WorldWideScience

Sample records for proton density fat-fraction

  1. Proton density fat fraction (PDFF) MRI for differentiation of benign and malignant vertebral lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Luetkens, Julian Alexander; Wagenhäuser, Peter Johannes; Meier-Schroers, Michael; Kuetting, Daniel Lloyd; Feißt, Andreas; Gieseke, Jürgen; Schmeel, Leonard Christopher; Träber, Frank; Schild, Hans Heinz; Kukuk, Guido Matthias

    2018-06-01

    To investigate whether proton density fat fraction (PDFF) measurements using a six-echo modified Dixon sequence can help to differentiate between benign and malignant vertebral bone marrow lesions. Sixty-six patients were prospectively enrolled in our study. In addition to conventional MRI at 3.0-Tesla including at least sagittal T2-weighted/spectral attenuated inversion recovery and T1-weighted sequences, all patients underwent a sagittal six-echo modified Dixon sequence of the spine. The mean PDFF was calculated using regions of interest and compared between vertebral lesions. A cut-off value of 6.40% in PDFF was determined by receiver operating characteristic curves and used to differentiate between malignant (benign and malignant vertebral lesions with a high diagnostic accuracy. • Establishing a diagnosis of indeterminate vertebral lesions is a common clinical problem • Benign bone marrow processes may mimic the signal alterations observed in malignancy • PDFF differentiates between benign and malignant lesions with a high diagnostic accuracy • PDFF of non-neoplastic vertebral lesions is significantly higher than that of malignancy • PDFF from six-echo modified Dixon may help avoid potentially harmful bone biopsy.

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: MR imaging of liver proton density fat fraction to assess hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, An; Tan, Justin; Sun, Mark; Hamilton, Gavin; Bydder, Mark; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C; Middleton, Michael; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Loomba, Rohit; Lavine, Joel E; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B; Sirlin, Claude B

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-estimated proton density fat fraction (PDFF) for assessing hepatic steatosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by using centrally scored histopathologic validation as the reference standard. This prospectively designed, cross-sectional, internal review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study was conducted in 77 patients who had NAFLD and liver biopsy. MR imaging-PDFF was estimated from magnitude-based low flip angle multiecho gradient-recalled echo images after T2* correction and multifrequency fat modeling. Histopathologic scoring was obtained by consensus of the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Clinical Research Network Pathology Committee. Spearman correlation, additivity and variance stabilization for regression for exploring the effect of a number of potential confounders, and receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed. Liver MR imaging-PDFF was systematically higher, with higher histologic steatosis grade (P steatosis grade (ρ = 0.69, P steatosis grade 0 (n = 5) from those with grade 1 or higher (n = 72), 0.825 (95% confidence interval: 0.734, 0.915) to distinguish those with grade 1 or lower (n = 31) from those with grade 2 or higher (n = 46), and 0.893 (95% confidence interval: 0.809, 0.977) to distinguish those with grade 2 or lower (n = 58) from those with grade 3 (n = 19). MR imaging-PDFF showed promise for assessment of hepatic steatosis grade in patients with NAFLD. For validation, further studies with larger sample sizes are needed. © RSNA, 2013.

  3. Reproducibility of MRI-Determined Proton Density Fat Fraction Across Two Different MR Scanner Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Geraldine H.; Cruite, Irene; Shiehmorteza, Masoud; Wolfson, Tanya; Gamst, Anthony C.; Hamilton, Gavin; Bydder, Mark; Middleton, Michael S.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-determined proton density fat fraction (PDFF) reproducibility across two MR scanner platforms and, using MR spectroscopy (MRS)-determined PDFF as reference standard, to confirm MRI-determined PDFF estimation accuracy. Materials and Methods This prospective, cross-sectional, crossover, observational pilot study was approved by an Institutional Review Board. Twenty-one subjects gave written informed consent and underwent liver MRI and MRS at both 1.5T (Siemens Symphony scanner) and 3T (GE Signa Excite HD scanner). MRI-determined PDFF was estimated using an axial 2D spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequence with low flip-angle to minimize T1 bias and six echo-times to permit correction of T2* and fat-water signal interference effects. MRS-determined PDFF was estimated using a stimulated-echo acquisition mode sequence with long repetition time to minimize T1 bias and five echo times to permit T2 correction. Interscanner reproducibility of MRI determined PDFF was assessed by correlation analysis; accuracy was assessed separately at each field strength by linear regression analysis using MRS-determined PDFF as reference standard. Results 1.5T and 3T MRI-determined PDFF estimates were highly correlated (r = 0.992). MRI-determined PDFF estimates were accurate at both 1.5T (regression slope/intercept = 0.958/−0.48) and 3T (slope/intercept = 1.020/0.925) against the MRS-determined PDFF reference. Conclusion MRI-determined PDFF estimation is reproducible and, using MRS-determined PDFF as reference standard, accurate across two MR scanner platforms at 1.5T and 3T. PMID:21769986

  4. Proton-density fat fraction measurement: A viable quantitative biomarker for differentiating adrenal adenomas from nonadenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiao; Shen, Yaqi; Hu, Xuemei; Tang, Hao; Hu, Daoyu [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Li, Zhen, E-mail: zhenli@hust.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Kamel, Ihab R. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • PDFF differentiated adenomas from nonadenomas with high sensitivity and specificity. • PDFF measurements are simple and can be readily applicable in clinical practice. • Oil-saline phantom study demonstarted good correlation between PDFF and SII. - Abstract: Purpose: This study aims to compare the accuracy of proton-density fat fraction (PDFF) measurements with chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging (CSI) for quantifying the fat content of adrenal nodules and for differentiating adenomas from nonadenomas. Materials and methods: Oil-saline phantom measurements was performed to compare the correlation between PDFF and CSI in detecting and quantifying fat content. 43 consecutive patients who had known adrenal nodules were imaged on a 3.0-T MR scanner. PDFF was measured, and the signal intensity (SI) index (SII), SI adrenal-to-liver ratio (ALR) and SI adrenal-to-spleen ratio (ASR) of the adrenal nodules were calculated. Results: In the phantom study, PDFF ranged from 12.6% to 99.1% and the SII was between 0.72 and 1.23. There was good correlation between these two methods (R square = 0.972, p < 0.0001). The PDFF of adrenal adenoma was significantly increased compared with that of nonadenoma (p < 0.001). PDFF was an effective tool for distinguishing adenoma from nonadenoma, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. In comparing SII, ALR and ASR the AUC was 0.94, 0.95 and 0.93, respectively. No significant difference was noted between these two methods (p > 0.05). Conclusion: PDFF measurements provide an accurate estimation of fat content in discriminating adenomas from nonadenomas compared with CSI, avoiding complicated data calculations and offering a simpler technique using 3T.

  5. Optimization of Region-of-Interest Sampling Strategies for Hepatic MRI Proton Density Fat Fraction Quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheng William; Wolfson, Tanya; Sy, Ethan Z.; Schlein, Alexandra N.; Hooker, Jonathan C.; Dehkordy, Soudabeh Fazeli; Hamilton, Gavin; Reeder, Scott B.; Loomba, Rohit; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clinical trials utilizing proton density fat fraction (PDFF) as an imaging biomarker for hepatic steatosis have used a laborious region-of-interest (ROI) sampling strategy of placing an ROI in each hepatic segment. PURPOSE To identify a strategy with the fewest ROIs that consistently achieves close agreement with the nine-ROI strategy. STUDY TYPE Retrospective secondary analysis of prospectively acquired clinical research data. POPULATION A total of 391 adults (173 men, 218 women) with known or suspected NAFLD. FIELD STRENGTH/SEQUENCE Confounder-corrected chemical-shift-encoded 3T MRI using a 2D multiecho gradientrecalled echo technique. ASSESSMENT An ROI was placed in each hepatic segment. Mean nine-ROI PDFF and segmental PDFF standard deviation were computed. Segmental and lobar PDFF were compared. PDFF was estimated using every combinatorial subset of ROIs and compared to the nine-ROI average. STATISTICAL TESTING Mean nine-ROI PDFF and segmental PDFF standard deviation were summarized descriptively. Segmental PDFF was compared using a one-way analysis of variance, and lobar PDFF was compared using a paired t-test and a Bland–Altman analysis. The PDFF estimated by every subset of ROIs was informally compared to the nine-ROI average using median intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland–Altman analyses. RESULTS The study population’s mean whole-liver PDFF was 10.1±8.9% (range: 1.1–44.1%). Although there was no significant difference in average segmental (P=0.452) or lobar (P=0.154) PDFF, left and right lobe PDFF differed by at least 1.5 percentage points in 25.1% (98/391) of patients. Any strategy with ≥ 4 ROIs had ICC >0.995. 115 of 126 four-ROI strategies (91%) had limits of agreement (LOA) 0.995, and 2/36 (6%) of two-ROI strategies and 46/84 (55%) of three-ROI strategies had LOA <1.5%. DATA CONCLUSION Four-ROI sampling strategies with two ROIs in the left and right lobes achieve close agreement with nine-ROI PDFF. Level of

  6. Optimization of region-of-interest sampling strategies for hepatic MRI proton density fat fraction quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheng William; Wolfson, Tanya; Sy, Ethan Z; Schlein, Alexandra N; Hooker, Jonathan C; Fazeli Dehkordy, Soudabeh; Hamilton, Gavin; Reeder, Scott B; Loomba, Rohit; Sirlin, Claude B

    2018-04-01

    Clinical trials utilizing proton density fat fraction (PDFF) as an imaging biomarker for hepatic steatosis have used a laborious region-of-interest (ROI) sampling strategy of placing an ROI in each hepatic segment. To identify a strategy with the fewest ROIs that consistently achieves close agreement with the nine-ROI strategy. Retrospective secondary analysis of prospectively acquired clinical research data. A total of 391 adults (173 men, 218 women) with known or suspected NAFLD. Confounder-corrected chemical-shift-encoded 3T MRI using a 2D multiecho gradient-recalled echo technique. An ROI was placed in each hepatic segment. Mean nine-ROI PDFF and segmental PDFF standard deviation were computed. Segmental and lobar PDFF were compared. PDFF was estimated using every combinatorial subset of ROIs and compared to the nine-ROI average. Mean nine-ROI PDFF and segmental PDFF standard deviation were summarized descriptively. Segmental PDFF was compared using a one-way analysis of variance, and lobar PDFF was compared using a paired t-test and a Bland-Altman analysis. The PDFF estimated by every subset of ROIs was informally compared to the nine-ROI average using median intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analyses. The study population's mean whole-liver PDFF was 10.1 ± 8.9% (range: 1.1-44.1%). Although there was no significant difference in average segmental (P = 0.452) or lobar (P = 0.154) PDFF, left and right lobe PDFF differed by at least 1.5 percentage points in 25.1% (98/391) of patients. Any strategy with ≥4 ROIs had ICC >0.995. 115 of 126 four-ROI strategies (91%) had limits of agreement (LOA) 0.995, and 2/36 (6%) of two-ROI strategies and 46/84 (55%) of three-ROI strategies had LOA <1.5%. Four-ROI sampling strategies with two ROIs in the left and right lobes achieve close agreement with nine-ROI PDFF. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:988-994. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance

  7. Impact of sequential proton density fat fraction for quantification of hepatic steatosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idilman, Ilkay S; Keskin, Onur; Elhan, Atilla Halil; Idilman, Ramazan; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2014-05-01

    To determine the utility of sequential MRI-estimated proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF) for quantification of the longitudinal changes in liver fat content in individuals with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A total of 18 consecutive individuals (M/F: 10/8, mean age: 47.7±9.8 years) diagnosed with NAFLD, who underwent sequential PDFF calculations for the quantification of hepatic steatosis at two different time points, were included in the study. All patients underwent T1-independent volumetric multi-echo gradient-echo imaging with T2* correction and spectral fat modeling. A close correlation for quantification of hepatic steatosis between the initial MRI-PDFF and liver biopsy was observed (rs=0.758, phepatic steatosis. The changes in serum ALT levels significantly reflected changes in MRI-PDFF in patients with NAFLD.

  8. Proton density fat-fraction is an accurate biomarker of hepatic steatosis in adolescent girls and young women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, Jennifer L.; Allen, David B. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Pediatrics, Madison, WI (United States); Wolfgram, Peter M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Pediatrics, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Hernando, Diego [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Eickhoff, Jens C. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Madison, WI (United States); Reeder, Scott B. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-15

    To compare complex quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with MR spectroscopy (MRS) for quantification of hepatic steatosis (HS) and determine clinically significant MRI-based thresholds of HS in female youths. This prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted in 132 healthy females (11-22 years, mean 13.3 ± 2). Proton density fat-fraction (PDFF) was measured using complex quantitative MRI and MRS. Body mass index (BMI), fasting labs [glucose, insulin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and other metabolic markers] were obtained. Outcomes were measured using regression analysis, Spearman-rank correlation, and receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis. HS was defined as MRI-PDFF >5.6 %. HS was detected by MRI-PDFF in 15 % of all subjects. Linear regression demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement [r{sup 2} = 0.96, slope = 0.97 (95 %CI: 0.94-1.00), intercept = 0.78 % (95 %CI: 0.58-0.98 %)] between MRI-PDFF and MRS-PDFF. MRI-PDFF had a sensitivity of 100 % (95 %CI: 0.79-1.00), specificity of 96.6 % (95 %CI: 0.91-0.99), and a kappa index of 87 % (95 %CI: 0.75-0.99) for identifying HS. In overweight subjects with HS, MRI-PDFF correlated with ALT (r = 0.84, p < 0.0001) and insulin (r = 0.833, p < 0.001), but not with BMI or WC. ROC analysis ascertained an optimal MRI-PDFF threshold of 3.5 % for predicting metabolic syndrome (sensitivity = 76 %, specificity = 83 %). Complex quantitative MRI demonstrates strong correlation and agreement with MRS to quantify hepatic triglyceride content in adolescent girls and young women. A low PDFF threshold is predictive of metabolic syndrome in this population. (orig.)

  9. Proton density fat-fraction is an accurate biomarker of hepatic steatosis in adolescent girls and young women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, Jennifer L.; Allen, David B.; Wolfgram, Peter M.; Hernando, Diego; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    To compare complex quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with MR spectroscopy (MRS) for quantification of hepatic steatosis (HS) and determine clinically significant MRI-based thresholds of HS in female youths. This prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted in 132 healthy females (11-22 years, mean 13.3 ± 2). Proton density fat-fraction (PDFF) was measured using complex quantitative MRI and MRS. Body mass index (BMI), fasting labs [glucose, insulin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and other metabolic markers] were obtained. Outcomes were measured using regression analysis, Spearman-rank correlation, and receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis. HS was defined as MRI-PDFF >5.6 %. HS was detected by MRI-PDFF in 15 % of all subjects. Linear regression demonstrated excellent correlation and agreement [r 2 = 0.96, slope = 0.97 (95 %CI: 0.94-1.00), intercept = 0.78 % (95 %CI: 0.58-0.98 %)] between MRI-PDFF and MRS-PDFF. MRI-PDFF had a sensitivity of 100 % (95 %CI: 0.79-1.00), specificity of 96.6 % (95 %CI: 0.91-0.99), and a kappa index of 87 % (95 %CI: 0.75-0.99) for identifying HS. In overweight subjects with HS, MRI-PDFF correlated with ALT (r = 0.84, p < 0.0001) and insulin (r = 0.833, p < 0.001), but not with BMI or WC. ROC analysis ascertained an optimal MRI-PDFF threshold of 3.5 % for predicting metabolic syndrome (sensitivity = 76 %, specificity = 83 %). Complex quantitative MRI demonstrates strong correlation and agreement with MRS to quantify hepatic triglyceride content in adolescent girls and young women. A low PDFF threshold is predictive of metabolic syndrome in this population. (orig.)

  10. MRI Proton Density Fat Fraction Is Robust Across the Biologically Plausible Range of Triglyceride Spectra in Adults With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheng William; Mamidipalli, Adrija; Hooker, Jonathan C.; Hamilton, Gavin; Wolfson, Tanya; Chen, Dennis H.; Dehkordy, Soudabeh Fazeli; Middleton, Michael S.; Reeder, Scott B.; Loomba, Rohit; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Proton density fat fraction (PDFF) estimation requires spectral modeling of the hepatic triglyceride (TG) signal. Deviations in the TG spectrum may occur, leading to bias in PDFF quantification. Purpose To investigate the effects of varying six-peak TG spectral models on PDFF estimation bias. Study Type Retrospective secondary analysis of prospectively acquired clinical research data. Population Forty-four adults with biopsy-confirmed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Field Strength/Sequence Confounder-corrected chemical-shift-encoded 3T MRI (using a 2D multiecho gradient-recalled echo technique with magnitude reconstruction) and MR spectroscopy. Assessment In each patient, 61 pairs of colocalized MRI-PDFF and MRS-PDFF values were estimated: one pair used the standard six-peak spectral model, the other 60 were six-peak variants calculated by adjusting spectral model parameters over their biologically plausible ranges. MRI-PDFF values calculated using each variant model and the standard model were compared, and the agreement between MRI-PDFF and MRS-PDFF was assessed. Statistical Tests MRS-PDFF and MRI-PDFF were summarized descriptively. Bland–Altman (BA) analyses were performed between PDFF values calculated using each variant model and the standard model. Linear regressions were performed between BA biases and mean PDFF values for each variant model, and between MRI-PDFF and MRS-PDFF. Results Using the standard model, mean MRS-PDFF of the study population was 17.9±8.0% (range: 4.1–34.3%). The difference between the highest and lowest mean variant MRI-PDFF values was 1.5%. Relative to the standard model, the model with the greatest absolute BA bias overestimated PDFF by 1.2%. Bias increased with increasing PDFF (P hepatic fat content, PDFF estimation is robust across the biologically plausible range of TG spectra. Although absolute estimation bias increased with higher PDFF, its magnitude was small and unlikely to be clinically meaningful. Level of

  11. Quantification of Liver Proton-Density Fat Fraction in an 7.1 Tesla preclinical MR Systems: Impact of the Fitting Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlke, C; Hernando, D; Jahn, C; Cigliano, A; Ittermann, T; Mössler, A; Kromrey, ML; Domaska, G; Reeder, SB; Kühn, JP

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of estimating the proton-density fat fraction (PDFF) using a 7.1 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system and to compare the accuracy of liver fat quantification using different fitting approaches. Materials and Methods Fourteen leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and eight intact controls were examined in a 7.1 Tesla animal scanner using a 3-dimensional six-echo chemical shift-encoded pulse sequence. Confounder-corrected PDFF was calculated using magnitude (magnitude data alone) and combined fitting (complex and magnitude data). Differences between fitting techniques were compared using Bland-Altman analysis. In addition, PDFFs derived with both reconstructions were correlated with histopathological fat content and triglyceride mass fraction using linear regression analysis. Results The PDFFs determined with use of both reconstructions correlated very strongly (r=0.91). However, small mean bias between reconstructions demonstrated divergent results (3.9%; CI 2.7%-5.1%). For both reconstructions, there was linear correlation with histopathology (combined fitting: r=0.61; magnitude fitting: r=0.64) and triglyceride content (combined fitting: r=0.79; magnitude fitting: r=0.70). Conclusion Liver fat quantification using the PDFF derived from MRI performed at 7.1 Tesla is feasible. PDFF has strong correlations with histopathologically determined fat and with triglyceride content. However, small differences between PDFF reconstruction techniques may impair the robustness and reliability of the biomarker at 7.1 Tesla. PMID:27197806

  12. Accuracy of multiecho magnitude-based MRI (M-MRI) for estimation of hepatic proton density fat fraction (PDFF) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, Kevin A; Shah, Amol; Heba, Elhamy; Wolfson, Tanya; Hamilton, Gavin; Lam, Jessica; Chen, Joshua; Hooker, Jonathan C; Gamst, Anthony C; Middleton, Michael S; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B; Sirlin, Claude B

    2015-11-01

    To assess accuracy of magnitude-based magnetic resonance imaging (M-MRI) in children to estimate hepatic proton density fat fraction (PDFF) using two to six echoes, with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) -measured PDFF as a reference standard. This was an IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant, single-center, cross-sectional, retrospective analysis of data collected prospectively between 2008 and 2013 in children with known or suspected nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Two hundred eighty-six children (8-20 [mean 14.2 ± 2.5] years; 182 boys) underwent same-day MRS and M-MRI. Unenhanced two-dimensional axial spoiled gradient-recalled-echo images at six echo times were obtained at 3T after a single low-flip-angle (10°) excitation with ≥ 120-ms recovery time. Hepatic PDFF was estimated using the first two, three, four, five, and all six echoes. For each number of echoes, accuracy of M-MRI to estimate PDFF was assessed by linear regression with MRS-PDFF as reference standard. Accuracy metrics were regression intercept, slope, average bias, and R(2) . MRS-PDFF ranged from 0.2-40.4% (mean 13.1 ± 9.8%). Using three to six echoes, regression intercept, slope, and average bias were 0.46-0.96%, 0.99-1.01, and 0.57-0.89%, respectively. Using two echoes, these values were 2.98%, 0.97, and 2.72%, respectively. R(2) ranged 0.98-0.99 for all methods. Using three to six echoes, M-MRI has high accuracy for hepatic PDFF estimation in children. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. MRI-determined liver proton density fat fraction, with MRS validation: Comparison of regions of interest sampling methods in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Kim-Nhien; Gilbert, Guillaume; Chalut, Marianne; Chagnon, Miguel; Chartrand, Gabriel; Tang, An

    2016-05-01

    To assess the agreement between published magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based regions of interest (ROI) sampling methods using liver mean proton density fat fraction (PDFF) as the reference standard. This retrospective, internal review board-approved study was conducted in 35 patients with type 2 diabetes. Liver PDFF was measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using a stimulated-echo acquisition mode sequence and MRI using a multiecho spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequence at 3.0T. ROI sampling methods reported in the literature were reproduced and liver mean PDFF obtained by whole-liver segmentation was used as the reference standard. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Bland-Altman analysis, repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and paired t-tests were performed. ICC between MRS and MRI-PDFF was 0.916. Bland-Altman analysis showed excellent intermethod agreement with a bias of -1.5 ± 2.8%. The repeated-measures ANOVA found no systematic variation of PDFF among the nine liver segments. The correlation between liver mean PDFF and ROI sampling methods was very good to excellent (0.873 to 0.975). Paired t-tests revealed significant differences (P sampling methods that exclusively or predominantly sampled the right lobe. Significant correlations with mean PDFF were found with sampling methods that included higher number of segments, total area equal or larger than 5 cm(2) , or sampled both lobes (P = 0.001, 0.023, and 0.002, respectively). MRI-PDFF quantification methods should sample each liver segment in both lobes and include a total surface area equal or larger than 5 cm(2) to provide a close estimate of the liver mean PDFF. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Validation of a motion-robust 2D sequential technique for quantification of hepatic proton density fat fraction during free breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooler, B Dustin; Hernando, Diego; Ruby, Jeannine A; Ishii, Hiroshi; Shimakawa, Ann; Reeder, Scott B

    2018-04-17

    Current chemical-shift-encoded (CSE) MRI techniques for measuring hepatic proton density fat fraction (PDFF) are sensitive to motion artifacts. Initial validation of a motion-robust 2D-sequential CSE-MRI technique for quantification of hepatic PDFF. Phantom study and prospective in vivo cohort. Fifty adult patients (27 women, 23 men, mean age 57.2 years). 3D, 2D-interleaved, and 2D-sequential CSE-MRI acquisitions at 1.5T. Three CSE-MRI techniques (3D, 2D-interleaved, 2D-sequential) were performed in a PDFF phantom and in vivo. Reference standards were 3D CSE-MRI PDFF measurements for the phantom study and single-voxel MR spectroscopy hepatic PDFF measurements (MRS-PDFF) in vivo. In vivo hepatic MRI-PDFF measurements were performed during a single breath-hold (BH) and free breathing (FB), and were repeated by a second reader for the FB 2D-sequential sequence to assess interreader variability. Correlation plots to validate the 2D-sequential CSE-MRI against the phantom and in vivo reference standards. Bland-Altman analysis of FB versus BH CSE-MRI acquisitions to evaluate robustness to motion. Bland-Altman analysis to assess interreader variability. Phantom 2D-sequential CSE-MRI PDFF measurements demonstrated excellent agreement and correlation (R 2 > 0.99) with 3D CSE-MRI. In vivo, the mean (±SD) hepatic PDFF was 8.8 ± 8.7% (range 0.6-28.5%). Compared with BH acquisitions, FB hepatic PDFF measurements demonstrated bias of +0.15% for 2D-sequential compared with + 0.53% for 3D and +0.94% for 2D-interleaved. 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were narrower for 2D-sequential (±0.99%), compared with 3D (±3.72%) and 2D-interleaved (±3.10%). All CSE-MRI techniques had excellent correlation with MRS (R 2 > 0.97). The FB 2D-sequential acquisition demonstrated little interreader variability, with mean bias of +0.07% and 95% LOA of ± 1.53%. This motion-robust 2D-sequential CSE-MRI can accurately measure hepatic PDFF during free breathing in a patient population with

  15. Proton Density Fat-Fraction of Rotator Cuff Muscles Is Associated With Isometric Strength 10 Years After Rotator Cuff Repair: A Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Holwein, Christian; Buchmann, Stefan; Baum, Thomas; Ruschke, Stefan; Gersing, Alexandra S; Sutter, Reto; Imhoff, Andreas B; Rummeny, Ernst J; Jungmann, Pia M

    2017-07-01

    Quantitative muscle fat-fraction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques correlate with semiquantitative Goutallier scores with failure after rotator cuff (RC) repair. To investigate the relationship of proton density fat fraction (PDFF) of the RC muscles with semiquantitative MR scores, cartilage T2 relaxation times, and clinical isometric strength measurements in patients 10 years after unilateral RC repair. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Bilateral shoulder MR imaging was performed in 13 patients (11 male, 2 female; age, 72 ± 8 years) 10.9 ± 0.4 years after unilateral autologous periosteal flap augmented RC repair (total shoulders assessed, N = 26). Goutallier classification, muscle atrophy, RC tendon integrity, and cartilage defects were determined based on morphological MR sequences. A paracoronal 2D multi-slice multi-echo sequence was used for quantitative cartilage T2 mapping. A chemical shift-encoding-based water-fat separation technique (based on a 6-echo 3D spoiled gradient echo sequence) was used for quantification of the PDFF of RC muscles. Isometric shoulder abduction strength was measured clinically. Mean and SD, Pearson correlation, and partial Spearman correlation were calculated. There were 6 RC full-thickness retears in ipsilateral shoulders and 6 RC full-thickness tears in contralateral shoulders. Isometric shoulder abduction strength was not significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral shoulders (50 ± 24 N vs 54 ± 24 N; P = .159). The mean PDFF of RC muscles was 11.7% ± 10.4% (ipsilateral, 14.2% ± 8.5%; contralateral, 9.2% ± 7.8%; P = .002). High supraspinatus PDFF correlated significantly with higher Goutallier scores ( R = 0.75, P isometric muscle strength ( R = -0.49, P = .011). This correlation remained significant after adjustment for muscle area measurements and tendon rupture ( R = -0.41, P = .048). More severe cartilage defects at the humerus were significantly associated with higher supraspinatus

  16. A comparison of liver fat content as determined by magnetic resonance imaging-proton density fat fraction and MRS versus liver histology in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idilman, Ilkay S; Keskin, Onur; Celik, Azim; Savas, Berna; Elhan, Atilla Halil; Idilman, Ramazan; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay

    2016-03-01

    Many imaging methods have been defined for quantification of hepatic steatosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, studies comparing the efficiency of magnetic resonance imaging-proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and liver histology for quantification of liver fat content are limited. To compare the efficiency of MRI-PDFF and MRS in the quantification of liver fat content in individuals with NAFLD. A total of 19 NAFLD patients underwent MRI-PDFF, MRS, and liver biopsy for quantification of liver fat content. The MR examinations were performed on a 1.5 HDx MRI system. The MRI protocol included T1-independent volumetric multi-echo gradient-echo imaging with T2* correction and spectral fat modeling and MRS with STEAM technique. A close correlation was observed between liver MRI-PDFF- and histology- determined steatosis (r = 0.743, P liver MRS- and histology-determined steatosis (r = 0.712, P quantification of hepatic steatosis, a high correlation was observed between the two MRI methods (r = 0.986, P steatosis from mild/no hepatic steatosis (P = 0.007 and 0.013, respectively), with no superiority between them (AUCMRI-PDFF = 0.881 ± 0.0856 versus AUCMRS = 0.857 ± 0.0924, P = 0.461). Both MRI-PDFF and MRS can be used for accurate quantification of hepatic steatosis. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  17. Fat fraction bias correction using T1 estimates and flip angle mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Issac Y; Cui, Yifan; Wiens, Curtis N; Wade, Trevor P; Friesen-Waldner, Lanette J; McKenzie, Charles A

    2014-01-01

    To develop a new method of reducing T1 bias in proton density fat fraction (PDFF) measured with iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL). PDFF maps reconstructed from high flip angle IDEAL measurements were simulated and acquired from phantoms and volunteer L4 vertebrae. T1 bias was corrected using a priori T1 values for water and fat, both with and without flip angle correction. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) maps were used to measure precision of the reconstructed PDFF maps. PDFF measurements acquired using small flip angles were then compared to both sets of corrected large flip angle measurements for accuracy and precision. Simulations show similar results in PDFF error between small flip angle measurements and corrected large flip angle measurements as long as T1 estimates were within one standard deviation from the true value. Compared to low flip angle measurements, phantom and in vivo measurements demonstrate better precision and accuracy in PDFF measurements if images were acquired at a high flip angle, with T1 bias corrected using T1 estimates and flip angle mapping. T1 bias correction of large flip angle acquisitions using estimated T1 values with flip angle mapping yields fat fraction measurements of similar accuracy and superior precision compared to low flip angle acquisitions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Leading Twist GPDs and Transverse Spin Densities in a Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Chandan; Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar; Zhao, Xingbo

    2018-05-01

    We present a study of both chirally even and odd generalized parton distributions in the leading twist for the quarks in a proton using the light-front wavefunctions of a quark-diquark model predicted by the holographic QCD. For transversely polarized proton, both chiral even and chiral odd GPDs contribute to the spin densities which are related to the GPDs in transverse impact parameter space. Here, we also present a study of the spin densities for transversely polarized quark and proton.

  19. Neutron and proton densities and the symmetry energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    2003-01-01

    The neutron/proton distributions in nuclei, in particular, the n-p difference, are considered in a 'macroscopic' Thomas-Fermi approach. The density dependence F(ρ) of the symmetry-energy density, where ρ is the total density, drives this difference in the absence of Coulomb and density-gradient contributions when we obtain an explicit solution for the difference in terms of F. If F is constant then the n-p difference and, in particular, the difference δR between the neutron and proton rms radii are zero. The Coulomb energy and gradient terms are treated variationally. The latter make only a small contribution to the n-p difference, and this is then effectively determined by F. The Coulomb energy reduces δR. Switching off the Coulomb contribution to the n-p difference then gives the maximum δR for a given F. Our numerical results are for 208 Pb. We consider a wide range of F; for these, both δR and the ratio χ of the surface to volume symmetry-energy coefficient depend, approximately, only on an integral involving F -1 . For δR < or approx. 0.45 fm this dependence is one valued and approximately linear for small δR, and this integral is then effectively determined by δR. There is a strong correlation between δR and χ, allowing an approximate determination of χ from δR. δR has a maximum of congruent with 0.65 fm

  20. Rapid determination of vertebral fat fraction over a large range of vertebral bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jarad; Nicholson, Geoffrey; Cowin, Gary; Ilente, Clare; Wong, Winnie; Kennedy, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Vertebral body fat fraction (FF) has been found to vary between lumbar vertebrae using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). We aim to more quickly assess a larger number of adjacent vertebrae using a single T2-weighted iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation (IDEAL) sequence. Five men had dual-energy X-ray absorptometry (DEXA) and 1.5-T MR scans performed. MRS was performed at L3, and a sagittal IDEAL sequence was also performed, resulting in separate fat-only and water-only readings from T10 to S2. For the IDEAL measurements, two independent observers followed a set reading protocol, with five observations each per vertebra. Intra- and interobserver variability were assessed as deviations from the mean within and between observers, respectively. For FF measurements there was limited intra-observer variation, with observers being on average within 3.4% of the pooled mean value. Similarly, there was good interobserver agreement, with an average variation of 2.1%. All men showed a reduction in FF of 1.6–7% between L5 and S1. Otherwise, there was a trend of increasing FF moving inferiorly from T10 to S2. This averaged 2.7% per vertebra (range 1.1–3.8%) and may not have been dependent on MRS-measured FF at the L3 level. There was poor correlation between MRS-measured FF at L2–4 and bone mineral density measured using DEXA (R2=0.06). IDEAL measurements are generally reproducible between observers following a set protocol. There appears to be a gradient in FF moving from T10 to S2, with S1 showing a consistent decrease. This variation may better describe overall marrow function than a single-vertebra reading.

  1. Normal range of hepatic fat fraction on dual- and triple-echo fat quantification MR in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Koh, Hong; Kim, Ha Yan; Roh, Yun Ho; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate hepatic fat fraction on dual- and triple-echo gradient-recalled echo MRI sequences in healthy children. We retrospectively reviewed the records of children in a medical check-up clinic from May 2012 to November 2013. We excluded children with abnormal laboratory findings or those who were overweight. Hepatic fat fraction was measured on dual- and triple-echo sequences using 3T MRI. We compared fat fractions using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and the Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement. The correlation between fat fractions and clinical and laboratory findings was evaluated using Spearman's correlation test, and the cut-off values of fat fractions for diagnosing fatty liver were obtained from reference intervals. In 54 children (M:F = 26:28; 5-15 years; mean 9 years), the dual fat fraction (0.1-8.0%; median 1.6%) was not different from the triple fat fraction (0.4-6.5%; median 2.7%) (p = 0.010). The dual- and triple-echo fat fractions showed good agreement using a Bland-Altman plot (-0.6 ± 2.8%). Eight children (14.8%) on dual-echo sequences and six (11.1%) on triple-echo sequences had greater than 5% fat fraction. From these children, six out of eight children on dual-echo sequences and four out of six children on triple-echo sequences had a 5-6% hepatic fat fraction. When using a cut-off value of a 6% fat fraction derived from a reference interval, only 3.7% of children were diagnosed with fatty liver. There was no significant correlation between clinical and laboratory findings with dual and triple-echo fat fractions. Dual fat fraction was not different from triple fat fraction. We suggest a cut-off value of a 6% fat fraction is more appropriate for diagnosing fatty liver on both dual- and triple-echo sequences in children.

  2. Quantitative MRI for hepatic fat fraction and T2* measurement in pediatric patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Fishbein, Mark H; Rigsby, Cynthia K; Zhang, Gang; Schoeneman, Samantha E; Donaldson, James S

    2014-11-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. The gold standard for diagnosis is liver biopsy. MRI is a non-invasive imaging method to provide quantitative measurement of hepatic fat content. The methodology is particularly appealing for the pediatric population because of its rapidity and radiation-free imaging techniques. To develop a multi-point Dixon MRI method with multi-interference models (multi-fat-peak modeling and bi-exponential T2* correction) for accurate hepatic fat fraction (FF) and T2* measurements in pediatric patients with NAFLD. A phantom study was first performed to validate the accuracy of the MRI fat fraction measurement by comparing it with the chemical fat composition of the ex-vivo pork liver-fat homogenate. The most accurate model determined from the phantom study was used for fat fraction and T2* measurements in 52 children and young adults referred from the pediatric hepatology clinic with suspected or identified NAFLD. Separate T2* values of water (T2*W) and fat (T2*F) components derived from the bi-exponential fitting were evaluated and plotted as a function of fat fraction. In ten patients undergoing liver biopsy, we compared histological analysis of liver fat fraction with MRI fat fraction. In the phantom study the 6-point Dixon with 5-fat-peak, bi-exponential T2* modeling demonstrated the best precision and accuracy in fat fraction measurements compared with other methods. This model was further calibrated with chemical fat fraction and applied in patients, where similar patterns were observed as in the phantom study that conventional 2-point and 3-point Dixon methods underestimated fat fraction compared to the calibrated 6-point 5-fat-peak bi-exponential model (P fat fraction, T2*W (27.9 ± 3.5 ms) decreased, whereas T2*F (20.3 ± 5.5 ms) increased; and T2*W and T2*F became increasingly more similar when fat fraction was higher than 15-20%. Histological fat

  3. Quantitative MRI for hepatic fat fraction and T2* measurement in pediatric patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jie; Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Donaldson, James S. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Fishbein, Mark H. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Gang [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Biostatistics Research Core, Chicago, IL (United States); Schoeneman, Samantha E. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children. The gold standard for diagnosis is liver biopsy. MRI is a non-invasive imaging method to provide quantitative measurement of hepatic fat content. The methodology is particularly appealing for the pediatric population because of its rapidity and radiation-free imaging techniques. To develop a multi-point Dixon MRI method with multi-interference models (multi-fat-peak modeling and bi-exponential T2* correction) for accurate hepatic fat fraction (FF) and T2* measurements in pediatric patients with NAFLD. A phantom study was first performed to validate the accuracy of the MRI fat fraction measurement by comparing it with the chemical fat composition of the ex-vivo pork liver-fat homogenate. The most accurate model determined from the phantom study was used for fat fraction and T2* measurements in 52 children and young adults referred from the pediatric hepatology clinic with suspected or identified NAFLD. Separate T2* values of water (T2*{sub W}) and fat (T2*{sub F}) components derived from the bi-exponential fitting were evaluated and plotted as a function of fat fraction. In ten patients undergoing liver biopsy, we compared histological analysis of liver fat fraction with MRI fat fraction. In the phantom study the 6-point Dixon with 5-fat-peak, bi-exponential T2* modeling demonstrated the best precision and accuracy in fat fraction measurements compared with other methods. This model was further calibrated with chemical fat fraction and applied in patients, where similar patterns were observed as in the phantom study that conventional 2-point and 3-point Dixon methods underestimated fat fraction compared to the calibrated 6-point 5-fat-peak bi-exponential model (P < 0.0001). With increasing fat fraction, T2*{sub W} (27.9 ± 3.5 ms) decreased, whereas T2*{sub F} (20.3 ± 5.5 ms) increased; and T2*{sub W} and T2*{sub F} became increasingly more similar when fat

  4. Pancreas volume and fat fraction in children with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnell, S E; Peterson, P; Trinh, L; Broberg, P; Leander, P; Lernmark, Å; Månsson, S; Elding Larsson, H

    2016-10-01

    People with Type 1 diabetes have smaller pancreases than healthy individuals. Several diseases causing pancreatic atrophy are associated with pancreatic steatosis, but pancreatic fat in Type 1 diabetes has not been measured. This cross-sectional study aimed to compare pancreas size and fat fraction in children with Type 1 diabetes and controls. The volume and fat fraction of the pancreases of 22 children with Type 1 diabetes and 29 controls were determined using magnetic resonance imaging. Pancreas volume was 27% smaller in children with diabetes (median 34.9 cm(3) ) than in controls (47.8 cm(3) ; P Pancreas volume correlated positively with age in controls (P = 0.033), but not in children with diabetes (P = 0.649). Pancreas volume did not correlate with diabetes duration, but it did correlate positively with units of insulin/kg body weight/day (P = 0.048). A linear model of pancreas volume as influenced by age, body surface area and insulin units/kg body weight/day found that insulin dosage correlated with pancreas volume after controlling for both age and body surface area (P = 0.009). Pancreatic fat fraction was not significantly different between the two groups (1.34% vs. 1.57%; P = 0.891). Our findings do not indicate that pancreatic atrophy in Type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased pancreatic fat fraction, unlike some other diseases featuring reduced pancreatic volume. We speculate that our results may support the hypotheses that much of pancreatic atrophy in Type 1 diabetes occurs before the clinical onset of the disease and that exogenous insulin administration decelerates pancreatic atrophy after diabetes onset. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  5. Atlas-based liver segmentation and hepatic fat-fraction assessment for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhennan; Zhang, Shaoting; Tan, Chaowei; Qin, Hongxing; Belaroussi, Boubakeur; Yu, Hui Jing; Miller, Colin; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2015-04-01

    Automated assessment of hepatic fat-fraction is clinically important. A robust and precise segmentation would enable accurate, objective and consistent measurement of hepatic fat-fraction for disease quantification, therapy monitoring and drug development. However, segmenting the liver in clinical trials is a challenging task due to the variability of liver anatomy as well as the diverse sources the images were acquired from. In this paper, we propose an automated and robust framework for liver segmentation and assessment. It uses single statistical atlas registration to initialize a robust deformable model to obtain fine segmentation. Fat-fraction map is computed by using chemical shift based method in the delineated region of liver. This proposed method is validated on 14 abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) volumetric scans. The qualitative and quantitative comparisons show that our proposed method can achieve better segmentation accuracy with less variance comparing with two other atlas-based methods. Experimental results demonstrate the promises of our assessment framework. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multicomponent Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Proton and Electron Excitation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Culpitt, Tanner; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2018-04-05

    The quantum mechanical treatment of both electrons and protons in the calculation of excited state properties is critical for describing nonadiabatic processes such as photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer. Multicomponent density functional theory enables the consistent quantum mechanical treatment of more than one type of particle and has been implemented previously for studying ground state molecular properties within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework, where all electrons and specified protons are treated quantum mechanically. To enable the study of excited state molecular properties, herein the linear response multicomponent time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is derived and implemented within the NEO framework. Initial applications to FHF - and HCN illustrate that NEO-TDDFT provides accurate proton and electron excitation energies within a single calculation. As its computational cost is similar to that of conventional electronic TDDFT, the NEO-TDDFT approach is promising for diverse applications, particularly nonadiabatic proton transfer reactions, which may exhibit mixed electron-proton vibronic excitations.

  7. Multicomponent Density Functional Theory: Impact of Nuclear Quantum Effects on Proton Affinities and Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-08-03

    Nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy play a critical role in computational chemistry and often are included as energetic corrections following geometry optimizations. The nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) method treats select nuclei, typically protons, quantum mechanically on the same level as the electrons. Electron-proton correlation is highly significant, and inadequate treatments lead to highly overlocalized nuclear densities. A recently developed electron-proton correlation functional, epc17, has been shown to provide accurate nuclear densities for molecular systems. Herein, the NEO-DFT/epc17 method is used to compute the proton affinities for a set of molecules and to examine the role of nuclear quantum effects on the equilibrium geometry of FHF - . The agreement of the computed results with experimental and benchmark values demonstrates the promise of this approach for including nuclear quantum effects in calculations of proton affinities, pK a 's, optimized geometries, and reaction paths.

  8. Star tracker operation in a high density proton field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklus, Kenneth J.; Kissh, Frank; Flynn, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms that reject transient signals due to proton effects on charge coupled device (CCD) sensors have been implemented in the HDOS ASTRA-l Star Trackers to be flown on the TOPEX mission scheduled for launch in July 1992. A unique technique for simulating a proton-rich environment to test trackers is described, as well as the test results obtained. Solar flares or an orbit that passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly can subject the vehicle to very high proton flux levels. There are three ways in which spurious proton generated signals can impact tracker performance: the many false signals can prevent or extend the time to acquire a star; a proton-generated signal can compromise the accuracy of the star's reported magnitude and position; and the tracked star can be lost, requiring reacquisition. Tests simulating a proton-rich environment were performed on two ASTRA-1 Star Trackers utilizing these new algorithms. There were no false acquisitions, no lost stars, and a significant reduction in reported position errors due to these improvements.

  9. Proton density-weighted MR imaging of the knee: fat suppression versus without fat suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Sun Ki; Jee, Won-Hee; Kim, Jung-Man

    2011-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of proton density-weighted imaging with and without fat suppression for detecting meniscal tears. The study involved 48 patients who underwent arthroscopy less than 3 months after proton density-weighted imaging with and without fat suppression. Sagittal images were independently reviewed by two radiologists for the presence of meniscal tears. Medial and lateral menisci were separately analyzed in terms of anterior horn, body, and posterior horn. Interobserver agreement was assessed using κ coefficients. The McNemar test was used to determine any differences between the two methods in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Arthroscopy findings were used as the diagnostic reference standard. Arthroscopy revealed 71 tears involving 85 meniscal segments: 34 medial meniscal segments and 51 lateral meniscal segments. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each radiologist were 95% (81/85), 92% (186/203), and 93% (267/288), and 93% (79/85), 93% (189/203), and 93% (268/288) when using fat-suppressed proton density-weighted imaging, and 91% (77/85), 93% (189/203), and 92% (266/288), and 91% (77/85), 93% (188/203), and 92% (265/288) when using proton density-weighted imaging without fat suppression, respectively. Interobserver agreement for meniscal tears was very high with proton-weighted imaging with (κ = 0.87) or without (κ = 0.86) fat suppression. There were no significant differences for detection of medial meniscal tears when using proton density-weighted imaging with or without fat suppression for both readers (p > 0.05). Fat-suppressed proton density-weighted imaging can replace proton density-weighted imaging without fat suppression for the detection of meniscal tears. (orig.)

  10. Proton density-weighted MR imaging of the knee: fat suppression versus without fat suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Sun Ki [Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jee, Won-Hee [Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Catholic University of Korea, Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Man [Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of proton density-weighted imaging with and without fat suppression for detecting meniscal tears. The study involved 48 patients who underwent arthroscopy less than 3 months after proton density-weighted imaging with and without fat suppression. Sagittal images were independently reviewed by two radiologists for the presence of meniscal tears. Medial and lateral menisci were separately analyzed in terms of anterior horn, body, and posterior horn. Interobserver agreement was assessed using {kappa} coefficients. The McNemar test was used to determine any differences between the two methods in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Arthroscopy findings were used as the diagnostic reference standard. Arthroscopy revealed 71 tears involving 85 meniscal segments: 34 medial meniscal segments and 51 lateral meniscal segments. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each radiologist were 95% (81/85), 92% (186/203), and 93% (267/288), and 93% (79/85), 93% (189/203), and 93% (268/288) when using fat-suppressed proton density-weighted imaging, and 91% (77/85), 93% (189/203), and 92% (266/288), and 91% (77/85), 93% (188/203), and 92% (265/288) when using proton density-weighted imaging without fat suppression, respectively. Interobserver agreement for meniscal tears was very high with proton-weighted imaging with ({kappa} = 0.87) or without ({kappa} = 0.86) fat suppression. There were no significant differences for detection of medial meniscal tears when using proton density-weighted imaging with or without fat suppression for both readers (p > 0.05). Fat-suppressed proton density-weighted imaging can replace proton density-weighted imaging without fat suppression for the detection of meniscal tears. (orig.)

  11. Quantification of low fat fractions at 3T: comparison of water-fat imaging toolbox and MR spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kořínek, Radim; Gajdošík, M.; Trattnig, S.; Krššák, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 29, S1 (2016), s. 203 E-ISSN 1352-8661. [ESMRMB 2016 Congress. 29.09.2016-01.10.2016, Vienna] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09086S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : MR spectroscopy * quantification of low fat fractions Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  12. Exploiting multicompartment effects in triple-echo steady-state T2 mapping for fat fraction quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dian; Steingoetter, Andreas; Curcic, Jelena; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    To investigate and exploit the effect of intravoxel off-resonance compartments in the triple-echo steady-state (TESS) sequence without fat suppression for T 2 mapping and to leverage the results for fat fraction quantification. In multicompartment tissue, where at least one compartment is excited off-resonance, the total signal exhibits periodic modulations as a function of echo time (TE). Simulated multicompartment TESS signals were synthesized at various TEs. Fat emulsion phantoms were prepared and scanned at the same TE combinations using TESS. In vivo knee data were obtained with TESS to validate the simulations. The multicompartment effect was exploited for fat fraction quantification in the stomach by acquiring TESS signals at two TE combinations. Simulated and measured multicompartment signal intensities were in good agreement. Multicompartment effects caused erroneous T 2 offsets, even at low water-fat ratios. The choice of TE caused T 2 variations of as much as 28% in cartilage. The feasibility of fat fraction quantification to monitor the decrease of fat content in the stomach during digestion is demonstrated. Intravoxel off-resonance compartments are a confounding factor for T 2 quantification using TESS, causing errors that are dependent on the TE. At the same time, off-resonance effects may allow for efficient fat fraction mapping using steady-state imaging. Magn Reson Med 79:423-429, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Quantification of fat fraction in lumbar vertebrae: correlation with age and implications for bone marrow dosimetry in molecular radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Ramirez, Maikol; Tran-Gia, Johannes; Kesenheimer, Christian; Weng, Andreas Max; Kosmala, Aleksander; Heidemeier, Anke; Köstler, Herbert; Lassmann, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Absorbed dose to active bone marrow is a predictor of hematological toxicity in molecular radiotherapy. Due to the complex composition of bone marrow tissue, the necessity to improve the personalized dosimetry has led to the application of non-conventional imaging methods in nuclear medicine. The aim of this study is to apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantification of the fat fraction in lumbar vertebrae and to analyze its implications for bone marrow dosimetry. First, a highly accelerated two-point Dixon MRI sequence for fat-water separation was validated in a 3T system against the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) gold standard. The validation was performed in a fat-water phantom composed of 11 vials with different fat fractions between 0% and 100%, and subsequently repeated in the lumbar vertebrae of three healthy volunteers. Finally, a retrospective study was performed by analyzing the fat fraction in five lumbar vertebrae of 44 patients scanned with the two-point Dixon sequence. The two-point Dixon phantom acquisition showed a good agreement (maximum difference  =  2.9%) between the nominal fat fraction and MRS. In the volunteers, a statistical analysis showed a non-significant difference (p  =  0.19) between MRI and MRS. In the patients, gender-specific linear fits for female and male data indicated that the age-dependent marrow conversion (red  →  yellow marrow) is slower in males (0.3% per year) than in females (0.5% per year). Lastly, the fat fraction values showed a considerable variability in patients of similar ages and the same gender. Two-point Dixon MRI enables a non-invasive and spatially resolved quantification of the fat fraction in bone marrow. Our study provides important evidence on the differences in marrow conversion between females and males. In addition, differences were observed in the cellularity values of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference man (0.7) and the

  14. Plasma Density Tapering for Laser Wakefield Acceleration of Electrons and Protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, A.; Gordon, D.; Kaganovich, D.; Sprangle, P.; Helle, M.; Hafizi, B.

    2010-01-01

    Extended acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator can be achieved by tailoring the phase velocity of the accelerating plasma wave, either through profiling of the density of the plasma or direct manipulation of the phase velocity. Laser wakefield acceleration has also reached a maturity that proton acceleration by wakefield could be entertained provided we begin with protons that are substantially relativistic, ∼1 GeV. Several plasma density tapering schemes are discussed. The first scheme is called ''bucket jumping'' where the plasma density is abruptly returned to the original density after a conventional tapering to move the accelerating particles to a neighboring wakefield period (bucket). The second scheme is designed to specifically accelerate low energy protons by generating a nonlinear wakefield in a plasma region with close to critical density. The third scheme creates a periodic variation in the phase velocity by beating two intense laser beams with laser frequency difference equal to the plasma frequency. Discussions and case examples with simulations are presented where substantial acceleration of electrons or protons could be obtained.

  15. Covariant density functional theory for decay of deformed proton emitters: A self-consistent approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Ferreira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Proton radioactivity from deformed nuclei is described for the first time by a self-consistent calculation based on covariant relativistic density functionals derived from meson exchange and point coupling models. The calculation provides an important new test to these interactions at the limits of stability, since the mixing of different angular momenta in the single particle wave functions is probed.

