WorldWideScience

Sample records for proton damage effects

  1. Relative effectiveness of electron-proton damage on organic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolomei, P.; Cabrini, A.

    1988-01-01

    With aim to verify the validity of simulation with photon irradiators, of damage caused on internal containment coatings by beta plus gamma mixed field following to a LOCA in LWR, irradiation tests with Co 60 photon and with nearly 1.5 MeV mean energy electrons have been performed. Changes of some properties of coating film have been verified versus absorbed doses up to 1000 KGy (100 Mrad). A special technique for measurement of dose absorbed in thin film of coating has been tested, to be related to absorbed dose in organic dosimeters and in water (Fricke solution) dosimeter. The changes of considered properties (tensile strength, ease to decontamination, color, brightness) do not allow at the moment, to determine undoubtedly the degree of equivalence between radiation damage to coatings by two types of radiation. A strong backscatter effect mainly evident in electron irradiation, has been pointed out, which contribute to damage to coating film

  2. Damage effects and mechanisms of proton irradiation on methyl silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.X.; He, Sh.Y.; Xu, Zh.; Wei, Q.

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed on the damage effects and mechanisms of proton irradiation with 150 keV energy to space-grade methyl silicone rubber. The changes in surface morphology, mechanical properties, infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectrum, mass spectrum and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrum (PYGC-MS) indicated that, under lower fluence, the proton radiation would induce cross-linking effect, resulting in an increase in tensile strengths and hardness of the methyl silicon rubber. However, under higher proton fluence, the radiation-induced degradation, which decreased the tensile strengths and hardness, became a dominant effect. A macromolecular-network destruction model for the silicone rubber radiated with the protons was proposed

  3. Code package for calculation of damage effects of medium-energy protons in metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, C.A.

    1976-12-01

    A program package was developed to calculate radiation damage effects produced in a metal target by protons in the 100-MeV to 3.5-GeV energy range. A detailed description is given of the control cards and data cards required to use the code package

  4. Ionization versus displacement damage effects in proton irradiated CMOS sensors manufactured in deep submicron process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goiffon, V.; Magnan, P.; Saint-Pe, O.; Bernard, F.; Rolland, G.

    2009-01-01

    Proton irradiation effects have been studied on CMOS image sensors manufactured in a 0.18μm technology dedicated to imaging. The ionizing dose and displacement damage effects were discriminated and localized thanks to 60 Co irradiations and large photodiode reverse current measurements. The only degradation observed was a photodiode dark current increase. It was found that ionizing dose effects dominate this rise by inducing generation centers at the interface between shallow trench isolations and depleted silicon regions. Displacement damages are is responsible for a large degradation of dark current non-uniformity. This work suggests that designing a photodiode tolerant to ionizing radiation can mitigate an important part of proton irradiation effects.

  5. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and distal edge effects of proton radiation on early damage in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Bassler, Niels; Nielsen, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    of the SOBP to behind the distal dose fall-off. Irradiations were performed with the same dose plan at all positions, corresponding to a dose of 31.25 Gy in the middle of the SOBP. Endpoint of the study was early skin damage of the foot, assessed by a mouse foot skin scoring system. RESULTS: The MDD50 values......, where LETd,z =1 was 3.3 keV/μm. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a need to expand the current study to be able to calculate an exact enhancement ratio, an enhanced biological effect in vivo for early skin damage in the distal edge was demonstrated....

  6. Effect of proton and electron-irradiation intensity on radiation-induced damages in silicon bioolar transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, Yu.A.; Gorin, B.M.; Kozhevnikov, V.P.; Mikhnovich, V.V.; Gusev, L.I.

    1981-01-01

    The increase of radiation-induced damages of bipolar n-p-n transistors 8-12 times with the irradiation intensity decrease by protons from 4.07x1010 to 2.5x107 cm-2 x c-1 has been found experimentally. damages of p-n-p transistors vary in the opposite way - they are decreased 2-3 times with the irradiation intensity decrease within the same limits. the dependence of damages on intansity of proton irradiation occurs at the dose rate by three orders less than it has been observed for electron irradiation. the results obtained are explained by the dependence of radiation defectoformation reactions on charge state of defects with account for the role of formation of disordering regions upon proton irradiation [ru

  7. Proton-induced direct and indirect damage of plasmid DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyšín, Luděk; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Štěpán, V.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bugler, B.; Legube, G.; Cafarelli, P.; Casta, R.; Champeaux, J. P.; Sence, M.; Vlk, M.; Wagner, Richard; Štursa, Jan; Zach, Václav; Incerti, S.; Juha, Libor; Davídková, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2015), s. 343-352 ISSN 0301-634X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28721S; GA MŠk LD12008; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : proton radiation * DNA plasmid * direct and indirect effects * clustered damage * repair enzymes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.923, year: 2015

  8. Clustered DNA damage induced by proton and heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidkova, M.; Pachnerova Brabcova, K; Stepan, V.; Vysin, L.; Sihver, L.; Incerti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces in DNA strand breaks, damaged bases and modified sugars, which accumulate with increasing density of ionizations in charged particle tracks. Compared to isolated DNA damage sites, the biological toxicity of damage clusters can be for living cells more severe. We investigated the clustered DNA damage induced by protons (30 MeV) and high LET radiation (C 290 MeV/u and Fe 500 MeV/u) in pBR322 plasmid DNA. To distinguish between direct and indirect pathways of radiation damage, the plasmid was irradiated in pure water or in aqueous solution of one of the three scavengers (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid, dimethylsulfoxide, and glycylglycine). The goal of the contribution is the analysis of determined types of DNA damage in dependence on radiation quality and related contribution of direct and indirect radiation effects. The yield of double strand breaks (DSB) induced in the DNA plasmid-scavenger system by heavy ion radiation was found to decrease with increasing scavenging capacity due to reaction with hydroxyl radical, linearly with high correlation coefficients. The yield of non-DSB clusters was found to occur twice as much as the DSB. Their decrease with increasing scavenging capacity had lower linear correlation coefficients. This indicates that the yield of non-DSB clusters depends on more factors, which are likely connected to the chemical properties of individual scavengers. (authors)

  9. Annealing of proton-damaged GaAs and 1/f noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.Y.; Folter, de L.C.

    1997-01-01

    GaAs layers were grown by MBE. The layers were then damaged by 3 MeV proton irradiation and later annealed. We performed Hall effect and low-frequency noise measurements at temperatures between 77 K and 300 K after each step. Several generation - recombination noise components created by proton

  10. Combined effect of bulk and surface damage on strip insulation properties of proton irradiated n$^{+}$-p silicon strip sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Dalal, R; Ranjan, K; Moll, M; Elliott-Peisert, A

    2014-01-01

    Silicon sensors in next generation hadron colliders willface a tremendously harsh radiation environment. Requirement tostudy rarest reaction channels with statistical constraints hasresulted in a huge increment in radiation flux, resulting in bothsurface damage and bulk damage. For sensors which are used in acharged hadron environment, both of these degrading processes takeplace simultaneously. Recently it has been observed in protonirradiated n$^{+}$-p Si strip sensors that n$^{+}$ strips had a goodinter-strip insulation with low values of p-spray and p-stop dopingdensities which is contrary to the expected behaviour from thecurrent understanding of radiation damage. In this work a simulationmodel has been devised incorporating radiation damage to understandand provide a possible explanation to the observed behaviour ofirradiated sensors.

  11. Energy-dependent proton damage in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegani, Elena Maria

    2017-09-29

    Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in the sensor bulk is a limiting factor for the lifetime of silicon detectors. In this work, the proton-energy dependent bulkdamage is studied in n- and p-type silicon pad diodes. The samples are thin (200 μm thick), and oxygen enriched (bulk material types: MCz, standard or deepdiffused FZ). Irradiations are performed with 23 MeV, 188 MeV and 23 GeV protons; the 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence assumes selected values in the range [0.1,3].10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. In reverse bias, Current-Voltage (IV) and Capacitance-Voltage (CV) measurements are performed to electrically characterise the samples; in forward bias, IV and CV measurements point out the transition from lifetime to relaxationlike semiconductor after irradiation. By means of Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements, 13 bulk defects have been found after proton irradiation. Firstly, TSC spectra are analysed to obtain defect concentrations after defect filling at the conventional temperature T{sub fill} =10 K. Secondly, temperature dependent capture coefficients of bulk defects are explained, according to the multi-phonon process, from the analysis of TSC measurements at higher filling temperatures (T{sub fill}<130 K). Thirdly, a new method based on the SRH statistics and accounting for cluster-induced shift in activation energy is proposed; it allows to fully characterise bulk defects (in terms of activation energy, concentration and majority capture cross-section) and to distinguish between point- and cluster-like defects. A correlation is noted between the leakage current and the concentration of three deep defects (namely the V{sub 2}, V{sub 3} and H(220K) defects), for all the investigated bulk materials and types, and after all the considered proton energies and fluences. At least five defects are found to be responsible for the space charge, with positive contributions from the E(30K) and B{sub i}O{sub i} defects, or negative contributions from three deep

  12. Energy-dependent proton damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donegani, Elena Maria

    2017-01-01

    Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) in the sensor bulk is a limiting factor for the lifetime of silicon detectors. In this work, the proton-energy dependent bulkdamage is studied in n- and p-type silicon pad diodes. The samples are thin (200 μm thick), and oxygen enriched (bulk material types: MCz, standard or deepdiffused FZ). Irradiations are performed with 23 MeV, 188 MeV and 23 GeV protons; the 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluence assumes selected values in the range [0.1,3].10 14 cm -2 . In reverse bias, Current-Voltage (IV) and Capacitance-Voltage (CV) measurements are performed to electrically characterise the samples; in forward bias, IV and CV measurements point out the transition from lifetime to relaxationlike semiconductor after irradiation. By means of Thermally Stimulated Current (TSC) measurements, 13 bulk defects have been found after proton irradiation. Firstly, TSC spectra are analysed to obtain defect concentrations after defect filling at the conventional temperature T fill =10 K. Secondly, temperature dependent capture coefficients of bulk defects are explained, according to the multi-phonon process, from the analysis of TSC measurements at higher filling temperatures (T fill <130 K). Thirdly, a new method based on the SRH statistics and accounting for cluster-induced shift in activation energy is proposed; it allows to fully characterise bulk defects (in terms of activation energy, concentration and majority capture cross-section) and to distinguish between point- and cluster-like defects. A correlation is noted between the leakage current and the concentration of three deep defects (namely the V 2 , V 3 and H(220K) defects), for all the investigated bulk materials and types, and after all the considered proton energies and fluences. At least five defects are found to be responsible for the space charge, with positive contributions from the E(30K) and B i O i defects, or negative contributions from three deep acceptors H(116K), H(140K) and H(152K).

  13. Track structure model for damage to mammalian cell cultures during solar proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Katz, R.

    1992-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) occur infrequently and unpredictably, thus representing a potential hazard to interplanetary space missions. Biological damage from SPEs will be produced principally through secondary electron production in tissue, including important contributions due to delta rays from nuclear reaction products. We review methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of SPEs using a high energy proton model and the parametric cellular track model. Results of the model are presented for several of the historically largest flares using typical levels and body shielding.

  14. Radiation damage in silicon exposed to high-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Gordon; Hayama, Shusaku; Murin, Leonid; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Sengupta, Asmita; Davia, Cinzia; Karpenko, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Photoluminescence, infrared absorption, positron annihilation, and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) have been used to investigate the radiation damage produced by 24 GeV/c protons in crystalline silicon. The irradiation doses and the concentrations of carbon and oxygen in the samples have been chosen to monitor the mobility of the damage products. Single vacancies (and self-interstitials) are introduced at the rate of ∼1 cm -1 , and divacancies at 0.5 cm -1 . Stable di-interstitials are formed when two self-interstitials are displaced in one damage event, and they are mobile at room temperature. In the initial stages of annealing the evolution of the point defects can be understood mainly in terms of trapping at the impurities. However, the positron signal shows that about two orders of magnitude more vacancies are produced by the protons than are detected in the point defects. Damage clusters exist, and are largely removed by annealing at 700 to 800 K, when there is an associated loss of broad band emission between 850 and 1000 meV. The well-known W center is generated by restructuring within clusters, with a range of activation energies of about 1.3 to 1.6 eV, reflecting the disordered nature of the clusters. Comparison of the formation of the X centers in oxygenated and oxygen-lean samples suggests that the J defect may be interstitial related rather than vacancy related. To a large extent, the damage and annealing behavior may be factorized into point defects (monitored by sharp-line optical spectra and DLTS) and cluster defects (monitored by positron annihilation and broadband luminescence). Taking this view to the limit, the generation rates for the point defects are as predicted by simply taking the damage generated by the Coulomb interaction of the protons and Si nuclei

  15. High energy proton simulation of 14-MeV neutron damage in Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Bunch, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    High-energy protons are a potentially useful tool for simulating the radiation damage produced by 14-MeV neutrons in CTR materials. A comparison is given of calculations and measurements of the relative damage effectiveness of these two types of radiation in single-crystal Al 2 O 3 . The experiments make use of the prominent absorption band at 206 nm as an index to lattice damage, on the assumption that peak absorption is proportional to the concentration of lattice vacancies. The induced absorption is measured for incident proton energies ranging from 5 to 15 MeV and for 14-MeV neutrons. Recoil-energy spectra are calculated for elastic and inelastic scattering using published angular distributions. Recoil-energy spectra also are calculated for the secondary alpha particles and 12 C nuclei produced by (p,p'α) reactions on 16 O. The recoil spectra are converted to damage-energy spectra and then integrated to yield the damage-energy cross section at each proton energy and for 14 MeV neutrons. A comparison of the calculations with experimental results suggests that damage energy, at least at high energies, is a reasonable criterion for estimating this type of radiation damage. (auth)

  16. Progressive damage to rat skin induced by protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, Beatriz L.; Saint-Martin, Maria L.G.; Bernaola, Omar A.; Duran, Hebe; Policastro, Lucia L.; O'Connor, Silvia E.; Palmieri, Monica; Davidson, Miguel; Davidson, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Wistar rats were locally irradiated with proton beams. Dorsal portions of the skin were irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy employing a plastic wedge as a variable thickness energy degrader. The animals were sacrificed 2,5,6,7,and 9 days post-irradiation. The doses were monitored with a transmission camera. Solid track detectors (Makrofold E) were placed on the area to be irradiated to determine spatial correlation with the dose. Tissue reactions were clearly observed and were quantitatively assessed as a function of dose. Track detectors proved to be valuable to determine the correlation between the dose and tissue damage . This biological experimental model proved useful to analyze the response of tissues to a gradient of doses yielded by a proton beam. (author)

  17. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartjes, F.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.

    1999-01-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5 * 10 15 protons/cm 2 . The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 10 15 protons/cm 2 . A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels

  18. Parameterisation of radiation effects on CVD diamond for proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartjes, F.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R.D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Procario, M.; Re, V.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Runolfsson, O.; Russ, J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, A.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M

    1999-08-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation hardness of CVD diamond for 24 GeV/c proton irradiation at fluences up to 5{sup *}10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. The results not only show radiation damage but also an annealing effect that is dominant at levels around 10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2}. A model describing both effects is introduced, enabling a prediction of the distribution curve of the charge signal for other levels.

  19. Beam tests of proton-irradiated PbWO$_4$ crystals and evaluation of double-sided read-out technique for mitigation of radiation damage effects

    CERN Document Server

    Lucchini, Marco Toliman

    2016-01-01

    The harsh radiation environment in which detectors will have to operate during the High Luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC) represents a crucial challenge for many calorimeter technologies. In the CMS forward calorimeters, ionizing doses and hadron fluences will reach up to 300 kGy (at a dose rate of 30 Gy/h) and $2\\times10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$, respectively, at the pseudorapidity region of $\\lvert \\eta\\rvert=2.6$. To evaluate the evolution of the CMS ECAL performance in such conditions, a set of PbWO$_4$ crystals, exposed to 24 GeV protons up to integrated fluences between $2.1\\times10^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$ and $1.3\\times10^{14}$ cm$^{-2}$, has been studied in beam tests. A degradation of the energy resolution and a non-linear response to electron showers are observed in damaged crystals. Direct measurements of the light output from the crystals show the amplitude decreasing and pulse becoming faster as the fluence increases. The evolution of the performance of the PbWO$_4$ crystals has been well understood and parame...

  20. Synthetic Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (LGM2605 Protects Human Lung in an Ex Vivo Model of Proton Radiation Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Velalopoulou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy for the treatment of thoracic malignancies has improved significantly by directing of the proton beam in higher doses on the targeted tumor while normal tissues around the tumor receive much lower doses. Nevertheless, exposure of normal tissues to protons is known to pose a substantial risk in long-term survivors, as confirmed by our work in space-relevant exposures of murine lungs to proton radiation. Thus, radioprotective strategies are being sought. We established that LGM2605 is a potent protector from radiation-induced lung toxicity and aimed in the current study to extend the initial findings of space-relevant, proton radiation-associated late lung damage in mice by looking at acute changes in human lung. We used an ex vivo model of organ culture where tissue slices of donor living human lung were kept in culture and exposed to proton radiation. We exposed donor human lung precision-cut lung sections (huPCLS, pretreated with LGM2605, to 4 Gy proton radiation and evaluated them 30 min and 24 h later for gene expression changes relevant to inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle arrest, and determined radiation-induced senescence, inflammation, and oxidative tissue damage. We identified an LGM2605-mediated reduction of proton radiation-induced cellular senescence and associated cell cycle changes, an associated proinflammatory phenotype, and associated oxidative tissue damage. This is a first report on the effects of proton radiation and of the radioprotective properties of LGM2605 on human lung.

  1. Proton irradiation effects on gallium nitride-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Aditya P.

    Proton radiation effects on state-of-the-art gallium nitride-based devices were studied using Schottky diodes and high electron-mobility transistors. The device degradation was studied over a wide range of proton fluences. This study allowed for a correlation between proton irradiation effects between different types of devices and enhanced the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiation damage in GaN-based devices. Proton irradiation causes reduced carrier concentration and increased series resistance and ideality factor in Schottky diodes. 1.0-MeV protons cause greater degradation than 1.8-MeV protons because of their higher non-ionizing energy loss. The displacement damage in Schottky diodes recovers during annealing. High electron-mobility transistors exhibit extremely high radiation tolerance, continuing to perform up to a fluence of ˜1014 cm-2 of 1.8-MeV protons. Proton irradiation creates defect complexes in the thin-film structure. Decreased sheet carrier mobility due to increased carrier scattering and decreased sheet carrier density due to carrier removal by the defect centers are the primary damage mechanisms. Interface disorder at either the Schottky or the Ohmic contact plays a relatively unimportant part in overall device degradation in both Schottky diodes and high electron-mobility transistors.

  2. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-01

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10 14 cm -2 and 10 16 cm -2 was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10 15 cm -2 . During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with α-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  3. Radiation damage in proton-irradiated epitaxial silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Joern

    2009-07-15

    In this work radiation hardness of 75 {mu}m, 100 {mu}m and 150 {mu}m thick epitaxial silicon pad diodes of both standard and oxygenated material was investigated. Damage after 24 GeV/c proton irradiation in a 1MeV neutron equivalent fluence range between 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was studied and isothermal annealing experiments at 80 C were carried out. Standard CV/IV measurements could be performed up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The volume-normalised reverse current was found to increase linearly with fluence with a slope independent of the thickness and impurity concentration. However, due to large fluctuations the fluences had to be renormalised using the current-related damage parameter. Concerning the depletion voltage, nearly all materials remained at a moderate level up to 4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. During short-term annealing acceptors annealed out, whereas others were introduced during the long-term annealing. The stable damage was characterised by donor removal at low fluences and fluence-proportional predominant donor introduction for highly irradiated diodes, depending on the oxygen level. No type inversion was observed. Time-resolved measurements with a new 670 nm laser-TCT setup made the determination of the trapping time constant with the charge correction method possible. The results agreed with expectations and showed a linear increase of trapping probability with fluence. The electric field exhibited a double peak structure in highly irradiated diodes. Charge collection efficiency measurements with {alpha}-particles were independent of oxygen concentration, but showed an improved efficiency for thinner diodes. A comparison to simulation revealed systematic discrepancies. A non-constant trapping time parameter was proposed as possible solution. (orig.)

  4. Proton irradiation effects in silicon devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoen, E; Vanhellemont, J; Alaerts, A [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium); and others

    1997-03-01

    Proton irradiation effects in silicon devices are studied for components fabricated in various substrates in order to reveal possible hardening effects. The degradation of p-n junction diodes increases in first order proportionally with the fluence, when submitted to 10 MeV proton irradiations in the range 5x10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} to 5x10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. The damage coefficients for both p- and n-type Czochralski, Float-Zone and epitaxial wafers are reported. Charge-Coupled Devices fabricated in a 1.2 {mu}m CCD-CMOS technology are shown to be quite resistant to 59 MeV H{sup +} irradiations, irrespective of the substrate type. (author)

  5. Analysis of Proton Radiation Effects on Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    non - ionizing proton radiation damage effects at different energy levels on a GaN-on-silicon high electron mobility transistor...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) In this work, a physics-based simulation of non - ionizing proton radiation damage effects at different...Polarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.3 Non - Ionizing Radiation Damage Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.4 Non - Ionizing Radiation Damage in

  6. Energy Dependence of Proton Radiation Damage in Si-Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084399; Neubüser, C.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation experiments on silicon sensors are used to mimic the radiation environment at collider experiments with the aim to forecast the change of the electrical properties of a detector with irradiation. Measurements on irradiated sensors are invaluable in choosing a material well suited for a silicon tracking detector. This is especially true for the upgraded detectors to be used in the high-luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), where silicon sensors as currently used would suffer severe loss in signal from irradiation with charged and neutral hadrons.\\\\ The CMS Tracker Collaboration has initiated irradiation studies with protons with energies ranging from 23 MeV to 23 GeV. They are often used instead of charged hadrons, their radiation induced damage to the silicon being rather similar. However, in oxygen rich silicon, NIEL violation concerning the full depletion voltage has been observed.\\\\ In this paper results from investigations on bulk defects compared to the change of the electrical properties of ...

  7. Experimental Study of the Lead Tungstate Scintillator Proton-Induced Damage and Recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Auffray, Etiennette; Singovski , A

    2011-01-01

    Lead tungstate (PbWO4, or PWO) scintillating crystals are used by two of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): 75848 in CMS and 17920 in ALICE. For the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter, one of the most important crystal properties is its radiation hardness. With the increase of luminosity, the radiation level will increase drastically, particularly in the high pseudorapidity regions of the calorimeter. Beside the effects of color-centre formation caused by gamma-radiation, additional measurable effect originated by hadron irradiation could appear, which will further deteriorate the optical transmission of the crystals and therefore their efficiency. In this paper, we will present results of the proton-induced damage in PWO and a study of optical transmission recovery at different temperatures and under different light-induced "bleaching" conditions for proton-irradiated crystals.

  8. Gold nanoparticle induced vasculature damage in radiotherapy: Comparing protons, megavoltage photons, and kilovoltage photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuting, E-mail: yutingl188@gmail.com; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); McMahon, Stephen J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Center for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT97AE, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) induced vasculature damage for proton, megavoltage (MV) photon, and kilovoltage (kV) photon irradiation. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were carried out using tool for particle simulation (TOPAS) to obtain the spatial dose distribution in close proximity up to 20 μm from the GNPs. The spatial dose distribution from GNPs was used as an input to calculate the dose deposited to the blood vessels. GNP induced vasculature damage was evaluated for three particle sources (a clinical spread out Bragg peak proton beam, a 6 MV photon beam, and two kV photon beams). For each particle source, various depths in tissue, GNP sizes (2, 10, and 20 nm diameter), and vessel diameters (8, 14, and 20 μm) were investigated. Two GNP distributions in lumen were considered, either homogeneously distributed in the vessel or attached to the inner wall of the vessel. Doses of 30 Gy and 2 Gy were considered, representing typical in vivo enhancement studies and conventional clinical fractionation, respectively. Results: These simulations showed that for 20 Au-mg/g GNP blood concentration homogeneously distributed in the vessel, the additional dose at the inner vascular wall encircling the lumen was 43% of the prescribed dose at the depth of treatment for the 250 kVp photon source, 1% for the 6 MV photon source, and 0.1% for the proton beam. For kV photons, GNPs caused 15% more dose in the vascular wall for 150 kVp source than for 250 kVp. For 6 MV photons, GNPs caused 0.2% more dose in the vascular wall at 20 cm depth in water as compared to at depth of maximum dose (Dmax). For proton therapy, GNPs caused the same dose in the vascular wall for all depths across the spread out Bragg peak with 12.7 cm range and 7 cm modulation. For the same weight of GNPs in the vessel, 2 nm diameter GNPs caused three times more damage to the vessel than 20 nm diameter GNPs. When the GNPs were attached

  9. Modelling the induction of cell death and chromosome damage by therapeutic protons

    CERN Document Server

    Carante, M P

    2015-01-01

    A two-parameter biophysical model cal led BIANCA (BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations), which assumes a pivotal role for DNA cluster damage and for “lethal” chromosome aberrations, was applied to calculate cell death and chromosome aberrations for normal and radio-resistant cells along a 62-MeV eye melanoma proton beam. The yield of DNA “Cluster Lesions” and the probability for a chromosome fragment of not being rejoined with any partne r were adjustable parameters. In line with other works, the beam effectiveness at inducing both biological endpoints was found to increase with increasing depth, and high levels of damage were found also beyond the dose fall-off, due to the higher biological effectiveness of low-energy protons. This implies that assuming a constant RBE along the whole SOBP, as is currently done in clinical practice, may be sub-optimal, also implying a possible underestimation of normal tissue damage. Furthermore, the calculations suggested that fo...

  10. Whole body proton irradiation causes acute damage to bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to proton irradiation during missions in deep space can lead to bone marrow injury. The acute effects of proton irradiation on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells remain undefined and thus were investigated. We exposed male C57BL/6 mice to 0.5 and 1.0 Gy proton total body irradiation (proton-TBI, 150 MeV) and examined changes in peripheral blood cells and bone marrow (BM) progenitors and LSK cells 2 weeks after exposure. 1.0 Gy proton-TBI significantly reduced the numbers of peripheral blood cells compared to 0.5 Gy proton-TBI and unirradiated animals, while the numbers of peripheral blood cell counts were comparable between 0.5 Gy proton-TBI and unirradiated mice. The frequencies and numbers of LSK cells and CMPs in BM of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy irradiated mice were decreased in comparison to those of normal controls. LSK cells and CMPs and their progeny exhibited a radiation-induced impairment in clonogenic function. Exposure to 1.0 Gy increased cellular apoptosis but not the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CMPs two weeks after irradiation. LSK cells from irradiated mice exhibited an increase in ROS production and apoptosis. Exposure to proton-TBI can induce acute damage to BM progenitors and LSK cells.

  11. Biological effectiveness of high-energy protons - Target fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J.W.; Townsend, L.W.; Shinn, J.; Hajnal, F.

    1991-01-01

    High-energy protons traversing tissue produce local sources of high-linear-energy-transfer ions through nuclear fragmentation. The contribution of these target fragments to the biological effectiveness of high-energy protons using the cellular track model is examined. The effects of secondary ions are treated in terms of the production collision density using energy-dependent parameters from a high-energy fragmentation model. Calculations for mammalian cell cultures show that at high dose, at which intertrack effects become important, protons deliver damage similar to that produced by gamma rays, and with fragmentation the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons increases moderately from unity. At low dose, where sublethal damage is unimportant, the contribution from target fragments dominates, causing the proton effectiveness to be very different from that of gamma rays with a strongly fluence-dependent RBE. At high energies, the nuclear fragmentation cross sections become independent of energy. This leads to a plateau in the proton single-particle-action cross section, below 1 keV/micron, since the target fragments dominate. 29 refs

  12. Equivalence of displacement radiation damage in superluminescent diodes induced by protons and heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xingji, E-mail: lxj0218@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Chaoming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lan, Mujie; Xiao, Liyi [Center of Micro-electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Jianchun; Ding, Dongfa [Beijing Aerospace Times Optical-electronic Technology Co.Ltd, Beijing 100854 (China); Yang, Dezhuang; He, Shiyu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-07-11

    The degradation of optical power for superluminescent diodes is in situ measured under exposures of protons with various energies (170 keV, 3 MeV and 5 MeV), and 25 MeV carbon ions for several irradiation fluences. Experimental results show that the optical power of the SLDs decreases with increasing fluence. The protons with lower energies cause more degradation in the optical power of SLDs than those with higher energies at a given fluence. Compared to the proton irradiation with various energies, the 25 MeV carbon ions induce more severe degradation to the optical power. To characterize the radiation damage of the SLDs, the displacement doses as a function of chip depth in the SLDs are calculated by SRIM code for the protons and carbon ions. Based on the irradiation testing and calculation results, an approach is given to normalize the equivalence of displacement damage induced by various charged particles in SLDs.

  13. Radiation effects of protons and 60Co γ rays on CMOS operational amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wu; Ren Diyuan; Guo Qi; Yu Xuefeng; Yan Rongliang

    1997-01-01

    Radiation effects of 60 Co γ ray and 4,7 and 30 MeV protons on LF 7650 CMOS operational amplifier were investigated. The damage mechanism of LF7650 was discussed. It is indicated that the mobility reduction of major carrier caused by ionizing and displacement damage is the chief mechanism causing the failure of CMOS operational amplifier irradiated by protons, and that is why the degradation of LF 7650 caused by protons is much more serious than that caused by 60 Co γ ray. In addition, a comparison of proton radiation effects on CMOS operational amplifier and MOSFET showed a significant difference in mechanism

  14. Biological effects of proton radiation: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girdhani, S.; Hlatky, L.; Sachs, R.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiation provides significant dosimetric advantages when compared with gamma radiation due to its superior energy deposition characteristics. Although the physical aspects of proton radiobiology are well understood, biological and clinical endpoints are understudied. The current practice to assume the relative biological effectiveness of low linear energy transfer (LET) protons to be a generic value of about 1.1 relative to photons likely obscures important unrecognised differentials in biological response between these radiation qualities. A deeper understanding of the biological properties induced by proton radiation would have both radiobiological and clinical impact. This article briefly points to some of the literature pertinent to the effects of protons on tissue-level processes that modify disease progression, such as angiogenesis, cell invasion and cancer metastasis. Recent findings hint that proton radiation may, in addition to offering improved radio-therapeutic targeting, be a means to provide a new dimension for increasing therapeutic benefits for patients by manipulating these tissue-level processes. (authors)

  15. Influence of the flux density on the radiation damage of bipolar silicon transistors by protons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannikov, Y.; Gorin, B.; Kozhevnikov, V.; Mikhnovich, V.; Gusev, L.

    1981-01-01

    It was found experimentally that the radiation damage of bipolar n-p-n transistors increased by a factor of 8--12 when the proton flux density was reduced from 4.07 x 10 10 to 2.5 x 10 7 cm -2 sec -1 . In the case of p-n-p transistors the effect was opposite: there was a reduction in the radiation damage by a factor of 2--3 when the dose rate was lowered between the same limits. A similar effect was observed for electrons but at dose rates three orders of magnitude greater. The results were attributed to the dependences of the radiation defect-forming reactions on the charge state of defects which was influenced by the formation of disordered regions in the case of proton irradiation

  16. Recovery of damage in rad-hard MOS devices during and after irradiation by electrons, protons, alphas, and gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, G. J.; Van Gunten, O.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Shapiro, P.; August, L. S.; Jordan, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on the recovery properties of rad-hard MOS devices during and after irradiation by electrons, protons, alphas, and gamma rays. The results indicated that complex recovery properties controlled the damage sensitivities of the tested parts. The results also indicated that damage sensitivities depended on dose rate, total dose, supply bias, gate bias, transistor type, radiation source, and particle energy. The complex nature of these dependencies make interpretation of LSI device performance in space (exposure to entire electron and proton spectra) difficult, if not impossible, without respective ground tests and analyses. Complete recovery of n-channel shifts was observed, in some cases within hours after irradiation, with equilibrium values of threshold voltages greater than their pre-irradiation values. This effect depended on total dose, radiation source, and gate bias during exposure. In contrast, the p-channel shifts recovered only 20 percent within 30 days after irradiation.

  17. Proton irradiation effects on organic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, T.; Sasuga, T.; Kawakami, W.; Hagiwara, M.; Kohno, I.; Kamitsubo, H.

    1987-01-01

    Organic polymer films(100 μm thickness) of polyethylene, polypropylene, polyethyleneterephtalate, and polyethersulfone were irradiated by protons of 8 MeV using a cyclotron, and their radiation effects were investigated by the changes of mechanical properties. In order to irradiate protons uniformly over wide area of polymer films, specimens were scanned during proton irradiation using a special apparatus. The absorbed dose was measured by CTA and RCD film dosimeters, and can be determined that 1 μC/cm 2 of 8 MeV proton fluence is equivalent to 54 kGy. For polyethylene and polypropylene, there was no significant difference between proton and electron irradiation for same doses. However, for polyethersulfone the decay of mechanical property was observed to be less than that of irradiation by electron. (author)

  18. Effect of cations on the hydrated proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, Niklas; Hunger, Johannes; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-09-17

    We report on a strong nonadditive effect of protons and other cations on the structural dynamics of liquid water, which is revealed using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the frequency range of 1-50 GHz. For pure acid solutions, protons are known to have a strong structuring effect on water, leading to a pronounced decrease of the dielectric response. We observe that this structuring is reduced when protons are cosolvated with salts. This reduction is exclusively observed for combinations of protons with other ions; for all studied solutions of cosolvated salts, the effect on the structural dynamics of water is observed to be purely additive, even up to high concentrations. We derive an empirical model that quantitatively describes the nonadditive effect of cosolvated protons and cations. We argue that the effect can be explained from the special character of the proton in water and that Coulomb fields exerted by other cations, in particular doubly charged cations like Mg(2+)aq and Ca(2+)aq, induce a localization of the H(+)aq hydration structures.

  19. Proton damage in linear and digital opto-couplers; Effets des protons sur des optocoupleurs lineaires et numeriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, A.; Rax, B.G. [California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena (United States)

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses proton degradation of linear and digital opto-couplers. One obvious way to harden opto-coupler technologies is to select LEDs (light emitting diodes) that are more resistant to displacement damage. A direct comparison is made of degradation of a commercial linear opto-coupler from one manufactured with a modified version of the same device with a different LED technology. Other factors, including degradation of optical photoresponse and transistor gain are also discussed, along with basic comparisons of digital and analog opto-couplers. The experimental work has been made with 50 MeV protons. 3 underlying factors contribute to opto-coupler degradation. The most important factor is LED degradation, it is possible to select opto-coupler with double-heterojunction LEDs that are inherently more resistant to displacement damage. The second factor is gain degradation that is particularly important for opto-couplers with sensitive LEDs because the light output decreases so much at low radiation levels. The third factor, optical photoresponse is the largest contribution to CTR (current transfer ratio) degradation for opto-couplers with improved LED hardness. Photoresponse degradation depends on wavelength because the absorption coefficient is wavelength dependent. (A.C.)

  20. Diffusion length variation and proton damage coefficients for InP/In(x)Ga(1-x)As/GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of lighter, mechanically strong and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5 and 3 MeV proton irradiations are explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence is calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient K(L) is plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  1. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BenMoussa, A., E-mail: ali.benmoussa@stce.be [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Saito, T. [Department of Environment and Energy, Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1, Yagiyama-Kasumi-cho, Taihaku-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 982-8577 (Japan); Averin, S. [Fryazino Branch of the Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 141190 Square Vvedenski 1, Fryazino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B. [Solar Terrestrial Center of Excellence (STCE), Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Berger, G. [Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain la Neuve (Belgium); Kroth, U. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); De Jaeger, J.-C. [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Gottwald, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal–semiconductor–metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3–6 pA/cm{sup 2}). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 10{sup 11} protons/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation. I. Initial characterization of DNA damage, micronucleus formation, apoptosis, cell survival, and cell cycle phase redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Bant, A. M.; Kazarians, G.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Tran, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    .12 Gy(-1) for protons), which suggests that the higher level of survival of gamma-irradiated cells could be attributed to the persistence of nonlethally irradiated thyrocytes and/or the capacity to repair damage more effectively than cells exposed to equal physical doses of protons. The final assessment in this study was radiation-induced cell cycle phase redistribution. Gamma rays and protons produced a similar dose-dependent redistribution toward a predominantly G(2)-phase population. From our cumulative results, it seems likely that a majority of the proton-irradiated cells would not continue to divide. In conclusion, these findings suggest that there are quantitative and qualitative differences in the biological effects of proton beams and gamma rays. These differences could be due to structured energy deposition from the tracks of primary protons and the associated high-LET secondary particles produced in the targets. The results suggest that a simple dose-equivalent approach to dosimetry may be inadequate to compare the biological responses of cells to photons and protons.

  3. Investigation of proton damage in III-V semiconductors by optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaccuzzi, E.; Giudici, P. [Departamento Energía Solar, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Godoy Cruz 2290 (C1425FQB), CABA (Argentina); Khachadorian, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Hoffmann, A. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Suárez, S. [Laboratorio de Colisiones Atómicas, Centro Atómico Bariloche, E. Bustillo 9500, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); CONICET, Godoy Cruz 2290 (C1425FQB), CABA (Argentina); Reinoso, M. [Departamento Física Experimental, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín (Argentina); CONICET, Godoy Cruz 2290 (C1425FQB), CABA (Argentina); Goñi, A. R. [ICREA, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2016-06-21

    We studied the damage produced by 2 MeV proton radiation on epitaxially grown InGaP/GaAs structure by means of spatially resolved Raman and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The irradiation was performed parallel to the sample surface in order to determine the proton penetration range in both compounds. An increase in the intensity of longitudinal optical phonons and a decrease in the luminescence were observed. We associate these changes with the creation of defects in the damaged region, also responsible for the observed change of the carrier concentration in the GaAs layer, determined by the shift of the phonon-plasmon coupled mode frequency. From the spatially resolved profile of the PL and phonon intensities, we obtained the proton range in both materials and we compared them with stopping and range of ions in matter simulations. The comparison between the experimentally obtained proton range and simulations shows a very good agreement for GaAs but a discrepancy of 20% for InGaP. This discrepancy can be explained in terms of limitations of the model to simulate the electronic orbitals and bonding structure of the simulated compound. In order to overcome this limitation, we propose an increase in 40% in the electronic stopping power for InGaP.

