designs under the conditions tested. The most significant difference between the types of system was their proton spot size and associated resolution

  11. Fundamental radiological and geometric performance of two types of proton beam modulated discrete scanning systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farr, J. B.; Schoenenberg, D. [Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen, Universitaetsklinikum-Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen (Germany); Dessy, F.; De Wilde, O.; Bietzer, O. [Ion Beam Applications, Chemin du Cyclotron, 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to compare and contrast the measured fundamental properties of two new types of modulated proton scanning systems. This provides a basis for clinical expectations based on the scanned beam quality and a benchmark for computational models. Because the relatively small beam and fast scanning gave challenges to the characterization, a secondary purpose was to develop and apply new approaches where necessary to do so.Methods: The following performances of the proton scanning systems were investigated: beamlet alignment, static in-air beamlet size and shape, scanned in-air penumbra, scanned fluence map accuracy, geometric alignment of scanning system to isocenter, maximum field size, lateral and longitudinal field uniformity of a 1 l cubic uniform field, output stability over time, gantry angle invariance, monitoring system linearity, and reproducibility. A range of detectors was used: film, ionization chambers, lateral multielement and longitudinal multilayer ionization chambers, and a scintillation screen combined with a digital video camera. Characterization of the scanned fluence maps was performed with a software analysis tool.Results: The resulting measurements and analysis indicated that the two types of delivery systems performed within specification for those aspects investigated. The significant differences were observed between the two types of scanning systems where one type exhibits a smaller spot size and associated penumbra than the other. The differential is minimum at maximum energy and increases inversely with decreasing energy. Additionally, the large spot system showed an increase in dose precision to a static target with layer rescanning whereas the small spot system did not.Conclusions: The measured results from the two types of modulated scanning types of system were consistent with their designs under the conditions tested. The most significant difference between the types of system was their proton

  12. Expected Particle Fluences and Performance of the LHCb Trigger Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Siegler, M; Needham, M; Steinkamp, O

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the expected 1 MeV-neutron equivalent fluence in the Trigger Tracker (TT) station of the LHCb detector have been used to investigate the effect of radiation damage on the performance of the detector. The build-up of leakage currents and the corresponding increase in electronic noise has been investigated, as well as the effect of bulk damage on the full-depletion voltage of the sensors and the risk of thermal runaway due to the power generated due to the leakage currents.

  13. Primary and aggregate color centers in proton irradiated LiF crystals and thin films for luminescent solid state detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccinini, M; Ambrosini, F; Ampollini, A; Bonfigli, F; Libera, S; Picardi, L; Ronsivalle, C; Vincenti, M A; Montereali, R M

    2015-01-01

    Proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by the injector of a linear accelerator for proton therapy, were used to irradiate at room temperature lithium fluoride crystals and polycrystalline thin films grown by thermal evaporation. The irradiation fluence range was 10 11 -10 15 protons/cm 2 . The proton irradiation induced the stable formation of primary and aggregate color centers. Their formation was investigated by optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The F 2 and F 3 + photoluminescence intensities, carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films, show linear behaviours up to different maximum values of the irradiation fluence, after which a quenching is observed, depending on the nature of the samples (crystals and films). The Principal Component Analysis, applied to the absorption spectra of colored crystals, allowed to clearly identify the formation of more complex aggregate defects in samples irradiated at highest fluences. (paper)

  14. Primary and aggregate color centers in proton irradiated LiF crystals and thin films for luminescent solid state detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, M.; Ambrosini, F.; Ampollini, A.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by the injector of a linear accelerator for proton therapy, were used to irradiate at room temperature lithium fluoride crystals and polycrystalline thin films grown by thermal evaporation. The irradiation fluence range was 1011-1015 protons/cm2. The proton irradiation induced the stable formation of primary and aggregate color centers. Their formation was investigated by optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The F2 and F3+ photoluminescence intensities, carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films, show linear behaviours up to different maximum values of the irradiation fluence, after which a quenching is observed, depending on the nature of the samples (crystals and films). The Principal Component Analysis, applied to the absorption spectra of colored crystals, allowed to clearly identify the formation of more complex aggregate defects in samples irradiated at highest fluences.