  16. Spin observables in antiproton-proton to AntiLambda-Lambda and density-matrix constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Elchikh, Mokhtar; Richard, Jean-Marc

    2005-01-01

    The positivity conditions of the spin density matrix constrain the spin observables of the reaction antiproton-proton to AntiLambda-Lambda, leading to model-independent, non-trivial inequalities. The formalism is briefly presented and examples of inequalities are provided.

  17. Dynamics of laser-driven proton beam focusing and transport into solid density matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F.; Wei, M.; Mariscal, D.; Chen, S.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-10-01

    Isochoric heating and local energy deposition capabilities make intense proton beams appealing for studying high energy density physics and the Fast Ignition of inertial confinement fusion. To study proton beam focusing that results in high beam density, experiments have been conducted using different target geometries irradiated by a kilojoule, 10 ps pulse of the OMEGA EP laser. The beam focus was measured by imaging beam-induced Cu K-alpha emission on a Cu foil that was positioned at a fixed distance. Compared to a free target, structured targets having shapes of wedge and cone show a brighter and narrower K-alpha radiation emission spot on a Cu foil indicating higher beam focusability. Experimentally observed images with proton radiography demonstrate the existence of transverse fields on the structures. Full-scale simulations including the contribution of a long pulse duration of the laser confirm that such fields can be caused by hot electrons moving through the structures. The simulated fields are strong enough to reflect the diverging main proton beam and pinch a transverse probe beam. Detailed simulation results including the beam focusing and transport of the focused intense proton beam in Cu foil will be presented. This work was supported by the National Laser User Facility Program through Award DE-NA0002034.

  18. Delayed Proton Emission in the A=70 Region, a Strobe for Level Density and Particle Width

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The delayed particle emission, which is a characteristic signature of the most exotic nuclei decay, provides a wide variety of spectroscopic information among which level density, and gives in some cases access to selected microscopic structures. In regard to these two aspects the $\\beta^+$-EC delayed proton emission in the A=70 neutron deficient mass region is of special interest to be investigated. Indeed, in this area located close to the proton drip line and along the N=Z line, the delayed proton emission constitutes an access to level density in the Q$_{EC}$-S$_p$ window of the emitting nucleus. Moreover, the unbound states populated by the EC process are expected to exhibit lifetimes in the vicinity of the K electronic shell filling time ($\\tau\\!\\sim\\!2\\times10^{-16}$s) and so the particle widths can be reached via proton X-ray coincidence measurements (PXCT). From theoretical approaches strongly deformed low-spin proton unbound levels which may be populated in the T$_Z$ = 1/2 precursors decay are predi...

  19. Simple descriptors for proton-conducting perovskites from density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2010-01-01

    series of (pseudo)cubic perovskites, ABO3, have been investigated using density functional theory calculations. The structures have been optimized and thermodynamic properties and activation energies for the relevant steps of the hydrogen/proton diffusion mechanism have been calculated using...... the nudged elastic band path technique. We find a strong correlation between the O-H binding energy for hydrogen/proton uptake in perovskites and the energy barriers involved in the observed Grotthuss-type diffusion process. We demonstrate the possibility of estimating diffusion rates based on O-H binding...

  20. Extraction of the gluon density of the proton at small χ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1994-10-01

    The gluon momentum density xg(x, Q 2 ) of the proton was extracted at Q 2 =20 GeV 2 for small values of x between 4x10 -4 and 10 -2 from the scaling violations of the proton structure function F 2 measured recently by ZEUS in deep inelastic neutral current ep scattering at HERA. The extraction was performed in two ways. Firstly, using a global NLO fit to the ZEUS data on F 2 at low x constrained by measurements from NMC at larger x; and secondly using published approximate methods for the solution of the GLAP QCD evolution equations. Consistent results are obtained. A substantial increase of the gluon density is found at small x in comparison with the NMC result obtained at larger values of x. (orig.)

  1. Reaction cross sections for 8He and 14B on proton target for the separation of proton and neutron density distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Nishimura, Daiki

    2015-01-01

    We utilized the proton-neutron asymmetry of nucleon–nucleon total cross sections in the intermediate energy region (σ pn ≠σ pp(nn) ) to obtain the information of proton and neutron distributions respectively. We have measured reaction cross sections (σ R ) for 14 B and 8 He on proton targets as isospin asymmetric targets in addition to symmetric ones. Proton and neutron density distributions were derived respectively through the χ 2 -fitting procedure with the modified Glauber calculation. The result suggests a necessity for 14 B of a long tail, and also a necessity for 8 He of a neutron tail. Root-mean-square proton, neutron and matter radii for 14 B and 8 He are also derived. Each radius is consistent with some of the other experimental values and also with some of the several theoretical values. (author)

  2. The CERN Super Proton Synchrotron as a tool to study high energy density physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Brugger, M; Assmann, R; Shutov, A V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov3, V E

    2008-01-01

    An experimental facility named HiRadMat, will be constructed at CERN to study the impact of the 450 GeV c−1 proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) on solid targets. This is designed to study damage caused to the equipment including absorbers, collimators and others in case of an accidental release of the beam energy. This paper presents two-dimensional numerical simulations of target behavior irradiated by the SPS beam. These numerical simulations have shown that the target will be completely destroyed in such an accident, thereby generating high energy density (HED) matter. This study therefore suggests that this facility may also be used for carrying out dedicated experiments to study HED states in matter.

  3. SU-E-T-470: Importance of HU-Mass Density Calibration Technique in Proton Pencil Beam Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penfold, S; Miller, A [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stoichiometric calibration of Hounsfield Units (HUs) for conversion to proton relative stopping powers (RStPs) is vital for accurate dose calculation in proton therapy. However proton dose distributions are not only dependent on RStP, but also on relative scattering power (RScP) of patient tissues. RScP is approximated from material density but a stoichiometric calibration of HU-density tables is commonly neglected. The purpose of this work was to quantify the difference in calculated dose of a commercial TPS when using HU-density tables based on tissue substitute materials and stoichiometric calibrated ICRU tissues. Methods: Two HU-density calibration tables were generated based on scans of the CIRS electron density phantom. The first table was based directly on measured HU and manufacturer quoted density of tissue substitute materials. The second was based on the same CT scan of the CIRS phantom followed by a stoichiometric calibration of ICRU44 tissue materials. The research version of Pinnacle{sup 3} proton therapy was used to compute dose in a patient CT data set utilizing both HU-density tables. Results: The two HU-density tables showed significant differences for bone tissues; the difference increasing with increasing HU. Differences in density calibration table translated to a difference in calculated RScP of −2.5% for ICRU skeletal muscle and 9.2% for ICRU femur. Dose-volume histogram analysis of a parallel opposed proton therapy prostate plan showed that the difference in calculated dose was negligible when using the two different HU-density calibration tables. Conclusion: The impact of HU-density calibration technique on proton therapy dose calculation was assessed. While differences were found in the calculated RScP of bony tissues, the difference in dose distribution for realistic treatment scenarios was found to be insignificant.

  4. The effects of irradiation and proton implantation on the density of mobile protons in SiO2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanheusden, K.

    1998-04-01

    Proton implantation into the buried oxide of Si/SiO 2 /Si structures does not introduce mobile protons. The cross section for capture of radiation-induced electrons by mobile protons is two orders of magnitude smaller than for electron capture by trapped holes. The data provide new insights into the atomic mechanisms governing the generation and radiation tolerance of mobile protons in SiO 2 . This can lead to improved techniques for production and radiation hardening of radiation tolerant memory devices

  5. CALCULATION OF THE PROTON-TRANSFER RATE USING DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION AND MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS - INCLUSION OF THE PROTON EXCITED-STATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1995-01-01

    The methodology for treatment of proton transfer processes by density matrix evolution (DME) with inclusion of many excited states is presented. The DME method (Berendsen, H. J. C.; Mavri, J. J. Phys. Chem. 1993, 97, 13464) that simulates the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in a classical

  6. Effect of Thermospheric Neutral Density upon Inner Trapped-belt Proton Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Diaz, Abel B.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to point out that a secular change in the Earth's atmospheric neutral density alters charged-particle lifetime in the inner trapped radiation belts, in addition to the changes recently reported as produced by greenhouse gases. Heretofore, changes in neutral density have been of interest primarily because of their effect on the orbital drag of satellites. We extend this to include the orbital lifetime of charged particles in the lower radiation belts. It is known that the charged-belt population is coupled to the neutral density of the atmosphere through changes induced by solar activity, an effect produced by multiple scattering off neutral and ionized atoms along with ionization loss in the thermosphere where charged and neutral populations interact. It will be shown here that trapped-belt flux J is bivariant in energy E and thermospheric neutral density , as J(E,rho). One can conclude that proton lifetimes in these belts are also directly affected by secular changes in the neutral species populating the Earth s thermosphere. This result is a consequence of an intrinsic property of charged-particle flux, that flux is not merely a function of E but is dependent upon density rho when a background of neutrals is present.

  7. Acoustic noise reduction in T 1- and proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Martin; Blaimer, Martin; Breuer, Felix; Grodzki, David; Heismann, Björn; Jakob, Peter

    2016-02-01

    To reduce acoustic noise levels in T 1-weighted and proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences, which typically reach acoustic noise levels up to 100 dB(A) in clinical practice. Five acoustic noise reduction strategies were combined: (1) gradient ramps and shapes were changed from trapezoidal to triangular, (2) variable-encoding-time imaging was implemented to relax the phase-encoding gradient timing, (3) RF pulses were adapted to avoid the need for reversing the polarity of the slice-rewinding gradient, (4) readout bandwidth was increased to provide more time for gradient activity on other axes, (5) the number of slices per TR was reduced to limit the total gradient activity per unit time. We evaluated the influence of each measure on the acoustic noise level, and conducted in vivo measurements on a healthy volunteer. Sound recordings were taken for comparison. An overall acoustic noise reduction of up to 16.8 dB(A) was obtained by the proposed strategies (1-4) and the acquisition of half the number of slices per TR only. Image quality in terms of SNR and CNR was found to be preserved. The proposed measures in this study allowed a threefold reduction in the acoustic perception of T 1-weighted and proton-density-weighted TSE sequences compared to a standard TSE-acquisition. This could be achieved without visible degradation of image quality, showing the potential to improve patient comfort and scan acceptability.

  8. Exceptional power density and stability at intermediate temperatures in protonic ceramic fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sihyuk; Kucharczyk, Chris J.; Liang, Yangang; Zhang, Xiaohang; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ji, Ho-Il; Haile, Sossina M.

    2018-03-01

    Over the past several years, important strides have been made in demonstrating protonic ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs). Such fuel cells offer the potential of environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electric power generation. However, their power outputs have lagged behind predictions based on their high electrolyte conductivities. Here we overcome PCFC performance and stability challenges by employing a high-activity cathode, PrBa0.5Sr0.5Co1.5Fe0.5O5+δ (PBSCF), in combination with a chemically stable electrolyte, BaZr0.4Ce0.4Y0.1Yb0.1O3 (BZCYYb4411). We deposit a thin dense interlayer film of the cathode material onto the electrolyte surface to mitigate contact resistance, an approach which is made possible by the proton permeability of PBSCF. The peak power densities of the resulting fuel cells exceed 500 mW cm-2 at 500 °C, while also offering exceptional, long-term stability under CO2.

  9. Diagnosis of Weibel instability evolution in the rear surface density scale lengths of laser solid interactions via proton acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, G G; Brenner, C M; Clarke, R J; Green, J S; Heathcote, R I; Rusby, D R; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Bagnoud, V; Zielbauer, B; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B; Powell, H W

    2017-01-01

    It is shown for the first time that the spatial and temporal distribution of laser accelerated protons can be used as a diagnostic of Weibel instability presence and evolution in the rear surface scale lengths of a solid density target. Numerical modelling shows that when a fast electron beam is injected into a decreasing density gradient on the target rear side, a magnetic instability is seeded with an evolution which is strongly dependent on the density scale length. This is manifested in the acceleration of a filamented proton beam, where the degree of filamentation is also found to be dependent on the target rear scale length. Furthermore, the energy dependent spatial distribution of the accelerated proton beam is shown to provide information on the instability evolution on the picosecond timescale over which the protons are accelerated. Experimentally, this is investigated by using a controlled prepulse to introduce a target rear scale length, which is varied by altering the time delay with respect to the main pulse, and similar trends are measured. This work is particularly pertinent to applications using laser pulse durations of tens of picoseconds, or where a micron level density scale length is present on the rear of a solid target, such as proton-driven fast ignition, as the resultant instability may affect the uniformity of fuel energy coupling. (paper)

  10. Absolute choline concentration measured by quantitative proton MR spectroscopy correlates with cell density in meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue, Qiang [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan)]|[West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Shibata, Yasushi; Kawamura, Hiraku; Matsumura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); Isobe, Tomonori [Kitasato University, Department of Medical Technology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Minato, Tokyo (Japan); Anno, Izumi [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Gong, Qi-Yong [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China)]|[University of Liverpool, Division of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and pathological changes in meningioma. Twenty-two meningioma cases underwent single voxel 1H-MRS (point-resolved spectroscopy sequence, repetition time/echo time = 2,000 ms/68, 136, 272 ms). Absolute choline (Cho) concentration was calculated using tissue water as the internal reference and corrected according to intra-voxel cystic/necrotic parts. Pathological specimens were stained with MIB-1 antibody to measure cell density and proliferation index. Correlation analysis was performed between absolute Cho concentration and cell density and MIB-1 labeled proliferation index. Average Cho concentration of all meningiomas before correction was 2.95 {+-} 0.86 mmol/kg wet weight. It was increased to 3.23 {+-} 1.15 mmol/kg wet weight after correction. Average cell density of all meningiomas was 333 {+-} 119 cells/HPF, and average proliferation index was 2.93 {+-} 5.72%. A linear, positive correlation between cell density and Cho concentration was observed (r = 0.650, P = 0.001). After correction of Cho concentration, the correlation became more significant (r = 0.737, P < 0.001). However, no significant correlation between Cho concentration and proliferation index was found. There seemed to be a positive correlation trend after correction of Cho concentration but did not reach significant level. Absolute Cho concentration, especially Cho concentration corrected according to intra-voxel cystic/necrotic parts, reflects cell density of meningioma. (orig.)

  11. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm{sup 2} have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material.

  12. Measurements of beam current density and proton fraction of a permanent-magnet microwave ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

    2011-11-01

    A permanent-magnet microwave ion source has been built for use in a high-yield, compact neutron generator. The source has been designed to produce up to 100 mA of deuterium and tritium ions. The electron-cyclotron resonance condition is met at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz and a magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT. The source operates at a low hydrogen gas pressure of about 0.15 Pa. Hydrogen beams with a current density of 40 mA/cm(2) have been extracted at a microwave power of 450 W. The dependence of the extracted proton beam fraction on wall materials and operating parameters was measured and found to vary from 45% for steel to 95% for boron nitride as a wall liner material. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Dependence of regular background noise of VLF radiation and thunder-storm activity on solar wind proton density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, A.V.; Kozlov, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    Correlation of the intensity of slowly changing regular background noise within 9.7 kHz frequency in Yakutsk (L = 3) and of the solar wind density protons was determined. This result explains the reverse dependence of the intensity of the regular background noise on the solar activity, 27-day frequency, increase before and following geomagnetic storms, absence of relation with K p index of geomagnetic activity. Conclusion is made that growth of density of the solar wind protons results in increase of the regular background noise and thunderstorm activity

  14. Non-invasive quantification of hepatic fat fraction by fast 1.0, 1.5 and 3.0 T MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian [Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie and Neuroradiologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany)]. E-mail: sebastian.schuchmann@charite.de; Weigel, Christiane [Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie and Neuroradiologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany); Albrecht, Lothar [Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie and Neuroradiologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany); Kirsch, Michael [Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie and Neuroradiologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany); Lemke, Arne [Institut fuer Radiologie, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Lorenz, Gerd [Institut fuer Pathologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany); Warzok, Rolf [Institut fuer Pathologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany); Hosten, Norbert [Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie and Neuroradiologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    Introduction: Even mild hepatic steatosis in a split liver donor may cause general liver failure and death in the donor. So far, CT density measurements or percutaneous biopsy is used to determine the presence of hepatic steatosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be an elegant method of non-invasive and non-radiation quantification of hepatic fat content. Methods: Fast gradient echo (GRE) technique was used to discriminate between fat and water spins. Echo time (TE) was adjusted for field strength dependent in-phase and out-of-phase states at 1.0, 1.5 and 3.0 T. Continuous MR signal transition from 100% water to 100% fat was investigated using a wedge water-oil phantom, which was positioned in such a way, that no spatial resolution occurred, thereby combining water and fat in one slice. Results: Using the phantom, a significant difference for a 5% difference in fat content was demonstrated in the range from 20 to 80% fat content (p < 0.05) for all tested field strengths. In 25 patients MRI data were correlated with the percentage of fat determined by histologic evaluation of a CT-guided liver biopsy. Using the linear correlation calculated from the MRI phantom data at 1.0 T, we determined the liver fat from each patient's MRI measurements. Comparison of these data with the histologic quantified fat fraction of liver tissue showed a strong correlation (r {sup 2} = 0.93 for TE 6 ms and r {sup 2} = 0.91 for TE 10 ms). Conclusion: The described method can be used to determine the presence of hepatic steatosis of >10% with p < 0.05.

  15. Phase-Space Density Analyses of the AE-8 Trapped Electron and the AP-8 Trapped Proton Model Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayton, Thomas E.

    2005-01-01

    The AE-8 trapped electron and the AP-8 trapped proton models are used to examine the L-shell variation of phase-space densities for sets of transverse (or 1st) invariants, μ, and geometrical invariants, K (related to the first two adiabatic invariants). The motivation for this study is twofold: first, to discover the functional dependence of the phase-space density upon the invariants; and, second, to explore the global structure of the radiation belts within this context. Variation due to particle rest mass is considered as well. The overall goal of this work is to provide a framework for analyzing energetic particle data collected by instruments on Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft that fly through the most intense region of the radiation belt. For all considered values of μ and K, and for 3.5 R E E , the AE-8 electron phase-space density increases with increasing L; this trend--the expected one for a population diffusing inward from an external source--continues to L = 7.5 R E for both small and large values of K but reverses slightly for intermediate values of K. The AP-8 proton phase-space density exhibits μ-dependent local minima around L = 5 R E . Both AE-8 and AP-8 exhibit critical or cutoff values for the invariants beyond which the flux and therefore the phase-space density vanish. For both electrons and protons, these cutoff values vary systematically with magnetic moment and L-shell and are smaller than those estimated for the atmospheric loss cone. For large magnetic moments, for both electrons and protons, the K-dependence of the phase-space density is exponential, with maxima at the magnetic equator (K = 0) and vanishing beyond a cutoff value, K c . Such features suggest that momentum-dependent trapping boundaries, perhaps drift-type loss cones, serve as boundary conditions for trapped electrons as well as trapped protons

  16. The neutron/proton ratio of squeezed-out nucleons and the high density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Gaochan; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2007-01-01

    Within a transport model it is shown that the neutron/proton ratio of squeezed-out nucleons perpendicular to the reaction plane, especially at high transverse momenta, in heavy-ion reactions induced by high energy neutron-rich nuclei can be a useful tool for studying the high density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy

  17. Numerical Studies of Electron Acceleration Behind Self-Modulating Proton Beam in Plasma with a Density Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Petrenko, A.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1e15 1/cm^3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project --- the proof-of-prin...

  18. A flexible metal-organic framework with a high density of sulfonic acid sites for proton conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Xu, Gang; Dou, Yibo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Heng; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Li, Jian-Rong; Chen, Banglin

    2017-11-01

    The design of stable electrolyte materials with high proton conductivity for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells remains a challenge. Most of the materials explored have good conductivity at high relative humidity (RH), but significantly decreased conductivity at reduced RH. Here we report a chemically stable and structurally flexible metal-organic framework (MOF), BUT-8(Cr)A, possessing a three-dimensional framework structure with one-dimensional channels, in which high-density sulfonic acid (-SO3H) sites arrange on channel surfaces for proton conduction. We propose that its flexible nature, together with its -SO3H sites, could allow BUT-8(Cr)A to self-adapt its framework under different humid environments to ensure smooth proton conduction pathways mediated by water molecules. Relative to other MOFs, BUT-8(Cr)A not only has a high proton conductivity of 1.27 × 10-1 S cm-1 at 100% RH and 80 °C but also maintains moderately high proton conductivity at a wide range of RH and temperature.

  19. TU-EF-BRA-01: NMR and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolbarst, A.

    2015-01-01

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  20. TU-EF-BRA-01: NMR and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolbarst, A. [Univ Kentucky (United States)

    2015-06-15

    NMR, and Proton Density MRI of the 1D Patient - Anthony Wolbarst Net Voxel Magnetization, m(x,t). T1-MRI; The MRI Device - Lisa Lemen ‘Classical’ NMR; FID Imaging in 1D via k-Space - Nathan Yanasak Spin-Echo; S-E/Spin Warp in a 2D Slice - Ronald Price Magnetic resonance imaging not only reveals the structural, anatomic details of the body, as does CT, but also it can provide information on the physiological status and pathologies of its tissues, like nuclear medicine. It can display high-quality slice and 3D images of organs and vessels viewed from any perspective, with resolution better than 1 mm. MRI is perhaps most extraordinary and notable for the plethora of ways in which it can create unique forms of image contrast, reflective of fundamentally different biophysical phenomena. As with ultrasound, there is no risk from ionizing radiation to the patient or staff, since no X-rays or radioactive nuclei are involved. Instead, MRI harnesses magnetic fields and radio waves to probe the stable nuclei of the ordinary hydrogen atoms (isolated protons) occurring in water and lipid molecules within and around cells. MRI consists, in essence, of creating spatial maps of the electromagnetic environments around these hydrogen nuclei. Spatial variations in the proton milieus can be related to clinical differences in the biochemical and physiological properties and conditions of the associated tissues. Imaging of proton density (PD), and of the tissue proton spin relaxation times known as T1 and T2, all can reveal important clinical information, but they do so with approaches so dissimilar from one another that each is chosen for only certain clinical situations. T1 and T2 in a voxel are determined by different aspects of the rotations and other motions of the water and lipid molecules involved, as constrained by the local biophysical surroundings within and between its cells – and they, in turn, depend on the type of tissue and its state of health. Three other common

  1. MR signal-fat-fraction analysis and T2* weighted imaging measure BAT reliably on humans without cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstila, Milja; Pesola, Marko; Saari, Teemu; Koskensalo, Kalle; Raiko, Juho; Borra, Ronald J H; Nuutila, Pirjo; Parkkola, Riitta; Virtanen, Kirsi A

    2017-05-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is compositionally distinct from white adipose tissue (WAT) in terms of triglyceride and water content. In adult humans, the most significant BAT depot is localized in the supraclavicular area. Our aim is to differentiate brown adipose tissue from white adipose tissue using fat T2* relaxation time mapping and signal-fat-fraction (SFF) analysis based on a commercially available modified 2-point-Dixon (mDixon) water-fat separation method. We hypothesize that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can reliably measure BAT regardless of the cold-induced metabolic activation, with BAT having a significantly higher water and iron content compared to WAT. The supraclavicular area of 13 volunteers was studied on 3T PET-MRI scanner using T2* relaxation time and SFF mapping both during cold exposure and at ambient temperature; and 18 F-FDG PET during cold exposure. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were defined semiautomatically in the supraclavicular fat depot, subcutaneous WAT and muscle. The supraclavicular fat depot (assumed to contain BAT) had a significantly lower SFF and fat T2* relaxation time compared to subcutaneous WAT. Cold exposure did not significantly affect MR-based measurements. SFF and T2* values measured during cold exposure and at ambient temperature correlated inversely with the glucose uptake measured by 18 F-FDG PET. Human BAT can be reliably and safely assessed using MRI without cold activation and PET-related radiation exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Proton transfer along water bridges in biological systems with density-functional tight-binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Krystle; Wise, Abigail; Mazzuca, James

    2015-03-01

    When examining the dynamics of charge transfer in high dimensional enzymatic systems, the cost of quantum mechanical treatment of electrons increases exponentially with the size of the system. As a semi-empirical method, density-functional tight-binding aids in shortening these calculation times, but can be inaccurate in the regime where bonds are being formed and broken. To address these inaccuracies with respect to proton transfer in an enzymatic system, DFTB is being used to calculate small model systems containing only a single amino acid residue donor, represented by an imidazole molecule, and a water acceptor. When DFTB calculations are compared to B3LYP geometry calculations of the donor molecule, we observe a bond angle error on the order of 1.2 degrees and a bond length error on the order of 0.011 Å. As we move forward with small donor-acceptor systems, comparisons between DFTB and B3LYP energy profiles will provide a better clue as to what extent improvements need to be made. To improve the accuracy of the DFTB calculations, the internuclear repulsion term may be altered. This would result in energy profiles that closely resemble those produced by higher-level theory. Alma College Provost's Office.

  3. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  4. D-region electron density and effective recombination coefficients during twilight – experimental data and modelling during solar proton events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Osepian

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of electron density in the lower D-region (below 70 km altitude are rarely made. This applies both with regard to measurements by ground-based facilities and by sounding rockets, and during both quiet conditions and conditions of energetic electron precipitation. Deep penetration into the atmosphere of high-energy solar proton fluxes (during solar proton events, SPE produces extra ionisation in the whole D-region, including the lower altitudes, which gives favourable conditions for accurate measurements using ground-based facilities. In this study we show that electron densities measured with two ground-based facilities at almost the same latitude but slightly different longitudes, provide a valuable tool for validation of model computations. The two techniques used are incoherent scatter of radio waves (by the EISCAT 224 MHz radar in Tromsø, Norway, 69.6° N, 19.3° E, and partial reflection of radio-waves (by the 2.8 MHz radar near Murmansk, Russia, 69.0° N, 35.7° E. Both radars give accurate electron density values during SPE, from heights 57–60 km and upward with the EISCAT radar and between 55–70 km with the partial reflection technique. Near noon, there is little difference in the solar zenith angle between the two locations and both methods give approximately the same values of electron density at the overlapping heights. During twilight, when the difference in solar zenith angles increases, electron density values diverge. When both radars are in night conditions (solar zenith angle >99° electron densities at the overlapping altitudes again become equal. We use the joint measurements to validate model computations of the ionospheric parameters f+, λ, αeff and their variations during solar proton events. These parameters are important characteristics of the lower ionosphere structure which cannot be determined by other methods.

  5. Phase-Space Density Analyses of the AE-8 Trapped Electron and the AP-8 Trapped Proton Model Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.E. Cayton

    2005-08-12

    The AE-8 trapped electron and the AP-8 trapped proton models are used to examine the L-shell variation of phase-space densities for sets of transverse (or 1st) invariants, {mu}, and geometrical invariants, K (related to the first two adiabatic invariants). The motivation for this study is twofold: first, to discover the functional dependence of the phase-space density upon the invariants; and, second, to explore the global structure of the radiation belts within this context. Variation due to particle rest mass is considered as well. The overall goal of this work is to provide a framework for analyzing energetic particle data collected by instruments on Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft that fly through the most intense region of the radiation belt. For all considered values of {mu} and K, and for 3.5 R{sub E} < L < 6.5 R{sub E}, the AE-8 electron phase-space density increases with increasing L; this trend--the expected one for a population diffusing inward from an external source--continues to L = 7.5 R{sub E} for both small and large values of K but reverses slightly for intermediate values of K. The AP-8 proton phase-space density exhibits {mu}-dependent local minima around L = 5 R{sub E}. Both AE-8 and AP-8 exhibit critical or cutoff values for the invariants beyond which the flux and therefore the phase-space density vanish. For both electrons and protons, these cutoff values vary systematically with magnetic moment and L-shell and are smaller than those estimated for the atmospheric loss cone. For large magnetic moments, for both electrons and protons, the K-dependence of the phase-space density is exponential, with maxima at the magnetic equator (K = 0) and vanishing beyond a cutoff value, K{sub c}. Such features suggest that momentum-dependent trapping boundaries, perhaps drift-type loss cones, serve as boundary conditions for trapped electrons as well as trapped protons.

  6. Phase-Space Density Analysis of the AE-8 Traped Electron and the AP-8 Trapped Proton Model Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Cayton

    2005-08-01

    The AE-8 trapped electron and the AP-8 trapped proton models are used to examine the L-shell variation of phase-space densities for sets of transverse (or 1st) invariants, {mu}, and geometrical invariants, K (related to the first two adiabatic invariants). The motivation for this study is twofold: first, to discover the functional dependence of the phase-space density upon the invariants; and, second, to explore the global structure of the radiation belts within this context. Variation due to particle rest mass is considered as well. The overall goal of this work is to provide a framework for analyzing energetic particle data collected by instruments on Global Positioning System (GPS) spacecraft that fly through the most intense region of the radiation belt. For all considered values of {mu} and K, and for 3.5 R{sub E} < L < 6.5 R{sub E}, the AE-8 electron phase-space density increases with increasing L; this trend--the expected one for a population diffusing inward from an external source--continues to L = 7.5 R{sub E} for both small and large values of K but reverses slightly for intermediate values of K. The AP-8 proton phase-space density exhibits {mu}-dependent local minima around L = 5 R{sub E}. Both AE-8 and AP-8 exhibit critical or cutoff values for the invariants beyond which the flux and therefore the phase-space density vanish. For both electrons and protons, these cutoff values vary systematically with magnetic moment and L-shell and are smaller than those estimated for the atmospheric loss cone. For large magnetic moments, for both electrons and protons, the K-dependence of the phase-space density is exponential, with maxima at the magnetic equator (K = 0) and vanishing beyond a cutoff value, K{sub c}. Such features suggest that momentum-dependent trapping boundaries, perhaps drift-type loss cones, serve as boundary conditions for trapped electrons as well as trapped protons.

  7. Combination of Complex-Based and Magnitude-Based Multiecho Water-Fat Separation for Accurate Quantification of Fat-Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huanzhou; Shimakawa, Ann; Hines, Catherine D. G.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B.; Brittain, Jean H.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Multipoint water–fat separation techniques rely on different water–fat phase shifts generated at multiple echo times to decompose water and fat. Therefore, these methods require complex source images and allow unambiguous separation of water and fat signals. However, complex-based water–fat separation methods are sensitive to phase errors in the source images, which may lead to clinically important errors. An alternative approach to quantify fat is through “magnitude-based” methods that acquire multiecho magnitude images. Magnitude-based methods are insensitive to phase errors, but cannot estimate fat-fraction greater than 50%. In this work, we introduce a water–fat separation approach that combines the strengths of both complex and magnitude reconstruction algorithms. A magnitude-based reconstruction is applied after complex-based water–fat separation to removes the effect of phase errors. The results from the two reconstructions are then combined. We demonstrate that using this hybrid method, 0–100% fat-fraction can be estimated with improved accuracy at low fat-fractions. PMID:21695724

  8. Constraints on the Parton Density Functions of the Proton by Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, Mark; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Parton distribution functions (PDFs) are crucial ingredients for measurements at hadron colliders, since they describe the initial states and therefore critically impact the precision of cross section predictions for observables. This talk will review recent precision analyses, where the PDFs play an important role and discuss the impact of several new ATLAS cross-section measurements on PDFs of the proton. Particular emphasis will be given to the determination of the strange and the gluon content of the proton.

  9. The pathway for serial proton supply to the active site of nitrogenase: enhanced density functional modeling of the Grotthuss mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, Ian

    2015-11-07

    Nitrogenase contains a well defined and conserved chain of water molecules leading to the FeMo cofactor (FeMo-co, an [Fe7MoCS9] cluster with bidentate chelation of Mo by homocitrate) that is the active site where N2 and other substrates are sequentially hydrogenated using multiple protons and electrons. The function of this chain is proposed to be a proton wire, serially translocating protons to triply-bridging S3B of FeMo-co, where, concomitant with electron transfer to FeMo-co, an H atom is generated on S3B. Density functional simulations of this proton translocation mechanism are reported here, using a large 269-atom model that includes all residues hydrogen bonded to and surrounding the water chain, and likely to influence proton transfer: three carboxylate O atoms of obligatory homocitrate are essential. The mechanism involves the standard two components of the Grotthuss mechanism, namely H atom slides that shift H3O(+) from one water site to the next, and HOH molecular rotations that convert backward (posterior) OH bonds in the water chain to forward (anterior) OH bonds. The topography of the potential energy surface for each of these steps has been mapped. H atom slides pass through very short (ca. 2.5 Å) O-H-O hydrogen bonds, while HOH rotations involve the breaking of O-HO hydrogen bonds, and the occurrence of long (up to 3.6 Å) separations between contiguous water molecules. Both steps involve low potential energy barriers, chain, occurring as ripples. These characteristics of the 'Grotthuss two-step', coupled with a buffering ability of two carboxylate O atoms of homocitrate, and combined with density functional characterisation of the final proton slide from the ultimate water molecule to S3B (including electron addition), have been choreographed into a complete mechanism for serial hydrogenation of FeMo-co. The largest potential barrier is estimated to be 14 kcal mol(-1). These results are discussed in the context of reactivity data for nitrogenase

  10. Critical fluctuations of the proton density in A+A collisions at $158A$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T.; Bartke, J.; Beck, H.; Betev, L.; Białkowska, H.; Blume, C.; Bogusz, M.; Boimska, B.; Book, J.; Botje, M.; Bunčić, P.; Cetner, T.; Christakoglou, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.; Eckardt, V.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Friese, V.; Gaździcki, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Höhne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kowalski, M.; Kresan, D.; Laszlo, A.; Leeuwen, M.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.I.; Mateev, M.; Melkumov, G.L.; Mitrovski, M.; Mrówczyński, St.; Pálla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Peryt, W.; Pluta, J.; Prindle, D.; Pühlhofer, F.; Renfordt, R.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczyński, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.; Seyboth, P.; Siklér, F.; Skrzypczak, E.; Slodkowski, M.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Ströbele, H.; Susa, T.; Szuba, M.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranić, D.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarć, A.; Antoniou, N.G.; Davis, N.; Diakonos, F.K.

    2015-12-12

    Studies of QCD suggest the existence of a critical point in the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. Close to this point, according to recent theoretical investigations, the net-proton density carries the critical fluctuations of the chiral order parameter. Using intermittency analysis in the transverse momentum phase space of protons produced around midrapidity in the 12.5% most central C+C, Si+Si and Pb+Pb collisions at the maximum SPS energy of 158$A$ GeV we find evidence of power-law fluctuations for the Si+Si and Pb+Pb data. The fitted power-law exponent approaches the value expected for critical fluctuations. This suggests that the freeze-out states of these two systems are located in the phase diagram in the neighbourhood of the chiral critical point.

  11. Influence of the flux density on the radiation damage of bipolar silicon transistors by protons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, Y.; Gorin, B.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Mikhnovich, V.; Gusev, L.

    1981-01-01

    It was found experimentally that the radiation damage of bipolar n-p-n transistors increased by a factor of 8--12 when the proton flux density was reduced from 4.07 x 10 10 to 2.5 x 10 7 cm -2 sec -1 . In the case of p-n-p transistors the effect was opposite: there was a reduction in the radiation damage by a factor of 2--3 when the dose rate was lowered between the same limits. A similar effect was observed for electrons but at dose rates three orders of magnitude greater. The results were attributed to the dependences of the radiation defect-forming reactions on the charge state of defects which was influenced by the formation of disordered regions in the case of proton irradiation

  12. Symmetry energy, its density slope, and neutron-proton effective mass splitting at normal density extracted from global nucleon optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chang; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, it is shown that both the symmetry energy E sym (ρ) and its density slope L(ρ) at normal density ρ 0 are completely determined by the nucleon global optical potentials. The latter can be extracted directly from nucleon-nucleus scatterings, (p,n) charge-exchange reactions, and single-particle energy levels of bound states. Averaging all phenomenological isovector nucleon potentials constrained by world data available in the literature since 1969, the best estimates of E sym (ρ 0 )=31.3 MeV and L(ρ 0 )=52.7 MeV are simultaneously obtained. Moreover, the corresponding neutron-proton effective mass splitting in neutron-rich matter of isospin asymmetry δ is estimated to be (m n * -m p * )/m=0.32δ.

  13. Which Density Functional Should Be Used to Describe Protonated Water Clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ruili; Huang, Xiaoming; Su, Yan; Lu, Hai-Gang; Li, Si-Dian; Tang, Lingli; Zhao, Jijun

    2017-04-27

    Protonated water cluster is one of the most important hydrogen-bond network systems. Finding an appropriate DFT method to study the properties of protonated water clusters can substantially improve the economy in computational resources without sacrificing the accuracy compared to high-level methods. Using high-level MP2 and CCSD(T) methods as well as experimental results as benchmark, we systematically examined the effect of seven exchange-correlation GGA functionals (with BLYP, B3LYP, X3LYP, PBE0, PBE1W, M05-2X, and B97-D parametrizations) in describing the geometric parameters, interaction energies, dipole moments, and vibrational properties of protonated water clusters H + (H 2 O) 2-9,12 . The overall performance of all these functionals is acceptable, and each of them has its advantage in certain aspects. X3LYP is the best to describe the interaction energies, and PBE0 and M05-2X are also recommended to investigate interaction energies. PBE0 gives the best anharmonic frequencies, followed by PBE1W, B97-D and BLYP methods. PBE1W, B3LYP, B97-D, and X3LYP can yield better geometries. The capability of B97-D to distinguish the relative energies between isomers is the best among all the seven methods, followed by M05-2X and PBE0.

  14. Polarized proton spin density images the tyrosyl radical locations in bovine liver catalase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Zimmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A tyrosyl radical, as part of the amino acid chain of bovine liver catalase, supports dynamic proton spin polarization (DNP. Finding the position of the tyrosyl radical within the macromolecule relies on the accumulation of proton polarization close to it, which is readily observed by polarized neutron scattering. The nuclear scattering amplitude due to the polarization of protons less than 10 Å distant from the tyrosyl radical is ten times larger than the amplitude of magnetic neutron scattering from an unpaired polarized electron of the same radical. The direction of DNP was inverted every 5 s, and the initial evolution of the intensity of polarized neutron scattering after each inversion was used to identify those tyrosines which have assumed a radical state. Three radical sites, all of them close to the molecular centre and the haem, appear to be equally possible. Among these is tyr-369, the radical state of which had previously been proven by electron paramagnetic resonance.

  15. SU-E-J-233: Effect of Brachytherapy Seed Artifacts in T2 and Proton Density Maps in MR Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashouf, S [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Dept of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fatemi-Ardekani, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, W [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Dept of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims at investigating the influence of brachytherapy seeds on T2 and proton density (PD) maps generated from MR images. Proton density maps can be used to extract water content. Since dose absorbed in tissue surrounding low energy brachytherapy seeds are highly influenced by tissue composition, knowing the water content is a first step towards implementing a heterogeneity correction algorithm using MR images. Methods: An LDR brachytherapy (IsoAid Advantage Pd-103) seed was placed in the middle of an agar-based gel phantom and imaged using a 3T Philips MR scanner with a 168-channel head coil. A multiple echo sequence with TE=20, 40, 60, 80, 100 (ms) with large repetition time (TR=6259ms) was used to extract T2 and PD maps. Results: Seed artifacts were considerably reduced on T2 maps compared to PD maps. The variation of PD around the mean was obtained as −97% to 125% (±1%) while for T2 it was recorded as −71% to 24% (±1%). Conclusion: PD maps which are required for heterogeneity corrections are susceptible to artifacts from seeds. Seed artifacts on T2 maps, however, are significantly reduced due to not being sensitive to B0 field variation.

  16. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 μs temporal resolution and approximately 100 μm spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  18. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2012-05-15

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  19. Probing the gluon density of the proton in the exclusive photoproduction of vector mesons at the LHC: a phenomenological analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, V.P. [Lund University, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund (Sweden); Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Martins, L.A.S.; Sauter, W.K. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The current uncertainty on the gluon density extracted from the global parton analysis is large in the kinematical range of small values of the Bjorken-x variable and low values of the hard scale Q{sup 2}. An alternative to reduces this uncertainty is the analysis of the exclusive vector meson photoproduction in photon-hadron and hadron-hadron collisions. This process offers a unique opportunity to constrain the gluon density of the proton, since its cross section is proportional to the gluon density squared. In this paper we consider current parametrisations for the gluon distribution and estimate the exclusive vector meson photoproduction cross section at HERA and LHC using the leading logarithmic formalism. We perform a fit of the normalisation of the γh cross section and the value of the hard scale for the process and demonstrate that the current LHCb experimental data are better described by models that assume a slow increasing of the gluon distribution at small x and low Q{sup 2}. (orig.)

  20. “Hot cross bun” sign in multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia: A comparison between proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasahara, Seiko, E-mail: nuun077@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Miki, Yukio, E-mail: yukio.miki@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545–8585 (Japan); Kanagaki, Mitsunori, E-mail: mitsuk@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kondo, Takayuki, E-mail: kondotak@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akira, E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Morimoto, Emiko, E-mail: foresta@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomokada@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ito, Hidefumi, E-mail: itohid@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Takahashi, Ryosuke, E-mail: ryosuket@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-Kawaharacho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); and others

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To investigate whether proton density-weighted imaging can detect the “hot cross bun” sign in the pons in multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia significantly better than T2-weighted imaging at 3 T. Methods: Sixteen consecutive patients with multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia according to the Consensus Criteria were reviewed. Axial unenhanced proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging were obtained using a dual-echo fast spin-echo sequence at 3 T. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated visualisation of the abnormal pontine signal using a 4-point visual grade from Grade 0 (no “hot cross bun” sign) to Grade 3 (prominent “hot cross bun” sign on two or more sequential slices). Differences in grade between proton density-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging were statistically analysed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: In 11 patients (69%), a higher grade was given for proton density-weighted imaging than T2-weighted imaging. In 1 patient (6%), grades were the same (Grade 3) on both images. In the remaining 4 patients (25%), signal abnormalities were not detected on either image (Grade 0). The “hot cross bun” sign was thus observed significantly better on proton density-weighted imaging than on T2-weighted imaging (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The “hot cross bun” sign considered diagnostic for multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia is significantly better visualised on proton density-weighted imaging than on T2-weighted imaging at 3 T.

  1. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  2. Proton density modulation of D atoms in PdD/sub 1-x/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.H.; Brun, T.O.; Hitterman, R.L.; Knott, H.W.; Satterthwaite, C.B.; Ellis, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    Recent resistivity and neutron diffraction measurements have provided evidence for ordering of D(H) atoms on the octahedral interstitial sites of PdD/sub 1-x/. This order--disorder transition is responsible for the 50 K anomaly which has been reported in many of the physical properties. Neutron diffraction measurements on a PdD 0 76 single crystal revealed satellite reflection at (4/5,2/5,0) and equivalent positions. These satellites can be accounted for by a multi-domained tetragonal unit cell with a/sub t/ = a/sub c/ root 5/2 and c/sub t/ = c/sub a/. This ordered state can be described as a deuteron density wave along a cubic direction. This density is modulated such that four fully occupied planes (Pd and D) are followed by a vacant plane

  3. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  4. Scattering of a proton with the Li{sub 4} cluster: Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics description based on time-dependent density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A., E-mail: acastro@bifi.es [Institute for Biocomputation and Physics of Complex Systems (BIFI) and Zaragoza Scientific Center for Advanced Modelling (ZCAM), University of Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Isla, M. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Martinez, Jose I. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, ES-28049 Madrid (Spain); Alonso, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2012-05-03

    Graphical abstract: Two trajectories for the collision of a proton with the Lithium tetramer. On the left, the proton is scattered away, and a Li{sub 2} molecule plus two isolated Lithium atoms result. On the right, the proton is captured and a LiH molecule is created. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scattering of a proton with Lithium clusters described from first principles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description based on non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic structure is described with time-dependent density-functional theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method allows to discern reaction channels depending on initial parameters. - Abstract: We have employed non-adiabatic molecular dynamics based on time-dependent density-functional theory to characterize the scattering behavior of a proton with the Li{sub 4} cluster. This technique assumes a classical approximation for the nuclei, effectively coupled to the quantum electronic system. This time-dependent theoretical framework accounts, by construction, for possible charge transfer and ionization processes, as well as electronic excitations, which may play a role in the non-adiabatic regime. We have varied the incidence angles in order to analyze the possible reaction patterns. The initial proton kinetic energy of 10 eV is sufficiently high to induce non-adiabatic effects. For all the incidence angles considered the proton is scattered away, except in one interesting case in which one of the Lithium atoms captures it, forming a LiH molecule. This theoretical formalism proves to be a powerful, effective and predictive tool for the analysis of non-adiabatic processes at the nanoscale.

  5. Influence of Hydration on Proton Transfer in the Guanine-Cytosine Radical Cation (G•+-C) Base Pair: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    On one-electron oxidation all molecules including DNA bases become more acidic in nature. For the GC base pair experiments suggest that a facile proton transfer takes place in the G•+-C base pair from N1 of G•+ to N3 of cytosine. This intra-base pair proton transfer reaction has been extensively considered using theoretical methods for the gas phase and it is predicted that the proton transfer is slightly unfavorable in disagreement with experiment. In the present study, we consider the effect of the first hydration layer on the proton transfer reaction in G•+-C by the use of density functional theory (DFT), B3LYP/6-31+G** calculations of the G•+-C base pair in the presence of 6 and 11 water molecules. Under the influence of hydration of 11 waters, a facile proton transfer from N1 of G•+ to N3 of C is predicted. The zero point energy (ZPE) corrected forward and backward energy barriers, for the proton transfer from N1 of G•+ to N3 of C, was found to be 1.4 and 2.6 kcal/mol, respectively. The proton transferred G•-(H+)C + 11H2O was found to be 1.2 kcal/mol more stable than G•+-C + 11H2O in agreement with experiment. The present calculation demonstrates that the inclusion of the first hydration shell around G•+-C base pair has an important effect on the internal proton transfer energetics. PMID:19485319

  6. Gamma strength functions and level densities from high-resolution inelastic proton scattering at very forward angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassauer, Sergej; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von; Tamii, Atsushi

    2017-09-01

    Inelastic proton scattering at energies of a few 100 MeV and forward angles including 0∘ provides a novel method to measure gamma strength functions (GSF) in nuclei in an energy range of about 5-23 MeV. The experiments provide not only the E1 but also the M1 part of the GSF. The latter is poorly known in heavy nuclei. A case study of 208Pb indicates that the systematics proposed for the M1-GSF in RIPL-3 needs to be substantially revised. Comparison with gamma decay data (e.g. from the Oslo method) allows to test the generalised Brink-Axel (BA) hypothesis in the energy region of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR) crucial for the modelling of (n,γ) and (γ,n) reactions in astrophysical reaction networks. A fluctuation analysis of the high-resolution data also provides a direct measure of level densities in the energy region well above the neutron threshold, where hardly any experimental information is available.

  7. Gamma strength functions and level densities from high-resolution inelastic proton scattering at very forward angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassauer Sergej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inelastic proton scattering at energies of a few 100 MeV and forward angles including 0∘ provides a novel method to measure gamma strength functions (GSF in nuclei in an energy range of about 5–23 MeV. The experiments provide not only the E1 but also the M1 part of the GSF. The latter is poorly known in heavy nuclei. A case study of 208Pb indicates that the systematics proposed for the M1-GSF in RIPL-3 needs to be substantially revised. Comparison with gamma decay data (e.g. from the Oslo method allows to test the generalised Brink-Axel (BA hypothesis in the energy region of the pygmy dipole resonance (PDR crucial for the modelling of (n,γ and (γ,n reactions in astrophysical reaction networks. A fluctuation analysis of the high-resolution data also provides a direct measure of level densities in the energy region well above the neutron threshold, where hardly any experimental information is available.

  8. Diagnosis of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage at 1.5 Tesla using proton-density weighted FSE and FLAIR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmann, M.; Mayer, T.E.; Brueckmann, H.; Medele, R.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate MR imaging at 1.5 Tesla in patients suffering from acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using proton-density weighted (PDW) fast spin echo (FSE) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences. Methods: 19 patients suffering from acute SAH as diagnosed by CT were studied 6 h to 3 days after hemorrhage. 10 patients without SAH were studied as a control group. The presence of subarachnoid blood as well as possible artifacts was recorded. Results: In all 19 patients subarachnoid hemorrhage was detected on both FLAIR and PDW images (100%). On the FLAIR images, the cerebral ventricles were partially obscured by flow artifacts in 7 of 19 patients, the basal cisterns in 6 of 19 patients. In 4 of these 13 regions blood was diagnosed on both PDW and CT images, while in the other 9 regions both PDW and CT were unremarkable. Conclusion: The sensitivity of MRI at 1.5 Tesla in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is comparable to CT. The combination of FLAIR and PDW FSE sequences helps to avoid false-positive results caused by flow artifacts. (orig.) [de

  9. MRI findings, patterns of disease distribution, and muscle fat fraction calculation in five patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 F disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, Michele; Mileto, Achille; Minutoli, Fabio; Settineri, Nicola; Donato, Rocco; Ascenti, Giorgio; Blandino, Alfredo [Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Messina (Italy); Mazzeo, Anna; Di Leo, Rita [Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Scienze Psichiatriche ed Anestesiologiche, Messina (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in five patients with late-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 F, due to a previously unknown mutation. Five patients (three males, two females) underwent MRI of the lower limbs to define the pattern of muscle involvement and evaluate the muscle fat fraction (MFF) of residual thigh muscle with gradient-echo (GRE) dual-echo dual-flip angle technique. Evaluation of fatty infiltration both by visual inspection and MFF calculation was performed. A proximal-to-distal gradient of muscle involvement was depicted in male patients with extensive muscle wasting of lower legs, less severe impairment of distal thigh muscles, and sparing of proximal thigh muscles. A peculiar phenotype finding was that no or only slight muscle abnormalities could be found in the two female patients. We described the pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in a family with CMT disease type 2 F. GRE dual-echo dual-flip angle MRI technique is a valuable technique to obtain a rapid quantification of MFF. (orig.)

  10. High-density kaonic-proton matter (KPM) composed of Λ* ≡ K-p multiplets and its astrophysical connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaishi, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    2017-11-01

    We propose and examine a new form of high-density neutral composite of Λ* ≡K- p = (s u bar) ⊗ (uud), which may be called anti-Kaonic Proton Matter (KPM), or simply, Λ*-Matter, where substantial shrinkage of baryonic bound systems originating from the strong attraction of the (K bar N) I = 0 interaction takes place, providing a ground-state neutral baryonic system with a large energy gap. The mass of an ensemble of (K-p)m, where m, the number of the K- p pair, becomes larger than m ≈ 10, is predicted to drop down below that of its corresponding neutron ensemble, (n)m, since the attractive interaction is further increased by the Heitler-London type molecular covalency as well as by chiral symmetry restoration of the QCD vacuum. Since the seed clusters (K- p, K- pp and K-K- pp) are short-lived, the formation of such a stabilized relic ensemble, (K-p)m, may be conceived during the Big-Bang Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) period in the early universe. At the final stage of baryogenesis a substantial amount of primordial (u bar , d bar)'s are transferred and captured into KPM, where the anti-quarks find places to survive forever. The expected KPM state may be cold, dense and neutral q bar q-hybrid (Quark Gluon Bound (QGB)) states,[ s (u bar ⊗ u) ud ] m, to which the relic of the disappearing anti-quarks plays an essential role as hidden components. KPM may also be produced during the formation and decay of neutron stars in connections with supernova explosions, and other forms may exist as strange quark matter in cosmic dusts.