  4. A survey of high explosive-induced damage and spall in selected metals using proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtkamp, D.B.; Clark, D.A.; Ferm, E.N.; Gallegos, R.A.; Hammon, D.; Hemsing, W.F.; Hogan, G.E.; Holmes, V.H.; King, N.S.P.; Lopez, R.P.; Merrill, F.E.; Morris, C.L.; Morley, K.B.; Murray, M.M.; Pazuchanics, P.D.; Prestridge, K.P.; Quintana, J.P.; Saunders, A.; Shinas, M.A.; Stacy, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple spall and damage layers can be created in metal when the free surface reflects a Taylor wave generated by high explosives. These phenomena have been explored in different thicknesses of several metals (tantalum, copper, 6061 T6-aluminum, and tin) using high-energy proton radiography. Multiple images (up to 21) can be produced of the dynamic evolution of damaged material on the microsecond time scale with a <50 ns 'shutter' time. Movies and multiframe still images of areal and (Abel inverted) volume densities are presented. An example of material that is likely melted on release (tin) is also presented

  5. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, Nikolaos, E-mail: simos@bnl.gov [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Elbakhshwan, Mohamed [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Zhong, Zhong [Photon Sciences, NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Camino, Fernando [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This paper focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  6. Studies of radiation damage in silicon sensors and a measurement of the inelastic proton--proton cross-section at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00360674; Ward, Patricia

    This thesis presents studies of radiation damage in silicon sensors for the new ATLAS tracker at the high-luminosity LHC, calibrations of the LHC luminosity scale, and a measurement of the proton--proton inelastic cross-section at 13 TeV~with ATLAS data. The studies of radiation damage are performed by comparing sensor performance before and after irradiation, and include annealing studies. The measured quantities include: leakage current, depletion depth, inter-strip isolation, and charge collection. Surface and bulk damage is studied by comparing the results of sensors irradiated with protons and neutrons. The observed degradation of performance suggests the current sensor design will endure the radiation damage expected over the lifetime of the experiment at the high-luminosity LHC. The luminosity is calibrated for the proton--proton, proton--lead, and lead--lead collisions delivered by the LHC during 2013 and 2015. The absolute luminosity scale is derived with the van der Meer method. The systematic unc...

  7. Analysis of Proton Induced Material Damage Using the DPA Cross-sections Based on NRT and BCA-MD Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-O; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The level of radiation induced material damage is mainly quantified by using the unit of Displacements Per Atom (DPA), and particularly, the displacement cross-section is used for characterizing/analyzing the radiation damage from incident neutrons and charged particles. Not long ago, the standard Norgett-Robinson-Torrens (NRT) model had been applied to produce the nuclear data due to its simplicity and implementation in commonly used codes, such as NJOY and MCNP codes. However, the evaluations based on NRT model represent the severe disagreement with experimental data and more accurate calculations. Hence, the evaluations with existing and new nuclear data are performed/compared in this study. It is assumed that a high energy proton beam is directly moved to the target, and a series of calculations are performed by using MCNPX code. The proton induced material damage is evaluated by using the displacement cross-sections, and the effect of nuclear data on the evaluation is specifically analyzed with MCNPX code. First, there is significant difference between the nuclear data from existing and new models, and the new evaluated data is generally lower than the existing one. Second, the position of maximum DPA is slightly differed with the position of maximum energy deposition, and the evaluation using new evaluated data is lower about 2 times than the other.

  8. Radiation damage to uracil and water by proton and electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheier, P.; Hanel, G.; Denifl, S; Gstir, B.; Maerk, T.D.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Coupier, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The inelastic interaction of protons (in the energy range from 20 keV to 150 keV) and electrons (from thermal energies up to 20 eV) with water and uracil, the latter a building block of the RNA has been studied in two laboratories with specially designed experimental setups. These measurements are motivated from a present lack of understanding how on a molecular level damage to living cells and organisms is caused. A unique way of simultaneous detection of the product ions after swift proton (or hydrogen) impact and the analysis of the charge state of the projectile after the collision allows to distinguish between direct ionization (e.g., projectile remains a proton) and electron capture events (e.g., proton becomes neutralized). The latter process turns out to be more destructive, i.e. leads to a higher yield of fragmentation. For electrons both the formation of positively and negatively charged ions has been investigated. We discovered that already thermal electrons lead with a rather large cross section to a dissociation of the uracil molecule producing an anion and a fast hydrogen radical. (author)

  9. A comparison of ionizing radiation damage in CMOS devices from 60Co gamma rays, electrons and protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Baoping; Yao Zhibin; Zhang Fengqi

    2009-01-01

    Radiation hardened CC4007RH and non-radiation hardened CC4011 devices were irradiated using 60 Co gamma rays, 1 MeV electrons and 1-9 MeV protons to compare the ionizing radiation damage of the gamma rays with the charged particles. For all devices examined, with experimental uncertainty, the radiation induced threshold voltage shifts (ΔV th ) generated by 60 Co gamma rays are equal to that of 1 MeV electron and 1-7 MeV proton radiation under 0 gate bias condition. Under 5 V gate bias condition, the distinction of threshold voltage shifts (ΔV th ) generated by 60 Co gamma rays and 1 MeV electrons irradiation are not large, and the radiation damage for protons below 9 MeV is always less than that of 60 Co gamma rays. The lower energy the proton has, the less serious the radiation damage becomes. (authors)

  10. Evaluation through comet assay of DNA damage induced in human lymphocytes by alpha particles. Comparison with protons and Co-60 gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Kreiner, A. J.; Schuff, J. A.; Vallerga, M. B.; Taja, M. R.; Lopez, F. O.; Alvarez, D. E.; Saint Martin, G.; Burton, A.; Debray, M. E.; Kesque, J. M.; Somacal, H.; Stoliar, P.; Valda, A.; Davidson, J.; Davidson, M.; Ozafran, M. J.; Vazquez, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Several techniques with different sensitivity to single-strand breaks and/or double strand breaks were applied to detect DNA breaks generated by high LET particles. Tests that assess DNA damage in single cells might be the appropriate tool to estimate damage induced by particles, facilitating the assessment of heterogeneity of damage in a cell population. The microgel electrophoresis (comet) assay is a sensitive method for measuring DNA damage in single cells. The objective of this work was to evaluate the proficiency of comet assay to assess the effect of high LET radiation on peripheral blood lymphocytes, compared to protons and Co-60 gamma rays. Materials and methods: Irradiations of blood samples were performed at TANDAR laboratory (Argentina). Thin samples of human peripheral blood were irradiated with different doses (0-2.5 Gy) of 20.2 MeV helium-4 particles in the track segment mode, at nearly constant LET. Data obtained were compared with the effect induced by a MeV protons and Co-60 gamma rays. Alkaline comet assay was applied. Comets were quantified by the Olive tail moment. Distribution of the helium-4 particle and protons were evaluated considering Poisson distribution in lymphocyte nuclei. The mean dose per nucleus per particle result 0.053 Gy for protons and 0.178 Gy for helium-4 particles. When cells are exposed to a dose of 0.1 Gy, the hit probability model predicts that 43% of the nuclei should have experienced and alpha traversal while with protons, 85% of the nuclei should be hit. The experimental results show a biphasic response for helium-4 particles (0.1 Gy), indicating the existence of two subpopulations: unhit and hit. Distributions of tail moment as a function of fluence and experimental dose for comets induced by helium-4 particles, protons and Co-60 gamma rays were analyzed. With helium-4 irradiations, lymphocyte nuclei show an Olive tail moment distribution flattened to higher tail moments a dose increase. However, for irradiations with

  11. High energy proton induced radiation damage of rare earth permanent magnet quadrupoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanz, M.; Endres, M.; Löwe, K.; Lienig, T.; Deppert, O.; Lang, P. M.; Varentsov, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2017-12-01

    Permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are an alternative to common electromagnetic quadrupoles especially for fixed rigidity beam transport scenarios at particle accelerators. Using those magnets for experimental setups can result in certain scenarios, in which a PMQ itself may be exposed to a large amount of primary and secondary particles with a broad energy spectrum, interacting with the magnetic material and affecting its magnetic properties. One specific scenario is proton microscopy, where a proton beam traverses an object and a collimator in which a part of the beam is scattered and deflected into PMQs used as part of a diagnostic system. During the commissioning of the PRIOR (Proton Microscope for Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) high energy proton microscope facility prototype at Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung in 2014, a significant reduction of the image quality was observed which was partially attributed to the demagnetization of the used PMQ lenses and the corresponding decrease of the field quality. In order to study this phenomenon, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out and spare units manufactured from the same magnetic material—single wedges and a fully assembled PMQ module—were deliberately irradiated by a 3.6 GeV intense proton beam. The performed investigations have shown that in proton radiography applications the above described scattering may result in a high irradiation dose in the PMQ magnets. This did not only decrease the overall magnetic strength of the PMQs but also caused a significant degradation of the field quality of an assembled PMQ module by increasing the parasitic multipole field harmonics which effectively makes PMQs impractical for proton radiography applications or similar scenarios.

  12. Effective elastic properties of damaged isotropic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, U Sik

    1998-01-01

    In continuum damage mechanics, damaged solids have been represented by the effective elastic stiffness into which local damage is smoothly smeared. Similarly, damaged solids may be represented in terms of effective elastic compliances. By virtue of the effective elastic compliance representation, it may become easier to derive the effective engineering constants of damaged solids from the effective elastic compliances, all in closed form. Thus, in this paper, by using a continuum modeling approach based on both the principle of strain energy equivalence and the equivalent elliptical micro-crack representation of local damage, the effective elastic compliance and effective engineering constants are derived in terms of the undamaged (virgin) elastic properties and a scalar damage variable for both damaged two-and three-dimensional isotropic solids

  13. Proton radiation damage assessment of a CCD for use in a Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, J.P.D.; Mason, J.; Leese, M.; Patel, M.; Hathi, B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the radiation environment and radiation damage analysis performed for the Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery (NOMAD) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVIS) channel launched onboard the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) in 2016. The aim of the instrument is to map the temporal and spatial variation of trace gases such as ozone and dust/cloud aerosols in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument consists of a set of two miniature telescope viewing optics which allow for selective input onto the optical bench, where an e2v technologies CCD30-11 will be used as the detector. A Geometry Description Markup Language model of the spacecraft and instrument box was created and through the use of ESA's SPace ENVironment Information System (SPENVIS) an estimate of the 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence was made at a number of radiation sensitive regions within NOMAD, including that of the CCD30-11 which is the focus of this paper. The end of life 10 MeV equivalent proton fluence at the charge coupled device was estimated to be 4.7 × 10 9 protons.cm −2 ; three devices were irradiated at different levels up a 10 MeV equivalent fluence of 9.4 × 10 9 protons.cm −2 . The dark current, charge transfer inefficiency, charge storage, and cosmetic quality of the devices was investigated pre- and post-irradiation, determining that the devices will continue to provide excellent science throughout the mission.

  14. Health effects of radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasimova, K; Azizova, F; Mehdieva, K.

    2012-01-01

    Full text : A summary of the nature of radiactive contamination would be incomplete without some mention of the human health effects relatied to radioactivity and radioactive materials. Several excellent reviews at the variety of levels of detail have been written and should be consulted by the reader. Internal exposures of alpha and beta particles are important for ingested and inhaled radionuclides. Dosimetry models are used to estimate the dose from internally deposited radioactive particles. As mentioned above weighting parameters that take into account the radiation type, the biological half-life and the tissue or organ at risk are used to convert the physically absorbed dose in units of gray (or red) to the biologically significant committed equivalent dose and effective dose, measured in units of Sv (or rem). There is considerable controversy over the shape of the dose-response curve at the chronic low dose levels important for enviromental contamination. Proposed models include linear models, non-linear models and threshold models. Because risks at low dose must be extrapolated from available date at high doses, the shape of the dose-response curve has important implications for the environmental regulations used to protect the general public. The health effect of radiation damage depends on a combination of events of on the cellular, tissue and systemic levels. These lead to mutations and cellular of the irradiated parent cell. The dose level at which significant damage occurs depends on the cell type. Cells that reproduce rapidily, such as those found in bone marrow or the gastrointestinal tract, will be more sensitive to radiation than those that are longer lived, such as striated muscle or nerve cells. The effects of high radiation doses on an organ depends on the various cell types it contains

  15. Low LET protons focused to submicrometer shows enhanced radiobiological effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, T E; Zlobinskaya, O; Michalski, D; Molls, M; Multhoff, G; Greubel, C; Hable, V; Girst, S; Siebenwirth, C; Dollinger, G; Schmid, E

    2012-01-01

    This study shows that enhanced radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) values can be generated focusing low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and thus changing the microdose distribution. 20 MeV protons (LET = 2.65 keV µm −1 ) are focused to submicrometer diameter at the ion microprobe superconducting nanoprobe for applied nuclear (Kern) physics experiments of the Munich tandem accelerator. The RBE values, as determined by measuring micronuclei (RBE MN = 1.48 ± 0.07) and dicentrics (RBE D = 1.92 ± 0.15), in human–hamster hybrid (A L ) cells are significantly higher when 117 protons were focused to a submicrometer irradiation field within a 5.4 × 5.4 µm 2 matrix compared to quasi homogeneous in a 1 × 1 µm 2 matrix applied protons (RBE MN = 1.28 ± 0.07; RBE D = 1.41 ± 0.14) at the same average dose of 1.7 Gy. The RBE values are normalized to standard 70 kV (dicentrics) or 200 kV (micronuclei) x-ray irradiation. The 117 protons applied per point deposit the same amount of energy like a 12 C ion with 55 MeV total energy (4.48 MeV u −1 ). The enhancements are about half of that obtained for 12 C ions (RBE MN = 2.20 ± 0.06 and RBE D = 3.21 ± 0.10) and they are attributed to intertrack interactions of the induced damages. The measured RBE values show differences from predictions of the local effect model (LEM III) that is used to calculate RBE values for irradiation plans to treat tumors with high LET particles. (paper)

  16. Low LET protons focused to submicrometer shows enhanced radiobiological effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, T. E.; Greubel, C.; Hable, V.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Michalski, D.; Girst, S.; Siebenwirth, C.; Schmid, E.; Molls, M.; Multhoff, G.; Dollinger, G.

    2012-10-01

    This study shows that enhanced radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) values can be generated focusing low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and thus changing the microdose distribution. 20 MeV protons (LET = 2.65 keV µm-1) are focused to submicrometer diameter at the ion microprobe superconducting nanoprobe for applied nuclear (Kern) physics experiments of the Munich tandem accelerator. The RBE values, as determined by measuring micronuclei (RBEMN = 1.48 ± 0.07) and dicentrics (RBED = 1.92 ± 0.15), in human-hamster hybrid (AL) cells are significantly higher when 117 protons were focused to a submicrometer irradiation field within a 5.4 × 5.4 µm2 matrix compared to quasi homogeneous in a 1 × 1 µm2 matrix applied protons (RBEMN = 1.28 ± 0.07; RBED = 1.41 ± 0.14) at the same average dose of 1.7 Gy. The RBE values are normalized to standard 70 kV (dicentrics) or 200 kV (micronuclei) x-ray irradiation. The 117 protons applied per point deposit the same amount of energy like a 12C ion with 55 MeV total energy (4.48 MeV u-1). The enhancements are about half of that obtained for 12C ions (RBEMN = 2.20 ± 0.06 and RBED = 3.21 ± 0.10) and they are attributed to intertrack interactions of the induced damages. The measured RBE values show differences from predictions of the local effect model (LEM III) that is used to calculate RBE values for irradiation plans to treat tumors with high LET particles.

  17. Effect of tensile stress on cavitation damage formation in mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naoe, Takashi, E-mail: naoe.takashi@jaea.go.j [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Yoshihito [Nuclear Safety Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Futakawa, Masatoshi [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Cavitation erosion or so called pitting damage was investigated under tensile stress conditions in mercury. In MW-class liquid metal spallation targets, pitting damage is a critical issue to satisfy required power and/or lifetime of the target vessel. Cavitation occurs by negative pressure which is induced through pressure wave propagation due to proton beam injection. Pitting damage is formed by microjet and/or shock wave during cavitation bubble collapse. A mercury target vessel suffers tensile stress due to thermal stress or welding. In order to investigate the effect of tensile stress on pitting damage formation, cavitation erosion tests were performed using stress imposed specimens in mercury. An ultrasonic vibratory horn and electro-Magnetic IMpact Testing Machine (MIMTM) were used to vary the cavitation intensity. In the incubation period of pitting damage, damaged area was slightly increased with increasing imposed tensile stress. In the steady state period, a mean depth of erosion was increased by the tensile stress. Additionally, in order to quantitatively evaluate the effect of tensile stress, an indentation test with Vickers indenter was carried out to quasi-statically simulate the impact load. From the measurement of the diagonal length of the indent aspect ratio and hardness, it is recognized that the threshold of the deformation, i.e. pitting damage formation, was decreased by the tensile stress.

  18. Proton implantation effect on (SUS-316) stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.K.; Ishigami, R.; Kamal, I.

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural damage and nano hardness of the industrial grade stainless steel (SUS-316) have been studied under proton (H + ) implanted condition applying different doses at room temperature. The implantation scheme such as proton energy, fluence, irradiation time, and penetration depth in the target materials were estimated by Monte Carlo Simulation Code SRIM-2008. In the simulation, the parameters were chosen in such a way that the damage density (displacement per atom or dpa) would be uniform up to certain depth from the surface. X-ray diffraction study of the annealed samples prior to the proton implantation showed the austenitic fcc structure and no significant change was observed after proton implantation in it. Microstructural observation made by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) revealed that 1 dpa of proton-irradiation induced the structural damage extended up to 1 μm depth from the surface. The nano hardness study showed that the hardness level of the irradiated samples increased monotonically with the irradiation doses. Proton dose of 1 dpa caused 65% increment of hardness level on average in case of uniformly irradiated samples. It was realized that the increment of hardness was a consequence of microstructural damages caused by the formation of interstitial dislocation loops in the sample matrix keeping the lattice structure unaffected

  19. The influence of the Coulomb-distortion effect on proton-proton observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plessas, W.; Mathelitsch, L.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the Coulomb distortion of the strong interaction is studied on the basis of nucleon-nucleon observables. In particular, cross sections, polarizations, spin-correlation parameters, and spin-transfer coefficients are considered for proton-proton as well as neutron-neutron scattering at laboratory kinetic energies Esub(Lab) = 10, 20, and 50 MeV. The calculations are performed for the meson-theoretical PARIS potential, the nonlocal separable GRAZ potential and also using the Arndt-Hackman-Roper parametrization of proton-proton scattering phase shifts. Important conclusions are drawn with respect to phenomenological phase-shift analyses. (Auth.)

  20. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Sejal; Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Pandey, Badri N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy

  1. Damaging and protective bystander cross-talk between human lung cancer and normal cells after proton microbeam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Sejal [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kobayashi, Alisa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu [Radiation System and Engineering Section, Department of Technical Support and Development, Research, Development and Support Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pandey, Badri N., E-mail: badrinarain@yahoo.co.in [Radiation Signalling and Cancer Biology Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Proton-microbeam irradiated A549 cells send damaging signals to bystander A549 cells. • Irradiated A549–A549 bystander response is through gap junctional communication. • Bystander WI38 cells exert protective signalling in irradiated A549 cells. • Rescue of irradiated A549 cells by WI38 cells is independent of gap junctions. - Abstract: Most of the studies of radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been focused on understanding the radiobiological changes observed in bystander cells in response to the signals from irradiated cells in a normal cell population with implications to radiation risk assessment. However, reports on RIBE with relevance to cancer radiotherapy especially investigating the bidirectional and criss-cross bystander communications between cancer and normal cells are limited. Hence, in present study employing co-culture approach, we have investigated the bystander cross-talk between lung cancer (A549) and normal (WI38) cells after proton-microbeam irradiation using γ-H2AX foci fluorescence as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We observed that in A549–A549 co-cultures, irradiated A549 cells exert damaging effects in bystander A549 cells, which were found to be mediated through gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). However, in A549–WI38 co-cultures, irradiated A549 did not affect bystander WI38 cells. Rather, bystander WI38 cells induced inverse protective signalling (rescue effect) in irradiated A549 cells, which was independent of GJIC. On the other hand, in response to irradiated WI38 cells neither of the bystander cells (A549 or WI38) showed significant increase in γ-H2AX foci. The observed bystander signalling between tumour and normal cells may have potential implications in therapeutic outcome of cancer radiotherapy.

  2. Correlations for damage in diffused-junction InP solar cells induced by electron and proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Takamoto, T.; Taylor, S.J.; Walters, R.J.; Summers, G.P.; Flood, D.J.; Ohmori, M.

    1997-01-01

    The damage to diffused-junction n + -p InP solar cells induced by electron and proton irradiations over a wide range of energy from 0.5 to 3 MeV and 0.015 to 20 MeV, respectively, has been examined. The experimental electron and proton damage coefficients have been analyzed in terms of displacement damage dose, which is the product of the particle fluence and the calculated nonionizing energy loss [G. P. Summers, E. A. Burke, R. Shapiro, S. R. Messenger, and R. J. Walters, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 40, 1300 (1993).] Degradation of InP cells due to irradiation with electrons and protons with energies of more than 0.5 MeV show a single curve as a function of displacement damage dose. Based on the deep-level transient spectroscopy analysis, damage equivalence between electron and proton irradiation is discussed. InP solar cells are confirmed to be substantially more radiation resistant than Si and GaAs-on-Ge cells. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Beam-Beam Effects in the SPS Proton-Anti Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cornelis, K.

    2014-01-01

    During the proton-anti proton collider run several experiments were carried out in order to understand the effect of the beam-beam interaction on backgrounds and lifetimes. In this talk a selection of these experiments will be presented. From these experiments, the importance of relative beam sizes and tune ripple could be demonstrated.

  4. Radiation damage and thermal shock response of carbon-fiber-reinforced materials to intense high-energy proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Simos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the effects of energetic protons on carbon-fiber composites and compounds under consideration for use as low-Z pion production targets in future high-power accelerators and low-impedance collimating elements for intercepting TeV-level protons at the Large Hadron Collider has been undertaken addressing two key areas, namely, thermal shock absorption and resistance to irradiation damage. Carbon-fiber composites of various fiber weaves have been widely used in aerospace industries due to their unique combination of high temperature stability, low density, and high strength. The performance of carbon-carbon composites and compounds under intense proton beams and long-term irradiation have been studied in a series of experiments and compared with the performance of graphite. The 24-GeV proton beam experiments confirmed the inherent ability of a 3D C/C fiber composite to withstand a thermal shock. A series of irradiation damage campaigns explored the response of different C/C structures as a function of the proton fluence and irradiating environment. Radiolytic oxidation resulting from the interaction of oxygen molecules, the result of beam-induced radiolysis encountered during some of the irradiation campaigns, with carbon atoms during irradiation with the presence of a water coolant emerged as a dominant contributor to the observed structural integrity loss at proton fluences ≥5×10^{20}  p/cm^{2}. The carbon-fiber composites were shown to exhibit significant anisotropy in their dimensional stability driven by the fiber weave and the microstructural behavior of the fiber and carbon matrix accompanied by the presence of manufacturing porosity and defects. Carbon-fiber-reinforced molybdenum-graphite compounds (MoGRCF selected for their impedance properties in the Large Hadron Collider beam collimation exhibited significant decrease in postirradiation load-displacement behavior even after low dose levels (∼5×10^{18}

  5. Relationship between opioid therapy, tissue-damaging procedures, and brain metabolites as measured by proton MRS in asphyxiated term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Ashwal, Stephen; Wycliffe, Nathaniel D; Ebner, Charlotte; Fayard, Elba; Sowers, Lawrence; Holshouser, Barbara A

    2007-05-01

    To examine the effects of opioid and tissue-damaging procedures (TDPs) [i.e. procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) known to result in pain, stress, and tissue damage] on brain metabolites, we reviewed the medical records of 28 asphyxiated term neonates (eight opioid-treated, 20 non-opioid treated) who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) within the first month of life as well as eight newborns with no clinical findings of asphyxial injury. We found that lower creatine (Cr), myoinositol (Ins), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/choline (Cho) (p OGM) NAA/Cr was decreased (p = 0.03) and lactate (Lac) was present in a significantly higher amount (40%; p = 0.03) in non-opioid-treated neonates compared with opioid-treated neonates. Compared with controls, untreated neonates showed larger changes in more metabolites in basal ganglia (BG), thalami (TH), and OGM with greater significance than treated neonates. Our data suggest that TDPs affect spectral metabolites and that opioids do not cause harm in asphyxiated term neonates exposed to repetitive TDPs in the first 2-4 DOL and may provide a degree of neuroprotection.

  6. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B.; Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G.; Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Manti, L.

    2013-01-01

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  7. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B. [Drug Sciences Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G. [Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN-LNS), Catania (Italy); Manti, L. [Physics Science Department, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, and National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Naples (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  8. Dynamical effects in proton breakup from exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaccorso, Angela; Kumar, Ravinder

    2012-01-01

    This contribution discusses dynamical effects in proton breakup from a weakly bound state in an exotic nucleus on a heavy target. The Coulomb interactions between the proton and the core and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. A number of experimentally measurable observables such as parallel momentum distributions, proton angular distributions and total breakup cross sections can be calculated. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra “effective energy” is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies.

  9. Neutrino interactions, proton production and a nuclear effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, J.; Allport, P.P.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Sansum, R.A.; Venus, W.; Berggren, M.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Parker, M.A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Clayton, E.F.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Hulth, P.O.; Katz, U.; Wittek, W.; Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Matsinos, E.; Simopoulou, E.; Myatt, G.; Neveu, M.; Apeldoorn, G.W. van

    1989-01-01

    Neutrino interactions are classified by the presence or absence of protons with momentum below 600 MeV/c at the interaction vertex. Interactions producing protons have softer x distributions for hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as for neon. In contrast to a recent claim, the effect is therefore not directly related to any nuclear effect in neon. (orig.)

  10. Neutrino interactions, proton production and a nuclear effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, J.; Allport, P. P.; Berggren, M.; Clayton, E. F.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.; Hulth, P. O.; Jones, G. T.; Katz, U.; Marage, P.; Matsinos, E.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Myatt, G.; Neveu, M.; O'Neale, S.; Parker, M. A.; Sacton, J.; Sansum, R. A.; Simopoulou, E.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; Varvell, K.; Venus, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wittek, W.

    1989-10-01

    Neutrino interactions are classified by the presence or absence of protons with momentum below 600 MeV/c at the interaction vertex. Interactions producing protons have softer x distributions for hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as for neon. In contrast to a recent claim, the effect is therefore not directly related to any nuclear effect in neon.

  11. High and Low Energy Proton Radiation Damage in p/n InP MOCVD Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, George; Weinberg, Irv; Scheiman, Dave; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Uribe, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    InP p(+)/n/n(+) solar cells, fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, (MOCVD) were irradiated with 0.2 MeV and 10 MeV protons to a fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. The power output degradation, IV behavior, carrier concentration and defect concentration were observed at intermediate points throughout the irradiations. The 0.2 MeV proton-irradiated solar cells suffered much greater and more rapid degradation in power output than those irradiated with 10 MeV protons. The efficiency losses were accompanied by larger increases in the recombination currents in the 0.2 MeV proton-irradiated solar cells. The low energy proton irradiations also had a larger impact on the series resistance of the solar cells. Despite the radiation induced damage, the carrier concentration in the base of the solar cells showed no reduction after 10 MeV or 0.2 MeV proton irradiations and even increased during irradiation with 0.2 MeV protons. In a deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study of the irradiated samples, the minority carrier defects H4 and H5 at E(sub v) + 0.33 and E(sub v) + 0.52 eV and the majority carrier defects E7 and El0 at E(sub c) - 0.39 and E(sub c) - 0.74 eV, were observed. The defect introduction rates for the 0.2 MeV proton irradiations were about 20 times higher than for the 10 MeV proton irradiations. The defect El0, observed here after irradiation, has been shown to act as a donor in irradiated n-type InP and may be responsible for obscuring carrier removal. The results of this study are consistent with the much greater damage produced by low energy protons whose limited range causes them to stop in the active region of the solar cell.

  12. Proton Damage Effects on Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-19

    gas, such as helium or argon at low pressure. A dc arc voltage is applied under these conditions to generate fullerenes. However, when the anode... argon gas. The target is vaporized during the synthesis process, resulting in the formation of SWCNTs that are carried into a collector due to the...light incident upon a molecule, usually a laser. Only Raman active modes are observed. A Raman active mode is the resultant of the polarizability of a

  13. The quantification of wound healing as a method to assess late radiation damage in primate skin exposed to high-energy protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    In an experiment examining the effects of space radiations on primates, different groups of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were exposed to single whole-body doses of 32- or 55-MeV protons. Survivors of those exposures, together with age-matched controls, have been monitored continuously since 1964 and 1965. Late effects of nominal proton doses ranging from 2-6 Gray have been measured in vitro using skin fibroblasts from the animals. A logical extension of that study is reported here, and it involves observations of wound healing after 3-mm diameter dermal punches were removed from the ears (pinnae) of control and irradiated monkeys. Tendencies in the reduction of competence to repair cutaneous wound have been revealed by the initial examinations of animals that received doses greater than 2 Gy more than 2 decades earlier. These trends indicate that this method of assessing radiation damage to skin exposed to high-energy radiations warrants further study.

  14. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calugaru, V.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment planning in proton therapy uses a generic value for the Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE) of 1.1 relative to 60 Co gamma-rays throughout the Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP). We have studied the variation of the RBE at three positions in the SOBP of the 76 and 201 MeV proton beams used for cancer treatment at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy in Orsay (ICPO) in two human tumor cell lines using clonogenic cell death and the incidence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) as measured by pulse-field gel electrophoresis without and with endonuclease treatment to reveal clustered lesions as endpoints.The RBE for induced cell killing by the 76 MeV beam increased with depth in the SOBP. However for the 201 MeV protons it was close to that for 137 Cs gamma-rays and did not vary significantly. The incidence of DSBs and clustered lesions was higher for protons than for 137 Cs g-rays, but did not depend on the proton energy or the position in the SOBP. In the second part of our work, we have shown using cell clones made deficient for known repair genes by stable or transient shRNA transfection, that the D-NHEJ pathway determine the response to protons. The response of DNA damages created in the distal part of the 76 MeV SOBP suggests that those damages belong to the class of DNA 'complex lesions' (LMDS). It also appears that the particle fluence is a major determinant of the outcome of treatment in the distal part of the SOBP. (author)

  15. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.

    1995-01-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons

  16. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Association EURATOM, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  17. Calculations of the displacement damage and short-circuit current degradation in proton irradiated (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C. S.; Li, S. S.; Loo, R. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical model for computing the displacement damage defect density and the short-circuit current (I sub sc) degradation in proton-irradiated (AlGa)As-GaAs p-n junction solar cells is presented. Assumptions were made with justification that the radiation induced displacement defects form an effective recombination center which controls the electron and hole lifetimes in the junction space charge region and in the n-GaAs active layer of the irradiated GaAs p-n junction cells. The degradation of I sub sc in the (AlGa)As layer was found to be negligible compared to the total degradation. In order to determine the I sub sc degradation, the displacement defect density, path length, range, reduced energy after penetrating a distance x, and the average number of displacements formed by one proton scattering event were first calculated. The I sub sc degradation was calculated by using the electron capture cross section in the p-diffused layer and the hole capture cross section in the n-base layer as well as the wavelength dependent absorption coefficients. Excellent agreement was found between the researchers calculated values and the measured I sub sc in the proton irradiated GaAs solar cells for proton energies of 100 KeV to 10 MeV and fluences from 10 to the 10th power p/square cm to 10 to the 12th power p/square cm.

  18. Effect of Proton Beam on Cancer Progressive and Metastatic Enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Y. H.; Nam, K. S.; Oh, Y. H.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, M. Y.; Jang, J. S.

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of proton beam on enzymes for promotion/progression of carcinogenesis and metastasis of malignant tumor cells to clarify proton beam-specific biological effects. The changes of cancer chemopreventive enzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells irradiated with proton beams were tested by measuring the activities of quinine reductase (QR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), glutathione (GSH) levels, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We also examined the effect of proton beam on the ODC activity and expression of COX-2 in human breast cancer cell. We then assessed the metastatic capabilities of HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cells irradiated with proton beam by measuring the invasiveness of cells through Matrigel-coated membrane and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. QR activity of irradiated HT-29 cells was slightly increased. Proton irradiation at dose of 32 Gy in HT-29 cells increased GST activity by 1.23-fold. In addition GSH levels in HT-29 cells was significantly increased 1.23- (p<0.05), 1.32- (p<0.01) and 1.34-fold (p<0.01) with the proton irradiation at doses of 8, 16 and 32 Gy, respectively. These results suggest that colon cancer chemopreventive activity was increased with the proton irradiation by increasing QR and GST activities and GSH levels and inhibiting ODC activity. Proton ion irradiation decreased the invasiveness of TPA-treated HT-29 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells through Matrigel-coated membrane. Proton ion irradiation pretreatment decreased TPA-induced MMP activity in MDA-MB-231 and HT-29 cells. Further studies are necessary to investigate if these findings could be translated to in vivo situations

  19. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Macek, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures

  20. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  1. The RADEX facility as a tool for studies of radiation damage under proton and spallation neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koptelov, E.A.; Lebedev, S.G.; Matveev, V.A.; Sobolevsky, N.M. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strebkov, Yu.S.; Subbotin, A.V. [Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-03-01

    We present results of numerical modeling for processes of primary protons and spallation neutrons interactions with structural materials at the RADiation EXperiment facility of the Neutron Complex. The installation has a vertical irradiation channel inside the beam stop for horizontally incident protons with energies up to 600 MeV of the Moscow Meson Factory of the INR (Institute for Nuclear Research) RAS (Russian Academy of Science). The calculations are based on a set of computer codes SHIELD and RADDAM, which were developed in the INR RAS and give data on point defect generation by irradiation, rate of accumulation of H and He atoms produced in nuclear reactions, energetic spectra of primary knocked-off atoms in collision displacements, temperature of samples under irradiation. Different positions of the channel, which are available by rotation of a target relatively the vertical axis for angles 0, 60, 120 and 180 degrees to the proton beam direction, are considered. Changes of irradiation damage parameters due to various inputs of primary protons and spallation neutrons at different target orientations are demonstrated. It is shown also that the spallation neutron facility RADEX may provide with perspective experimental possibilities for modeling of irradiation conditions for fusion reactors ITER and DEMO. (author)

  2. Physical and biological factors determining the effective proton range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grün, Rebecca; Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael; Zink, Klemens; Durante, Marco; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy is rapidly becoming a standard treatment option for cancer. However, even though experimental data show an increase of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with depth, particularly at the distal end of the treatment field, a generic RBE of 1.1 is currently used in proton radiotherapy. This discrepancy might affect the effective penetration depth of the proton beam and thus the dose to the surrounding tissue and organs at risk. The purpose of this study was thus to analyze the impact of a tissue and dose dependent RBE of protons on the effective range of the proton beam in comparison to the range based on a generic RBE of 1.1.Methods: Factors influencing the biologically effective proton range were systematically analyzed by means of treatment planning studies using the Local Effect Model (LEM IV) and the treatment planning software TRiP98. Special emphasis was put on the comparison of passive and active range modulation techniques.Results: Beam energy, tissue type, and dose level significantly affected the biological extension of the treatment field at the distal edge. Up to 4 mm increased penetration depth as compared to the depth based on a constant RBE of 1.1. The extension of the biologically effective range strongly depends on the initial proton energy used for the most distal layer of the field and correlates with the width of the distal penumbra. Thus, the range extension, in general, was more pronounced for passive as compared to active range modulation systems, whereas the maximum RBE was higher for active systems.Conclusions: The analysis showed that the physical characteristics of the proton beam in terms of the width of the distal penumbra have a great impact on the RBE gradient and thus also the biologically effective penetration depth of the beam

  3. The effects of proton exposure on neurochemistry and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Szprengiel, A.; Pluhar, J.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, where astronauts will be exposed to radiation hazards such as those that arise from galactic cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of protons, α particles, and particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles). Research by our group has shown that exposure to HZE particles, primarily 600 MeV/n and 1 GeV/n 56Fe, can produce significant alterations in brain neurochemistry and behavior. However, given that protons can make up a significant portion of the radiation spectrum, it is important to study their effects on neural functioning and on related performance. Therefore, these studies examined the effects of exposure to proton irradiation on neurochemical and behavioral endpoints, including dopaminergic functioning, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, and spatial learning and memory as measured by the Morris water maze. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a dose of 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.0 Gy of 250 MeV protons at Loma Linda University and were tested in the different behavioral tests at various times following exposure. Results showed that there was no effect of proton irradiation at any dose on any of the endpoints measured. Therefore, there is a contrast between the insignificant effects of high dose proton exposure and the dramatic effectiveness of low dose (<0.1 Gy) exposures to 56Fe particles on both neurochemical and behavioral endpoints.