  15. Model for bremsstrahlung emission accompanying interactions between protons and nuclei from low energies up to intermediate energies: Role of magnetic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P.

    2012-07-01

    A model of the bremsstrahlung emission which accompanies proton decay and collisions of protons off nuclei in the low- to intermediate-energy region has been developed. This model includes spin formalism, a potential approach for describing the interaction between protons and nuclei, and an emission that includes a component of the magnetic emission (defined on the basis of the Pauli equation). For the problem of bremsstrahlung during proton decay the role of magnetic emission is studied by using such a model. For the 146Tm nucleus the following has been studied: (1) How much does the magnetic emission change the full bremsstrahlung spectrum? (2) At which angle is the magnetic emission the most intensive relative to the electric emission? (3) Is there some spatial region where the magnetic emission increases strongly relative to the electric emission? (4) How intensive is the magnetic emission in the tunneling region? (5) Which is the maximal probability? Which value does it equal to at the zero-energy limit of the emitted photons? It is demonstrated that the model is able to describe well enough experimental data of bremsstrahlung emission which accompanies collisions of protons off 9C, 64Cu, and 107Ag nuclei at an incident energy of Tlab=72 MeV (at a photon energy up to 60 MeV) and off 9Be, 12C, and 208Pb nuclei at an incident energy of Tlab=140 MeV (at a photon energy up to 120 MeV).

  16. A fully microscopic model of 200 MeV proton-{sup 12}C elastic and inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S; Dortmans, P J; Amos, K; de Swiniarski, R

    1996-03-01

    An effective two nucleon (NN) interaction in the nuclear medium is defined from an accurate mapping of the NN g matrices obtained by solving the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equations for infinite nuclear matter. That effective interaction is used in a fully microscopic calculation of the nonlocal effective proton-{sup 12}C interaction from which are obtained predictions of the differential cross section and analysing power for 200 MeV elastic scattering. The relative motion wave functions so found are used as the distorted waves in a distorted wave approximation (DWA) study of select inelastic scattering events. The effective NN interaction is used as the transition operator in those calculations. The relevant nuclear spectroscopy for the elastic and DWA (p, p`) calculations is found from a full (0 + 2) {Dirac_h}{omega} shell model evaluation of the positive parity states while a restricted (1 + 3){Dirac_h}{omega} has been used to give the negative parity states. Results are compared with those of the 0p-shell model of Cohen and Kurath or with those based upon axially symmetric, projected Hartree-Fock calculations. The diverse structure model wave functions are assessed by using them in calculations to compare with measured longitudinal, transverse electric and transverse magnetic form factors from electron scattering to many of the excited states of {sup 12}C. Using those models of the structure of {sup 12}C in the completely microscopic model of the elastic and inelastic scattering of 200 MeV protons, good fits have been found to the cross section and analysing power data. 50 refs., 3 tabs., 20 figs.

  17. Tailoring of refractive index profiles in LiNbO3 optical waveguides by low-fluence swift-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, T; Mendez, A; Carrascosa, M; Carnicero, J; GarcIa-Cabanes, A; Olivares, J; Agullo-Lopez, F; GarcIa-Navarro, A; GarcIa, G

    2007-01-01

    Proton-exchange LiNbO 3 planar optical waveguides have been irradiated with swift ions (Cl 30 MeV) at very low fluences in the range 5 x 10 10 -5 x 10 12 cm -2 . Large modifications in the refractive index profiles, and therefore in the optical performance, have been obtained due to the generation of amorphous nano-tracks by the individual ion impacts. Moreover, a fine tuning of the refractive index can be achieved by a suitable control of the fluence (δn/δφ ∼ 10 -14 cm 2 or δn ∼ 10 -5 for δφ = 10 9 cm -2 ). An effective medium approach has been used to account for those changes and determine the amorphous fraction of material. The results have been compared with information extracted from complementary RBS channelling experiments. From the calculated amorphous fractions a radius of ∼2 nm for the amorphous tracks have been estimated