  11. Determination of 40Ca and 48Ca matter densities by 600 MeV and 1 GeV proton elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brissaud, I.; Campi, X.

    1979-02-01

    The 600MeV and 1GeV data of proton elastic scattering on 40 Ca and 48 Ca have been analyzed in the framework of the Glauber model. The matter distributions are extracted from the data in an approximately model-independent form based on a Fourier series expansion. A similar method is used to deduce directly the 48 Ca- 40 Ca neutron density difference

  12. First proton-proton collisions at the LHC as observed with the ALICE detector measurement of the charged particle pseudorapidity density at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aamodt, K; Abeysekara, U; Abrahantes Quintana, A; Acero, A; Adamová, D; Aggarwal, M M; Aglieri Rinella, G; Agocs, A G; Aguilar Salazar, S; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, A; Ahmad, N; Ahn, S U; Akimoto, R; Akindinov, A; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alfaro Molina, R; Alici, A; Almaráz Aviña, E; Alme, J; Altini, V; Altinpinar, S; Alt, T; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anelli, G; Angelov, V; Anson, C; Anticic, T; Antinori, F; Antinori, S; Antipin, K; Antonczyk, D; Antonioli, P; Anzo, A; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arcelli, S; Arceo, R; Arend, A; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Asryan, A; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Äystö, J; Azmi, M D; Bablok, S; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldisseri, A; Baldit, A; Bán, J; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L; Barret, V; Bartke, J; Basile, M; Basmanov, V; Bastid, N; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Batyunya, B; Baumann, C; Bearden, I G; Becker, B; Belikov, I; Bellwied, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Belogianni, A; Benhabib, L; Beolé, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdermann, E; Berdnikov, Y; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bianchi, L; Bianchin, C; Bianchi, N; Bielcík, J; Bielcíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Bimbot, L; Biolcati, E; Blanc, A; Blanco, F; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Boccioli, M; Bock, N; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Bogolyubsky, M; Bohm, J; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Bombonati, C; Bondila, M; Borel, H; Borshchov, V; Bortolin, C; Bose, S; Bosisio, L; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Böttger, S; Bourdaud, G; Boyer, B; Braun, M; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bravina, L; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Bruckner, G; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Brun, R; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bugaev, K; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Caffarri, D; Caines, H; Cai, X; Camacho, E; Camerini, P; Campbell, M; Canoa Roman, V; Capitani, G P; Cara Romeo, G; Carena, F; Carena, W; Carminati, F; Casanova Díaz, A; Caselle, M; Castillo Castellanos, J; Castillo Hernandez, J F; Catanescu, V; Cattaruzza, E; Cavicchioli, C; Cerello, P; Chambert, V; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Charpy, A; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Chibante Barroso, V; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Choi, K; Chojnacki, M; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chuman, F; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Cobanoglu, O; Coffin, J P; Coli, S; Colla, A; Conesa Balbastre, G; Conesa del Valle, Z; Conner, E S; Constantin, P; Contin, G; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Corrales Morales, Y; Cortese, P; Cortés Maldonado, I; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Cotallo, M E; Crescio, E; Crochet, P; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Cussonneau, J; Dainese, A; Dalsgaard, H H; Danu, A; Dash, A; Dash, S; Das, I; Das, S; de Barros, G O V; De Caro, A; de Cataldo, G; de Cuveland, J; De Falco, A; de Gaspari, M; de Groot, J; De Gruttola, D; de Haas, A P; De Marco, N; de Rooij, R; De Pasquale, S; de Vaux, G; Delagrange, H; Dellacasa, G; Deloff, A; Demanov, V; Dénes, E; Deppman, A; D'Erasmo, G; Derkach, D; Devaux, A; Di Bari, D; Di Giglio, C; Di Liberto, S; Di Mauro, A; Di Nezza, P; Dialinas, M; Díaz, L; Díaz, R; Dietel, T; Ding, H; Divià, R; Djuvsland, Ø; do Amaral Valdiviesso, G; Dobretsov, V; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Dönigus, B; Domínguez, I; Dordic, O; Dubey, A K; Dubuisson, J; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Dutta Majumdar, A K; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Elia, D; Emschermann, D; Enokizono, A; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Evans, D; Evrard, S; Eyyubova, G; Fabjan, C W; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Falchieri, D; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Fearick, R; Fedunov, A; Fehlker, D; Fekete, V; Felea, D; Fenton-Olsen, B; Feofilov, G; Fernández Téllez, A; Ferreiro, E G; Ferretti, A; Ferretti, R; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Fini, R; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Floris, M; Fodor, Z; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Formenti, F; Fragiacomo, E; Fragkiadakis, M; Frankenfeld, U; Frolov, A; Fuchs, U; Furano, F; Furget, C; Fusco Girard, M; Gaardhøje, J J; Gadrat, S; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A; Gallio, M; Ganoti, P; Ganti, M S; Garabatos, C; García Trapaga, C; Gebelein, J; Gemme, R; Germain, M; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Ghidini, B; Ghosh, P; Giraudo, G; Giubellino, P; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Glasow, R; Glässel, P; Glenn, A; Gomez, R; González Santos, H; González-Trueba, L H; González-Zamora, P; Gorbunov, S; Gorbunov, Y; Gotovac, S; Gottschlag, H; Grabski, V; Grajcarek, R; Grelli, A; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Gros, P; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J Y; Grosso, R; Guarnaccia, C; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerzoni, B; Gulbrandsen, K; Gulkanyan, H; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Gustafsson, H A; Gutbrod, H; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Hamblen, J; Han, B H; Harris, J W; Hartig, M; Harutyunyan, A; Hasch, D; Hasegan, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayrapetyan, A; Heide, M; Heinz, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Hernández, C; Herrera Corral, G; Herrmann, N; Hetland, K F; Hicks, B; Hiei, A; Hille, P T; Hippolyte, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hristov, P; Hrivnácová, I; Huber, S; Humanic, T J; Hu, S; Hutter, D; Hwang, D S; Ichou, R; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Innocenti, P G; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivan, C; Ivanov, A; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Iwasaki, T; Jacholkowski, A; Jacobs, P; Jancurová, L; Jangal, S; Janik, R; Jayananda, K; Jena, C; Jena, S; Jirden, L; Jones, G T; Jones, P G; Jovanovic, P; Jung, H; Jung, W; Jusko, A; Kaidalov, A B; Kalcher, S; Kalinák, P; Kalliokoski, T; Kalweit, A; Kamal, A; Kamermans, R; Kanaki, K; Kang, E; Kang, J H; Kapitan, J; Kaplin, V; Kapusta, S; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kazantsev, A; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Khan, M M; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kikola, D; Kileng, B; Kim, D J; Kim, D S; Kim, D W; Kim, H N; Kim, J H; Kim, J; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, S H; Kim, S; Kim, Y; Kirsch, S; Kiselev, S; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein-Bösing, C; Klein, J; Kliemant, M; Klovning, A; Kluge, A; Kniege, S; Koch, K; Kolevatov, R; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Konevskih, A; Kornas, E; Kour, R; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Kozlov, K; Králik, I; Kral, J; Kramer, F; Kraus, I; Kravcáková, A; Krawutschke, T; Krivda, M; Krumbhorn, D; Krus, M; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kucheriaev, Y; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kumar, L; Kumar, N; Kupczak, R; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, A N; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kushpil, V; Kutouski, M; Kvaerno, H; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Lackner, F; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Lafage, V; Lal, C; Lara, C; La Rocca, P; Larsen, D T; Laurenti, G; Lazzeroni, C; Le Bornec, Y; Le Bris, N; Lee, H; Lee, K S; Lee, S C; Lefèvre, F; Lehnert, J; Leistam, L; Lenhardt, M; Lenti, V; León, H; León Monzón, I; León Vargas, H; Lévai, P; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Listratenko, O; Liu, L; Li, Y; Loginov, V; Lohn, S; López Noriega, M; López-Ramírez, R; López Torres, E; Lopez, X; Løvhøiden, G; Lozea Feijo Soares, A; Lunardon, M; Luparello, G; Luquin, L; Lu, S; Lutz, J R; Luvisetto, M; Madagodahettige-Don, D M; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahajan, A; Mahapatra, D P; Maire, A; Makhlyueva, I; Ma, K; Malaev, M; Maldonado Cervantes, I; Malek, M; Mal'Kevich, D; Malkiewicz, T; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Mangotra, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Mao, Y; Mares, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Marín, A; Martashvili, I; Martinengo, P; Martínez Davalos, A; Martínez García, G; Martínez, M I; Maruyama, Y; Ma, R; Marzari Chiesa, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masetti, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastromarco, M; Mastroserio, A; Matthews, Z L; Mattos Tavares, B; Matyja, A; Mayani, D; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, M A; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Mendez Lorenzo, P; Meoni, M; Mercado Pérez, J; Mereu, P; Miake, Y; Michalon, A; Miftakhov, N; Milosevic, J; Minafra, F; Mischke, A; Miskowiec, D; Mitu, C; Mizoguchi, K; Mlynarz, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Mondal, M M; Montaño Zetina, L; Monteno, M; Montes, E; Morando, M; Moretto, S; Morsch, A; Moukhanova, T; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Muhuri, S; Müller, H; Munhoz, M G; Munoz, J; Musa, L; Musso, A; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Navach, F; Navin, S; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nazarov, G; Nedosekin, A; Nendaz, F; Newby, J; Nianine, A; Nicassio, M; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaev, S; Nikolic, V; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Nilsen, B S; Nilsson, M S; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Novitzky, N; Nyatha, A; Nygaard, C; Nyiri, A; Nystrand, J; Ochirov, A; Odyniec, G; Oeschler, H; Oinonen, M; Okada, K; Okada, Y; Oldenburg, M; Oleniacz, J; Oppedisano, C; Orsini, F; Ortíz Velázquez, A; Ortona, G; Oskamp, C; Oskarsson, A; Osmic, F; Österman, L; Ostrowski, P; Otterlund, I; Otwinowski, J; Øvrebekk, G; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pachmayer, Y; Pachr, M; Padilla, F; Pagano, P; Paic, G; Painke, F; Pajares, C; Palaha, A; Palmeri, A; Pal, S K; Pal, S; Panse, R; Pappalardo, G S; Park, W J; Pastircák, B; Pastore, C; Paticchio, V; Pavlinov, A; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Pepato, A; Pereira, H; Peressounko, D; Pérez, C; Perini, D; Perrino, D; Peryt, W; Peschek, J; Pesci, A; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Peters, A J; Petrácek, V; Petridis, A; Petris, M; Petrovici, M; Petrov, P; Petta, C; Peyré, J; Piano, S; Piccotti, A; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinsky, L; Pitz, N; Piuz, F; Platt, R; Pluta, J; Pocheptsov, T; Pochybova, S; Podesta Lerma, P L M; Poggio, F; Poghosyan, M G; Poghosyan, T; Polák, K; Polichtchouk, B; Polozov, P; Polyakov, V; Pommeresch, B; Pop, A; Posa, F; Pospísil, V; Potukuchi, B; Pouthas, J; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puddu, G; Pujahari, P; Pulvirenti, A; Punin, A; Punin, V; Putis, M; Putschke, J; Quercigh, E; Rachevski, A; Rademakers, A; Radomski, S; Räihä, T S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Ramírez Reyes, A; Rammler, M; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S; Rashevskaya, I; Rath, S; Read, K F; Real, J; Redlich, K; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J P; Reygers, K; Ricaud, H; Riccati, L; Ricci, R A; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Rivetti, A; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M; Røed, K; Röhrich, D; Román López, S; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Rosinský, P; Rosnet, P; Rossegger, S; Rossi, A; Roukoutakis, F; Rousseau, S; Roy, C; Roy, P; Rubio-Montero, A J; Rui, R; Rusanov, I; Russo, G; Ryabinkin, E; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Safarík, K; Sahoo, R; Saini, J; Saiz, P; Sakata, D; Salgado, C A; Salgueiro Dominques da Silva, R; Salur, S; Samanta, T; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Sano, S; Santo, R; Santoro, R; Sarkamo, J; Saturnini, P; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schindler, H; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schreiner, S; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Segato, G; Semenov, D; Senyukov, S; Seo, J; Serci, S; Serkin, L; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Sgura, I; Shabratova, G; Shahoyan, R; Sharkov, G; Sharma, N; Sharma, S; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siciliano, M; Sicking, E; Siddi, E; Siemiarczuk, T; Silenzi, A; Silvermyr, D; Simili, E; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singhal, V; Singh, R; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Skjerdal, K; Smakal, R; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Snow, H; Søgaard, C; Sokolov, O; Soloviev, A; Soltveit, H K; Soltz, R; Sommer, W; Son, C W; Song, M; Son, H S; Soos, C; Soramel, F; Soyk, D; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Staley, F; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Stefanini, G; Steinbeck, T; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stocco, D; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, P; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Subieta Vásquez, M A; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Susa, T; Swoboda, D; Symons, J; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarka, I; Szostak, A; Szuba, M; Tadel, M; Tagridis, C; Takahara, A; Takahashi, J; Tanabe, R; Tapia Takaki, J D; Taureg, H; Tauro, A; Tavlet, M; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terrevoli, C; Thäder, J; Tieulent, R; Tlusty, D; Toia, A; Tolyhy, T; Torcato de Matos, C; Torii, H; Torralba, G; Toscano, L; Tosello, F; Tournaire, A; Traczyk, T; Tribedy, P; Tröger, G; Truesdale, D; Trzaska, W H; Tsiledakis, G; Tsilis, E; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Turvey, A; Tveter, T S; Tydesjö, H; Tywoniuk, K; Ulery, J; Ullaland, K; Uras, A; Urbán, J; Urciuoli, G M; Usai, G L; Vacchi, A; Vala, M; Valencia Palomo, L; Vallero, S; van den Brink, A; van der Kolk, N; Vande Vyvre, P; van Leeuwen, M; Vannucci, L; Vargas, A; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A; Vassiliev, I; Vassiliou, M; Vechernin, V; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Vergara, S; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vetlitskiy, I; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Vikhlyantsev, O; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Vinogradov, Y; Virgili, T; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopianov, A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Wagner, B; Wagner, V; Wallet, L; Wan, R; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Watanabe, K; Wen, Q; Wessels, J; Wheadon, R; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilk, A; Wilk, G; Williams, M C S; Willis, N; Windelband, B; Xu, C; Yang, C; Yang, H; Yasnopolsky, A; Yermia, F; Yi, J; Yin, Z; Yokoyama, H; Yoo, I-K; Yuan, X; Yushmanov, I; Zabrodin, E; Zagreev, B; Zalite, A; Zampolli, C; Zanevsky, Yu; Zaporozhets, Y; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zbroszczyk, H; Zelnicek, P; Zenin, A; Zepeda, A; Zgura, I; Zhalov, M; Zhang, X; Zhou, D; Zhou, S; Zhu, J; Zichichi, A; Zinchenko, A; Zinovjev, G; Zinovjev, M; Zoccarato, Y; Zychácek, V; Ploskon, M

    2010-01-01

    On 23rd November 2009, during the early commissioning of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), two counter-rotating proton bunches were circulated for the first time concurrently in the machine, at the LHC injection energy of 450 GeV per beam. Although the proton intensity was very low, with only one pilot bunch per beam, and no systematic attempt was made to optimize the collision optics, all LHC experiments reported a number of collision candidates. In the ALICE experiment, the collision region was centred very well in both the longitudinal and transverse directions and 284 events were recorded in coincidence with the two passing proton bunches. The events were immediately reconstructed and analyzed both online and offline. We have used these events to measure the pseudorapidity density of charged primary particles in the central region. In the range |eta| < 0.5, we obtain dNch/deta = 3.10 +- 0.13 (stat.) +- 0.22 (syst.) for all inelastic interactions, and dNch/deta = 3.51 +- 0.15 (stat.) +- 0.25 (syst.)...

  13. LET spectra behind high-density titanium and stainless steel hip implants irradiated with a therapeutic proton beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oancea, Cristina; Ambrožová, Iva; Popescu, A. I.; Mytsin, G. V.; Vondráček, V.; Davídková, Marie

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 3 (2018), s. 7-13 ISSN 1350-4487 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF16_013/0001677 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : proton therapy * metallic hip implant * titanium * stainless steel * track etched detectors Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2016

  14. Proton density differences in signal characteristics of multiple sclerosis plaques versus white matter lesions of small vessel disease and vasculitis on high-field strength MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyster, R.G.; Siegal, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines if variations in signal intensity characteristics on multi-spin-echo images obtained with a high-field-strength magnet can be useful in differentiating demyelinating plaques of multiple sclerosis from other pathologic white matter processes due to small vessel disease and vasculities. Using the first of two multi-spin-echo images obtained with a General Electric 1.5-T magnet, the investigators compared signal intensity characteristics in 30 patients with a firm clinical diagnosis of multiple sclerosis versus a control group of 30 patients with a known clinical history of small-vessel disease and vasculitis are isodense to gray matter on proton-density images

  15. Towards an automated tool to evaluate the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density on quarkonium, D and B meson production in proton-nucleus collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2016-12-27

    We propose a simple and model-independent procedure to account for the impact of the nuclear modification of the gluon density as encoded in nuclear collinear PDF sets on two-to-two partonic hard processes in proton-nucleus collisions. This applies to a good approximation to quarkonium, D and B meson production, generically referred to H. Our procedure consists in parametrising the square of the parton scattering amplitude, A_{gg -> H X} and constraining it from the proton-proton data. Doing so, we have been able to compute the corresponding nuclear modification factors for J/psi, Upsilon and D^0 as a function of y and P_T at sqrt(s_NN)=5 and 8 TeV in the kinematics of the various LHC experiments in a model independent way. It is of course justified since the most important ingredient in such evaluations is the probability of each kinematical configuration. Our computations for D mesons can also be extended to B meson production. To further illustrate the potentiality of the tool, we provide --for the first t...

  16. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  17. Investigation of the nuclear matter density distributions of the exotic 12Be,14Be and 8B nuclei by elastic proton scattering in inverse kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, Stoyanka

    2008-01-01

    In the current experiment, the differential cross sections for proton elastic scattering on the isotopes 7,9,10,11,12,14 Be and 8 B were measured. As results from the experiment, the absolute differential cross sections dσ/dt as a function of the four momentum transfer t were obtained. In this work the differential cross sections for elastic p- 12 Be, p- 14 Be and p- 8 B scattering at low t (t≤0.05(GeV/c) 2 ) are presented. The measured cross sections were analyzed within the Glauber multiple-scattering theory using different density parameterizations, and the nuclear matter density distributions and radii of the investigated isotopes were determined. The determined rms matter radius is 3.11±0.04±0.13 fm. In the case of the 12 Be nucleus the results showed an extended matter distribution as well. For this nucleus a matter radius of 2.82±0.03±0.12 fm was determined. An interesting result is that the free 12 Be nucleus behaves differently from the core of 14 Be and is much more extended than it. Preliminary experimental results for the isotope 8 B are also presented. An extended matter distribution was obtained (though much more compact as compared to the neutron halos). A proton halo structure was observed for the first time with the proton elastic scattering method. The deduced matter radius is 2.60±0.02±0.26 fm. Results from the feasibility studies of the EXL detector setup, performed at the present ESR storage ring, are presented. (orig.)

  18. Proton conducting graft copolymers with tunable length and density of phosphonated side chains for fuel cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Takamuku, Shogo; Jankova Atanasova, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Polysulfones functionalized with highly phosphonated poly(pentafluorostyrene) side chains of different lengths were synthesized applying controlled polymerization and modification methods. The graft copolymers' thermal properties were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry and thermal...... gravimetrical analyses. The proton conductivity of membrane prepared from the graft copolymer with the shortest phosphonated side chains was 134 mS cm(-1) at 100 degrees C under fully immersed conditions. The graft copolymer TEM image shows a nanophase separation of ion-rich segments within the polysulfone...

  19. Measurement of D* meson cross sections at HERA and determination of the gluon density in the proton using NLO QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, C.; Anderson, M.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Arkadov, V.; Arndt, C.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Behrend, H.-J.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bernardi, G.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Brueckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Buerger, J.; Buesser, F.W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Calvet, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Carli, T.; Chabert, E.; Charlet, M.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Contreras, J.G.; Cormack, C.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Davidsson, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; Diaconu, C.; Dirkmann, M.; Dixon, P.; Dlugosz, W.; Donovan, K.T.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Ebert, J.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Elsen, E.; Enzenberger, M.; Erdmann, M.; Fahr, A.B.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Fleischer, M.; Fluegge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gaede, F.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Gorelov, I.; Grab, C.; Graessler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Griffiths, R.K.; Grindhammer, G.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, T.; Hampel, M.; Haustein, V.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herynek, I.; Hewitt, K.; Hiller, K.H.; Hilton, C.D.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Jansen, D.M.; Joensson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.; Jung, H.; Kaestli, H.K.; Kander, M.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnik, O.; Katzy, J.; Kaufmann, O.; Kausch, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koehne, J.H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Kraemerkaemper, T.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Kuepper, A.; Kuester, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Langenegger, U.; Lebedev, A.; Lehner, F.; Lemaitre, V.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobo, G.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, S.; Lueke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Malinovski, E.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martin, G.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; McMahon, T.R.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Metlica, F.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.-O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Moeck, J.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J.V.; Mueller, D.; Mueller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Negri, I.; Newman, P.R.; Nguyen, H.K.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Niedzballa, Ch.; Niggli, H.; Nikitin, D.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Oberlack, H.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Palmen, P.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Passaggio, S.; Patel, G.D.; Pawletta, H.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pieuchot, A.; Pitzl, D.; Poeschl, R.; Pope, G.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Rick, H.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rouse, F.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Schacht, P.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleif, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schoeffel, L.; Schroeder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwab, B.; Sefkow, F.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Siegmon, G.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, M.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiekermann, J.; Spitzer, H.; Squinabol, F.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J.P.; Swart, M.; Tapprogge, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Theissen, J.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Todenhagen, R.; Truoel, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Haecke, A.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; West, L.R.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wittek, C.; Wittmann, E.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wuensch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zini, P.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zurNedden, M.

    1999-01-01

    With the H1 detector at the ep collider HERA, D * meson production cross sections have been measured in deep inelastic scattering with four-momentum transfers Q 2 > 3 GeV 2 and in photoproduction at energies around W γp ∼ 88 GeV and 194 GeV. Next-to-Leading Order QCD calculations are found to describe the differential cross sections within theoretical and experimental uncertainties. Using these calculations, the NLO gluon momentum distribution in the proton, x g g(x g ), has been extracted in the momentum fraction range 7.5 x 10 -4 g -2 at average scales μ 2 = 25 to 50 GeV 2 . The gluon momentum fraction x g has been obtained from the measured kinematics of the scattered electron and the D * meson in the final state. The results compare well with the gluon distribution obtained from the analysis of scaling violations of the proton structure function F 2

  20. Level density parameter dependence of the fission cross sections of some subactinide nuclei induced by protons with the incident energy up to 250 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, A.; Yalim, H.A.; Tel, E.; Sarer, B.; Unal, R.; Sarpuen, I.H.; Kaplan, A.; Dag, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to show the dependence on the choice of the ratio of the level density parameters a f and a n corresponding to the saddle point of fission and equilibrium deformation of nucleus, respectively, of the proton induced fission cross sections of some subactinide targets. The method was employed using different level density parameter ratios for each fission cross section calculation in ALICE/ASH computer code. The ALICE/ASH code calculations were compared both with the available experimental data and with the Prokofiev systematics data. It is found that the fission cross sections dependent heavily on the choice of level density parameter ratio in the fission and neutron emission channels, a f /a n , for some subactinide nuclei. To get a good description of the measured fission cross sections for subactinide nuclei, we used a ratio of the level density parameters in the fission and neutron emission channels, a f /a n , depending both on the target-nucleus and on the energy of the projectile, in agreement with results published in literature.

  1. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  2. Critical fluctuations of the proton density in A+A collisions at 158A GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anticic, T.; Kadija, K.; Susa, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Baatar, B.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Bartke, J.; Kowalski, M.; Rybicki, A. [Polish Academy of Science, H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Beck, H.; Blume, C.; Book, J.; Mitrovski, M.; Renfordt, R.; Rustamov, A.; Schuster, T.; Stock, R.; Stroebele, H. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Betev, L.; Buncic, P.; Karev, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B. [National Center for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Bogusz, M.; Cetner, T.; Grebieszkow, K.; Mackowiak-Pawlowska, M.; Peryt, W.; Pluta, J.; Slodkowski, M.; Szuba, M. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Botje, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Leeuwen, M. van [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Chvala, O. [Charles University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D. [University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Seattle, WA (United States); Eckardt, V.; Schmitz, N.; Seyboth, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Fodor, Z.; Laszlo, A.; Palla, G.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Foka, P.; Friese, V.; Hoehne, C.; Kresan, D.; Sandoval, A.; Vranic, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Gazdzicki, M. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Jan Kochanowski University, Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Makariev, M. [BAS, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Mateev, M. [Sofia University St. Kliment Ohridski, Atomic Physics Department, Sofia (Bulgaria); Mrowczynski, S.; Rybczynski, M.; Stefanek, G.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A. [Jan Kochanowski University, Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Panagiotou, A.D.; Vassiliou, M.; Antoniou, N.G.; Davis, N.; Diakonos, F.K. [University of Athens, Department of Physics, Athens (Greece); Puehlhofer, F. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet, Marburg (Germany); Roland, C.; Roland, G. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Skrzypczak, E. [University of Warsaw, Institute for Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Varga, D. [Eoetvoes Lorant University, Budapest (Hungary); Collaboration: (NA49 Collaboration)

    2015-12-15

    We look for fluctuations expected for the QCD critical point using an intermittency analysis in the transverse momentum phase space of protons produced around midrapidity in the 12.5 % most central C+C, Si+Si and Pb+Pb collisions at the maximum SPS energy of 158A GeV. We find evidence of power-law fluctuations for the Si+Si data. The fitted power-law exponent φ{sub 2} = 0.96{sub -0.25}{sup +0.38}(stat.)±0.16(syst.) is consistent with the value expected for critical fluctuations. Power-law fluctuations had previously also been observed in low-mass π{sup +}π{sup -} pairs in the same Si+Si collisions. (orig.)

  3. Proton radiography of dynamic electric and magnetic fields in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Manuel, M.; Casey, D.; Sinenian, N.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Delettrez, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Soures, J. M.; Shvarts, D.

    2009-01-01

    Time-gated, monoenergetic-proton radiography provides unique measurements of the electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields produced in laser-foil interactions and during the implosion of inertial-confinement-fusion capsules. These experiments resulted in the first observations of several new and important features: (1) observations of the generation, decay dynamics, and instabilities of megagauss B fields in laser-driven planar plastic foils, (2) the observation of radial E fields inside an imploding capsule, which are initially directed inward, reverse direction during deceleration, and are likely related to the evolution of the electron pressure gradient, and (3) the observation of many radial filaments with complex electromagnetic field striations in the expanding coronal plasmas surrounding the capsule. The physics behind and implications of such observed fields are discussed.

  4. Combining density functional theory (DFT) and collision cross-section (CCS) calculations to analyze the gas-phase behaviour of small molecules and their protonation site isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschmans, Jasper; Jacobs, Sam; Williams, Jonathan P; Palmer, Martin; Richardson, Keith; Giles, Kevin; Lapthorn, Cris; Herrebout, Wouter A; Lemière, Filip; Sobott, Frank

    2016-06-20

    Electrospray ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) data show that for some small molecules, two (or even more) ions with identical sum formula and mass, but distinct drift times are observed. In spite of showing their own unique and characteristic fragmentation spectra in MS/MS, no configurational or constitutional isomers are found to be present in solution. Instead the observation and separation of such ions appears to be inherent to their gas-phase behaviour during ion mobility experiments. The origin of multiple drift times is thought to be the result of protonation site isomers ('protomers'). Although some important properties of protomers have been highlighted by other studies, correlating the experimental collision cross-sections (CCSs) with calculated values has proven to be a major difficulty. As a model, this study uses the pharmaceutical compound melphalan and a number of related molecules with alternative (gas-phase) protonation sites. Our study combines density functional theory (DFT) calculations with modified MobCal methods (e.g. nitrogen-based Trajectory Method algorithm) for the calculation of theoretical CCS values. Calculated structures can be linked to experimentally observed signals, and a strong correlation is found between the difference of the calculated dipole moments of the protomer pairs and their experimental CCS separation.

  5. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km.

    The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  6. On the relations between proton influx and D-region electron densities during the polar-cap absorption event of 28-29 October 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations by incoherent-scatter radar have been applied to explore relationships between the fluxes of incident protons and the resulting D-region electron densities during a polar-cap radio-absorption event. Using proton flux data from a GOES geosynchronous satellite, the energy band having the greatest influence at a selected height is estimated by a process of trial and error, and empirical relationships are defined. The height profiles of the effective recombination coefficient are determined for day and night, and the transition over the evening twilight is investigated for the height range 60-70 km. The results show that the day-night change is confined to heights below 80 km, night-time values at the lower levels being consistent with a balance between negative ions and electrons controlled by 3-body attachment and collisional detachment. The daytime results confirm that, contrary to the prediction of some chemical models, a square-law continuity equation may be strictly applied. It is confirmed that, as previously reported, the timing of the sunset change varies with altitude.

  7. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Demirag, Burak; Nas, Omer Fatih; Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih; Yazici, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade

  8. Meniscal tear evaluation. Comparison of a conventional spin-echo proton density sequence with a fast spin-echo sequence utilizing a 512x358 matrix size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, M.A.; Robinson, P.; Grainger, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the sensitivities, specificities, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs) for sagittal conventional spin-echo proton density (SE-PD) and fast spin-echo proton density (FSE-PD) sequences in the diagnosis of meniscal tears when compared to arthroscopic findings utilizing increased FSE matrix acquisition size. Method and materials: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 97 knees (194 menisci) were independently and prospectively interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists over four separate readings at least 3 weeks apart. Readings 1 and 2 included images in all three planes in accordance with the standard protocol with either a SE or FSE sagittal PD, at readings 3 and 4 just the SE or FSE sagittal PD sequences were reported. The FSE sequence was acquired with an increased matrix size, compared to the SE sequence, to provide increased resolution. Menisci were graded for the presence of a tear and statistical analysis to calculate sensitivity and specificity was performed comparing to arthroscopy as the reference standard. ROC analysis for the diagnosis of meniscal tears on the SE and FSE sagittal sequences was also evaluated. Reader concordance for the SE and FSE sequences was calculated. Results: Sixty-seven tears were noted at arthroscopy; 60 were detected on SE and 56 on FSE. The sensitivity and specificity for SE was 90 and 90%, and for FSE was 84 and 94%, respectively, with no significant difference. ROC analysis showed no significant difference between the two sequences and kappa values demonstrated a higher level of reader agreement for the FSE than for the SE reading. Conclusion: Use of a FSE sagittal PD sequence with an increased matrix size provides comparable performance to conventional SE sagittal PD when evaluating meniscal disease with a modern system. The present study indicates an increased level of concordance between readers for the FSE sagittal sequence compared to the conventional SE.

  9. Meniscal tear evaluation. Comparison of a conventional spin-echo proton density sequence with a fast spin-echo sequence utilizing a 512x358 matrix size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, M.A.; Robinson, P. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J., E-mail: andrew.grainger@leedsth.nhs.u [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To determine the sensitivities, specificities, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs) for sagittal conventional spin-echo proton density (SE-PD) and fast spin-echo proton density (FSE-PD) sequences in the diagnosis of meniscal tears when compared to arthroscopic findings utilizing increased FSE matrix acquisition size. Method and materials: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 97 knees (194 menisci) were independently and prospectively interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists over four separate readings at least 3 weeks apart. Readings 1 and 2 included images in all three planes in accordance with the standard protocol with either a SE or FSE sagittal PD, at readings 3 and 4 just the SE or FSE sagittal PD sequences were reported. The FSE sequence was acquired with an increased matrix size, compared to the SE sequence, to provide increased resolution. Menisci were graded for the presence of a tear and statistical analysis to calculate sensitivity and specificity was performed comparing to arthroscopy as the reference standard. ROC analysis for the diagnosis of meniscal tears on the SE and FSE sagittal sequences was also evaluated. Reader concordance for the SE and FSE sequences was calculated. Results: Sixty-seven tears were noted at arthroscopy; 60 were detected on SE and 56 on FSE. The sensitivity and specificity for SE was 90 and 90%, and for FSE was 84 and 94%, respectively, with no significant difference. ROC analysis showed no significant difference between the two sequences and kappa values demonstrated a higher level of reader agreement for the FSE than for the SE reading. Conclusion: Use of a FSE sagittal PD sequence with an increased matrix size provides comparable performance to conventional SE sagittal PD when evaluating meniscal disease with a modern system. The present study indicates an increased level of concordance between readers for the FSE sagittal sequence compared to the conventional SE.

  10. Enhanced vortex pinning and critical current density in proton-irradiated YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, E.L.; Siegal, M.P.; White, A.E.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The appropriate fluence of 2.0 MeV H + ions has been shown previously to enhance the critical current density J c by a factor of two at a magnetic field of 0.9 tesla in 1,000 angstrom thick epitaxial films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ grown by the ex situ BaF 2 process. The as-grown films exhibit single crystal-like behavior in both atomic ordering and J c versus temperature and magnetic field. TRIM simulations suggest that H + irradiation generates mainly point defects throughout the crystal structure. The authors show here that such defects result in an even greater enhancement of J c for fields above 1 tesla plus a significant increase in the apparent vortex pinning potential deduced from magnetization relaxation data

  11. Enhanced vortex pinning and critical current density in proton-irradiated YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, E.L.; Siegal, M.P.; White, A.E.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The appropriate fluence of 2.0 MeV H + ions has been shown previously to enhance the critical current density J c by a factor of two at a magnetic field of 0.9 tesla in 1000 Angstrom thick epitaxial films of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ grown by the ex situ BaF 2 process. The as-grown films exhibit single crystal-like behavior in both atomic ordering and J c versus temperature and magnetic field. TRIM simulations suggest that H + irradiation generates mainly point defects throughout the crystal structure. We show here that such defects produce both a large enhancement of J c for fields above 1 tesla and a significant increase in the apparent vortex pinning potential deduced from magnetization relaxation data

  12. Enhanced vortex pinning and critical current density in proton-irradiated YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, E. L.; Siegal, M. P.; White, A. E.; Hou, S. Y.; Phillips, J. M.

    1992-11-01

    The appropriate fluence of 2.0 MeV H(sup +) ions has been shown previously to enhance the critical current density J(sub c) by a factor of two at a magnetic field of 0.9 tesla in 1000 (Angstrom) thick epitaxial films of YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) grown by the ex situ BaF2 process. The as-grown films exhibit single crystal-like behavior in both atomic ordering and J(sub c) versus temperature and magnetic field. TRIM simulations suggest that H(sup +) irradiation generates mainly point defects throughout the crystal structure. We show here that such defects produce both a large enhancement of J(sub c) for fields above 1 tesla and a significant increase in the apparent vortex pinning potential deduced from magnetization relaxation data.

  13. Current density and polarization curves for radial flow field patterns applied to PEMFCs (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano-Andrade, S.; Hernandez-Guerrero, A.; Spakovsky, M.R. von; Damian-Ascencio, C.E.; Rubio-Arana, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical solution of the current density and velocity fields of a 3-D PEM radial configuration fuel cell is presented. The energy, momentum and electrochemical equations are solved using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code based on a finite volume scheme. There are three cases of principal interest for this radial model: four channels, eight channels and twelve channels placed in a symmetrical path over the flow field plate. The figures for the current-voltage curves for the three models proposed are presented, and the main factors that affect the behavior of each of the curves are discussed. Velocity contours are presented for the three different models, showing how the fuel cell behavior is affected by the velocity variations in the radial configuration. All these results are presented for the case of high relative humidity. The favorable results obtained for this unconventional geometry seems to indicate that this geometry could replace the conventional commercial geometries currently in use.

  14. T1 weighted brain images at 7 Tesla unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF coil receive B1 sensitivity with simultaneous vessel visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-06-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as "intensity field bias". Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B(1) profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T(1)-weighted (T(1)w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T(1) weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T(1) contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B(1) variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B(1) profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T(1)w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T(1)w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T(2)(*) contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 T, provide higher T(1) contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help in identifying small brain structures and that T(2)(*) induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T(1)w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T(1)w structural images. In addition

  15. T1 weighted Brain Images at 7 Tesla Unbiased for Proton Density, T2* contrast and RF Coil Receive B1 Sensitivity with Simultaneous Vessel Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Auerbach, Edwards J.; Olman, Cheryl; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Moeller, Steen

    2009-01-01

    At high magnetic field, MR images exhibit large, undesirable signal intensity variations commonly referred to as “intensity field bias”. Such inhomogeneities mostly originate from heterogeneous RF coil B1 profiles and, with no appropriate correction, are further pronounced when utilizing rooted sum of square reconstruction with receive coil arrays. These artifacts can significantly alter whole brain high resolution T1-weighted (T1w) images that are extensively utilized for clinical diagnosis, for gray/white matter segmentation as well as for coregistration with functional time series. In T1 weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequences, it is possible to preserve a bulk amount of T1 contrast through space by using adiabatic inversion RF pulses that are insensitive to transmit B1 variations above a minimum threshold. However, large intensity variations persist in the images, which are significantly more difficult to address at very high field where RF coil B1 profiles become more heterogeneous. Another characteristic of T1w MPRAGE sequences is their intrinsic sensitivity to Proton Density and T2* contrast, which cannot be removed with post-processing algorithms utilized to correct for receive coil sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate a simple technique capable of producing normalized, high resolution T1w 3D-MPRAGE images that are devoid of receive coil sensitivity, Proton Density and T2* contrast. These images, which are suitable for routinely obtaining whole brain tissue segmentation at 7 Tesla, provide higher T1 contrast specificity than standard MPRAGE acquisitions. Our results show that removing the Proton Density component can help identifying small brain structures and that T2* induced artifacts can be removed from the images. The resulting unbiased T1w images can also be used to generate Maximum Intensity Projection angiograms, without additional data acquisition, that are inherently registered with T1w structural images. In addition, we introduce a simple technique

  16. Performance of Density Functional Theory Procedures for the Calculation of Proton-Exchange Barriers: Unusual Behavior of M06-Type Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Bun; Gilbert, Andrew T B; Gill, Peter M W; Radom, Leo

    2014-09-09

    We have examined the performance of a variety of density functional theory procedures for the calculation of complexation energies and proton-exchange barriers, with a focus on the Minnesota-class of functionals that are generally highly robust and generally show good accuracy. A curious observation is that M05-type and M06-type methods show an atypical decrease in calculated barriers with increasing proportion of Hartree-Fock exchange. To obtain a clearer picture of the performance of the underlying components of M05-type and M06-type functionals, we have investigated the combination of MPW-type and PBE-type exchange and B95-type and PBE-type correlation procedures. We find that, for the extensive E3 test set, the general performance of the various hybrid-DFT procedures improves in the following order: PBE1-B95 → PBE1-PBE → MPW1-PBE → PW6-B95. As M05-type and M06-type procedures are related to PBE1-B95, it would be of interest to formulate and examine the general performance of an alternative Minnesota DFT method related to PW6-B95.

  17. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  18. Effects of clamping force on the water transport and performance of a PEM (proton electrolyte membrane) fuel cell with relative humidity and current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Dowon; Ahn, Jae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Soon; Kim, Yongchan

    2015-01-01

    The clamping force should be applied to a proton electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell due to its structural characteristics. The clamping force affects the ohmic and mass transport resistances in the PEM fuel cell. In this study, the effects of the clamping force on the water transport and performance characteristics of a PEM fuel cell are experimentally investigated with variations in the relative humidity and current density. The water transport characteristics were analyzed by calculating the net drag coefficient. The ohmic resistance decreased with the increase in the clamping force due to the reduced contact resistance and more even membrane hydration. However, the mass transport resistance increased with the increase in the clamping force due to the gas diffusion layer compression. The net drag coefficient decreased with the increase in the clamping force due to high water back-diffusion. Additionally, the relationship between the total resistance and the net drag coefficient was investigated. - Highlights: • Effects of clamping force on the performance of a PEM fuel cell are investigated. • Water transport characteristics are analyzed using net drag coefficient. • Ohmic resistance decreased with clamping force, but mass transport resistance increased. • Net drag coefficient decreased with the increase in clamping force. • Total resistance was significantly degraded for a net drag coefficient below 0.2.

  19. Regarding the use and misuse of retinal protonated Schiff base photochemistry as a test case for time-dependent density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valsson, Omar [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich and Facoltà di Informatica, Instituto di Scienze Computationali, Università della Svizzera italiana, Via Giuseppe Buffi 13, CH-6900 Lugano (Switzerland); Filippi, Claudia, E-mail: c.filippi@utwente.nl [MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Casida, Mark E., E-mail: mark.casida@ujf-grenoble.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Département de Chimie Moléculaire (DCM), Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Grenoble (ICMG), Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble I, F-3801 Grenoble (France)

    2015-04-14

    The excited-state relaxation of retinal protonated Schiff bases (PSBs) is an important test case for biological applications of time-dependent (TD) density-functional theory (DFT). While well-known shortcomings of approximate TD-DFT might seem discouraging for application to PSB relaxation, progress continues to be made in the development of new functionals and of criteria allowing problematic excitations to be identified within the framework of TD-DFT itself. Furthermore, experimental and theoretical ab initio advances have recently lead to a revised understanding of retinal PSB photochemistry, calling for a reappraisal of the performance of TD-DFT in describing this prototypical photoactive system. Here, we re-investigate the performance of functionals in (TD-)DFT calculations in light of these new benchmark results, which we extend to larger PSB models. We focus on the ability of the functionals to describe primarily the early skeletal relaxation of the chromophore and investigate how far along the out-of-plane pathways these functionals are able to describe the subsequent rotation around formal single and double bonds. Conventional global hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are investigated as the presence of Hartree-Fock exchange reduces problems with charge-transfer excitations as determined by the Peach-Benfield-Helgaker-Tozer Λ criterion and by comparison with multi-reference perturbation theory results. While we confirm that most functionals cannot render the complex photobehavior of the retinal PSB, do we also observe that LC-BLYP gives the best description of the initial part of the photoreaction.

  20. High-density kaonic-proton matter (KPM composed of Λ⁎≡K−p multiplets and its astrophysical connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Akaishi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose and examine a new form of high-density neutral composite of Λ⁎≡K−p=(su¯⊗(uud, which may be called anti-Kaonic Proton Matter (KPM, or simply, Λ⁎-Matter, where substantial shrinkage of baryonic bound systems originating from the strong attraction of the (K¯NI=0 interaction takes place, providing a ground-state neutral baryonic system with a large energy gap. The mass of an ensemble of (K−pm, where m, the number of the K−p pair, becomes larger than m≈10, is predicted to drop down below that of its corresponding neutron ensemble, (nm, since the attractive interaction is further increased by the Heitler–London type molecular covalency as well as by chiral symmetry restoration of the QCD vacuum. Since the seed clusters (K−p, K−pp and K−K−pp are short-lived, the formation of such a stabilized relic ensemble, (K−pm, may be conceived during the Big-Bang Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP period in the early universe. At the final stage of baryogenesis a substantial amount of primordial (u¯,d¯'s are transferred and captured into KPM, where the anti-quarks find places to survive forever. The expected KPM state may be cold, dense and neutral q¯q-hybrid (Quark Gluon Bound (QGB states, [s(u¯⊗uud]m, to which the relic of the disappearing anti-quarks plays an essential role as hidden components. KPM may also be produced during the formation and decay of neutron stars in connections with supernova explosions, and other forms may exist as strange quark matter in cosmic dusts.

  1. Comparison of spin echo T1-weighted sequences versus fast spin-echo proton density-weighted sequences for evaluation of meniscal tears at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Andrew B.; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Wu, Jim S.; Smart, L.R.; Medvecky, Michael J.; Haims, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    At our institution, fast spin-echo (FSE) proton density (PD) imaging is used to evaluate articular cartilage, while conventional spin-echo (CSE) T1-weighted sequences have been traditionally used to characterize meniscal pathology. We sought to determine if FSE PD-weighted sequences are equivalent to CSE T1-weighted sequences in the detection of meniscal tears, obviating the need to perform both sequences. We retrospectively reviewed the records of knee arthroscopies performed by two arthroscopy-focused surgeons from an academic medical center over a 2-year period. The preoperative MRI images were interpreted independently by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists who graded the sagittal CSE T1 and FSE PD sequences at different sittings with grades 1-5, where 1 = normal meniscus, 2 = probable normal meniscus, 3 indeterminate, 4 = probable torn meniscus, and 5 = torn meniscus. Each meniscus was divided into an anterior and posterior half, and these halves were graded separately. Operative findings provided the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the two sequences. There were 131 tears in 504 meniscal halves. Using ROC analysis, the reader 1 area under curve for FSE PD was significantly better than CSE T1 (0.939 vs. 0.902, >95% confidence). For reader 2, the difference met good criteria for statistical non-inferiority but not superiority (0.913 for FSE PD and 0.908 for CSE T1; >95% non-inferiority for difference at most of -0.027). FSE PD-weighted sequences, using our institutional protocol, are not inferior to CSE T1-weighted sequences for the detection of meniscal tears and may be superior. (orig.)

  2. Value of Fat-Suppressed Proton-Density-Weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences in Detecting Meniscal Lesions: Comparison with Arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, F.K.W.; Schaefer, P.J.; Brossmann, J.; Frahm, C.; Hilgert, R.E.; Heller, M.; Jahnke, T.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate fat-suppressed (FS) proton-density-weighted (PDw) turbo spin-echo (TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to arthroscopy in the detection of meniscal lesions. Material and Methods: In a prospective study, 31 knee joints were imaged on a 1.5T MR scanner before arthroscopy using the following sequences: (a) coronal and sagittal FS-PDw TSE (TR/TE: 4009/15 ms); (b) coronal T1w SE (TR/TE: 722/20 ms), and sagittal PDw TSE (TR/TE: 3800/15 ms). Other imaging parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, FOV 160 mm, matrix 256x256. A total of 186 meniscal regions (62 menisci; anterior horn, body, posterior horn) were evaluated. Standard of reference was arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (npv), positive predictive value (ppv), and accuracy were calculated. Results: Arthroscopically, meniscal lesions were detected in 55/186 segments (35 medial and 20 lateral meniscal lesions). Sensitivity, specificity, npv, ppv, and accuracy for combination of coronal and sagittal FS PDw TSE were 91.4%, 98.3%, 95%, 97%, and 93.5% for the medial meniscus, and 90%, 98.6%, 97.3%, 94.7%, and 96.8% for the lateral. The results were comparable to the combination of coronal T1w SE and sagittal PDw TSE for the medial (88.6%, 98.3%, 93.4%, 96.9%, 91.4%) and the lateral (90%, 95.9%, 97.2%, 85.7%, 92.5%) meniscus. Conclusion: FS PDw TSE-MR sequences are an excellent alternative for the detection of meniscal lesions in comparison with diagnostic arthroscopy

  3. Modeling the chelation of As(III) in lewisite by dithiols using density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lenora K; Bayse, Craig A

    2015-12-01

    Dithiols such as British anti-lewisite (BAL, rac-2,3-dimercaptopropanol) are an important class of antidotes for the blister agent lewisite (trans-2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine) and, more generally, are chelating agents for arsenic and other toxic metals. The reaction of the vicinal thiols of BAL with lewisite through the chelation of the As(III) center has been modeled using density functional theory (DFT) and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE), a microsolvation method that uses a network of water molecules to mimic the role of bulk solvent in models of aqueous phase chemical reactions. The small activation barriers for the stepwise SN2-type nucleophilic attack of BAL on lewisite (0.7-4.9kcal/mol) are consistent with the favorable leaving group properties of the chloride and the affinity of As(III) for soft sulfur nucleophiles. Small, but insignificant, differences in activation barriers were found for the initial attack of the primary versus secondary thiol of BAL and the R vs S enantiomer. An examination of the relative stability of various dithiol-lewisite complexes shows that ethanedithiols like BAL form the most favorable chelation complexes because the angles formed in five-membered ring are most consistent with the hybridization of As(III). More obtuse S-As-S angles are required for larger chelate rings, but internal As⋯N or As⋯O interactions can enhance the stability of moderate-sized rings. The low barriers for lewisite detoxification by BAL and the greater stability of the chelation complexes of small dithiols are consistent with the rapid reversal of toxicity demonstrated in previously reported animal models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-invasive quantification of hepatic fat fraction by fast 1.0, 1.5 and 3.0 T MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Weigel, Christiane; Albrecht, Lothar; Kirsch, Michael; Lemke, Arne; Lorenz, Gerd; Warzok, Rolf; Hosten, Norbert

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Even mild hepatic steatosis in a split liver donor may cause general liver failure and death in the donor. So far, CT density measurements or percutaneous biopsy is used to determine the presence of hepatic steatosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be an elegant method of non-invasive and non-radiation quantification of hepatic fat content. Methods: Fast gradient echo (GRE) technique was used to discriminate between fat and water spins. Echo time (TE) was adjusted for field strength dependent in-phase and out-of-phase states at 1.0, 1.5 and 3.0 T. Continuous MR signal transition from 100% water to 100% fat was investigated using a wedge water-oil phantom, which was positioned in such a way, that no spatial resolution occurred, thereby combining water and fat in one slice. Results: Using the phantom, a significant difference for a 5% difference in fat content was demonstrated in the range from 20 to 80% fat content (p 2 = 0.93 for TE 6 ms and r 2 = 0.91 for TE 10 ms). Conclusion: The described method can be used to determine the presence of hepatic steatosis of >10% with p < 0.05

  5. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Is an Effective, Non-invasive Method to Evaluate Changes in the Liver Fat Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedderich, Dennis M; Hasenberg, Till; Haneder, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Kücükoglu, Özlem; Canbay, Ali; Otto, Mirko

    2017-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the most common liver disease worldwide and is highly associated with obesity. The prevalences of both conditions have markedly increased in the Western civilization. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and its comorbidities such as NAFLD. Measure postoperative liver fat fraction (LFF) in bariatric patients by using in-opposed-phase MRI, a widely available clinical tool validated for the quantification of liver fat METHODS: Retrospective analyses of participants, who underwent laparoscopic Roux-Y-gastric-bypass (17) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (2) were performed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and anthropometric measurements 1 day before surgery, as well as 6, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, LFF was calculated from fat-only and water-only MR images. Six months after surgery, a significant decrease of LFF and liver volume has been observed along with weight loss, decreased waist circumference, and parameters obtained by body fat measured by BIA. LFF significantly correlated with liver volume in the postoperative course. MRI including in-opposed-phase imaging of the liver can detect the quantitative decrease of fatty infiltration within the liver after bariatric surgery and thus could be a valuable tool to monitor NAFLD/NASH postoperatively.