  4. Sodium and Proton Effects on Inward Proton Transport through Na/K Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Travis J.; Zugarramurdi, Camila; Olivera, J. Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The Na/K pump hydrolyzes ATP to export three intracellular Na (Nai) as it imports two extracellular K (Ko) across animal plasma membranes. Within the protein, two ion-binding sites (sites I and II) can reciprocally bind Na or K, but a third site (site III) exclusively binds Na in a voltage-dependent fashion. In the absence of Nao and Ko, the pump passively imports protons, generating an inward current (IH). To elucidate the mechanisms of IH, we used voltage-clamp techniques to investigate the [H]o, [Na]o, and voltage dependence of IH in Na/K pumps from ventricular myocytes and in ouabain-resistant pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lowering pHo revealed that Ho both activates IH (in a voltage-dependent manner) and inhibits it (in a voltage-independent manner) by binding to different sites. Nao effects depend on pHo; at pHo where no Ho inhibition is observed, Nao inhibits IH at all concentrations, but when applied at pHo that inhibits pump-mediated current, low [Na]o activates IH and high [Na]o inhibits it. Our results demonstrate that IH is a property inherent to Na/K pumps, not linked to the oocyte expression environment, explains differences in the characteristics of IH previously reported in the literature, and supports a model in which 1), protons leak through site III; 2), binding of two Na or two protons to sites I and II inhibits proton transport; and 3), pumps with mixed Na/proton occupancy of sites I and II remain permeable to protons. PMID:24940773

  5. Mutagenic effects of space environment and protons on rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Shen Mei

    1998-07-01

    Dry seeds of 5 rice varieties were carried by recoverable satellite for space mutation, and were irradiated by 4∼8 MeV protons with various doses. The mutagenic effects was studied. The results indicated that the space environment could cause chromosomal structure aberration and had stimulating mitosis action in root tip cells. As compared with γ-rays and protons, the effects of space environment flight were lower on chromosomal aberration but were significantly higher on mitosis index. Space environment and protons induce high frequency of chlorophyll deficient mutation and mutation in plant height and heading date in M 2 generation. Frequency of beneficial mutation induced by space environment and protons were higher than those induced by γ-rays

  6. A Coupled Plastic Damage Model for Concrete considering the Effect of Damage on Plastic Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Feng; Cheng, Guangxu

    2015-01-01

    A coupled plastic damage model with two damage scalars is proposed to describe the nonlinear features of concrete. The constitutive formulations are developed by assuming that damage can be represented effectively in the material compliance tensor. Damage evolution law and plastic damage coupling are described using the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The plasticity part is developed without using the effective stress concept. A plastic yield function based on the true stress is ado...

  7. Chromosome-damaging effect of betel leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivan, G; Rani, G; Kumari, C K

    1978-05-01

    The chewing of betel leaf with other ingredients is a widespread addiction in India. The chromosome damaging effect was studied in human leukocyte cultures. There was an increase in the frequency of chromatid aberrations when the leaf extract was added to cultures.

  8. Silicon/HfO2 interface: Effects of proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurya, Savita; Radhakrishna, M.

    2015-01-01

    Substrate oxide interfaces are of paramount importance in deciding the quality of the semiconductor devices. In this work we have studied how 200 keV proton irradiation affects the interface of a 13 nm thick, atomic layer deposited hafnium dioxide on silicon substrate. Pre- and post-irradiation electrical measurements are used to quantify the effect of proton irradiation for varying electrode geometries. Proton irradiation introduces positive charge in the oxide and at the interface of Si/HfO 2 interface. The gate current is not very much affected under positive injection since the induced positive charge is compensated by the injected electrons. Current voltage characteristics under negative bias get affected by the proton irradiation

  9. A study on the proton irradiation effect of reactor materials using cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Park, Deuk Keun; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung

    1993-02-01

    Understanding on radiation damage of important structural materials is important for safe operation and radiation damage evaluation of new reactor structural materials. This study was performed to simulate and evaluate 14 MeV neutron irradiation effects on mechanical properties of candidate structural materials (HT-9/SS316) of next generation reactors (FBR, Fusion) irradiated by Cyclotron(MC-50) using SP test technique. After qualification of SP test techniques from J IC and ε qf correlation, SP tests were performed to evaluate 16MeV proton irradiation effects on mechanical properties of irradiated and unirradiated HT-9/SS316 steels. Test results were evaluated for ε qf , energy and displacement up to failure and J IC change. In addition, damaged zone and dpa upon depth after irradiation were calculated using TRIM code and Doppler broadening line shapes were measured to evaluate defects for 15% cold worked HT-9 steel using PAS. (Author)

  10. Kinetic Effects Of Increased Proton Transfer Distance On Proton-Coupled Oxidations Of Phenol-Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhile, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    To test the effect of varying the proton donor-acceptor distance in proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, the oxidation of a bicyclic amino-indanol (2) is compared with that of a closely related phenol with an ortho CPh2NH2 substituent (1). Spectroscopic, structural, thermochemical and computational studies show that the two amino-phenols are very similar, except that the O⋯N distance (dON) is >0.1 Å longer in 2 than in 1. The difference in dON is 0.13 ± 0.03 Å from X-ray crystallography and 0.165 Å from DFT calculations. Oxidations of these phenols by outer-sphere oxidants yield distonic radical cations •OAr–NH3+ by concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET). Simple tunneling and classical kinetic models both predict that the longer donor-acceptor distance in 2 should lead to slower reactions, by ca. two orders of magnitude, as well as larger H/D kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). However, kinetic studies show that the compound with the longer proton-transfer distance, 2, exhibits smaller KIEs and has rate constants that are quite close to those of 1. For example, the oxidation of 2 by the triarylamminium radical cation N(C6H4OMe)3•+ (3a+) occurs at (1.4 ± 0.1) × 104 M-1 s-1, only a factor of two slower than the closely related reaction of 1 with N(C6H4OMe)2(C6H4Br)•+ (3b+). This difference in rate constants is well accounted for by the slightly different free energies of reaction: ΔG°(2 + 3a+) = +0.078 V vs. ΔG°(1 + 3b+) = +0.04 V. The two phenol-amines do display some subtle kinetic differences: for instance, compound 2 has a shallower dependence of CPET rate constants on driving force (Brønsted α, Δln(k)/Δln(Keq)). These results show that the simple tunneling model is not a good predictor of the effect of proton donor-acceptor distance on concerted-electron transfer reactions involving strongly hydrogen-bonded systems. Computational analysis of the observed similarity of the two phenols emphasizes the importance of the highly

  11. Argonne effect - evidence for the shell structure of proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levintov, I.I.

    1983-01-01

    A strong spin effect in P,P scattering at parallel spin orientation of a target and a projectile and psub(t)sup(2) > or approximately 4(GeV/c) 2 (psub(t) is a transverse momentum of scattered proton) - Argonne effect - is explained by the presence of Fock configuration (qqc anti cq) ip proton which has the structure of p-shell. An analogous effect in the region psub(perpendicular)sup(2) > or approximately 25(GeV/c) 2 associated with the configuration (qqb anti bq) is predicted

  12. Proton irradiation effects in oxide-confined vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.E.; Swift, G.M.; Guertin, S.; Schwank, J.R.; Armendariz, M.G.; Hash, G.L.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    Vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diodes are employed as the emitter portion of opto-couplers that are used in space applications. Proton irradiation studies on VCSELs were performed at the Indiana University cyclotron facility. The beam energy was set at 192 MeV, the beam current was 200 nA that is equivalent to a flux of approximately 1*10 11 protons/cm 2 .s. We conclude that the oxide confined VCSELs examined in this study show more than sufficient radiation hardness for nearly all space applications. The observed proton-induced decreases in light output and the corresponding increases in laser threshold current can be explained in terms of proton-induced displacement damage which introduces non-radiative recombination centers in the active region of the lasers and causes a decrease in laser efficiency. These radiation effects accentuate the detrimental thermal effects observed at high currents. We also note that forward bias annealing is effective in these devices in producing at least partial recovery of the light output, and that this may be a viable hardness assurance technique during a flight mission. (A.C.)

  13. Damage evaluation of proton irradiated titanium deuteride thin films to be used as neutron production targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez Anzorena, Manuel; Bertolo, Alma A.; Gagetti, Leonardo; Gaviola, Pedro A.; del Grosso, Mariela F.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2018-06-01

    Titanium deuteride thin films have been manufactured under different conditions specified by deuterium gas pressure, substrate temperature and time. The films were characterized by different techniques to evaluate the deuterium content and the homogeneity of such films. Samples with different concentrations of deuterium, including non deuterated samples, were irradiated with a 150 keV proton beam. Both deposits, pristine and irradiated, were characterized by optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy.

  14. H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, Nikolaos; Huijser, A.; Poulsen, Finn Willy

    2015-01-01

    The atomic mass ratio of ca. 2 between deuterium and hydrogen is the highest for any pair of stable isotopes and results in significant and measurable H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors containing these species. This paper discusses H/D isotope effects manifested in O-H/O-D...

  15. Use of primary cell cultures to measure the late effects in the skins of rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.; Lett, J. T.

    Previous pilot investigations of the uses of primary cell cultures to study late damage in stem cells of the skin of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit and the rhesus monkey /1-3/, have been extended to individual monkeys exposed to 55 MeV protons. Protons of this energy have a larger range in tissue of (~2.6 cm) than the 32 MeV protons (~0.9 cm) to which the animals in our earlier studies had been exposed. Although the primary emphases in the current studies were improvement and simplification in the techniques and logistics of transportation of biopsies to a central analytical facility, comparison of the quantitative measurements obtained thus far for survival of stem cells in the skins from animals irradiated 21 years ago reveals that the effects of both proton energies are similar.

  16. Helium production for 0.8-2.5 GeV proton induced spallation reactions, damage induced in metallic window materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilscher, D.; Herbach, C.-M.; Jahnke, U.; Tishchenko, V.; Enke, M.; Filges, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Neef, R.-D.; Nuenighoff, K.; Paul, N.; Schaal, H.; Sterzenbach, G.; Letourneau, A.; Boehm, A.; Galin, J.; Lott, B.; Peghaire, A.; Pienkowski, L.

    2001-01-01

    Production cross-sections for neutrons and charged particles as well as excitation energy distributions in spallation reactions were measured recently by the NESSI-collaboration and have been employed to test different intra nuclear cascade models and the subsequent evaporation. The INCL/GEMINI code, which describes best the experimental data has been employed to calculate the damage cross-sections in Fe and Ta as well as the He/dpa ratio as a function of proton energy. For the same amount of neutron production in a typical target of a spallation neutron source the proton beam induced radiation damage in an Fe window is shown to decrease almost linearly with proton energy. For heavier materials such as Ta a similar decrease of the radiation damage is found only for energies above about 3 GeV

  17. Spot Scanning and Passive Scattering Proton Therapy: Relative Biological Effectiveness and Oxygen Enhancement Ratio in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Shingo; Yamada, Maho; Shibata, Hiroki; Yasui, Keisuke; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Omachi, Chihiro; Tatekawa, Kotoha; Manabe, Yoshihiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and contribution of the indirect effect of spot scanning proton beams, passive scattering proton beams, or both in cultured cells in comparison with clinically used photons. The RBE of passive scattering proton beams at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) was determined from dose-survival curves in 4 cell lines using 6-MV X rays as controls. Survival of 2 cell lines after spot scanning and passive scattering proton irradiation was then compared. Biological effects at the distal end region of the SOBP were also investigated. The OER of passive scattering proton beams and 6 MX X rays were investigated in 2 cell lines. The RBE and OER values were estimated at a 10% cell survival level. The maximum degree of protection of radiation effects by dimethyl sulfoxide was determined to estimate the contribution of the indirect effect against DNA damage. All experiments comparing protons and X rays were made under the same biological conditions. The RBE values of passive scattering proton beams in the 4 cell lines examined were 1.01 to 1.22 (average, 1.14) and were almost identical to those of spot scanning beams. Biological effects increased at the distal end of the SOBP. In the 2 cell lines examined, the OER was 2.74 (95% confidence interval, 2.56-2.80) and 3.08 (2.84-3.11), respectively, for X rays, and 2.39 (2.38-2.43) and 2.72 (2.69-2.75), respectively, for protons (Pcells between X rays and protons). The maximum degree of protection was significantly higher for X rays than for proton beams (P<.05). The RBE values of spot scanning and passive scattering proton beams were almost identical. The OER was lower for protons than for X rays. The lower contribution of the indirect effect may partly account for the lower OER of protons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of High-Energy Proton Irradiation on β-Ga2O3 Nanobelt Field-Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gwangseok; Jang, Soohwan; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen J; Kim, Jihyun

    2017-11-22

    The robust radiation resistance of wide-band gap materials is advantageous for space applications, where the high-energy particle irradiation deteriorates the performance of electronic devices. We report on the effects of proton irradiation of β-Ga 2 O 3 nanobelts, whose energy band gap is ∼4.85 eV at room temperature. Back-gated field-effect transistor (FET) based on exfoliated quasi-two-dimensional β-Ga 2 O 3 nanobelts were exposed to a 10 MeV proton beam. The proton-dose- and time-dependent characteristics of the radiation-damaged FETs were systematically analyzed. A 73% decrease in the field-effect mobility and a positive shift of the threshold voltage were observed after proton irradiation at a fluence of 2 × 10 15 cm -2 . Greater radiation-induced degradation occurs in the conductive channel of the β-Ga 2 O 3 nanobelt than at the contact between the metal and β-Ga 2 O 3 . The on/off ratio of the exfoliated β-Ga 2 O 3 FETs was maintained even after proton doses up to 2 × 10 15 cm -2 . The radiation-induced damage in the β-Ga 2 O 3 -based FETs was significantly recovered after rapid thermal annealing at 500 °C. The outstanding radiation durability of β-Ga 2 O 3 renders it a promising building block for space applications.

  19. Proton Minibeam Radiation Therapy Reduces Side Effects in an In Vivo Mouse Ear Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.girst@unibw.de [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, Christoph; Reindl, Judith [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Siebenwirth, Christian [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Zlobinskaya, Olga [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Walsh, Dietrich W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Ilicic, Katarina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel [Research Unit Analytical Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Oberschleißheim (Germany); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Proton minibeam radiation therapy is a novel approach to minimize normal tissue damage in the entrance channel by spatial fractionation while keeping tumor control through a homogeneous tumor dose using beam widening with an increasing track length. In the present study, the dose distributions for homogeneous broad beam and minibeam irradiation sessions were simulated. Also, in an animal study, acute normal tissue side effects of proton minibeam irradiation were compared with homogeneous irradiation in a tumor-free mouse ear model to account for the complex effects on the immune system and vasculature in an in vivo normal tissue model. Methods and Materials: At the ion microprobe SNAKE, 20-MeV protons were administered to the central part (7.2 × 7.2 mm{sup 2}) of the ear of BALB/c mice, using either a homogeneous field with a dose of 60 Gy or 16 minibeams with a nominal 6000 Gy (4 × 4 minibeams, size 0.18 × 0.18 mm{sup 2}, with a distance of 1.8 mm). The same average dose was used over the irradiated area. Results: No ear swelling or other skin reactions were observed at any point after minibeam irradiation. In contrast, significant ear swelling (up to fourfold), erythema, and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3 to 4 weeks after irradiation. Hair loss and the disappearance of sebaceous glands were only detected in the homogeneously irradiated fields. Conclusions: These results show that proton minibeam radiation therapy results in reduced adverse effects compared with conventional homogeneous broad-beam irradiation and, therefore, might have the potential to decrease the incidence of side effects resulting from clinical proton and/or heavy ion therapy.

  20. Effects of radiation damage on the silicon lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Katherine A.; Lowry, Lynn; Russo, O. Louis

    1987-01-01

    Silicon was irradiated with both proton and electron particle beams in order to investigate changes in the structural and optical properties of the lattice as a result of the radiation damage. Lattice expansions occurred when large strain fields (+0.34 percent) developed after 1- and 3-MeV proton bombardment. The strain was a factor of three less after 1-MeV electron irradiation. Average increases of approximately 22 meV in the 3.46-eV interband energy gap and 14 meV in the Lorentz broadening parameter were measured after the electron irradiation.

  1. Effectiveness of ranitidine bismuth citrate and proton pump inhibitor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness of ranitidine bismuth citrate and proton pump inhibitor based triple therapies of Helicobacter pylori in Turkey. ... Results: When we look at the eradication rates of the treatment groups, only two groups (ranitidine bismuth citrate and rabeprazole groups) had eradication rates greater than 80%, both at intention to ...

  2. Proton microbeam irradiation effects on PtBA polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microbeam irradiation effects on poly-tert-butyl-acrylate (PtBA) polymer using 2.0 MeV proton microbeam are reported. Preliminary results on pattern formation on PtBA are carried out as a function of fluence. After writing the pattern, a thin layer of Ge is deposited. Distribution of Ge in pristine and ion beam patterned surface ...

  3. Radiation damage in semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    A survey is presented of the important damage-producing interactions in semiconductor detectors and estimates of defect numbers are made for MeV protons, neutrons and electrons. Damage effects of fast neutrons in germanium gamma ray spectrometers are given in some detail. General effects in silicon detectors are discussed and damage constants and their relationship to leakage current is introduced

  4. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  5. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Johnson Creek, Madison, WI (United States); Friedmann, Alison M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  6. Effect of front and rear incident proton irradiation on silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, Bruce; Kachare, Ram

    1987-01-01

    Four solar cell types of current manufacture were irradiated through the front and rear surfaces with protons in the energy range between 1 and 10 MeV. The solar cell parameters varied for this study were cell thickness and back surface field (BSF) vs. no BSF. Some cells were irradiated at normal incidence and an equal number were irradiated with simulated isotropic fluences. The solar cell electrical characteristics were measured under simulated AM0 illumination after each fluence. Using the normal incidence data, proton damage coefficients were computed for all four types of cells for both normal and omnidirectional radiation fields. These were found to compare well with the omnidirectional damage coefficients derived directly from the rear-incidence radiation data. Similarly, the rear-incidence omnidirectional radiation data were used to compute appropriate damage coefficients. A method for calculating the effect of a spectrum of energies is derived from these calculations. It is suitable for calculating the degradation of cells in space when they have minimal rear-surface shielding.

  7. Emulation of neutron irradiation effects with protons: validation of principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Busby, J.T.; Allen, T.; Kenik, E.A.; Jensson, A.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Edwards, A.D.; Scott, P.M.; Andreson, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the irradiation, characterization and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) behavior of proton- and neutron-irradiated samples of 304SS and 316SS from the same heats. The objective of the study was to determine whether proton irradiation does indeed emulate the full range of effects of in-reactor neutron irradiation: radiation-induced segregation (RIS), irradiated microstructure, radiation hardening and IASCC susceptibility. The work focused on commercial heats of 304 stainless steel (heat B) and 316 stainless steel (heat P). Irradiation with protons was conducted at 360 deg. C to doses between 0.3 and 5.0 dpa to approximate those by neutron irradiation at 275 deg. C over the same dose range. Characterization consisted of grain boundary microchemistry, dislocation loop microstructure, hardness as well as stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of both un-irradiated and irradiated samples in oxygenated and de-oxygenated water environments at 288 deg. C. Overall, microchemistry, microstructure, hardening and SCC behavior of proton- and neutron-irradiated samples were in excellent agreement. RIS analysis showed that in both heats and for both irradiating particles, the pre-existing grain boundary Cr enrichment transformed into a 'W' shaped profile at 1.0 dpa and then into a 'V' shaped profile between 3.0 and 5.0 dpa. Grain boundary segregation of Cr, Ni, Si, and Mo all followed the same trends and agreed well in magnitude. The microstructure of both proton- and neutron-irradiated samples was dominated by small, faulted dislocation loops. Loop size distributions were nearly identical in both heats over a range of doses. Saturated loop size following neutron irradiation was about 30% larger than that following proton irradiation. Loop density increased with dose through 5.0 dpa for both particle irradiations and was a factor of 3 greater in neutron-irradiated samples vs. proton-irradiated samples. Grain boundary

  8. Proton decay in a nucleus: Nonrelativistic treatment of nuclear effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L.A.; Alvarez-Estrada, R.F.; Sanchez-Gomez, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, proton decay in a large nucleus is studied in the framework of SU(5) grand unification theory (GUT). By using a method based upon the Green's-function technique of many-body physics, nuclear effects on spectator and pole terms are computed. The decay width in the nucleus is found to be practically the same as in free space. However, nuclear effects are of considerable importance concerning the positron spectrum. A density-correlation expansion is introduced which is useful for carrying out a systematic study of nuclear effects in proton decay in a large nucleus. The method presented here can be easily extended to other GUT's or supersymmetric GUT's

  9. Neutron-proton pairing effect on the proton-rich nuclei moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, D.; Ami, I.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    The neutron-proton (n-p) pairing effect on the nuclear moment of inertia is studied within the BCS approximation in the isovector case. An analytical expression of the moment of inertia is established by means of the cranking model. This expression generalizes the usual BCS one (i.e. when only the pairing between like-particles is considered). The moment of inertia of N = Z even-even nuclei, for which experimental values are known, i.e., such as 32 ≤ A ≤ 80, has been numerically evaluated, with and without inclusion of the n-p pairing effect. The used single-particle and Eigen-states are those of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It turns out that the inclusion of the n-p pairing improves the obtained values when compared to the usual BCS approximation, since the average discrepancies with the experimental data are respectively 7% and 37%. (authors)

  10. Neutron-proton pairing effect on the proton-rich nuclei moment of inertia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, D.; Ami, I.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB, Algiers (Algeria); Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, COMENA, Algiers (Algeria)

    2008-07-01

    The neutron-proton (n-p) pairing effect on the nuclear moment of inertia is studied within the BCS approximation in the isovector case. An analytical expression of the moment of inertia is established by means of the cranking model. This expression generalizes the usual BCS one (i.e. when only the pairing between like-particles is considered). The moment of inertia of N = Z even-even nuclei, for which experimental values are known, i.e., such as 32 {<=} A {<=} 80, has been numerically evaluated, with and without inclusion of the n-p pairing effect. The used single-particle and Eigen-states are those of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It turns out that the inclusion of the n-p pairing improves the obtained values when compared to the usual BCS approximation, since the average discrepancies with the experimental data are respectively 7% and 37%. (authors)

  11. In honour of N. Yngve Öhrn: surveying proton cancer therapy reactions with Öhrn's electron nuclear dynamics method. Aqueous clusters radiolysis and DNA-base damage by proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaurin, Patrick M.; Privett, Austin J.; Stopera, Christopher; Grimes, Thomas V.; Perera, Ajith; Morales, Jorge A.

    2015-02-01

    Proton cancer therapy (PCT) utilises high-energy H+ projectiles to cure cancer. PCT healing arises from its DNA damage in cancerous cells, which is mostly inflicted by the products from PCT water radiolysis reactions. While clinically established, a complete microscopic understanding of PCT remains elusive. To help in the microscopic elucidation of PCT, Professor Öhrn's simplest-level electron nuclear dynamics (SLEND) method is herein applied to H+ + (H2O)3-4 and H+ + DNA-bases at ELab = 1.0 keV. These are two types of computationally feasible prototypes to study water radiolysis reactions and H+-induced DNA damage, respectively. SLEND is a time-dependent, variational, non-adiabatic and direct-dynamics method that adopts a nuclear classical-mechanics description and an electronic single-determinantal wavefunction. Additionally, our SLEND + effective-core-potential method is herein employed to simulate some computationally demanding PCT reactions. Due to these attributes, SLEND proves appropriate for the simulation of various types of PCT reactions accurately and feasibly. H+ + (H2O)3-4 simulations reveal two main processes: H+ projectile scattering and the simultaneous formation of H and OH fragments; the latter process is quantified through total integrals cross sections. H+ + DNA-base simulations reveal atoms and groups displacements, ring openings and base-to-proton electron transfers as predominant damage processes. The authors warmly dedicate this SLEND investigation in honour of Professor N. Yngve Öhrn on the occasion of his 80th birthday celebration during the 54th Sanibel Symposium in St. Simons' Island, Georgia, on February 16-21, 2014. Associate Professor Jorge A. Morales was a former chemistry PhD student under the mentorship of Professor Öhrn and Dr Ajith Perera took various quantum chemistry courses taught by Professor Öhrn during his chemistry PhD studies. Both Jorge and Ajith look back to those great times of their scientific formation under

  12. Relative biological effectiveness of protons and heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyglenov, A.; Fedorenko, B.; Kabachenko, A.

    1986-01-01

    The genetic effectiveness was studied of protons (9 GeB/nuclon, 0,72 Gy/min), α-particles (4 GeB/nuclon, 0,9 Gy/min) and carbon ions (4 GeB/nuclon 0,36 Gy/min). The translocation yield in mouse spermatogonia was used as indicator of radiation-induced genetic injury. Reciprocal translocation were registered six months after the irradiation on spermatocytes in diakinesmetaphase I. Comparison was made with gamma-irradiated animals from 60 Co source with dose rate 1,44 Gy/min. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was determined by comparing the regression coefficients from the linear dose translocation yield dependency. The values of the RBE coefficients were 0.8, 0.9 and 1.2, accordingly for protons, α-particles and carbon ions

  13. The effects of electron and proton radiation on GaSb infrared solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenbaum, P. E.; Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium antimonide (GaSb) infrared solar cells were exposed to 1 MeV electrons and protons up to fluences of 1 times 10(exp 15) cm (-2) and 1 times 10(exp 12) cm (-2) respectively. In between exposures, current voltage and spectral response curves were taken. The GaSb cells were found to degrade slightly less than typical GaAs cells under electron irradiation, and calculations from spectral response curves showed that the damage coefficient for the minority carrier diffusion length was 3.5 times 10(exp 8). The cells degraded faster than GaAs cells under proton irradiation. However, researchers expect the top cell and coverglass to protect the GaSb cell from most damaging protons. Some annealing of proton damage was observed at low temperatures (80 to 160 C).

  14. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption

  15. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  16. Effects of electrons on the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michno, M. J.; Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Among the kinetic microinstabilities, the firehose instability is one of the most efficient mechanisms to restrict the unlimited increase of temperature anisotropy in the direction of an ambient magnetic field as predicted by adiabatic expansion of collision-poor solar wind. Indeed, the solar wind proton temperature anisotropy detected near 1 AU shows that it is constrained by the marginal firehose condition. Of the two types of firehose instabilities, namely, parallel and oblique, the literature suggests that the solar wind data conform more closely to the marginal oblique firehose condition. In the present work, however, it is shown that the parallel firehose instability threshold is markedly influenced by the presence of anisotropic electrons, such that under some circumstances, the cumulative effects of both electron and proton anisotropies could describe the observation without considering the oblique firehose mode.

  17. Effect of Nafion ionometer content on proton conductivity in the catalyst layer of proton exchange fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozalevlia, Cihan Cemil; Jian Xie; Xu, Fan [METU MS Mechanical Engineering (United States)], email: cihan.ozalevli@metu.edu.tr, email: jianxie@iupui.edu, email: fanxu@iupui.edu

    2011-07-01

    In the energy conversion sector, proton exchange fuel cells (PEFC's) are among the most promising technologies for the future. The Nafion ionometer is the most important part of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) which is the core technology of the system. The Nafion ionometer is both a proton conductor and a binder for the catalyst layer in the technology. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of the Nafion content in the cathode catalyst layer on the proton conductivity of the MEA. Two MEAs with different Nafion content were prepared following the LANL process and the proton conductivity of the catalyst layer was measured. Results showed a much higher performance of the 28wt. % Nafion MEA than the 10wt. %. This study demonstrated that when the Nafion ionometer content decreases, the performance of the fuel cell decreases; further investigations should be undertaken with Nafion ionometer amounts of 15wt. % to 20wt. %.

  18. Effect of proton transfer on the electronic coupling in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rak, Janusz; Makowska, Joanna; Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of single and double proton transfer within Watson-Crick base pairs on donor-acceptor electronic couplings, V da , in DNA are studied on the bases of quantum chemical calculations. Four dimers [AT,AT], [GC,GC], [GC,AT] and [GC,TA)] are considered. Three techniques - the generalized Mulliken-Hush scheme, the fragment charge method and the diabatic states method - are employed to estimate V da for hole transfer between base pairs. We show that both single- and double proton transfer (PT) reactions may substantially affect the electronic coupling in DNA. The electronic coupling in [AT,AT] is predicted to be most sensitive to PT. Single PT within the first base pair in the dimer leads to increase in the hole transfer efficiency by a factor of 4, while proton transfer within the second pair should substantially, by 2.7 times, decrease the rate of charge transfer. Thus, directional asymmetry of the PT effects on the electronic coupling is predicted. The changes in the V da matrix elements correlate with the topological properties of orbitals of donor and acceptor and can be qualitatively rationalized in terms of resonance structures of donor and acceptor. Atomic pair contributions to the V da matrix elements are also analyzed

  19. Low energy proton irradiation effects on InP/InGaAs DHBTs and InP-base frequency dividers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingyao; Li, Yudong; Guo, Qi; Feng, Jie

    2018-03-01

    InP/InGaAs DHBTs and frequency dividers are irradiated by low energy proton, and displacement damage effect of the devices are analyzed. InP/InGaAs DHBTs has been made DC characteristics measurements, and the function measurement for frequency dividers has been done both before and after proton irradiation. The breakdown voltage of InP DHBTs drop to 3.7V When the fluence up to 5x1013 protons/cm2. Meanwhile, the function of frequency dividers get out of order. Degradation of DC characteristics of DHBTs are due to the radiation-induced defects in the quasi neutral base and the space charge region of base-collector and base-emitter junctions. The performance deterioration of DHBTs induce the fault of frequency dividers, and prescaler may be the most sensitive circuit.

  20. Effect of secondary radiation from 70 GeV protons and γ-quanta on Chinese hamster chromosomes depending on the cell cycle stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antipov, A.V.; Aptikaeva, G.F.; Akhmadieva, A.Kh.; Ganassi, E.Eh.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Livanova, I.A.; Smirnova, E.N.

    1987-01-01

    In cultured Chinese hamster cells, no decrease in the number of chromosome aberrations was noted after exposure thereof to 70 GeV protons at the late S-phase as opposed to early one. It is suggested that high biological effectiveness of this type of raiation is associated with its inhibiting effect of cytogenetic damages repair

  1. High-energy and high-fluence proton irradiation effects in silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Taylor, S.J.; Yang, M.; Matsuda, S.; Kawasaki, O.; Hisamatsu, T.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined proton irradiation damage in high-energy (1 endash 10 MeV) and high-fluence (approx-gt 10 13 cm -2 ) Si n + -p-p + structure space solar cells. Radiation testing has revealed an anomalous increase in short-circuit current I sc followed by an abrupt decrease and cell failure, induced by high-fluence proton irradiation. We propose a model to explain these phenomena by expressing the change in carrier concentration p of the base region as a function of the proton fluence in addition to the well-known model where the short-circuit current is decreased by minority-carrier lifetime reduction after irradiation. The reduction in carrier concentration due to majority-carrier trapping by radiation-induced defects has two effects. First, broadening of the depletion layer increases both the generation endash recombination current and also the contribution of the photocurrent generated in this region to the total photocurrent. Second, the resistivity of the base layer is increased, resulting in the abrupt decrease in the short circuit current and failure of the solar cells. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  2. MIXING THE SOLAR WIND PROTON AND ELECTRON SCALES: EFFECTS OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY ON THE OBLIQUE PROTON FIREHOSE INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Viñas, A., E-mail: yana.maneva@wis.kuleuven.be [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons, unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma β and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  3. Mixing the Solar Wind Proton and Electron Scales: Effects of Electron Temperature Anisotropy on the Oblique Proton Firehose Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Y.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A.; Poedts, S.

    2016-01-01

    The double adiabatic expansion of the nearly collisionless solar wind plasma creates conditions for the firehose instability to develop and efficiently prevent the further increase of the plasma temperature in the direction parallel to the interplanetary magnetic field. The conditions imposed by the firehose instability have been extensively studied using idealized approaches that ignore the mutual effects of electrons and protons. Recently, more realistic approaches have been proposed that take into account the interplay between electrons and protons,? unveiling new regimes of the parallel oscillatory modes. However, for oblique wave propagation the instability develops distinct branches that grow much faster and may therefore be more efficient than the parallel firehose instability in constraining the temperature anisotropy of the plasma particles. This paper reports for the first time on the effects of electron plasma properties on the oblique proton firehose (PFH) instability and provides a comprehensive vision of the entire unstable wave-vector spectrum, unifying the proton and the smaller electron scales. The plasma ß and temperature anisotropy regimes considered here are specific for the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions, and enable the electrons and protons to interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters, simultaneous electron and PFH instabilities can be observed with a dispersion spectrum of the electron firehose (EFH) extending toward the proton scales. Growth rates of the PFH instability are markedly boosted by the anisotropic electrons, especially in the oblique direction where the EFH growth rates are orders of magnitude higher.

  4. Solar proton events and their effect on space systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquille, C.

    1994-01-01

    Solar protons present a major problem to space systems because of the ionisation and displacement effects which arise from their interaction with matter. This is likely to become a greater problem in the future due to the use of more sensitive electronic components and the proposed expansion of manned activities in space. An outline is provided of the physical processes associated with individual solar events, the solar activity cycle and the transport of solar particles between the Sun and the Earth. The problems of predicting solar event fluences, both over short- and long-term periods, are discussed. The currently available solar proton event models used for long-term forecasting are briefly reviewed, and the advantages and deficiencies of each model are investigated. Predictions using the models are compared to measurements made by the GOES-7 satellite during the rising phase of the current solar cycle. These measurements are also used to illustrate the sensitivity of the models to the choice of confidence level and to the spectral form used for extrapolation over the solar proton energy range. (author)

  5. Disruption of SLX4-MUS81 Function Increases the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Underwood, Tracy S.A.; Kung, Jong [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Meng [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Clinical proton beam therapy has been based on the use of a generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ∼1.1. However, emerging data have suggested that Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination pathway defects can lead to a variable RBE, at least in vitro. We investigated the role of SLX4 (FANCP), which acts as a docking platform for the assembly of multiple structure-specific endonucleases, in the response to proton irradiation. Methods and Materials: Isogenic cell pairs for the study of SLX4, XPF/ERCC1, MUS81, and SLX1 were irradiated at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer 2.5 keV/μm) or with 250 kVp x-rays, and the clonogenic survival fractions were determined. To estimate the RBE of the protons relative to cobalt-60 photons (Co60Eq), we assigned a RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to x-rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor the damage responses, and the cell cycle distributions were assessed by flow cytometry. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib was used for comparison. Results: Loss of SLX4 function resulted in an enhanced proton RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.42 compared with 1.11 for wild-type cells (at a survival fraction of 0.1; P<.05), which correlated with increased persistent DNA double-strand breaks in cells in the S/G{sub 2} phase. Genetic analysis identified the SLX4-binding partner MUS81 as a mediator of resistance to proton radiation. Both proton irradiation and olaparib treatment resulted in a similar prolonged accumulation of RAD51 foci in SLX4/MUS81-deficient cells, suggesting a common defect in the repair of DNA replication fork-associated damage. Conclusions: A defect in the FA pathway at the level of SLX4 results in hypersensitivity to proton radiation, which is, at least in part, due to impaired MUS81-mediated processing of replication forks that stall at clustered DNA damage. In vivo and clinical studies are needed to

  6. Correlated analysis of 2 MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe crystals using photoluminescence and thermally stimulated current techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yaxu [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Detection Materials and Devices of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Jie, Wanqi, E-mail: jwq@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Detection Materials and Devices of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Rong, Caicai [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Yuhan; Xu, Lingyan; Xu, Yadong [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Detection Materials and Devices of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Lv, Haoyan; Shen, Hao [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Du, Guanghua [Materials Research Center, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Fu, Xu [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Detection Materials and Devices of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • 2 MeV proton-induced radiation damage in CdZnTe crystals is investigated by PL and TSC techniques. • The influence of radiation damage on the luminescent and electrical properties of CdZnTe crystals is studied. • Intensity of PL spectrum is found to decrease significantly in irradiated regions, suggesting the increase of non-radiative recombination centers. • A correlated analysis of PL and TSC spectra suggests that the density of dislocations and A-centers increase after proton irradiation. - Abstract: Radiation damage induced by 2 MeV protons in CdZnTe crystals has been studied by means of photoluminescence (PL) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques. A notable quenching of PL intensity is observed in the regions irradiated with a fluence of 6 × 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2}, suggesting the increase of non-radiative recombination centers. Moreover, the intensity of emission peak D{sub complex} centered at 1.48 eV dominates in the PL spectrum obtained from irradiated regions, ascribed to the increase of interstitial dislocation loops and A centers. The intensity of TSC spectra in irradiated regions decreases compared to the virgin regions, resulting from the charge collection inefficiency caused by proton-induced recombination centers. By comparing the intensity of identified traps obtained from numerical fitting using simultaneous multiple peak analysis (SIMPA) method, it suggests that proton irradiation under such dose can introduce high density of dislocation and A-centers in CdZnTe crystals, consistent with PL results.