  18. Analysis of proton-induced fragment production cross sections by the Quantum Molecular Dynamics plus Statistical Decay Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Fukahori, Tokio; Niita, Koji; Maruyama, Toshiki; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Iwamoto, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The production cross sections of various fragments from proton-induced reactions on {sup 56}Fe and {sup 27}Al have been analyzed by the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) plus Statistical Decay Model (SDM). It was found that the mass and charge distributions calculated with and without the statistical decay have very different shapes. These results also depend strongly on the impact parameter, showing an importance of the dynamical treatment as realized by the QMD approach. The calculated results were compared with experimental data in the energy region from 50 MeV to 5 GeV. The QMD+SDM calculation could reproduce the production cross sections of the light clusters and intermediate-mass to heavy fragments in a good accuracy. The production cross section of {sup 7}Be was, however, underpredicted by approximately 2 orders of magnitude, showing the necessity of another reaction mechanism not taken into account in the present model. (author)

  19. A study of V79 cell survival after for proton and carbon ion beams as represented by the parameters of Katz' track structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, Leszek; Waligórski, M. P. R.; Bassler, Niels

    different sets of data obtained for the same cell line and different ions, measured at different laboratories, we have fitted model parameters to a set of carbon-irradiated V79 cells, published by Furusawa et al. (2), and to a set of proton-irradiated V79 cells, published by Wouters et al. (3), separately....... We found that values of model parameters best fitted to the carbon data of Furusawa et al. yielded predictions of V79 survival after proton irradiation which did not match the V79 proton data of Wouters et al. Fitting parameters to both sets combined did not improve the accuracy of model predictions...... carbon irradiation. 1. Katz, R., Track structure in radiobiology and in radiation detection. Nuclear Track Detection 2: 1-28 (1978). 2. Furusawa Y. et al. Inactivation of aerobic and hypoxic cells from three different cell lines by accelerated 3He-, 12C- and 20Ne beams. Radiat Res. 2012 Jan; 177...

  20. Modeling and analysis of all the positron emitters simulation steps generated during the treatment phase in proton-therapy - from the beam to the PET camera - for the follow-up of the irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ty, C.V.N.

    2012-01-01

    The proton-therapy is an innovative technique for cancer treatment in critical areas, such as the eye or the head. Even though the interaction of protons with human tissues is a well-known physical phenomenon which gives rise to the proton-therapy, there are uncertainties on the proton trajectory due to heterogeneities in the irradiated tissue, the calculation of the beam parameters in the planning treatment affects the theoretical benefits of the protons and the chosen dose delivery process. Thus, methods for irradiation quality control have been suggested. Most of them rely on utilizing the mapping of the positron emitters generated during the irradiation. They are detectable and quantifiable thanks to the use of the PET (positron emitter tomography), a medical imaging technique mainly used for the cancer expansion assessment. PET acquisitions were proposed and then realized on phantoms and patients after proton-therapy. The quality control relies on comparing the measured radioactive distribution to the simulated β + distribution. The modeling of the positron activity generated by protons in the irradiated area can be divided into three steps: the simulation of the proton beam, the modeling of the proton interactions in the irradiated object and the modeling of the PET acquisition. Different ways of simulating these steps are possible. This PhD work suggests different ways of modeling the three steps and evaluates theirs benefits for the irradiation quality control. We have restrained our evaluation to the verification of the proton range and to the uncertainties related to the proton range. This research work utilizes on irradiations in homogenous and inhomogeneous areas in a head model. We have compared the uncertainties on the proton range measured thanks to the following β + distributions: 1) A β + distribution obtained by modeling the irradiation with a proton beam simulated analytically and simulated using the complete Monte Carlo method; 2) A Monte

  1. All possible lightes supersymmetric particles in proton hexality violating minimal supergravity models and their signals at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grab, Sebastian

    2009-08-15

    The most widely studied supersymmetric scenario is the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with more than a hundred free parameters. However for detailed phenomenological studies, the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) model, a restricted and well-motivated framework for the MSSM, is more convenient. In this model, lepton- and baryon-number violating interactions are suppressed by a discrete symmetry, R-parity or proton-hexality, to keep the proton stable. However, it is sufficient to forbid only lepton- or baryon-number violation. We thus extend mSUGRA models