  6. Improve definition of titanium tandems in MR-guided high dose rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer using proton density weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yanle; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Mutic, Sasa; Richardson, Susan; Gay, Hiram A; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W

    2013-01-01

    For cervical cancer patients treated with MR-guided high dose rate brachytherapy, the accuracy of radiation delivery depends on accurate localization of both tumors and the applicator, e.g. tandem and ovoid. Standard T2-weighted (T2W) MRI has good tumor-tissue contrast. However, it suffers from poor uterus-tandem contrast, which makes the tandem delineation very challenging. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of using proton density weighted (PDW) MRI to improve the definition of titanium tandems. Both T2W and PDW MRI images were obtained from each cervical cancer patient. Imaging parameters were kept the same between the T2W and PDW sequences for each patient except the echo time (90 ms for T2W and 5.5 ms for PDW) and the slice thickness (0.5 cm for T2W and 0.25 cm for PDW). Uterus-tandem contrast was calculated by the equation C = (S u -S t )/S u , where S u and S t represented the average signal in the uterus and the tandem, respectively. The diameter of the tandem was measured 1.5 cm away from the tip of the tandem. The tandem was segmented by the histogram thresholding technique. PDW MRI could significantly improve the uterus-tandem contrast compared to T2W MRI (0.42±0.24 for T2W MRI, 0.77±0.14 for PDW MRI, p=0.0002). The average difference between the measured and physical diameters of the tandem was reduced from 0.20±0.15 cm by using T2W MRI to 0.10±0.11 cm by using PDW MRI (p=0.0003). The tandem segmented from the PDW image looked more uniform and complete compared to that from the T2W image. Compared to the standard T2W MRI, PDW MRI has better uterus-tandem contrast. The information provided by PDW MRI is complementary to those provided by T2W MRI. Therefore, we recommend adding PDW MRI to the simulation protocol to assist tandem delineation process for cervical cancer patients

  7. Proton affinity of diastereoisomers of modified prolines using the kinetic method and density functional theory calculations: role of the cis/trans substituent on the endo/exo ring conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzache, S; Pepe, C; Karoyan, P; Fournier, F; Tabet, J-C

    2005-01-01

    The proton affinity (PA) of cis/trans-3-prolinoleucines and cis/trans-3-prolinoglutamic acids have been studied by the kinetic method and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Several conformations of the neutral and the protonated modified prolines, in particular the endo and exo ring conformations, were analyzed with respect to their contribution to the PA values. When the substituent is an alkyl, both the diastereoisomers have the same PA value. However, the PA values for the diastereoisomers are different when the substituted chain contains functional groups (e.g. a carboxyl group). This variation in PA values could be attributed to the existence of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  9. Investigation of the nuclear matter density distributions of the exotic {sup 12}Be,{sup 14}Be and {sup 8}B nuclei by elastic proton scattering in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilieva, Stoyanka

    2008-07-01

    In the current experiment, the differential cross sections for proton elastic scattering on the isotopes {sup 7,9,10,11,12,14}Be and {sup 8}B were measured. As results from the experiment, the absolute differential cross sections d{sigma}/dt as a function of the four momentum transfer t were obtained. In this work the differential cross sections for elastic p-{sup 12}Be, p-{sup 14}Be and p-{sup 8}B scattering at low t (t{<=}0.05(GeV/c){sup 2}) are presented. The measured cross sections were analyzed within the Glauber multiple-scattering theory using different density parameterizations, and the nuclear matter density distributions and radii of the investigated isotopes were determined. The determined rms matter radius is 3.11{+-}0.04{+-}0.13 fm. In the case of the {sup 12}Be nucleus the results showed an extended matter distribution as well. For this nucleus a matter radius of 2.82{+-}0.03{+-}0.12 fm was determined. An interesting result is that the free {sup 12}Be nucleus behaves differently from the core of {sup 14}Be and is much more extended than it. Preliminary experimental results for the isotope {sup 8}B are also presented. An extended matter distribution was obtained (though much more compact as compared to the neutron halos). A proton halo structure was observed for the first time with the proton elastic scattering method. The deduced matter radius is 2.60{+-}0.02{+-}0.26 fm. Results from the feasibility studies of the EXL detector setup, performed at the present ESR storage ring, are presented. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of vertebral bone marrow lipid profile at 1.5-T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and bone mineral density at dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry: correlation in a swine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Fina, Laura [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unita di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milan (Italy); Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Unita di Radiologia, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    Bone marrow is mainly composed of red (hematopoietic) and yellow (fatty) components. Soon after the birth there is a physiological conversion of the bone marrow from red to yellow, so that the percentage of hematopoietic cells and adipocytes changes with aging. Although bone marrow adipogenesis is a physiologic process involving all mammals, recent studies showed an accelerated marrow adipogenesis associated with several chronic conditions, including osteoporosis [4] and diabetes mellitus. Moreover, this increased marrow fat is accompanied by a decrease in bone density. Marrow fat is therefore increasingly believed to influence the bone microenvironment. Diagnostic tools for quantitative measurement of bone marrow fat and bone mineral density (BMD) include proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and dual-energy Xray absorptiometry (DXA), respectively. Using MRS, an inverse relationship between vertebral bone marrow fat content and lumbar BMD has been demonstrated in patients affected with osteoporosis or with diabetes mellitus. In most studies, a quite standard MRS sequence has been used, with short echo times (TE) for the measurement of the bulk methylene. In this study we sought to optimize the MRS sequence in order to try to measure other fat components of the vertebral bone marrow at 1.5 T. For this purpose, we used an animal model that allowed long acquisition times and repeated measures. Moreover, we aimed at estimating in this model the relationship between vertebral bone marrow fat content at proton MRS and BMD at DXA.

  11. Measurement of vertebral bone marrow lipid profile at 1.5-T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and bone mineral density at dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry: correlation in a swine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Fina, Laura; Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow is mainly composed of red (hematopoietic) and yellow (fatty) components. Soon after the birth there is a physiological conversion of the bone marrow from red to yellow, so that the percentage of hematopoietic cells and adipocytes changes with aging. Although bone marrow adipogenesis is a physiologic process involving all mammals, recent studies showed an accelerated marrow adipogenesis associated with several chronic conditions, including osteoporosis [4] and diabetes mellitus. Moreover, this increased marrow fat is accompanied by a decrease in bone density. Marrow fat is therefore increasingly believed to influence the bone microenvironment. Diagnostic tools for quantitative measurement of bone marrow fat and bone mineral density (BMD) include proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and dual-energy Xray absorptiometry (DXA), respectively. Using MRS, an inverse relationship between vertebral bone marrow fat content and lumbar BMD has been demonstrated in patients affected with osteoporosis or with diabetes mellitus. In most studies, a quite standard MRS sequence has been used, with short echo times (TE) for the measurement of the bulk methylene. In this study we sought to optimize the MRS sequence in order to try to measure other fat components of the vertebral bone marrow at 1.5 T. For this purpose, we used an animal model that allowed long acquisition times and repeated measures. Moreover, we aimed at estimating in this model the relationship between vertebral bone marrow fat content at proton MRS and BMD at DXA.

  12. PROTON MICROSCOPY AT FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Mariam, F. G.; Golubev, A. A.; Turtikov, V. I.; Varentsov, D.

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and a facility has been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international effort has investigated a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR(PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. It is also proposed to install the PRIOR system at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung before installation at FAIR for dynamic experiments with different drivers including high explosives, pulsed power and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  13. The study of electroplating trivalent CrC alloy coatings with different current densities on stainless steel 304 as bipolar plate of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Cheng; Hou, Kung-Hsu; Lu, Chen-En; Ger, Ming-Der

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the trivalent Cr–C coatings were electroplated on stainless steel 304 (SS304) substrates for an application in bipolar plates (BPPs) that was because of coating's excellent electric conductivity and corrosion resistance. The images of scanning electron microscope showed that the thickness of the coatings was between 1.4 and 11.4 μm, which increased with increase of coating current density. The surface morphology of Cr–C plated at coating current density of 10 A/dm 2 was smooth, crack- and pinhole-free, while cracks and pinholes appearing in networks were observed apparently in the deposits plated at a higher coating current density. Additionally, the C content in the coating decreased with increasing the coating current density. Moreover, the polarization curve with different coating current densities (10, 30, 50 A/dm 2 ) exhibited the coating prepared at 10 A/dm 2 and 10 min possessing the best corrosion resistance (I corr = 9.360 × 10 −8 A/cm 2 ). The contact resistance of Cr–C plated at coating current density of 10 A/dm 2 was the lowest (16.54 mΩ cm 2 at 150 N cm −2 ), which showed great potential of application. The single cell test with Cr–C coated SS304 prepared at coating current density of 10 A/dm 2 as BPPs showed the highest current density (about 791.532 mA/cm 2 ) and power density (about 270.150 mW/cm 2 ). - Highlights: • The Cr–C coatings on steel are electroplated for utilization as bipolar plate. • The electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance increase with carbon content. • The power density of Cr–C coated steel is superior to the bare steel

  14. The study of electroplating trivalent CrC alloy coatings with different current densities on stainless steel 304 as bipolar plate of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hsiang-Cheng [Graduate School of Defense Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hou, Kung-Hsu, E-mail: khou@ndu.edu.tw [Department of Power Vehicle and Systems Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lu, Chen-En [Graduate School of Defense Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Ger, Ming-Der [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    In this study, the trivalent Cr–C coatings were electroplated on stainless steel 304 (SS304) substrates for an application in bipolar plates (BPPs) that was because of coating's excellent electric conductivity and corrosion resistance. The images of scanning electron microscope showed that the thickness of the coatings was between 1.4 and 11.4 μm, which increased with increase of coating current density. The surface morphology of Cr–C plated at coating current density of 10 A/dm{sup 2} was smooth, crack- and pinhole-free, while cracks and pinholes appearing in networks were observed apparently in the deposits plated at a higher coating current density. Additionally, the C content in the coating decreased with increasing the coating current density. Moreover, the polarization curve with different coating current densities (10, 30, 50 A/dm{sup 2}) exhibited the coating prepared at 10 A/dm{sup 2} and 10 min possessing the best corrosion resistance (I{sub corr} = 9.360 × 10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}). The contact resistance of Cr–C plated at coating current density of 10 A/dm{sup 2} was the lowest (16.54 mΩ cm{sup 2} at 150 N cm{sup −2}), which showed great potential of application. The single cell test with Cr–C coated SS304 prepared at coating current density of 10 A/dm{sup 2} as BPPs showed the highest current density (about 791.532 mA/cm{sup 2}) and power density (about 270.150 mW/cm{sup 2}). - Highlights: • The Cr–C coatings on steel are electroplated for utilization as bipolar plate. • The electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance increase with carbon content. • The power density of Cr–C coated steel is superior to the bare steel.

  15. Diagnosis by proton bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, V.W.; Koehler, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Beams of monoenergetic protons or other charged ions are passed through the living human body to detect abnormalities and obstructions in body tissue, which abnormalities and obstructions are visualized as density variations in the particle image emerging from the body part under investigation. The particles used are preferably protons having an energy of 100 to 300 MeV, more especially 200 to 300 MeV. The method is of use in detecting inter alia tumors, blood clots, infarcts, soft tissue lesions and multiple sclerosis in patients without exposure to high radiation dosages. 6 claims, 2 drawing figures

  16. Qualitative assessment of ultra-fast non-Grotthuss proton dynamics in S1 excited state of liquid H2O from ab initio time-dependent density functional theory★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    We study qualitatively ultra-fast proton transfer (PT) in the first singlet (S1) state of liquid water (absorption onset) through excited-state dynamics by means of time-dependent density functional theory and ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. We find that after the initial excitation, a PT occurs in S1 in form of a rapid jump to a neighboring water molecule, on which the proton either may rest for a relatively long period of time (as a consequence of possible defect in the hydrogen bond network) followed by back and forth hops to its neighboring water molecule or from which it further moves to the next water molecule accompanied by back and forth movements. In this way, the proton may become delocalized over a long water wire branch, followed again by back and forth jumps or short localization on a water molecule for some femtoseconds. As a result, the mechanism of PT in S1 is in most cases highly non-Grotthuss-like, delayed and discrete. Furthermore, upon PT an excess charge is ejected to the solvent trap, the so-called solvated electron. The spatial extent of the ejected solvated electron is mainly localized within one solvent shell with overlappings on the nearest neighbor water molecules and delocalizing (diffuse) tails extending beyond the first solvent sphere. During the entire ultra-short excited-state dynamics the remaining OH radical from the initially excited water molecule exhibits an extremely low mobility and is non-reactive. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2017-80329-7.

  17. Proton impurity in the neutron matter: a nuclear polaron problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutschera, M [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Wojcik, W [Politechnika Krakowska, Cracow (Poland)

    1992-10-01

    We study interactions of a proton impurity with density oscillations of the neutron matter in a Debye approximation. The proton-phonon coupling is of the deformation-potential type at long wavelengths. It is weak at low density and increases with the neutron matter density. We calculate the proton`s effective mass perturbatively for a weak coupling, and use a canonical transformation technique for stronger couplings. The proton`s effective mass grows significantly with density, and at higher densities the proton impurity can be localized. This behaviour is similar to that of the polaron in solids. We obtain properties of the localized proton in the strong coupling regime from variational calculations, treating the neutron in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. (author). 14 refs, 8 figs.

  18. Comparison of in vivo vs. frozen vs. Thiel cadaver specimens in visualisation of anatomical structures of the ankle on proton density Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) through a visual grading analysis (VGA) study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarb, F.; McNulty, J.; Gatt, A.; Formosa, C.; Chockalingam, N.; Evanoff, M.G.; Rainford, L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The use of cadavers for medical education purposes and for radiology research methodologies which involve subjective image quality evaluation of anatomical criteria is well documented. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of cadaver tissue preservation in producing MR images that are representative of living tissue by comparing the visualisation of anatomical structures of the ankle obtained from live and cadaver (fresh frozen and Thiel embalmed) specimens through a visual grading analysis (VGA) study. Methods: A VGA study was conducted on an image data set consisting of 4 coronal proton density weighted (PDw) sequences obtained from ankles of a live patient and those of a cadaveric specimen, of which the right ankle was frozen and the left Thiel embalmed. Results: Comparison of the image quality scores obtained from: the live patient vs. the Thiel specimen indicate a significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) between the scores in favour of the Thiel specimen; between the live patient vs. the frozen specimen indicate a significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) in favour of the frozen specimen and between the frozen vs. the Thiel specimen indicate a significant difference (p ≤ 0.05) in favour of the Thiel specimen. Conclusions: The advantages of the use of cadavers (frozen or Thiel embalmed) has been shown to also apply for use with proton density (PD) MR imaging. The preservation of cadavers especially using Thiel is a suitable alternative for MRI optimisation and protocol development purposes. - Highlights: • Thiel preservation: a better alternative compared to frozen methods for MR image analysis. • VGA demonstrated an efficient research study design for the investigation of embalming methods. • Thiel embalmed cadavers: an acceptable alternative from patients for MR imaging optimisation. • Additional MR sequences and increased sample sizes are recommended for further investigation.

  19. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  20. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  1. Evaluation of B3LYP, X3LYP, and M06-Class Density Functionals for Predicting the Binding Energies of Neutral, Protonated, and Deprotonated Water Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Diallo, Mamadou S; van Duin, Adri C T; Goddard, William A

    2009-04-14

    In this paper we assess the accuracy of the B3LYP, X3LYP, and newly developed M06-L, M06-2X, and M06 functionals to predict the binding energies of neutral and charged water clusters including (H2O)n, n = 2-8, 20), H3O(+)(H2O)n, n = 1-6, and OH(-)(H2O)n, n = 1-6. We also compare the predicted energies of two ion hydration and neutralization reactions on the basis of the calculated binding energies. In all cases, we use as benchmarks calculated binding energies of water clusters extrapolated to the complete basis set limit of the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory with the effects of higher order correlation estimated at the coupled-cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations in the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. We rank the accuracy of the functionals on the basis of the mean unsigned error (MUE) between calculated benchmark and density functional theory energies. The corresponding MUE (kcal/mol) for each functional is listed in parentheses. We find that M06-L (0.73) and M06 (0.84) give the most accurate binding energies using very extended basis sets such as aug-cc-pV5Z. For more affordable basis sets, the best methods for predicting the binding energies of water clusters are M06-L/aug-cc-pVTZ (1.24), B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) (1.29), and M06/aug-cc-PVTZ (1.33). M06-L/aug-cc-pVTZ also gives more accurate energies for the neutralization reactions (1.38), whereas B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) gives more accurate energies for the ion hydration reactions (1.69).

  2. The relationship between proton pump inhibitor use and longitudinal change in bone mineral density: a population-based study [corrected] from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targownik, Laura E; Leslie, William D; Davison, K Shawn; Goltzman, David; Jamal, Sophie A; Kreiger, Nancy; Josse, Robert G; Kaiser, Stephanie M; Kovacs, Christopher S; Prior, Jerilynn C; Zhou, Wei

    2012-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use has been identified as a risk factor for hip and vertebral fractures. Evidence supporting a relationship between PPI use and osteoporosis remains scant. Demonstrating that PPIs are associated with accelerated bone mineral density (BMD) loss would provide supportive evidence for a mechanism through which PPIs could increase fracture risk. We used the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study data set, which enrolled a population-based sample of Canadians who underwent BMD testing of the femoral neck, total hip, and lumbar spine (L1-L4) at baseline, and then again at 5 and 10 years. Participants also reported drug use and exposure to risk factors for osteoporosis and fracture. Multivariate linear regression was used to determine the independent association of PPI exposure and baseline BMD, and on change in BMD at 5 and 10 years. In all, 8,340 subjects were included in the baseline analysis, with 4,512 (55%) undergoing year 10 BMD testing. After adjusting for potential confounders, PPI use was associated with significantly lower baseline BMD at the femoral neck and total hip. PPI use was not associated with a significant acceleration in covariate-adjusted BMD loss at any measurement site after 5 and 10 years of follow-up. PPI users had lower BMD at baseline than PPI non-users, but PPI use over 10 years did not appear to be associated with accelerated BMD loss. The reasons for discordant findings between PPI use at baseline and during follow-up require further study.

  3. Comparison of three-dimensional isotropic and conventional MR arthrography with respect to the diagnosis of rotator cuff and labral lesions: Focus on isotropic fat-suppressed proton density and VIBE sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.Y.; Lee, I.S.; Park, S.K.; Cheon, S.J.; Ahn, J.M.; Song, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracies of three-dimensional (3D) isotropic magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using fat-suppressed proton density (PD) or volume interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences with that of conventional MRA for the diagnosis of rotator cuff and labral lesions. Materials and methods: Eighty-six patients who underwent arthroscopic surgery were included. 3D isotropic sequences were performed in the axial plane using fat-suppressed PD (group A) in 53 patients and using VIBE (group B) in 33 patients. Reformatted images were obtained corresponding to conventional images, and evaluated for the presence of labral and rotator cuff lesions using conventional and 3D isotropic sequences. The diagnostic performances of each sequence were determined using arthroscopic findings as the standard. Results: Good to excellent interobserver agreements were obtained for both 3D isotropic sequences for the evaluation of rotator cuff and labral lesions. Excellent agreement was found between two-dimensional (2D) and 3D isotropic MRA, except for supraspinatus tendon (SST) tears by both readers and for subscapularis tendon (SCT) tears by reader 2 in group B. 2D MRA and 3D isotropic sequences had high diagnostic performances for rotator and labral tears, and the difference between the two imaging methods was insignificant. Conclusions: The diagnostic performances of 3D isotropic VIBE and PD sequences were similar to those of 2D MRA

  4. Proton channeling in Au at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes, J.E.; Vargas, P.

    1996-01-01

    The electronic energy loss for low velocity protons channeled in the direction single crystal Au is calculated. The spatial distribution of valence electronic density in Au is calculated using Tight Binding Linear Muffin Tin Method. The proton trajectories are determined by numerical integration of the classical motion equation, and the energy loss is evaluated using the calculated valence electronic density in the friction term. The results allow to describe qualitatively the non linear behavior of energy loss with ion velocity observed experimentally. (author)

  5. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byungjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 110–746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, 138–736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 410–769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungyong [Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  6. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  7. Role of three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D FLAIR) and proton density magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and evaluation of lesion extent of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Jitender; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy; Singh, Atampreet; Rathore, Chathurbhuj; Radhakrishnan, Ashalatha; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Bahuleyan, Biji

    2010-01-01

    Background: Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is often associated with epilepsy. Identification of FCD can be difficult due to subtle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. Though fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence detects the majority of these lesions, smaller lesions may go unnoticed while larger lesions may be poorly delineated. Purpose: To determine the ability of a specialized epilepsy protocol in visualizing and delineating the extent of FCD. Material and Methods: We compared the imaging findings in nine patients with cortical malformation who underwent routine epilepsy MR imaging as well as a specialized epilepsy protocol. All imaging was done on a 1.5T MR unit. The specialized epilepsy protocol included 3D FLAIR in the sagittal plane as well as proton density (PD) and high-resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images in the transverse plane. Results: In all nine patients, the specialized protocol identified lesion anatomy better. In three patients in whom routine MRI was normal, the specialized epilepsy protocol including 3D FLAIR helped in identifying the lesions. One of these patients underwent surgery, and histo-pathology revealed a cortical dysplasia. In one patient, lesion characterization was improved, while in the remaining patients the extent of the FCD was more clearly demonstrated in the 3D FLAIR and PD images. Statistical analysis of images for cortical thickness, cortical signal intensity, adjacent white matter abnormalities, and gray-white matter junction showed significant statistical difference in the ability of 3D FLAIR to assess these aspects over conventional images. PD images were also found superior to the routine epilepsy protocol in assessment of cortical signal, adjacent white matter, and gray-white matter junction. Conclusion: Specialized MRI sequences and techniques should be performed whenever there is a high suspicion of cortical dysplasia, especially when they remain occult on conventional MR protocols. These techniques

  8. Three-Dimensional Isotropic Fat-Suppressed Proton Density-Weighted MRI at 3 Tesla Using a T/R-Coil Can Replace Multiple Plane Two-Dimensional Sequences in Knee Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, R; Gieseke, J; Luetkens, J A; Kupczyk, P; Maedler, B; Kukuk, G M; Träber, F; Agha, B; Rauch, M; Rajakaruna, N; Willinek, W; Schild, H H; Hadizadeh, D R

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether a 3 D proton density-weighted fat-suppressed sequence (PDwFS) of the knee is able to replace multiplanar 2D-PDwFS. 52 patients (26 men, mean age: 41.9 ± 14.5years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee at 3.0 Tesla using a T/R-coil. The imaging protocol included 3 planes of 2D-PDwFS (acquisition time (AT): 6:40 min; voxel sizes: 0.40 - 0.63 × 0.44 - 0.89 × 3mm³) and a 3D-PDwFS (AT: 6:31 min; voxel size: 0.63 × 0.68 × 0.63mm³). Homogeneity of fat suppression (HFS), artifacts, and image sharpness (IS) were evaluated on a 5-point scale (5[excellent] - 1[non-diagnostic]). The sum served as a measure for the overall image quality (OIQ). Contrast ratios (CR) compared to popliteal muscle were calculated for the meniscus (MEN), anterior (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL). In 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery, two radiologists evaluated the presence of meniscal, ligamental and cartilage lesions to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. The CR was higher in the ACL, PCL and MEN in 3D- PDwFS compared to 2D-PDwFS (p Tesla Using a T/R-Coil Can Replace Multiple Plane Two-Dimensional Sequences in Knee Imaging. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2016; 188: 949 - 956. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Skeletal muscle lipid quantification in lean and diabetic subjects using in vivo proton MR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Valaparla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To quantify and compare the intramyocellular (IMCL, extramyocellular (EMCL lipids and total fat fraction in human vastus lateralis muscle between lean and type 2 diabetic (T2DM subjects using long echo time (TE STEAM proton MR spectroscopy (1H-MRS. Methods: 1H-MRS using single voxel (15 × 15 × 15 mm3 stimulated acquisition mode (STEAM was performed in right vastus lateralis m. on 10 lean controls (age: 28.3 ± 3.94 yo, BMI: 24.25 ± 3.20 kg/m2 and 7 type 2 diabetic (age: 54.28 ± 6.42 yo, BMI: 31.34 ± 3.13 kg/m2 subjects with Siemens 3T MRI and a four-channel flex coil. Unsuppressed water spectra (NSA = 16 with TR/TE = 3000/30 ms, TM = 10 ms BW = 2000 Hz, and water-suppressed spectra (NSA = 128 with TR/TE = 3000/270 ms, TM = 10 ms, fixed water suppression BW = 50 Hz were acquired. Spectral intensity ratios of IMCL-CH2, EMCL-CH2 and total lipid (IMCL + EMCL with unsuppressed water signal (W were converted into absolute concentrations expressed in mmol/kg. Fat fraction (100 × F/(W+F was also calculated, where F includes the signal intensities of IMCL and EMCL methylene (CH2n, peaks only.Results: Comparison of IMCL (controls: 11.70 ± 6.7, T2DM: 21.74 ± 10.2, p < 0.01, EMCL (controls: 22.89 ± 18.42, T2DM: 77.21 ± 33.4, p < 0.001 and total lipid (64.35 mmol/kg less in controls, p < 0.001 showed statistical significance using two-tailed student’s t-test. Mean fat fraction (% exhibited considerable inter-individual variability for controls (3.14 ± 2.09; range: 1.34 – 7.04 and T2DM (9.34 ± 2.88; range: 4.15 – 13.67 and deemed significant (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Single voxel STEAM 1H-MRS at long TE provides a robust non-invasive method for characterizing lipids within localized muscle regions, with well-resolved IMCL/EMCL peak separation. Regional lipid estimate and fat fraction in vastus lateralis muscle is significantly different in T2DM compared to normal lean controls.------------------------------Cite this article as

  10. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  11. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  12. SU-E-J-63: Feasibility Study of Proton Digital Tomosynthesis in Proton Beam Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, B; Kwak, J; Lee, J; Cho, S; Park, S; Yoo, S; Chung, K; Cho, S; Lim, Y; Shin, D; Lee, S; Kim, J

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of proton tomosynthesis as daily positioning of patients and compared the results with photon tomosynthesis as an alternative to conventional portal imaging or on-board cone-beam computed tomography. Dedicated photon-like proton beam using the passively scattered proton beams by the cyclotron was generated for proton imaging. The eleven projections were acquired over 30 degree with 3 degree increment in order to investigate the performance of proton tomosynthesis. The cylinder blocks and resolution phantom were used to evaluate imaging performance. Resolution phantom of a cylinder of diameter 12 cm was used to investigate the reconstructed imaging characteristics. Electron density cylinder blocks with diameter of 28 mm and height of 70 mm were employed to assess the imaging quality. The solid water, breast, bone, adipose, lung, muscle, and liver, which were tissue equivalent inserts, were positioned around the resolution phantom. The images were reconstructed by projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm and total variation minimization (TVM) methods. The Gafchromic EBT films were utilized for measuring the photon-like proton beams as a proton detector. In addition, the photon tomosynthesis images were obtained for a comparison with proton tomosynthesis images. The same angular sampling data were acquired for both proton and photon tomosynthesis. In the resolution phantom image obtained proton tomosynthesis, down to 1.6 mm diameter rods were resolved visually, although the separation between adjacent rods was less distinct. In contrast, down to 1.2 mm diameter rods were resolved visually in the reconstructed image obtained photon tomosynthesis. Both proton and photon tomosynthesis images were similar in intensities of different density blocks. Our results demonstrated that proton tomosynthesis could make it possible to provide comparable tomography imaging to photon tomosynthesis for positioning as determined by manual registration

  13. TU-C-12A-01: Measurement of Skeletal Muscle Lipids in Type 2 Diabetes Using in Vivo Proton MR Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valaparla, S; Boone, G; Ripley, E; Abdul-Ghani, M; Duong, T; Clarke, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the intramyocellular (IMCL), extramyocellular (EMCL) lipids and total fat fraction in human vastus lateralis (VL) muscle between lean controls and type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects using long echo time in vivo proton MR spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) Methods: 1 H-MRS single voxel (15 × 15 × 15 mm 3 ) stimulated acquisition mode (STEAM) was performed in right vastus lateralis m. on 10 lean controls (age: 28.3±3.94 yrs, BMI: 24.25±3.20 kg/m 2 ) and 7 type 2 diabetic (age: 54.28±6.42 yrs, BMI: 31.34±3.13 kg/m 2 ) subjects with Siemens 3T MRI and four-channel flex coil. Unsuppressed water spectra (NSA = 16) with TR/TE = 3000/30 msec, TM = 10 msec, BW = 2000 Hz, and water-suppressed spectra (NSA = 128) with TR/TE = 3000/270 msec, TM = 10 msec, and fixed water suppression BW = 50 Hz were acquired. Spectral intensity ratios of IMCL-CH 2 , EMCL-CH 2 and total lipid (IMCL + EMCL) with unsuppressed water signal (W) were converted into absolute concentrations expressed in mmol/kg. Fat fraction (100 × F/(W+F)) was calculated, where F includes the signal intensities of IMCL and EMCL methylene (CH 2 )n, peaks only. Results: Comparison of IMCL (controls: 11.70 ± 6.7, T2DM: 21.74 ± 10.2, p ≤ 0.01), EMCL (controls: 22.89 ± 18.42, T2DM: 77.21 ± 33.4, p ≤ 0.001) and total lipid (64.35 mmol/kg less in controls, p ≤ 0.001) showed statistical significance using two-tailed student t-test. Fat fraction (%) exhibited considerable inter-individual variability for controls (3.14 ± 2.09; range: 1.34 - 7.04) and T2DM (9.34 ± 2.88; range: 4.15 - 13.67) and deemed significant (p ≤ 0.05 Conclusion: Single voxel STEAM 1 H-MRS at long TE provides a robust non-invasive method for characterizing lipids within localized muscle regions, with well-resolved IMCL/EMCL peak separation. Regional lipid estimate and fat fraction in VL m. was significantly different in T2DM compared to lean controls. American Heart Association Southwest Affiliate Pre

  14. TU-C-12A-01: Measurement of Skeletal Muscle Lipids in Type 2 Diabetes Using in Vivo Proton MR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valaparla, S; Boone, G; Ripley, E; Abdul-Ghani, M; Duong, T; Clarke, G [UT Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the intramyocellular (IMCL), extramyocellular (EMCL) lipids and total fat fraction in human vastus lateralis (VL) muscle between lean controls and type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects using long echo time in vivo proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) Methods: {sup 1}H-MRS single voxel (15 × 15 × 15 mm{sup 3}) stimulated acquisition mode (STEAM) was performed in right vastus lateralis m. on 10 lean controls (age: 28.3±3.94 yrs, BMI: 24.25±3.20 kg/m{sup 2}) and 7 type 2 diabetic (age: 54.28±6.42 yrs, BMI: 31.34±3.13 kg/m{sup 2}) subjects with Siemens 3T MRI and four-channel flex coil. Unsuppressed water spectra (NSA = 16) with TR/TE = 3000/30 msec, TM = 10 msec, BW = 2000 Hz, and water-suppressed spectra (NSA = 128) with TR/TE = 3000/270 msec, TM = 10 msec, and fixed water suppression BW = 50 Hz were acquired. Spectral intensity ratios of IMCL-CH{sub 2}, EMCL-CH{sub 2} and total lipid (IMCL {sub +} EMCL) with unsuppressed water signal (W) were converted into absolute concentrations expressed in mmol/kg. Fat fraction (100 × F/(W+F)) was calculated, where F includes the signal intensities of IMCL and EMCL methylene (CH{sub 2})n, peaks only. Results: Comparison of IMCL (controls: 11.70 ± 6.7, T2DM: 21.74 ± 10.2, p ≤ 0.01), EMCL (controls: 22.89 ± 18.42, T2DM: 77.21 ± 33.4, p ≤ 0.001) and total lipid (64.35 mmol/kg less in controls, p ≤ 0.001) showed statistical significance using two-tailed student t-test. Fat fraction (%) exhibited considerable inter-individual variability for controls (3.14 ± 2.09; range: 1.34 - 7.04) and T2DM (9.34 ± 2.88; range: 4.15 - 13.67) and deemed significant (p ≤ 0.05 Conclusion: Single voxel STEAM {sup 1}H-MRS at long TE provides a robust non-invasive method for characterizing lipids within localized muscle regions, with well-resolved IMCL/EMCL peak separation. Regional lipid estimate and fat fraction in VL m. was significantly different in T2DM compared to lean controls. American Heart

  15. Delayed protons and properties of proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    The object of the investigation is to study the properties of proton-rich nuclei. The emphasis in the proposed survey is made on investigations in the range of Z > 50. Measurement of the total energy in emission of delayed protons (DP) enables one to determine the difference between the masses of initial and final isotopes. The statistical model of the DP emission is used for describing the proton spectrum. A comparison of the DP experimental and theoretical spectra shows that the presence of local resonances in the strength functions of the β dacay is rather a rule than an exception. Studies into the fine structure of the proton spectra supply information of the density of nuclei considerably removed from the β-stability line at the excitation energies of 3-7 MeV. The aproaches for retrieval of nuclear information with the aid of proton radiators developed so far can serve as a good basis for systematic investigation over a wide range of A and Z

  16. The Structure of the Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  17. Techniques for quantification of liver fat in risk stratification of diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, J.P.; Spoerl, M.C.; Mahlke, C.; Hegenscheid, K.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty liver disease plays an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Accurate techniques for detection and quantification of liver fat are essential for clinical diagnostics. Chemical shift-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a simple approach to quantify liver fat content. Liver fat quantification using chemical shift-encoded MRI is influenced by several bias factors, such as T2* decay, T1 recovery and the multispectral complexity of fat. The confounder corrected proton density fat fraction is a simple approach to quantify liver fat with comparable results independent of the software and hardware used. The proton density fat fraction is an accurate biomarker for assessment of liver fat. An accurate and reproducible quantification of liver fat using chemical shift-encoded MRI requires a calculation of the proton density fat fraction. (orig.) [de

  18. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  19. SU-G-IeP1-07: Inaccuracy of Lesion Blood Flow Quantification Related to the Proton Density Reference Image in Arterial Spin Labeling MRI of Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jen, M; Johnson, J; Hou, P; Liu, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR, 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients

  20. SU-G-IeP1-07: Inaccuracy of Lesion Blood Flow Quantification Related to the Proton Density Reference Image in Arterial Spin Labeling MRI of Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jen, M; Johnson, J; Hou, P; Liu, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cerebral blood flow quantification in arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI requires an estimate of the equilibrium magnetization of blood, which is often obtained by a set of proton density (PD) reference image. Normally, a constant blood-brain partition coefficient is assumed across the brain. However, this assumption may not be valid for brain lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of lesion-related PD variations on ASL quantification in patients with brain tumors. Methods: MR images for posttreatment evaluation of 42 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively analyzed. These images were acquired on a 3T MRI scanner, including T2-weighted FLAIR, 3D pseudo-continuous ASL and post-contrast T1-weighted images. Anatomical images were coregistered with ASL images using the SPM software. Regions of interest (ROIs) of the enhancing and FLAIR lesions were manually drawn on the coregistered images. ROIs of the contralateral normal appearing tissues were also determined, with the consideration of approximating coil sensitivity patterns in lesion ROIs. Relative lesion blood flow (lesion/contralateral tissue) was calculated from both the CBF map (dependent on the PD) and the ΔM map for comparison. Results: The signal intensities in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions were significantly different than contralateral tissues on the PD reference image (p<0.001). The percent signal difference ranged from −15.9 to 19.2%, with a mean of 5.4% for the enhancing lesion, and from −2.8 to 22.9% with a mean of 10.1% for the FLAIR lesion. The high/low lesion-related PD signal resulted in inversely proportional under-/over-estimation of blood flow in both enhancing and FLAIR lesions. Conclusion: Significant signal differences were found between lesions and contralateral tissues in the PD reference image, which introduced errors in blood flow quantification in ASL. The error can be up to 20% in individual patients with an average of 5- 10% for the group of patients

  1. Differentiation between grade 3 and grade 4 articular cartilage defects of the knee: Fat-suppressed proton density-weighted versus fat-suppressed three-dimensional gradient-echo MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Yeon; Jee, Won-Hee; Kim, Sun Ki (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: whjee@catholic.ac.kr; Koh, In-Jun (Dept. of Joint Reconstruction Center, Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seoul (Korea)); Kim, Jung-Man (Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-05-15

    Background: Fat-suppressed (FS) proton density (PD)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FS three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo imaging such as spoiled gradient-recalled (SPGR) sequence have been established as accurate methods for detecting articular cartilage defects. Purpose: To retrospectively compare the diagnostic efficacy between FS PD-weighted and FS 3D gradient-echo MRI for differentiating between grade 3 and grade 4 cartilage defects of the knee with arthroscopy as the standard of reference. Material and Methods: Twenty-one patients who had grade 3 or 4 cartilage defects in medial femoral condyle at arthroscopy and knee MRI were included in this study: grade 3, >50% cartilage defects; grade 4, full thickness cartilage defects exposed to the bone. Sagittal FS PD-weighted MR images and FS 3D gradient-echo images with 1.5 T MR images were independently graded for the cartilage abnormalities of medial femoral condyle by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's exact test. Inter-observer agreement in grading of cartilage was assessed using ? coefficients. Results: Arthroscopy revealed grade 3 defects in 17 patients and grade 4 defects in 4 patients in medial femoral condyles. For FS 3D gradient-echo images grade 3 defects were graded as grade 3 (n=15) and grade 4 (n=2), and all grade 4 defects (n=4) were correctly graded. However, for FS PD-weighted MR images all grade 3 defects were misinterpreted as grade 1 (n=1) and grade 4 (n=16), whereas all grade 4 defects (n=4) were correctly graded. FS 3D gradient-echo MRI could differentiate grade 3 from grade 4 defects (P=0.003), whereas FS PD-weighted imaging could not (P=1.0). Inter-observer agreement was substantial (?=0.70) for grading of cartilage using FS PD-weighted imaging, whereas it was moderate (?=0.46) using FS 3D gradient-echo imaging. Conclusion: FS 3D gradient-echo MRI is more helpful for differentiating between grade 3 and grade 4 cartilage

  2. Exploration of the Singlet O2 Oxidation of 8-Oxoguanine by Guided-Ion Beam Scattering and Density Functional Theory: Changes of Reaction Intermediates, Energetics, and Kinetics upon Protonation/Deprotonation and Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Lu, Wenchao; Liu, Jianbo

    2017-02-09

    8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) is one of the most common DNA lesions resulting from reactive oxygen species and ionizing radiation, and is involved in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and cell death. Notably, 8-oxodGuo is more reactive toward singlet (a 1 Δ g ) O 2 than the undamaged guanosine, and the lesions arising from the secondary oxidation of 8-oxodGuo are more mutagenic. Herein the 1 O 2 oxidation of free base 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) was investigated at different initial conditions including protonated [8-oxoG + H] + , deprotonated [8-oxoG - H] - , and their monohydrates. Experiment was carried out on a guided-ion beam scattering tandem mass spectrometer. Measurements include the effects of collision energy (E col ) on reaction cross sections over a center-of-mass E col range from 0.1 to 0.5 eV. The aim of this study is to quantitatively probe the sensitivity of the early stage of 8-oxoG oxidation to ionization and hydration. Density functional theory and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations were performed to identify the intermediates and the products along reaction pathways and locate accessible reaction potential energy surfaces, and to rationalize reaction outcomes from energetic and kinetic points of view. No product was observed for the reaction of [8-oxoG + H] + ·W 0,1 (W = H 2 O) because insurmountable barriers block the addition of 1 O 2 to reactant ions. Neither was [8-oxoG - H] - reactive with 1 O 2 , in this case due to the rapid decay of transient intermediates to starting reactants. However, the nonreactivity of [8-oxoG - H] - was inverted by hydration; as a result, 4,5-dioxetane of [8-oxoG - H] - was captured as the main oxidation product. Reaction cross section for [8-oxoG - H] - ·W + 1 O 2 decreases with increasing E col and becomes negligible above 0.3 eV, indicating that the reaction is exothermic and has no barriers above reactants. The contrasting oxidation behaviors of [8-oxoG + H] + ·W 0,1 and [8-oxoG - H] - ·W 0

  3. Three-dimensional isotropic fat-suppressed proton density-weighted MRI at 3 tesla using a T/R-coil can replace multiple plane two-dimensional sequences in knee imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homsi, R.; Luetkens, J.A. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Gieseke, J. [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate whether a 3D proton density-weighted fat-suppressed sequence (PDwFS) of the knee is able to replace multiplanar 2D-PDwFS. 52 patients (26 men, mean age: 41.9±14.5 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee at 3.0 Tesla using a T/R-coil. The imaging protocol included 3 planes of 2D-PDwFS (acquisition time (AT): 6:40 min; voxel sizes: 0.40-0.63 x 0.44-0.89 x 3 mm{sup 3}) and a 3D-PDwFS (AT: 6:31 min; voxel size: 0.63 x 0.68 x 0.63 mm{sup 3}). Homogeneity of fat suppression (HFS), artifacts, and image sharpness (IS) were evaluated on a 5-point scale (5[excellent] - 1[non-diagnostic]). The sum served as a measure for the overall image quality (OIQ). Contrast ratios (CR) compared to popliteal muscle were calculated for the meniscus (MEN), anterior (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL). In 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery, two radiologists evaluated the presence of meniscal, ligamental and cartilage lesions to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. The CR was higher in the ACL, PCL and MEN in 3D- PDwFS compared to 2D-PDwFS (p<0.01 for ACL and PCL; p=0.07 for MEN). Compared to 2D images, the OIQ was rated higher in 3D-PDwFS images (p<0.01) due to fewer artifacts and HFS despite the lower IS (p<0.01). The sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection in 3D- and 2D-PDwFS were similar. Compared to standard multiplanar 2D-PDwFS knee imaging, isotropic high spatial resolution 3D-PDwFS of the knee at 3.0T can be acquired with high image quality in a reasonable scan time. Multiplanar reformations in arbitrary planes may serve as an additional benefit of 3D-PDwFS.

  4. DFT studies on proton-ethylene collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiping; Zhang Fengshou; Wang Jing

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA)which applied to valence electrons, coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics of ions, the microscopic mechanisms of collisions between energetic protons and ethylene are studied. Not only the amount of energy lost of the projectile, but also the electron and vibration excitations of the target are identified. In addition, the influences of the collision orientation on the energy loss of the proton and excitation dynamics of ethylene are discussed. It is found that the ionization is enhanced and more electrons are captured by the proton when the proton with the impact energy less than 250 eV moves perpendicularly to the molecular plane. A strong relation between the proton energy lost and the impact orientation is obtained when the impact energy is larger than 250 eV. (authors)

  5. Aerosol composition studies using accelerator proton bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.W.; Winchester, J.W.; Akselsson, R.

    1974-01-01

    The proton beam of the Florida State University Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator is being used to make quantitative determinations of the composition of particulate matter found in the atmosphere. Proton scattering using 16 MeV incident particle energy is employed to resolve the light elements (up to Cl), while elements Al and heavier are observed via proton induced x-ray emission analysis. In order to realize advantages of these proton excited analyses, specialized techniques are used, such as the use of uniform beams which entirely cover the area of targets of nonuniform areal density. Also, specialized air sampling equipment was built to take advantage of the small size of samples required for proton-induced analyses. The multielement character, ease of automation, and short time (several minutes) needed for analysis make these techniques attractive from the standpoint of analysis cost per sample

  6. Exclusive compton scattering on the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.P.; Chudakov, E.; DeJager, C.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Keppel, C.; Klein, F.; Kuss, M.

    1999-01-01

    An experiment is proposed to measure the cross sections for Real Compton Scattering from the proton in the energy range 3-6 GeV and over a wide angular range, and to measure the longitudinal and transverse components of the polarization transfer to the recoil proton at a single kinematic point. Together, these measurements will test models of the reaction mechanism and determine new structure functions of the proton that are related to the same non-forward parton densities that determine the elastic electron scattering form factors and the parton densities. The experiment utilizes an untagged Bremsstrahlung photon beam and the standard Hall A cryogenic targets. The scattered photon is detected in a photon spectrometer, currently under construction. The coincident recoil proton is detected in one of the Hall A magnetic spectrometers and its polarization components are measured in the existing Focal Plane Polarimeter. This proposal extends and supersedes E97 - 108 which was approved by PAC13. (author)

  7. Exclusive compton scattering on the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.P.; Chudakov, E.; DeJager, C.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Keppel, C.; Klein, F.; Kuss, M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)] [and others

    1999-07-01

    An experiment is proposed to measure the cross sections for Real Compton Scattering from the proton in the energy range 3-6 GeV and over a wide angular range, and to measure the longitudinal and transverse components of the polarization transfer to the recoil proton at a single kinematic point. Together, these measurements will test models of the reaction mechanism and determine new structure functions of the proton that are related to the same non-forward parton densities that determine the elastic electron scattering form factors and the parton densities. The experiment utilizes an untagged Bremsstrahlung photon beam and the standard Hall A cryogenic targets. The scattered photon is detected in a photon spectrometer, currently under construction. The coincident recoil proton is detected in one of the Hall A magnetic spectrometers and its polarization components are measured in the existing Focal Plane Polarimeter. This proposal extends and supersedes E97 - 108 which was approved by PAC13. (author)

  8. Exclusive Compton Scattering on the Proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; DeJager, C.; Degtyarenko, P.; Ent, R.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Keppel, C.; Klein, F.; Kuss, M.; LeRose, J.; Liang, M.; Michaels, R.; Mitchell, J.; Liyanage, N.; Rutt, P.; Saha, A.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Bouwhuis, M.; Chang, T.H.; Holt, R. J.; Nathan, A. M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Wijesooriya, K.; Williamson, S. E.; Dodge, G.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Radyushkin, A.; Sabatie, F.; Weinstein, L. B.; Ulmer, P.; Bosted, P.; Finn, J. M.; Jones, M.; Churchwell, S.; Howell, C.; Gilman, R.; Glashausser, C.; Jiang, X.; Ransome, R.; Strauch, S.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.; Fonvielle, H.; Roblin, Y.; Bertozzi, W.; Gilad, S.; Rowntree, D.; Zu, Z.; Brown, D.; Chang, G.; Afanasev, A.; Egiyan, K.; Hoohauneysan, E.; Ketikyan, A.; Mailyan, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Shahinyan, A.; Voskanyan, H.; Boeglin, W.; Markowitz, P.; Hines, J.; Strobel, G.; Templon, J.; Feldman, G.; Morris, C. L.; Gladyshev, V.; Lindgren, R. A.; Calarco, J.; Hersman, W.; Leuschner, M.; Gasparian, A.

    1999-01-01

    An experiment is proposed to measure the cross sections for Real Compton Scattering from the proton in the energy range 3-6 GeV and over a wide angular range; and to measure the longitudinal and transverse components of the polarization transfer to the recoil proton at a single kinematic point. Together; these measurements will test models of the reaction mechanism and determine new structure functions of the proton that are related to the same nonforward parton densities that determine the elastic electron scattering form factors and the parton densities. The experiment utilizes an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the standard Hall A cryogenic targets. The scattered photon is detected in a photon spectrometer; currently under construction. The coincident recoil proton is detected in one of the Hall A magnetic spectrometers and its polarization components are measured in the existing Focal Plane Polarimeter. This proposal extends and supercedes E97-108 which was approved by PAC13

  9. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Bonanno, D. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Maccioni, G. [INFN – Cagliari Division, Cagliari (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E. [Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to ~1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of ~15′ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  10. Application of protons to computer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.; Bradbury, J.N.; Cannon, T.M.; Hutson, R.L.; Laubacher, D.B.; Macek, R.; Paciotti, M.A.; Taylor, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the application of protons to computed tomography can result in a significant dose advantage relative to x rays. Thus, at the same dose as is delivered by contemporary commercial x-ray scanners, a proton scanner could produce reconstructions with a factor of 2 or more improvement in density resolution. Whether such an improvement can result in significantly better diagnoses of human disease is an open question which can only be answered by the implementation of a proton scanner in a clinical situation

  11. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  12. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  13. Energetic magnetospheric protons in the plasma depletion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuselier, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field draping against the Earth's dayside subsolar magnetopause creates a region of reduced plasma density and increased magnetic field called the plasma depletion layer. In this region, leakage of energetic ions from the Earth's magnetosphere onto magnetic field lines in the plasma depletion layer can be studied without interference from ions accelerated at the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Experiment/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) observations for 13 plasma depletion layer events are used to determine the characteristics of energetic protons between a few keV/e and ∼100keV/e leaked from the magnetosphere. Results indicate that the leaked proton distributions resemble those in the magnetosphere except that they have lower densities and temperatures and much higher velocities parallel (or antiparallel) and perpendicular to the magnetic field. Compared to the low-energy magnetosheath proton distributions present in the depletion layer, the leaked energetic proton distributions typically have substantially higher flow velocities along the magnetic field indicate that the leaked energetic proton distributions to contribute to the energetic proton population seen upstream and downstream from the quasi-parallel bow shock. However, their contribution is small compared to the contribution from acceleration of protons at the bow shock because the leaked proton densities are on the order of 10 times smaller than the energetic proton densities typically observed in the vicinity of the quasi-parallel bow shock

  14. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  15. Baryon production in proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.M.; Werner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by the recent rapidity spectra of baryons and antibaryons in pp collisions at 158 GeV and the Ω-bar/Ω ratio discussion, we reviewed string formation mechanism and some string models. This investigation told us how color strings are formed in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions

  16. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  17. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  18. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Koehler, Markus K

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision.\\\\ Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium.\\\\ To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-...

  19. Multicomponent density functional theory embedding formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culpitt, Tanner; Brorsen, Kurt R.; Pak, Michael V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon, E-mail: shs3@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Ave, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) methods have been developed to treat two types of particles, such as electrons and nuclei, quantum mechanically at the same level. In the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) approach, all electrons and select nuclei, typically key protons, are treated quantum mechanically. For multicomponent DFT methods developed within the NEO framework, electron-proton correlation functionals based on explicitly correlated wavefunctions have been designed and used in conjunction with well-established electronic exchange-correlation functionals. Herein a general theory for multicomponent embedded DFT is developed to enable the accurate treatment of larger systems. In the general theory, the total electronic density is separated into two subsystem densities, denoted as regular and special, and different electron-proton correlation functionals are used for these two electronic densities. In the specific implementation, the special electron density is defined in terms of spatially localized Kohn-Sham electronic orbitals, and electron-proton correlation is included only for the special electron density. The electron-proton correlation functional depends on only the special electron density and the proton density, whereas the electronic exchange-correlation functional depends on the total electronic density. This scheme includes the essential electron-proton correlation, which is a relatively local effect, as well as the electronic exchange-correlation for the entire system. This multicomponent DFT-in-DFT embedding theory is applied to the HCN and FHF{sup −} molecules in conjunction with two different electron-proton correlation functionals and three different electronic exchange-correlation functionals. The results illustrate that this approach provides qualitatively accurate nuclear densities in a computationally tractable manner. The general theory is also easily extended to other types of partitioning schemes for multicomponent systems.