  7. Radiation damage to DNA: the effect of LET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J F; Milligan, J R [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    Mechanisms whereby ionizing radiation induced damage are introduced into cellular DNA are discussed. The types of lesions induced are summarized and the rationale is presented which supports the statement that radiation induced singly damaged sites are biologically unimportant. The conclusion that multiply damaged sites are critical is discussed and the mechanisms whereby such lesions are formed are presented. Structures of multiply damaged sites are summarized and problems which they present to cellular repair systems are discussed. Lastly the effects of linear energy transfer on the complexity of multiply damaged sites are surveyed and the consequences of this increased complexity are considered in terms of cell survival and mutation. (author)

  8. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole; Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui; Gheorghiu, Liliana; Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Held, Kathryn D.; Willers, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and 137 Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to 60 Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation

  9. Lung Cancer Cell Line Screen Links Fanconi Anemia/BRCA Pathway Defects to Increased Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Ghosh, Priyanjali; Magpayo, Nicole [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Testa, Mauro; Tang, Shikui [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gheorghiu, Liliana [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Biggs, Peter; Paganetti, Harald [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Division of Radiation Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Held, Kathryn D. [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Growing knowledge of genomic heterogeneity in cancer, especially when it results in altered DNA damage responses, requires re-examination of the generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1 of protons. Methods and Materials: For determination of cellular radiosensitivity, we irradiated 17 lung cancer cell lines at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm). For comparison, 250-kVp X rays and {sup 137}Cs γ-rays were used. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to {sup 60}Co (Co60eq), we assigned an RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor damage responses. FANCD2 was depleted using RNA interference. Results: Five lung cancer cell lines (29.4%) exhibited reduced clonogenic survival after proton irradiation compared with X-irradiation with the same physical doses. This was confirmed in a 3-dimensional sphere assay. Corresponding proton RBE(Co60Eq) estimates were statistically significantly different from 1.1 (P≤.05): 1.31 to 1.77 (for a survival fraction of 0.5). In 3 of these lines, increased RBE was correlated with alterations in the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway of DNA repair. In Calu-6 cells, the data pointed toward an FA pathway defect, leading to a previously unreported persistence of proton-induced RAD51 foci. The FA/BRCA-defective cells displayed a 25% increase in the size of subnuclear 53BP1 foci 18 hours after proton irradiation. Conclusions: Our cell line screen has revealed variations in proton RBE that are partly due to FA/BRCA pathway defects, suggesting that the use of a generic RBE for cancers should be revisited. We propose that functional biomarkers, such as size of residual 53BP1 foci, may be used to identify cancers with increased sensitivity to proton radiation.

  10. Behavioral effects of heavy ions and protons and potential countermeasure agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M.; Gatley, J.; Bruneus, M.; Koslosky, S.; Billups, A.

    Space travel beyond the Earth's protective magnetic field (for example, to Mars) will involve exposure of astronauts to irradiation by high-energy nuclei such as 56 Fe, which are a component of galactic cosmic rays. These particles have high linear energy transfer (LET) and are expected to irreversibly damage cells they traverse. Exposure to HZE radiation may therefore cause progressive deterioration of brain function, adding to other inescapable damage involved in normal aging. We propose a study of the hypothesis that long-term behavioral alterations are induced after exposure of the brain to 1 GeV/n iron and silicon particles with fluences of 1 to 8 particles/cell targets. Previous studies support this notion but are not definitive, especially with regard to long-term effects. Our principal goal is to examine the neurological effects of high-LET radiation on C57BL/6 mice using a series of behavioral tests to unveil the temporal expression of altered behaviors in the radiation response, as well as the means, which can modulate these responses. The studies planned in this project are designed to: 1) Characterize the behavioral consequences after exposure to low-fluences of heavy ions and protons on C57BL/6 mice. The main behavioral endpoints to be used in these studies are locomotor activity to evaluate the integrity of striatal dopaminergic pathways, and spatial reference memory to probe hippocampal cholinergic pathways. 2) Characterize the neurochemical and structural changes induced by heavy ions and protons. 3) To develop countermeasures to protect neural cell populations exposed to low fluences of heavy ions and protons. The project will test methods to protect injured neural cells based on their molecular and cellular mechanisms that may regulate neural cell survival in the central nervous system. Among the methods that will be studied is the direct administration of neuroprotective molecules as well as the modulation of apoptotic pathways by pharmacological

  11. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  12. Biological effects and application of proton beam (H+) implantation on melon seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xun; Ren Ruixing; Meng Hui; Shi Jinguo; Tang Zhangxiong; Tao Xianping

    2006-01-01

    Various doses and energy of the proton beam (H + ) were used to treat dry seeds of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Results show that, the proton beam irradiation can induced structural variations of chromosomes and abnormal behaviors during mitosis and meiosis. The percentage of cells with chromosomal aberration increased with the increment of energy and dose of the proton. The micronuclei, chromosomal bridge and chromosomal fragments were included in chromosomal aberration. The proton beam was effective in inducing mutants of early maturity. A early maturity line T 63-1-17-8-1-3 was selected from the progenies of the seeds treated with the proton beam. (authors)

  13. Heat Damaged Forages: Effects on Forage Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditionally, heat damage in forages has been associated with alterations in forage protein quality as a result of Maillard reactions, and most producers and nutritionists are familiar with this concept. However, this is not necessarily the most important negative consequence of spontaneous heating...

  14. Postbuckling Investigations of Piezoelectric Microdevices Considering Damage Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhigang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric material has been emerging as a popular building block in MEMS devices owing to its unique mechanical and electrical material properties. However, the reliability of MEMS devices under buckling deformation environments remains elusive and needs to be further explored. Based on the Talreja's tensor valued internal state damage variables as well as the Helmhotlz free energy of piezoelectric material, a constitutive model of piezoelectric materials with damage is presented. The Kachanvo damage evolution law under in-plane compressive loads is employed. The model is applied to the specific case of the postbuckling analysis of the piezoelectric plate with damage. Then, adopting von Karman's plate theory, the nonlinear governing equations of the piezoelectric plates with initial geometric deflection including damage effects under in-plane compressive loads are established. By using the finite difference method and the Newmark scheme, the damage evolution for damage accumulation is developed and the finite difference procedure for postbuckling equilibrium path is simultaneously employed. Numerical results show the postbuckling behaviors of initial flat and deflected piezoelectric plates with damage or no damage under different sets of electrical loading conditions. The effects of applied voltage, aspect ratio of plate, thick-span ratio of plate, damage as well as initial geometric deflections on the postbuckling behaviors of the piezoelectric plate are discussed. PMID:24618774

  15. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of regionally ischemic canine hearts: effects of paramagnetic proton signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, T.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Pykett, I.L.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Newhouse, J.H.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Pohost, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the potential of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging with and without manganese contrast enhancement for detecting acute myocardial infarction, 12 dogs underwent 90-minute occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. Transverse-section NMR images of the excised, nonbeating heart were obtained at 1-cm intervals using the steady-state-free-precession (SSFP) technique. All NMR images revealed detailed structure of the heart. The three hearts without manganese showed no difference in intensity between the normal and the ischemic posterior regions, whereas those with manganese demonstrated a clearly demarcated zone of reduced signal intensity consistent with the ischemic zone. It is concluded that high-resolution tomograms of the excised canine myocardium can be obtained using proton NMR imaging. With the SSFP imaging technique, proton signal enhancement with manganese infusion is necessary to differentiate between ischemic and nonischemic myocardium after 90 minutes of coronary occlusion

  16. Effect of artemether on rat hepatocytes during acute damage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chief OGBUZULU F

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... could have regenerative effect on acute liver damage. Oguntibeju et al. .... the synthesis of the alkaline phosphatase in the tissues ... This sug- gests that artemether may have a possible repair effect ... human biology. Talwar ...

  17. Radiation damage effect on avalanche photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Baccaro, S; Cavallari, F; Da Ponte, V; Deiters, K; Denes, P; Diemoz, M; Kirn, Th; Lintern, A L; Longo, E; Montecchi, M; Musienko, Y; Pansart, J P; Renker, D; Reucroft, S; Rosi, G; Rusack, R; Ruuska, D; Stephenson, R; Torbet, M J

    1999-01-01

    Avalanche Photodiodes have been chosen as photon sensors for the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS experiment at the LHC. These sensors should operate in the 4T magnetic field of the experiment. Because of the high neutron radiation in the detector extensive studies have been done by the CMS collaboration on the APD neutron radiation damage. The characteristics of these devices after irradiation have been analized, with particular attention to the quantum efficiency and the dark current. The recovery of the radiation induced dark current has been studied carefully at room temperature and at slightly lower and higher temperatures. The temperature dependence of the defects decay-time has been evaluated.

  18. Nonlinear resonance islands and modulational effects in a proton synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors examine one-dimensional and two-dimensional nonlinear resonance islands created in the transverse phase space of a proton synchrotron by nonlinear magnets. The authors examine application of the theoretical framework constructed to the phenomenon of modulational diffusion in a collider model of the Fermilab Tevatron. For the one-dimensional resonance island system, the authors examine the effects of two types of modulational perturbations on the stability of these resonance islands: Tune modulation and beta function modulation. Hamiltonian models are presented which predict stability boundaries that depend on only three parameters: The strength and frequency of the modulation and the frequency of small oscillations inside the resonance island. The tune modulation model is successfully tested in experiment, where frequency domain analysis coupled with tune modulation is demonstrated to be useful in measuring the strength of a nonlinear resonance. Nonlinear resonance islands are examined in two transverse dimensions in the presence of coupling and linearly independent crossing resonances. The authors present a first-order Hamiltonian model which predicts fixed point locations, but does not reproduce small oscillation frequencies seen in tracking. Particle tracking is presented which shows evidence of two-dimensional persistent signals, and the authors make suggestions on methods for observing such signals in future experiment. The authors apply the tune modulation stability diagram to the explicitly two-dimensional phenomenon of modulational diffusion in the Fermilab Tevatron with beam-beam kicks as the source of nonlinearity. The amplitude growth created by this mechanism in simulation is exponential rather than root-time as predicted by modulational diffusion models. The authors comment upon the luminosity and lifetime limitations such a mechanism implies in a proton storage ring

  19. Nonlocal effects on dynamic damage accumulation in brittle solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a nonlocal analysis of the dynamic damage accumulation processes in brittle solids. A nonlocal formulation of a microcrack based continuum damage model is developed and implemented into a transient dynamic finite element computer code. The code is then applied to the study of the damage accumulation process in a concrete plate with a central hole and subjected to the action of a step tensile pulse applied at opposite edges of the plate. Several finite element discretizations are used to examine the mesh size effect. Comparisons between calculated results based on local and nonlocal formulations are made and nonlocal effects are discussed.

  20. DFT study on the effect of exocyclic substituents on the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haining; Bara, Jason E.; Turner, C. Heath

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • DFT calculations are used to predict the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazoles. • The electron-withdrawing groups dominate the predicted proton affinity. • The effects of multiple substituents on the proton affinity can be accurately predicted. • Large compound libraries can be screened for imidazoles with tailored reactivity. - Abstract: A deeper understanding of the acid/base properties of imidazole derivatives will aid the development of solvents, polymer membranes and other materials that can be used for CO 2 capture and acid gas removal. In this study, we employ density functional theory calculations to investigate the effect of various electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups on the proton affinity of 1-methylimidazole. We find that electron-donating groups are able to increase the proton affinity relative to 1-methylimidazole, i.e., making the molecule more basic. In contrast, electron-withdrawing groups cause a decrease of the proton affinity. When multiple substituents are present, their effects on the proton affinity were found to be additive. This finding offers a quick approach for predicting and targeting the proton affinities of this series of molecules, and we show the strong correlation between the calculated proton affinities and experimental pK a values

  1. Effect of 200 keV proton irradiation on the properties of methyl silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lixin; Xu Zhou; Wei Qiang; He Shiyu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of 200 keV proton irradiation on methyl silicone rubber were studied. The changes in surface morphology, mechanical properties, cross-linking density, glass transition temperature, infrared attenuated total reflection spectrum and mass spectrum indicated that, at lower fluence, the proton irradiation induced cross-linking, resulting in an increase in tensile strength and hardness of the methyl silicone rubber. However, at higher proton fluence, radiation-induced degradation, which decreased the tensile strength and hardness, became dominant. A macromolecular-network destruction model for silicone rubber irradiated with protons was proposed

  2. Angle-averaged effective proton-carbon analyzing powers at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir-Ahmadi, H.R.; Berg, A.M. van den; Hunyadi, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Woertche, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The angle-averaged effective analyzing powers, A-bar c , for proton-carbon inclusive scattering were measured as a function of the kinetic energy of protons in a double scattering experiment. The measurements were performed in the kinetic energy range of 44.8-136.5MeV at the center of 1-5cm thick graphite analyzers using a polarized proton beam on a CH 2 film or liquid hydrogen serving as target for the primary scattering. These data can be used for measuring the polarization of protons emerging from other reactions such as H(d-bar ,p-bar )d

  3. Protective effects of vitamin C against gamma-ray induced wholly damage and genetic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Chunling; Jiang Weiwei; Zhang Ping; Chen Xiang; Zhu Shengtao

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Protective effects of supplemental vitamin C against 60 Co-gamma-ray induced wholly damage and genetic damage was investigated in mice. Method: Mice were divided into normal control group, irradiation control group and vitamin C experimental group 1,2,3 (which were orally given vitamin C 15, 30, 45 mg/kg.bw for 10 successive days respectively prior to gamma-ray irradiation). Micronuclei in the bone marrow polychromatophilic erythrocytes in each group of mice were examined and the 30 day survival rate of mice following whole-body 5.0 Gy γ irradiation were also determined. Results: Supplemental vitamin C prior to gamma-rays irradiation can significantly decrease bone marrow PECMN rate of mice and increase 30 day survival rate and prolong average survival time. The protection factor is 2.09. Conclusion: Vitamin C has potent protective effects against gamma irradiation induced damage in mice. In certain dose range, vitamin C can absolutely suppress the gamma-rays induced genetic damage in vivo

  4. Effect of site conditions on ground motion and damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R.; Glassmoyer, G.; Andrews, M.; Cranswick, E.

    1989-01-01

    Results of seismologic studies conducted by the U.S. reconnaissance team in conjunction with Soviet colleagues following the tragic earthquakes of December 7, 1988, suggest that site conditions may have been a major factor in contributing to increased damage levels in Leninakan. As the potential severity of these effects in Leninakan had not been previously identified, this chapter presents results intended to provide a preliminary quantification of these effects on both damage and levels of ground motion observed in Leninakan. The article describes the damage distribution geologic setting, ground motion amplification in Leninakan, including analog amplifications and spectral amplifications. Preliminary model estimates for site response are presented. It is concluded that ground motion amplification in the 0.5-2.5-second period range was a major contributing factor to increased damage in Leninakan as compared with Kirovakan. Leninakan is located on thick water saturated alluvial deposits.

  5. Femtoscopy and energy-momentum conservation effects in proton-proton collisions at 900 GeV in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Two particle correlations are used to extract information about the characteristic size of the system for proton-proton collisions at 900 GeV measured by the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider experiment) detector at CERN. The correlation functions obtained show the expected Bose-Einstein effect for identical particles, but there are also long range correlations present that shift the baseline from the expected flat behavior. A possible source of these correlations is the conservation of energy and momentum, especially for small systems, where the energy available for particle production is limited. A new technique, first introduced by the STAR collaboration, of quantifying these long range correlations using energy-momentum conservation considerations is presented here. It is shown that the baseline of the two particle correlation function can be described using this technique.

  6. Multicomponent Density Functional Theory: Impact of Nuclear Quantum Effects on Proton Affinities and Geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsen, Kurt R; Yang, Yang; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2017-08-03

    Nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy play a critical role in computational chemistry and often are included as energetic corrections following geometry optimizations. The nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) multicomponent density functional theory (DFT) method treats select nuclei, typically protons, quantum mechanically on the same level as the electrons. Electron-proton correlation is highly significant, and inadequate treatments lead to highly overlocalized nuclear densities. A recently developed electron-proton correlation functional, epc17, has been shown to provide accurate nuclear densities for molecular systems. Herein, the NEO-DFT/epc17 method is used to compute the proton affinities for a set of molecules and to examine the role of nuclear quantum effects on the equilibrium geometry of FHF - . The agreement of the computed results with experimental and benchmark values demonstrates the promise of this approach for including nuclear quantum effects in calculations of proton affinities, pK a 's, optimized geometries, and reaction paths.

  7. The donut and dynamic polarization effects in proton channeling through carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borka, D; Petrovic, S; Neskovic, N; Mowbray, D J; Miskovic, Z L

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the angular and spatial distributions of protons with an energy of 0.223 MeV after channeling them through an (11, 9) single-wall carbon nanotube of 0.2 μm length. The proton incident angle is varied between 0 and 10 mrad, being close to the critical angle for channeling. We show that, as the proton incident angle increases and approaches the critical angle for channeling, a ring-like structure is developed in the angular distribution-the donut effect. We demonstrate that it is the rainbow effect. If the proton incident angle is between zero and half of the critical angle for channeling, the image force affects considerably the number and positions of the maxima of the angular and spatial distributions. However, if the proton incident angle is close to the critical angle for channeling, its influence on the angular and spatial distributions is considerably decreased. We demonstrate that an increase of the proton incident angle can lead to a significant rearrangement of the propagating protons within the nanotube. This effect may be used to locate atomic impurities in nanotubes as well as for creating nanosized proton beams to be used in materials science, biology and medicine.

  8. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-11-21

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  9. Nonadiabatic rate constants for proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions in solution: Effects of quadratic term in the vibronic coupling expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Rate constant expressions for vibronically nonadiabatic proton transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions are presented and analyzed. The regimes covered include electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactions, as well as high-frequency and low-frequency proton donor-acceptor vibrational modes. These rate constants differ from previous rate constants derived with the cumulant expansion approach in that the logarithmic expansion of the vibronic coupling in terms of the proton donor-acceptor distance includes a quadratic as well as a linear term. The analysis illustrates that inclusion of this quadratic term in the framework of the cumulant expansion framework may significantly impact the rate constants at high temperatures for proton transfer interfaces with soft proton donor-acceptor modes that are associated with small force constants and weak hydrogen bonds. The effects of the quadratic term may also become significant in these regimes when using the vibronic coupling expansion in conjunction with a thermal averaging procedure for calculating the rate constant. In this case, however, the expansion of the coupling can be avoided entirely by calculating the couplings explicitly for the range of proton donor-acceptor distances sampled. The effects of the quadratic term for weak hydrogen-bonding systems are less significant for more physically realistic models that prevent the sampling of unphysical short proton donor-acceptor distances. Additionally, the rigorous relation between the cumulant expansion and thermal averaging approaches is clarified. In particular, the cumulant expansion rate constant includes effects from dynamical interference between the proton donor-acceptor and solvent motions and becomes equivalent to the thermally averaged rate constant when these dynamical effects are neglected. This analysis identifies the regimes in which each rate constant expression is valid and thus will be important for future applications to proton

  10. Effects of fotemustine or dacarbasine on a melanoma cell line pretreated with therapeutic proton irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Privitera Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering that HTB140 melanoma cells have shown a poor response to either protons or alkylating agents, the effects of a combined use of these agents have been analysed. Methods Cells were irradiated in the middle of the therapeutic 62 MeV proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP. Irradiation doses were 12 or 16 Gy and are those frequently used in proton therapy. Four days after irradiation cells were treated with fotemustine (FM or dacarbazine (DTIC. Drug concentrations were 100 and 250 μM, values close to those that produce 50% of growth inhibition. Cell viability, proliferation, survival and cell cycle distribution were assessed 7 days after irradiation that corresponds to more than six doubling times of HTB140 cells. In this way incubation periods providing the best single effects of drugs (3 days and protons (7 days coincided at the same time. Results Single proton irradiations have reduced the number of cells to ~50%. FM caused stronger cell inactivation due to its high toxicity, while the effectiveness of DTIC, that was important at short term, almost vanished with the incubation of 7 days. Cellular mechanisms triggered by proton irradiation differently influenced the final effects of combined treatments. Combination of protons and FM did not improve cell inactivation level achieved by single treatments. A low efficiency of the single DTIC treatment was overcome when DTIC was introduced following proton irradiation, giving better inhibitory effects with respect to the single treatments. Most of the analysed cells were in G1/S phase, viable, active and able to replicate DNA. Conclusion The obtained results are the consequence of a high resistance of HTB140 melanoma cells to protons and/or drugs. The inactivation level of the HTB140 human melanoma cells after protons, FM or DTIC treatments was not enhanced by their combined application.

  11. Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienitz, Brian; Yamada, Haruhiko; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Weber, Adam

    2009-11-19

    It is well known that the proton-exchange membrane is perhaps the most critical component of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. Typical membranes, such as Nafion(R), require hydration to conduct efficiently and are instrumental in cell water management. Recently, evidence has been shown that these membranes might have different interfacial morphology and transport properties than in the bulk. In this paper, experimental data combined with theoretical simulations will be presented that explore the existence and impact of interfacial resistance on water transport for Nafion(R) 21x membranes. A mass-transfer coefficient for the interfacial resistance is calculated from experimental data using different permeation cells. This coefficient is shown to depend exponentially on relative humidity or water activity. The interfacial resistance does not seem to exist for liquid/membrane or membrane/membrane interfaces. The effect of the interfacial resistance is to flatten the water-content profiles within the membrane during operation. Under typical operating conditions, the resistance is on par with the water-transport resistance of the bulk membrane. Thus, the interfacial resistance can be dominant especially in thin, dry membranes and can affect overall fuel-cell performance.

  12. Nonlinear Resonance Islands and Modulational Effects in a Proton Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata, Todd Jeffrey [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    We examine both one-dimensional and two-dimensional nonlinear resonance islands created in the transverse phase space of a proton synchrotron by nonlinear magnets. We also examine application of the theoretical framework constructed to the phenomenon of modulational diffusion in a collider model of the Fermilab Tevatron. For the one-dimensional resonance island system, we examine the effects of two types of modulational perturbations on the stability of these resonance islands: tune modulation and beta function modulation. Hamiltonian models are presented which predict stability boundaries that depend on only three paramders: the strength and frequency of the modulation and the frequency of small oscillations inside the resonance island. These. models are compared to particle tracking with excellent agreement. The tune modulation model is also successfully tested in experiment, where frequency domain analysis coupled with tune modulation is demonstrated to be useful in measuring the strength of a nonlinear resonance. Nonlinear resonance islands are also examined in two transverse dimensions in the presence of coupling and linearly independent crossing resonances. We present a first-order Hamiltonian model which predicts fixed point locations, but does not reproduce small oscillation frequencies seen in tracking; therefore in this circumstance such a model is inadequate. Particle tracking is presented which shows evidence of two-dimensional persistent signals, and we make suggestions on methods for observing such signals in future experiment.

  13. Hall effect measurements on proton-irradiated ROSE samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggeri, U.; Bruzzi, M.; Borchi, E.

    1997-01-01

    Bulk samples obtained from two wafers of a silicon monocrystal material produced by Float-Zone refinement have been analyzed using the four-point probe method. One of the wafers comes from an oxygenated ingot; two sets of pure and oxygenated samples have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c protons in the fluence range from 10 13 p/cm 2 to 2x10 14 p/cm 2 . Van der Pauw resistivity and Hall coefficient have been measured before and after irradiation as a function of the temperature. A thermal treatment (30 minutes at 100C) has been performed to accelerate the reverse annealing effect in the irradiated silicon. The irradiated samples show the same exponential dependence of the resistivity and of the Hall coefficient on the temperature from 370K to 100K, corresponding to the presence of radiation-induced deep energy levels around 0.6-0.7eV in the silicon gap. The free carrier concentrations (n, p) have been evaluated in the investigated fluence range. The inversion of the conductivity type from n to p occurred respectively at 7x10 13 p/cm 2 and at 4x10 13 p/cm 2 before and after the annealing treatment, for both the two sets. Only slight differences have been detected between the pure and oxygenated samples

  14. The donut and dynamic polarization effects in proton channeling through carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borka, D.; Mowbray, Duncan; Miskovic, Z.L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the angular and spatial distributions of protons with an energy of 0.223 MeV after channeling them through an (11, 9) single-wall carbon nanotube of 0.2 mu m length. The proton incident angle is varied between 0 and 10 mrad, being close to the critical angle for channeling. We show...... that, as the proton incident angle increases and approaches the critical angle for channeling, a ring-like structure is developed in the angular distribution-the donut effect. We demonstrate that it is the rainbow effect. If the proton incident angle is between zero and half of the critical angle...... for channeling, the image force affects considerably the number and positions of the maxima of the angular and spatial distributions. However, if the proton incident angle is close to the critical angle for channeling, its influence on the angular and spatial distributions is considerably decreased. We...

  15. Particle-number fluctuations and neutron-proton pairing effects on proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douici, M.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria) and Institut des Sciences et Technologie, Centre Universitaire de Khemis Miliana, Route de Theniet-El-Had, 44225 Khemis-Milia (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria) and Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, COMENA, BP399 Alger-Gare, Alger (Algeria); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB BP 32 El-Alia, 16111 Bab-Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria)

    2012-10-20

    The particle-number fluctuation effect on the root-mean-square (rms) proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei is studied in the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing case using an exact particle-number projection method and the Woods-Saxon model.

  16. Experimental evaluation of the primary damage process: neutron energy effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goland, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the neutron energy dependnece of the primary damage stage depends upon a number of theoretical concepts. This state can only be observed after low- or perhaps ambient-temperature, low-fluence irradiations. The primary recoil energy spectrum, which determines the character of the displacement cascades, can be calculated if dosimetry has provided an accurate neutron spectrum. A review of experimental results relating neutron-energy effects shows that damage energy or damage energy cross section has often been a reliable correlation parameter for primary damage state experiments. However, the forthcoming emphasis on higher irradiation temperatures, more complex alloys and microstructural evolution has fostered a search for additional meaningful correlation parameters.

  17. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    We combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of Silicon. We obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, we study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates.

  18. Dose rate effects during damage accumulation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    The authors combine molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to study damage accumulation and dose rate effects during irradiation of silicon. They obtain the initial stage of the damage produced by heavy and light ions using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While heavy ions like As or Pt induce amorphization by single ion impact, light ions like B only produce point defects or small clusters of defects. The amorphous pockets generated by heavy ions are stable below room temperature and recrystallize at temperatures below the threshold for recrystallization of a planar amorphous-crystalline interface. The damage accumulation during light ion irradiation is simulated using a Monte Carlo model for defect diffusion. In this approach, the authors study the damage in the lattice as a function of dose and dose rate. A strong reduction in the total number of defects left in the lattice is observed for lower dose rates

  19. Relative Biological Effectiveness and Peripheral Damage of Antiproton Annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    Kavanagh, J N; Kaiser, F; Tegami, S; Schettino, G; Kovacevic, S; Hajdukovic, D; Knudsen, H; Currell, F J; Toelli, H T; Doser, M; Holzscheiter, M; Herrmann, R; Timson, D J; Alsner, J; Landua, R; Comor, J; Moller, S P; Beyer, G

    2002-01-01

    The use of ions to deliver radiation to a body for therapeutic purposes has the potential to be significant improvement over the use of low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation because of the improved energy deposition profile and the enhanced biological effects of ions relative to photons. Proton therapy centers exist and are being used to treat patients. In addition, the initial use of heavy ions such as carbon is promising to the point that new treatment facilities are planned. Just as with protons or heavy ions, antiprotons can be used to deliver radiation to the body in a controlled way; however antiprotons will exhibit additional energy deposition due to annihilation of the antiprotons within the body. The slowing down of antiprotons in matter is similar to that of protons except at the very end of the range beyond the Bragg peak. Gray and Kalogeropoulos estimated the additional energy deposited by heavy nuclear fragments within a few millimeters of the annihilation vertex to be approximately 30 MeV (...

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cochlear dose reduction by proton beam therapy for medulloblastoma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Emi; Kawabuchi, Koichi; Fuji, Hiroshi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Kumar, Vinay; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of proton beam therapy with cochlear dose reduction compared with conventional X-ray radiotherapy for medulloblastoma in childhood. We developed a Markov model to describe health states of 6-year-old children with medulloblastoma after treatment with proton or X-ray radiotherapy. The risks of hearing loss were calculated on cochlear dose for each treatment. Three types of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of EQ-5D, HUI3 and SF-6D were used for estimation of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for proton beam therapy compared with X-ray radiotherapy was calculated for each HRQOL. Sensitivity analyses were performed to model uncertainty in these parameters. The ICER for EQ-5D, HUI3 and SF-6D were $21 716/QALY, $11 773/QALY, and $20 150/QALY, respectively. One-way sensitivity analyses found that the results were sensitive to discount rate, the risk of hearing loss after proton therapy, and costs of proton irradiation. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis revealed a 99% probability of proton therapy being cost effective at a societal willingness-to-pay value. Proton beam therapy with cochlear dose reduction improves health outcomes at a cost that is within the acceptable cost-effectiveness range from the payer's standpoint. (author)

  1. Enhanced relative biological effectiveness of proton radiotherapy in tumor cells with internalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Gillin, Michael; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2011-01-01

    The development and use of sensitizing agents to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy have long been sought to improve our ability to treat cancer. In this letter, we have studied the relative biological effectiveness of proton beam radiotherapy on prostate tumor cells with and without internalized gold nanoparticles. The effectiveness of proton radiotherapy for the killing of prostate tumor cells was increased by approximately 15%-20% for those cells containing internalized gold nanoparticles.

  2. Enhanced relative biological effectiveness of proton radiotherapy in tumor cells with internalized gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Gillin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The development and use of sensitizing agents to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy have long been sought to improve our ability to treat cancer. In this letter, we have studied the relative biological effectiveness of proton beam radiotherapy on prostate tumor cells with and without internalized gold nanoparticles. The effectiveness of proton radiotherapy for the killing of prostate tumor cells was increased by approximately 15%–20% for those cells containing internalized gold nanoparticles. PMID:21915155

  3. Investigation of high-energy-proton effects in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Todosow, M.

    1997-01-01

    Specimens of 1100 aluminum were exposed to several fluences of 23.5-GeV protons at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Although this energy is above those currently being proposed for spallation-neutron applications, the results can be viewed as indicative of trends and other microstructural evolution with fluence that take place with high-energy proton exposures such as those associated with an increasing ratio of gas generation to dpa. TEM investigation showed significantly larger bubble size and lower density of bubbles compared with lower-energy proton results. Additional testing showed that the tensile strength increased with fluence as expected, but the microhardness decreased, a result for which an intepretation is still under investigation

  4. The proton transfer reaction in malonaldehyde derivatives: Substituent effects and quasi-aromaticity of the proton bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palusiak, Marcin; Simon, Silvia; Sola, Miquel

    2007-01-01

    The proton transfer in malonaldehyde and in some of its derivatives have been considered in order to study the interrelation between the reaction barrier and the π-delocalization in the quasi-ring. A set of simple and mostly common substituents having different properties in resonance effect according to values of substituents constants were chosen in order to simulate the influence of substitution in position 2 or in position 1 (or 3) of malonaldehyde on the quasi-aromaticity and H-bonding. The following substituents have been taken into consideration: NO, NO 2 , CN, CHO, F, H, CH 3 , OCH 3 , OH, and NH 2 . Our results show that when the substituent is attached at position 2 of the quasi-ring, the resonance effect predominates over the field/inductive effect which leads to changes in H-bonding and quasi-aromaticity of the ring motif, while in the case of 1(3) substitution the field/inductive effect is significantly more effective influencing the HB strength, and thus, the proton transfer barrier. Somehow counterintuitively, for the 1(3) substituted systems, the most stable isomer is the one having the weakest HB and lower aromaticity. The reason for this surprising behaviour is discussed

  5. Effects of proton irradiation on electronic structure of NdFeB permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhen, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)], E-mail: lzhen@hit.edu.cn; Xu, C.Y.; Sun, X.Y.; Shao, W.Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Effects of proton irradiation on electronic structure and atomic local structure of N35EH-type NdFeB permanent magnet were investigated by soft X-ray absorption spectrometry and Moessbauer spectrometry. The local coordination environment of Fe atoms changes after proton irradiation, and the average hyperfine field H{sub in} of the magnets decreases from 288.4 to 286.9 kOe. The effects of irradiation on Fe atoms local environment at different lattice sites are different. The near edge structure of Fe L{sub 3} edge is changed, indicating the density of unoccupied state of Fe 3d electrons increases after proton irradiation.

  6. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benko', Klara; Pintye, Eva; Szabo, Boglarka; Geresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benko, Ilona

    2008-01-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ--irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD 50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  7. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  8. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  9. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  10. Proton therapy of cancer: Potential clinical advantages and cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundkvist, Jonas; Ekman, Mattias; Rehn Ericsson, Suzanne; Glimelius, Bengt; Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala

    2005-01-01

    Proton therapy may offer potential clinical advantages compared with conventional radiation therapy for many cancer patients. Due to the large investment costs for building a proton therapy facility, however, the treatment cost with proton radiation is higher than with conventional radiation. It is therefore important to evaluate whether the medical benefits of proton therapy are large enough to motivate the higher costs. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of proton therapy in the treatment of four different cancers: left-sided breast cancer, prostate cancer, head and neck cancer, and childhood medulloblastoma. A Markov cohort simulation model was created for each cancer type and used to simulate the life of patients treated with radiation. Cost and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) were used as primary outcome measures. The results indicated that proton therapy was cost-effective if appropriate risk groups were chosen. The average cost per QALY gained for the four types of cancer assessed was about Euro 10,130. If the value of a QALY was set to Euro 55,000, the total yearly net benefit of treating 925 cancer patients with the four types of cancer was about Euro 20.8 million. Investment in a proton facility may thus be cost-effective. The results must be interpreted with caution, since there is a lack of data, and consequently large uncertainties in the assumptions used

  11. Proton microbeam irradiation effects on PtBA polymer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    deposition, which fills the resist mold with metal, then ... and metal nanoparticles on a polymer follow the 'bottom- up' approach ... In order to understand the growth of semiconductor particles .... film (e.g. 2 MeV proton penetrates 62 µm into PMMA).

  12. Atomic effects of electrons and protons at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippler, R.

    1985-01-01

    Some aspects of electronic and atomic collisions are discussed. Impact ionization by electrons and protons, and electron bremsstrahlung processes are considered in some detail. Emphasis is also given to (uncorrelated and correlated) many-electron processes, which are of particular importance in collisions of highly-charged ions with atoms. 84 refs., 15 figs

  13. Effect of phosphorus limiting on phytase activity, proton efflux and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work intended to measure the nodulated-roots oxygen consumption, proton efflux and phytase activity in 2 lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) (115, 147) at 2 levels of P supply. Rooted seedlings were inoculated with Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 in hydroaeroponic cultivation under glasshouse. Phosphorus was ...

  14. Numerical study of assembly pressure effect on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taymaz, Imdat; Benli, Merthan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sakarya, 54187 Adapazari (Turkey)

    2010-05-15

    The performance of the fuel cell is affected by many parameters. One of these parameters is assembly pressure that changes the mechanical properties and dimensions of the fuel cell components. Its first duty, however, is to prevent gas or liquid leakage from the cell and it is important for the contact behaviors of fuel cell components. Some leakage and contact problems can occur on the low assembly pressures whereas at high pressures, components of the fuel cell, such as bipolar plates (BPP), gas diffusion layers (GDL), catalyst layers, and membranes, can be damaged. A finite element analysis (FEA) model is developed to predict the deformation effect of assembly pressure on the single channel PEM fuel cell in this study. Deformed fuel cell single channel model is imported to three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model which is developed for simulating proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Using this model, the effect of assembly pressure on fuel cell performance can be calculated. It is found that, when the assembly pressure increases, contact resistance, porosity and thickness of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) decreases. Too much assembly pressure causes GDL to destroy; therefore, the optimal assembly pressure is significant to obtain the highest performance from fuel cell. By using the results of this study, optimum fuel cell design and operating condition parameters can be predicted accordingly. (author)

  15. TLD-100 glow-curve deconvolution for the evaluation of the thermal stress and radiation damage effects

    CERN Document Server

    Sabini, M G; Cuttone, G; Guasti, A; Mazzocchi, S; Raffaele, L

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the dose response of TLD-100 dosimeters has been studied in a 62 MeV clinical proton beams. The signal versus dose curve has been compared with the one measured in a sup 6 sup 0 Co beam. Different experiments have been performed in order to observe the thermal stress and the radiation damage effects on the detector sensitivity. A LET dependence of the TL response has been observed. In order to get a physical interpretation of these effects, a computerised glow-curve deconvolution has been employed. The results of all the performed experiments and deconvolutions are extensively reported, and the TLD-100 possible fields of application in the clinical proton dosimetry are discussed.

  16. Effect of Temperature on the Protonation of the TALSPEAK Ligands: Lactic and Diethylenetrinitropentaacetic Acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-01-01

    The protonation reactions of two ligands that play important roles in the TALSPEAK process for the separation of trivalent actinides from lanthanides, lactic acid and diethylenetrinitropentaacetic acid (DTPA), have been studied at variable temperatures. The protonation constants at 10-70 C were determined by titration potentiometry and the protonation enthalpies were determined at 25 C by titration microcalorimetry. The protonation constants remain essentially unchanged (25-70 C) within the experimental uncertainties, indicating that the effect of temperature on the protonation of lactate is insignificant. In contrast, the protonation constants of DTPA (log βH's) generally decrease as the temperature is increased. Results from this study indicate that the effect of temperature on the protonation of DTPA could alter the speciation of metal ions (actinides and lanthanides) in the TALSPEAK system, since lower values of logβH at higher temperatures suggest that the hydrogen ions would compete less strongly with the metal ions for the complexation of DTPA at higher temperatures.

  17. Effects of target plasma electron-electron collisions on correlated motion of fragmented H2+ protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to examined the effects of plasma target electron-electron collisions on H 2 + protons traversing it. Specifically, the target is deuterium in a plasma state with temperature T e =10 eV and density n=10 23 cm -3 , and proton velocities are v p =v th , v p =2v th , and v p =3v th , where v th is the electron thermal velocity of the target plasma. Proton interactions with plasma electrons are treated by means of the dielectric formalism. The interactions among close protons through plasma electronic medium are called vicinage forces. It is checked that these forces always screen the Coulomb explosions of the two fragmented protons from the same H 2 + ion decreasing their relative distance. They also align the interproton vector along the motion direction, and increase the energy loss of the two protons at early dwell times while for longer times the energy loss tends to the value of two isolated protons. Nevertheless, vicinage forces and effects are modified by the target electron collisions. These collisions enhance the calculated self-stopping and vicinage forces over the collisionless results. Regarding proton correlated motion, when these collisions are included, the interproton vector along the motion direction overaligns at slower proton velocities (v p =v th ) and misaligns for faster ones (v p =2v th , v p =3v th ). They also contribute to a great extend to increase the energy loss of the fragmented H 2 + ion. This later effect is more significant in reducing projectile velocity

  18. Clustered DNA damage on subcellular level: effect of scavengers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Sihver, L.; Yasuda, N.; Matuo, Y.; Štěpán, Václav; Davídková, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2014), s. 705-712 ISSN 0301-634X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12008 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : clustered damage * indirect effects * haevy ion * plasmid in liquid water * scavenger Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.528, year: 2014

  19. Heat damaged forages: effects on forage energy content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditionally, educational materials describing the effects of heat damage within baled hays have focused on reduced bioavailability of crude protein as a result of Maillard reactions. These reactions are not simple, but actually occur in complex, multi-step pathways. Typically, the initial step inv...

  20. Radiation damage and defect behavior in proton irradiated lithium-counterdoped n/sup +/p silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupica, J.; Goradia, C.; Swartz, C.K.; Weinberg, I.

    1987-01-01

    Two lithium-counterdoped n/sup +/p silicon solar cells with different lithium concentrations were irradiated by 10 MeV protons. Cell performance was measured as a function of fluence, and it was found that the cell with the highest concentration of lithium had the higher radiation resistance. Deep level defects were studied using deep level transient spectroscopy which yielded two defects that were lithium related. Relating the defect energy levels obtained from this study under 10 MeV protons, with an earlier work using 1 MeV electron irradiations shows no correlation of the defect energy levels. There is one marked comparison though. The absence of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. This consistency strengthens the belief that lithium interacts with oxygen to prevent the formation of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. The present results indicate that, in general, addition of lithium in small amounts to the p-base of a boron doped silicon solar cell such that the base remains p-type, tends to increase the radiation resistance of the cell

  1. Point defect induced degradation of electrical properties of Ga2O3 by 10 MeV proton damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, A. Y.; Smirnov, N. B.; Shchemerov, I. V.; Yakimov, E. B.; Yang, Jiancheng; Ren, F.; Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Jihyun; Kuramata, A.; Pearton, S. J.

    2018-01-01

    Deep electron and hole traps in 10 MeV proton irradiated high-quality β-Ga2O3 films grown by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE) on bulk β-Ga2O3 substrates were measured by deep level transient spectroscopy with electrical and optical injection, capacitance-voltage profiling in the dark and under monochromatic irradiation, and also electron beam induced current. Proton irradiation caused the diffusion length of charge carriers to decrease from 350-380 μm in unirradiated samples to 190 μm for a fluence of 1014 cm-2, and this was correlated with an increase in density of hole traps with optical ionization threshold energy near 2.3 eV. These defects most likely determine the recombination lifetime in HVPE β-Ga2O3 epilayers. Electron traps at Ec-0.75 eV and Ec-1.2 eV present in as-grown samples increase in the concentration after irradiation and suggest that these centers involve native point defects.

  2. Study of Cluster-size Effect on Damage Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Nakai, Atsuko; Matsuo, Jiro; Takaoka, Gikan

    2003-01-01

    Computer simulation and experiments were performed in order to understand the effect of cluster size on damage formation. Results of molecular dynamics simulations of cluster impact on solid targets derived the model function, which explains the relationship among cluster size, incident energy and number of displacements. On the other hand, time of flight mass measurement system was installed a cluster irradiation system, so that cluster ion beam which cluster size distribution is well known can be irradiated on the target. The damage properties under various cluster irradiation conditions were examined using RBS. The results from computer simulations and experiments showed good agreements with each other, which suggests that irradiation damage by cluster ion beam can be controlled by selecting cluster size distribution and incident energy

  3. Investigation of radiation damage effects in neutron irradiated CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, James E.; Igonkina, Olga; Potter, Chris T.; Sinev, Nikolai B.

    2005-01-01

    A Charge Coupled Devices (CCD)-based vertex detector is a leading option for vertex detection at the future linear collider. A major issue for this application is the radiation hardness of such devices. Tests of radiation hardness of CCDs used in the SLD vertex detector, VXD3, have been reported earlier. The first measurements of 1998 involved a spare VXD3 CCD that was irradiated with neutrons from a radioactive source (Pu-Be), and from a nuclear reactor. In 2003, we had the opportunity to disassemble the VXD3 detector and study the nature of the radiation damage it incurred during 3 years of operation at SLC. In the preparation for this study, additional experiments with the spare VXD3 CCD were performed. These included measurements of trapping times in neutron irradiated CCDs. Results, reported here, will help us better understand the mechanism of radiation damage effects and develop techniques to minimize performance degradation due to radiation damage

  4. The effect of electromagnetic interactions on the proton spectrum in free neutron β-decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunatyan, G.G.

    2000-01-01

    In the β decay of an unpolarized free neutron, the effect of electromagnetic interactions on the proton recoil spectrum is studied in the light of the experiments which are carried out and planned for now. The corrections to the energy distribution of protons prove to amount to the value of a few per cent. Nowadays, this is substantial for obtaining with a high accuracy, of ∼ 1% or better, the characteristics of weak interactions by processing the data of the experiments on the proton distribution in the free neutron β-decay

  5. Radiation effects for high-energy protons and X-ray in integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, M.A.G.; Santos, R.B.B. [Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil); Medina, N.H.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Lima, J.A. de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Cirne, K.H. [Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Electronic circuits are strongly influenced by ionizing radiation. The necessity to develop integrated circuits (IC's) featuring radiation hardness is largely growing to meet the stringent environment in space electronics [1]. This work aims to development a test platform to qualify electronic devices under the influence of high radiation dose, for aerospace applications. To understand the physical phenomena responsible for changes in devices exposed to ionizing radiation several kinds of radiation should then be considered, among them heavy ions, alpha particles, protons, gamma and X-rays. Radiation effects on the ICs are usually divided into three categories: Total Ionizing Dose (TID), a cumulative dose that shifts the threshold voltage and increases transistor's off-state current; Single Events Effects (SEE), a transient effect which can deposit charge directly into the device and disturb the properties of electronic circuits and Displacement Damage (DD) which can change the arrangement of the atoms in the lattice [2]. In this study we are investigating the radiation effects in rectangular-gate and circular-gate MOSFETs, manufactured with standard CMOS fabrication process, using particle beams produced in electrostatic tandem accelerators and X-rays. Initial tests for TID effects were performed using the 1.7 MV 5SDH tandem Pelletron accelerator of the Instituto de Fisica da USP with a proton beam of 2.6 MeV. The devices were exposed to different doses, varying the beam current, and irradiation time with the accumulated dose reaching up to Grad. To study the effect of X-rays on the electronic devices, an XRD-7000 (Shimadzu) X-ray setup was used as a primary X-ray source. The devices were irradiated with a total dose from krad to Grad using different dose rates. The results indicate that changes of the I-V characteristic curve are strongly dependents on the geometry of the devices. [1] Duzellier, S., Aerospace Science and Technology 9, p. 93

  6. Reducing Wildlife Damage with Cost-Effective Management Programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl R Krull

    Full Text Available Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control, with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a conservation issue of global concern because of its potential effects on successional changes in vegetation structure and composition, habitat for other species, and functional soil properties. In this study, we used a 3-year pig control programme (ground hunting undertaken in a temperate rainforest area of northern New Zealand to evaluate effects on pig abundance, and patterns and rates of ground disturbance and ground disturbance recovery and the cost effectiveness of differing control strategies. Control reduced pig densities by over a third of the estimated carrying capacity, but more than halved average prevailing ground disturbance. Rates of new ground disturbance accelerated with increasing pig density, while rates of ground disturbance recovery were not related to prevailing pig density. Stochastic simulation models based on the measured relationships between control, pig density and rate of ground disturbance and recovery indicated that control could reduce ground disturbance substantially. However, the rate at which prevailing ground disturbance was reduced diminished rapidly as more intense, and hence expensive, pig control regimes were simulated. The model produced in this study provides a framework that links conservation of indigenous ecological communities to control inputs through the reduction of wildlife damage and suggests that managers should consider carefully the marginal cost of higher investment in wildlife damage control, relative to its marginal conservation

  7. Effect of energy level sequences and neutron–proton interaction on α-particle preformation probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.; Adel, A.

    2013-01-01

    A realistic density-dependent nucleon–nucleon (NN) interaction with finite-range exchange part which produces the nuclear matter saturation curve and the energy dependence of the nucleon–nucleus optical model potential is used to calculate the preformation probability, S α , of α-decay from different isotones with neutron numbers N=124,126,128,130 and 132. We studied the variation of S α with the proton number, Z, for each isotone and found the effect of neutron and proton energy levels of parent nuclei on the behavior of the α-particle preformation probability. We found that S α increases regularly with the proton number when the proton pair in α-particle is emitted from the same level and the neutron level sequence is not changed during the Z-variation. In this case the neutron–proton (n–p) interaction of the two levels, contributing to emission process, is too small. On the contrary, if the proton or neutron level sequence is changed during the emission process, S α behaves irregularly, the irregular behavior increases if both proton and neutron levels are changed. This behavior is accompanied by change or rapid increase in the strength of n–p interaction

  8. Medium effects on spin observables of proton knockout reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krein, G.; Maris, T.A.J.; Rodrigues, B.B.; Veit, E.A.

    1994-07-01

    Medium modifications of the properties of bound nucleons and mesons are investigated by means of medium energy quasi free proton knockout reactions with polarized incident protons. The sensitivity of the spin observables of these reactions to modifications of the nucleon and meson properties is studied using the Bonn one-boson exchange model of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. A method proposed to extract the pp analysing power in medium from the (p, 2 p) asymmetries indicates a reduction of this quantity compared to its free space value. This reduction is linked to modifications of masses and coupling constants of the nucleons and mesons in the nucleus. The implications of these modifications for another spin observable to be measured in the future are discussed. (author). 39 refs, 9 figs

  9. Medium effects on spin observables of proton knockout reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krein, G [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Maris, T A.J.; Rodrigues, B B; Veit, E A [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1994-07-01

    Medium modifications of the properties of bound nucleons and mesons are investigated by means of medium energy quasi free proton knockout reactions with polarized incident protons. The sensitivity of the spin observables of these reactions to modifications of the nucleon and meson properties is studied using the Bonn one-boson exchange model of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. A method proposed to extract the pp analysing power in medium from the (p, 2 p) asymmetries indicates a reduction of this quantity compared to its free space value. This reduction is linked to modifications of masses and coupling constants of the nucleons and mesons in the nucleus. The implications of these modifications for another spin observable to be measured in the future are discussed. (author). 39 refs, 9 figs.

  10. Effect of neutron and proton radiations on magnetization of biotite

    CERN Document Server

    Abdurakhimov, A U; Sharipov, S M; Yugaj, V P; Granovskij, A B; Radkovskaya, A A

    2002-01-01

    One analyzes curves of field dependence of magnetization of biotite measured in the initial state under 4.2 K temperature subsequent to irradiation of 14 MeV energy and 1.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 3 cm sup - sup 2 dose neutrons and by 3 MeV energy and 2.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 4 cm sup - sup 2 dose protons, as well as, subsequent to annealing under 1000 deg temperature during 15 min. Irradiation by neutrons and protons was determined to result in increase of magneto-ordered phase content in biotite and, thus, in increase of magnetization of specimen. It is accounted for by formation of oxides in melt radiation thermal peaks and by freezing of high-temperature phase states corresponding to magnetite or solid solution of magnetite and hematite there. Thermal treatment does not change content of magneto-ordered phase in specimens

  11. Channeling effect in electronic spectra produced by grazing impact of fast protons on insulator surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archubi, C D; Gravielle, M S, E-mail: archubi@iafe.uba.a, E-mail: msilvia@iafe.uba.a [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-01

    Electron emission due to grazing scattering of fast protons from LiF and KCl surfaces is studied under axial incidence conditions. The differential emission probability is calculated within a distorted-wave formalism, taking into account axial channeled trajectories. For different emission angles, electronic spectra for proton incidence along the two principal crystal axes ([100] and [110]) are compared with those corresponding to an impact velocity in a random direction, finding effects associated with the channeling conditions.

  12. Alignment-related Effects in Forward Proton Experiments at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Staszewski, R.; Korcyl, K.; Trzebiński, M.

    2015-11-21

    The activity in the field of difractive physics at the Large Hadron Collider has been constantly increasing. This includes the planning for additional dedicated apparatus -- horizontal forward proton detectors. This work focusses on the problems related to the alignment of such detectors. The effects of the misalignment of the detectors on their geometric acceptance and the proton kinematics reconstruction is studied. The requirements for the alignment precision is inferred for different types of possible measurements.

  13. Alignment-related effects in forward proton experiments at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staszewski, R., E-mail: Rafal.Staszewski@ifj.edu.pl; Chwastowski, J., E-mail: Janusz.Chwastowski@ifj.edu.pl; Korcyl, K., E-mail: Krzysztof.Korcyl@ifj.edu.pl; Trzebiński, M., E-mail: Maciej.Trzebinski@ifj.edu.pl

    2015-11-21

    The activity in the field of diffractive physics at the Large Hadron Collider has been constantly increasing. This includes the planning for additional dedicated apparatus – horizontal forward proton detectors. This work focuses on the problems related to the alignment of such devices. The effects of the misalignment of the detectors on their geometric acceptance and on the reconstruction of the proton kinematics are studied. The requirements for the alignment precision are inferred for different types of possible measurements.

  14. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sabin, Noah D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Ogg, Robert J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Jane, John A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  15. Effects of Surgery and Proton Therapy on Cerebral White Matter of Craniopharyngioma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Sabin, Noah D.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Ogg, Robert J.; Boop, Frederick A.; Jane, John A.; Hua, Chiaho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine radiation dose effect on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in craniopharyngioma patients receiving surgery and proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients (2.1-19.3 years of age) with craniopharyngioma underwent surgery and proton therapy in a prospective therapeutic trial. Anatomical magnetic resonance images acquired after surgery but before proton therapy were inspected to identify white matter structures intersected by surgical corridors and catheter tracks. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed to measure microstructural integrity changes in cerebral white matter. Fractional anisotropy (FA) derived from DTI was statistically analyzed for 51 atlas-based white matter structures of the brain to determine radiation dose effect. FA in surgery-affected regions in the corpus callosum was compared to that in its intact counterpart to determine whether surgical defects affect radiation dose effect. Results: Surgical defects were seen most frequently in the corpus callosum because of transcallosal resection of tumors and insertion of ventricular or cyst catheters. Longitudinal DTI data indicated reductions in FA 3 months after therapy, which was followed by a recovery in most white matter structures. A greater FA reduction was correlated with a higher radiation dose in 20 white matter structures, indicating a radiation dose effect. The average FA in the surgery-affected regions before proton therapy was smaller (P=.0001) than that in their non–surgery-affected counterparts with more intensified subsequent reduction of FA (P=.0083) after therapy, suggesting that surgery accentuated the radiation dose effect. Conclusions: DTI data suggest that mild radiation dose effects occur in patients with craniopharyngioma receiving surgery and proton therapy. Surgical defects present at the time of proton therapy appear to accentuate the radiation dose effect longitudinally

  16. Effect of in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section on proton-proton momentum correlation in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Ma, Yu-Gang; Zhang, Chun-Jian; Zhang, Zheng-Qiao

    2018-03-01

    The proton-proton momentum correlation function from different rapidity regions is systematically investigated for the Au + Au collisions at different impact parameters and different energies from 400 A MeV to 1500 A MeV in the framework of the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model complemented by the Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical method. In particular, the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross-section dependence of the correlation function is brought into focus, while the impact parameter and energy dependence of the momentum correlation function are also explored. The sizes of the emission source are extracted by fitting the momentum correlation functions using the Gaussian source method. We find that the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section obviously influences the proton-proton momentum correlation function, which is from the whole-rapidity or projectile or target rapidity region at smaller impact parameters, but there is no effect on the mid-rapidity proton-proton momentum correlation function, which indicates that the emission mechanism differs between projectile or target rapidity and mid-rapidity protons.

  17. Effects of high-energy proton irradiation on the superconducting properties of Fe(Se,Te) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylva, G.; Bellingeri, E.; Ferdeghini, C.; Martinelli, A.; Pallecchi, I.; Pellegrino, L.; Putti, M.; Ghigo, G.; Gozzelino, L.; Torsello, D.; Grimaldi, G.; Leo, A.; Nigro, A.; Braccini, V.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we explore the effects of 3.5 MeV proton irradiation on Fe(Se,Te) thin films grown on CaF2. In particular, we carry out an experimental investigation with different irradiation fluences up to 7.30 · 1016 cm‑2 and different proton implantation depths, in order to clarify whether and to what extent the critical current is enhanced or suppressed, what are the effects of irradiation on the critical temperature, resistivity, and critical magnetic fields, and finally what is the role played by the substrate in this context. We find that the effect of irradiation on superconducting properties is generally small compared to the case of other iron-based superconductors. The irradiation effect is more evident on the critical current density Jc, while it is minor on the transition temperature Tc, normal state resistivity ρ, and on the upper critical field Hc2 up to the highest fluences explored in this work. In more detail, our analysis shows that when protons implant in the substrate far from the superconducting film, the critical current can be enhanced up to 50% of the pristine value at 7 T and 12 K; meanwhile, there is no appreciable effect on critical temperature and critical fields together with a slight decrease in resistivity. On the contrary, when the implantation layer is closer to the film–substrate interface, both critical current and temperature show a decrease accompanied by an enhancement of the resistivity and lattice strain. This result evidences that possible modifications induced by irradiation in the substrate may affect the superconducting properties of the film via lattice strain. The robustness of the Fe(Se,Te) system to irradiation-induced damage makes it a promising compound for the fabrication of magnets in high-energy accelerators.

  18. Incorporating partial shining effects in proton pencil-beam dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Lii Mingfwu; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, Ron X; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe

    2008-01-01

    A range modulator wheel (RMW) is an essential component in passively scattered proton therapy. We have observed that a proton beam spot may shine on multiple steps of the RMW. Proton dose calculation algorithms normally do not consider the partial shining effect, and thus overestimate the dose at the proximal shoulder of spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) compared with the measurement. If the SOBP is adjusted to better fit the plateau region, the entrance dose is likely to be underestimated. In this work, we developed an algorithm that can be used to model this effect and to allow for dose calculations that better fit the measured SOBP. First, a set of apparent modulator weights was calculated without considering partial shining. Next, protons spilled from the accelerator reaching the modulator wheel were simplified as a circular spot of uniform intensity. A weight-splitting process was then performed to generate a set of effective modulator weights with the partial shining effect incorporated. The SOBPs of eight options, which are used to label different combinations of proton-beam energy and scattering devices, were calculated with the generated effective weights. Our algorithm fitted the measured SOBP at the proximal and entrance regions much better than the ones without considering partial shining effect for all SOBPs of the eight options. In a prostate patient, we found that dose calculation without considering partial shining effect underestimated the femoral head and skin dose

  19. The effects of irradiation and proton implantation on the density of mobile protons in SiO2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanheusden, K.

    1998-04-01

    Proton implantation into the buried oxide of Si/SiO 2 /Si structures does not introduce mobile protons. The cross section for capture of radiation-induced electrons by mobile protons is two orders of magnitude smaller than for electron capture by trapped holes. The data provide new insights into the atomic mechanisms governing the generation and radiation tolerance of mobile protons in SiO 2 . This can lead to improved techniques for production and radiation hardening of radiation tolerant memory devices

  20. Effect of radiation damage on the infrared properties of apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anis Faridah Md Nori; Yusof Mohd Amin; Rosli Mahat; Burhanuddin Kamaluddin

    1991-01-01

    Apatites are known to contain radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium at a few ppm in concentration. These elements decay and produce fission tracks inside the crystals. The presence of such tracks have been known to affect the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of apatites. These fission tracks can be removed by annealing the crystals in air. In this paper we present the result of a preliminary study on the effect of radiation damage on the infrared transmission of apatites

  1. Radiation damage and defect behavior in proton irradiated lithium-counterdoped n+p silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupica, John; Goradia, Chandra; Swartz, Clifford K.; Weinberg, Irving

    1987-01-01

    Two lithium-counterdoped n+p silicon solar cells with different lithium concentrations were irradiated by 10-MeV protons. Cell performance was measured as a function of fluence, and it was found that the cell with the highest concentration of lithium had the highest radiation resistance. Deep level transient spectroscopy which showed two deep level defects that were lithium related. Relating the defect energy levels obtained from this study with those from earlier work using 1-MeV electron irradiation shows no correlation of the defect energy levels. There is one marked similarity: the absence of the boron-interstitial-oxygen-interstitial defect. This consistency strengthens the belief that lithium interacts with oxygen to prevent the formation of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. The results indicate that, in general, addition of lithium in small amounts to the p-base of a boron doped silicon solar cell such that the base remains p-type, tends to increase the radiation resistance of the cell.

  2. Protective Effect of HSP25 on Radiation Induced Tissue Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kwon, Hee-Choong; Bae, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Kim, Sung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Control of cancer by irradiation therapy alone or in conjunction with combination chemotherapy is often limited by organ specific toxicity. Ionizing irradiation toxicity is initiated by damage to normal tissue near the tumor target and within the transit volume of radiotherapy beams. Irradiation-induced cellular, tissue, and organ damage is mediated by acute effects, which can be dose limiting. A latent period follows recovery from the acute reaction, then chronic irradiation fibrosis (late effects) pose a second cause of organ failure. HSP25/27 has been suggested to protect cells against apoptotic cell death triggered by hyperthermia, ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, Fas ligand, and cytotoxic drugs. And several mechanisms have been proposed to account for HSP27-mediated apoptotic protection. However radioprotective effect of HSP25/27 in vivo system has not yet been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of exogenous HSP25 expression, as delivered by adenoviral vectors, to protect animal from radiation induced tissue damage

  3. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-01-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  4. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  5. Target shape effects on monoenergetic GeV proton acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Min; Yu Tongpu; Pukhov, Alexander [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Sheng Zhengming, E-mail: pukhov@tp1.uni-duesseldorf.d [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-04-15

    When a circularly polarized laser pulse interacts with a foil target, there are three stages: pre-hole-boring, hole-boring and light sail acceleration. We study the electron and ion dynamics in the first stage and find the minimum foil thickness requirement for a given laser intensity. Based on this analysis, we propose using a shaped foil for ion acceleration, whose thickness varies transversely to match the laser intensity. Then, the target evolves into three regions: the acceleration, transparency and deformation regions. In the acceleration region, the target can be uniformly accelerated producing a mono-energetic and spatially collimated ion beam. Detailed numerical simulations are performed to check the feasibility and robustness of this scheme, such as the influence of shape factors and surface roughness. A GeV mono-energetic proton beam is observed in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations when a laser pulse with a focus intensity of 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} is used. The energy conversion efficiency of the laser pulse to the accelerated proton beam with the simulation parameters is more than 23%.

  6. Target shape effects on monoenergetic GeV proton acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Min; Yu Tongpu; Pukhov, Alexander; Sheng Zhengming

    2010-01-01

    When a circularly polarized laser pulse interacts with a foil target, there are three stages: pre-hole-boring, hole-boring and light sail acceleration. We study the electron and ion dynamics in the first stage and find the minimum foil thickness requirement for a given laser intensity. Based on this analysis, we propose using a shaped foil for ion acceleration, whose thickness varies transversely to match the laser intensity. Then, the target evolves into three regions: the acceleration, transparency and deformation regions. In the acceleration region, the target can be uniformly accelerated producing a mono-energetic and spatially collimated ion beam. Detailed numerical simulations are performed to check the feasibility and robustness of this scheme, such as the influence of shape factors and surface roughness. A GeV mono-energetic proton beam is observed in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations when a laser pulse with a focus intensity of 10 22 W cm -2 is used. The energy conversion efficiency of the laser pulse to the accelerated proton beam with the simulation parameters is more than 23%.

  7. Evidence for plasma effect on charge collection efficiency in proton irradiated GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nava, F; Canali, C; Vittone, E; Polesello, P; Biggeri, U; Leroy, C

    1999-01-01

    The radiation damage in 100 mu m thick Schottky diodes made on semi-insulating undoped GaAs materials, were studied using alpha-, beta-, proton- and gamma-spectroscopy as well as I-V measurements. The results have been analysed within the framework of the Hecht model to investigate the influence of the plasma produced by short-range strongly ionising particles on the detector performance after 24 GeV proton irradiation. It has been found that with the mean free drift lengths for electrons and holes determined from alpha-spectra in overdepleted detectors, the charge collection efficiency for beta-particles, cce subbeta, is well predicted in the unirradiated detectors, while in the most irradiated ones, the cce subbeta is underestimated by more than 40%. The observed disagreement can be explained by assuming that the charge carrier recombination in the plasma region of such detectors, becomes significant.

  8. Effects of the anion salt nature on the rate constants of the aqueous proton exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Jose M; Garzon, Andres; Crovetto, Luis; Orte, Angel; Lopez, Sergio G; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2012-04-28

    The proton-transfer ground-state rate constants of the xanthenic dye 9-[1-(2-methyl-4-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (TG-II), recovered by Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS), have proven to be useful to quantitatively reflect specific cation effects in aqueous solutions (J. M. Paredes, L. Crovetto, A. Orte, J. M. Alvarez-Pez and E. M. Talavera, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011, 13, 1685-1694). Since these phenomena are more sensitive to anions than to cations, in this paper we have accounted for the influence of salts with the sodium cation in common, and the anion classified according to the empirical Hofmeister series, on the proton transfer rate constants of TG-II. We demonstrate that the presence of ions accelerates the rate of the ground-state proton-exchange reaction in the same order than ions that affect ion solvation in water. The combination of FLCS with a fluorophore undergoing proton transfer reactions in the ground state, along with the desirable feature of a pseudo-dark state when the dye is protonated, allows one unique direct determination of kinetic rate constants of the proton exchange chemical reaction. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  9. Compendium of Single Event Effects, Total Ionizing Dose, and Displacement Damage for Candidate Spacecraft Electronics for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; OBryan, Martha V.; Chen, Dakai; Campola, Michael J.; Casey, Megan C.; Pellish, Jonathan A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Topper, Alyson D.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present results and analysis investigating the effects of radiation on a variety of candidate spacecraft electronics to proton and heavy ion induced single event effects (SEE), proton-induced displacement damage (DD), and total ionizing dose (TID). Introduction: This paper is a summary of test results.NASA spacecraft are subjected to a harsh space environment that includes exposure to various types of ionizing radiation. The performance of electronic devices in a space radiation environment is often limited by its susceptibility to single event effects (SEE), total ionizing dose (TID), and displacement damage (DD). Ground-based testing is used to evaluate candidate spacecraft electronics to determine risk to spaceflight applications. Interpreting the results of radiation testing of complex devices is quite difficult. Given the rapidly changing nature of technology, radiation test data are most often application-specific and adequate understanding of the test conditions is critical. Studies discussed herein were undertaken to establish the application-specific sensitivities of candidate spacecraft and emerging electronic devices to single-event upset (SEU), single-event latchup (SEL), single-event gate rupture (SEGR), single-event burnout (SEB), single-event transient (SET), TID, enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS), and DD effects.

  10. Effects of solutes on damage production and recovery in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, R.H.; Birtcher, R.C.; MacEwen, S.R.; Abromeit, C.

    1986-04-01

    Dilute zirconium-based alloys and pure zirconium were irradiated at 10 K with spallation neutrons at IPNS. Four types of alloys - Zr-Ti, Zr-Sn, Zr-Dy and Zr-Au - each with three concentration levels, were used. Low-temperature resistivity damage rates are enhanced by the presence of any of the four solutes. The greatest enhancement was produced by Au while the least by Dy. Within each alloy group, damage production also increased but at a decreasing rate, with increasing concentration. Post-irradiation annealing experiments, up to 400 K, showed that all four solutes suppress recovery due to interstitial migration, indicative of interstitial trapping by the solutes. Vacancy recovery is also suppressed by the presence of Sn, Dy or Au. The effect of Ti is to shift this stage to lower temperature. No clear correlation between the results with solute size was detected

  11. Temperature effects on radiation damage in plastic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza A, D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of present work was to study the temperature effect on radiation damage registration in the structure of a Solid State Nuclear Track Detector of the type CR-39. In order to study the radiation damage as a function of irradiation temperature, sheets of CR-39 detectors were irradiated with electron beams, simulating the interaction of positive ions. CR-39 detectors were maintained at a constant temperature from room temperature up to 373 K during irradiation. Two techniques were used from analyzing changes in the detector structure: Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Infrared Spectroscopy (IR). It was found by EPR analysis that the amount of free radicals decrease as irradiation temperature increases. The IR spectrums show yield of new functional group identified as an hydroxyl group (OH). A proposed model of interaction of radiation with CR-39 detectors is discussed. (Author)

  12. Analysis of Low Dose Irradiation Damages in Structural Ferritic/Martensitic Steels by Proton Irradiation and Nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, Owais A.; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Byong Guk; Jeong, Jong Ryul; Maeng, Cheol Soo; Lee, Myoung Goo

    2016-01-01

    As a result, ferritic-martensitic steels find applications in the in-core and out-of-core components which include ducts, piping, pressure vessel and cladding, etc. Due to ferromagnetism of F/M steel, it has been successfully employed in solenoid type fuel injector. Although the irradiation induced degradation in ferritic martensitic steels is lower as compare to (i) reduced activation steels, (ii) austenitic steels and (iii) martensitic steels, F/M steels are still prone to irradiation induced hardening and void swelling. The irradiation behavior may become more sophisticated due to transmutation and production of helium and hydrogen. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of F/M steels is also expected to increase due to irradiation. These irradiation induced degradations may deteriorate the integrity of F/M components. As a result of these investigations, it has found that the F/M steels experience no irradiation hardening above 400 .deg. C, but below this temperature, up to 350 .deg. C, weak hardening is observed. The irradiation hardening becomes more pronounced below 300 .deg. C. Moreover, the irradiation hardening has also found dependent upon radiation damage. The hardening was found increasing with increasing dose. Due to pronounced irradiation hardening below 300 .deg. C and increasing radiation damage with increasing dose (even at low dpa), it is required to investigate the post irradiation mechanical properties of F/M steel, in order to confirm its usefulness in structural and magnetic components which experience lifetime doses as low as 1x10"-"5 dpa.

  13. Analysis of Low Dose Irradiation Damages in Structural Ferritic/Martensitic Steels by Proton Irradiation and Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waseem, Owais A.; Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Byong Guk [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jong Ryul [Chungnam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Maeng, Cheol Soo; Lee, Myoung Goo [KEPCO, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As a result, ferritic-martensitic steels find applications in the in-core and out-of-core components which include ducts, piping, pressure vessel and cladding, etc. Due to ferromagnetism of F/M steel, it has been successfully employed in solenoid type fuel injector. Although the irradiation induced degradation in ferritic martensitic steels is lower as compare to (i) reduced activation steels, (ii) austenitic steels and (iii) martensitic steels, F/M steels are still prone to irradiation induced hardening and void swelling. The irradiation behavior may become more sophisticated due to transmutation and production of helium and hydrogen. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of F/M steels is also expected to increase due to irradiation. These irradiation induced degradations may deteriorate the integrity of F/M components. As a result of these investigations, it has found that the F/M steels experience no irradiation hardening above 400 .deg. C, but below this temperature, up to 350 .deg. C, weak hardening is observed. The irradiation hardening becomes more pronounced below 300 .deg. C. Moreover, the irradiation hardening has also found dependent upon radiation damage. The hardening was found increasing with increasing dose. Due to pronounced irradiation hardening below 300 .deg. C and increasing radiation damage with increasing dose (even at low dpa), it is required to investigate the post irradiation mechanical properties of F/M steel, in order to confirm its usefulness in structural and magnetic components which experience lifetime doses as low as 1x10{sup -5} dpa.

  14. Solvation effect on isomer stability and electronic structures of protonated serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyan, Reza; Amanollahi, Zohreh; Azimi, Gholamhassan

    2017-07-01

    Microsolvation effect on geometry and transition energies of protonated serotonin has been investigated by MP2 and CC2 quantum chemical methods. Also, conductor-like screening model, implemented recently in the MP2 and ADC(2) methods, was examined to address the bulk water environment's effect on the isomer stability and electronic transition energies of protonated serotonin. It has been predicted that the dipole moment of gas phase isomers plays the main role on the isomer stabilization in water solution and electronic transition shifts. Also, both red- and blue-shift effects have been predicted to take place on electronic transition energies, upon hydration.

  15. Proton Beam Writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajta, I.; Szilasi, S.Z.; Csige, I.; Baradacs, E.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Refractive index depth profile in PMMA due to proton irradiation Proton Beam Writing has been successfully used to create buried channel waveguides in PMMA, which suggested that proton irradiation increases the refractive index. To investigate this effect, PMMA samples were irradiated by 1.7-2.1 MeV proton beam. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry has been used to investigate the depth profile of the refractive index. An increase of the refractive index was observed in the order of 0.01, which is approximately one order of magnitude higher than the detection limit. The highest increase of the refractive index occurs at the end of range, i.e. we found a good correlation with the Bragg curve of the energy loss. Hardness changes in PMMA due to proton beam micromachining As protons penetrate a target material and lose their energy according to the Bragg curve, the energy loss is different at different depths. This causes depth-dependent changes of some physical properties in the target material (e.g. refractive index, hardness). In order to characterize the changes of hardness and other mechanical properties as a function of beam penetration depth, systematic investigations have been performed on PMMA, the most common resist material used in proton beam micromachining. Silicon check valve made by proton beam micromachining The possible application of Proton Beam Micromachining (PBM) has been demonstrated by a few authors for creating 3D Si microstructures. In this work we present alternative methods for the formation of a simple a non-return valve for microfluidic applications. Two different approaches have been applied, in both cases we exploited characteristic features of the PBM technique and the selective formation and dissolution of porous Si over the implantation damaged areas. In the first case we implanted 10 μm thick cantilever-type membrane of the valve normally to the crystal surface and at 30-60 degrees to the sidewalls of the

  16. Characteristics of the Biological Effects and the RBE of High Energy Protons; Caracteristiques des Effets Biologiques et EBR des Protons de Haute Energie; Osobennosti biologicheskogo dejstviya i obeh protonov vysokikh ehnergii; Caracteristicas de los Efectos Biologicos y de la EBR de los Protones de Elevada Energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigor' ev, Ju. G.; Darenskaja, N. G.; Domshlak, M. M.; Lebedinskij, A. V.; Nefedov, Ju. G.; Ryzhov, N. I.

    1964-03-15

    The characteristics of the biological effects of high-energy protons (120, 240 and 510 MeV) were studied in experiments on mice, rats and dogs. It was shown that together with a certain resemblance or identity in radiation damage due to the effects of X-rays and protons, there were certain differences in the case of proton irradiation. In the proton irradiation of dogs the haemorrhagic syndrome was more pronounced. Haemorrhage appeared earlier in the animals and was more abundant. A difference was found in proton RBE levels for small animals (rats, mice) and large animals (dogs). This difference is quite large and equals respectively 0.7 and 1.0 * 1.15. Some considerations are presented in the report on the cause of these differences. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie les caracteristiques des effets biologiques des protons de haute energie (120, 240 et 510 MeV) au cours d'experiences sur des souris, des rats et des chiens. Ils montrent que si les dommages causes par les rayons X et les protons presentent une certaine ressemblance ou des caracteres identiques, on observe des differences dans le cas de l'irradiation par les protons. Chez les chiens exposes aux protons, le syndrome hemorragique etait plus prononce. L'hemorragie s'est manifestee plus tot chez ces animaux et etait plus abondante. Les auteurs ont decele une difference dans l*EBRdes protons pour les petits animaux (rats, souris) et pour les grands animaux (chiens). Cette difference etait importante: 0,7 dans le premier cas et de 1,0 a 1,15 dans le second cas. On trouve dans le memoire quelques considerations sur la cause de ces differences. (author) [Spanish] Los autores estudiaron las caracteristicas de los efectos biologicos de los protones de elevada energia (120, 240 y 510 MeV) mediante experimentos con ratones, ratas y perros. Comprobaron que a pesar de ciertas semejanzas en las radiolesiones causadas por los rayos X y los protones, los efectos de estos ultimos acusan algunas diferencias. El

  17. Multi-scale approach to radiation damage induced by ion beams: complex DNA damage and effects of thermal spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the latest advances of the multi-scale approach to radiation damage caused by irradiation of a tissue with energetic ions and report the calculations of complex DNA damage and the effects of thermal spikes on biomolecules. The multi-scale approach aims to quantify the most important physical, chemical, and biological phenomena taking place during and following irradiation with ions and provide a better means for clinically-necessary calculations with adequate accuracy. We suggest a way of quantifying the complex clustered damage, one of the most important features of the radiation damage caused by ions. This quantification allows the studying of how the clusterization of DNA lesions affects the lethality of damage. We discuss the first results of molecular dynamics simulations of ubiquitin in the environment of thermal spikes, predicted to occur in tissue for a short time after an ion's passage in the vicinity of the ions' tracks. (authors)

  18. Pulsed total dose damage effect experimental study on EPROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yinhong; Yao Zhibin; Zhang Fengqi; Guo Hongxia; Zhang Keying; Wang Yuanming; He Baoping

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, memory radiation effect study mainly focus on functionality measurement. Measurable parameters is few in china. According to the present situation, threshold voltage testing method was presented on floating gate EPROM memory. Experimental study of pulsed total dose effect on EPROM threshold voltage was carried out. Damage mechanism was analysed The experiment results showed that memory cell threshold voltage negative shift was caused by pulsed total dose, memory cell threshold voltage shift is basically coincident under steady bias supply and no bias supply. (authors)

  19. Higher order net-proton number cumulants dependence on the centrality definition and other spurious effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sombun, S.; Steinheimer, J.; Herold, C.; Limphirat, A.; Yan, Y.; Bleicher, M.