  20. Density dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.

    1994-01-01

    An effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is defined by an optimal fit to select on-and half-off-of-the-energy shell t-and g-matrices determined by solutions of the Lippmann-Schwinger and Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equations with the Paris nucleon-nucleon interaction as input. As such, it is seen to better reproduce the interaction on which it is based than other commonly used density dependent effective interactions. The new (medium modified) effective interaction when folded with appropriate density matrices, has been used to define proton- 12 C and proton- 16 O optical potentials. With them elastic scattering data are well fit and the medium effects identifiable. 23 refs., 8 figs

  1. Probing water structure and transport in proton exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ling, X.

    2018-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) have attracted tremendous attention as alternative energy sources because of their high energy density and practically zero greenhouse gas emission - water is their only direct by-product. Critical to the function of PEMFCs is fast proton and water

  2. Spherical proton emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Semmes, P.B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Various theoretical approaches to proton emission from spherical nuclei are investigated, and it is found that all the methods employed give very similar results. The calculated decay widths are found to be qualitatively insensitive to the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential, i.e., changing the potential parameters over a fairly large range typically changes the decay width by no more than a factor of ∼3. Proton half-lives of observed heavy proton emitters are, in general, well reproduced by spherical calculations with the spectroscopic factors calculated in the independent quasiparticle approximation. The quantitative agreement with experimental data obtained in our study requires that the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential be chosen carefully. It also suggests that deformed proton emitters will provide invaluable spectroscopic information on the angular momentum decomposition of single-proton orbitals in deformed nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  4. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  5. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  6. Mechanisms of proton conductance in polymer electrolyte membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikerling, M.; Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.

    2001-01-01

    We provide a phenomenological description of proton conductance in polymer electrolyte membranes, based on contemporary views of proton transfer processes in condensed media and a model for heterogeneous polymer electrolyte membrane structure. The description combines the proton transfer events...... in a single pore with the total pore-network performance and, thereby, relates structural and kinetic characteristics of the membrane. The theory addresses specific experimentally studied issues such as the effect of the density of proton localization sites (equivalent weight) of the membrane material...

  7. Moving protons with pendant amines: proton mobility in a nickel catalyst for oxidation of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Molly; Shaw, Wendy J; Raugei, Simone; Chen, Shentan; Yang, Jenny Y; Kilgore, Uriah J; DuBois, Daniel L; Bullock, R Morris

    2011-09-14

    Proton transport is ubiquitous in chemical and biological processes, including the reduction of dioxygen to water, the reduction of CO(2) to formate, and the production/oxidation of hydrogen. In this work we describe intramolecular proton transfer between Ni and positioned pendant amines for the hydrogen oxidation electrocatalyst [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+) (P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2) = 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-dicyclohexyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane). Rate constants are determined by variable-temperature one-dimensional NMR techniques and two-dimensional EXSY experiments. Computational studies provide insight into the details of the proton movement and energetics of these complexes. Intramolecular proton exchange processes are observed for two of the three experimentally observable isomers of the doubly protonated Ni(0) complex, [Ni(P(Cy)(2)N(Bn)(2)H)(2)](2+), which have N-H bonds but no Ni-H bonds. For these two isomers, with pendant amines positioned endo to the Ni, the rate constants for proton exchange range from 10(4) to 10(5) s(-1) at 25 °C, depending on isomer and solvent. No exchange is observed for protons on pendant amines positioned exo to the Ni. Analysis of the exchange as a function of temperature provides a barrier for proton exchange of ΔG(‡) = 11-12 kcal/mol for both isomers, with little dependence on solvent. Density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental observations, suggesting metal-mediated intramolecular proton transfers between nitrogen atoms, with chair-to-boat isomerizations as the rate-limiting steps. Because of the fast rate of proton movement, this catalyst may be considered a metal center surrounded by a cloud of exchanging protons. The high intramolecular proton mobility provides information directly pertinent to the ability of pendant amines to accelerate proton transfers during catalysis of hydrogen oxidation. These results may also have broader implications for proton movement in

  8. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  9. Proton channeling in Au at low energies; Canalizacion de protones en Au a bajas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, J E; Vargas, P [Chile Univ., Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    The electronic energy loss for low velocity protons channeled in the <100> direction single crystal Au is calculated. The spatial distribution of valence electronic density in Au is calculated using Tight Binding Linear Muffin Tin Method. The proton trajectories are determined by numerical integration of the classical motion equation, and the energy loss is evaluated using the calculated valence electronic density in the friction term. The results allow to describe qualitatively the non linear behavior of energy loss with ion velocity observed experimentally. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  11. Neutron transition densities for the 2+-8+ multiplet of states in 90Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onegin, M.S.; Plavko, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron transition densities for the 2 + -8 + levels in 90 Zr were extracted in the process of analyzing (p,p ' ) scattering at 400 MeV. They were compared with the calculated neutron transition densities and with the experimental proton transition densities. Radial distributions of the experimental neutron and proton transition densities for each state were found to be different. (orig.)

  12. Proton scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumeaux, A.; Layly, V.; Schaeffer, R.

    1977-01-01

    This article is devoted to the analysis of the most recent Saclay data of elastic and inelastic proton scattering on nuclei at incident energies around 1GeV ( 16 O, the Ca isotopes, the Ni isotopes, 90 Zr and 208 Pb). Various theories (Impulse or Glauber approximation) are comapred. It is shown that the reaction mechanism is very well understood at 1GeV and that, at these energies, absorption and distortion is small enough, so one can extract nuclear densities from the experiment. In particular, the shape of the neutron densities is given, and compared to the Hartree-Fock predictions. The uncertainties, especially in the determination of the neutron radii are discussed [fr

  13. Proton decay: spectroscopic probe beyond the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seweryniak, D; Davids, C N; Robinson, A; Woods, P J; Blank, B; Carpenter, M P; Davinson, T; Freeman, S J; Hammond, N; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Khoo, T L; Liu, Z; Mukherjee, G; Shergur, J; Sinha, S; Sonzogni, A A; Walters, W B; Woehr, A

    2005-01-01

    Proton decay has been transformed in recent years from an exotic phenomenon into a powerful spectroscopic tool. The frontiers of experimental and theoretical proton-decay studies will be reviewed. Different aspects of proton decay will be illustrated with recent results on the deformed proton emitter 135 Tb, the odd-odd deformed proton emitter 130 Eu, the complex fine structure in the odd-odd 146 Tm nucleus and on excited states in the transitional proton emitter 145 Tm

  14. Review of inelastic proton-proton reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston

    1973-01-01

    The most important new results on inelastic proton-proton scattering obtained with the new machines, I.S.R. and N.A.L., are: (1) The inelastic cross-section increases monotonically with energy from threshold to 1500 GeV/c. Above 6 GeV/c the energy variation has a s /sup +0.04/ behaviour. (2) Scaling is observed at I.S.R. energies in pion production. Confirmation is obtained of the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation. (3) The results are in general, consistent with the two-component model-one class of events being produced by diffraction dissociation and the other by a short-range-order process (e.g. the multiperipheral model). (4) There are indications that the protons have a granular structure; this from observation of secondaries of large transverse momenta. (33 refs).

  15. Probing the density tail of radioactive nuclei with antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Obertelli, Alexandre; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Corsi, Anna; Pollacco, Emmanuel; Flavigny, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    We propose an experiment to determine the proton and neutron content of the radial density tail in short-lived nuclei. The objectives are to (i) to evidence new proton and neutron halos, (ii) to understand the development of neutron skins in medium-mass nuclei, (iii) to provide a new observable that characterises the density tail of short-lived nuclei.

  16. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...... proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK (a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires....

  17. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  18. On the proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-07-01

    The problem of the proton decay is considered taking into account that in actual experiments there is an interaction of the proton with its environment which could imply an increase of its theoretical lifetime. It is seen that, by application of the time-energy uncertainty relation, no prolongation of the lifetime is obtained in this case. (author)

  19. PS proton source

    CERN Multimedia

    1959-01-01

    The first proton source used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron (PS) which started operation in 1959. This is CERN's oldest accelerator still functioning today (2018). It is part of the accelerator chain that supplies proton beams to the Large Hadron Collider. The source is a Thonemann type. In order to extract and accelerate the protons at high energy, a high frequency electrical field is used (140Mhz). The field is transmitted by a coil around a discharge tube in order to maintain the gas hydrogen in an ionised state. An electrical field pulse, in the order of 15kV, is then applied via an impulse transformer between anode and cathode of the discharge tube. The electrons and protons of the plasma formed in the ionised gas in the tube, are then separated. Currents in the order of 200mA during 100 microseconds have benn obtained with this type of source.

  20. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed

  1. Proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, R.R.

    1978-04-01

    A discussion is given of proton storage ring beam dynamic characteristics. Topics considered include: (1) beam energy; (2) beam luminosity; (3) limits on beam current; (4) beam site; (5) crossing angle; (6) beam--beam interaction; (7) longitudinal instability; (8) effects of scattering processes; (9) beam production; and (10) high magnetic fields. Much of the discussion is related to the design parameters of ISABELLE, a 400 x 400 GeV proton---proton intersecting storage accelerator to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  2. ATLAS Forward Proton Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grieco, Chiara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system is the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The full two-arm setup was installed during the 2016/2017 EYETS. This allows measurements of processes with two forward protons: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. In 2017, AFP participated in the ATLAS high-luminosity data taking on the day-by-day basis. In addition, several special runs with reduced luminosity were taken. The poster will present the AFP detectors and the lessons learned from the last year operation and some performance from 2016 and 2017.

  3. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  4. Electron - proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    Electron-proton storage rings allow us to study the interaction between the two basic constituents of matter, electrons and quarks at very short distances. Such machines were first discussed in connection with the ISR but the idea was abandoned because of the anticipated low counting rate. The interest in electron-proton storage rings was rekindeled by the discovery of large pointlike cross sections in lepton-hardon interactions and several/sup 2-15/ projects have been discussed during the past decade. However, despite a glorious past, which includes the discovery of quarks and neutral currents, and a multitude of proposals no electron-proton storage ring has ever been built. What we might learn by studying electron-proton collisions at high energies is discussed. After some brief comments on present proposals the proposed DESY ep project HERA is described as an example of how to realize such a machine

  5. Apparatus for proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors. 10 claims, 7 drawing figures

  6. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  7. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  8. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  9. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  10. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  11. Structure and Intramolecular Proton Transfer of Alanine Radical Cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gab Yong

    2012-01-01

    The structures of the four lowest alanine conformers, along with their radical cations and the effect of ionization on the intramolecular proton transfer process, are studied using the density functional theory and MP2 method. The energy order of the radical cations of alanine differs from that of the corresponding neutral conformers due to changes in the basicity of the NH 2 group upon ionization. Ionization favors the intramolecular proton transfer process, leading to a proton-transferred radical-cation structure, [NH 3 + -CHCH 3 -COO·], which contrasts with the fact that a proton-transferred zwitterionic conformer is not stable for a neutral alanine in the gas phase. The energy barrier during the proton transfer process is calculated to be about 6 kcal/mol

  12. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a

  13. Intermediate energy proton scattering from 10B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.R.; Shute, G.G.; Spicer, R.S.; Henderson, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Differential cross sections have been measured for 200 MeV proton scattering from 10 B. Data for six low lying natural parity levels below 6 MeV excitation energy are presented. Distorted wave analysis using a density dependent nucleon-nucleon interaction has assessed model spectroscopies of these excited states. The significance of the contribution from quadrupole scattering to the elastic cross section is discussed. 49 refs., 5 tabs., 21 figs

  14. Local Equation of State for Protons, and Implications for Proton Heating in the Solar Wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Kasper, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind protons temperature is observed to decrease with distance to the Sun at a slower rate than expected from an adiabatic expansion law: the protons are therefore said to be heated. This observation raises the question of the evaluation of the heating rate, and the question of the heat source.These questions have been investigated by previous authors by gathering proton data on various distances to the Sun, using spacecraft as Helios or Ulysses, and then computing the radial derivative of the proton temperature in order to obtain a heating rate from the internal energy equation. The problem of such an approach is the computation of the radial derivative of the temperature profile, for which uncertainties are very large, given the dispersion of the temperatures measured at a given distance.An alternative approach, that we develop in this paper, consists in looking for an equation of state that links locally the pressure (or temperature) to the mass density. If such a relation exists then one can evaluate the proton heating rate on a local basis, without having any space derivative to compute.Here we use several years of STEREO and WIND proton data to search for polytropic equation of state. We show that such relationships are indeed a good approximation in given solar wind's velocity intervals and deduce the associated protons heating rates as a function of solar wind's speed. The obtained heating rates are shown to scale from around 1 kW/kg in the slow wind to around 10 kW/kg in the fast wind, in remarkable agreement with the rate of energy observed by previous authors to cascade in solar wind's MHD turbulence at 1 AU. These results therefore support the idea of proton turbulent heating in the solar wind.

  15. Double streams of protons in the distant geomagnetic tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villante, U.; Lazarus, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Two intermingled streams of protons have been observed in the distant geomagnetic tail. The number densities of the two streams are comparable, and their velocity difference tends to lie along the field direction. The lower-velocity stream is probably composed of magnetosheath protons which have diffused through the boundary of the distant tail. The higher-velocity stream appears to originate in the field reversal region.

  16. Double streams of protons in the distant geomagnetic tail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villante, U.; Lazarus, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    Two intermingled streams of protons have been observed in the distant geomagnetic tail. The number densities of the two streams are comparable, and their velocity difference tends to lie along the field direction. The lower-velocity stream is probably composed of magnetosheath protons which have diffused through the boundary of the distant tail. The higher-velocity stream appears to originate in the field reversal region

  17. Proton ring trapping in a gated magnetic mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrow, P.D.; Greenly, J.B.; Hammer, D.A.; Sudan, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    An axis-encircling proton ring has been trapped for times (roughly-equal4 μs) much longer than the ion cyclotron period (roughly-equal80 ns). The rings, with mean radius 10 cm and with particle energies 15 protons during the first pass and 2 x 10 13 protons during the eighth and final pass. With a central solenoidal field of 0.8 T, the peak diamagnetism and azimuthal current density of the injected ring were typically 10 mT (100 G) and 10 A/cm 2 , respectively

  18. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  19. Proton and hydrogen transport through two-dimensional monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seel, Max; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion of protons and hydrogen atoms in representative two-dimensional materials is investigated. Specifically, density functional calculations were performed on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), phosphorene, silicene, and molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) monolayers to study the surface interaction and penetration barriers for protons and hydrogen atoms employing finite cluster models. The calculated barrier heights correlate approximately with the size of the opening formed by the three-fold open sites in the monolayers considered. They range from 1.56 eV (proton) and 4.61 eV (H) for graphene to 0.12 eV (proton) and 0.20 eV (H) for silicene. The results indicate that only graphene and h-BN monolayers have the potential for membranes with high selective permeability. The MoS 2 monolayer behaves differently: protons and H atoms become trapped between the outer S layers in the Mo plane in a well with a depth of 1.56 eV (proton) and 1.5 eV (H atom), possibly explaining why no proton transport was detected, suggesting MoS 2 as a hydrogen storage material instead. For graphene and h-BN, off-center proton penetration reduces the barrier to 1.38 eV for graphene and 0.11 eV for h-BN. Furthermore, Pt acting as a substrate was found to have a negligible effect on the barrier height. In defective graphene, the smallest barrier for proton diffusion (1.05 eV) is found for an oxygen-terminated defect. Therefore, it seems more likely that thermal protons can penetrate a monolayer of h-BN but not graphene and defects are necessary to facilitate the proton transport in graphene. (paper)

  20. Proton and hydrogen transport through two-dimensional monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Max; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion of protons and hydrogen atoms in representative two-dimensional materials is investigated. Specifically, density functional calculations were performed on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), phosphorene, silicene, and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayers to study the surface interaction and penetration barriers for protons and hydrogen atoms employing finite cluster models. The calculated barrier heights correlate approximately with the size of the opening formed by the three-fold open sites in the monolayers considered. They range from 1.56 eV (proton) and 4.61 eV (H) for graphene to 0.12 eV (proton) and 0.20 eV (H) for silicene. The results indicate that only graphene and h-BN monolayers have the potential for membranes with high selective permeability. The MoS2 monolayer behaves differently: protons and H atoms become trapped between the outer S layers in the Mo plane in a well with a depth of 1.56 eV (proton) and 1.5 eV (H atom), possibly explaining why no proton transport was detected, suggesting MoS2 as a hydrogen storage material instead. For graphene and h-BN, off-center proton penetration reduces the barrier to 1.38 eV for graphene and 0.11 eV for h-BN. Furthermore, Pt acting as a substrate was found to have a negligible effect on the barrier height. In defective graphene, the smallest barrier for proton diffusion (1.05 eV) is found for an oxygen-terminated defect. Therefore, it seems more likely that thermal protons can penetrate a monolayer of h-BN but not graphene and defects are necessary to facilitate the proton transport in graphene.

  1. Proton therapy in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities but with the development of more compact and reliable accelerators it is now possible to realistically plan for proton therapy in an Australian hospital. The Australian National Proton Project has been formed to look at the feasibility of a facility which would be primarily for patient treatment but would also be suitable for research and commercial applications. A detailed report will be produced by the end of the year. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. With the development of hospital-based facilities, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. . Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in

  2. Proton irradiation effects on gallium nitride-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Aditya P.

    Proton radiation effects on state-of-the-art gallium nitride-based devices were studied using Schottky diodes and high electron-mobility transistors. The device degradation was studied over a wide range of proton fluences. This study allowed for a correlation between proton irradiation effects between different types of devices and enhanced the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiation damage in GaN-based devices. Proton irradiation causes reduced carrier concentration and increased series resistance and ideality factor in Schottky diodes. 1.0-MeV protons cause greater degradation than 1.8-MeV protons because of their higher non-ionizing energy loss. The displacement damage in Schottky diodes recovers during annealing. High electron-mobility transistors exhibit extremely high radiation tolerance, continuing to perform up to a fluence of ˜1014 cm-2 of 1.8-MeV protons. Proton irradiation creates defect complexes in the thin-film structure. Decreased sheet carrier mobility due to increased carrier scattering and decreased sheet carrier density due to carrier removal by the defect centers are the primary damage mechanisms. Interface disorder at either the Schottky or the Ohmic contact plays a relatively unimportant part in overall device degradation in both Schottky diodes and high electron-mobility transistors.

  3. Proton dynamics in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Veronica; De Milito, Angelo; Harguindey, Salvador; Reshkin, Stephan J; Wahl, Miriam L; Rauch, Cyril; Chiesi, Antonio; Pouysségur, Jacques; Gatenby, Robert A; Rivoltini, Licia; Fais, Stefano

    2010-06-15

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth.Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  4. Proton dynamics in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouysségur Jacques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  5. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  6. Journal of Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each published articleFree access to published articles for all readers without any access barriers or subscriptionThe views and opinions expressed in articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Journal of Proton Therapy.Authors are encouraged to submit articles for publication in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Proton Therapy by online or email to editor@protonjournal.comOfficial Website of Journal of Proton Therapy: http://www.protonjournal.org/

  7. Medical Proton Accelerator Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.

    2008-01-01

    A project for a medical proton accelerator for cancer treatment is outlined. The project is motivated by the need for a precise modality for cancer curing especially in children. Proton therapy is known by its superior radiation and biological effectiveness as compared to photon or electron therapy. With 26 proton and 3 heavy-ion therapy complexes operating worldwide only one (p) exists in South Africa, and none in south Asia and the Middle East. The accelerator of choice should provide protons with energy 75 MeV for eye treatment and 250 MeV for body treatment. Four treatment rooms are suggested: two with isocentric gantries, one with fixed beams and one for development. Passive scanning is recommended. The project can serve Middle East and North Africa with ∼ 400 million populations. The annual capacity of the project is estimated as 1,100 to be compared with expected radiation cases eligible for proton cancer treatment of not less than 200,000

  8. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1996-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A Proton-Cyclotron Wave Storm Generated by Unstable Proton Distribution Functions in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, R. T.; Alexander, R. L.; Stevens, M.; Wilson, L. B., III; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A.; Jian, L. K.; Roberts, D. A.; O’Modhrain, S.; Gilbert, J. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We use audification of 0.092 seconds cadence magnetometer data from the Wind spacecraft to identify waves with amplitudes greater than 0.1 nanoteslas near the ion gyrofrequency (approximately 0.1 hertz) with duration longer than 1 hour during 2008. We present one of the most common types of event for a case study and find it to be a proton-cyclotron wave storm, coinciding with highly radial magnetic field and a suprathermal proton beam close in density to the core distribution itself. Using linear Vlasov analysis, we conclude that the long-duration, large-amplitude waves are generated by the instability of the proton distribution function. The origin of the beam is unknown, but the radial field period is found in the trailing edge of a fast solar wind stream and resembles other events thought to be caused by magnetic field footpoint motion or interchange reconnection between coronal holes and closed field lines in the corona.

  10. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature

  11. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  12. Proton mixing in -condensed phase of neutron star matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsuka, Tatsuyuki

    1984-08-01

    The mixing of protons in neutron star matter under the occurrence of condensation is studied in the framework of the ALS (Alternating Layer Spin) model and with the effective interaction approach. It is found that protons are likely to mix under the situation and cause a remarkable energy gain from neutron matter as the density increases. The extent of proton mixing becomes larger by about a factor (1.5-2.5) according to the density rho asymptotically equals (2-5)rho0, rho0 being the nuclear density, as compared with that for the case without pion condensation. The reason can be attributed to the two-dimensional nature of the Fermi gas state characteristic of the nucleon system under condensation.

  13. Current-current interaction picture for proton-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, D.J.; Lo, S.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The authors propose that color current - color current interaction is reponsible for small angle elastic proton proton scattering at asymptotic energy. Excellent fits are obtained for all data above 12 GeV/c which covers twelve orders of magnitude

  14. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Veierskov, Bjarke

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  15. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  16. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references

  17. Do protons decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litchfield, P.J.

    1984-09-01

    The experimental status of proton decay is reviewed after the Leipzig International conference, July 1984. A brief comparative description of the currently active experiments is given. From the overall samples of contained events it can be concluded that the experiments are working well and broadly agree with each other. The candidates for proton decay from each experiment are examined. Although several experiments report candidates at a higher rate than expected from background calculations, the validity of these calculations is still open to doubt. (author)

  18. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  19. Proton Beam Writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajta, I.; Szilasi, S.Z.; Csige, I.; Baradacs, E.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Refractive index depth profile in PMMA due to proton irradiation Proton Beam Writing has been successfully used to create buried channel waveguides in PMMA, which suggested that proton irradiation increases the refractive index. To investigate this effect, PMMA samples were irradiated by 1.7-2.1 MeV proton beam. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry has been used to investigate the depth profile of the refractive index. An increase of the refractive index was observed in the order of 0.01, which is approximately one order of magnitude higher than the detection limit. The highest increase of the refractive index occurs at the end of range, i.e. we found a good correlation with the Bragg curve of the energy loss. Hardness changes in PMMA due to proton beam micromachining As protons penetrate a target material and lose their energy according to the Bragg curve, the energy loss is different at different depths. This causes depth-dependent changes of some physical properties in the target material (e.g. refractive index, hardness). In order to characterize the changes of hardness and other mechanical properties as a function of beam penetration depth, systematic investigations have been performed on PMMA, the most common resist material used in proton beam micromachining. Silicon check valve made by proton beam micromachining The possible application of Proton Beam Micromachining (PBM) has been demonstrated by a few authors for creating 3D Si microstructures. In this work we present alternative methods for the formation of a simple a non-return valve for microfluidic applications. Two different approaches have been applied, in both cases we exploited characteristic features of the PBM technique and the selective formation and dissolution of porous Si over the implantation damaged areas. In the first case we implanted 10 μm thick cantilever-type membrane of the valve normally to the crystal surface and at 30-60 degrees to the sidewalls of the

  20. Advanced Proton Conducting Polymer Electrolytes for Electrochemical Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Han

    Research on solid electrochemical energy storage devices aims to provide high performance, low cost, and safe operation solutions for emerging applications from flexible consumer electronics to microelectronics. Polymer electrolytes, minimizing device sealing and liquid electrolyte leakage, are key enablers for these next-generation technologies. In this thesis, a novel proton-conducing polymer electrolyte system has been developed using heteropolyacids (HPAs) and polyvinyl alcohol for electrochemical capacitors. A thorough understanding of proton conduction mechanisms of HPAs together with the interactions among HPAs, additives, and polymer framework has been developed. Structure and chemical bonding of the electrolytes have been studied extensively to identify and elucidate key attributes affecting the electrolyte properties. Numerical models describing the proton conduction mechanism have been applied to differentiate those attributes. The performance optimization of the polymer electrolytes through additives, polymer structural modifications, and synthesis of alternative HPAs has achieved several important milestones, including: (a) high proton mobility and proton density; (b) good ion accessibility at electrode/electrolyte interface; (c) wide electrochemical stability window; and (d) good environmental stability. Specifically, high proton mobility has been addressed by cross-linking the polymer framework to improve the water storage capability at normal-to-high humidity conditions (e.g. 50-80% RH) as well as by incorporating nano-fillers to enhance the water retention at normal humidity levels (e.g. 30-60% RH). High proton density has been reached by utilizing additional proton donors (i.e. acidic plasticizers) and by developing different HPAs. Good ion accessibility has been achieved through addition of plasticizers. Electrochemical stability window of the electrolyte system has also been investigated and expanded by utilizing HPAs with different heteroatoms

  1. SU-F-T-191: 4D Dose Reconstruction of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) Based On Breathing Probability Density Function (PDF) From 4D Cone Beam Projection Images: A Study for Lung Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J; Ding, X; Liang, J; Zhang, J; Wang, Y; Yan, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: With energy repainting in lung IMPT, the dose delivered is approximate to the convolution of dose in each phase with corresponding breathing PDF. This study is to compute breathing PDF weighted 4D dose in lung IMPT treatment and compare to its initial robust plan. Methods: Six lung patients were evaluated in this study. Amsterdam shroud image were generated from pre-treatment 4D cone-beam projections. Diaphragm motion curve was extract from the shroud image and the breathing PDF was generated. Each patient was planned to 60 Gy (12GyX5). In initial plans, ITV density on average CT was overridden with its maximum value for planning, using two IMPT beams with robust optimization (5mm uncertainty in patient position and 3.5% range uncertainty). The plan was applied to all 4D CT phases. The dose in each phase was deformed to a reference phase. 4D dose is reconstructed by summing all these doses based on corresponding weighting from the PDF. Plan parameters, including maximum dose (Dmax), ITV V100, homogeneity index (HI=D2/D98), R50 (50%IDL/ITV), and the lung-GTV’s V12.5 and V5 were compared between the reconstructed 4D dose to initial plans. Results: The Dmax is significantly less dose in the reconstructed 4D dose, 68.12±3.5Gy, vs. 70.1±4.3Gy in the initial plans (p=0.015). No significant difference is found for the ITV V100, HI, and R50, 92.2%±15.4% vs. 96.3%±2.5% (p=0.565), 1.033±0.016 vs. 1.038±0.017 (p=0.548), 19.2±12.1 vs. 18.1±11.6 (p=0.265), for the 4D dose and initial plans, respectively. The lung-GTV V12.5 and V5 are significantly high in the 4D dose, 13.9%±4.8% vs. 13.0%±4.6% (p=0.021) and 17.6%±5.4% vs. 16.9%±5.2% (p=0.011), respectively. Conclusion: 4D dose reconstruction based on phase PDF can be used to evaluate the dose received by the patient. A robust optimization based on the phase PDF may even further improve patient care.

  2. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanuma, A.; Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-01-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods

  3. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akanuma, A. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-09-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods.

  4. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information

  5. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  6. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, L. S., E-mail: flidia@ist.utl.pt [Center of Physics and Engineering of Advanced Materials, CeFEMA and Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  7. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  8. Advances in compact proton spectrometers for inertial-confinement fusion and plasma nuclear science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, F H; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M; Zylstra, A; Manuel, M J-E; Sio, H; Waugh, C; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Petrasso, R; Sangster, T C; Roberts, S

    2012-10-01

    Compact wedge-range-filter proton spectrometers cover proton energies ∼3-20 MeV. They have been used at the OMEGA laser facility for more than a decade for measuring spectra of primary D(3)He protons in D(3)He implosions, secondary D(3)He protons in DD implosions, and ablator protons in DT implosions; they are now being used also at the National Ignition Facility. The spectra are used to determine proton yields, shell areal density at shock-bang time and compression-bang time, fuel areal density, and implosion symmetry. There have been changes in fabrication and in analysis algorithms, resulting in a wider energy range, better accuracy and precision, and better robustness for survivability with indirect-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments.

  9. Experimental level densities of atomic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttormsen, M.; Bello Garrote, F.L.; Eriksen, T.K.; Giacoppo, F.; Goergen, A.; Hagen, T.W.; Klintefjord, M.; Larsen, A.C.; Nyhus, H.T.; Renstroem, T.; Rose, S.J.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T.G.; Tveten, G.M. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Aiche, M.; Ducasse, Q.; Jurado, B. [University of Bordeaux, CENBG, CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 120, Gradignan (France); Bernstein, L.A.; Bleuel, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Byun, Y.; Voinov, A. [Ohio University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Athens, Ohio (United States); Gunsing, F. [CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/SPhN, Cedex (France); Lebois, L.; Leniau, B.; Wilson, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Orsay Cedex (France); Wiedeking, M. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West (South Africa)

    2015-12-15

    It is almost 80 years since Hans Bethe described the level density as a non-interacting gas of protons and neutrons. In all these years, experimental data were interpreted within this picture of a fermionic gas. However, the renewed interest of measuring level density using various techniques calls for a revision of this description. In particular, the wealth of nuclear level densities measured with the Oslo method favors the constant-temperature level density over the Fermi-gas picture. From the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that nuclei exhibit a constant-temperature level density behavior for all mass regions and at least up to the neutron threshold. (orig.)

  10. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  11. Violent collisions of spinning protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisch, A.D. [Michigan Univ., Spin Physics Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The author draws the history of polarized proton beams that has relied on experiments that took place in different accelerators like ZGS (zero gradient synchrotron, Argonne), AGS (Brookhaven) and Fermilab from 1973 till today. The first studies of the behavior and spin-manipulation of polarized protons helped in developing polarized beams around the world: Brookhaven now has 200 GeV polarized protons in the RHIC collider, perhaps someday the 7 TeV LHC at CERN might have polarized protons.

  12. Neutron-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, P.

    1990-02-01

    Neutron-proton scattering as fundamental interaction process below and above hundred MeV is discussed. Quark model inspired interactions and phenomenological potential models are described. The seminar also indicates the experimental improvements for achieving new precise scattering data. Concluding remarks indicate the relevance of nucleon-nucleon scattering results to finite nuclei. (orig.) [de

  13. Radiotherapy : proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first phase of proton therapy at the National Accelerator Centre will be the development of a 200 MeV small-field horizontal beam radioneurosurgical facility in the south treatment vault. A progressive expansion of this facility is planned. The patient support and positioning system has been designed and developed by the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Surveying of the University of Cape Town to ensure the accurate positioning in the proton beam of the lesion to be treated. The basic components of the system are an adjustable chair, a series of video cameras and two computers. The specifications for the proton therapy interlock system require that the inputs to and the outputs from the system be similar to those of the neutron therapy system. Additional facilities such as a full diagnostic system which would assist the operators in the event of an error will also be provided. Dosimeters are required for beam monitoring, for monitor calibration and for determining dose distributions. Several designs of transmission ionization chambers for beam monitoring have been designed and tested, while several types of ionization chambers and diodes have been used for the dose distribution measurements. To facilitate the comparison of measured ranges and energy losses of proton beams in the various materials with tabled values, simple empirical approximations, which are sufficiently accurate for most applications, have been used. 10 refs., 10 fig., 4 tabs

  14. Proton Pulse Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, H C; Nilsson, G; Reitberger, T; Thuomas, K A

    1973-03-15

    A 5 MeV proton accelerator (Van de Graaff) has been used for pulse radiolysis of a number of organic gases and the transient spectra obtained from the alkanes methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and neopentane have tentatively been assigned to alkyl radicals. Some methodological aspects of this new technique are discussed

  15. The Melbourne proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legge, G.J.F.; McKenzie, C.D.; Mazzolini, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning proton microprobe is described which operates in ultra-high vacuum with a resolution of ten microns. The operating principles and main features of the design are discussed and the ability of such an instrument to detect trace elements down to a few ppm by mass is illustrated

  16. Proton microanalysis in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrec, J.P.

    Micro-analyses by nuclear reactions and atomic excitation are used to determine the distribution of fluorine and calcium in the needles of Abies Alba. Fluorine is detected by the nuclear reaction 19 F(p,α) 16 O at the 1.35 MeV resonance. Calcium is measured by its characteristic X-rays due to proton excitation [fr

  17. Proton transfer events in GFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Donato, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.G.W.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton

  18. Scanning transmission proton microscopy tomography of reconstruction cells from simulated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Conghua; Li Min; Hou Qing

    2011-01-01

    For scanning transmission proton microscopy tomography, to compare cell images of the proton stopping power and relative electron density, two cell phantoms are designed and simulated by code FLUKA. The cell images are reconstructed by the filtered back projection algorithm, and compared with their tomography imaging. The images of stopping power and relative electron density slightly vary with proton energies, but the internal images are of clear with high resolution. The organic glass image of relative electron density reveals the resolution power of proton tomography. Also, the simulation results reflect effects of the boundary enhancement, the weak artifacts, and the internal structure border extension by multiple scattering. So using proton tomography to analyze internal structure of a cell is a superior. (authors)

  19. Australian national proton facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities and apart from the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and some low energy machines for eye treatment, only small numbers of patients were treated in each centre and conditions were less than optimal. Limited beam time and lack of support facilities restricted the type of patient treated and conventional fractionation could not be used. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. Since the development of hospital-based facilities, such as the one in Loma Linda in California, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in the low dose volume is likely to be particularly

  20. Proton transfer to charged platinum electrodes. A molecular dynamics trajectory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Florian; Schmickler, Wolfgang; Spohr, Eckhard

    2010-05-05

    A recently developed empirical valence bond (EVB) model for proton transfer on Pt(111) electrodes (Wilhelm et al 2008 J. Phys. Chem. C 112 10814) has been applied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a water film in contact with a charged Pt surface. A total of seven negative surface charge densities σ between -7.5 and -18.9 µC cm(-2) were investigated. For each value of σ, between 30 and 84 initial conditions of a solvated proton within a water slab were sampled, and the trajectories were integrated until discharge of a proton occurred on the charged surfaces. We have calculated the mean rates for discharge and for adsorption of solvated protons within the adsorbed water layer in contact with the metal electrode as a function of surface charge density. For the less negative values of σ we observe a Tafel-like exponential increase of discharge rate with decreasing σ. At the more negative values this exponential increase levels off and the discharge process is apparently transport limited. Mechanistically, the Tafel regime corresponds to a stepwise proton transfer: first, a proton is transferred from the bulk into the contact water layer, which is followed by transfer of a proton to the charged surface and concomitant discharge. At the more negative surface charge densities the proton transfer into the contact water layer and the transfer of another proton to the surface and its discharge occur almost simultaneously.

  1. Protonation of pyridine. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahran, N F; Ghoniem, H; Helal, A I [Physics Dept., Nuclear Research Center, AEA., Cairo, (Egypt); Rasheed, N [Nuclear Material Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Field ionization mass spectra of pyridine is measured using 10{mu}m activated wire. protonation of pyridine, is observed as an intense peak in the mass spectra. Charge distribution of pyridine molecule is calculated using the modified neglect of diatomic overlap (MNDO) technique, and consequently proton attachment is proposed to be on the nitrogen atom. Temperature dependence of (M+H){sup +} ion is investigated and discussed. MNDO calculations of the protonated species are done, and the proton affinity of pyridine molecule is estimated. Time dependence of the field ionization process of pyridine and protonated ions are observed and discussed. 5 figs.

  2. Structural dynamic response of target container against proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Ishikura, Syuichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Stress waves were analyzed for a target container of neutron science research project using a high-intensity proton accelerator that generates high energy and high current proton beam. In the mercury target, the pulsed proton beam generates intense power density in the course of spallation reaction and causes pressure wave in the mercury and stress wave in the target container due to a sudden temperature change. Structural integrity of the target container depends on the power intensity at a maximum energy deposit. A broad proton profile is favorable to the structural assessment of the container rather than narrow one. Stress wave have propagated in the target container at a speed of sound. It only takes 0.1 ms for the size of 40 cm length stainless steel container. Further assessment is necessary to optimize a geometry of the container and establish a method to evaluate a life time. (author)

  3. Structural dynamic response of target container against proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Ishikura, Syuichi; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Hino, Ryutaro

    1997-01-01

    Stress waves were analyzed for a target container of neutron science research project using a high-intensity proton accelerator that generates high energy and high current proton beam. In the mercury target, the pulsed proton beam generates intense power density in the course of spallation reaction and causes pressure wave in the mercury and stress wave in the target container due to a sudden temperature change. Structural integrity of the target container depends on the power intensity at a maximum energy deposit. A broad proton profile is favorable to the structural assessment of the container rather than narrow one. Stress wave have propagated in the target container at a speed of sound. It only takes 0.1 ms for the size of 40 cm length stainless steel container. Further assessment is necessary to optimize a geometry of the container and establish a method to evaluate a life time. (author)

  4. Dependence of two-proton radioactivity on nuclear pairing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Kortelainen, Markus; Pastore, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    Sensitivity of two-proton emitting decay to nuclear pairing correlation is discussed within a time-dependent three-body model. We focus on the 6Be nucleus assuming α +p +p configuration, and its decay process is described as a time evolution of the three-body resonance state. For a proton-proton subsystem, a schematic density-dependent contact (SDDC) pairing model is employed. From the time-dependent calculation, we observed the exponential decay rule of a two-proton emission. It is shown that the density dependence does not play a major role in determining the decay width, which can be controlled only by the asymptotic strength of the pairing interaction. This asymptotic pairing sensitivity can be understood in terms of the dynamics of the wave function driven by the three-body Hamiltonian, by monitoring the time-dependent density distribution. With this simple SDDC pairing model, there remains an impossible trinity problem: it cannot simultaneously reproduce the empirical Q value, decay width, and the nucleon-nucleon scattering length. This problem suggests that a further sophistication of the theoretical pairing model is necessary, utilizing the two-proton radioactivity data as the reference quantities.

  5. Proton transfer events in GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Stuart, Thomas Cohen; Kennis, John T M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-09-28

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton transfer through a 'proton-wire', formed by the chromophore (the proton donor), water molecule W22, Ser205 and Glu222 (the acceptor), on a picosecond time scale. To obtain a more refined view of this process, we have used a combined approach of time resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy and visible pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to resolve with atomic resolution how and how fast protons move through this wire. Our results indicate that absorption of light by GFP induces in 3 ps (10 ps in D(2)O) a shift of the equilibrium positions of all protons in the H-bonded network, leading to a partial protonation of Glu222 and to a so-called low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) for the chromophore's proton, giving rise to dual emission at 475 and 508 nm. This state is followed by a repositioning of the protons on the wire in 10 ps (80 ps in D(2)O), ultimately forming the fully deprotonated chromophore and protonated Glu222.

  6. Solar proton fluxes since 1956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of 56 Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of 22 Na and 55 Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity

  7. Beam diagnostics for Laser-induced proton generation at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Heun; Park, Seong Hee; Jeong, Young Uk; Lee, Ki Tae; Chan, Young Ho; Lee, Byung Cheol; Yoo, Byeong Duk

    2005-01-01

    With an advent of femto-second lasers, a laseraccelerated ion generation has been world-widely studied for medical and nuclear applications. It is known that protons with the energy from several tens MeV to a few hundreds MeV require for a cancer therapy and nuclear reaction. Even though, up to present, the maximum energy of laser-accelerated proton is about 60 MeV, it is expected that the energy of protons generated can be obtained at least up to 150 MeV. According to theoretical and experimental works, it turns out the energy distribution and the flux of ions strongly depends on the intensity of a fs laser at a target. However, physics on laser-plasma interaction is still not clear. The precise measurements of parameters of a fs laser and ions are important to figure out the physics and develop the theoretical interpretation. Typically, beam diagnostic system includes measurements and/or monitoring of the temporal and spatial profiles of lasers at the target as well as the energy spectrum and density profile of protons, which are critical for the analysis of mechanism and the characterization of protons generated. We fabricated and installed the target chamber for laser-accelerated proton generation and are now integrating beam diagnostic system. For laser diagnostics, beam monitoring and alignment system has been installed. For a charged particle, CR-39 detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and Si charged particle detectors are installed for density profile and energy spectrum. In this paper, we discuss the laser beam monitoring and alignment system. We also estimates expected spectrum of protons from Thomson parabola spectrometer, depending on the parameters of protons

  8. Proton mass decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Chen, Ying; Draper, Terrence; Liang, Jian; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2018-03-01

    We report the results on the proton mass decomposition and also on the related quark and glue momentum fractions. The results are based on overlap valence fermions on four ensembles of Nf = 2 + 1 DWF configurations with three lattice spacings and volumes, and several pion masses including the physical pion mass. With 1-loop pertur-bative calculation and proper normalization of the glue operator, we find that the u, d, and s quark masses contribute 9(2)% to the proton mass. The quark energy and glue field energy contribute 31(5)% and 37(5)% respectively in the MS scheme at µ = 2 GeV. The trace anomaly gives the remaining 23(1)% contribution. The u, d, s and glue momentum fractions in the MS scheme are consistent with the global analysis at µ = 2 GeV.

  9. Proton solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikova, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    The observations of proton solar flares have been carried out in 1950-1958 using the extrablackout coronograph of the Crimea astrophysical observatory. The experiments permit to determine two characteristic features of flares: the directed motion of plasma injection flux from the solar depths and the appearance of a shock wave moving from the place of the injection along the solar surface. The appearance of the shock wave is accompanied by some phenomena occuring both in the sunspot zone and out of it. The consistent flash of proton flares in the other groups of spots, the disappearance of fibres and the appearance of eruptive prominences is accomplished in the sunspot zone. Beyond the sunspot zone the flares occur above spots, the fibres disintegrate partially or completely and the eruptive prominences appear in the regions close to the pole

  10. The Amsterdam proton microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis is to develop a microbeam setup such that small beam spot sizes can be produced routinely, and to investigate the capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE analysis. The development and performance of the Amsterdam proton microbeam setup are described. The capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE are shown with an investigation into the presence of trace elements in human hair. (Auth.)

  11. Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, S.; Verdon, C.P.; Petrasso, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Recently, it was proposed to use energetic (up to 31 MeV) tertiary protons produced during the final stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions to measure the fuel areal density of compressed deuterium endash tritium (DT). The method is based on seeding the fuel with 3 He. The reaction of 3 He ions with the energetic knock-on deuterons, produced via the elastic scattering of 14.1 MeV neutrons, is a source of very energetic protons capable of escaping from very large areal density targets. This work presents results of detailed time-dependent Monte Carlo simulations of the nuclear processes involved in producing and transporting these protons through imploding targets proposed for direct-drive experiments on OMEGA [D. K. Bradley et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1870 (1998)] and the National Ignition Facility [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2480 (1995)]. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  12. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesini, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    The FAMU (Fisica degli Atomi Muonici) experiment has the goal to measure precisely the proton Zemach radius, thus contributing to the solution of the so-called proton radius "puzzle". To this aim, it makes use of a high-intensity pulsed muon beam at RIKEN-RAL impinging on a cryogenic hydrogen target with an high-Z gas admixture and a tunable mid-IR high power laser, to measure the hyperfine (HFS) splitting of the 1S state of the muonic hydrogen. From the value of the exciting laser frequency, the energy of the HFS transition may be derived with high precision ( 10-5) and thus, via QED calculations, the Zemach radius of the proton. The experimental apparatus includes a precise fiber-SiPMT beam hodoscope and a crown of eight LaBr3 crystals and a few HPGe detectors for detection of the emitted characteristic X-rays. Preliminary runs to optimize the gas target filling and its operating conditions have been taken in 2014 and 2015-2016. The final run, with the pump laser to drive the HFS transition, is expected in 2018.

  13. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  14. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  15. Proton and neutron densities from elastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1979-01-01

    Elastic electron scattering has now determined extremely fine details of the shape of the nuclear groound state. The combination of (e,e) and muonic X-rays data are giving informations that are among the most precise on nuclear structure. This enables to see all the limitations of existing theories. However, we begin to have a very coherent description of nuclei with the self consistent field theories to a few percent. A very significant progress has been achieved with the calculations of RPA correlations in the round state in a self consistent way. Only recent experiments (on medium and heavy nuclei) of some significance for the understanding of the structure of the nucleus are reviewed

  16. [Why proton therapy? And how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, Juliette; Habrand, Jean Louis; Lesueur, Paul; Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Kammerer, Emmanuel; Lecomte, Delphine; Batalla, Alain; Balosso, Jacques; Tessonnier, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Proton therapy is a radiotherapy, based on the use of protons, charged subatomic particles that stop at a given depth depending on their initial energy (pristine Bragg peak), avoiding any output beam, unlike the photons used in most of the other modalities of radiotherapy. Proton therapy has been used for 60 years, but has only become ubiquitous in the last decade because of recent major advances in particle accelerator technology. This article reviews the history of clinical implementation of protons, the nature of the technological advances that now allows its expansion at a lower cost. It also addresses the technical and physical specificities of proton therapy and the clinical situations for which proton therapy may be relevant but requires evidence. Different proton therapy techniques are possible. These are explained in terms of their clinical potential by explaining the current terminology (such as cyclotrons, synchrotrons or synchrocyclotrons, using superconducting magnets, fixed line or arm rotary with passive diffusion delivery or active by scanning) in basic words. The requirements associated with proton therapy are increased due to the precision of the depth dose deposit. The learning curve of proton therapy requires that clinical indications be prioritized according to their associated uncertainties (such as range uncertainties and movement in lung tumors). Many clinical indications potentially fall under proton therapy ultimately. Clinical strategies are explained in a paralleled manuscript. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Proton permeation of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D W

    1987-10-01

    Proton permeation of the lipid bilayer barrier has two unique features. First, permeability coefficients measured at neutral pH ranges are six to seven orders of magnitude greater than expected from knowledge of other monovalent cations. Second, proton conductance across planar lipid bilayers varies at most by a factor of 10 when pH is varied from near 1 to near 11. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this anomalous behavior: proton conductance related to contaminants of lipid bilayers, and proton translocation along transient hydrogen-bonded chains (tHBC) of associated water molecules in the membrane. The weight of evidence suggests that trace contaminants may contribute to proton conductance across planar lipid membranes at certain pH ranges, but cannot account for the anomalous proton flux in liposome systems. Two new results will be reported here which were designed to test the tHBC model. These include measurements of relative proton/potassium permeability in the gramicidin channel, and plots of proton flux against the magnitude of pH gradients. (1) The relative permeabilities of protons and potassium through the gramicidin channel, which contains a single strand of hydrogen-bonded water molecules, were found to differ by at least four orders of magnitude when measured at neutral pH ranges. This result demonstrates that a hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules can provide substantial discrimination between protons and other cations. It was also possible to calculate that if approximately 7% of bilayer water was present in a transient configuration similar to that of the gramicidin channel, it could account for the measured proton flux. (2) The plot of proton conductance against pH gradient across liposome membranes was superlinear, a result that is consistent with one of three alternative tHBC models for proton conductance described by Nagle elsewhere in this volume.

  18. Spin asymmetry in proton-proton collisions as a probe of sea and gluon polarization in a proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Lai, S.

    1990-01-01

    Quark and gluon spin densities in a proton are phenomenologically parametrized based on the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) data and on some plausible theoretical arguments. Four different characteristic values of gluon and sea polarizations suggested by various theoretical conjectures are considered. The sea polarization in a proton is probed by measuring the spin-spin asymmetry A LL DY in the Drell-Yan process, while the helicity asymmetry A LL γ in direct photon production at high p T is employed to test the gluon spin content. Helicity asymmetries in both processes are quite sizable. A LL DY is positive and of order 10 -1 if the sea is polarized opposite to the proton spin, as suggested by the EMC data. However, even in the absence of the sea polarization at the EMC energies, we find A LL DY to be large and negative. Experimental measurements of A LL DY and A LL γ together will not only provide a clean probe of sea and gluon polarizations, but also test whether the combination Δs-(α s /4π)ΔG inferred from the EMC data is valid, i.e., whether gluons contribute to the spin-dependent structure function g 1 p (x,Q 2 ) via the triangular anomaly

  19. Effect of 200 keV proton irradiation on the properties of methyl silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lixin; Xu Zhou; Wei Qiang; He Shiyu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of 200 keV proton irradiation on methyl silicone rubber were studied. The changes in surface morphology, mechanical properties, cross-linking density, glass transition temperature, infrared attenuated total reflection spectrum and mass spectrum indicated that, at lower fluence, the proton irradiation induced cross-linking, resulting in an increase in tensile strength and hardness of the methyl silicone rubber. However, at higher proton fluence, radiation-induced degradation, which decreased the tensile strength and hardness, became dominant. A macromolecular-network destruction model for silicone rubber irradiated with protons was proposed

  20. MUSE: Measuring the proton radius with muon-proton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, Jan Christopher [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The proton radius has been measured so far using electron-proton scattering, electronic Hydrogen spectroscopy and muonic Hydrogen spectroscopy, the latter producing a much more accurate, but seven sigma different, result, leading to the now famous proton radius puzzle. The MUSE collaboration aims to complete the set of measurements by using muon scattering to determine the proton radius and to shed light on possible explanations of the discrepancy. The talk gives an overview of the experiment motivation and design and a status report on the progress.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper......A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR...

  2. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  3. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  4. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.

    1995-01-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons

  5. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Association EURATOM, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  6. Search for proton decay: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1984-01-01

    In interpreting contained events observed in various proton decay detectors one can sometimes postulate, though usually not unambiguously, a potential decay mode of the proton, called a candidate. It is called a candidate, because for any individual event it is not possible to exclude the possibility that it is instead due to cosmic ray background, chiefly atmospheric neutrinos. Some consistency checks are proposed which could help establish proton decay, if it does occur in the presently accessible lifetime window

  7. Sea Quarks in the Proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimer Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton is a composite particle in which the binding force is responsible for the majority of its mass. To understand this structure, the distributions and origins of the quark-antiquark pairs produced by the strong force must be measured. The SeaQuest collaboration is using the Drell-Yan process to elucidate antiquark distributions in the proton and to study their modification when the proton is held within a nucleus.