    2018-02-01

    We study the dependence of the normalized moments of the net-proton multiplicity distributions on the definition of centrality in relativistic nuclear collisions at a beam energy of \\sqrt{{s}{NN}}=7.7 {GeV}. Using the ultra relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model as event generator we find that the centrality definition has a large effect on the extracted cumulant ratios. Furthermore we find that the finite efficiency for the determination of the centrality introduces an additional systematic uncertainty. Finally, we quantitatively investigate the effects of event-pile up and other possible spurious effects which may change the measured proton number. We find that pile-up alone is not sufficient to describe the data and show that a random double counting of events, adding significantly to the measured proton number, affects mainly the higher order cumulants in most central collisions.

  20. Damage limits of accelerator equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Rosell, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Beam losses occur in particle accelerators for various reasons. The effect of lost particles on accelerator equipment becomes more severe with the increasing energies and intensities. The present study is focused on the damage potential of the proton beam as a function of particle energy and beam size. Injection and extraction energies of different accelerators at CERN were considered.

  1. Proton pump inhibitors suppress iNOS-dependent DNA damage in Barrett's esophagus by increasing Mn-SOD expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanan, Raynoo [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan); Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Ma, Ning [Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie 513-0293 (Japan); Iijima, Katsunori; Abe, Yasuhiko; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru [Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyaki 980-8574 (Japan); Pinlaor, Somchai [Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Murata, Mariko [Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Kawanishi, Shosuke, E-mail: kawanisi@suzuka-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan)

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation by Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a risk factor of its adenocarcinoma (BEA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 8-Nitroguanine and 8-oxodG are inflammation-related DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA lesions and iNOS expression were higher in the order, BEA > BE > normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton pump inhibitors suppress DNA damage by increasing Mn-SOD via Nrf2 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA lesions can be useful biomarkers to predict risk of BEA in BE patients. -- Abstract: Barrett's esophagus (BE), an inflammatory disease, is a risk factor for Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma (BEA). Treatment of BE patients with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is expected to reduce the risk of BEA. We performed an immunohistochemical study to examine the formation of nitrative and oxidative DNA lesions, 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 Prime -deoxygaunosine (8-oxodG), in normal esophageal, BE with pre- and post-treatment by PPIs and BEA tissues. We also observed the expression of an oxidant-generating enzyme (iNOS) and its transcription factor NF-{kappa}B, an antioxidant enzyme (Mn-SOD), its transcription factor (Nrf2) and an Nrf2 inhibitor (Keap1). The immunoreactivity of DNA lesions was significantly higher in the order of BEA > BE > normal tissues. iNOS expression was significantly higher in the order of BEA > BE > normal tissues, while Mn-SOD expression was significantly lower in the order of BEA < BE < normal tissues. Interestingly, Mn-SOD expression and the nuclear localization of Nrf2 were significantly increased, and the formation of DNA lesions was significantly decreased in BE tissues after PPIs treatment for 3-6 months. Keap1 and iNOS expression was not significantly changed by the PPIs treatment in BE tissues. These results indicate that 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG play a role in BE-derived BEA. Additionally, PPIs treatment may trigger the activation and

  2. Minimizing treatment planning errors in proton therapy using failure mode and effects analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yuanshui, E-mail: yuanshui.zheng@okc.procure.com [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 W Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 and Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); Johnson, Randall; Larson, Gary [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 W Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool to evaluate safety or reliability in conventional photon radiation therapy. However, reports about FMEA application in proton therapy are scarce. The purpose of this study is to apply FMEA in safety improvement of proton treatment planning at their center. Methods: The authors performed an FMEA analysis of their proton therapy treatment planning process using uniform scanning proton beams. The authors identified possible failure modes in various planning processes, including image fusion, contouring, beam arrangement, dose calculation, plan export, documents, billing, and so on. For each error, the authors estimated the frequency of occurrence, the likelihood of being undetected, and the severity of the error if it went undetected and calculated the risk priority number (RPN). The FMEA results were used to design their quality management program. In addition, the authors created a database to track the identified dosimetric errors. Periodically, the authors reevaluated the risk of errors by reviewing the internal error database and improved their quality assurance program as needed. Results: In total, the authors identified over 36 possible treatment planning related failure modes and estimated the associated occurrence, detectability, and severity to calculate the overall risk priority number. Based on the FMEA, the authors implemented various safety improvement procedures into their practice, such as education, peer review, and automatic check tools. The ongoing error tracking database provided realistic data on the frequency of occurrence with which to reevaluate the RPNs for various failure modes. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for identifying and evaluating potential errors in proton treatment planning before they result in an error in patient dose delivery. The application of FMEA framework and the implementation of an ongoing error tracking system at their

  3. Minimizing treatment planning errors in proton therapy using failure mode and effects analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Johnson, Randall; Larson, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is a widely used tool to evaluate safety or reliability in conventional photon radiation therapy. However, reports about FMEA application in proton therapy are scarce. The purpose of this study is to apply FMEA in safety improvement of proton treatment planning at their center. Methods: The authors performed an FMEA analysis of their proton therapy treatment planning process using uniform scanning proton beams. The authors identified possible failure modes in various planning processes, including image fusion, contouring, beam arrangement, dose calculation, plan export, documents, billing, and so on. For each error, the authors estimated the frequency of occurrence, the likelihood of being undetected, and the severity of the error if it went undetected and calculated the risk priority number (RPN). The FMEA results were used to design their quality management program. In addition, the authors created a database to track the identified dosimetric errors. Periodically, the authors reevaluated the risk of errors by reviewing the internal error database and improved their quality assurance program as needed. Results: In total, the authors identified over 36 possible treatment planning related failure modes and estimated the associated occurrence, detectability, and severity to calculate the overall risk priority number. Based on the FMEA, the authors implemented various safety improvement procedures into their practice, such as education, peer review, and automatic check tools. The ongoing error tracking database provided realistic data on the frequency of occurrence with which to reevaluate the RPNs for various failure modes. Conclusions: The FMEA technique provides a systematic method for identifying and evaluating potential errors in proton treatment planning before they result in an error in patient dose delivery. The application of FMEA framework and the implementation of an ongoing error tracking system at their

  4. An UV photochromic memory effect in proton-based WO3 electrochromic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Lee, S.-H.; Mascarenhas, A.; Deb, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    We report an UV photochromic memory effect on a standard proton-based WO 3 electrochromic device. It exhibits two memory states, associated with the colored and bleached states of the device, respectively. Such an effect can be used to enhance device performance (increasing the dynamic range), re-energize commercial electrochromic devices, and develop memory devices

  5. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  6. Electrochemical H-D isotope effect at metal-perovskite proton conductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kek, D.; Bonanos, N.

    1999-01-01

    The H-D isotope effect on the electrode kinetics of a metal-proton conductor interface has been investigated. The current-voltage behaviour depends on the nature of the electrode (Ni, Ag), the atmosphere (H(2), D(2)), the partial pressures of the gases, and the temperature. The isotope effect was...

  7. An UV photochromic memory effect in proton-based WO3 electrochromic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Lee, S.-H.; Mascarenhas, A.; Deb, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    We report an UV photochromic memory effect on a standard proton-based WO3 electrochromic device. It exhibits two memory states, associated with the colored and bleached states of the device, respectively. Such an effect can be used to enhance device performance (increasing the dynamic range), re-energize commercial electrochromic devices, and develop memory devices.

  8. TU-EF-304-10: Efficient Multiscale Simulation of the Proton Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB) Induction and Bio-Effective Dose in the FLUKA Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, V; Tsiamas, P; Axente, M; Farr, J [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: One of the more critical initiating events for reproductive cell death is the creation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). In this study, we present a computationally efficient way to determine spatial variations in the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton therapy beams within the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. Methods: We used the independently tested Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) developed by Stewart and colleagues (Radiat. Res. 176, 587–602 2011) to estimate the RBE for DSB induction of monoenergetic protons, tritium, deuterium, hellium-3, hellium-4 ions and delta-electrons. The dose-weighted (RBE) coefficients were incorporated into FLUKA to determine the equivalent {sup 6}°60Co γ-ray dose for representative proton beams incident on cells in an aerobic and anoxic environment. Results: We found that the proton beam RBE for DSB induction at the tip of the Bragg peak, including primary and secondary particles, is close to 1.2. Furthermore, the RBE increases laterally to the beam axis at the area of Bragg peak. At the distal edge, the RBE is in the range from 1.3–1.4 for cells irradiated under aerobic conditions and may be as large as 1.5–1.8 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. Across the plateau region, the recorded RBE for DSB induction is 1.02 for aerobic cells and 1.05 for cells irradiated under anoxic conditions. The contribution to total effective dose from secondary heavy ions decreases with depth and is higher at shallow depths (e.g., at the surface of the skin). Conclusion: Multiscale simulation of the RBE for DSB induction provides useful insights into spatial variations in proton RBE within pristine Bragg peaks. This methodology is potentially useful for the biological optimization of proton therapy for the treatment of cancer. The study highlights the need to incorporate spatial variations in proton RBE into proton therapy treatment plans.

  9. The effect of low energy protons on silicon solar cells with simulated coverglass cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasner, S.; Anspaugh, B.; Francis, R.; Marvin, D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a series of low-energy proton (LEP) tests are presented. The purpose of the tests was to investigate the effect of low-energy protons on the electrical performance of solar cells with simulated cracked covers. The results of the tests were then related to the space environment. A matrix of LEP tests was set up using solar cells with simulated cracks to determine the effect on electrical performance as a function of fluence, energy, crack width, coverglass adhesive shielding, crack location, and solar cell size. The results of the test were, for the most part, logical, and consistent.

  10. Estimation of relative biological effectiveness for low energy protons using cytogenetic end points in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, N.N.; Nairy, Rajesh; Chaurasia, Rajesh; Desai, Utkarsha; Shirsath, K.B.; Anjaria, K.B.; Sreedevi, B.

    2013-01-01

    A facility has been designed and developed to facilitate irradiation of biological samples to proton beam using folded tandem ion accelerator (FOTIA) at BARC. The primary proton beam from the accelerator was diffused using gold foil and channelled through a drift tube. Scattered beam was monitored and calibrated. Uniformity and dosimetry studies were conducted to calibrate the setup for precise irradiation of mammalian cells. Irradiation conditions and geometry were optimized for mammalian cells and other biological samples in thin layer. The irradiation facility is housed in a clean air laminar flow to help exposure of samples in aseptic conditions. The set up has been used for studying various radiobiological endpoints in many biological model systems. CHO, MCF-7, A-549 and INT-407 cell lines were studied in the present investigation using micronucleus (MN) induction as an indicator of radiation damage. The mammalian cells grown on petri plates to about 40 % confluence (log phase) were exposed to proton beam of known doses in the range of 0.1 to 2 Gy. The dose estimation was done based on specific ionization in cell medium. Studies were also conducted using 60 Co gamma radiation to compare the results. Linear quadratic response was observed for all the cell lines when exposed to 60 Co gamma radiation. In contrast, linear response was observed for proton beam. In addition, very significant increase in the MN yield was observed for proton beam compared to 60 Co gamma radiation. Estimated α and β values for CHO cells is found to be 0.02±0.003 Gy-1 and 0.042±0.006 Gy-2 respectively for 60 Co gamma radiation. For proton beam, estimated α for linear fit is found to be 0.37±0.011 Gy-1. Estimated RBE was found to be in the range of 4-8 for all the cell lines and dose ranges studied. In conclusion, the proton irradiation facility developed for mammalian cells has helped to study various radiobiological endpoints. In this presentation, facility description, MN as

  11. SU-E-T-571: Microdosimetric Characterization of Proton Biological Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardiola, C; Carabe-Fernandez, A; Tuttle, S [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The knowledge of cell repair kinetics is critical in order to understand relevant aspects of proton therapy such optimal fractionation. High LET radiation induces larger proportions of more complex DSBs that might not be resolved in standard interfractional times (24h). We propose a method to characterize the cell repair kinetic at different positions within the spread-out Bragg peak (i.e. as a function of proton LETd) and use this information to model normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) as a function of LETd Methods: Repair kinetics curves will be obtained using U251-glioblastoma cells plating over microscope slides that are immersed in culture-medium that will be exposed along the axis of a proton-beam (10cm in range, 2cm modulation) of 1Gy. Culture is immersed within a solid-water block to place the distal edge of the proton-beam within the slide. gamma-H2AX foci along the slide in the beam axis is imaged with a microscope at different positions in order to correlate number of gamma-H2AX foci with dose and LET, where dose is obtained from a strip of gafchromic film placed on the side of the slide. Each slide is fixed at different time points. Results: We will present the correlation between an increase of LET and the increase of the gamma-H2AX along the depth within the proton beam, at different post-irradiation times and doses. Different fractions of unrepaired damage at 24h after irradiation will be presented at each depth of the proton beam, with larger fractions at the distal edge of the beam, where normal tissue exist. Larger values of NTCP are therefore observed at the distal edge. Conclusion: Slower repair kinetics is observed at the distal edge of a proton beam, and this study shows a method to obtain such information and the correlation between increased LET and increased NTCP. This research is supported by the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania as a pilot project.

  12. Establishing Cost-Effective Allocation of Proton Therapy for Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailhot Vega, Raymond B.; Ishaq, Omar; Raldow, Ann; Perez, Carmen A.; Jimenez, Rachel; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Bussiere, Marc; Taghian, Alphonse; Sher, David J.; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiac toxicity due to conventional breast radiation therapy (RT) has been extensively reported, and it affects both the life expectancy and quality of life of affected women. Given the favorable oncologic outcomes in most women irradiated for breast cancer, it is increasingly paramount to minimize treatment side effects and improve survivorship for these patients. Proton RT offers promise in limiting heart dose, but the modality is costly and access is limited. Using cost-effectiveness analysis, we provide a decision-making tool to help determine which breast cancer patients may benefit from proton RT referral. Methods and Materials: A Markov cohort model was constructed to compare the cost-effectiveness of proton versus photon RT for breast cancer management. The model was analyzed for different strata of women based on age (40 years, 50 years, and 60 years) and the presence or lack of cardiac risk factors (CRFs). Model entrants could have 1 of 3 health states: healthy, alive with coronary heart disease (CHD), or dead. Base-case analysis assumed CHD was managed medically. No difference in tumor control was assumed between arms. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to test model robustness and the influence of including catheterization as a downstream possibility within the health state of CHD. Results: Proton RT was not cost-effective in women without CRFs or a mean heart dose (MHD) <5 Gy. Base-case analysis noted cost-effectiveness for proton RT in women with ≥1 CRF at an approximate minimum MHD of 6 Gy with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life-year. For women with ≥1 CRF, probabilistic sensitivity analysis noted the preference of proton RT for an MHD ≥5 Gy with a similar willingness-to-pay threshold. Conclusions: Despite the cost of treatment, scenarios do exist whereby proton therapy is cost-effective. Referral for proton therapy may be cost-effective for patients with ≥1 CRF in cases for which

  13. Establishing Cost-Effective Allocation of Proton Therapy for Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailhot Vega, Raymond B.; Ishaq, Omar [Department of Radiation Oncology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Raldow, Ann [Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Perez, Carmen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Jimenez, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle [Cardiovascular Research Center, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussiere, Marc; Taghian, Alphonse [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sher, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Cardiac toxicity due to conventional breast radiation therapy (RT) has been extensively reported, and it affects both the life expectancy and quality of life of affected women. Given the favorable oncologic outcomes in most women irradiated for breast cancer, it is increasingly paramount to minimize treatment side effects and improve survivorship for these patients. Proton RT offers promise in limiting heart dose, but the modality is costly and access is limited. Using cost-effectiveness analysis, we provide a decision-making tool to help determine which breast cancer patients may benefit from proton RT referral. Methods and Materials: A Markov cohort model was constructed to compare the cost-effectiveness of proton versus photon RT for breast cancer management. The model was analyzed for different strata of women based on age (40 years, 50 years, and 60 years) and the presence or lack of cardiac risk factors (CRFs). Model entrants could have 1 of 3 health states: healthy, alive with coronary heart disease (CHD), or dead. Base-case analysis assumed CHD was managed medically. No difference in tumor control was assumed between arms. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to test model robustness and the influence of including catheterization as a downstream possibility within the health state of CHD. Results: Proton RT was not cost-effective in women without CRFs or a mean heart dose (MHD) <5 Gy. Base-case analysis noted cost-effectiveness for proton RT in women with ≥1 CRF at an approximate minimum MHD of 6 Gy with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life-year. For women with ≥1 CRF, probabilistic sensitivity analysis noted the preference of proton RT for an MHD ≥5 Gy with a similar willingness-to-pay threshold. Conclusions: Despite the cost of treatment, scenarios do exist whereby proton therapy is cost-effective. Referral for proton therapy may be cost-effective for patients with ≥1 CRF in cases for which

  14. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  15. Research on spatial Model and analysis algorithm for nuclear weapons' damage effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaohong; Meng Tao; Du Maohua; Wang Weili; Ji Wanfeng

    2011-01-01

    In order to realize the three dimension visualization of nuclear weapons' damage effects. Aiming at the characteristics of the damage effects data, a new model-MRPCT model is proposed, and this model can carry out the modeling of the three dimension spatial data of the nuclear weapons' damage effects. For the sake of saving on the memory, linear coding method is used to store the MRPCT model. On the basis of Morton code, spatial analysis of the damage effects is completed. (authors)

  16. Bystander effects: intercellular transmission of radiation damage signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B.; Azzam, E.I.; Toledo, S.M. de; Nagasawa, H

    2002-07-01

    Biological effects were examined in confluent cultures of fibroblasts and epithelial cells exposed to very low mean doses of alpha radiation, doses by which only 1-2% of the cells were actually traversed by an alpha particle. Enhanced frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges and HPRT mutations occurred in the non-irradiation, 'bystander' cells associated with a similar increase in the frequency of micronuclei, indicating the induction of DNA damage in these cells. In order to gain information concerning molecular pathways, changes in gene expression were examined in bystander cells by western analysis and in situ immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of p53, p21 and MDM2 were significantly modulated in bystander cells: the damage signals leading to these changes were transmitted from irradiated to bystander cells by gap junction mediated intracellular communication. The bystander response was suppressed by incubation with superoxide dismutase as well as an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, suggesting the effect may be mediated by oxidative stress. To examine other signalling pathways responsive to oxidative stress, the activation of stress-related kinases and their downstream transcription factors were analysed in bystander cells by western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays: a 2-4 fold increase in the phosphorylation levels of JNK, EPK1/2, p90RSK, Elk-1 and ATF2 was observed. These changes were detected by 15 min after irradiation and persisted for at least 1 h. These findings indicate the activation of multiple signal transduction pathways in bystander cells, involving signals arising from the plasma membrane as well as from DNA damage. (author)

  17. Extension of TOPAS for the simulation of proton radiation effects considering molecular and cellular endpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polster, Lisa; Schuemann, Jan; Rinaldi, Ilaria; McNamara, Aimee L; Paganetti, Harald; Burigo, Lucas; Stewart, Robert D; Attili, Andrea; Carlson, David J; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Ramos Méndez, José; Faddegon, Bruce; Perl, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to extend a widely used proton Monte Carlo tool, TOPAS, towards the modeling of relative biological effect (RBE) distributions in experimental arrangements as well as patients.TOPAS provides a software core which users configure by writing parameter files to, for instance, define application specific geometries and scoring conditions. Expert users may further extend TOPAS scoring capabilities by plugging in their own additional C++ code. This structure was utilized for the implementation of eight biophysical models suited to calculate proton RBE. As far as physics parameters are concerned, four of these models are based on the proton linear energy transfer, while the others are based on DNA double strand break induction and the frequency-mean specific energy, lineal energy, or delta electron generated track structure. The biological input parameters for all models are typically inferred from fits of the models to radiobiological experiments.The model structures have been implemented in a coherent way within the TOPAS architecture. Their performance was validated against measured experimental data on proton RBE in a spread-out Bragg peak using V79 Chinese Hamster cells.This work is an important step in bringing biologically optimized treatment planning for proton therapy closer to the clinical practice as it will allow researchers to refine and compare pre-defined as well as user-defined models. (paper)

  18. Relative biological effectiveness of the therapeutic proton beams at NIRS and Tsukuba University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Kawachi, Kiyomitsu

    1985-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams dedicated to radiotherapy was examined using a method of simultaneous irradiation. Mice received i.v. transplantation of syngeneic fibrosarcoma (NFSa) cells. These mice were divided into 3 groups on the following day, and thorax was simultaneously irradiated with one of the following beams: 70MeV proton beam at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 250 MeV Proton beam at Tsukuba University (PARMS) and 60 Co γ ray. Ten to 13 days thereafter, lungs were removed for colony counts to give dose-cell survival relationships. RBE of NIRS proton was ranging from 1.01 to 1.12 with an average of 1.06 while that of PARMS proton was ranging from 1.03 to 1.09 with an average of 1.06 at surviving fraction of 0.01. The simultaneous irradiation for RBE study was found to be reliable at large dose-low survival regions. (author)

  19. Study of the Clinical Proton Beam Relative Biological Effectiveness at the JINR Phasotron, Dubna

    CERN Document Server

    Vitanova, A; Gaevskii, V N; Molokonov, A G; Spurny, F; Fadeeva, T A; Shmakova, N L

    2002-01-01

    Proton clinical beams contain particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Secondary heavy charged particles produced from nuclear interactions and degraded protons at the Bragg peak region are particles with high LET. These particles could enhance the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of the proton beam. We have carried out two radiobiological experiments to investigate the RBE of 150 MeV clinical proton beam. The irradiation of the Chinese Hamster V79 cells were performed at two points of the depth-dose distribution - at the beam entrance and at the Bragg peak. The contribution of the high LET particles to dosimetric and microdosimetric characteristics in the various depth of proton beam was also experimentally studied using the CR-39 track etched detectors. The LET spectra between 10 and 700 keV/{\\mu}m were measured by means of track detectors and the automatic optical image analyzer LUCIA-II. The relative contribution of the high LET particles to ab! sorbed dose increases from several per cent ...

  20. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  1. Irradiation effects of 11 MeV protons on ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu; Kuwano, Hisashi; Misawa, Toshihei

    1985-01-01

    It is considered that ferritic/martensitic steels are the candidate of the first wall materials for future fusion reactors. The most serious problem in the candidate materials is the loss of ductility due to the elevation of ductile-brittle transition temperature by the high dpa irradiation of neutrons. 14 MeV neutrons produced by D-T reaction cause high dpa damage and also produce large quantity of helium and hydrogen atoms in first wall materials. Those gas atoms also play an important role in the embrittlement of steels. The main purpose of this work was to simulate the behavior of hydrogen produced by the transmutation in the mechanical properties of ferritic steels when they were irradiated with 11 MeV protons. The experimental procedure and the results of hardness, the broadening of x-ray diffraction lines, Moessbauer spectroscopy and small punch test are reported. High energy protons of 10 - 20 MeV are suitable to the simulation experiment of 14 MeV neutron radiation damage. But the production of the active nuclei emitting high energy gamma ray and having long life, Co-56, is the most serious problem. Another difficulty is the control of irradiation temperature. A small irradiation chamber must be developed. (Kako, I.)

  2. 380 keV proton irradiation effects on photoluminescence of Eu-doped GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Yasuo; Wakahara, Akihiro; Yoshida, Akira; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    The effect of 380 keV proton irradiation on the photoluminescence (PL) properties has been investigated for undoped and Eu-doped GaN. As the proton irradiation exceeds 1x10 13 cm -2 , a drastic decrease of PL intensity of the near band-edge emission of undoped GaN was observed. On the other hand, for Eu-doped GaN, the PL emission corresponding to the 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 transition in Eu 3+ kept the initial PL intensity after the proton irradiation up to 1x10 14 cm -2 . Present results, together with our previous report on electron irradiation results, suggest that Eu-doped GaN is a strong candidate for light emitting devices in high irradiation environment

  3. Proton flux effects and prediction on the free radicals behavior of polyimide in vacuum using EPR measurements in ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Chengyue [Physics Department, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); National Key Lab of Materials Behaviors and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, Yiyong, E-mail: wuyiyong@hit.edu.cn [National Key Lab of Materials Behaviors and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiao, Jingdong [National Key Lab of Materials Behaviors and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yu, Sui [Physics Department, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yi, Zhong; Shen, Zicai [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Li [Qian Xuesen Laboratory of Space Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Yi [Lanzhou Institute of Physics, CAST, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Irradiation flux is an important parameter to the material irradiation damage investigation, for space material irradiation damage evaluation and the accelerated ground-based test, the irradiation flux effects cannot be ignored. In this paper, the polyimide was set as the research object, the irradiation flux effect and mechanism are investigated by the means of electron paramagnetic resonance test, and based on the free radical dynamic analysis, the dynamics mode of free radical population in vacumm can be established as a function of irradiation time (or proton irradiation flux). The results show that the free radical anneal process in vacuum follows the exponential mode, and the characteristic time constant τ{sub radical-vacuum} is about 1.9 h. Furthermore, a simplified method is proposed with the investigation of the free radical behavior of the irradiated surface modification polyimide (TiO{sub 2}/PI), and the characteristic time constant τ{sub bulk} is 1.9 h, which is almost the same to the value of τ{sub radical-vacuum}.

  4. Atmospheric effects on laser eye safety and damage to instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Arkadi; Kopeika, Natan S.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-optical sensors as well as unprotected human eyes are extremely sensitive to laser radiation and can be permanently damaged from direct or reflected beams. Laser detector/eye hazard depends on the interaction between the laser beam and the media in which it traverses. The environmental conditions including terrain features, atmospheric particulate and water content, and turbulence, may alter the laser's effect on the detector/eye. It is possible to estimate the performance of an electro-optical system as long as the atmospheric propagation of the laser beam can be adequately modeled. More recent experiments and modeling of atmospheric optics phenomena such as inner scale effect, aperture averaging, atmospheric attenuation in NIR-SWIR, and Cn2 modeling justify an update of previous eye/detector safety modeling. In the present work, the influence of the atmospheric channel on laser safety for personnel and instrumentation is shown on the basis of theoretical and experimental data of laser irradiance statistics for different atmospheric conditions. A method for evaluating the probability of damage and hazard distances associated with the use of laser systems in a turbulent atmosphere operating in the visible and NIR-SWIR portions of the electromagnetic spectrum is presented. It can be used as a performance prediction model for directed energy engagement of ground-based or air-based systems.

  5. Study of the effects of high-energy proton beams on escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan

    2015-10-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection is one of the most serious risks to public health care today. However, discouragingly, the development of new antibiotics has progressed little over the last decade. There is an urgent need for alternative approaches to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Novel methods, which include photothermal therapy based on gold nano-materials and ionizing radiation such as X-rays and gamma rays, have been reported. Studies of the effects of high-energy proton radiation on bacteria have mainly focused on Bacillus species and its spores. The effect of proton beams on Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been limitedly reported. Escherichia coli is an important biological tool to obtain metabolic and genetic information and is a common model microorganism for studying toxicity and antimicrobial activity. In addition, E. coli is a common bacterium in the intestinal tract of mammals. In this research, the morphological and the physiological changes of E. coli after proton irradiation were investigated. Diluted solutions of cells were used for proton beam radiation. LB agar plates were used to count the number of colonies formed. The growth profile of the cells was monitored by using the optical density at 600 nm. The morphology of the irradiated cells was observed with an optical microscope. A microarray analysis was performed to examine the gene expression changes between irradiated samples and control samples without irradiation. E coli cells have observed to be elongated after proton irradiation with doses ranging from 13 to 93 Gy. Twenty-two were up-regulated more than twofold in proton-irradiated samples (93 Gy) compared with unexposed one.

  6. Proton radiation effects on the optical properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnhenn, J.; Khavrus, V.; Leonhardt, A.; Eversheim, D.; Noll, C.; Hinderlich, S.; Dahl, A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper discusses proton-induced radiation effects in vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNT). VACNTs exhibit extremely low optical reflectivity which makes them interesting candidates for use in spacecraft stray light suppression. Investigating their behavior in space environment is a precondition for the implementation on a satellite.

  7. Elastic proton-deuteron backward scattering: relativistic effects and polarization observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaptari, L.P.; Semikh, S.S.

    1997-10-01

    The elastic proton-deuteron backward reaction is analyzed within a covariant approach based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation with 000. Lorentz boost and other relativistic effects in the cross section and spin correlation observables, like tensor analyzing power and polarization transfer etc., are investigated in explicit form. Results of numerical calculations for a complete set of polarization observables are presented. (orig.)

  8. Neutron roton pairing effect on some even ven rare-earth proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, D.

    2004-01-01

    The neutron roton pairing effect on some even ven rare-earth proton-rich nuclei is studied. It is taken into account, in the isovector case, within the framework of the generalized Bogoliubov-Valatin transformation, using Woods-Saxon single-particle energies. (author)

  9. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  10. Relative biological effectiveness of high energy protons for a human melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, I.; Ristic-Fira, A.; Todorovic, D.; Valastro, I.; Cirrone, P.; Cuttone, G.

    2005-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the survival of human melanoma cells induced by high linear energy transfer (LET) protons was investigated. Exponentially growing HTB140 cells were irradiated close to the Bragg peak maximum of the 62 MeV protons, as well as with 60 Co γ-rays, over single doses, ranging from 8-24 Gy. Clonogenic survival and cell viability were assessed up to 48 h post-irradiation, therefore considered as early inactivation effects. Dose dependent cell inactivation induced by high LET protons was observed. Surviving fractions have shown great overlapping with estimated cell viability, both with the increase of dose and with prolonged cell incubation. Evaluated RBEs were higher with the rise of dose, being in the range from 2 to 3. All analyzes performed have demonstrated a very radio-resistant nature of HTB140 melanoma cells. However, high LET protons are able to inactivate these cells in a larger extent compared to the effects of γ-rays. (author)

  11. Effect of low dose pre-irradiation on DNA damage and genetic material damage caused by high dosage of cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hongsheng; Zhu Jingjuan; Shang Qingjun; Wang Zhuomin; Cui Fuxian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of low dose γ-rays pre-irradiation on the induction of DNA damage and genetic material damage in peripheral lymphocytes by high dosage of cyclophosphamide (CTX). Methods: Male Kunming strain mice were randomly divided into five groups: control group, sham-irradiated group, low dose irradiated group(LDR group), cyclophosphamide chemotherapy group(CTX group) and low dose irradiation combined with chemotherapy group(LDR + CTX group). After being feeded for one week, all the mice were implanted subcutaneously with S180 cells in the left groin (control group excluded). On days 8 and 11, groups of LDR and LDR + CTX were administered with 75 mGy of whole-body irradiation, 30 h later groups CTX and LDR + CTX were injected intraperitoneally 3.0 mg cyclophosphamide. All the mice were sacrificed on day 13. DNA damage of the peripheral lymphocytes was analyzed using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Genetic material damage was analyzed using micronucleus frequency(MNF) of polychromatoerythrocytes(PCE) in bone marrow. Results: (1) Compared with control group and sham-irradiated group, the DNA damage of peripheral lymphocytes in CTX group were increased significantly (P 0.05). Conclusions: (1) High- dosage of CTX chemotherapy can cause DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes. 75 mGy y-irradiation before chemotherapy may have certain protective effect on DNA damage. (2) CTX has potent mutagenic effect, giving remarkable rise to MNF of PCE. 75 mGy γ-ray pre-irradiation has not obvious protection against genetic toxicity of high-dose CTX chemotherapy. (authors)

  12. Increasing the proton conductivity of sulfonated polyether ether ketone by incorporating graphene oxide: Morphology effect on proton dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Jun Xing; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Ahmad, Azizan; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Kasai, Hideaki

    2018-03-01

    We synthesized graphene oxide-sulfonated polyether ether ketone (GO-SPEEK) composite membrane and compare its proton conductivity with that of Nafion® 117 and SPEEK membranes. From experimental measurements, we found that GO-SPEEK has better proton conductivity (σGO-SPEEK = 3.8 × 10-2 S cm-1) when compared to Nafion® 117 (σNafion = 2.4 × 10-2 S cm-1) and SPEEK (σSPEEK = 2.9 × 10-3 S cm-1). From density functional theory (DFT-) based total energy calculations, we found that GO-SPEEK has the shortest proton diffusion distance among the three membranes, yielding the highest tunneling probability. Hence, GO-SPEEK exhibits the highest conductivity. The short proton diffusion distance in GO-SPEEK, as compared to Nafion® 117 and SPEEK, can be attributed to the presence of oxygenated functional groups of GO in the polymer matrix. This also explains why GO-SPEEK requires the lowest hydration level to reach its maximum conductivity. Moreover, we have successfully shown that the proton conductivity σ is related to the tunneling probability T, i.e., σ = σ‧ exp(-1/T). We conclude that the proton diffusion distance and hydration level are the two most significant factors that determine the membrane’s good conductivity. The distance between ionic sites of the membrane should be small to obtain good conductivity. With this short distance, lower hydration level is required. Thus, a membrane with short separation between the ionic sites can have enhanced conductivity, even at low hydration conditions.

  13. Computer simulation of cascade damage in iron: PKA mass effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calder, A.; Bacon, D.J.; Barashev, A.; Osetsky, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Results are presented from an extensive series of computer simulations of the damage created by displacement cascades in alpha-iron. The objective has been to determine for the first time the effect of the mass of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) on defect number, defect clustering and cluster morphology. Cascades with PKA energy in the range 5 to 20 keV have been simulated by molecular dynamics for temperature up to 600 K using an interatomic potential for iron for which the energy difference between the dumbbell interstitial and the crowdion is close to the value from ab initio calculation (Ackland et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2004). At least 30 cascades have been simulated for each condition in order to generate reasonable statistics. The influence of PKA species on damage has been investigated in two ways. In one, the PKA atom was treated as an Fe atom as far as its interaction with other atoms was concerned, but its atomic weight (in amu) was either 12 (C), 56 (Fe) or 209 (Bi). Pairs of Bi PKAs have also been used to mimic heavy molecular ion irradiation. In the other approach, the short-range pair part of the interatomic potential was changed from Fe-Fe to that for Bi-Fe, either with or without a change of PKA mass, in order to study the influence of high-energy collisions on the cascade outcome. It is found that PKA mass is more influential than the interatomic potential between the PKA and Fe atoms. At low cascade energy (5-10 keV), increasing PKA mass leads to a decrease in number of interstitials and vacancies. At high energy (20 keV), the main effect of increasing mass is to increase the probability of creation of interstitial and vacancy clusters in the form of 1/2 and dislocation loops. The simulation results are consistent with experimental TEM observations of damage in irradiated iron. (authors)

  14. BIANCA, a biophysical model of cell survival and chromosome damage by protons, C-ions and He-ions at energies and doses used in hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietro Carante, Mario; Aimè, Chiara; Tello Cajiao, John James; Ballarini, Francesca

    2018-04-01

    An upgraded version of the BIANCA II biophysical model, which describes more realistically interphase chromosome organization and the link between chromosome aberrations and cell death, was applied to V79 and AG01522 cells exposed to protons, C-ions and He-ions over a wide LET interval (0.6–502 keV µm‑1), as well as proton-irradiated U87 cells. The model assumes that (i) ionizing radiation induces DNA ‘cluster lesions’ (CLs), where by definition each CL produces two independent chromosome fragments; (ii) fragment (distance-dependent) mis-rejoining, or un-rejoining, produces chromosome aberrations; (iii) some aberrations lead to cell death. The CL yield, which mainly depends on radiation quality but is also modulated by the target cell, is an adjustable parameter. The fragment un-rejoining probability, f, is the second, and last, parameter. The value of f, which is assumed to depend on the cell type but not on radiation quality, was taken from previous studies, and only the CL yield was adjusted in the present work. Good agreement between simulations and experimental data was obtained, suggesting that BIANCA II is suitable for calculating the biological effectiveness of hadrontherapy beams. For both V79 and AG01522 cells, the mean number of CLs per micrometer was found to increase with LET in a linear-quadratic fashion before the over-killing region, where a less rapid increase, with a tendency to saturation, was observed. Although the over-killing region deserves further investigation, the possibility of fitting the CL yields is an important feature for hadrontherapy, because it allows performing predictions also at LET values where experimental data are not available. Finally, an approach was proposed to predict the ion-response of the cell line(s) of interest from the ion-response of a reference cell line and the photon response of both. A pilot study on proton-irradiated AG01522 and U87 cells, taking V79 cells as a reference, showed encouraging

  15. Electrolyte effects in a model of proton discharge on charged electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Johannes; Kravchenko, Kateryna; Spohr, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    We report results on the influence of NaCl electrolyte dissolved in water on proton discharge reactions from aqueous solution to charged platinum electrodes. We have extended a recently developed combined proton transfer/proton discharge model on the basis of empirical valence bond theory to include NaCl solutions with several different concentrations of cations and anions, both stoichiometric (1:1) compositions and non-stoichiometric ones with an excess of cations. The latter solutions partially screen the electrostatic potential from the surface charge of the negatively charged electrode. 500-1000 trajectories of a discharging proton were integrated by molecular dynamics simulations until discharge occurred, or for at most 1.5 ns. The results show a strong dependence on ionic strength, but only a weak dependence on the screening behavior, when comparing stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric solutions. Overall, the Na+ cations exert a more dominant effect on the discharge reaction, which we argue is likely due to the very rigid arrangements of the cations on the negatively polarized electrode surface. Thus, our model predicts, for the given and very high negative surface charge densities, the fastest discharge reaction for pure water, but obviously cannot take into account the fact that such high charge densities are even more out of reach experimentally than for higher electrolyte concentrations.

  16. Quantification of the Relative Biological Effectiveness for Ion Beam Radiotherapy: Direct Experimental Comparison of Proton and Carbon Ion Beams and a Novel Approach for Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaesser, Thilo; Weyrather, Wilma K.; Friedrich, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Iancu, Gheorghe; Kraemer, Michael; Kragl, Gabriele; Brons, Stephan; Winter, Marcus; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Scholz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To present the first direct experimental in vitro comparison of the biological effectiveness of range-equivalent protons and carbon ion beams for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed in a three-dimensional phantom using a pencil beam scanning technique and to compare the experimental data with a novel biophysical model. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was measured in the phantom after irradiation with two opposing fields, thus mimicking the typical patient treatment scenario. The novel biophysical model represents a substantial extension of the local effect model, previously used for treatment planning in carbon ion therapy for more than 400 patients, and potentially can be used to predict effectiveness of all ion species relevant for radiotherapy. A key feature of the new approach is the more sophisticated consideration of spatially correlated damage induced by ion irradiation. Results: The experimental data obtained for Chinese hamster ovary cells clearly demonstrate that higher cell killing is achieved in the target region with carbon ions as compared with protons when the effects in the entrance channel are comparable. The model predictions demonstrate agreement with these experimental data and with data obtained with helium ions under similar conditions. Good agreement is also achieved with relative biological effectiveness values reported in the literature for other cell lines for monoenergetic proton, helium, and carbon ions. Conclusion: Both the experimental data and the new modeling approach are supportive of the advantages of carbon ions as compared with protons for treatment-like field configurations. Because the model predicts the effectiveness for several ion species with similar accuracy, it represents a powerful tool for further optimization and utilization of the potential of ion beams in tumor therapy.

  17. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  18. Antiprotons four times more effective than protons for cell irradiation

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "A pioneering experiment at CERN with potential future application in cancer therapy has produced its first results. Started in 2003, ACE (Antiproton Cell Experiment) is the first investigation of the biological effects of antiprotons." (1,5 page)

  19. The effect on radiation damage of structural material in a hybrid system by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, Mehtap; Şarer, Başar; Kasap, Hızır

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of some fluids on gas production rates in structural material were investigated. • The MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo code was used for three-dimensional calculations. • It was found that biggest contribution to gas production rates comes from Fe isotope of the. • The desirable values for 5% SFG-PuO 2 with respect to radiation damage were specified. - Abstract: In this study, the molten salt-heavy metal mixtures 99–95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-Pu, 99–95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-PuF4, 99-95% Li20Sn80-1-5% SFG-PuO2 were used as fluids. The fluids were used in the liquid first-wall, blanket and shield zones of the designed hybrid reactor system. 9Cr2WVTa ferritic steel with the width of 4 cm was used as the structural material. The parameters of radiation damage are proton, deuterium, tritium, He-3 and He-4 gas production rates. In this study, the effects of the selected fluid on the radiation damage, in terms of individual as well as total isotopes in the structural material, were investigated for 30 full power years (FPYs). Three-dimensional analyses were performed using the most recent version of the MCNPX-2.7.0 Monte Carlo radiation transport code and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library

  20. Polarization reversal of proton spins in solid-state targets by superradiance effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichertz, L.A.

    1991-02-01

    Scattering experiments with polarized targets are prepared at the Bonn accelerator ELSA. The new Bonn frozen spin target (BOFROST) developed for real photon experiments at the PHOENICS detector has been tested in the laboratory. Proton polarization values of -99% and +94% in ammonia, -96% and +90% in butanol have been achieved at a magnetic field of 3.5 Tesla. At a temperature of 70 mK and a magnetic field of 0.35 Tesla a very fast spontaneous polarization reversal has been observed. This effect occured at negative polarization only and has been identified as a self-induced superradiance effect in the proton spin system. This work describes the polarization and relaxation measurements at BOFROST and detailed experiments concerning the superradiance effect. (orig.) [de

  1. The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and the proton radius from effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Grup de Fisica Teorica, Dept. Fisica and IFAE, Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    We comprehensively analyse the theoretical prediction for the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, and the associated determination of the proton radius. We use effective field theories. This allows us to relate the proton radius with well-defined objects in quantum field theory, eliminating unnecessary model dependence. The use of effective field theories also helps us to organize the computation so that we can clearly state the parametric accuracy of the result. In this paper we review all (and check several of) the contributions to the energy shift of order α{sup 5}, as well as those that scale like α{sup 6} x logarithms in the context of non-relativistic effective field theories of QED. (orig.)

  2. Neutron-proton isovector pairing effect on the nuclear moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, D.; Ami, I.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    The neutron-proton (n-p) isovector pairing effect on the nuclear moment of inertia has been studied within the framework of the BCS approximation. An analytical expression of the moment of inertia, that explicitly depends upon the n-p pairing, has been established using the Inglis cranking model. The model was first tested numerically for nuclei such as N = Z and whose experimental values of the moment of inertia are known (i.e. such as 16 ≤ Z ≤ 40). It has been shown that the n-p pairing effect is non-negligible and clearly improves the theoretical predictions when compared to those of the pairing between like particles. Secondly, predictions have been established for even-even proton-rich rare-earth nuclei. It has been shown that the n-p pairing effect is non-negligible when N = Z and rapidly decreases with increasing values of (N-Z). (author)

  3. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-04-04

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors.

  4. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose‐weighted correction method for LET effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth‐dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high‐bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L‐shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth‐dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth‐output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose‐weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L‐shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors. PACS number: 87.56.‐v

  5. Effects of Neurological Damage on Production of Formulaic Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, Diana; Canterucci, Gina; Katsnelson, Dora

    2009-01-01

    Early studies reported preserved formulaic language in left hemisphere damaged subjects and reduced incidence of formulaic expressions in the conversational speech of stroke patients with right hemispheric damage. Clinical observations suggest a possible role also of subcortical nuclei. This study examined formulaic language in the spontaneous…

  6. Short- and Medium-term Atmospheric Effects of Very Large Solar Proton Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Vitt, Francis M.; Garcia, Rolando R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Labow, Gordon J.; Randall, Cora E.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Funke, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    Long-term variations in ozone have been caused by both natural and humankind related processes. In particular, the humankind or anthropogenic influence on ozone from chlorofluorocarbons and halons (chlorine and bromine) has led to international regulations greatly limiting the release of these substances. These anthropogenic effects on ozone are most important in polar regions and have been significant since the 1970s. Certain natural ozone influences are also important in polar regions and are caused by the impact of solar charged particles on the atmosphere. Such natural variations have been studied in order to better quantify the human influence on polar ozone. Large-scale explosions on the Sun near solar maximum lead to emissions of charged particles (mainly protons and electrons), some of which enter the Earth's magnetosphere and rain down on the polar regions. "Solar proton events" have been used to describe these phenomena since the protons associated with these solar events sometimes create a significant atmospheric disturbance. We have used the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) to study the short- and medium-term (days to a few months) influences of solar proton events between 1963 and 2005 on stratospheric ozone. The four largest events in the past 45 years (August 1972; October 1989; July 2000; and October-November 2003) caused very distinctive polar changes in layers of the Earth's atmosphere known as the stratosphere (12-50 km; -7-30 miles) and mesosphere (50-90 km; 30-55 miles). The solar protons connected with these events created hydrogen- and nitrogen- containing compounds, which led to the polar ozone destruction. The hydrogen-containing compounds have very short lifetimes and lasted for only a few days (typically the duration of the solar proton event). On the other hand, the nitrogen-containing compounds lasted much longer, especially in the Winter. The nitrogen oxides were predicted

  7. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation .... has also been noted in the case of the mutant Lys- ... we outline the theoretical method used. ... The starting point of our analysis is a high-reso-.

  8. Irradiation effects in beryllium exposed to high energy protons of the NuMI neutrino source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuksenko, V., E-mail: viacheslav.kuksenko@materials.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Ammigan, K.; Hartsell, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia (United States); Densham, C. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Hurh, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia (United States); Roberts, S. [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-15

    A beryllium primary vacuum-to-air beam ‘window’ of the 'Neutrinos at the Main Injector' (NuMI) beamline at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, USA, has been irradiated by 120 GeV protons over 7 years, with a maximum integrated fluence at the window centre of 2.06 10{sup 22} p/cm{sup 2} corresponding to a radiation damage level of 0.48 dpa. The proton beam is pulsed at 0.5 Hz leading to an instantaneous temperature rise of 40 °C per pulse. The window is cooled by natural convection and is estimated to operate at an average of around 50 °C. The microstructure of this irradiated material was investigated by SEM/EBSD and Atom Probe Tomography, and compared to that of unirradiated regions of the beam window and that of stock material of the same PF-60 grade. Microstructural investigations revealed a highly inhomogeneous distribution of impurity elements in both unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Impurities were mainly localised in precipitates, and as segregations at grain boundary and dislocation lines. Low levels of Fe, Cu, Ni, C and O were also found to be homogeneously distributed in the beryllium matrix. In the irradiated materials, up to 440 appm of Li, derived from transmutation of beryllium was homogeneously distributed in solution in the beryllium matrix.

  9. Evidence for higher-order effects in L-shell ionization by proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkadi, L.; Mukoyama, T.

    1988-01-01

    It is widely believed that higher order processes of ion-atom collisions are negligible in cases of light projectiles like proton. Recent refined experiments tried to prove that the existence of such effects were comperable with the experimental errors, and they showed the unexpected relative importance of the higher order processes. Thus a new coupled channel calculation was performed for proton-gold atom collision in the energy range of 0.15-3.0 MeV, including dynamical subshell coupling effects. The results show that the deviations from the first order cross sections reach 40% at low collision energy. This result made necessary to correct the calculations of L-shell X-ray production cross sections. (D.G.) 6 refs

  10. Wavefunction effects in inner shell ionization of light atoms by protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aashamar, K.; Amundsen, P.A.

    An efficient computer code for calculating the impact parameter distribution of atomic ionization probabilities caused by charged particle impact, has been developed. The programme is based on the semiclassical approximation, and it allows the use of an arbitrary atomic central potential for deriving the one-electron orbitals that form the basis for the description of the atomic states. Extensive calculations are reported for proton induced K-shell ionization in carbon and neon, covering energies in the range 0.1-10 MeV. Some calculations on proton-argon L-shell ionization are also reported. Comparison of the results obtained using (screened) hydrogenic potentials and the recently reported energy- optimized effective atomic central potentials, respectively demonstrates that wavefunction effects are generally important for inner-shell ionization of light atoms. The agreement between theory and experiment in the K-shell case is improved for fast collisions upon using better wavefunctions. (Auth.)

  11. The effect of delta rays on the ionometric dosimetry of proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casnati, E.; Baraldi, C.; Tartari, A.; Boccaccio, P.; Bonifazzi, C.; Singh, B.

    1998-01-01

    The interface effects arising in the measurement of absorbed dose by ionization chambers, owing to the inhomogeneity between the walls and the gas, have been evaluated by an analytical model. The geometrical situation considered here is appropriate for representing the behaviour of a plane-parallel ionization chamber exposed to a radiotherapeutic beam of protons. Two gases, dry air and tissue equivalent gas (methane based), as well as six materials commonly used in ionization chamber walls, i.e. graphite, A-150 tissue equivalent plastic, C-522 air equivalent plastic, nylon type 6, polymethyl methacrylate and polystyrene, have been examined. The analysis of the results shows that, within the limits of the detector dimensions and proton energies commonly used in the dosimetry of radiotherapeutic beams, these effects, if not taken into account in the measurement interpretation, can entail deviations of up to about 2% with respect to the correct absorbed dose in gas. (author)

  12. Contribution of Indirect Effects to Clustered Damage in DNA Irradiated with Protons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Štěpán, Václav; Karamitros, M.; Karabín, M.; Dostálek, P.; Incerti, S.; Davídková, Marie; Sihver, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 166, 1-4 (2015), s. 44-48 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12008; GA MŠk LM2011019 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Geant4-DNA * radiolysis * breakage * lesions * cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.894, year: 2015

  13. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  14. Taurine effect on cytogenetic lesions in the cornea of mice exposed to 9 Gev proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorozhtsova, S.V.; Yartsev, E.I.

    1989-01-01

    Possibilities of preventive measures and treatment of cytogenetic injuries in the mice cornea, subjected to proton irradiation at 9 Gev were studied. Taurine containing solution (TCS) was used as a radiomodifying agent. It is shown that TCS application enables to decrease aberrant mitoses level in cornea epithelium cells of mice. Antiactinic effect of the above agent is determined by its considerable action on mitotic delay

  15. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Pushpa, N.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods

  16. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana, E-mail: gnanaprakash@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore-570006, Karnataka (India); Pushpa, N. [Department of PG Studies in Physics, JSS College, Ooty Road, Mysore-570025, Karnataka (India)

    2014-04-24

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods.

  17. Tritium conductivity and isotope effect in proton-conducting perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukundan, R.; Brosha, E.L.; Birdsell, S.A.; Costello, A.L.; Garzon, F.H.; Willms, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The tritium ion conductivities of SrZr 0.9 Yb 0.1 O 2.95 and BaCe 0.9 Yb 0.1 O 2.95 have been measured by ac impedance analysis. The high tritium conductivity of these perovskites could potentially lead to their application as an electrochemical membrane for the recovery of tritium from tritiated gas streams. The conductivities of these perovskites, along with SrCe 0.95 Yb 0.05 O 2.975 , were also measured in hydrogen- and deuterium-containing atmospheres to illustrate the isotope effect. For the strontium zirconate and barium cerate samples, the impedance plot consists of two clearly resolved arcs, a bulk and a grain boundary arc, in the temperature range 50--350 C. However, for the strontium cerate sample, the clear resolution of the bulk conductivity was not possible and only the total conductivity was measurable. Thus, the isotope effect was clearly established only for the strontium zirconate and barium cerate samples. The decrease in bulk conductivity with increasing isotope mass was found to be a result of an increase in the activation energy for conduction accompanied by a decrease in the pre-exponential factor. Since the concentration of the mobile species (H+, D+, or T+) should remain relatively constant at T < 350 C, this increase in activation energy is directly attributable to the increased activation energy for the isotope mobility

  18. Proton Radiation Effects on Dark Signal Distribution of PPD CMOS Image Sensors: Both TID and DDD Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Zujun; Chen, Wei; Liu, Minbo; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun; Ma, Wuying; Dong, Guantao; Jin, Junshan

    2017-11-30

    Four-transistor (T) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) with four-megapixel resolution using 11µm pitch high dynamic range pixel were radiated with 3 MeV and 10MeV protons. The dark signal was measured pre- and post-radiation, with the dark signal post irradiation showing a remarkable increase. A theoretical method of dark signal distribution pre- and post-radiation is used to analyze the degradation mechanisms of the dark signal distribution. The theoretical results are in good agreement with experimental results. This research would provide a good understanding of the proton radiation effects on the CIS and make it possible to predict the dark signal distribution of the CIS under the complex proton radiation environments.

  19. Cell potentials, cell resistance, and proton fluxes in corn root tissue. Effects of dithioerythritol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Hanson, J.B.

    1976-09-01

    Studies were made of the effect of dithioerythritol on net proton flux, potassium influx and efflux, cell potential, and cell resistance in fresh and washed corn (Zea mays L. WF9XM14) root tissue. Dithioerythritol induces equal proton influx and potassium efflux rates, decreases membrane resistance, and hyperpolarizes the cell potential. Greater effects on H/sup +/ and K/sup +/ fluxes are secured at pH 7 than at pH 5. Other sulfhydryl-protecting reagents produced the same responses. No evidence could be found that dithioerythritol affected energy metabolism or membrane ATPase, and proton influx was induced in the presence of uncoupling agents. We deduce that dithioerythritol activates a passive H/sup +//K/sup +/ antiport, driven in these experiments by the outwardly directed electrochemical gradient of K/sup +/. The net effect on H/sup +/ and K/sup +/ fluxes is believed to reside with the combined activity of a polarized H/sup +//K/sup +/ exchanging ATPase and the passive H/sup +//K/sup +/ antiport. A model is presented to show how the combined system might produce stable potential differences and K/sup +/ content.

  20. Effects of solar proton events on dayglow observed by the TIMED/SABER satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Xu, Jiyao; Smith, Anne K.; Chen, Guang-Ming

    2017-07-01

    The effect of solar proton events on the daytime O2 and OH airglows and ozone and atomic oxygen concentrations in the mesosphere is studied using data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER). Five events occurred in September 2005, December 2006, March 2012, May 2013, and June 2015 that satisfy two criteria: the maximum proton fluxes are larger than 1000 pfu, and daytime data in the high latitude region are available from SABER. The event in December 2006 is studied in detail, and the effects of all five events are compared in brief. The results indicate that all four parameters in the mesosphere decrease during the events. During the event in 2006, the maximum depletions of O2 and OH dayglow emission rates and ozone and atomic oxygen volume mixing ratios at 70 km are respectively 31.6%, 37.0%, 42.4%, and 38.9%. The effect of the solar proton event changes with latitude, longitude, and altitude. The depletions due to the stronger events are larger on average than those due to the weaker events. The depletions of both dayglow emission rates are weaker than those of ozone and atomic oxygen. The responses of O2 and OH nightglow emissions around their peak altitudes to the SPEs are not as strong and regular as those for dayglow in the mesosphere.

  1. Polymer-inorganic hybrid proton conductive membranes: Effect of the interfacial transfer pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pingping; Hao, Lie; Wu, Wenjia; Li, Yifan; Wang, Jingtao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A series of hybrid membranes are prepared using fillers with different structures. • The fillers (0-D, 1-D, and 2-D) are sulfonated to ensure close surface component. • The effect of filler’s structure on microstructure of hydrid membrane is explored. • For single-kind filler series, 2-D filler has the strongest conduction promotion. • The synergy effect of different kinds of fillers is systematacially investigated. - Abstract: For hybrid membrane, the polymer-inorganic interface along filler surface can be facilely created to be distinctive and controllable pathway for mass transfer. Herein, three kinds of fillers are used as inorganic additives including zero-dimensional silica (0-D, SiO_2), one-dimensional halloysite nanotube (1-D, HNT), and two-dimensional graphene oxide (2-D, GO), which are functionalized by sulfonated polymer layer to ensure close surface component. Then the fillers are incorporated into two types of polymer matrixes (phase-separated sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) and non-phase-separated chitosan) to prepare three series of hybrid membranes with single-kind filler, double-kinds fillers, or triple-kinds fillers, respectively. The microstructures, physicochemical properties, and proton conduction properties (under hydrated and anhydrous conditions) of the membranes are extensively investigated. It is found that (i) for the single-kind filler-filled membranes, 2-D filler has the strongest promotion ability for proton conductivity of membrane due to the constructed wide and long-range pathways for proton transfer; (ii) while for the hybrid membranes with double-kinds fillers, instead of synergistic promotion effect, the fillers cause more tortuous transfer pathways within membranes and then decrease proton conductivity; (iii) the hybrid membranes with triple-kinds fillers exhibit similar behavior but a little higher conductivity than the membranes with double-kinds fillers.

  2. Lifetime effects of single-event proton exposures in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.

    1986-01-01

    The US School of Aerospace Medicine studies of the lifetime effects of proton irradiation in rhesus monkeys have been conducted. Life-span shortening has been associated with proton energies of 55 MeV and above, as well as with doses greater than 360 rads. Female rhesus monkeys have a higher mortality than males as a result of high incidence of endometriosis in the irradiated animals. A dose ordering effect is apparent. Mortality rates began to accelerate at eight years after doses of 360 to 400 rads; at two years, after 500 to 650 rads; and less than one year, after 800 rads. Malignant tumors accounted for 18% of the deaths in the proton-exposed animals. Endometriosis was the cause of 25% of the deaths in this group. Energy-specific effects were observed. Eight malignant brain tumors occurred in animals exposed to 55-MeV protons and in no other group. Cataract incidence was highest in animals exposed to 32 and 55 MeV. These observations suggest a positive relationship with the Bragg peak energy distribution in the area of the brain and crystalline lens. Glucose tolerance was lowest in the animals exposed to totally penetrating radiation, where the fraction of the surface dose reaching the pancreas was highest. Age-matched control animals have yet to pass their median survival time, and the colony continues to be a valuable source of data on the relationship of total-body radiation to age-related diseases in captive monkeys. 16 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Power of protons in the fight against cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.

    2011-01-01

    a large percentage of patients with cancer are receiving radiotherapy as part of their treatment. At present it is possible to plan with precision these treatments, reducing the risk of side effects and increasing therapeutic efficiency. Proton therapy (also known as particle therapy) is a form external radiotherapy that uses beams of energized protons to treat cancer. The main advantage of proton therapy is its ability to accurately manage an optimal dose of radiation to the tumor, without damaging surrounding healthy tissues and significantly reducing the likelihood and/or severity of side effects. (Author)

  4. Reductive effects of poria cocos on radiation-induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Heon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jo, Sung-Kee; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2002-01-01

    In order to screen a radioprotective material from nontoxic natural products, the effects of Poria cocos (PC), known as a blood tonic of traditional Oriental herbs, were investigated in HL-60 cells and ICR mice. The water extract of PC was administrated to mice and then the mice were irradiated with - rays. The jejunal crypt survival, endogenous spleen colony formation and apoptosis in jejunal crypt cells were investigated in mice irradiated with 12 Gy, 6.5 Gy, 2 Gy of -rays, respectively. The administration of the PC extract protected the jejunal crypts (p<0.005) and decreased the apoptosis frequency (p<0.05). The formation of endogenous spleen colony was increased but not significantly. The micronuclei (MN) formation and the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; comet assay) were investigated in HL- 60 cells irradiated 2 Gy of -rays. The frequency of MN was decreased (p<0.001) and the tail movement, which was a marker of DNA strand breaks in the SCGE, was decreased in groups treated with PC extract (p<0.01) before exposure to-irradiation. These results indicated that PC protects stem cells and reduces DNA damage induced by -rays. Therefore, Poria cocos might be a useful radioprotector, especially since it is a relatively nontoxic product

  5. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S Gregory

    Full Text Available Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm, lactate (10mM, and acidic pH (pH 6.0 produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol, on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM or acidic pH (pH 6.0, i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  6. Relative biological effectiveness of 160 MeV protons. II. Biological data and their interpretation in terms of microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Kellerer, A.M.; Rossi, H.H.; Lam, Y.M.P.

    1978-01-01

    The radiobiological effectiveness of 160 MeV protons was measured relative to 60 Co γ rays using Chinese hamster cells cultured in vitro. Separate experiments were performed with cells irradiated in suspension, or attached to plastic tissue culture flasks. Proton irradiations were performed in the incident plateau of the depth dose profile and with the Bragg peak spread out to cover 10 cm. In all cases the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for protons relative to gamma rays was 1.2 for doses in excess of about 200 rad. The attached cell experiments indicate an increasing RBE at low doses, which is consistent with the microdosimetric measurements

  7. Synergistic effects of total ionizing dose on single event upset sensitivity in static random access memory under proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yao; Guo Hong-Xia; Zhang Feng-Qi; Zhao Wen; Wang Yan-Ping; Zhang Ke-Ying; Ding Li-Li; Luo Yin-Hong; Wang Yuan-Ming; Fan Xue

    2014-01-01

    Synergistic effects of the total ionizing dose (TID) on the single event upset (SEU) sensitivity in static random access memories (SRAMs) were studied by using protons. The total dose was cumulated with high flux protons during the TID exposure, and the SEU cross section was tested with low flux protons at several cumulated dose steps. Because of the radiation-induced off-state leakage current increase of the CMOS transistors, the noise margin became asymmetric and the memory imprint effect was observed. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  8. Simulating the Effects of Laser Damage to the Retina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    This Phase II SBIR brought vision and signal processing researchers from the Air Force, academia and the public sector together to develop a visualization tool for modeling laser damage to the retina...

  9. Effect of machining damage on tensile properties of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafee, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    It is well established that damage introduced at the surface of beryllium during machining operations can lower its mechanical properties. Tensile tests were conducted to illustrate this on beryllium presently being used for parts in the W79 program and similar to the new powder-processed beryllium specified for production (tentative specification MEL 76-001319). The objective of this study is to quantitatively illuminate the importance of controlling machining damage in this particular grade of powder-processed beryllium

  10. Effect of protonation on the electronic properties of DNA base pairs: applications for molecular electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallajosyula, Sairam S; Pati, Swapan K

    2007-10-11

    Protonation of DNA basepairs is a reversible phenomenon that can be controlled by tuning the pH of the system. Under mild acidic conditions, the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the DNA basepairs undergoes a change. We study the effect of protonation on the electronic properties of the DNA basepairs to probe for possible molecular electronics applications. We find that, under mild acidic pH conditions, the A:T basepair shows excellent rectification behavior that is, however, absent in the G:C basepair. The mechanism of rectification has been discussed using a simple chemical potential model. We also consider the noncanonical A:A basepair and find that it can be used as efficient pH dependent molecular switch. The switching action in the A:A basepair is explained in the light of pi-pi interactions, which lead to efficient delocalization over the entire basepair.

  11. Correcting Detector Efficiency Effects in Event-by-Event Net-Proton Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of fluctuations of conserved quantities give valuable information on the susceptibilities of the nuclear matter produced in a heavy-ion collision, and could in principle be used to distinguish QGP from hadronic matter. However, measurements of the cumulants of conserved-quantity distributions are affected by the detector efficiency, which must be accounted for in order to ensure accuracy. Following the development of a toy model that simulates detector efficiency effects on net-proton number, various correction methods, including those developed by A. Bzdak and V. Koch, were implemented and tested in a wide range of conditions. We find that the first four cumulants of net-proton-number distribution can be accurately reproduced by the Koch-Bzdak corrections with reasonable input statistics. Various methods of correcting for $p_T$ dependence of detector efficiency are also explored.

  12. Effect of indomethacin and salt depletion on renal proton MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyman, S.N.; Mammen, M.

    1991-01-01

    Blockade of the synthesis of vasodilating prostaglandins with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) renders the renal medulla susceptible to hypoxic injury with reduced renal function, especially in clinical conditions characterized by volume depletion. Alterations in renal hemodynamics and urine production may effect renal MR imaging under these circumstances. We injected salt-depleted and control rats undergoing proton MR imaging with indomethacin 10 mg/kg. Indomethacin abolished the cortico-medullary T2-gradient and markedly diminished the overall renal signal in salt-depleted rats only. These changes, which progressed over a period of 40 min after indomethacin was injected, probably result from renal oligemia and decreased urine production, with an associated decrease in T2-values. We suggest that a history of consumption of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be obtained and taken into account in the evaluation of renal proton MR imaging, especially in the presence of salt and volume depletion. (orig.)

  13. The effect of protons on the performance of swept-charge devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David R.; Gow, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The e2v technologies CCD54, or swept-charge device (SCD) has been extensively radiation tested for use in the Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) instrument, to be launched as a part of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 payload in 2008. The principle use of the SCD is in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) applications, the device providing a relatively large collecting area of 1.1 cm 2 , and achieving near Fano-limited spectroscopy at -15 deg. C, a temperature that is easily obtained using a thermoelectric cooler (TEC). This paper describes the structure and operation of the SCD and details the methodology and results obtained from two proton irradiation studies carried out in 2006 and 2008, respectively to quantify the effects of proton irradiation on the operational characteristics of the device. The analysis concentrates on the degradation of the measured FWHM of various elemental lines and quantifies the effects of proton fluence on the observed X-ray fluorescence spectra from mineralogical target samples.

  14. Confinement effect of protonation/deprotonation of carboxylic group modified in nanochannel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Hong-Li; Zhang, Hui; Li, Cheng-Yong; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Protonation and deprotonation processes are the key step of acid–base reaction and occur in many biological processes. Study on the deprotonation process of molecules and/or functional groups in confined conditions would help us understand the acid–base theory and confinement effect of biomolecules. In this paper, we use a recently established approach to the study of protonation and deprotonation processes of functional groups in porous anodic alumina array nanochannels by measuring the flux of electrochemical active probes (ferricyanide ions) using an Au film electrochemical detector sputtered at the end of nanochannels. The protonation and deprotonation processes of surface functional groups in nanochannels will change the surface charges and in turn modulate the transportation of charged electroactive probes through nanochannels. The titration curve for the deprotonation of carboxylic groups in nanochannel confined conditions is obtained by measuring the current signal of ferricyanide probe flowing through an carboxylic-anchored PAA nanochannels array at different solution pH. Results show that the deprotonation of carboxylic group in nanochannel occurs in one step with a pK 1/2 = 6.2. The present method provides an effective tool to study the deprotonation processes of various functional groups and biomolecules under confined conditions

  15. SU-F-T-171: Manufacturing Cost Effective Heterogeneous Phantoms for Use in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruett, J; Chen, Y; Ahmad, S; Johnson, D [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of 3D printing cost effective heterogeneous phantoms for use in proton therapy treatment planning quality assurance. Methods: A desktop 3D printer was utilized to create a series of 2 cm × 2 cm × 4 cm PLA plastic blocks of varying fill materials and hexagonal fill pattern. The blocks were than tested when filled with air, polyurethane foam, paraffin, silicone, and caulk of calcium carbonate – acrylic polymer blend. The blocks were evaluated with a “GE Lightspeed” 16 slice CT scanner and average CT# of the materials’ centers evaluated. Blocks were then placed into a custom aperture fitted to a Mevion Proton system to determine the relative stopping power of each. Scans were performed in water tank with Marcus type parallel plate chamber under a beam with a range of 15 cm and modulation of 2 cm. Shifts in range occurring relative to the 80% distal edge of the open SOBP were evaluated. Results: The CT#s of the blocks were plotted against their measured relative stopping power. This curve was compared to that which is in clinical use. While the trend agrees generally, specific differences between the relative stopping powers were as great as 10%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that it is possible to utilize different cost effective materials in the manufacturing of phantoms for use in proton therapy. While different materials may provide better agreement to established calibration curves, a custom curve specific to the materials used may be utilized to accurately predict proton treatment dose distributions.

  16. Dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijl, Hendrik P.; Vuijk, Peter van; Coppes, Rob P.; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Konings, Antonius W.T.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate dose-volume effects in the rat cervical spinal cord with protons. Methods and Materials: Wistar rats were irradiated on the cervical spinal cord with a single fraction of unmodulated protons (150-190 MeV) using the shoot through method, which employs the plateau of the depth-dose profile rather than the Bragg peak. Four different lengths of the spinal cord (2, 4, 8, and 20 mm) were irradiated with variable doses. The endpoint for estimating dose-volume effects was paralysis of fore or hind limbs. Results: The results obtained with a high-precision proton beam showed a marginal increase of ED 50 when decreasing the irradiated cord length from 20 mm (ED 50 = 20.4 Gy) to 8 mm (ED 50 = 24.9 Gy), but a steep increase in ED 50 when further decreasing the length to 4 mm (ED 50 = 53.7 Gy) and 2 mm (ED 50 = 87.8 Gy). These results generally confirm data obtained previously in a limited series with 4-6-MV photons, and for the first time it was possible to construct complete dose-response curves down to lengths of 2 mm. At higher ED 50 values and shorter lengths irradiated, the latent period to paralysis decreased from 125 to 60 days. Conclusions: Irradiation of variable lengths of rat cervical spinal cord with protons showed steeply increasing ED 50 values for lengths of less than 8 mm. These results suggest the presence of a critical migration distance of 2-3 mm for cells involved in regeneration processes

  17. Radiomodifying effect of caffeine on mammalian cellular system using gamma radiation and proton beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanth, Sneha P.; Yadav, Usha; Shirsath, K.B.; Desai, Utkarsha N.; Chaurasia, Rajesh K.; Bhat, Nagesh N.; Anjaria, K.B.; Sapra, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is a commonly consumed neurostimulant in the world. Reports suggest the radiomodifying effects of caffeine against low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation when administered pre and post irradiation by releasing checkpoint arrest. In the present report, the radioprotective and radiosensitizing ability of caffeine (10μM - 2mM) were studied on Chinese Hamster Ovary (CRO) cell line against low as well as high LET radiation when administered pre, post and continuously during radiation. Effect of caffeine treatment on the genotoxicity induced by gamma and proton beam radiation was assessed by micronucleus assay. Effect of caffeine treatment on clonogenic survival of irradiated cells was also assessed

  18. The Biological Effect of Fast Neutrons and High-Energy Protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalev, Ju.I.; Petrovich, I.K.; Strel'cova, V.N.

    1964-01-01

    The paper gives the results of comparative experiments on the effects of fast neutrons and high-energy protons (500 MeV) on life expectancy, peripheral blood, incidence and rate of appearance of tumours in the rat as a function of administered dose and time of observation. The neutron experiment was performed on 573 and the proton experiment on 490 white rats. The animals irradiated with fast neutrons were given doses between 8.5 and 510 rad, and those irradiated with protons received doses between 28 and 1008 rad. The effective doses for the acute, sub-acute and chronic forms of sickness were established for fast neutrons and for protons. LD 50/30 for neutrons was 408 and for protons 600 rad, and the corresponding LD 50 / 120 values were 380 and 600 rad. The conditions governing rat mortality were analysed both in the early and the later stages of the experiment. It is shown that the average life expectancy of rats irradiated with fast neutrons does not depend on sex. The shape of the dose-effect curve for the various peripheral-blood indexes is strongly dependent not only on the radiosensitivity of the blood cells in question but also on the time of observation. It may change greatly in time for one and the same index. A considerable time after irradiation with either fast neutrons or protons, benign and malignant tumours appear in different tissues of the rats, including the haemopoeitic tissues, mammary glands, pituitary, uterus, ovaries, prostate gland, testicles, liver, kidneys, lungs, gastro-intestinal tract, subcutaneous tissue, lymph nodes, urinary bladder, etc. The over-all incidence of tumours and the number of cases of multi centred neoplasms in females are two to three times higher than in males. The minimum tumour dose for the mammary glands with neutron irradiation is apparently rather less than 42.5 rad. The maximum incidence of tumours of the pituitary is found after irradiation with a dose of 42.5 rad.- At this same dose leucosis and tumour of the

  19. Effect of Proton Irradiation on the Corrosion Behaviors of Ferritic/Martensitic Steel in Liquid Metal Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeonghyeon; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) are the candidates of GEN-IV nuclear energy systems. Among various liquid metals that can be used as primary coolant material, sodium is a world widely used coolant for GEN-IV reactors. In this study, as-received Gr.92 and irradiated Gr.92 specimen in the oxygen-saturated liquid sodium were examined at high temperature for 300h. The microstructure results reveal the information of the effect of irradiation and effect of the chrome concentration in specimen. From the SRIM result, penetration distance of 40 μm in stainless steel and nominal sample thickness of 30 μm was used to avoid the damage peak and any proton implantation and From the microstructural evaluation, chromium-rich zones existed under the surface of the both of non-irradiated and irradiated materials. The irradiated materials showed chromium-rich zones with larger depths than the non-irradiated specimens.

  20. Recent Developments of the Local Effect Model (LEM) - Implications of clustered damage on cell transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsässer, Thilo

    Exposure to radiation of high-energy and highly charged ions (HZE) causes a major risk to human beings, since in long term space explorations about 10 protons per month and about one HZE particle per month hit each cell nucleus (1). Despite the larger number of light ions, the high ionisation power of HZE particles and its corresponding more complex damage represents a major hazard for astronauts. Therefore, in order to get a reasonable risk estimate, it is necessary to take into account the entire mixed radiation field. Frequently, neoplastic cell transformation serves as an indicator for the oncogenic potential of radiation exposure. It can be measured for a small number of ion and energy combinations. However, due to the complexity of the radiation field it is necessary to know the contribution to the radiation damage of each ion species for the entire range of energies. Therefore, a model is required which transfers the few experimental data to other particles with different LETs. We use the Local Effect Model (LEM) (2) with its cluster extension (3) to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neoplastic transformation. It was originally developed in the framework of hadrontherapy and is applicable for a large range of ions and energies. The input parameters for the model include the linear-quadratic parameters for the induction of lethal events as well as for the induction of transformation events per surviving cell. Both processes of cell inactivation and neoplastic transformation per viable cell are combined to eventually yield the RBE for cell transformation. We show that the Local Effect Model is capable of predicting the RBE of neoplastic cell transformation for a broad range of ions and energies. The comparison of experimental data (4) with model calculations shows a reasonable agreement. We find that the cluster extension results in a better representation of the measured RBE values. With this model it should be possible to better

  1. Ultraviolet-B-effects on plants: Spectra of harmful effects, primary damage and UV protective mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellmann, E.; Beggs, C.; Moehle, B.; Schneider-Ziebert, U.; Steinmetz, V.; Koch, U.

    1986-01-01

    In two model systems of higher plants, damage caused by ultraviolet-B-radiation was analysed as to its mechanism of action and the spectral quantum efficiency. These investigations were to provide information on the relevance of such UV effects in cases of increased ultraviolet-B-irradiation owing to the destruction of ozone. The results indicate the very high tolerance of the plants to ultraviolet-B-radiation which obviously is the result of very effective protective mechanisms, and show at the same time that potential damage must already be reckoned with, given the current share of ultraviolet-B-radiation in solar radiation. Should ultraviolet-B-radiation be increased, then indirect damage to the plant from the destruction of ultraviolet protective mechanisms through UV-B-radiation will probably constitute a particular risk. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Effects of proton beam irradiation on seed germination and growth of soybean ( Glycine max L. Merr.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Juhyun; Kim, Woon Ji; Kim, Sang Hun; Ha, Bo-Keun

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the morphological effects of proton beam irradiation on the seed germination, seedling survival, and plant growth of soybean. Seeds of three Korean elite cultivars (Kwangankong, Daepungkong, and Pungsannamulkong) were irradiated with a 57-MeV proton beam in the range of 50 - 400 Gy. The germination rates of all the varieties increased to > 95%; however, the survival rates were significantly reduced. At doses of > 300 Gy irradiation, the Daepungkong, Kwangankong, and Pungsannamulkong cultivars exhibited 39, 75, and 71% survival rates, respectively. In addition, plant height and the fresh weight of shoots and roots were significantly decreased by doses of > 100 Gy irradiation, as were the dry weights of the shoots and roots. However, SPAD values increased with increasing doses of irradiation. Abnormal plants with atypically branched stems, modified leaves, and chlorophyll mutations were observed. Based on the survival rate, plant growth inhibition, and mutation frequency, it appears that the optimum dosage of proton beam irradiation for soybean mutation breeding is between 250 and 300 Gy.