  8. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Markus Konrad

    2015-10-01

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision. Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium. To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-ion collisions. The analysis of pp collisions is an essential step towards the extraction of medium influences on the vector meson spectral functions and the thermal radiation in heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the production of electron-positron pairs (dielectrons) in pp collisions at a collision energy of 7 TeV in the ALICE central barrel is analysed. ALICE has unique particle identification capabilities at low momentum. Electrons and positrons are identified with a high purity and combined to pairs. The invariant mass distribution of dielectrons is corrected for detector effects and the selection criteria in the analysis with Monte Carlo simulations. The dielectron invariant mass spectrum of known hadronic sources is calculated based on the cross sections measured in other decay channels using the known decay kinematics. This so called hadronic cocktail represents the dielectron spectrum at the moment of kinematic freeze-out and can be compared to the

  9. Level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatyuk, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    For any applications of the statistical theory of nuclear reactions it is very important to obtain the parameters of the level density description from the reliable experimental data. The cumulative numbers of low-lying levels and the average spacings between neutron resonances are usually used as such data. The level density parameters fitted to such data are compiled in the RIPL Starter File for the tree models most frequently used in practical calculations: i) For the Gilber-Cameron model the parameters of the Beijing group, based on a rather recent compilations of the neutron resonance and low-lying level densities and included into the beijing-gc.dat file, are chosen as recommended. As alternative versions the parameters provided by other groups are given into the files: jaeri-gc.dat, bombay-gc.dat, obninsk-gc.dat. Additionally the iljinov-gc.dat, and mengoni-gc.dat files include sets of the level density parameters that take into account the damping of shell effects at high energies. ii) For the backed-shifted Fermi gas model the beijing-bs.dat file is selected as the recommended one. Alternative parameters of the Obninsk group are given in the obninsk-bs.dat file and those of Bombay in bombay-bs.dat. iii) For the generalized superfluid model the Obninsk group parameters included into the obninsk-bcs.dat file are chosen as recommended ones and the beijing-bcs.dat file is included as an alternative set of parameters. iv) For the microscopic approach to the level densities the files are: obninsk-micro.for -FORTRAN 77 source for the microscopical statistical level density code developed in Obninsk by Ignatyuk and coworkers, moller-levels.gz - Moeller single-particle level and ground state deformation data base, moller-levels.for -retrieval code for Moeller single-particle level scheme. (author)

  10. Measurement of polarization-transfer to bound protons in carbon and its virtuality dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izraeli, D.; Brecelj, T.; Achenbach, P.; Ashkenazi, A.; Böhm, R.; Cohen, E. O.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Gilman, R.; Kolar, T.; Korover, I.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Mardor, I.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Olivenboim, M.; Piasetzky, E.; Ron, G.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schoth, M.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Štajner, S.; Strauch, S.; Thiel, M.; Weber, A.; Yaron, I.; A1 Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    We measured the ratio Px /Pz of the transverse to longitudinal components of polarization transferred from electrons to bound protons in 12C by the 12C (e → ,e‧ p →) process at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI). We observed consistent deviations from unity of this ratio normalized to the free-proton ratio, (Px /Pz) 12C /(Px /Pz) 1H, for both s- and p-shell knocked out protons, even though they are embedded in averaged local densities that differ by about a factor of two. The dependence of the double ratio on proton virtuality is similar to the one for knocked out protons from 2H and 4He, suggesting a universal behavior. It further implies no dependence on average local nuclear density.

  11. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers

  12. Proton nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchazeaubeneix, J.C.; Faivre, J.C.; Garreta, D.

    1982-10-01

    Nuclear scattering of protons allows to radiograph objects with specific properties: direct 3- dimensional radiography, different information as compared to X-ray technique, hydrogen radiography. Furthermore, it is a well adapted method to gating techniques allowing the radiography of fast periodic moving systems. Results obtained on different objects (light and heavy materials) are shown and discussed. The dose delivery is compatible with clinical use, but at the moment, the irradiation time is too long between 1 and 4 hours. Perspectives to make the radiography faster and to get a practical method are discussed

  13. Proton nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudinos, J.

    1982-04-01

    Nuclear scattering of protons allows to radiograph objects with specific properties: 3-dimensional radiography, different information as compared to X-ray technique, hydrogen radiography. Furthermore the nuclear scattering radiography (NSR) is a well adapted method to gating techniques allowing the radiography of fast periodic moving objects. Results obtained on phantoms, formalin fixed head and moving object are shown and discussed. The dose delivery is compatible with clinical use, but at the moment, the irradiation time is too long between 1 and 4 hours. Perspectives to make the radiograph faster and to get a practical method are discussed

  14. Proton relativistic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author)

  15. Biological effectiveness of high-energy protons - Target fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J.W.; Townsend, L.W.; Shinn, J.; Hajnal, F.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy protons traversing tissue produce local sources of high-linear-energy-transfer ions through nuclear fragmentation. The contribution of these target fragments to the biological effectiveness of high-energy protons using the cellular track model is examined. The effects of secondary ions are treated in terms of the production collision density using energy-dependent parameters from a high-energy fragmentation model. Calculations for mammalian cell cultures show that at high dose, at which intertrack effects become important, protons deliver damage similar to that produced by gamma rays, and with fragmentation the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons increases moderately from unity. At low dose, where sublethal damage is unimportant, the contribution from target fragments dominates, causing the proton effectiveness to be very different from that of gamma rays with a strongly fluence-dependent RBE. At high energies, the nuclear fragmentation cross sections become independent of energy. This leads to a plateau in the proton single-particle-action cross section, below 1 keV/micron, since the target fragments dominate. 29 refs

  16. Proton implantation effect on (SUS-316) stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.K.; Ishigami, R.; Kamal, I.

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural damage and nano hardness of the industrial grade stainless steel (SUS-316) have been studied under proton (H + ) implanted condition applying different doses at room temperature. The implantation scheme such as proton energy, fluence, irradiation time, and penetration depth in the target materials were estimated by Monte Carlo Simulation Code SRIM-2008. In the simulation, the parameters were chosen in such a way that the damage density (displacement per atom or dpa) would be uniform up to certain depth from the surface. X-ray diffraction study of the annealed samples prior to the proton implantation showed the austenitic fcc structure and no significant change was observed after proton implantation in it. Microstructural observation made by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) revealed that 1 dpa of proton-irradiation induced the structural damage extended up to 1 μm depth from the surface. The nano hardness study showed that the hardness level of the irradiated samples increased monotonically with the irradiation doses. Proton dose of 1 dpa caused 65% increment of hardness level on average in case of uniformly irradiated samples. It was realized that the increment of hardness was a consequence of microstructural damages caused by the formation of interstitial dislocation loops in the sample matrix keeping the lattice structure unaffected

  17. Construction and test of a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aures, R.

    1983-12-01

    This work describes experiments in which for the first time a proton target has been constructed which is polarized by the ''brute-force'' method. This method requires very low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The low temperatures (down to 10 mK) are obtained by a 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigerator, the magnetic field (up to 9 T) is produced by a superconducting split pair magnet. The proton target has a volume of about 18 cm 3 and consists of pressed titaniumhydride powder, which has a titanium/-hydrogen ratio of 1:1,96. The hydrogen content is 1,3 mol. Titaniumhydride has the advantage of sufficient heat conductivity at low temperatures and a very high proton density. The heat conductivity of the sample is measured, with and without the presence of a magnetic field. Thermodynamical measurements and adiabatic demagnetisation experiments proved quantitatively the polarization of the protons. The polarization of the proton has been measured in a transmission experiment using polarized neutrons of 1.2 MeV. The result shows a good agreement of theoretical and actual polarization. From the results it can be concluded, that this sample can be used successfully as a polarized proton target for neutron scattering experiments to measure spin-correlations. (orig.) [de

  18. Recommended data on proton-ion collision rate coefficients for Fe X-Fe XV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skobelev, I.; Murakami, I.; Kato, T.

    2006-01-01

    The proton-ion collisions are important for excitation of some ion levels in a high-temperature low density plasma. In the present work evaluation of data obtained for proton-induced transitions in Fe X - Fe XV ions with the help of different theoretical methods is carried out. It is suggested a simple analytical formula with 7 parameters allowing to describe dependency of proton rate coefficient on proton temperature in an enough wide temperature range. The values of free parameters have been determined by fitting of approximation formula to numerical data and are presented for recommended data together with fitting accuracies. By comparing of proton collision rates with electron ones it is shown that proton impact excitation processes may be important for Fe X, XI, XIII-XV ions. The results obtained can be used for plasma kinetics calculations and for development of spectroscopy methods of plasma diagnostics. (author)

  19. STARCODES, Stopping Power and Ranges for Electrons, Protons, He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The 'STAR CODES', ESTAR, PSTAR, and ASTAR, calculate stopping-power and range tables for electrons, protons, and helium ions (alphas), according to methods described in ICRU Reports 37 and 39. 2 - Method of solution: Collision stopping powers are calculated from the theory of Bethe (1930, 1932), with a density-effect correction evaluated according to Sternheimer (1952, 1982). The stopping-power formula contains an important parameter, the mean excitation energy (I-value), which characterizes the stopping properties of a material. The codes provide output for electrons in any stopping material (279 provided) and for protons and helium ions in 74 materials. The calculations include the 1) Collision stopping power, 2) Radiative stopping power (electrons only), 3) Nuclear stopping power (protons and helium ions), 4) Total stopping power, 5) CSDA range, 6) Projected range (protons and helium ions), 7) Density effect parameter (electrons), 8) Radiation yield (electrons), and 9) Detour factor (protons and helium ions). Standard energy grids and files of elements w/ionization-excitation information are included with lookup table capabilities. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The minimum energies used in the calculations are at 1 KeV (protons and helium ions) and 10 KeV (electrons), and the maximum are 1 GeV. The standard energy grids are set at 81 for electrons, equally spaced (logarithmically), 133 for protons, and 122 for helium ions. The lower energy electron calculations (< 10 KeV) have up to 5-10% errors and are considered too fallable

  20. Proton resonance spectroscopy in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warthen, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    The differential cross sections for the 39 K(p,p o ) 39 K and 39 K-(p,α o ) 36 Ar reactions have been measured for E p = 1.90 to 4.02 MeV at laboratory angles θ = 90 degree, 108 degree, 150 degree and 165 degree. Data were taken with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) KN Van de Graaff accelerator and the associated high resolution system. The targets consisted of 1-2 μg/cm 2 of potassium carbonate (K 2 CO 3 ), enriched to 99.97% 39 K, evaporated onto gold coated carbon backings. Excitation functions were measured in proton energy steps varying from 100 to 400 3V. The energy region studied corresponds to an excitation energy range in the 40 Ca nucleus of E x = 10.2 to 12.3 MeV. A multi-level multi-channel R-matrix based computer code was used to fit the experimental excitation functions. Resonance parameters obtained include resonance energy, spin, parity, partial widths, and channel spin and orbital angular momentum mixing ratios. Of the 248 resonances observed in the proton channel, 148 were also observed in the alpha channel. A fit to the observed level density yielded a nuclear temperature of 1.5 MeV. The data were compared with predictions of statistical theories of energy levels for both level spacing and reduced width distributions. The alpha reduced widths agree with the Porter-Thomas distribution and suggest that only 5-10% of the states with alpha widths were not observed. The summed strength in each of the alpha channels represents a significant fraction of the Wigner limit for these channels. The proton channels, on the other hand, generally have much smaller fractions. The two proton s-wave strength functions are equal and thus show no evidence for spin-exchange forces in the nucleon-nucleus interaction

  1. Proton structure functions at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recent result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F 2 and F L , which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F 2 . We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F 2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. Predictions for the structure function F L are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA data. (paper)

  2. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung towards the elastic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Castelijns, R.; Ermisch, K.; van Garderen, E.; Gašparić, I.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiš, M.; Löhner, H.

    2005-05-01

    In oder to study proton-proton bremsstrahlung moving towards the elastic limit, a detection system, consisting of Plastic-ball and SALAD, was set up and an experiment at 190 MeV incident beam energy was performed. Here, the experimental setup and the data analysis procedure along with some results obtained in the measurement are discussed.

  3. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung towards the elastic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H.R.; Bacelar, J.C.S.; Castelijns, R.; Ermisch, K.; Garderen, E. van; Harakeh, M.N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Loehner, H.; Gasparic, I.

    2005-01-01

    In oder to study proton-proton bremsstrahlung moving towards the elastic limit, a detection system, consisting of Plastic-ball and SALAD, was set up and an experiment at 190 MeV incident beam energy was performed. Here, the experimental setup and the data analysis procedure along with some results obtained in the measurement are discussed

  4. The FAIR proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, O.

    2015-01-01

    FAIR - the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe - constructed at GSI in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research. FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated accelerator system, which delivers beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations - APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA - in parallel. Modern H-type cavities offer highest shunt impedances of resonant structures of heavy ion linacs at low beam energies < 20 MeV/u and enable the acceleration of intense proton and ion beams. One example is the interdigital H-type structure. The crossed-bar H-cavities extend these properties to high energies even beyond 100 MeV/u. Compared to conventional Alvarez cavities, these crossed-bar (CH) cavities feature much higher shunt impedance at low energies. The design of the proton linac is based on those cavities

  5. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  6. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  7. Filtered backprojection proton CT reconstruction along most likely paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rit, Simon; Dedes, George; Freud, Nicolas; Sarrut, David; Letang, Jean Michel [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard, 69008 Lyon (France)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) has the potential to accurately measure the electron density map of tissues at low doses but the spatial resolution is prohibitive if the curved paths of protons in matter is not accounted for. The authors propose to account for an estimate of the most likely path of protons in a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Methods: The energy loss of protons is first binned in several proton radiographs at different distances to the proton source to exploit the depth-dependency of the estimate of the most likely path. This process is named the distance-driven binning. A voxel-specific backprojection is then used to select the adequate radiograph in the distance-driven binning in order to propagate in the pCT image the best achievable spatial resolution in proton radiographs. The improvement in spatial resolution is demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations of resolution phantoms. Results: The spatial resolution in the distance-driven binning depended on the distance of the objects from the source and was optimal in the binned radiograph corresponding to that distance. The spatial resolution in the reconstructed pCT images decreased with the depth in the scanned object but it was always better than previous FBP algorithms assuming straight line paths. In a water cylinder with 20 cm diameter, the observed range of spatial resolutions was 0.7 - 1.6 mm compared to 1.0 - 2.4 mm at best with a straight line path assumption. The improvement was strongly enhanced in shorter 200 Degree-Sign scans. Conclusions: Improved spatial resolution was obtained in pCT images with filtered backprojection reconstruction using most likely path estimates of protons. The improvement in spatial resolution combined with the practicality of FBP algorithms compared to iterative reconstruction algorithms makes this new algorithm a candidate of choice for clinical pCT.

  8. Proton radiographic characteristics of thin CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, A.; Manzoor, S.; Khan, H.A.; Urlep, I.; Ilic, R.

    1991-01-01

    Two parameters, track registration sensitivity and densitometric response, were measured in radiography with a low energy (∼4.5 MeV) proton beam and a stack of thin (100μm) CR-39 detector foils. The optimum image quality was obtained at a layer removal thickness of about 1 μm. The image obtained under these conditions is characterized by a high track registration sensitivity (∼60%), high image contrast (the maximum value of the net optical density is ∼0.7) and high spatial resolution (∼1 μm). The application of the technique in biomedicine is illustrated by proton radiographs of botanical samples. (author)

  9. Proton radiography of magnetic field in laser produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, S.; Patel, P.; Chen, S.; Town, R.; Mackinnon, A.

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields generated by the interaction with plasmas of long-pulse laser beams relevant to inertial confinement fusion have been measure. A proton beam generated by the interaction of an ultra intense laser with a thin metallic foil is used to probe the B-fields. The proton beam then generated is temporally short (of the order of a ps), highly laminar and hence equivalent to a virtual point which makes it an ideal source for radiography. We have investigated, using face-on radiography, B fields at intensity around 10 14 W/cm 2 due to the non co-linearity of temperature and density gradients. (authors)

  10. Highlights of electron-proton deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feltesse, J.

    1996-02-01

    Salient results on deep inelastic scattering from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations are reviewed. These include preliminary measurements of the proton structure function F 2 extending to new regimes at both high Q 2 and low Q 2 and x, studies of the hadronic final states and discussion on QCD interpretations of low x data. New determination of α s from jet rates in deep inelastic scattering based on 1994 data are presented. A consistent picture of the gluon density in the proton at low x from a variety of processes is obtained. (author)

  11. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  12. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to √s=500 GeV

  13. Protonic decay of oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmensky, S.G.

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the multiparticle theory of protonic decay, the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented spherical and deformed nuclei in the laboratory frame and in the internal coordinate frame of deformed parent nuclei are constructed with allowance for symmetry with respect to time inversion. It is shown that, because of the deep-subbarrier character of protonic decay, the adiabatic approximation is not applicable to describing the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented deformed nuclei and that the angular distribution of protons in the laboratory frame does not coincide with that in the internal coordinate frame. It is demonstrated that these angular distributions coincide only if the adiabatic and the semiclassical approximation are simultaneously valid

  14. Protein proton-proton dynamics from amide proton spin flip rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Daniel S.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.

    2009-01-01

    Residue-specific amide proton spin-flip rates K were measured for peptide-free and peptide-bound calmodulin. K approximates the sum of NOE build-up rates between the amide proton and all other protons. This work outlines the theory of multi-proton relaxation, cross relaxation and cross correlation, and how to approximate it with a simple model based on a variable number of equidistant protons. This model is used to extract the sums of K-rates from the experimental data. Error in K is estimated using bootstrap methodology. We define a parameter Q as the ratio of experimental K-rates to theoretical K-rates, where the theoretical K-rates are computed from atomic coordinates. Q is 1 in the case of no local motion, but decreases to values as low as 0.5 with increasing domination of sidechain protons of the same residue to the amide proton flips. This establishes Q as a monotonous measure of local dynamics of the proton network surrounding the amide protons. The method is applied to the study of proton dynamics in Ca 2+ -saturated calmodulin, both free in solution and bound to smMLCK peptide. The mean Q is 0.81 ± 0.02 for free calmodulin and 0.88 ± 0.02 for peptide-bound calmodulin. This novel methodology thus reveals the presence of significant interproton disorder in this protein, while the increase in Q indicates rigidification of the proton network upon peptide binding, confirming the known high entropic cost of this process

  15. Proton-proton correlations at small relative momentum in neon and argon collision with nuclei at Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alard, J.P.; Dupieux, P.; Charmensat, P.; Augerat, J.; Babinet, R.; Cavaton, C.; Demoulins, M.; Lemaire, M.C.; Brochard, F.; Gorodetzky, P.; Racca, C.

    1990-01-01

    Proton proton correlations at small relative momentum have been studied using the Diogene 4π- Facility at Saturne. The incident energies vary from 200 to 1000 A.MeV for Ne and Ar projectiles on various targets. Experimental correlation functions are compared to theoretical calculations of S. Koonin, corrected for experimental biases. This paper gives the values of the source size as a function of incident energy, target-projectile system and centrality of the collisions. Extracted values of eh density of nuclear matter show that the method is mainly sensitive to the final stage of the interaction; nevertheless we have some indications of a highly compressed phase at the beginning collision

  16. Proton femtoscopy at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbroszczyk, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of two-particle femtoscopy provides a powerful tool to study the properties of matter created in heavy-ion collisions. Applied to identical and nonidentical hadron pairs, it makes the study of space-time evolution of the source in femtoscopic scale possible. Baryon femtoscopy allows extraction of the radii of produced sources which can be compared to those deduced from identical pion studies, providing additional information about source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for protons and antiprotons for Au + Au collisions at √ s NN = 62.4 and 200 GeV. On the other hand, as STAR experiment participates in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program, we present theoretical predictions of p - p , p-bar - p-bar and p - p-bar femtoscopic measurements, based on UrQMD simulation for √ s NN = 5-39 GeV

  17. Proton synchrotron accelerator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.J.N.

    1977-01-01

    This is the text of a series of lectures given as part of the CERN Academic Training Programme and primarily intended for young engineers and technicians in preparation for the running-in of the 400 GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Following the definition of basic quantities, the problems of betatron motion and the effect of momentum spread and orbital errors on the transverse motion of the beam are reviewed. Consideration is then given to multipole fields, chromaticity and non-linear resonances. After dealing with basic relations governing longitudinal beam dynamics, the space-charge, resistive-wall and other collective effects are treated, with reference to precautions in the SPS to prevent their occurrence. (Auth.)

  18. Proton decay: 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Employing the current world average Λ/sub MS/ = 0.160 GeV as input, the minimal Georgi-Glashow SU(5) model predicts sin 2 theta/sub W/(m/sub W/) = 0.214, m/sub b//m/sub tau/ approx. = 2.8 and tau/sub p/ approx. = (0.4 approx. 12) x 10 29 yr. The first two predictions are in excellent agreement with experiment; but the implied proton lifetime is already somewhat below the present experimental bound. In this status report, uncertainties in tau/sub p/ are described and effects of appendages to the SU(5) model (such as new fermion generations, scalars, supersymmetry, etc.) are examined

  19. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10 13 protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10 13 ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10 13 ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10 13 ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10 13 ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found

  20. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10{sup 13} ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10{sup 13} ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10{sup 13} ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10{sup 13} ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10{sup 13} ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found.

  1. Proton-proton correlations at small relative momentum in neon-nucleus collisions at E/A=400 and 800 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupieux, P.; Alard, J.P.; Augerat, J.; Bastid, N.; Charmensat, P.; Fraysse, L.; Marroncle, J.; Montarou, G.; Parizet, M.J.; Qassoud, D.; Rahmani, A.; Fodor, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Proton-proton small angle correlations have been measured in neon-nucleus collisions, using the 4π detector Diogene, at 400 and 800 MeV per nucleon incident energies. Values of the size of the emitting region are obtained by comparison with the Koonin formula, taking into account the biases of the apparatus. The dependence of the density of target mass and incident energy is also analysed. (orig.)

  2. Proton accumulator ring injection studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.K.; Neil, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    Protons may be created in an accelerator or storage ring by stripping electrons from neutral hydrogen atoms that have been injected into the machine. Because Liouville's theorem is violated by this type of injection, particles may be continually injected into a region of phase space that is already populated, and the density in that region increases with time. A computational investigation was made of the evolution of the distribution of particles in longitudinal phase space during such an injection process for a storage ring operating below the transition energy. In one calculation, an rf cavity is present in the ring and particles are injected into the stable phase region once each revolution. The purpose of this calculation is to determine the rf voltage necessary to overcome the longitudinal self-forces and contain the particles within the region of stable phase. In a second calculation, the rf is turned off, so that there is spreading in azimuth of the injected particles (i.e., de-bunching). The de-bunching occurs because of the initial energy spread and the action of the self-forces. One purpose of the calculation is to determine the total energy spread after a given number of revolutions. Another purpose is to elucidate the effect of finite resistance in the vacuum tank walls. For sufficiently high current, the finite resistance can cause bunching of a beam that is initially uniform in azimuth. Therefore it might be expected that the finite resistance would inhibit or prevent de-bunching once the number of particles injected reaches some threshold, and that this threshold would depend upon the energy spread in the beam

  3. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuernberg, Frank

    2010-11-15

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}) prior to the main pulse ({proportional_to}ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 {mu}m is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy ({proportional_to}25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 {mu}m foil irradiated with an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} onto a 60 {mu}m spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and

  4. Laser-accelerated proton beams as a new particle source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuernberg, Frank

    2010-01-01

    The framework of this thesis is the investigation of the generation of proton beams using high-intensity laser pulses. In this work, an experimental method to fully reconstruct laser-accelerated proton beam parameters, called radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy (RIS), was developed. Since the proton beam expansion is a plasma expansion with accompanying electrons, a low-energy electron spectrometer was developed, built and tested to study the electron distribution matching to the proton beam energy distribution. Two experiments were carried out at the VULCAN Petawatt laser with the aim of showing dynamic control and enhancement of proton acceleration using multiple or defocused laser pulses. Irradiating the target with a long pulse, low-intensity laser (10 12 W/cm 2 ) prior to the main pulse (∝ns), an optimum pre-plasma density scale length of 60 μm is generated leading to an enhancement of the maximum proton energy (∝25%), the proton flux (factor of 3) and the beam uniformity. Proton beams were generated more efficiently than previously by driving thinner target foils at a lower intensity over a large area. The optimum condition was a 2 μm foil irradiated with an intensity of 10 19 W/cm 2 onto a 60 μm spot. Laser to proton beam efficiencies of 7.8% have been achieved (2.2% before) - one of the highest conversion efficiencies ever achieved. In the frame of this work, two separate experiments at the TRIDENT laser system have shown that these laser-accelerated proton beams, with their high number of particles in a short pulse duration, are well-suited for creating isochorically heated matter in extreme conditions. Besides the manipulation of the proton beam parameters directly during the generation, the primary aim of this thesis was the capture, control and transport of laser-accelerated proton beams by a solenoidal magnetic field lense for further purpose. In a joint project proposal, the laser and plasma physics group of the Technische Universitat

  5. Heavy ion and proton-induced single event multiple upset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, R.A.; Carts, M.A.; Marshall, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    Individual ionizing heavy ion events are shown to cause two or more adjacent memory cells to change logic states in a high density CMOS SRAM. A majority of the upsets produced by normally incident heavy ions are due to single-particle events that causes a single cell to upset. However, for grazing angles a majority of the upsets produced by heavy-ion irradiation are due to single-particle events that cause two or more cells to change logic states. Experimental evidence of a single proton-induced spallation reaction that causes two adjacent memory cells to change logic states is presented. Results from a dual volume Monte-Carlo simulation code for proton-induced single-event multiple upsets are within a factor of three of experimental data for protons at normal incidence and 70 degrees

  6. High Intensity Beam Issues in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Aumon, Sandra; Rivkin, Leonid

    This PhD work is about limitations of high intensity proton beams observed in the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) and, in particular, about issues at injection and transition energies. With its 53 years, the CERN PS would have to operate beyond the limit of its performance to match the future requirements. Beam instabilities driven by transverse impedance and aperture restrictions are important issues for the operation and for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade which foresees an intensity increase delivered by the injectors. The main subject of the thesis concerns the study of a fast transverse instability occurring at transition energy. The proton beams crossing this energy range are particularly sensitive to wake forces because of the slow synchrotron motion. This instability can cause a strong vertical emittance blow-up and severe losses in less than a synchrotron period. Experimental observations show that the particles at the peak density of the beam longitudinal distribution oscillate in the vertical plane du...

  7. Investigation of high-energy-proton effects in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Todosow, M.

    1997-01-01

    Specimens of 1100 aluminum were exposed to several fluences of 23.5-GeV protons at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Although this energy is above those currently being proposed for spallation-neutron applications, the results can be viewed as indicative of trends and other microstructural evolution with fluence that take place with high-energy proton exposures such as those associated with an increasing ratio of gas generation to dpa. TEM investigation showed significantly larger bubble size and lower density of bubbles compared with lower-energy proton results. Additional testing showed that the tensile strength increased with fluence as expected, but the microhardness decreased, a result for which an intepretation is still under investigation

  8. Two proton decay in 12O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, M.; Singh, U.K.; Jain, S.K.; Saxena, G.; Kaushik, M.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity was observed experimentally in the decay of 45 Fe, 54 Zn and 48 Ni. From then many theoretical studies of one and two-proton radioactivity have been carried out within the framework of different models including RMF+BCS approach for medium mass region. Towards light mass region proton-proton correlations were observed in two-proton decay of 19 Mg and 16 Ne. Recently, different mechanism of two-proton emission from proton-rich nuclei 23 Al and 22 Mg has been investigated and transition from direct to sequential two-proton decay in sd shell nuclei is observed. Encouraged with these recent studies of two proton emission in light mass nuclei, we have applied our RMF+BCS approach for the study of two proton emission in light mass region and in this paper we present our result of two proton emission in 12 O

  9. High intensity proton accelerator and its application (Proton Engineering Center)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1995-01-01

    A plan called PROTON ENGINEERING CENTER has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities and a beam shape and storage ring based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA. The research facilities planned are OMEGA·Nuclear Energy Development Facility, Neutron Facility for Material Irradiation, Nuclear Data Experiment Facility, Neutron Factory, Meson Factory, Spallation Radioisotope Beam Facility, and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutrons, π-mesons, muons, and unstable isotopes originated from the protons are available for promoting the innovative research of nuclear energy and basic science and technology. (author)

  10. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  11. Proton-proton elastic scattering measurements at COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdasarian, Zara [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    To construct the reliable phase shift analysis (PSA) that can successfully describe the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction it is necessary to measure variety of experimental observables for both proton-proton (pp) and neutron-proton (np) elastic scattering. The polarized beams and targets at COSY-ANKE facility allow a substantial contribution to the existing database. The experiment was carried out in April 2013 at ANKE using a transversely polarized proton beam incident on an unpolarized hydrogen cluster target. Six beam energies of T{sub p}=0.8,1.6,1.8,2.0,2.2,2.4 GeV were used. The aim of this talk is to present the preliminary results for the analyzing power (A{sub y}) for the pp elastic scattering in the so-far unexplored 5 <θ{sub cm}<30 angular range. Our measurements are also compared to the world data and current partial wave solutions.

  12. Where is the proton's spin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future. 33 refs

  13. Acceleration of polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian snakes are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  14. Where is the proton's spin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future

  15. Measurement of proton autoneutralization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.

    1984-09-01

    A proton space charge having multi-MeV kinetic energy was injected through a thin ground plane to extract electrons and produce a time-dependent autoneutralization space potential. An electon-emitting floating-potential resistive divider was used to measure the space potential during 20 ns of the proton current pulse. During this time, proton kinetic energy fell from 10.6 MeV to 8.5 MeV and thus the space potential (taken as 1.09 x the floating potential) fell from 5.8 kV to 4.6 kV

  16. Scattering of intermediate energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumeaux, Alain.

    1980-06-01

    The scattering of 1 GeV protons appears to be a powerful means of investigating nuclear matter. We worked with SPESI and the formalism of Kerman-Mc Manus and Thaler. The amplitude of nucleon-nucleon scattering was studied as were the aspects of 1 GeV proton scattering (multiple scattering, absorption, spin-orbit coupling, N-N amplitude, KMT-Glauber comparison, second order effects). The results of proton scattering on 16 O, the isotopes of calcium, 58 Ni, 90 Zr and 208 Pb are given [fr

  17. Non-invasive quantification of hepatic steatosis in living, related liver donors using dual-echo Dixon imaging and single-voxel proton spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishan, S.; Jain, D.; Bathina, Y.; Kale, A.; Saraf, N.; Saigal, S.; Choudhary, N.; Baijal, S.S.; Soin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic implications of hepatic fat fraction calculated using dual-echo Dixon imaging and "1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect hepatic steatosis in potential liver donors using histopathology as the reference standard. Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-five potential liver donors were included in the study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using a 1.5 T system using a three-dimensional dual-echo MRI sequence with automated reconstruction of in-phase (IP), out-of-phase (OP), fat-signal-only, and water-signal-only images. Hepatic fat fraction was calculated by drawing 15 regions of interest on the IP, OP, fat-only, and water-only images. Single-voxel MRS was performed at echo times (TEs) of 30 ms in the right and left lobes of liver. Liver fat fraction was calculated from water and fat peaks. One hundred and forty-five biopsies were prospectively evaluated for steatosis by a pathologist using traditional determination of the cell-count fraction. MRI and pathology values of steatosis were correlated using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The sensitivity and specificity of each of these methods was calculated using histopathology as the reference standard. Reproducibility was assessed in 40 patients who had repeat scanning within 4–40 days. Measurement error was calculated from the coefficient of variation (CoV) with histopathologically proven <5% fat (n=112). Results: The Bland–Altman limits of agreement with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was –2.9 to 5.3%. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for interobserver variability and reproducibility was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.91–0.97), 0.92 (95% CI: 0.91–0.97). The CoV was 7.6% (95% CI: 3.4–11.85). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for Dixon imaging 0.89 (95% CI: 0.87–0.91), for MRS 0.88 (95% CI: 0.86–0.90). The sensitivity for detecting <5% fat was 84% and specificity was 90%. Conclusion: Combination of

  18. Spot size dependence of laser accelerated protons in thin multi-ion foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tung-Chang; Shao, Xi; Liu, Chuan-Sheng; Eliasson, Bengt; Wang, Jyhpyng; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the effect of the laser spot size of a circularly polarized laser beam on the energy of quasi-monoenergetic protons in laser proton acceleration using a thin carbon-hydrogen foil. The used proton acceleration scheme is a combination of laser radiation pressure and shielded Coulomb repulsion due to the carbon ions. We observe that the spot size plays a crucial role in determining the net charge of the electron-shielded carbon ion foil and consequently the efficiency of proton acceleration. Using a laser pulse with fixed input energy and pulse length impinging on a carbon-hydrogen foil, a laser beam with smaller spot sizes can generate higher energy but fewer quasi-monoenergetic protons. We studied the scaling of the proton energy with respect to the laser spot size and obtained an optimal spot size for maximum proton energy flux. Using the optimal spot size, we can generate an 80 MeV quasi-monoenergetic proton beam containing more than 10 8 protons using a laser beam with power 250 TW and energy 10 J and a target of thickness 0.15 wavelength and 49 critical density made of 90% carbon and 10% hydrogen

  19. DFT study on the effect of exocyclic substituents on the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haining; Bara, Jason E.; Turner, C. Heath

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • DFT calculations are used to predict the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazoles. • The electron-withdrawing groups dominate the predicted proton affinity. • The effects of multiple substituents on the proton affinity can be accurately predicted. • Large compound libraries can be screened for imidazoles with tailored reactivity. - Abstract: A deeper understanding of the acid/base properties of imidazole derivatives will aid the development of solvents, polymer membranes and other materials that can be used for CO 2 capture and acid gas removal. In this study, we employ density functional theory calculations to investigate the effect of various electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups on the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazole. We find that electron-donating groups are able to increase the proton affinity relative to 1-methylimidazole, i.e., making the molecule more basic. In contrast, electron-withdrawing groups cause a decrease of the proton affinity. When multiple substituents are present, their effects on the proton affinity were found to be additive. This finding offers a quick approach for predicting and targeting the proton affinities of this series of molecules, and we show the strong correlation between the calculated proton affinities and experimental pK a values

  20. Aspects of the fundamental theory of proton-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A

    1973-01-01

    After recalling the existence of a high energy bound on proton-proton total cross-sections, the author discusses the various phenomena which occur when these cross-sections rise and especially when they have the qualitative behaviour of the bound: rising elastic cross- sections, shrinking diffraction peak, validity of the Pomeranchuk theorem for total and elastic cross-sections, existence of a positive real part of the forward amplitude at high energies. (16 refs).

  1. Proton-proton elastic scattering at ultrahigh energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M.; Shaukat, M.A.; Fazal-e-Aleem

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results on proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies are discussed in the context of the comments by Chou and Yang. There does not appear to be any tendency that the experimental results would agree with the predictions of the geometrical model even at ultrahigh energies. The angular distribution structure as described by using the dipole pomeron is consistent with the experimental data at presently available high energies and predicts results quite different from the geometrical model. (author)

  2. Proton-proton elastic scattering at ultrahigh energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Shaukat, M.A.; Fazal-e-Aleem (University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1981-05-30

    Recent experimental results on proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies are discussed in the context of the comments by Chou and Yang. There does not appear to be any tendency that the experimental results would agree with the predictions of the geometrical model even at ultrahigh energies. The angular distribution structure as described by using the dipole pomeron is consistent with the experimental data at presently available high energies and predicts results quite different from the geometrical model.

  3. Proton resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriner, J.F. Jr.

    1991-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Complete Level Scheme for 30 P; A Search for Resonances Suitable for Tests of Detailed-Balance Violation; The Fourier Transform as a Tool for Detecting Chaos; Entrance Channel Correlations in p + 27 Al; The Parity Dependence of Level Densities in 49 V; and A Computer Program for the Calculation of Angular Momentum Coupling

  4. To flow or not to flow : a study of elliptic flow and nonflow in proton-proton collisions in ALICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kolk, N.

    2012-01-01

    The standard model of particle physics describes all known elementary particles and the forces between them. The strong force, which binds quarks inside hadrons and nucleons inside nuclei, is described by the theory of Quantum Chromodynamics. This theory predicts a new state of matter at extreme temperatures and densities: the Quark Gluon plasma. The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva was build to study this QGP by looking at collisions of the most heavy stable ions: lead (Pb) ions. In such collisions one hopes to achieve sufficient energy density for the creation of a QGP. One of the signatures of QGP formation in high energy heavy ion collisions is the presence of collective behaviour in the system formed during the collision. This collectivity manifests itself in a common velocity in all produced particles: a collective flow. The most dominant contribution to collective flow is elliptic flow, which originates from the anisotropic overlap region of the two nuclei in non-central collisions and is visible in the azimuthal distribution of the produced particles. Elliptic flow is related to the equation of state of the system and its degree of thermalisation. The analysis of elliptic flow is complicated by the presence of correlations between particles from other sources, summarised in the term nonflow. Several analysis methods have become available over the years and have been implemented for elliptic flow analysis within the ALICE computing framework. These methods have different sensitivities to these nonflow correlations. Because the centre of mass energy at the LHC is so high, predictions have been made of collective behaviour even in proton-proton collisions. These predictions are very divers and give values between 0 and 0.2 for elliptic flow using different models. To constrain these predictions proton-proton data, recorded with the ALICE experiment at the LHC in the 2010 7 TeV proton-proton run, was studied. In proton-proton collisions

  5. Measurements of proton energy spectra using a radiochromic film stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkins, T. M.; Steidle, Jessica; Ellison, D. M.; Steidle, Jeffrey; Freeman, C. G.; Padalino, S. J.; Fiksel, G.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    The energy spectrum of protons accelerated from the rear-side of a thin foil illuminated with ultra-intense laser light from the OMEGA EP laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) was measured using a stack of radiochromic film (RCF). The film stack consisted of four layers of Gafchromic HD-V2 film and four layers of Gafchromic MD-V2-55 film. Aluminum foils of various thicknesses were placed between each piece of RCF in the stack. This arrangement allowed protons with energies of 30 MeV to reach the back layer of RCF in the stack. The stack was placed in the detector plane of a Thomson parabola ion energy (TPIE) spectrometer. Each piece of film in the stack was scanned using a commercially available flat-bed scanner (Epson 10000XL). The resulting optical density was converted into proton fluence using an absolute calibration of the RCF obtained at the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV Pelletron accelerator laboratory. In these calibration measurements, the sensitivity of the radiochromic film was measured using monoenergetic protons produced by the accelerator. Details of the analysis procedure and the resulting proton energy spectra will be presented. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  6. ULF waves associated with enhanced subauroral proton precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immel, Thomas J.; Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.; Patel, J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Engebretson, M. J.; Fuselier, S. A.

    Several types of sub-auroral proton precipitation events have been identified using the Spectrographic Imager (SI) onboard the NASA-IMAGE satellite, including dayside subauroral proton flashes and detached proton arcs in the dusk sector. These have been observed at various levels of geomagnetic activity and solar wind conditions and the mechanism driving the precipitation has often been assumed to be scattering of protons into the loss cone by enhancement of ion-cyclotron waves in the interaction of the thermal plasmaspheric populations and more energetic ring current particles. Indeed, recent investigation of the detached arcs using the MPA instruments aboard the LANL geosynchronous satellites has shown there are nearly always heightened densities of cold plasma on high-altitude field lines which map down directly to the sub-auroral precipitation. If the ion-cyclotron instability is a causative mechanism, the enhancement of wave activity at ion-cyclotron frequencies should be measurable. It is here reported that magnetic pulsations in the Pc1 range occur in the vicinity of each of 4 detached arcs observed in 2000-2002, though with widely varying signatures. Additionally, longer period pulsations in the Pc5 ranges are also observed in the vicinity of the arcs, leading to the conclusion that a bounce-resonance of ring-current protons with the azimuthal Pc5 wave structure may also contribute to the detached precipitation.

  7. Unusual features of proton and α-spectra from low-energy heavy-ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 75; Issue 1. Unusual features ... Keywords. Proton and α-spectra; heavy-ion reaction; broad structures; nuclear level density. ... The broad structures in the -spectra cannot be fully explained within the statistical model even with the enhanced level density. In this case ...

  8. LRSPC, Proton High-Energy Loss in Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The LRSPC program is designed to estimate the energy loss, due to ionization and excitation, and the range of charged particles passing through matter. The code treats protons in elements or mixtures composed of elements with atomic numbers ranging from 1 to 100. The results for protons are generally valid from 1 MeV to 100 GeV. The code may be extended to treat other charged particles such as muons, pions, hyperons, deuterons, tritons and alphas by changing the particle mass, charge and range at 2 MeV. 2 - Method of solution: Stopping power is calculated from the Bethe-Bloch equation with shell and density corrections included. Range is calculated by integrating the reciprocal of the stopping power from an initial value at 2 MeV. The K-shell correction is taken from Walske's data. The L-shell and higher shell corrections are adjusted to fit low energy measurements fro 30 elements. The density correction is calculated by a method similar to that of Sternheimer, differing chiefly in the large number of electron shells considered. LRSPC computes improved proton range and stopping power data for use in the proton penetration code, LPPC (CCC-0051). It is packages separately and may be requested independently. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Number of elements in mixture ≤ 10, Atomic number of element ≤ 100, Number of energy points ≤ 500

  9. Microscopic analysis of proton elastic scattering in the range 80-200 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, F.S.; Petrovich, F.

    1983-01-01

    A systematic comparison is made of differential cross-section and analyzing-power data on 12 C, 28 Si, 40 Ca, 90 Zr, and 208 Pb at 80-200 MeV with calculations based on the single-step folding-model approach to the optical potential. In these calculations, proton densities have been inferred from electron scattering results, with neutron densities either the same as for protons ( 12 C, 28 Si, 40 Ca) or with a small neutron skin consistent with 800-MeV proton scattering results ( 80 Zr, 208 Pb). The effective two-body interactions that have been used are the Love-Franey t-matrix, a density-dependent interaction based on the Paris potential (calculated by von Geramb), and finally the Brieva-Rook density-dependent central interaction used with the spin-orbit part of the Love-Franey interaction

  10. Proton bubble and robustness of neutron skin thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, M.; Saxena, G.; Agrawal, B.K.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    The 'Bubble Structure' or the depletion in the central density of the nucleus has renewed a lot of research interest currently. There have been increasing experimental and theoretical efforts to search and understand the phenomena of bubble which mainly arises due to the unoccupancy of the s-state because of which the density at the center becomes significantly lower than the saturation density. The first experimental evidence for depletion of the central density of protons in 34 Si has been recently reported which has opened a testing ground for already developed successful models and of course the new avenues for better and consistent understanding of the nuclear structure throughout the periodic chart. Very recently, nuclear density functional theory and ab initio self consistent Green's function many-body method have been applied to investigate bubble structure in in nuclei over a wide range of masses

  11. Proton radiotherapy: some perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirn, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    A news article highlighting the use of protons in radiotherapy is presented. Development of stereotaxic radiosurgery is the result of contributions from physicists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons, says Jacob Fabrikant, MD, head of the Arteriovenous Malformation Program at the University of California's Lawrence Berkeley laboratory. It also appears to have been the product of Harvard University (Boston) and University of California (Berkeley) cooperation. Robert R. Wilson, PhD, now a professor emeritus at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, is credited with proposing the medical use of charged particles. Wilson, a physicist, says that the idea occurred to him while he was at Berkeley in the mid-1940's, designing the cyclotron to be built at Harvard. Although he was aware of their work, he does not remember discussing it with Robert Stone, MD, or John Lawrence, MD, who only a few years earlier at Berkeley had begun the initial medical experiments with neutrons. Wilson says that it simply occurred to him that in certain instances charged particles had two advantages over x-rays

  12. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  13. Proton-proton and deuteron-deuteron correlations in interactions of relativistic helium nuclei with protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galazka-Friedman, J.; Sobczak, T.; Stepaniak, J.; Zielinski, I.P.; Bano, M.; Hlavacova, J.; Martinska, G.; Patocka, J.; Seman, M.; Sandor, L.; Urban, J.

    1993-01-01

    The reactions 4 Hep→pp+X, 3 Hep→pp+X and 4 Hep→ddp have been investigated and the correlation function has been measured for protons and deuterons with small relative momenta. Strong positive correlation has been observed for protons related mainly to the final state interactions in 1 S 0 state. The root mean square radius of the proton source calculated from the correlation function has been found to be equal to (1.7±0.3) fm and (2.1±0.3) fm for 4 He and 3 He respectively. It agrees with the known radii of these nuclei. (orig.)

  14. Dynamics of Anti-Proton -- Protons and Anti-Proton -- Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A; Uzhinsky, V

    2016-01-01

    A short review of simulation results of anti-proton-proton and anti-proton-nucleus interactions within the framework of Geant4 FTF (Fritiof) model is presented. The model uses the main assumptions of the Quark-Gluon-String Model or Dual Parton Model. The model assumes production and fragmentation of quark-anti-quark and diquark-anti-diquark strings in the mentioned interactions. Key ingredients of the model are cross sections of string creation processes and an usage of the LUND string fragmentation algorithm. They allow one to satisfactory describe a large set of experimental data, especially, a strange particle production, Lambda hyperons and K mesons.

  15. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  16. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Roubelakis, Manolis M.; Maher, Andrew G.; Lee, Chang Hoon; Chambers, Matthew B.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    The hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We conclude that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring. PMID:25298534

  17. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomà, C; Meer, D; Safai, S; Lorentini, S

    2014-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences—of the order of 3%—were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth—i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers—rather than cylindrical chambers—for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. (paper)

  18. On the proton radius problem

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent values of the proton charge radius obtained by means of muonic-hydrogen laser spectroscopy are about $4\\%$ different from the electron scattering data. It has been suggested that the proton radius is actually measured in different frames and that, starting from a non relativistic quark model calculation, the Lorentz transformation of the form factors accounts properly for the discepancy. We shall show that the relation between the charge radii measured in different frames can be de...

  19. Proton therapy project at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Karasawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Particle radiation which might present steeper dose distribution has received much attention as the third particle facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. Proton conformation with sharp fall-off is considered to be the radiation beam suitable for confining high doses to a target volume without complications and for verifying which factor out of high RBE or physical dose distribution is more essential for local control in malignant tumors. This paper discusses the current status of the spot scanning method, which allows three dimensional conformation radiotherapy, and preliminary results. Preliminary dose distribution with proton conformation technique was acquired by modifying a computer program for treatment planning in pion treatment. In a patient with prostate carcinoma receiving both proton and pion radiation therapy, proton conformation was found to confine high doses to the target area and spare both the bladder and rectum well; and pion therapy was found to deliver non-homogeneous radiation to these organs. Although there are some obstacles in the proton project at PSI, experimental investigations are encouraging. The dynamic spot scanning method with combination of the kicker magnet, wobbler magnet, range shifter, patient transporter, and position sensitive monitor provides highly confined dose distribution, making it possible to increase total doses and thus to improve local control rate. Proton confirmation is considered to be useful for verifying possible biological effectiveness of negative pion treatment of PSI as well. (N.K.)

  20. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  1. Jet probes of the nuclear and proton wavefunctions in proton--lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Perepelitsa, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of high pT processes in ultrarelativistic proton-nucleus collisions are sensitive to changes in the partonic densities arising from the presence of the high-density nuclear environment. Such measurements are thought to serve as a benchmark of the so called "cold nuclear matter" effects, providing the context within which to understand the strong suppression of high pT processes observed in nucleus-nucleus collisions. However, measurements of the centrality dependence of jet production at forward (proton-going) rapidities may additionally shed light on the behavior of the proton wavefunction at large Bjorken-x. The latest ATLAS results for inclusive jets and charged particles in 31/nb of 5.02 TeV proton-lead collisions at the LHC are presented. The centrality in these collisions is characterized through the sum of the transverse energy in the lead-going forward calorimeter. The nuclear modification factors RpPb and RCP are presented for jets and high-pT charged particles as a function of transvers...

  2. Study of elastic scattering of polarized proton with 6He by folding model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseri, Y.; Tanifuji, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Hiyama, E.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental data of the elastic scattering of 6 He with polarized proton target has been analyzed using a simple folding model. As we regard 6 He as three bodies consisting of 4 He+n+n, the potential between the proton and 6 He is obtained by folding the two potentials, one between a proton and 4 He and another between a proton and a neutron, with the density distribution of 6 He. Calculated results of both the differential cross section and the vector analyzing power reproduce the experimental data satisfactorily. It is shown that the vector analyzing power of the p- 6 He scattering is mainly due to the spin orbit interaction between the proton and 4 He. (S. Funahashi)

  3. Isochoric heating of DT fuels through PW-laser-produced proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, G.; Barriga-Carrasco, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Laser Proton Source (LPS) can generate short bunch of energetic protons with a nearly zero initial emittance. It is thus expected that LPS can deposit a very high density of energy inside dense matter, in particular, in the context of fast ignition of an inertial fusion target. We investigate here one of the factors that can limit the density of deposited energy. It concerns the transverse diffusion, occurring during the transport between the LPS and DT. As the rear surface of LPS should be efficiently protected, the proton along its path has to interact with a substantial amount of high-Z material. Therefore the induced transverse dispersion can become significant. The transport of the proton beam inside a plasma target is calculated using a numerical code, which main features are presented

  4. Isochoric heating of DT fuels through PW-laser-produced proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Pasmas, CNRS UMR8578, bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405, Orsay (France)]. E-mail: gilles.maynard@pgp.u-psud.fr; Barriga-Carrasco, M.D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Pasmas, CNRS UMR8578, bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405, Orsay (France)

    2005-05-21

    Laser Proton Source (LPS) can generate short bunch of energetic protons with a nearly zero initial emittance. It is thus expected that LPS can deposit a very high density of energy inside dense matter, in particular, in the context of fast ignition of an inertial fusion target. We investigate here one of the factors that can limit the density of deposited energy. It concerns the transverse diffusion, occurring during the transport between the LPS and DT. As the rear surface of LPS should be efficiently protected, the proton along its path has to interact with a substantial amount of high-Z material. Therefore the induced transverse dispersion can become significant. The transport of the proton beam inside a plasma target is calculated using a numerical code, which main features are presented.

  5. Golden Jubilee photos: The Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Energy record Standing before the CERN personnel in the Main Auditorium on 25 November 1959, John Adams held not a bottle of champagne but a bottle of vodka. It had been presented to him a few months earlier during a visit to Dubna in the Soviet Union, where the world's most powerful accelerator had just been commissioned. He had been given strict instructions not to open the bottle until Dubna's energy record of 10 GeV had been broken. On 24 November, the record was smashed by CERN's brand new machine, the Proton Synchrotron, which accelerated protons at 24 GeV, over twice the energy of the Dubna machine. Before sending the empty bottle back to the Soviet Union, John Adams, who had headed the accelerator's construction, placed the recording of the signal in it as proof of the record. More than 40 years later, the PS is still going strong, delivering beams with particle densities a thousand times greater than when it first started operation. Over the years, other accelerators have grown up around it and the...

  6. SU-D-BRC-04: Development of Proton Tissue Equivalent Materials for Calibration and Dosimetry Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, E [Gainesville, FL (United States); Flampouri, S [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Lipnharski, I [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bolch, W [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop new proton tissue equivalent materials (PTEM), urethane and fiberglass based, for proton therapy calibration and dosimetry studies. Existing tissue equivalent plastics are applicable only for x-rays because they focus on matching mass attenuation coefficients. This study aims to create new plastics that match mass stopping powers for proton therapy applications instead. Methods: New PTEMs were constructed using urethane and fiberglass resin materials for soft, fat, bone, and lung tissue. The stoichiometric analysis method was first used to determine the elemental composition of each unknown constituent. New initial formulae were then developed for each of the 4 PTEMs using the new elemental compositions and various additives. Samples of each plastic were then created and exposed to a well defined proton beam at the UF Health Proton Therapy Institute (UFHPTI) to validate its mass stopping power. Results: The stoichiometric analysis method revealed the elemental composition of the 3 components used in creating the PTEMs. These urethane and fiberglass based resins were combined with additives such as calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, and phenolic micro spheres to achieve the desired mass stopping powers and densities. Validation at the UFHPTI revealed adjustments had to be made to the formulae, but the plastics eventually had the desired properties after a few iterations. The mass stopping power, density, and Hounsfield Unit of each of the 4 PTEMs were within acceptable tolerances. Conclusion: Four proton tissue equivalent plastics were developed: soft, fat, bone, and lung tissue. These plastics match each of the corresponding tissue’s mass stopping power, density, and Hounsfield Unit, meaning they are truly tissue equivalent for proton therapy applications. They can now be used to calibrate proton therapy treatment planning systems, improve range uncertainties, validate proton therapy Monte Carlo simulations, and assess in-field and out

  7. Ultrafast Melting of Carbon Induced by Intense Proton Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, A.; Guenther, M. M.; Harres, K.; Otten, A.; Roth, M.; Gregori, G.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kritcher, A. L.; Heathcote, R.; Li, B.; Neely, D.; Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.; Makita, M.; Riley, D.; Mithen, J.; Schaumann, G.; Schollmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-produced proton beams have been used to achieve ultrafast volumetric heating of carbon samples at solid density. The isochoric melting of carbon was probed by a scattering of x rays from a secondary laser-produced plasma. From the scattering signal, we have deduced the fraction of the material that was melted by the inhomogeneous heating. The results are compared to different theoretical approaches for the equation of state which suggests modifications from standard models.

  8. Proton Affinities of Organocatalysts Derived from Pyridine N-oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Váňa, J.; Roithová, J.; Kotora, Martin; Beran, Pavel; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Kočovský, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 4 (2014), s. 349-356 ISSN 0011-1643 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0587 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * isodesmic reactions * kinetic method * mass spectrometry * organocatalysis * proton affinity * superbases Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.728, year: 2014

  9. Superconductivity and fast proton transport in nanoconfined water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. H.

    2018-04-01

    A real-space molecular-orbital density-wave description of Cooper pairing in conjunction with the dynamic Jahn-Teller mechanism for high-Tc superconductivity predicts that electron-doped water confined to the nanoscale environment of a carbon nanotube or biological macromolecule should superconduct below and exhibit fast proton transport above the transition temperature, Tc ≅ 230 K (-43 °C).

  10. Heteronuclear proton assisted recoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paëpe, Gaël; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Loquet, Antoine; Eddy, Matt; Megy, Simon; Böckmann, Anja; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a theoretical framework for understanding the heteronuclear version of the third spin assisted recoupling polarization transfer mechanism and demonstrate its potential for detecting long-distance intramolecular and intermolecular 15N-13C contacts in biomolecular systems. The pulse sequence, proton assisted insensitive nuclei cross polarization (PAIN-CP) relies on a cross term between 1H-15N and 1H-13C dipolar couplings to mediate zero- and/or double-quantum 15N-13C recoupling. In particular, using average Hamiltonian theory we derive effective Hamiltonians for PAIN-CP and show that the transfer is mediated by trilinear terms of the form N±C∓Hz (ZQ) or N±C±Hz (DQ) depending on the rf field strengths employed. We use analytical and numerical simulations to explain the structure of the PAIN-CP optimization maps and to delineate the appropriate matching conditions. We also detail the dependence of the PAIN-CP polarization transfer with respect to local molecular geometry and explain the observed reduction in dipolar truncation. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of PAIN-CP in structural studies with 15N-13C spectra of two uniformly 13C,15N labeled model microcrystalline proteins—GB1, a 56 amino acid peptide, and Crh, a 85 amino acid domain swapped dimer (MW = 2 × 10.4 kDa). The spectra acquired at high magic angle spinning frequencies (ωr/2π > 20 kHz) and magnetic fields (ω0H/2π = 700-900 MHz) using moderate rf fields, yield multiple long-distance intramonomer and intermonomer 15N-13C contacts. We use these distance restraints, in combination with the available x-ray structure as a homology model, to perform a calculation of the monomer subunit of the Crh protein.

  11. Radiation stability of proton irradiated zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Dickerson, Clayton A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for the deep burn (DB)-TRISO fuel as a replacement for the silicon carbide coating. The radiation stability of ZrC was studied using 2.6 MeV protons, across the irradiation temperature range from 600 to 900degC and to doses up to 1.75 dpa. The microstructural characterization shows that the irradiated microstructure is comprised of a high density of nanometer-sized dislocation loops, while no irradiation induced amorphization or voids are observed. The lattice expansion induced by point defects is found to increase as the dose increases for the samples irradiated at 600 and 800degC, while for the 900degC irradiation, a slight lattice contraction is observed. The radiation hardening is also quantified using a micro indentation technique for the temperature and doses studies. (author)

  12. Leading Twist TMDs in a Light-Front Quark-Diquark Model for Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2018-05-01

    We present p_{\\perp } variation (fixed x) of the leading-twist T-even transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs) of a proton in a light-front quark-diquark model at μ ^2=2.4 and 20 GeV^2. The quark densities for unpolarized and transversely polarized proton are also presented. We observe a Soffer bound for TMDs in this model.

  13. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Mamta [Nuclear Science Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2006-07-15

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line.

  14. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2006-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line

  15. Proton Radiography of Laser-Plasma Interactions with Picosecond Time Resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Town, R J; Hatchett, S P; Hicks, D; Phillips, T H; Wilks, S C; Price, D; Key, M H; Lasinski, B; Langdon, B; Borghesi, M; Romagnani, L; Kar, S

    2005-01-01

    Radiography of laser-produced plasmas with MeV protons has the potential to provide new information on plasma conditions in extreme states of matter. Protons with energies up to many hundreds MeV, produced by large scale accelerators have been recently been used to obtain mass density radiographs of the behavior of large samples which have been shocked on microsecond timescales with approximately mm spatial resolution. The recent discovery of laminar proton beams accelerated to multi-MeV energies by picosecond duration laser beams has provided the opportunity to probe dense plasmas with hitherto unparalleled temporal and spatial resolution

  16. Tautomeric transformation of temozolomide, their proton affinities and chemical reactivities: A theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang-Aroon, Wichien; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya; Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya

    2016-05-01

    The gas-phase geometry optimizations of bare, mono- and dihydrated complexes of temozolomide isomers were carried out using density functional calculation at the M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) level of the theory. The structures and protonation energies of protonated species of temozolomide are reported. Chemical indices of all isomers and protonated species are also reported. Energies, thermodynamic quantities, rate constants and equilibrium constants of tautomeric and rotameric transformations of all isomers I1↔TZM↔HIa↔HIb↔I2↔I3 in bare and hydrated systems were obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of proton irradiation on electronic structure of NdFeB permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhen, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: lzhen@hit.edu.cn; Xu, C.Y.; Sun, X.Y.; Shao, W.Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Effects of proton irradiation on electronic structure and atomic local structure of N35EH-type NdFeB permanent magnet were investigated by soft X-ray absorption spectrometry and Moessbauer spectrometry. The local coordination environment of Fe atoms changes after proton irradiation, and the average hyperfine field H{sub in} of the magnets decreases from 288.4 to 286.9 kOe. The effects of irradiation on Fe atoms local environment at different lattice sites are different. The near edge structure of Fe L{sub 3} edge is changed, indicating the density of unoccupied state of Fe 3d electrons increases after proton irradiation.

  18. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Juan A.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Debray, Mario E.; Kesque, Jose M.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Stoliar, Pablo A.; Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Vazquez, Monica E.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Somacal, Hector; Valda, Alejandro; Canevas, S.; Ruffolo, M.; Tasat, D.R.; Muhlmann, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  19. Level densities in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.

    1978-01-01

    In the independent-particle model nucleons move independently in a central potential. There is a well-defined set of single- particle orbitals, each nucleon occupies one of these orbitals subject to Fermi statistics, and the total energy of the nucleus is equal to the sum of the energies of the individual nucleons. The basic question is the range of validity of this Fermi gas description and, in particular, the roles of the residual interactions and collective modes. A detailed examination of experimental level densities in light-mass system is given to provide some insight into these questions. Level densities over the first 10 MeV or so in excitation energy as deduced from neutron and proton resonances data and from spectra of low-lying bound levels are discussed. To exhibit some of the salient features of these data comparisons to independent-particle (shell) model calculations are presented. Shell structure is predicted to manifest itself through discontinuities in the single-particle level density at the Fermi energy and through variatons in the occupancy of the valence orbitals. These predictions are examined through combinatorial calculations performed with the Grover [Phys. Rev., 157, 832(1967), 185 1303(1969)] odometer method. Before the discussion of the experimenta results, statistical mechanical level densities for spherical nuclei are reviewed. After consideration of deformed nuclei, the conclusions resulting from this work are drawn. 7 figures, 3 tables

  20. MO-A-201-01: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  1. MO-A-201-00: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  2. MO-A-201-00: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  3. MO-A-201-01: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, J. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  4. Study of nuclear level densities for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Sepiani, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear level density is one of the properties of nuclei with widespread applications in astrophysics and nuclear medicine. Since there has been little experimental and theoretical research on the study of nuclei which are far from stability line, studying nuclear level density for these nuclei is of crucial importance. Also, as nuclear level density is an important input for nuclear research codes, hence studying the methods for calculation of this parameter is essential. Besides introducing various methods and models for calculating nuclear level density for practical applications, we used exact spectra distribution (SPDM) for determining nuclear level density of two neutron and proton enriched exotic nuclei with the same mass number.

  5. Construction and test of the PRIOR proton microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Philipp-Michael

    2015-01-01

    The study of High Energy Density Matter (HEDM) in the laboratory makes great demands on the diagnostics because these states can usually only be created for a short time and usual diagnostic techniques with visible light or X-rays come to their limit because of the high density. The high energy proton radiography technique that was developed in the 1990s at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is a very promising possibility to overcome those limits so that one can measure the density of HEDM with high spatial and time resolution. For this purpose the proton microscope PRIOR (Proton Radiography for FAIR) was set up at GSI, which not only reproduces the image, but also magnifies it by a factor of 4.2 and thereby penetrates matter with a density up to 20 g/cm 2 . Straightaway a spatial resolution of less than 30 μm and a time resolution on the nanosecond scale was achieved. This work describes details to the principle, design and construction of the proton microscope as well as first measurements and simulations of essential components like magnetic lenses, a collimator and a scintillator screen. For the latter one it was possible to show that plastic scintillators can be used as converter as an alternative to the slower but more radiation resistant crystals, so that it is possible to reach a time resolution of 10 ns. Moreover the characteristics were investigated for the system at the commissioning in April 2014. Also the changes in the magnetic field due to radiation damage were studied. Besides that an overview about future applications is given. First experiments with Warm Dense Matter created by using a Pulsed Power Setup have already been performed. Furthermore the promising concept of combining proton radiography with particle therapy has been investigated in context of the PaNTERA project. An outlook on the possibilities with future experiments at the FAIR accelerator facility is given as well. Because of higher beam intensity an energy one can expect even

  6. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  7. Proton-proton reaction rates at extreme energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Motohiko

    1993-01-01

    Results on proton-antiproton reaction rates (total cross-section) at collision energies of 1.8 TeV from experiments at Fermilab have suggested a lower rate of increase with energy compared to the extrapolation based on results previously obtained at CERN's proton-antiproton collider (CERN Courier, October 1991). Now an independent estimate of the values for the proton-proton total cross-section for collision energies from 5 to 30 TeV has been provided by the analysis of cosmic ray shower data collected over ten years at the Akeno Observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research of University of Tokyo. These results are based on the inelastic cross-section for collisions of cosmic ray protons with air nuclei at energies in the range10 16-18 eV. A new extensive air shower experiment was started at Akeno, 150 km west of Tokyo, in 1979 with a large array of detectors, both on the ground and under a 1-metre concrete absorber. This measured the total numbers of electrons and muons of energies above 1GeV for individual showers with much better accuracy than before. Data collection was almost continuous for ten years without any change in the triggering criteria for showers above10 16 eV. The mean free path for proton-air nuclei collisions has been determined from the zenith angle of the observed frequency of air showers which have the same effective path length for development in the atmosphere and the same primary energy

  8. Structural design study of a proton beam window for a 1-MW spallation neutron source

    CERN Document Server

    Teraoku, T; Ishikura, S; Kaminaga, M; Maekawa, F; Meigo, S I; Terada, A

    2003-01-01

    A 1-MW spallation neutron source aiming at materials and life science researches will be constructed under the JAERI-KEK High-intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC). A proton beam passes through a proton beam window, and be injected into a target of the neutron source. The proton beam window functions as a boundary wall between a high vacuum area in the proton beam line and a helium atmosphere at about atmospheric pressure in a helium vessel which contains the target and moderators. The proton beam window is cooled by light water because high heat-density is generated in the window material by interactions with the proton beam. Then, uniformity of the water flow is requested at the window to suppress a hot-spot that causes excessive thermal stress and cooling water boiling. Also, the window has to be strong enough in its structure for inner stress due to water pressure and thermal stress due to heat generation. In this report, we propose two types of proton beam windows; one flat-type that is easy to m...

  9. Regional-Scale Surface Magnetic Fields and Proton Fluxes to Mercury's Surface from Proton-Reflection Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, R. M.; Johnson, C. L.; Anderson, B. J.; Gershman, D. J.; Raines, J. M.; Lillis, R. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2014-12-01

    ) derived from proton loss-cone measurements, we find an increase in proton flux near 0° and 180° planetary longitudes. This pattern is consistent with that expected from the combined effects of increased incident solar wind density at these longitudes at local noon (given the 3:2 spin-orbit resonance of Mercury) and phasing of MESSENGER's orbit.

  10. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  11. High energy proton PIXE [HEPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, J.S.C.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) have been widespread and detailed in recent years and despite the fact that most data obtained are from low energy 1-3 MeV experiments, the value of higher energy proton work with its emphasis on K X-ray emission has become more marked as time has progressed. The purpose of this review paper is to outline the history of analysis using high energy protons and to compare and contrast the results obtained with those from lower energy analysis using more firmly established analytical techniques. The work described will concentrate exclusively on proton induced processes and will attempt to outline the rationale for selecting an energy, greater than 20 and up to 70 MeV protons for initiating particles. The relative ease and accuracy of the measurements obtained will be addressed. Clearly such X-ray studies should be seen as complementing low energy work in many instances rather than competing directly with them. However, it will be demonstrated that above a Z value of approximately 20, K X-ray analysis using high energy protons is the only way to go in this type of analysis. (author)

  12. Dynamics and adsorption of gas molecules using proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Kim, E. K.; Lee, J. K.

    2008-04-01

    We irradiated nano sized MgO powders and carbon nanotubes by proton beams with energy of 35 MeV for different dosing time and the difference before and after the irradiation was investigated by using NO and Ar gas adsorptions studies. Particular interest was given to the irradiation of proton beams on quasicrystals made with Ti-Zr-Ni to remove the oxygen layer on the surface of the sample. Quasicrystals are known to exhibit a 5-fold rotational symmetry which is theoretically forbidden in a concept of solid state physics, and have a potential applications on large amount of hydrogen loading due to their structural complexity and chemical affinity with hydrogen. The results are summarized as four major accomplishments. 1) Proton irradiated MgO powders demonstrated the increased number of NO atomic layers in a layer-by-layer fashion suggesting that the surface of the sample became homogeneous compare to the pure samples. 2) the synchrotron based X-ray diffraction data suggests that NO molecules form an 1x1 commensurate structure on MgO (100) surface evidenced by the NO peak location at the Q values of 2.12 A -1 . 3) Proton irradiated SWCNTs exhibit the uniform Ar atomic layer formation suggesting that the surface of the CNTs can be homonized by the proton beam irradiation, and 4) 20 MeV of proton beam can effectively remove the oxygen layer on metal oxides so that Ti-Zr-Ni quasicrystals can load a large amount of hydrogen (exceeding to the density of liquid hydrogen) at room temperature.

  13. Thermochemical and structural properties of DMAN-“proton sponges”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dávalos, Juan Z.; Lago, Alexsandre F.; Costa, José C.S.; Santos, Luís M.N.B.F.; González, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We determined the enthalpy of formation Δ f H m o (g) of neutral and protonated DMAN. ► It has been estimated the “strain” effect and hydrogen bond enthalpies in DMAN-H + . ► GB gas phase basicities of naphthalene proton sponges are compared with their pK a . - Abstract: We report a study on the energetics and structural properties of naphthalene-based proton sponges and their corresponding protonated cations. In particular, we have determined the experimental standard enthalpies of formation in the gas phase at T = 298.15 K, Δ f H m o (g), for the neutral and protonated DMAN [1,8-bis (dimethylamino)-naphthalene], (221.0 ± 7.3) and (729.0 ± 11.1) kJ·mol −1 , respectively. A reliable experimental estimation of enthalpy associated with “strain” effect and hydrogen bond intramolecular (included within “enhanced basicity”, EB) contributions to the basicity of DMAN, were deduced from isodesmic reactions, −(29.1 ± 4.6) and (87.1 ± 11.9) kJ·mol −1 , respectively. The gas-phase basicities (GB) of naphthalene-based proton sponges are compared with the corresponding aqueous basicities (pK a ), covering a range of 149 kJ·mol −1 in GB and 11.5 in pK a . Density functional calculations at the M05-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory were used to check the consistency of the experimental results and also to estimate the unavailable GB values of the considered species.

  14. The Importance of Protons in Reactive Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of pH in aqueous chemistry is evident; yet, its role in reactive transport is complex. Consider a column flow experiment through silica glass beads. Take the column to be saturated and flowing with solution of a distinct pH. An instantaneous change in the influent solution pH can yield a breakthrough curve with both a rarefaction and shock component (composite wave). This behavior is unique among aqueous ions in transport and is more complex than intuition would tell. Analysis of the hyperbolic limit of this physical system can explain these first order transport phenomenon. This analysis shows that transport behavior is heavily dependent on the shape of the adsorption isotherm. Hence it is clear that accurate surface chemistry models are important in reactive transport. The proton adsorption isotherm has nonconstant concavity due to the proton's ability to partition into hydroxide. An eigenvalue analysis shows that an inflection point in the adsorption isotherm allows the development of composite waves. We use electrostatic surface complexation models to calculate realistic proton adsorption isotherms. Surface characteristics such as specific surface area, and surface site density were determined experimentally. We validate the model by comparison against silica glass bead flow through experiments. When coupled to surface complexation models, the transport equation captures the timing and behavior of breakthrough curves markedly better than with commonly used Langmuir assumptions. Furthermore, we use the adsorption isotherm to predict, a priori, the transport behavior of protons across pH composition space. Expansion of the model to multicomponent systems shows that proton adsorption can force composite waves to develop in the breakthrough curves of ions that would not otherwise exhibit such behavior. Given the abundance of reactive surfaces in nature and the nonlinearity of chemical systems, we conclude that building a greater understanding of

  15. ATLAS proton-proton event containing four muons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event with four identified muons from a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. This event is consistent with coming from two Z particles decaying: both Z particles decay to two muons each. Such events are produced by Standard Model processes without Higgs particles. They are also a possible signature for Higgs particle production, but many events must be analysed together in order to tell if there is a Higgs signal. This view is a zoom into the central part of the detector. The four muons are picked out as red tracks. Other tracks and deposits of energy in the calorimeters are shown in yellow.

  16. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  17. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jingyu; et al.

    2015-07-12

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  18. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jingyu; Chai, Weiping; Chen, Fusan; Chen, Nian; Chou, Weiren; Dong, Haiyi; Gao, Jie; Han, Tao; Leng, Yongbin; Li, Guangrui; Gupta, Ramesh; Li, Peng; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Baiqi; Liu, Yudong; Lou, Xinchou; Luo, Qing; Malamud, Ernie; Mao, Lijun; Palmer, Robert B.; Peng, Quanling; Peng, Yuemei; Ruan, Manqi; Sabbi, GianLuca; Su, Feng; Su, Shufang; Stratakis, Diktys; Sun, Baogeng; Wang, Meifen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liantao; Wang, Xiangqi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Ming; Xing, Qingzhi; Xu, Qingjin; Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Wei; Witte, Holger; Yan, Yingbing; Yang, Yongliang; Yang, Jiancheng; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuxin; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Zian; Zou, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  19. Parity Non-Conservation in Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, V.R.; B.F. Gibson; J.A. Carlson; R. Schiavilla

    2002-01-01

    The parity non-conserving longitudinal asymmetry in proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering is calculated in the lab-energy range 0-350 MeV using contemporary, realistic strong-interaction potentials combined with a weak-interaction potential comprised of rho- and omega-meson exchanges as exemplified by the DDH model. Values for the rho- and omega-meson coupling constants, h rho rho rho and h rho rho omega , are determined from comparison with the measured asymmetries at 13.6 MeV, 45 MeV, and 221 MeV

  20. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  1. Family symmetries and proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Kaplan, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The proton decay modes p → K 0 e + and p → K 0 μ + may be visible in certain supersymmetric theories, and if seen would provide evidence for new flavor physics at extremely short distances. These decay modes can arise from the dimension five operator (Q 1 Q 1 Q 2 L 1,2 ), where Q i and L i are i th generation quark and lepton superfields respectively. Such an operator is not generated at observable levels due to gauge or Higgs boson exchange in a minimal GUT. However in theories that explain the fermion mass hierarchy, it may be generated at the Planck scale with a strength such that the decays p → K 0 ell + are both compatible with the proton lifetime and visible at Super-Kamiokande. Observable proton decay can even occur in theories without unification

  2. The search for proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; McGrew, C.; Mohapatra, R.; Peterson, E.; Cline, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The conservation of the quantum number called baryon number, like lepton (or family) number, is an empirical fact even though there are very good reasons to expect otherwise. Experimentalists have been searching for baryon number violating decays of the proton and neutron for decades now without success. Theorists have evolved deep understanding of the relationship between the natural forces in the development of various Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) that nearly universally predict baryon number violating proton decay, or related phenomena like n-bar n oscillations. With this in mind, the Proton Decay Working Group reviewed the current experimental and theoretical status of the search for baryon number violation with an eye to the advancement in the next decade

  3. Proton and neutron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, S.

    1991-01-01

    New result on charged lepton scattering from hydrogen and deuterium targets by the BCDMS, NMC and SLAC collaborations have greatly increased our knowledge of the structure functions of protons and neutrons. The disagreement between the high energy muon scattering cross sections obtained by the EMC and BCDMS collaborations have been almost completely resolved by comparison with a global analysis of old and new SLAC data and a reanalysis of EMC data. We now have a consistent set of structure functions which covers an approximate range 1 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 200 (GeV/c) 2 and 0.07 ≤ x ≤ 0.7. The ratio of neutron to proton structure functions decreases with increasing Q 2 for values of x ≥ 0.1. The difference between proton and neutron structure functions approaches zero as x decreases, consistent with the expected √x behavior. (orig.)

  4. Techniques for quantification of liver fat in risk stratification of diabetics; Techniken zur Leberfettquantifizierung bei der Risikostratifikation von Diabetikern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, J.P.; Spoerl, M.C.; Mahlke, C.; Hegenscheid, K. [Universitaetsmedizin Greifswald, Abteilung Experimentelle Radiologie, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Fatty liver disease plays an important role in the development of type 2 diabetes. Accurate techniques for detection and quantification of liver fat are essential for clinical diagnostics. Chemical shift-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a simple approach to quantify liver fat content. Liver fat quantification using chemical shift-encoded MRI is influenced by several bias factors, such as T2* decay, T1 recovery and the multispectral complexity of fat. The confounder corrected proton density fat fraction is a simple approach to quantify liver fat with comparable results independent of the software and hardware used. The proton density fat fraction is an accurate biomarker for assessment of liver fat. An accurate and reproducible quantification of liver fat using chemical shift-encoded MRI requires a calculation of the proton density fat fraction. (orig.) [German] Die Fettleber scheint einen unmittelbaren Einfluss auf die Pathophysiologie des Diabetes mellitus Typ 2 zu besitzen. Zur Detektion und Quantifizierung des Leberfetts werden in der klinischen Diagnostik akkurate Verfahren gebraucht. Ein einfaches Verfahren ist die Chemical-shift-kodierte Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT). Eine suffiziente Quantifizierung von Leberfett mithilfe der Chemical-shift-kodierten MRT erfordert eine Beruecksichtigung von Stoervariablen, wie den T2*-Zerfall, den T1-Wiederaufbau und die multispektrale Komplexitaet von Fett. Eine Korrektur aller Stoervariablen wird als Proton-density-Fettfraktion bezeichnet. Diese liefert unabhaengig von der verwendeten Einstellung und Hardware reproduzierbare Ergebnisse. Die korrigierte Proton-density-Fettfraktion ist ein akkurater Biomarker zur Quantifizierung von Leberfett. Die akkurate und reproduzierbare Quantifizierung von Leberfett in der MRT erfordert eine Berechnung der Proton-density-Fettfraktion. (orig.)

  5. Increasing the proton conductivity of sulfonated polyether ether ketone by incorporating graphene oxide: Morphology effect on proton dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Jun Xing; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Ahmad, Azizan; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Kasai, Hideaki

    2018-03-01

    We synthesized graphene oxide-sulfonated polyether ether ketone (GO-SPEEK) composite membrane and compare its proton conductivity with that of Nafion® 117 and SPEEK membranes. From experimental measurements, we found that GO-SPEEK has better proton conductivity (σGO-SPEEK = 3.8 × 10-2 S cm-1) when compared to Nafion® 117 (σNafion = 2.4 × 10-2 S cm-1) and SPEEK (σSPEEK = 2.9 × 10-3 S cm-1). From density functional theory (DFT-) based total energy calculations, we found that GO-SPEEK has the shortest proton diffusion distance among the three membranes, yielding the highest tunneling probability. Hence, GO-SPEEK exhibits the highest conductivity. The short proton diffusion distance in GO-SPEEK, as compared to Nafion® 117 and SPEEK, can be attributed to the presence of oxygenated functional groups of GO in the polymer matrix. This also explains why GO-SPEEK requires the lowest hydration level to reach its maximum conductivity. Moreover, we have successfully shown that the proton conductivity σ is related to the tunneling probability T, i.e., σ = σ‧ exp(-1/T). We conclude that the proton diffusion distance and hydration level are the two most significant factors that determine the membrane’s good conductivity. The distance between ionic sites of the membrane should be small to obtain good conductivity. With this short distance, lower hydration level is required. Thus, a membrane with short separation between the ionic sites can have enhanced conductivity, even at low hydration conditions.

  6. Superconducting proton ring for PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynham, E.

    1979-01-01

    A powerful new facility for colliding beam physics could be provided by adding a proton storage ring in the range of several hundred GeV to the electron-positron storage ring PETRA at DESY. This can be achieved in an economic way utilizing the PETRA tunnel and taking advantage of the higher magnetic fields of superconducting magnets which would be placed above or below the PETRA magnets. A central field of 4 Tesla in the bending magnets corresponds to a proton energy of 225 GeV. (orig.)

  7. Protons in near earth orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Ao, L; Arefev, A; Azzarello, P; Babucci, E; Baldini, L; Basile, M; Barancourt, D; Barão, F; Barbier, G; Barreira, G; Battiston, R; Becker, R; Becker, U; Bellagamba, L; Béné, P; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Biland, A; Bizzaglia, S; Blasko, S; Bölla, G; Boschini, M; Bourquin, Maurice; Bruni, G; Buénerd, M; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Cavalletti, R; Camps, C; Cannarsa, P; Capell, M; Casadei, D; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Chang, Y H; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, Z G; Chernoplekov, N A; Chiarini, A; Tzi Hong Chiueh; Chuang, Y L; Cindolo, F; Commichau, V; Contin, A; Cotta-Ramusino, A; Crespo, P; Cristinziani, M; Da Cunha, J P; Dai, T S; Deus, J D; Dinu, N; Djambazov, L; D'Antone, I; Dong, Z R; Emonet, P; Engelberg, J; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Esposito, G; Extermann, Pierre; Favier, Jean; Feng, C C; Fiandrini, E; Finelli, F; Fisher, P H; Flaminio, R; Flügge, G; Fouque, N; Galaktionov, Yu; Gervasi, M; Giusti, P; Grandi, D; Gu, W Q; Hangarter, K; Hasan, A; Hermel, V; Hofer, H; Huang, M A; Hungerford, W; Ionica, M; Ionica, R; Jongmanns, M; Karlamaa, K; Karpinski, W; Kenney, G; Kenny, J; Kim, W; Klimentov, A; Kossakowski, R; Koutsenko, V F; Laborie, G; Laitinen, T; Lamanna, G; Laurenti, G; Lebedev, A; Lee, S C; Levi, G; Levchenko, P M; Liu, C L; Liu Hong Tao; Lolli, M; Lopes, I; Lu, G; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luckey, D; Lustermann, W; Maña, C; Margotti, A; Massera, F; Mayet, F; McNeil, R R; Meillon, B; Menichelli, M; Mezzanotte, F; Mezzenga, R; Mihul, A; Molinari, G; Mourão, A M; Mujunen, A; Palmonari, F; Pancaldi, G; Papi, A; Park, I H; Pauluzzi, M; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, E; Pesci, A; Pevsner, A; Pilastrini, R; Pimenta, M; Plyaskin, V; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Postolache, V; Prati, E; Produit, N; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Raupach, F; Recupero, S; Ren, D; Ren, Z; Ribordy, M; Richeux, J P; Riihonen, E; Ritakari, J; Röser, U; Roissin, C; Sagdeev, R; Santos, D; Sartorelli, G; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shoutko, V; Shoumilov, E; Siedling, R; Son, D; Song, T; Steuer, M; Sun, G S; Suter, H; Tang, X W; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tornikoski, M; Torromeo, G; Torsti, J; Trümper, J E; Ulbricht, J; Urpo, S; Usoskin, I; Valtonen, E; Van den Hirtz, J; Velcea, F; Velikhov, E P; Verlaat, B; Vetlitskii, I; Vezzu, F; Vialle, J P; Viertel, Gert M; Vitè, Davide F; Von Gunten, H P; Waldmeier-Wicki, S; Wallraff, W; Wang, B C; Wang, J Z; Wang, Y H; Wiik, K; Williams, C; Wu, S X; Xia, P C; Yan, J L; Yan Lu Guang; Yang, C G; Yang, M; Ye Shu Wei; Yeh, P; Xu, Z Z; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, W Z; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A

    2000-01-01

    The proton spectrum in the kinetic energy range 0.1 to 200 GeV was measuredby the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) during space shuttle flight STS-91 atan altitude of 380 km. Above the geomagnetic cutoff the observed spectrum isparameterized by a power law. Below the geomagnetic cutoff a substantial secondspectrum was observed concentrated at equatorial latitudes with a flux ~ 70m^-2 sec^-1 sr^-1. Most of these second spectrum protons follow a complicatedtrajectory and originate from a restricted geographic region.

  8. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  9. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Christopher L.; Chung, Kiwhan; Greene, Steven J.; Hogan, Gary E.; Makela, Mark; Mariam, Fesseha; Milner, Edward C.; Murray, Matthew; Saunders, Alexander; Spaulding, Randy; Wang, Zhehui; Waters, Laurie; Wysocki, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  10. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Preface Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsFuel CellsTypes of Fuel CellsAdvantages of Fuel CellsProton Exchange Membrane Fuel CellsMembraneCatalystCatalyst LayerGas Diffusion MediumMicroporous LayerMembrane Electrode AssemblyPlateSingle CellStackSystemCell Voltage Monitoring Module (CVM)Fuel Supply Module (FSM)Air Supply Module (ASM)Exhaust Management Module (EMM)Heat Management Module (HMM)Water Management Module (WMM)Internal Power Supply Module (IPM)Power Conditioning Module (PCM)Communications Module (COM)Controls Module (CM)SummaryThermodynamics and KineticsTheoretical EfficiencyVoltagePo

  11. Proton therapy of hypophyseal adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirakova, E.I.; Kirpatovskaya, L.E.; Lyass, F.M.; Snigireva, R.Ya.; Krymskij, V.A.; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehksperimental'noj Ehndokrinologii i Khimii Gormonov)

    1983-01-01

    The authors present the results of proton therapy in 59 patients with different hypophyseal adenomas. The period of observation lasted from 6 mos. to 5 yrs. Irradiation was done using a multifield-convergent method and a proton beam of the ITEF synchrotron. The beam energy was 200 MeV, the beam diameter 7-15 mm. Radiation response and immediate results were evaluated for all the patients. The least favorable results were noted in the patients with prolactinomas, for which, in addition to irradiation, parlodel therapy is needed. No marked radiation reactions, neurological complications and manifestations of hypopituitarism were observed with the chosen doses and schemes of irradiation

  12. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  13. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-04-14

    In a recent paper, Tye and Wong (TW) have argued that sphaleron-induced transitions in high-energy proton-proton collisions should be enhanced compared to previous calculations, based on a construction of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential and the corresponding pass band structure. Here we convolute the calculations of TW with parton distribution functions and simulations of final states to explore the signatures of sphaleron transitions at the LHC and possible future colliders. We calculate the increase of sphaleron transition rates in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 13/14/33/100 TeV for different sphaleron barrier heights, while recognising that the rates have large overall uncertainties. We use a simulation to show that LHC searches for microscopic black holes should have good efficiency for detecting sphaleron-induced final states, and discuss their experimental signatures and observability in Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. We recast the early ATLAS Run-2 search...

  14. Proton beam therapy how protons are revolutionizing cancer treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Yajnik, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam therapy is an emerging technology with promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. While nearly half of all patients diagnosed with cancer in the US receive radiation therapy, the majority is delivered via electron accelerators, where photons are used to irradiate cancerous tissue. Because of the physical properties of photon beams, photons may deposit energy along their entire path length through the body. On the other hand, a proton beam directed at a tumor travels in a straight trajectory towards its target, gives off most of its energy at a defined depth called the Bragg peak, and then stops. While photons often deposit more energy within the healthy tissues of the body than within the cancer itself, protons can deposit most of their cancer-killing energy within the area of the tumor. As a result, in the properly selected patients, proton beam therapy has the ability to improve cure rates by increasing the dose delivered to the tumor and simultaneously reduce side-effects by decreasing...

  15. Correlated stopping, proton clusters and higher order proton cumulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzdak, Adam [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Koch, Volker [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Nuclear Science Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Skokov, Vladimir [RIKEN/BNL, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-15

    We investigate possible effects of correlations between stopped nucleons on higher order proton cumulants at low energy heavy-ion collisions. We find that fluctuations of the number of wounded nucleons N{sub part} lead to rather nontrivial dependence of the correlations on the centrality; however, this effect is too small to explain the large and positive four-proton correlations found in the preliminary data collected by the STAR collaboration at √(s) = 7.7 GeV. We further demonstrate that, by taking into account additional proton clustering, we are able to qualitatively reproduce the preliminary experimental data. We speculate that this clustering may originate either from collective/multi-collision stopping which is expected to be effective at lower energies or from a possible first-order phase transition, or from (attractive) final state interactions. To test these ideas we propose to measure a mixed multi-particle correlation between stopped protons and a produced particle (e.g. pion, antiproton). (orig.)

  16. Proton-90Zr interaction at sub-coulomb proton energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, C.E.; Flynn, D.; Hershberger, R.L.; Gabbard, F.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements have been made of proton elastic scattering differential cross sections for proton scattering at 135 0 and 165 0 from 2 to 7 MeV, of inelastic scattering cross sections for proton scattering from 3.9 to 5.7 MeV, and of the radiative capture cross sections from 1.9 to 5.7 MeV detecting primary and cascade gamma rays. Optical potentials with Hauser-Feshbach and coupled-channel models have been used to analyze the data. This analysis yields an energy dependent absorptive potential of W = 2.63+.73 whose mean value of 5 MeV at E/sub p/ = 4 MeV is consistent with previously reported, but anomalously small values. The diffuseness of the real potential is .54 fm, which is consistent with values found for 92 Zr and 94 Zr. The adopted model values are used to deduce a total proton strength function which displays the features of both the 3s and the 3p single particle resonances

  17. Quantification of Bone Marrow Involvement in Treated Gaucher Disease With Proton MR Spectroscopy: Correlation With Bone Marrow MRI Scores and Clinical Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Diego; Bedoya, Maria A; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Pena, Andres H; Delgado, Jorge; Jaimes, Camilo; Ho-Fung, Victor; Kaplan, Paige

    2015-06-01

    The objective of our study was to use proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) to quantitatively evaluate bone marrow infiltration by measuring the fat fraction (FF) and to compare the FF with semiquantitative bone marrow MRI scores and clinical status in children treated for type 1 Gaucher disease (GD). Over a 2-year period, we prospectively evaluated 10 treated GD patients (six males, four females; median age, 15.1 years) and 10 healthy age-matched control subjects (five males, five females; median age, 15.3 years) using 3-T proton MRS of L5 and the femoral neck. Water and lipid AUCs were measured to calculate the FF. Two blinded pediatric musculoskeletal radiologists performed a semiquantitative analysis of the conventional MR images using the bone marrow burden score and modified Spanish MRI score. We evaluated symptoms, spleen and liver volumes, platelet levels, hemoglobin levels, and bone complications. In the femur, the FF was higher in the control subjects (median, 0.71) than the GD patients (0.54) (p = 0.02). In L5, the difference in FF--higher FF in control subjects (0.37) than in GD patients (0.26)--was not significant (p = 0.16). In both groups and both regions, the FF increased with patient age (p 0.11). Eight of 10 GD patients were asymptomatic and two had chronic bone pain. The median age of patients at symptom onset was 4.0 years, the median age of patients at the initiation of enzyme replacement therapy was 4.3 years, and the median treatment duration was 10.2 years. Hemoglobin level, platelet count, and liver volume at MRI were normal. Mean pretreatment spleen volume (15.4-fold above normal) decreased to 2.8-fold above normal at the time of MRI (p = 0.01). Proton MRS detected FF differences that were undetectable using conventional MRI; for that reason, proton MRS can be used to optimize treatment of GD patients.

  18. Ceramic membrane fuel cells based on solid proton electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Guangyao; Ma, Qianli; Peng, Ranran; Liu, Xingqin [USTC Lab. for Solid State Chemistry and Inorganic Membranes, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Ma, Guilin [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2007-04-15

    The development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has reached its new stage characterized with thin electrolytes on porous electrode support, and the most important fabrication techniques developed in which almost all are concerned with inorganic membranes, and so can be named as ceramic membrane fuel cells (CMFCs). CMFCs based on proton electrolytes (CMFC-H) may exhibit more advantages than CMFCs based on oxygen-ion electrolytes (CMFC-O) in many respects, such as energy efficiency and avoiding carbon deposit. Ammonia fuelled CMFC with proton-conducting BaCe{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2.9} (BCGO) electrolyte (50 {mu}m in thickness) is reported in this works, which showed the open current voltage (OCV) values close to theoretical ones and rather high power density. And also, we have found that the well known super oxide ion conductor, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{alpha}} (LSGM), is a pure proton conductor in H{sub 2} and mixed proton and oxide ion conductor in wet air, while it is a pure oxide ion conductor in oxygen or dry air. To demonstrate the CMFC-H concept to get high performance fuel cells the techniques for thin membranes, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particularly novel CVD techniques, should be given more attention because of their many advantages. (author)

  19. Exposure parameters in proton beam writing for hydrogen silsesquioxane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Zhang, F.; Zhang, C.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F.

    2008-01-01

    In proton beam writing (PBW) a focused MeV proton beam is scanned in a predetermined pattern over a resist (e.g. PMMA, SU-8 or HSQ), which is subsequently chemically developed. In e-beam writing as well as p-beam writing the energy loss of the primary beam is dominated by energy transfer to substrate electrons. Unlike the high energy secondary electrons generated during e-beam writing the secondary electrons induced by the primary proton beam have low energy and therefore a limited range, resulting in minimal proximity effects. The low proximity effects exhibited by p-beam writing coupled with the straight trajectory and high penetration of the proton beam enables the production of high aspect ratio, high density 3D micro and nanostructures with well defined smooth side walls to be directly written into resist materials. This property together with the stability and focusing power of the end station ensures even exposures with nm smoothness and allows fabrication of details down to the 20 nm level. In this paper, we present results like contrast and sensitivity for PBW using, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ) and XR-1541, both are non-C based resists. Unlike PMMA and SU-8 resist HSQ shows aging effects, requiring optimized processing parameters in PBW

  20. From 2D to 3D: Proton Radiography and Proton CT in proton therapy: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, Aleksandra

    (1) Purpose In order to reduce the uncertainty in translation of the X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image into a map of proton stopping powers (3-4% and even up to 10% in regions containing bones [1-8]), proton radiography is being studied as an alternative imaging technique in proton therapy. We

  1. Quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conesa del Valle, Z.; Corcella, G.; Fleuret, F.; Ferreiro, E.G.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kopeliovich, B.; Lansberg, J.P.; Lourenco, C.; Martinez, G.; Papadimitriou, V.; Satz, H.; Scomparin, E.; Ullrich, T.; Teryaev, O.; Vogt, R.; Wang, J.X.

    2011-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  2. A Fano cavity test for Monte Carlo proton transport algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, Edmond; Sorriaux, Jefferson; Souris, Kevin; Vynckier, Stefaan; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the scope of reference dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to compute ionization chamber dose response accurately. Uncertainties related to the transport algorithm can be verified performing self-consistency tests, i.e., the so-called “Fano cavity test.” The Fano cavity test is based on the Fano theorem, which states that under charged particle equilibrium conditions, the charged particle fluence is independent of the mass density of the media as long as the cross-sections are uniform. Such tests have not been performed yet for MC codes simulating proton transport. The objectives of this study are to design a new Fano cavity test for proton MC and to implement the methodology in two MC codes: Geant4 and PENELOPE extended to protons (PENH). Methods: The new Fano test is designed to evaluate the accuracy of proton transport. Virtual particles with an energy ofE 0 and a mass macroscopic cross section of (Σ)/(ρ) are transported, having the ability to generate protons with kinetic energy E 0 and to be restored after each interaction, thus providing proton equilibrium. To perform the test, the authors use a simplified simulation model and rigorously demonstrate that the computed cavity dose per incident fluence must equal (ΣE 0 )/(ρ) , as expected in classic Fano tests. The implementation of the test is performed in Geant4 and PENH. The geometry used for testing is a 10 × 10 cm 2 parallel virtual field and a cavity (2 × 2 × 0.2 cm 3 size) in a water phantom with dimensions large enough to ensure proton equilibrium. Results: For conservative user-defined simulation parameters (leading to small step sizes), both Geant4 and PENH pass the Fano cavity test within 0.1%. However, differences of 0.6% and 0.7% were observed for PENH and Geant4, respectively, using larger step sizes. For PENH, the difference is attributed to the random-hinge method that introduces an artificial energy straggling if step size is not

  3. Polarized protons and parity violating asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueman, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    The potential for utilizing parity violating effects, associated with polarized protons, to study the standard model, proton structure, and new physics at the SPS Collider is summarized. 24 references

  4. Accuracy of Liver Fat Quantification With Advanced CT, MRI, and Ultrasound Techniques: Prospective Comparison With MR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Harald; Pickhardt, Perry J; Kliewer, Mark A; Hernando, Diego; Chen, Guang-Hong; Zagzebski, James A; Reeder, Scott B

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of proton-density fat-fraction, single- and dual-energy CT (SECT and DECT), gray-scale ultrasound (US), and US shear-wave elastography (US-SWE) in the quantification of hepatic steatosis with MR spectroscopy (MRS) as the reference standard. Fifty adults who did not have symptoms (23 men, 27 women; mean age, 57 ± 5 years; body mass index, 27 ± 5) underwent liver imaging with un-enhanced SECT, DECT, gray-scale US, US-SWE, proton-density fat-fraction MRI, and MRS for this prospective trial. MRS voxels for the reference standard were colocalized with all other modalities under investigation. For SECT (120 kVp), attenuation values were recorded. For rapid-switching DECT (80/140 kVp), monochromatic images (70-140 keV) and fat density-derived material decomposition images were reconstructed. For proton-density fat fraction MRI, a quantitative chemical shift-encoded method was used. For US, echogenicity was evaluated on a qualitative 0-3 scale. Quantitative US shear-wave velocities were also recorded. Data were analyzed by linear regression for each technique compared with MRS. There was excellent correlation between MRS and both proton-density fat-fraction MRI (r 2 = 0.992; slope, 0.974; intercept, -0.943) and SECT (r 2 = 0.856; slope, -0.559; intercept, 35.418). DECT fat attenuation had moderate correlation with MRS measurements (r 2 = 0.423; slope, 0.034; intercept, 8.459). There was good correlation between qualitative US echogenicity and MRS measurements with a weighted kappa value of 0.82. US-SWE velocity did not have reliable correlation with MRS measurements (r 2 = 0.004; slope, 0.069; intercept, 6.168). Quantitative MRI proton-density fat fraction and SECT fat attenuation have excellent linear correlation with MRS measurements and can serve as accurate noninvasive biomarkers for quantifying steatosis. Material decomposition with DECT does not improve the accuracy of fat quantification over

  5. Polarized protons at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krisch, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Various aspects of the project of modifying the Brookhaven AGS for the production of polarized proton beams are discussed. It is observed that pure spin state cross sections are of great importance in many investigations since differences between spin states are frequently significant. Financial and technical aspects of the modification of the Brookhaven accelerator are also discussed

  6. High intensity circular proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craddock, M.K.

    1987-12-01

    Circular machines suitable for the acceleration of high intensity proton beams include cyclotrons, FFAG accelerators, and strong-focusing synchrotrons. This paper discusses considerations affecting the design of such machines for high intensity, especially space charge effects and the role of beam brightness in multistage accelerators. Current plans for building a new generation of high intensity 'kaon factories' are reviewed. 47 refs

  7. Rise in proton structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal-e-Aleem; Rashid, H.; Ali, S.

    1996-08-01

    By the choice of a new scale factor we obtain a good qualitative fit to the HERA data for the proton structure function in the small x region which exhibits double asymptotic scaling. Any scaling violations in the future measurements when made in smaller bins will be of immense value. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  8. Uncertainties in the proton lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Nanopoulos, D.V.; Rudaz, S.; Gaillard, M.K.

    1980-04-01

    We discuss the masses of the leptoquark bosons m(x) and the proton lifetime in Grand Unified Theories based principally on SU(5). It is emphasized that estimates of m(x) based on the QCD coupling and the fine structure constant are probably more reliable than those using the experimental value of sin 2 theta(w). Uncertainties in the QCD Λ parameter and the correct value of α are discussed. We estimate higher order effects on the evolution of coupling constants in a momentum space renormalization scheme. It is shown that increasing the number of generations of fermions beyond the minimal three increases m(X) by almost a factor of 2 per generation. Additional uncertainties exist for each generation of technifermions that may exist. We discuss and discount the possibility that proton decay could be 'Cabibbo-rotated' away, and a speculation that Lorentz invariance may be violated in proton decay at a detectable level. We estimate that in the absence of any substantial new physics beyond that in the minimal SU(5) model the proton lifetimes is 8 x 10 30+-2 years

  9. Proton exciting X ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinpei

    1986-04-01

    The analyzing capability of proton exciting X ray analysis for different elements in organisms was discussed, and dealing with examples of trace element analysis in the human body and animal organisms, such as blood serum, urine, and hair. The sensitivity, accuracy, and capability of multielement analysis were discussed. Its strong points for the trace element analysis in biomedicine were explained

  10. Playing with Protons CREATIONS Demonstrator

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexopoulos, Angelos

    2017-01-01

    This document describes Playing with Protons, a CMS education initiative that seeks to enhance teachers’ pedagogical practice with creative, hands-on methodologies through which 10-12 year old students can, in turn, get engaged effectively with science, technology and innovation.

  11. Proton-beam energy analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belan, V.N.; Bolotin, L.I.; Kiselev, V.A.; Linnik, A.F.; Uskov, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a magnetic analyzer for measurement of proton-beam energy in the range from 100 keV to 25 MeV. The beam is deflected in a uniform transverse magnetic field and is registered by photographing a scintillation screen. The energy spectrum of the beam is constructed by microphotometry of the photographic film

  12. Proton gyromagnetic precision measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Deming; Deming Zhu

    1991-01-01

    A computerized control and measurement system used in the proton gyromagnetic precision meausrement is descirbed. It adopts the CAMAC data acquisition equipment, using on-line control and analysis with the HP85 and PDP-11/60 computer systems. It also adopts the RSX11M computer operation system, and the control software is written in FORTRAN language

  13. Resist materials for proton micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Sanchez, J.L.; Xu, B.; Osipowicz, T.; Watt, F.

    1999-01-01

    The production of high aspect ratio microstructures is a potential growth area. The combination of deep X-ray lithography with electroforming and micromolding (i.e. LIGA) is one of the main techniques used to produce 3D microstructures. The new technique of proton micromachining employs focused MeV protons in a direct write process which is complementary to LIGA, e.g. micromachining with 2 MeV protons results in microstructures with a height of 63 μm and lateral sub-micrometer resolution in PMMA resist. The aim of this paper is to investigate the capabilities of proton micromachining as a lithographic technique. This involves the study of different types of resists. The dose distribution of high molecular weight PMMA is compared with three other types of resist: First the positive photo resist AZ P4620 will be discussed and then PMGI SF 23, which can be used as a deep UV, e-beam or X-ray resist. Finally SU-8, a new deep UV negative type of chemically amplified resist will be discussed. All these polymers are applied using the spin coating technique at thicknesses of between 1 and 36 μm

  14. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%–20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect. It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle

  15. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  16. Target experiments with high-power proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumung, K; Bluhm, H; Hoppe, P; Rusch, D; Singer, J; Stoltz, O [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Kanel, G I; Razorenov, S V; Utkin, A V [Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation). Inst. of Chemical Physics

    1997-12-31

    At the Karlsruhe Light Ion Facility KALE a pulsed high-power proton beam (50 ns, 0.15 TW/cm{sup 2}, 8 mm fwhm focus diameter, 1.7 MeV peak proton energy) is used to generate short, intense pressure pulses or to ablatively accelerate targets 10-100 {mu}m thick to velocities > 10 km/s. The velocity history of the rear target surface is recorded by line-imaging laser Doppler velocimetry with high spatial ({>=} 10 {mu}m) and temporal ({>=} 200 ps) resolution, and provides information on proton beam parameters, and on the state of the matter at high energy densities and intense loading. Utilizing the bell-shaped power density profile the authors demonstrated a new straightforward method for measuring the shock pressure that leads to material melting in the rarefaction wave. For the first time, the dynamic tensile strength was measured across a crystal grain boundary, and using targets with a 1D periodic structure, the growth rate of a Rayleigh Taylor instability could be measured for the first time in direct drive experiments with an ion beam. (author). 8 figs., 15 refs.

  17. Radiative proton-capture nuclear processes in metallic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, Setsuo

    2001-01-01

    Protons being the lightest nuclei, metallic hydrogen may exhibit the features of quantum liquids most relevant to enormous enhancement of nuclear reactions; thermonuclear and pycnonuclear rates and associated enhancement factors of radiative proton captures of high-Z nuclei as well as of deuterons are evaluated. Atomic states of high-Z impurities are determined in a way consistent with the equations of state and screening characteristics of the metallic hydrogen. Rates of pycnonuclear p-d reactions are prodigiously high at densities ≥20 g/cm 3 , pressures ≥1 Gbar, and temperatures ≥950 K near the conditions of solidification. It is also predicted that proton captures of nuclei such as C, N, O, and F may take place at considerable rates, owing to strong screening by K-shell electrons, if the densities ≥60-80 g/cm 3 , the pressures ≥7-12 Gbar, and the temperatures just above solidification. The possibilities and significance of pycnonuclear p-d fusion experiments are specifically remarked

  18. Proton Therapy at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The brochure deals with the following topics: radiation therapy and its significance, proton therapy - worldwide and at PSI, advantages of the protons, the new proton therapy facility at PSI, therapy at PSI using the spot-scan technique. figs., tabs., refs

  19. Neutrino proton scattering and the isosinglet term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    Elastic neutrino proton scattering is sensitive to the SU(3) axial isosinglet term which is in turn dependent on the strangeness content of the proton. The uncertainties in the analysis of a neutrino proton elastic scattering experiment are discussed, and an experiment which is insensitive to many of the difficulties of the previous experiment is described

  20. Energizing porters by proton-motive force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, N

    1994-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the chemistry of water was the most crucial determinant in shaping life on earth. Among the more important chemical features of water is its dissociation into protons and hydroxyl ions. The presence of relatively high proton concentrations in the ambient solution resulted in the evolution of proton pumps during the dawn of life on earth. These proton pumps maintained neutral pH inside the cells and generated electrochemical gradients of protons (proton-motive force) across their membranes. The existence of proton-motive force enabled the evolution of porters driven by it that are most probably among the more primitive porters in the world. The directionality of the substrate transport by the porters could be to both sides of the membranes because they can serve as proton symporters or antiporters. One of the most important subjects of this meeting is the mechanism by which proton-motive and other ion-motive forces drive the transport processes through porters. Is there a common mechanism of action for all proton-driven porters? Is there some common partial reaction by which we can identify the way that porters are energized by proton-motive force? Is there a common coupling between proton movement and uptake or secretion of certain molecules? Even a partial answer to one of these questions would advance our knowledge... or confusion. As my mentor Efraim Racker used to say: 'If you are not totally confused you do not understand the issue'.

  1. Proton hexality in local grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerste, Stefan; Nilles, Hans Peter [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics

    2010-07-15

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of ''Local Grand Unification'' discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory. (orig.)

  2. Proton--proton analyzing power measurements at 16 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovoi, P.A.

    1975-01-01

    Few attempts have been made to measure accurately the proton--proton analyzing powers at low energies. With the advent of polarized particle beams the measurement can now be made with high accuracy. Analyzing powers were measured at nine scattering angles from 10 0 to 35 0 in the laboratory system. As a check on systematic errors, analyzing power measurements were also made by scattering protons from 4 He. In the p vector-p case the measured values are in very good agreement with the phase shift predictions. The p vector- 4 He measurements, while giving the same form and sign as the phase shift predictions, differ from the predictions by as much as 11 standard deviations. The p vector-p analyzing powers had a maximum value of -0.0043 +- 0.0004 at 10 0 (laboratory) and decreased to zero near 25 0 . A new technique to measure analyzing powers without symmetric detectors is explained. This technique preserves the advantages of the symmetric arm method in that current integration, target density, detector efficiencies, and geometry are cancelled from the final expressions. A new scattering chamber, named the Supercube, is described. The Supercube was designed primarily to perform scattering experiments with a polarized beam. It contains both left-right and up-down detectors for use with both spin- 1 / 2 and spin-1 measurements. The Supercube was designed to make analyzing power measurements to an accuracy of 0.001 routine. The Supercube has proved to have low systematic errors and to perform as expected. The systematic errors were found to be equal to or less than 0.0002

  3. Proton--proton analyzing power measurements at 16 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovoi, P.A.

    1975-07-01

    Few attempts have been made to measure accurately the proton-proton analyzing powers at low energies. With the advent of polarized particle beams the measurement can now be made with high accuracy. Analyzing powers were measured at nine scattering angles from 10 0 to 35 0 in the laboratory system. As a check on systematic errors, analyzing power measurements were also made by scattering protons from 4 He. In the p Vector-p case the measured values are in very good agreement with the phase shift predictions. The p Vector- 4 He measurements, while giving the same form and sign as the phase shift predictions, differ from the predictions by as much as 11 standard deviations. The p Vector-p analyzing powers had a maximum value of -0.0043 +- 0.0004 at 10 0 (laboratory) and decreased to zero near 25 0 . A new technique to measure analyzing powers without symmetric detectors is explained. This technique preserves the advantages of the symmetric arm method in that current integration, target density, detector efficiencies, and geometry are cancelled from the final expressions. A new scattering chamber, named the Supercube, is described. The Supercube was designed primarily to perform scattering experiments with a polarized beam. It contains both left-right and up-down detectors for use with both spin-1/2 and spin-1 measurements. The Supercube was designed to make analyzing power measurements to an accuracy of 0.001 routine. The Supercube has proved to have low systematic errors and to perform as expected. The systematic errors were found to be equal to or less than 0.0002. (23 figures, 14 tables) (auth)

  4. Proton-proton, anti-proton-anti-proton, proton-anti-proton correlations in Au+Au collisions measured by STAR at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gos, H.P.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of two-particle correlations provides a powerful tool to study the properties of hot and dense matter created in heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies. Applied to identical and non-identical hadron pairs, it makes the study of space-time evolution of the source in femtoscopic scale possible. Baryon femtoscopy allows extraction of the radii of produced sources which can be compared to those deduced from identical pion studies, providing complete information about the source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for identical and non-identical baryon pairs of protons and anti-protons. The data were collected recently in Au+Au collisions at √(s NN )=62 GeV and √(s NN )=200 GeV by the STAR detector at the RHIC accelerator. We introduce corrections to the baryon-baryon correlations taking into account: residual correlations from weak decays, particle identification probability and the fraction of primary baryons. Finally we compare our results to theoretical predictions. (orig.)

  5. Microscopic Gold Particle-Based Fiducial Markers for Proton Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young Kyung; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Soah; Kim, Jin Sung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Shin, Jungwook; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong; Pyo, Hong Ryeol; Kim, Dae Yong M.D.; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the feasibility of using fiducial markers composed of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers as a means to overcome current problems with conventional macroscopic gold fiducial markers, such as dose reduction and artifact generation, in proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We examined two types of gold particle fiducial marker interactions: that with diagnostic X-rays and with a therapeutic proton beam. That is, we qualitatively and quantitatively compared the radiographic visibility of conventional gold and gold particle fiducial markers and the CT artifacts and dose reduction associated with their use. Results: The gold particle fiducials could be easily distinguished from high-density structures, such as the pelvic bone, in diagnostic X-rays but were nearly transparent to a proton beam. The proton dose distribution was distorted <5% by the gold particle fiducials with a 4.9% normalized gold density; this was the case even in the worst configuration (i.e., parallel alignment with a single-direction proton beam). In addition, CT artifacts were dramatically reduced for the gold particle mixture. Conclusion: Mixtures of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers have excellent potential as fiducial markers for proton therapy for prostate cancer. These include good radiographic visibility, low distortion of the depth-dose distribution, and few CT artifacts.

  6. Pair angular correlations for pions, kaons and protons in proton-proton collisions in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Zaborowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents the correlation functions in $\\Delta\\eta\\, \\Delta\\phi$ space for pairs of pions, kaons and protons. The studies were carried out on the set of proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, obtained in ALICE, A Large Ion Collider Experiment at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The analysis was performed for two charge combinations (like-sign pairs and unlike-sign pairs) as well as for three multiplicity ranges. Angular correlations are a rich source of information about the elementary particles behaviour. They result in from the interplay of numerous effects, including resonances’ decays, Coulomb interactions and energy and momentum conservation. In case of identical particles quantum statistics needs to be taken into account. Moreover, particles differ in terms of quark content. Kaons, carrying the strange quark obey the strangeness conservation law. In the production of protons baryon number must be conserved. These features are reflected...

  7. A simulation of low energy channeling of protons in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabin, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The authors present early results from the CHANNEL code, which simulates the passage of ionized projectiles through bulk solids. CHANNEL solves the classical equations of motion for the projectile using the force obtained from the gradient of the quantum mechanically derived coulombic potential of the solid (determined via a full potential augmented plane wave FLAPW calculation on the bulk) and a quantum mechanical energy dissipation term, the stopping power, as determined from the local electron density, using the method of Echenique, Nieminen, and Ritchie. The code then generates the trajectory of the ionic projectile for a given initial velocity and a given incident position on the unit cell face. For each incident projectile velocity, the authors generate trajectories for incidence distributed over the channel face. The distribution of ranges generates an implantation profile. In this paper, they report ion (proton) implantation profiles for low energy protons with initial velocity along the (100) and (110) channel directions of diamond structured Silicon

  8. Proton decay in a nucleus: Nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L.A.; Alvarez-Estrada, R.F.; Sanchez-Gomez, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, proton decay in a large nucleus is studied in the framework of SU(5) grand unification theory (GUT). By using a method based upon the Green's-function technique of many-body physics, nuclear effects on spectator and pole terms are computed. The decay width in the nucleus is found to be practically the same as in free space. However, nuclear effects are of considerable importance concerning the positron spectrum. A density-correlation expansion is introduced which is useful for carrying out a systematic study of nuclear effects in proton decay in a large nucleus. The method presented here can be easily extended to other GUT's or supersymmetric GUT's

  9. Effect of energy level sequences and neutron–proton interaction on α-particle preformation probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Adel, A.

    2013-01-01

    A realistic density-dependent nucleon–nucleon (NN) interaction with finite-range exchange part which produces the nuclear matter saturation curve and the energy dependence of the nucleon–nucleus optical model potential is used to calculate the preformation probability, S α , of α-decay from different isotones with neutron numbers N=124,126,128,130 and 132. We studied the variation of S α with the proton number, Z, for each isotone and found the effect of neutron and proton energy levels of parent nuclei on the behavior of the α-particle preformation probability. We found that S α increases regularly with the proton number when the proton pair in α-particle is emitted from the same level and the neutron level sequence is not changed during the Z-variation. In this case the neutron–proton (n–p) interaction of the two levels, contributing to emission process, is too small. On the contrary, if the proton or neutron level sequence is changed during the emission process, S α behaves irregularly, the irregular behavior increases if both proton and neutron levels are changed. This behavior is accompanied by change or rapid increase in the strength of n–p interaction

  10. Benchmark measurements and simulations of dose perturbations due to metallic spheres in proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Rechner, Laura; Mirkovic, Dragan; Yepes, Pablo; Koch, Nicholas C.; Titt, Uwe; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are increasingly used for dose calculations in proton therapy due to its inherent accuracy. However, dosimetric deviations have been found using Monte Carlo code when high density materials are present in the proton beamline. The purpose of this work was to quantify the magnitude of dose perturbation caused by metal objects. We did this by comparing measurements and Monte Carlo predictions of dose perturbations caused by the presence of small metal spheres in several clinical proton therapy beams as functions of proton beam range and drift space. Monte Carlo codes MCNPX, GEANT4 and Fast Dose Calculator (FDC) were used. Generally good agreement was found between measurements and Monte Carlo predictions, with the average difference within 5% and maximum difference within 17%. The modification of multiple Coulomb scattering model in MCNPX code yielded improvement in accuracy and provided the best overall agreement with measurements. Our results confirmed that Monte Carlo codes are well suited for predicting multiple Coulomb scattering in proton therapy beams when short drift spaces are involved. - Highlights: • We compared measurements and Monte Carlo predictions of dose perturbations caused by the metal objects in proton beams. • Different Monte Carlo codes were used, including MCNPX, GEANT4 and Fast Dose Calculator. • Good agreement was found between measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. • The modification of multiple Coulomb scattering model in MCNPX code yielded improved accuracy. • Our results confirmed that Monte Carlo codes are well suited for predicting multiple Coulomb scattering in proton therapy

  11. First Observation of the Seeded Proton Bunch Self-Modulation in Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2093171; Vincke, Helmut

    In this thesis I observe experimentally and study in simulations the seeded selfmodulation of a relativistic proton bunch in AWAKE, the Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment. The 400 GeV/c proton bunch from the CERN SPS with a rms length of 12 cm propagates in a 10m long plasma with a density adjustable between 2-10x10^14 electrons/cm3. The seeded self-modulation process results in focusing and defocusing of the protons, thereby forming a bunch train that resonantly drives wakefields to large amplitudes. I use the two-screen measurement setup, to observe the result of the proton bunch self-modulation and to learn about its physics (i.e. growth of the process). The idea is to obtain images of protons that were defocused by the transverse wakefields, 2 and 10m downstream the end of the plasma. From these images I determine the maximum transverse momentum of the defocused protons as well as infer their point of origin along the plasma. I use simulations to guide the understanding of the...

  12. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Satco, Daria

    2017-01-01

    In view of new possibilities becoming more realistic with FCC design and of recent promising results regarding $(B+L)$-violating processes detection we concentrated our research on generation and analysis of sphaleron transitions. The existence of instanton and sphaleron solutions which are associated with transitions between different vacuum states is well known since 1980s. However first calculations of instanton rate killed any hope to detect them even at very high energies while the calculation of sphaleron transitions rate is a tricky problem which continue being widely discussed. In our research we used HERBVI package to generate baryon- and lepton-number violating processes in proton-proton collisions at typical energies 14, 33, 40 and 100 TeV in order to estimate the upper limit on the sphaleron cross-section. We considered the background processes and determined the zero background regions.

  13. Experimental support at proton--proton colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.

    1977-01-01

    Proton--proton colliding beam facilities have a number of special features which increase the importance of support for experiments when compared to fixed target accelerators: (1) the laboratory system is very close to the center-of-mass system; this affects the geometry and general size of the experiments; (2) the primary p--p interaction is inaccessible, that is, it takes place in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber; and (3) the experiment detection system is necessarily inside the machine structure and becomes very closely linked to it in many respects. An overall picture is given of experimental support based on experience at the CERN ISR under the following headings: Experimental Areas, Scheduling, Intersection Vacuum Chambers, Machine Background, and Magnets for Experiments. The first two of these topics concern the requirements in space and time of an experiment, while the last three are all related to the close interaction between experiment and machine

  14. Better Proton-Conducting Polymers for Fuel-Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri; Reddy, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Polyoxyphenylene triazole sulfonic acid has been proposed as a basis for development of improved proton-conducting polymeric materials for solid-electrolyte membranes in hydrogen/air fuel cells. Heretofore, the proton-conducting membrane materials of choice have been exemplified by a family of perfluorosulfonic acid-based polymers (Nafion7 or equivalent). These materials are suitable for operation in the temperature of 75 to 85 C, but in order to reduce the sizes and/or increase the energy-conversion efficiencies of fuel-cell systems, it would be desirable to increase temperatures to as high as 120 C for transportation applications, and to as high as 180 C for stationary applications. However, at 120 C and at relative humidity values below 50 percent, the loss of water from perfluorosulfonic acid-based polymer membranes results in fuel-cell power densities too low to be of practical value. Therefore, membrane electrolyte materials that have usefully high proton conductivity in the temperature range of 180 C at low relative humidity and that do not rely on water for proton conduction at 180 C would be desirable. The proposed polyoxyphenylene triazole sulfonic acid-based materials have been conjectured to have these desirable properties. These materials would be free of volatile or mobile acid constituents. The generic molecular structure of these materials is intended to exploit the fact, demonstrated in previous research, that materials that contain ionizable acid and base groups covalently attached to thermally stable polymer backbones exhibit proton conduction even in the anhydrous state.

  15. Laser-driven proton beams applied to radiobiological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yogo, Akifumi

    2012-01-01

    The proton accelerators based on the high intensity laser system generate shorter and higher pulse beams compared to the conventional particle accelerators used for the cancer therapy. To demonstrate the radiobiological effects of the new proton beams, the program to develop a biological irradiation instrument for the DNA double-strand break was started in the fiscal year 2008. A prototype instrument was made by making use of the J-KAREN (JAEA Kansai Advanced Relativistic Engineering) laser beam. Polyimide thin film targets were used to irradiate A-549 cells. The DNA double-strand break was tested by the fluorescence spectrometry. In the second year the quantitative yield of the DNA double-strand break and its proton dose dependence were measured. The results indicated that they were comparative to the cases of the conventional particle accelerators. In the fiscal year of 2010 the design of the magnetic field for the energy selection has been changed. The new irradiation instrument, the main part of which is only about 40 cm in length as illustrated in the figure, has been constructed and tested. The experiment has been carried out using the human cancer cells (HSG) and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) has been quantitatively evaluated by the colony assay for varied distribution of the proton beam energy. The survival fractions plotted against the dose were in good agreement with the case of 3 He beam. RBE was found not to be changed up to 1x10 7 Gy/s. Stability of the energy peak, half width and the proton density has been confirmed for this very compact instrument. (S. Funahashi)

  16. ACCELERATION OF POLARIZED PROTONS AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUANG, H.

    2002-01-01

    Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) ended its second year of operation in January 2002 with five weeks of polarized proton collisions. Polarized protons were successfully injected in both RHIC rings and maintained polarization during acceleration up to 100 GeV per ring using two Siberian snakes in each ring. This is the first time that polarized protons have been accelerated to 100 GeV. The machine performance and accomplishments during the polarized proton run will be reviewed. The plans for the next polarized proton run will be outlined

  17. Construction and test of a proton detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranefeld, G.

    1990-08-01

    Nonmagnetic proton detectors will be used in future at the ELAN experiment. For this purpose a prototype of a proton telescope has being designed. The detector consists of three scintillation counters which are used as dE/dx counter, energy (stopping) counter and veto counter. This telescope was calibrated by using elastic electron proton scattering and tested with quasielastic electrodisintegration of the deuteron. These are no principal problems to identify the protons. In the electrodisintegration of the deuteron a missing mass resolution of ± 5.1 MeV was achieved. It has been shown, that such detectors are well suited for proton detection. (orig.) [de

  18. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  19. Fine structure in deformed proton emitting nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A. A.; Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Ressler, J. J.; Schwartz, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-01-01

    In a recent experiment to study the proton radioactivity of the highly deformed 131 Eu nucleus, two proton lines were detected. The higher energy one was assigned to the ground-state to ground-state decay, while the lower energy, to the ground-state to the 2 + state decay. This constitutes the first observation of fine structure in proton radioactivity. With these four measured quantities, proton energies, half-life and branching ratio, it is possible to determine the Nilsson configuration of the ground state of the proton emitting nucleus as well as the 2 + energy and nuclear deformation of the daughter nucleus. These results will be presented and discussed

  20. Predicting Ionization Rates from SEP and Solar Wind Proton Precipitation into the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolitz, R.; Dong, C.; Lee, C. O.; Curry, S.; Lillis, R. J.; Brain, D.; Halekas, J. S.; Larson, D. E.; Bougher, S. W.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    Precipitating energetic particles ionize planetary atmospheres and increase total electron content. At Mars, the solar wind and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can precipitate directly into the atmosphere because solar wind protons can charge exchange to become neutrals and pass through the magnetosheath, while SEPs are sufficiently energetic to cross the magnetosheath unchanged. In this study we will present predicted ionization rates and resulting electron densities produced by solar wind and SEP proton ionization during nominal solar activity and a CME shock front impact event on May 16 2016. We will use the Atmospheric Scattering of Protons and Energetic Neutrals (ASPEN) model to compare ionization by SEP and solar wind protons currently measured by the SWIA (Solar Wind Ion Analyzer) and SEP instruments aboard the MAVEN spacecraft. Results will help to quantify how the ionosphere responds to extreme solar events during solar minimum.

  1. Electronic stopping power calculation for water under the Lindhard formalism for application in proton computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, A. F., E-mail: afguerreror@uqvirtual.edu.co [Departamento de Física, Universidad Del Quindío Cra 15 # 12N Armenia, Quindío (Colombia); Mesa, J., E-mail: jmesa@ibb.unesp.br [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu da UNESP Distrito de Rubião Jr. s/n°, 18618-000, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-07

    Because of the behavior that charged particles have when they interact with biological material, proton therapy is shaping the future of radiation therapy in cancer treatment. The planning of radiation therapy is made up of several stages. The first one is the diagnostic image, in which you have an idea of the density, size and type of tumor being treated; to understand this it is important to know how the particles beam interacts with the tissue. In this work, by using de Lindhard formalism and the Y.R. Waghmare model for the charge distribution of the proton, the electronic stopping power (SP) for a proton beam interacting with a liquid water target in the range of proton energies 10{sup 1} eV - 10{sup 10} eV taking into account all the charge states is calculated.

  2. Twist-3 effect from the longitudinally polarized proton for ALT in hadron production from pp collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Koike

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We compute the contribution from the longitudinally polarized proton to the twist-3 double-spin asymmetry ALT in inclusive (light hadron production from proton–proton collisions, i.e., p↑p→→hX. We show that using the relevant QCD equation-of-motion relation and Lorentz invariance relation allows one to eliminate the twist-3 quark-gluon correlator (associated with the longitudinally polarized proton in favor of one-variable twist-3 quark distributions and the (twist-2 transversity parton density. Including this result with the twist-3 pieces associated with the transversely polarized proton and unpolarized final-state hadron (which have already been calculated in the literature, we now have the complete leading-order cross section for this process.

  3. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M. [Helmholtz Institute Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Yan, X. Q. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-15

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated.

  4. Dynamics of intense pulsed proton beam in the Nagaoka ETIGO-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hajime; Konno, Kohji; Masugata, Katsumi; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Masao

    1982-01-01

    Dynamics of an intense pulsed proton beam have been studied by measuring nuclear reactions as well as by a biased ion-collector (BIC). When the ion-current density (Jsub(i)) is small such that Jsub(i) lt 30 A/cm 2 , the proton numer measured by BIC is in good agreement with that by nuclear activation. Good linearity exists between time integrated gamma -ray signal and proton number measured by the activation. Hence, it would be possible to obtain the proton number quantitatively even when a target ''blow-off'' takes place at Jsub(i) gt 1 kA/cm 2 . Prompt gamma -ray is also measured by the time-of-flight method to yield reasonable agreement with the applied peak potential. (author)

  5. Hydroxide diffuses slower than hydronium in water because its solvated structure inhibits correlated proton transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohan; Zheng, Lixin; Santra, Biswajit; Ko, Hsin-Yu; DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Klein, Michael L.; Car, Roberto; Wu, Xifan

    2018-03-01

    Proton transfer via hydronium and hydroxide ions in water is ubiquitous. It underlies acid-base chemistry, certain enzyme reactions, and even infection by the flu. Despite two centuries of investigation, the mechanism underlying why hydroxide diffuses slower than hydronium in water is still not well understood. Herein, we employ state-of-the-art density-functional-theory-based molecular dynamics—with corrections for non-local van der Waals interactions, and self-interaction in the electronic ground state—to model water and hydrated water ions. At this level of theory, we show that structural diffusion of hydronium preserves the previously recognized concerted behaviour. However, by contrast, proton transfer via hydroxide is less temporally correlated, due to a stabilized hypercoordination solvation structure that discourages proton transfer. Specifically, the latter exhibits non-planar geometry, which agrees with neutron-scattering results. Asymmetry in the temporal correlation of proton transfer leads to hydroxide diffusing slower than hydronium.

  6. Proton transport in additives to the polymer electrolyte membrane for fuel cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelle, Pia

    2011-03-21

    The enhancement of proton transport in polymer electrolyte membranes is an important issue for the development of fuel cell technology. The objective is a material providing proton transport at a temperature range of 350 K to 450 K independent from a purely water based mechanism. To enhance the PEM properties of standard polymer materials, a class of additives is studied by means of atomistic simulations consisting of functionalised mesoporous silicon dioxide particles. The functional molecules are imidazole or sulphonic acid, covalently bound to the surface via a carbon chain with a surface density of about 1.0 nm{sup -2} groups. At first, the proton transport mechanism is explored in a system of functional molecules in vacuum. The molecules are constrained by the terminal carbon groups according to the geometric arrangement in the porous silicon dioxide. The proton transport mechanism is characterised by structural properties obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations and consists of the aggregation of two or more functional groups, a barrier free proton transport between these groups followed by the separation of the groups and formation of new aggregates due to fluctuations in the hydrogen bond network and movement of the carbon chain. For the different proton conducting groups, i.e. methyl imidazole, methyl sulphonic acid and water, the barrier free proton transport and the formation of protonated bimolecular complexes were addressed by potential energy calculations of the density functional based tight binding method (DFTB). For sulphonic acid even at a temperature of 450 K, relatively stable aggregates are formed, while most imidazole groups are isolated and the hydrogen bond fluctuations are high. However, high density of groups and elevated temperatures enhance the proton transport in both systems. Besides the anchorage and the density of the groups, the influence of the chemical environment on the proton transport was studied. Therefore, the

  7. Collimated proton acceleration in light sail regime with a tailored pinhole target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H. Y.; Zepf, M.; Yan, X. Q.

    2014-01-01

    A scheme for producing collimated protons from laser interactions with a diamond-like-carbon + pinhole target is proposed. The process is based on radiation pressure acceleration in the multi-species light-sail regime [B. Qiao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 155002 (2010); T. P. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065002 (2010)]. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that transverse quasistatic electric field at TV/m level can be generated in the pinhole. The transverse electric field suppresses the transverse expansion of protons effectively, resulting in a higher density and more collimated proton beam compared with a single foil target. The dependence of the proton beam divergence on the parameters of the pinhole is also investigated

  8. Cosmic-ray energy densities in star-forming galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persic Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy density of cosmic ray protons in star forming galaxies can be estimated from π0-decay γ-ray emission, synchrotron radio emission, and supernova rates. To galaxies for which these methods can be applied, the three methods yield consistent energy densities ranging from Up ~ 0.1 − 1 eV cm−3 to Up ~ 102 − 103 eV cm−3 in galaxies with low to high star-formation rates, respectively.

  9. Constraints on parton density functions from D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Jonathan M.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2008-04-01

    Five recent results from D0 which either impact or have the potential to impact on uncertainties in parton density functions are presented. Many analyses at D0 are sensitive to the modeling of the partonic structure of the proton. When theoretical and experimental uncertainties are well controlled there exists the possibility for additional constraints on parton density functions (PDF). Five measurements are presented which either have already been included in global parton fits or have the potential to contribute in the future.

  10. Proton acceleration experiments and warm dense matter research using high power lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bagnoud, V [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brown, C R D [Plasma Physics Group, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), Chilton, Didcot, OX14 OQX (United Kingdom); Daido, H [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Geissel, M [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Gregori, G, E-mail: markus.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.d [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. In this paper we report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore, we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by x-ray Thomson scattering to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  11. Transport of laser accelerated proton beams and isochoric heating of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K; Bagnoud, V; Brown, C; Gregori, G; Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B; Daido, H; Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C; Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S; Makita, M

    2010-01-01

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. We report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  12. Proton acceleration experiments and warm dense matter research using high power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K; Bagnoud, V; Brown, C R D; Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B; Daido, H; Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C; Geissel, M; Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S; Gregori, G

    2009-01-01

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. In this paper we report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore, we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by x-ray Thomson scattering to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  13. Transport of laser accelerated proton beams and isochoric heating of matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, M; Alber, I; Guenther, M; Harres, K [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Bagnoud, V [GSI Helmholtzzentrum f. Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brown, C; Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Clarke, R; Heathcote, R; Li, B [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX14 OQX (United Kingdom); Daido, H [Photo Medical Research Center, JAEA, Kizugawa-City, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fernandez, J; Flippo, K; Gaillard, S; Gauthier, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Glenzer, S; Kritcher, A; Kugland, N; LePape, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Makita, M, E-mail: markus.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.d [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    The acceleration of intense proton and ion beams by ultra-intense lasers has matured to a point where applications in basic research and technology are being developed. Crucial for harvesting the unmatched beam parameters driven by the relativistic electron sheath is the precise control of the beam. We report on recent experiments using the PHELIX laser at GSI, the VULCAN laser at RAL and the TRIDENT laser at LANL to control and use laser accelerated proton beams for applications in high energy density research. We demonstrate efficient collimation of the proton beam using high field pulsed solenoid magnets, a prerequisite to capture and transport the beam for applications. Furthermore we report on two campaigns to use intense, short proton bunches to isochorically heat solid targets up to the warm dense matter state. The temporal profile of the proton beam allows for rapid heating of the target, much faster than the hydrodynamic response time thereby creating a strongly coupled plasma at solid density. The target parameters are then probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) to reveal the density and temperature of the heated volume. This combination of two powerful techniques developed during the past few years allows for the generation and investigation of macroscopic samples of matter in states present in giant planets or the interior of the earth.

  14. Matter density distributions and elastic form factors of some two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmed N Abdullah

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... include the proton, neutron and matter density distributions, the corresponding rms radii, the binding energy per nucleon and the charge form ... the nuclear structure models based on the experimental data for stable nuclei ... Most exotic nuclei are so short lived that they cannot be used as targets at rest.

  15. Proton and non-proton activation of ASIC channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gautschi

    Full Text Available The Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASIC exhibit a fast desensitizing current when activated by pH values below 7.0. By contrast, non-proton ligands are able to trigger sustained ASIC currents at physiological pHs. To analyze the functional basis of the ASIC desensitizing and sustained currents, we have used ASIC1a and ASIC2a mutants with a cysteine in the pore vestibule for covalent binding of different sulfhydryl reagents. We found that ASIC1a and ASIC2a exhibit two distinct currents, a proton-induced desensitizing current and a sustained current triggered by sulfhydryl reagents. These currents differ in their pH dependency, their sensitivity to the sulfhydryl reagents, their ionic selectivity and their relative magnitude. We propose a model for ASIC1 and ASIC2 activity where the channels can function in two distinct modes, a desensitizing mode and a sustained mode depending on the activating ligands. The pore vestibule of the channel represents a functional site for binding non-proton ligands to activate ASIC1 and ASIC2 at neutral pH and to prevent channel desensitization.

  16. Proton and non-proton activation of ASIC channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautschi, Ivan; van Bemmelen, Miguel Xavier; Schild, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASIC) exhibit a fast desensitizing current when activated by pH values below 7.0. By contrast, non-proton ligands are able to trigger sustained ASIC currents at physiological pHs. To analyze the functional basis of the ASIC desensitizing and sustained currents, we have used ASIC1a and ASIC2a mutants with a cysteine in the pore vestibule for covalent binding of different sulfhydryl reagents. We found that ASIC1a and ASIC2a exhibit two distinct currents, a proton-induced desensitizing current and a sustained current triggered by sulfhydryl reagents. These currents differ in their pH dependency, their sensitivity to the sulfhydryl reagents, their ionic selectivity and their relative magnitude. We propose a model for ASIC1 and ASIC2 activity where the channels can function in two distinct modes, a desensitizing mode and a sustained mode depending on the activating ligands. The pore vestibule of the channel represents a functional site for binding non-proton ligands to activate ASIC1 and ASIC2 at neutral pH and to prevent channel desensitization.

  17. Golden Jubilee photos: ISR - The first proton-proton interactions

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    At the inauguration ceremony for the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) on 16 October 1971, the man in charge of their construction, Kjell Johnsen, presented the "key" to the machine to Edoardo Amaldi, President of Council. Seated on the stage with them for this symbolic event were Victor Weisskopf, Marcel Antonioz, Willy Jentschke (seen on the left of the photo) and Werner Heisenberg (on the far right). On 27 January that year, in a world premier, signals produced by proton-proton collisions had been observed at the ISR. The protons, supplied by the PS, were injected into two identical rings, each measuring 300 metres in diameter, and collided head on at the 8 points where the rings intersected. The installation, which remained in operation until 1984, gave physicists access to a wide range of energies for hadron physics, hitherto restricted to the data from cosmic ray studies. The many technological challenges that were met at the ISR, in the fields of vacuum technology and stochastic cooling for instance,...

  18. LONG-TERM TRENDS IN THE SOLAR WIND PROTON MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Heather A.; McComas, David J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); DeForest, Craig E. [Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We examine the long-term time evolution (1965–2015) of the relationships between solar wind proton temperature ( T {sub p}) and speed ( V {sub p}) and between the proton density ( n {sub p}) and speed using OMNI solar wind observations taken near Earth. We find a long-term decrease in the proton temperature–speed ( T {sub p}– V {sub p}) slope that lasted from 1972 to 2010, but has been trending upward since 2010. Since the solar wind proton density–speed ( n {sub p}– V {sub p}) relationship is not linear like the T {sub p}– V {sub p} relationship, we perform power-law fits for n {sub p}– V {sub p}. The exponent (steepness in the n {sub p}– V {sub p} relationship) is correlated with the solar cycle. This exponent has a stronger correlation with current sheet tilt angle than with sunspot number because the sunspot number maxima vary considerably from cycle to cycle and the tilt angle maxima do not. To understand this finding, we examined the average n {sub p} for different speed ranges, and found that for the slow wind n {sub p} is highly correlated with the sunspot number, with a lag of approximately four years. The fast wind n {sub p} variation was less, but in phase with the cycle. This phase difference may contribute to the n {sub p}– V {sub p} exponent correlation with the solar cycle. These long-term trends are important since empirical formulas based on fits to T {sub p} and V {sub p} data are commonly used to identify interplanetary coronal mass ejections, but these formulas do not include any time dependence. Changes in the solar wind density over a solar cycle will create corresponding changes in the near-Earth space environment and the overall extent of the heliosphere.

  19. Proton-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitenzahl, I.R.; Timmes, F.X.; Marin-Lafleche, A.; Brown, E.; Magkotsios, G.; Truran, J.

    2008-01-01

    Proton-rich material in a state of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is one of the least studied regimes of nucleosynthesis. One reason for this is that after hydrogen burning, stellar evolution proceeds at conditions of an equal number of neutrons and protons or at a slight degree of neutron-richness. Proton-rich nucleosynthesis in stars tends to occur only when hydrogen-rich material that accretes onto a white dwarf or a neutron star explodes, or when neutrino interactions in the winds from a nascent proto-neutron star or collapsar disk drive the matter proton-rich prior to or during the nucleosynthesis. In this Letter we solve the NSE equations for a range of proton-rich thermodynamic conditions. We show that cold proton-rich NSE is qualitatively different from neutron-rich NSE. Instead of being dominated by the Fe-peak nuclei with the largest binding energy per nucleon that have a proton-to-nucleon ratio close to the prescribed electron fraction, NSE for proton-rich material near freezeout temperature is mainly composed of 56Ni and free protons. Previous results of nuclear reaction network calculations rely on this nonintuitive high-proton abundance, which this Letter explains. We show how the differences and especially the large fraction of free protons arises from the minimization of the free energy as a result of a delicate competition between the entropy and nuclear binding energy.

  20. Principles and practice of proton beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Indra J

    2015-01-01

    Commissioned by The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) for their June 2015 Summer School, this is the first AAPM monograph printed in full color. Proton therapy has been used in radiation therapy for over 70 years, but within the last decade its use in clinics has grown exponentially. This book fills in the proton therapy gap by focusing on the physics of proton therapy, including beam production, proton interactions, biology, dosimetry, treatment planning, quality assurance, commissioning, motion management, and uncertainties. Chapters are written by the world's leading medical physicists who work at the pioneering proton treatment centers around the globe. They share their understandings after years of experience treating thousands of patients. Case studies involving specific cancer treatments show that there is some art to proton therapy as well as state-of-the-art science. Even though the focus lies on proton therapy, the content provided is also valuable to heavy charged particle th...

  1. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm-3) and beef (~1.0 g cm-3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  2. Probing hydrogen bonding interactions and proton transfer in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Beining

    Scope and method of study. Hydrogen bonding is a fundamental element in protein structure and function. Breaking a single hydrogen bond may impair the stability of a protein. It is therefore important to probe dynamic changes in hydrogen bonding interactions during protein folding and function. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is highly sensitive to hydrogen bonding interactions. However, it lacks quantitative correlation between the vibrational frequencies and the number, type, and strength of hydrogen bonding interactions of ionizable and polar residues. We employ quantum physics theory based ab initio calculations to study the effects of hydrogen bonding interactions on vibrational frequencies of Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues and to develop vibrational spectral markers for probing hydrogen bonding interactions using infrared spectroscopy. In addition, proton transfer process plays a crucial role in a wide range of energy transduction, signal transduction, and enzymatic reactions. We study the structural basis for proton transfer using photoactive yellow protein as an excellent model system. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to investigate the structures of early intermediate states. Quantum theory based ab initio calculations are used to study the impact of hydrogen bond interactions on proton affinity and proton transfer. Findings and conclusions. Our extensive density function theory based calculations provide rich structural, spectral, and energetic information on hydrogen bonding properties of protonated side chain groups of Asp/Glu and Tyr. We developed vibrational spectral markers and 2D FTIR spectroscopy for structural characterization on the number and the type of hydrogen bonding interactions of the COOH group of Asp/Glu and neutral phenolic group of Tyr. These developments greatly enhance the power of time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy as a major experimental tool for structural characterization of functionally important

  3. Kinetics of water-mediated proton transfer in our atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loerting, T.

    2000-07-01

    Variational transition state theory and multidimensional tunneling methods on hybrid density functional theory generated hypersurfaces have been used to investigate the temperature dependence of the reaction rate constants of water-mediated proton transfer reactions relevant to the chemistry of our atmosphere, namely the hydration of sulfur dioxide and sulfur trioxide and the decomposition of chlorine nitrate. Highly accurate reaction barriers were calculated using ab initio methods taking into account most of the electron correlation, namely CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ and G2(MP2). On comparing the determined rate constants with laboratory and atmospheric data, the following points could be established: All of the investigated reactions are highly sensitive to changes in humidity, as water acts as efficient catalyst, i.e., the barrier to the reaction is reduced drastically. Present-day atmospheric chemistry can only be explained when a limited number of water molecules is available for the formation of molecular clusters. Both in the troposphere and in the stratosphere SO 3 is hydrated rather than SO 2 . SO 2 emissions have to be oxidized, therefore, before being subject to hydration. A mechanism involving two or three water molecules is relevant for the production of sulfate aerosols, which play a decisive role in the context of global climate change and acid rain. A third water molecule has the function of assisting double-proton transfer rather than acting as active participant in triple-proton transfer in the case of the hydration of sulfur oxides. The observed ozone depletion above Arctica and Antarctica can be explained either by decomposition of chlorine nitrate in the presence of three water molecules (triple proton transfer) or by decomposition of chlorine nitrate in the presence of one molecule of HCl and one molecule of water (double proton transfer). The preassociation reaction required for homogeneous gas-phase conversion of chlorine

  4. Assessment of Proton Deflectometry for Exploding Wire Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, Farhat Nadeem [University of California San Diego

    2013-09-25

    This project provides the first demonstration of the application of proton deflectometry for the diagnosis of electromagnetic field topology and current-carrying regions in Z-pinch plasma experiments. Over the course of this project several milestones were achieved. High-energy proton beam generation was demonstrated on the short-pulse high-intensity Leopard laser, (10 Joules in ~350 femtoseconds, and the proton beam generation was shown to be reproducible. Next, protons were used to probe the electromagnetic field structure of short circuit loads in order to benchmark the two numerical codes, the resistive-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code, Gorgon, and the hybrid particle-in-cell code, LSP for the interpretation of results. Lastly, the proton deflectometry technique was used to map the magnetic field structure of pulsed-power-driven plasma loads including wires and supersonic jets formed with metallic foils. Good agreement between the modeling and experiments has been obtained. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the understanding of current flow and electromagnetic field topology in pulsed power driven high energy density plasmas. Proton probing with a high intensity laser was for the first time implemented in the presence of the harsh debris and x-ray producing z-pinch environment driven by a mega-ampere-scale pulsed-power machine. The intellectual merit of the program was that it investigated strongly driven MHD systems and the influence of magnetic field topology on plasma evolution in pulsed power driven plasmas. The experimental program involved intense field-matter interaction in the generation of the proton probe, as well as the generation of plasma subjected to 1 MegaGauss scale magnetic fields. The computational aspect included two well-documented codes, in combination for the first time to provide accurate interpretation of the experimental results. The broader impact included the support of 2 graduate students, one at

  5. Neutron and proton optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.

    1985-11-01

    The neutron and proton optical model potentials (OMP) are discussed in terms of microscopic (MOMP) and phenomenological (POMP) models. For the MOMP, two approaches are discussed, the nucleus matter approach [Jeukenne-Lejeune-Mahaux (JLM) and Brieva-Rook-von Geramb (BRVG), potentials] and the finite nuclei approach (Osterfeld and Madsen). For the POMP, the Lane charge-exchange potential and its validity over a wide mass range is reviewed. In addition to the Lane symmetry term, the Coulomb correction to both the real and imaginary parts of the OMP is discussed for the above models. The use of the OMP to calculate collective inelastic scattering and observed differences between the neutron- and proton-deformation parameters is also illustrated. 25 refs., 3 figs

  6. Proton Radiography at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos National Lab uses high energy protons to acquire multiple frame flash radiographic sequences at megahertz speeds: that is, it can make movies of the inside of explosions as they happen. The facility is primarily used to study the damage to and failure of metals subjected to the shock forces of high explosives as well as to study the detonation of the explosives themselves. Applications include improving our understanding of the underlying physical processes that drive the performance of the nuclear weapons in the United States stockpile and developing novel armor technologies in collaboration with the Army Research Lab. The principle and techniques of pRad will be described, and examples of some recent results will be shown.

  7. Proton radiotherapy of skin carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umebayashi, Y.; Uyeno, K.; Otsuka, F.

    1994-01-01

    At the Proton Medical Research Centre, University of Tsukuba, a pilot study of proton-beam radiotherapy was performed in 12 patients with the following types of carcinoma: Bowen's disease (4), oral verrucous carcinoma (5), and squamous cell carcinoma (3). They received total doses of 51-99.2 Gy in fractions of 2-12.5 Gy. All tumours responded well to the treatment. All four lesions of Bowen's disease, three of the five oral verrucous carcinomas, and the three squamous cell carcinomas completely regressed following irradiation. Two squamous cell carcinomas recurred during the follow-up period. One recurrent squamous cell carcinoma was successfully treated by a salvage surgical operation, and in the other case the patient refused further therapy. In two verrucous carcinomas there was 90% regression of tumour volume. No severe radiation-related complication occurred. (Author)

  8. Radiotherapy Proton Interactions in Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschalk, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    A survey of physics useful to proton radiotherapy, centered on stopping, scattering and hard scatters: 1. Introduction 2. The fundamental formula dose = fluence x mass stopping power. Practical units, comments on effective stopping power. 3. Range: experimental definition, Beth-Bloch CSDA theory, range-energy tables and approximations, range straggling. 4. Multiple Coulomb Scattering: suggested reading, elements of Moliere theory, the Gaussian approximation, scattering power. 5. Hard scatters...

  9. Are starburst galaxies proton calorimeters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xilu; Fields, Brian D.

    2018-03-01

    Several starburst galaxies have been observed in the GeV and TeV bands. In these dense environments, gamma-ray emission should be dominated by cosmic ray (CR) interactions with the interstellar medium (pcrpism → π0 → γγ). Indeed, starbursts may act as proton `calorimeters' where a substantial fraction of CR energy input is emitted in gamma-rays. Here, we build a one-zone, `thick-target' model implementing calorimetry and placing a firm upper bound on gamma-ray emission from CR interactions. The model assumes that CRs are accelerated by supernovae (SNe), and all suffer nuclear interactions rather than escape. Our model has only two free parameters: the CR proton acceleration energy per SN ɛcr, and the proton injection spectral index s. We calculate the pionic gamma-ray emission from 10 MeV to 10 TeV, and derive thick-target parameters for six galaxies with Fermi, H.E.S.S., and/or VERITAS data. Our model provides good fits for the M82 and NGC 253, and yields ɛcr and s values suggesting that SN CR acceleration is similar in starbursts and in our Galaxy. We find that these starbursts are indeed nearly if not fully proton calorimeters. For NGC 4945 and NGC 1068, the models are consistent with calorimetry but are less well-constrained due to the lack of TeV data. However, the Circinus galaxy and the ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 exceed our pionic upper-limit; possible explanations are discussed.

  10. Proton Therapy for Thoracoabdominal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tokuuye, Koichi

    In advanced-stage disease of certain thoracoabdominal tumors, proton therapy (PT) with concurrent chemotherapy may be an option to reduce side effects. Several technological developments, including a respiratory gating system and implantation of fiducial markers for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), are necessary for the treatment in thoracoabdominal tumors. In this chapter, the role of PT for tumors of the lung, the esophagus, and liver are discussed.

  11. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, Jr., J. F. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

    2009-07-27

    This report summarizes work supported by the DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER40990 during its duration from June 1996 to May 2009. Topics studied include (1) statistical descriptions of nuclear levels and measurements of proton resonances relevant to such descriptions, including measurements toward a complete level scheme for 30P, (2) the development of methods to estimate the missing fraction of levels in a given measurement, and (3) measurements at HRIBF relevant to nuclear astrophysics.

  12. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  13. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ρR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M Gatu; Waugh, C J; Séguin, F H; Sio, H; Sinenian, N; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Hohenberger, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Yeamans, C B; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Bionta, R M; Talison, B; Casey, D T; Landen, O L; Moran, M J; Zacharias, R A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2014-10-01

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (ρR) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ∼1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  14. High-energy monoenergetic proton beams from two stage acceleration with a slow laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a new regime to generate high-energy quasimonoenergetic proton beams in a “slow-pulse” regime, where the laser group velocity v_{g}density plasma. In this regime, for properly matched laser intensity and group velocity, ions initially accelerated by the light sail (LS mode can be further trapped and reflected by the snowplough potential generated by the laser in the near-critical density plasma. These two acceleration stages are connected by the onset of Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT instability. The usual ion energy spectrum broadening by RT instability is controlled and high quality proton beams can be generated. It is shown by multidimensional particle-in-cell simulation that quasimonoenergetic proton beams with energy up to hundreds of MeV can be generated at laser intensities of 10^{21}  W/cm^{2}.

  15. Antiquark distributions in the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, M.; Carey, T.; Garvey, G.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The study of quark and antiquark distributions in the nucleon has been a major endeavor in nuclear and particle physics. Results from a recent deep-inelastic scattering experiment suggest the surprising possibility that the up and down antiquark distributions in the proton are not symmetric. A sensitive and direct determination of the antiquark distributions in the proton can be made by comparing the Drell-Yan cross sections on hydrogen versus deuterium targets. The authors have proposed a new experiment (E866) at Fermilab to carry out such measurements. E866 has been taking data since September 1996. Preliminary results show that the apparatus is working very well. The authors anticipate having seven months of beam in 1997, which would allow them to achieve the sensitivities for a definitive measurement of flavor symmetry of sea quarks in the proton

  16. The intense proton accelerator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1990-01-01

    The Science and Technology Agency of Japan has formulated the OMEGA project, in which incineration of nuclear wastes by use of accelerators is defined as one of the important tasks. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been engaged for several years in basic studies in incineration technology with use of an intense proton linear accelerator. The intense proton accelerator program intends to provide a large scale proton linear accelerator called Engineering Test Accelerator. The principal purpose of the accelerator is to develop nuclear waste incineration technology. The accelerator will also be used for other industrial applications and applied science studies. The present report further outlines the concept of incineration of radio-activities of nuclear wastes, focusing on nuclear reactions and a concept of incineration plant. Features of Engineering Test Accelerator are described focusing on the development of the accelerator, and research and development of incineration technology. Applications of science and technology other than nuclear waste incineration are also discussed. (N.K.)

  17. Ever-changing proton radius?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihovilovic, Miha [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the presently best value obtained from elastic scattering experiments remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today's nuclear physics. Therefore, several new experiments are underway, committed to provide new insight into the problem. High-precision electron scattering experiments are in progress at the Jefferson Lab and the Mainz Microtron. As a counterpart to these measurements, a muon-proton scattering experiment is envisioned at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Together with the nuclear scattering experiments, new atomic measurements are underway at the Max Planck Institute in Garching, which aim to further improve also the spectroscopic results on electronic hydrogen. These experiments are complemented by extensive theoretical efforts focused on studying various processes contributing to the atomic Lamb shift measurements that could explain the difference, as well as on pursuing different ways to interpret nuclear form-factor measurements, which could lead to a consistent value of the radius. In this presentation the currently best proton radius measurements are summarized, and the importance of the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data is discussed. Selected new experiments dedicated to remeasuring the radius are described, and the results of the MAMI experiment are presented.

  18. Neutron-proton bremsstrahlung experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koster, J.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Nelson, R.O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Schillaci, M.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Wender, S.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Mayo, D. (Univ. of California at Davis, CA (United States)); Brady, F.P. (Univ. of California at Davis, CA (United States)); Romero, J. (Univ. of California at Davis, CA (United States)); Krofcheck, D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Blann, M. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Anthony, P. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Brown, V.R. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Hansen, L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Pohl, B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Sangster, T.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Nifenecker, H. (Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, Grenoble (France)); Pinston,

    1993-06-01

    It is well known that charged particles emit bremsstrahlung radiation when they are accelerated. Classical electron bremsstrahlung occurs when a proton is emitted by an electron accelerated in the field of a nucleus. The bremsstrahlung process also occurs in the scattering of nucleons, for which it is the lowest energy inelastic process that can occur. Like electron bremsstrahlung, nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung also requires the exchange of a virtual particle to conserve energy and momentum. In electron bremsstrahlung a virtual photon is exchanged but with two nucleons a meson can be exchanged. Unlike electron bremsstrahlung, in nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung the photon can originate from the exchanged meson. This exchange contribution has been shown in calculations to be a significant fraction of bremsstrahlung events. Thus bremsstrahlung serves as a probe of exchange currents in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Because of a lack of a free neutron target or an intense neutron beam, few measurements of neutron-proton bremsstrahlung exist, each having poor statistical accuracy and poor energy resolution. The white neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) target area at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) produces neutrons with energies from below 50 to above 400 MeV. Using time-of-flight techniques and a liquid hydrogen target, we are measuring the outgoing photons of energies up to 250 MeV at gamma ray angles of around 90 relative to the incident beam. Protons scattered at very forward angles are also detected in coincidence with the gamma rays. (orig.)

  19. Structural design study of a proton beam window for a 1-MW spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Terada, Atsuhiko; Maekawa, Fujio; Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Kaminaga, Masanori; Ishikura, Syuichi; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    A 1-MW spallation neutron source aiming at materials and life science researches will be constructed under the JAERI-KEK High-intensity Proton Accelerator Project (J-PARC). A proton beam passes through a proton beam window, and be injected into a target of the neutron source. The proton beam window functions as a boundary wall between a high vacuum area in the proton beam line and a helium atmosphere at about atmospheric pressure in a helium vessel which contains the target and moderators. The proton beam window is cooled by light water because high heat-density is generated in the window material by interactions with the proton beam. Then, uniformity of the water flow is requested at the window to suppress a hot-spot that causes excessive thermal stress and cooling water boiling. Also, the window has to be strong enough in its structure for inner stress due to water pressure and thermal stress due to heat generation. In this report, we propose two types of proton beam windows; one flat-type that is easy to manufacture, and the other, curved-type that has high stress resistivity. As a part of design study for the windows, evaluation of strength of structure and thermal hydraulic analysis were conducted. As a result, it was found that sufficient heat removal was assured with uniform water flow at the window, and stress caused by internal water pressure and thermal stress could be maintained below allowable stress values. Accordingly, it was confirmed that the proton beam window designs were feasible. (author)

  20. Effects of target plasma electron-electron collisions on correlated motion of fragmented H2+ protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to examined the effects of plasma target electron-electron collisions on H 2 + protons traversing it. Specifically, the target is deuterium in a plasma state with temperature T e =10 eV and density n=10 23 cm -3 , and proton velocities are v p =v th , v p =2v th , and v p =3v th , where v th is the electron thermal velocity of the target plasma. Proton interactions with plasma electrons are treated by means of the dielectric formalism. The interactions among close protons through plasma electronic medium are called vicinage forces. It is checked that these forces always screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H 2 + ion decreasing their relative distance. They also align the interproton vector along the motion direction, and increase the energy loss of the two protons at early dwell times while for longer times the energy loss tends to the value of two isolated protons. Nevertheless, vicinage forces and effects are modified by the target electron collisions. These collisions enhance the calculated self-stopping and vicinage forces over the collisionless results. Regarding proton correlated motion, when these collisions are included, the interproton vector along the motion direction overaligns at slower proton velocities (v p =v th ) and misaligns for faster ones (v p =2v th , v p =3v th ). They also contribute to a great extend to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H 2 + ion. This later effect is more significant in reducing projectile velocity