  3. Effect of analytical proton beam irradiation on lead-white pigments, characterized by EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Gonzalez, Victor; Vezin, Hervé; Touati, Nadia; Calligaro, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Analytical techniques using proton beams with energy in the MeV range are commonly used to study archeological artefact and artistic objects. However ion beams can induce alteration of fragile materials, which is notably the case of easel paintings, limiting the use of these techniques. We used continuous wave EPR and pulse EPR spectroscopy to reveal the effect of 3 MeV proton irradiation on lead carbonates, which were extensively employed as white pigments from the antiquity to the 20th century. Two kinds of paramagnetic centers were identified in cerussite (PbCO3): the first one is CO3- radicals formed by hole trapping by CO32- ions, and the second one is NO32- radical resulting from electron trapping by NO3- impurities. Hydrocerussite (2PbCO3·Pb(OH)2) is the most darkened material under proton beam, however it exhibits no NO32- radicals and 20 times less CO3- radicals than cerussite. Consequently these paramagnetic centers are not directly responsible for the darkening of lead-white pigments. We proposed that their higher instability in hydrocerussite might be at the origin of the formation of color centers in this material.

  4. Effects of hyperthermal proton bombardment on alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer on Au(1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi Luan [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Zheng Zhi; Lam, N.-S. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Grizzi, Oscar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Lau, W.-M. [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada)], E-mail: llau22@uwo.ca

    2007-10-31

    The effects of hyperthermal proton bombardment on alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on Au(1 1 1) are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The STM and XPS results show that proton bombardment with proton energy as low as 2 eV can induce cross-linking of the adsorbed alkanethiols and transform the original ordered SAM lattice to an array of nanoclusters of the cross-linked alkanethiols. For a bombardment at 3 eV with a fluence of 3x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, the typical cluster size is about 5 nm. In addition, the cluster size distribution is narrow, with no cluster larger than 8 nm. The cluster growth can be promoted by increasing the fluence at a fixed bombardment energy or increasing the energy at a fixed fluence. This indicates that surface diffusion of alkanethiols and cluster growth can be harnessed by the control of the bombardment energy and fluence.

  5. Effects of hyperthermal proton bombardment on alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer on Au(1 1 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Luan; Zheng Zhi; Lam, N.-S.; Grizzi, Oscar; Lau, W.-M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of hyperthermal proton bombardment on alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on Au(1 1 1) are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The STM and XPS results show that proton bombardment with proton energy as low as 2 eV can induce cross-linking of the adsorbed alkanethiols and transform the original ordered SAM lattice to an array of nanoclusters of the cross-linked alkanethiols. For a bombardment at 3 eV with a fluence of 3x10 15 cm -2 , the typical cluster size is about 5 nm. In addition, the cluster size distribution is narrow, with no cluster larger than 8 nm. The cluster growth can be promoted by increasing the fluence at a fixed bombardment energy or increasing the energy at a fixed fluence. This indicates that surface diffusion of alkanethiols and cluster growth can be harnessed by the control of the bombardment energy and fluence

  6. Protective effect of transparent film dressing on proton therapy induced skin reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, Jonathan T; Kirk, Maura; Cengel, Keith; McDonough, James; Bekelman, Justin; Christodouleas, John P

    2013-01-01

    Proton therapy can result in clinically significant radiation dermatitis. In some clinical scenarios, such as lung or breast cancer, the risk of severe radiation dermatitis may limit beam arrangement and prescription doses. Patients undergoing proton therapy for prostate cancer commonly develop mild radiation dermatitis. Herein, we report the outcomes of two prostate cancer patients whose radiation dermatitis appears to have been substantially diminished by transparent film dressings (Beekley stickers). This is a descriptive report of the skin toxicity observed in two patients undergoing proton therapy for prostate cancer at a single institution in 2011. A phantom dosimetric study was performed to evaluate the impact of a transparent film dressing on a beam’s spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). Two patients with low risk prostate cancer were treated with proton therapy to a total dose of 79.2Gy (RBE) in 1.8 Gy (RBE) fractions using two opposed lateral beams daily. Both patients had small circular (2.5 cm diameter) transparent adhesive markers placed on their skin to assist with daily alignment. Patient 1 had markers in place bilaterally for the entirety of treatment. Patient 2 had a marker in place for three weeks on one side and six weeks on the other. Over the course of therapy, both men developed typical Grade 1 radiation dermatitis (asymptomatic erythema) on their hips; however, in both patients, the erythema was substantially decreased beneath the markers. Patient 2 demonstrated less attenuation and thus greater erythema in the skin covered for three weeks compared to the skin covered for six weeks. The difference in skin changes between the covered and uncovered skin persisted for at least 1 month. A phantom study of double scattered beam SOBP with and without the marker in the beam path showed no gross dosimetric effect. Transparent adhesive markers appear to have attenuated radiation dermatitis in these two patients without affecting the SOBP. One patient may

  7. SU-E-T-665: Radiochromic Film Quenching Effect Reduction for Proton Beam Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldelaijan, S; Alzorkany, F; Moftah, B; Alrumayan, F [King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Lewis, D [RCF Consulting, LLC, Monroe, CT (United States); Devic, S [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Depending on the useful dose range in which radiochromic films operate, number of different radiochromic film models have been designed. The impact of different film models on quenching effect for percent depth dose (PDD) measurements in proton beams has been investigated. Methods: Calibrated PTW Markus ionization chamber was used to measure PDD and beam output for 26.5 MeV protons produced by CS30 cyclotron. An aluminum cylinder was added in front of the beam exit serving as a radiation shutter. The measured signal was normalized to a monitor chamber reading and subsequently scaled by ratio of water-to-air stopping powers at given depth, while the effective depth of measurements was scaled by ratios of material-to-water physical densities and CSDA ranges. Output was measured in water at 2.1 mm reference-depth in the plateau upstream from the Bragg peak. Following the TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol for proton beams, the output was calibrated in water. Three radiochromic film models (EBT, EBT3 and HD-V2) were calibrated within Lexan phantom positioned at the same water-equivalent depth. Thicknesses of films sensitive layers were 34 µm, 30 µm and 8 µm, respectively. Small film pieces (1 x 2 cm{sup 2}) were positioned within polyethylene phantom along the beam central axis with an angulation of 5° for PDD measurements. Results: While the output of the proton beam was found to be around 7 Gy/sec, the actual value of the output per monitor chamber reading (2.32 Gy/nC) was used for reference-dose irradiations during film calibration. Dose ratios at the Bragg peak relative to the reference-depth were 3.88, 2.52, 2.19, and 2.02 for the Markus chamber, HD-V2, EBT3, and EBT film models, respectively. Conclusion: Results at hand suggest that quenching effect is reduced when a radiochromic film model with smaller sensitive layer thickness is used for PDD measurements in proton beams. David Lewis is the owner of RCF Consulting, LLC.

  8. SU-E-T-549: Modeling Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons for Radiation Induced Brain Necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkovic, D; Peeler, C; Grosshans, D; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mohan, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons as a function of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) for induction of brain necrosis using clinical data. Methods: In this study, treatment planning information was exported from a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) and used to construct a detailed Monte Carlo model of the patient and the beam delivery system. The physical proton dose and LET were computed in each voxel of the patient volume using Monte Carlo particle transport. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study registered to the treatment planning CT was used to determine the region of the necrosis in the brain volume. Both, the whole brain and the necrosis volumes were segmented from the computed tomography (CT) dataset using the contours drawn by a physician and the corresponding voxels were binned with respect to dose and LET. The brain necrosis probability was computed as a function of dose and LET by dividing the total volume of all necrosis voxels with a given dose and LET with the corresponding total brain volume resulting in a set of NTCP-like curves (probability as a function of dose parameterized by LET). Results: The resulting model shows dependence on both dose and LET indicating the weakness of the constant RBE model for describing the brain toxicity. To the best of our knowledge the constant RBE model is currently used in all clinical applications which may Result in increased rate of brain toxicities in patients treated with protons. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to develop more accurate brain toxicity models for patients treated with protons and other heavy ions

  9. Medium-energy ion-beam simulation of the effect of ionizing radiation and displacement damage on SiO{sub 2}-based memristive nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, Alexey; Mikhaylov, Alexey; Korolev, Dmitry; Guseinov, Davud; Gryaznov, Eugeny; Okulich, Eugenia; Sergeev, Victor; Antonov, Ivan; Kasatkin, Alexandr; Gorshkov, Oleg [Lobachevsky University, 23/3 Gagarin prospect, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Tetelbaum, David, E-mail: tetelbaum@phys.unn.ru [Lobachevsky University, 23/3 Gagarin prospect, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kozlovski, Vitali [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 29 Polytechnicheskaya street, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The principles of ion-beam simulation of the effect of fast (fission) neutrons and high-energy protons based on medium-energy ion irradiation have been developed for the Au/Zr/SiO{sub 2}/TiN/Ti capacitor-like memristive nanostructures demonstrating the repeatable resistive switching phenomenon. By using the Monte-Carlo approach, the irradiation fluences of H{sup +}, Si{sup +} and O{sup +} ions at the energy of 150 keV are determined that provide the ionization and displacement damage equivalent to the cases of space protons (15 MeV) and fission neutrons (1 MeV) irradiation. No significant change in the resistive switching parameters is observed under ion irradiation up to the fluences corresponding to the extreme fluence of 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} of space protons or fission neutrons. The high-level radiation tolerance of the memristive nanostructures is experimentally confirmed with the application of 15 MeV proton irradiation and is interpreted as related to the local nature of conducting filaments and high concentration of the initial field-induced defects in oxide film.

  10. The Damage Effects in Steel Bridges under Highway Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Nielsen, Jette Andkjær

    1996-01-01

    In the present investigation, fatigue damage accumulation in steel bridges under highway random loading is studied. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series on welded plate test specimens have been carried through. The fatigue tests have been carried out using load histo...... indicate that the linear fatigue damage accumulation formula, which is normally used in the design against fatigue in steel bridges, may give results, which are unconservative.......In the present investigation, fatigue damage accumulation in steel bridges under highway random loading is studied. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series on welded plate test specimens have been carried through. The fatigue tests have been carried out using load...

  11. Correlation of displacement effects produced by electrons, protons, and neutrons in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Lint, V.A.J.; Gigas, G.; Barengoltz, J.

    1975-01-01

    The correlation of displacement effects produced by electrons, protons, and neutrons in silicon is studied. Available data from the literature is employed. In particular the scope of the study is limited to the degradation of excess carrier lifetime and device electrical parameters directly related to it. The degree to which displacement effects may be correlated in order to predict semiconductor device response based on response data to another type of radiation is discussed. Useful ranges of the correlation factors (K/sub tau/ ratios) as a function of device majority carrier type, device resistivity, and injection level are presented. A significant dependence on injection level for the correlation factors is found

  12. The search for molecular effects in range corrections: boron determination by proton bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, C.; Peisach, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three different nuclear reactions viz. 10 B(p,αγ) 7 Be, 10 B(p,p,'γ) 10 B, and 11 B(p,p'γ) 11 B were used to analyse 21 pure boron compounds and mixtures of known composition by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry under proton bombardment. Elemental stopping powers were calculated from tables and used to compute the stopping power of the target matrices by Bragg's Law. Apparent discrepancies in the measured yield could point to deviations from Bragg's Law and hence to molecular effects. The maximum value for any molecular effect was found to be < 8,3%

  13. WE-H-BRA-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): Nano-Dosimetric Kinetic Model for Variable Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton and Ion Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolfath, R; Bronk, L; Titt, U.; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Helo, Y [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Schuemann, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Recent clonogenic cell survival and γH2AX studies suggest proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) may be a non-linear function of linear energy transfer (LET) in the distal edge of the Bragg peak and beyond. We sought to develop a multiscale model to account for non-linear response phenomena to aid in the optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy. Methods: The model is based on first-principle simulations of proton track structures, including secondary ions, and an analytical derivation of the dependence on particle LET of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model parameters α and β. The derived formulas are an extension of the microdosimetric kinetic (MK) model that captures dissipative track structures and non-Poissonian distribution of DNA damage at the distal edge of the Bragg peak and beyond. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to confirm the non-linear dose-response characteristics arising from the non-Poisson distribution of initial DNA damage. Results: In contrast to low LET segments of the proton depth dose, from the beam entrance to the Bragg peak, strong deviations from non-dissipative track structures and Poisson distribution in the ionization events in the Bragg peak distal edge govern the non-linear cell response and result in the transformation α=(1+c-1 L) α-x+2(c-0 L+c-2 L^2 )(1+c-1 L) β-x and β=(1+c-1 L)^2 β-x. Here L is the charged particle LET, and c-0,c-1, and c-2 are functions of microscopic parameters and can be served as fitting parameters to the cell-survival data. In the low LET limit c-1, and c-2 are negligible hence the linear model proposed and used by Wilkins-Oelfke for the proton treatment planning system can be retrieved. The present model fits well the recent clonogenic survival data measured recently in our group in MDACC. Conclusion: The present hybrid method provides higher accuracy in calculating the RBE-weighted dose in the target and normal tissues.

  14. WE-H-BRA-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): Nano-Dosimetric Kinetic Model for Variable Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton and Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolfath, R; Bronk, L; Titt, U.; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R; Helo, Y; Schuemann, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recent clonogenic cell survival and γH2AX studies suggest proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) may be a non-linear function of linear energy transfer (LET) in the distal edge of the Bragg peak and beyond. We sought to develop a multiscale model to account for non-linear response phenomena to aid in the optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy. Methods: The model is based on first-principle simulations of proton track structures, including secondary ions, and an analytical derivation of the dependence on particle LET of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model parameters α and β. The derived formulas are an extension of the microdosimetric kinetic (MK) model that captures dissipative track structures and non-Poissonian distribution of DNA damage at the distal edge of the Bragg peak and beyond. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to confirm the non-linear dose-response characteristics arising from the non-Poisson distribution of initial DNA damage. Results: In contrast to low LET segments of the proton depth dose, from the beam entrance to the Bragg peak, strong deviations from non-dissipative track structures and Poisson distribution in the ionization events in the Bragg peak distal edge govern the non-linear cell response and result in the transformation α=(1+c_1 L) α_x+2(c_0 L+c_2 L^2 )(1+c_1 L) β_x and β=(1+c_1 L)^2 β_x. Here L is the charged particle LET, and c_0,c_1, and c_2 are functions of microscopic parameters and can be served as fitting parameters to the cell-survival data. In the low LET limit c_1, and c_2 are negligible hence the linear model proposed and used by Wilkins-Oelfke for the proton treatment planning system can be retrieved. The present model fits well the recent clonogenic survival data measured recently in our group in MDACC. Conclusion: The present hybrid method provides higher accuracy in calculating the RBE-weighted dose in the target and normal tissues.

  15. WE-E-BRE-07: High-Throughput Mapping of Proton Biologic Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronk, L; Guan, F; Kerr, M; Dinh, J; Titt, U; Mirkovic, D; Lin, S; Mohan, R; Grosshans, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To systematically relate the relative biological effectives (RBE) of proton therapy to beam linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. Methods: Using a custom irradiation apparatus previously characterized by our group, H460 NSCLCs were irradiated using a clinical 80MeV spot scanning proton beam. Utilizing this system allowed for high-throughput clonogenic assays performed in 96-well tissue culture plates as opposed to the traditional 6-well technique. Each column in the 96-well plate received a set LET-dose combination. By altering the total number of dose repaintings, numerous dose-LET configurations were examined to effectively generate surviving fraction (SF) data over the entire Bragg peak. The clonogenic assay was performed post-irradiation using an INCell Analyzer for colony quantification. SF data were fit to the linear-quadratic model for analysis. Results: Irradiation with increasing LETs resulted in decreased cell survival largely independent of dose. A significant correlation between LET and SF was identified by two-way ANOVA and the extra sum-of-squares F test. This trend was obscured at the lower LET values in the plateau region of the Bragg peak; however, it was clear for LET values at and beyond the Bragg peak. Data fits revealed the SF at a dose of 2Gy (SF2) to be 0.48 for the lowest tested LET (1.55keV/um), 0.47 at the end of the plateau region (4.74keV/um) and 0.33 for protons at the Bragg peak (10.35keV/um). Beyond the Bragg peak we measured SF2s of 0.16 for 15.01keV/um, 0.02 for 16.79keV/um, and 0.004 for 18.06keV/um. Conclusion: We have shown that our methodology enables high-content automated screening for proton irradiations over a range of LETs. The observed decrease in cellular SF in high LET regions confirms an increased RBE of the radiation and suggests further evaluation of proton RBE values is necessary to optimize clinical outcomes. Rosalie B. Hite Graduate Fellowship in Cancer Research, NIH Program Project Grant P01CA021239.

  16. Reducing the effect of damage on operational effectiveness with DINCS technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegraven, K.S. van; Logtmeijer, R.A.; Stanley, J.; Wildt, F.W.J. de; Janssen, J.A.A.J.; Smit, C.S.; Anakin, B.; Doherty, G.

    2010-01-01

    The combat systems of a naval ship are essential to the operational effectiveness of the maritime unit; less obviously, this is also true for several marine systems. The operation of the combat systems, the control of (battle) damage, and the ship’s mobility all depend on functions provided by a

  17. Reducing the effect of damage on operational effectiveness with DINCS technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C.S.; Janssen, J.A.A.J.; Bodegraven, K.S. van; Logtmeijer, R.A.; Stanley, J.; Wildt, F.W.J. de; Annakin, B.; Doherty, G.

    2012-01-01

    The combat systems of a naval ship are essential to the operational effectiveness of the maritime unit; less obviously, this is also true for several marine systems. The operation of the combat systems, the control of (battle) damage, and the ship's mobility all depend on functions provided by a

  18. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  19. Sex Differences in the Effects of Unilateral Brain Damage on Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, James; Lawson, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    A sexual dimorphism in the functional asymmetry of the damaged human brain is reflected in a test-specific laterality effect in male but not in female patients. This sex difference explains some contradictions concerning the effects of unilateral brain damage on intelligence in studies in which the influence of sex was overlooked.

  20. Design of offline measuring system for radiation damage effects on linear CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yong; Tang Benqi; Xiao Zhigang; Wang Zujun; Huang Fang; Huang Shaoyan

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses the hardware design of offline measuring system for radiation damage effects on linear CCD. Some credible results were achieved by using this system. The test results indicate that the system is available for the study of the radiation damage effects on linear CCD. (authors)

  1. Effects of bear damage on Douglas-fir lumber recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini C. Lowell; Dennis Dykstra; George McFadden

    2009-01-01

    Bear activily resulting in injury to Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) trees has been documented as early as the mid-1850s in the Pacific Northwest. The study reported in this article was designed to help managers decide whether the common practice of removing the damaged but potentially valuable butt section of the bottom log and...

  2. Study on effective modifiers for damaging salts in mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Lubelli, B.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Rodgriguez-Navarro

    2014-01-01

    The use of crystallization modifiers for the prevention or mitigation of salt crystallization damage has recently received a lot of research interest in the field of building conservation. However, the use of crystallization modifiers mixed in a lime-based mortar, is still a very new field of

  3. SU-E-T-321: The Effects of a Dynamic Collimation System On Proton Pencil Beams to Improve Lateral Tissue Sparing in Spot Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, P; Wang, D; Flynn, R; Hyer, D [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the lateral beam penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy delivered using a dynamic collimator device capable of trimming a portion of the primary beam in close proximity to the patient. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams were performed using MCNPX. Each simulation transported a 125 MeV proton pencil beam through a range shifter, past acollimator, and into a water phantom. Two parameters were varied among the simulations, the source beam size (sigma in air from 3 to 9 mm), and the position of the edge of the collimator (placed from 0 to 30 mm from the central axis of the beam). Proton flux was tallied at the phantom surface to determine the effective beam sizefor all combinations of source beam size and collimator edge position. Results: Quantifying beam size at the phantom surface provides a useful measure tocompare performance among varying source beam sizes and collimation conditions. For arelatively large source beam size (9 mm) entering the range shifter, sigma at thesurface was found to be 10 mm without collimation versus 4 mm with collimation. Additionally, sigma at the surface achievable with collimation was found to be smallerthan for any uncollimated beam, even for very small source beam sizes. Finally, thelateral penumbra achievable with collimation was determined to be largely independentof the source beam size. Conclusion: Collimation can significantly reduce proton pencil beam lateral penumbra.Given the known dosimetric disadvantages resulting from large beam spot sizes,employing a dynamic collimation system can significantly improve lateral tissuesparing in spot-scanned dose distributions.

  4. Targeting Ongoing DNA Damage in Multiple Myeloma: Effects of DNA Damage Response Inhibitors on Plasma Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Herrero

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs and a subset of myeloma patients with poor prognosis exhibit high levels of replication stress (RS, leading to DNA damage. In this study, we confirmed the presence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs in several HMCLs by measuring γH2AX and RAD51 foci and analyzed the effect of various inhibitors of the DNA damage response on MM cell survival. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR, the main kinase mediating the response to RS, using the specific inhibitor VE-821 induced more cell death in HMCLs than in control lymphoblastoid cells and U266, an HMCL with a low level of DNA damage. The absence of ATR was partially compensated by ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM, since chemical inhibition of both kinases using VE-821 and KU-55933 significantly increased the death of MM cells with DNA damage. We found that ATM and ATR are involved in DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR in MM. Inhibition of both kinases resulted in a stronger inhibition that may underlie cell death induction, since abolition of HR using two different inhibitors severely reduced survival of HMCLs that exhibit DNA damage. On the other hand, inhibition of the other route involved in DSB repair, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, using the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441, did not affect MM cell viability. Interestingly, we found that NHEJ inhibition did not increase cell death when HR was simultaneously inhibited with the RAD51 inhibitor B02, but it clearly increased the level of cell death when HR was inhibited with the MRE11 inhibitor mirin, which interferes with recombination before DNA resection takes place. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that MM cells with ongoing DNA damage rely on an intact HR pathway, which thereby suggests therapeutic opportunities. We also show that inhibition of HR after the initial step of end resection might be more appropriate for inducing MM cell death, since it

  5. Characterizations of Proton-irradiated wide bandgap semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, H. R.; Ahn, J. H.

    2008-04-01

    Current-voltages were compared before and after proton irradiation. As expected from simulation results, 5keV protons severely damaged the transistors' performance compared to 25MeV protons. Also, the effects of both lower and higher fluencies were compared. Source-Drain currents were dramatically decreased under higher fluency. At the highest dose of 2x10 16 protons/cm 2 there was a decrease of 43% in IDS and a 29% decrease in gm. The data is consistent with the introduction of defect centers in the HEMT structure by the high energy protons leading to a reduction in carrier concentration and mobility in the 2- dimensional electron gas channel due to the extremely thin 2DEG and the high displacement threshold energy, AlGaN/GaN HEMT has great potential for applications in earth orbit

  6. Minibeam Therapy With Protons and Light Ions: Physical Feasibility and Potential to Reduce Radiation Side Effects and to Facilitate Hypofractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham, E-mail: avraham.dilmanian@stonybrook.edu [Departments of Radiation Oncology, Neurology, and Radiology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York (United States); Eley, John G. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Despite several advantages of proton therapy over megavoltage x-ray therapy, its lack of proximal tissue sparing is a concern. The method presented here adds proximal tissue sparing to protons and light ions by turning their uniform incident beams into arrays of parallel, small, or thin (0.3-mm) pencil or planar minibeams, which are known to spare tissues. As these minibeams penetrate the tissues, they gradually broaden and merge with each other to produce a solid beam. Methods and Materials: Broadening of 0.3-mm-diameter, 109-MeV proton pencil minibeams was measured using a stack of radiochromic films with plastic spacers. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the broadening in water of minibeams of protons and several light ions and the dose from neutron generated by collimator. Results: A central parameter was tissue depth, where the beam full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 0.7 mm, beyond which tissue sparing decreases. This depth was 22 mm for 109-MeV protons in a film stack. It was also found by simulations in water to be 23.5 mm for 109 MeV proton pencil minibeams and 26 mm for 116 MeV proton planar minibeams. For light ions, all with 10 cm range in water, that depth increased with particle size; specifically it was 51 mm for Li-7 ions. The ∼2.7% photon equivalent neutron skin dose from the collimator was reduced 7-fold by introducing a gap between the collimator and the skin. Conclusions: Proton minibeams can be implemented at existing particle therapy centers. Because they spare the shallow tissues, they could augment the efficacy of proton therapy and light particle therapy, particularly in treating tumors that benefit from sparing of proximal tissues such as pediatric brain tumors. They should also allow hypofractionated treatment of all tumors by allowing the use of higher incident doses with less concern about proximal tissue damage.

  7. Pion-induced damage in silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, S; Glaser, M; Lemeilleur, F; León-Florián, E; Gössling, C; Kaiser, B; Rolf, A; Wunstorf, R; Feick, H; Fretwurst, E; Lindström, G; Moll, Michael; Taylor, G; Chilingarov, A G

    1995-01-01

    The damage induced by pions in silicon detectors is studied for positive and negative pions for fluence up to 10(14)cm-2 and 10(13) cm-2 respectively. Results on the energy dependence of the damage in the region of 65-330 MeV near to the  resonance are presented. The change in detector characteristics such as leakage current, charge collection efficiency and effective impurity concentration including long-term annealing effects have been studied. Comparisons to neutron and proton-induced damage are presented and discussed.

  8. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy on recovery after hamstring damaging exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Fonda, Borut; Šarabon, Nejc

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) on biochemical, pain, and performance parameters during the 5-day recovery period after damaging exercise for hamstrings. Participants completed a bout of damaging exercise for the hamstring muscles on two separate occasions (control and experimental condition) separated by 10 weeks. During the control condition, subjects received no treatment after the damaging exercise. The experimental condition consisted ...

  9. Study of nuclear effects in the deuteron and extraction of neutron to proton stucture function ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, A.; Rock, S.E.

    1991-06-01

    We performed a combined analysis of electron, muon, neutrino, and anti-neutrino deep inelastic scattering structure functions of hydrogen and deuterium, within the framework of quark-parton model. The neutron to proton structure function ratio was obtained using three different techniques: electron and muon scattering experiments on deuterium and hydrogen by using traditional Fermi motion corrections; extrapolation of the EMC effect on heavy targets to deuterium and free nucleons; and using Be and C data. At high x there is a disagreement between these data. 10 refs., 2 figs

  10. Chemical effects in the stopping cross sections of protons in rare earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, J.; Pineda, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Stopping cross sections were measured for 0.5-0.7 MeV protons impinging on selected rare earth fluorides using energy differences of ions backscattered by thin films. The surface approximation was employed to determine the stopping cross sections. Consideration of chemical effects through the enthalpy of formation of the target compounds, as suggested by Bauer and Semrad (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 182 (2001) 62), allows a much better agreement with the electronic stopping predictions of the SRIM code, the Montenegro et al. universal formula and the tables by Janni

  11. The Effects of Mitigation Measures on Flood Damage Prevention in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol-Hee Son

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the characteristics of flood damages and the effects of structural and non-structural flood damage mitigation measures in Korea. First, a theoretical discussion of the structural and non-structural measures to mitigate flood damages was used to select the variables and devise the hypotheses. An analysis was conducted using the Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving-Average (ARIMA time series methodology, Korean socioeconomic data, and damage characteristics of major flood events. The effects of flood damage mitigation measures on the extent of flood damages were assessed using an intervention time series model. The major findings were that the intervention effects of structural and non-structural measures were statistically significant from 1958 to 2013 (a period of 55 years and that while the former were ineffective at mitigating flood damages, the latter were successful in doing so. Based on the above findings, policy suggestions for future flood damage mitigation measures in Korea were offered. For structural measures, the government should manage its existing facilities, recover ecosystems of damaged rivers, and devise mitigation measures for urban areas. For non-structural measures, the government should enhance its flood forecasting capacity, revise laws related to flood control and prevention, and update and rationalize land-use plans.

  12. Radiation damage effects in solids special topic volume with invited peer reviewed papers only

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2013-01-01

    Public interest and concern about radiation damage effects has increased during recent times. Nuclear radiation proved to be a precursor for the study of radiation damage effects in solids. In general, all types of radiation, e.g. X-ray, gamma ray, heavy ions, fission fragments and neutrons produce damage effects in materials. Radiation damage latent tracks in solids find applications in nuclear and elementary particle physics, chemistry, radiobiology, earth sciences, nuclear engineering, and a host of other areas such as nuclear safeguards, virus counting, ion track filters, uranium exploration and archaeology. Radiation dosimetry and reactor shielding also involve concepts based on radiation damage in solids. This special volume consists of ten Chapters, including Review and Research Papers on various topics in this field.Physical scientists known to be investigating the effects of radiation on material were invited to contribute research and review papers on the areas of their specialty. The topics include...

  13. Acrolein: An Effective Biomarker for Tissue Damage Produced from Polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kazuei; Uemura, Takeshi; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2018-01-01

    It is thought that the major factor responsible for cell damage is reactive oxygen species (ROS), but our recent studies have shown that acrolein (CH 2 =CH-CHO) produced from spermine and spermidine is more toxic than ROS. Thus, (1) the mechanism of acrolein production during brain stroke, (2) one of the mechanisms of acrolein toxicity, and (3) the role of glutathione in acrolein detoxification are described in this chapter.

  14. Ion irradiation and biomolecular radiation damage II. Indirect effect

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Zengliang; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that damage of genome in a living cell by ionizing radiation is about one-third direct and two-thirds indirect. The former which has been introduced in our last paper, concerns direct energy deposition and ionizing reactions in the biomolecules; the latter results from radiation induced reactive species (mainly radicals) in the medium (mainly water) surrounding the biomolecules. In this review, a short description of ion implantation induced radical formation in water is ...

  15. Hydrogen effects on deep level defects in proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} based thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Seol, M.S.; Kwak, D.W.; Oh, J.S. [Department of Physics, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Photo-electronic Hybrids Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen effects on deep level defects and a defect generation in proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) based thin films for solar cell were investigated. CIGS films with a thickness of 3 {mu}m were grown on a soda-lime glass substrate by a co-evaporation method, and then were implanted with protons. To study deep level defects in the proton implanted CIGS films, deep level transient spectroscopy measurements on the CIGS-based solar cells were carried out, these measurements found 6 traps (including 3 hole traps and 3 electron traps). In the proton implanted CIGS films, the deep level defects, which are attributed to the recombination centers of the CIGS solar cell, were significantly reduced in intensity, while a deep level defect was generated around 0.28 eV above the valence band maximum. Therefore, we suggest that most deep level defects in CIGS films can be controlled by hydrogen effects. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film and solar cell are prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep level defects of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film and solar cell are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation using proton implantation and H{sub 2} annealing reduces deep level defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation could enhance electrical properties and efficiency of solar cells.

  16. Proton irradiation effects on tensile and bend-fatigue properties of welded F82H specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, S., E-mail: saito.shigeru@jaea.go.j [JAEA Tokai, J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kikuchi, K.; Hamaguchi, D. [JAEA Tokai, J-PARC Center, 2-4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Usami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Nishino, Y.; Endo, S. [JAEA Tokai, Department of Hot Laboratories, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kawai, M. [KEK, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken 305-0801 (Japan); Dai, Y. [PSI, Spallation Source Division, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-03-15

    In several institutes, research and development for an accelerator-driven transmutation system (ADS) have been progressed. Ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels are the candidate materials for the beam window of ADS. To evaluate of the mechanical properties of the irradiated materials, the post irradiation examination (PIE) work of the SINQ (Swiss spallation neutron source) target irradiation program (STIP) specimens was carried out at JAEA. In present study, the results of PIE on FM steel F82H and its welded joint have been reported. The present irradiation conditions of the specimens were as follows: proton energy was 580 MeV. Irradiation temperatures were ranged from 130 to 380 deg. C, and displacement damage level was ranged from 5.7 to 11.8 dpa. The results of tensile tests performed at 22 deg. C indicated that the irradiation hardening occurred with increasing the displacement damage up to 10.1 dpa at 320 deg. C irradiation. At higher dose (11.8 dpa) and higher temperature (380 deg. C), irradiation hardening was observed, but degradation of ductility was relaxed in F82H welded joint. In present study, all specimens kept its ductility after irradiation and fractured in ductile manner. The results on bend-fatigue tests showed that the fatigue life (N{sub f}) of F82H base metal irradiated up to 6.3 dpa was almost the same with that of unirradiated specimens. The N{sub f} of the specimens irradiated up to 9.1 dpa was smaller than that of unirradiated specimens. Though the number of specimen was limited, the N{sub f} of F82H EB (15 mm) and EB (3.3 mm) welded joints seemed to increase after irradiation and the fracture surfaces of the specimens showed transgranular morphology. While F82H TIG welded specimens were not fractured by 10{sup 7} cycles.

  17. The Effect of Isotopic Substitution on Quantum Proton Transfer Across Short Water Bridges in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejewski, Jacob; Schultz, Chase; Mazzuca, James

    2015-03-01

    Many biological systems utilize water chains to transfer charge over long distances by means of an excess proton. This study examines how quantum effects impact these reactions in a small model system. The model consists of a water molecule situated between an imidazole donor and acceptor group, which simulate a fixed amino acid backbone. A one dimensional energy profile is evaluated using density functional theory at the 6-31G*/B3LYP level, which generates a barrier with a width of 0.6 Å and a height of 20.7 kcal/mol. Quantum transmission probability is evaluated by solving the time dependent Schrödinger equation on a grid. Isotopic effects are examined by performing calculations with both hydrogen and deuterium. The ratio of hydrogen over the deuterium shows a 130-fold increase in transmission probability at low temperatures. This indicates a substantial quantum tunneling effect. The study of higher dimensional systems as well as increasing the number of water molecules in the chain will be necessary to fully describe the proton transfer process. Alma College Provost's Office.

  18. Use of X - Rays for the evaluation of internal damages provoked by corn seed drying and the effect of those damages upon the seeds quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obando Flor, Ebert Pepe; Moreira de Carvalho, Maria Laene

    2002-01-01

    The work was conducted in the seed analysis laboratory of the department of agriculture and forest sciences of the Universidade Federal de Lavras (Federal University of Lavras. MG), over the period 1999 - 2000. Aiming to evaluate the efficiency of utilization of X - rays in the identification of the several types of internal damages provoked by corn seed drying to high temperatures as well as the effect of those damages upon the physiological quality of stored seeds, lots of the cultivars AG1143 and BR 106 were submitted to drying at the temperature of 50 degrades Celsius. The lots were divided into two categories according to the presence or not of internal damages visible with the naked eye submitted to the X - ray test (for 45 at 25 Kvp of radiation intensity) afterwards. They were separated into three sub lots. CDVCDRX (with visual damages and detected by X - ray) SDVSDRX (without visual damages and with damages detected by X ray). The sub lots were evaluated in their physiological quality by viability and vigor tests. The results showed the efficiency of X ray in detecting internal damages of drying not observed by visual analysis. The vigor of corn seeds with internal drying damages is affected in several manners, depending on the cultivars, evaluation time and sort of damage internal damages of drying detected by the radiographical analysis in spite of not affecting early viability, when they occurs in the two directions horizontal and vertical (Double damage) decrease the vigor of seeds after storage

  19. In vitro evaluation of relative biological effectiveness of 3MeV protons using γH2AX immuno-fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaurasia, Rajesh K.; Desai, Utkarsha; Sirsath, K.B.; Bhat, N.N.; Sapra, B.K.; Gaur, Neeraj

    2018-01-01

    Use of charged particles for treating complicated tumors is gaining momentum. Their defined dose profile, near zero dose to normal tissue beyond tumour, skin sparing, more lethal effect than mutations, ability to focus beam with complex geometries are some of the advantages. Lack of scientific information on radiobiological efficacy, complexity and cost/maintenance of such facilities are hindering their use at present. Though a huge amount of time and resources are invested cancer treatment still primarily depends on chemotherapy and radiotherapy (γ-ray). Through this study we aim to demonstrate relative biological effectiveness of 3MeV proton beam with estimated LET of 13 keV/μm on cancerous mammalian cell line using highly reliable DNA double strand break γH2AX marker as a damage quantification tool

  20. Spall damage of a mild carbon steel: Effects of peak stress, strain rate and pulse duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.; Li, B.; Huang, J.Y.; Ma, H.H.; Zhu, M.H.; Zhu, J.; Luo, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate spall damage of a mild carbon steel under high strain-rate loading, regarding the effects of peak stress, strain rate, and pulse duration on spall strength and damage, as well as related microstructure features, using gas gun plate impact, laser velocimetry, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis. Our experiments demonstrate strong dependences of spall strength on peak stress and strain rate, and its weak dependence on pulse duration. We establish numerical relations between damage and peak stress or pulse duration. Brittle and ductile spall fracture modes are observed at different loading conditions. Damage nucleates at grain boundaries and triple junctions, either as transgranular cleavage cracks or voids.

  1. Spall damage of a mild carbon steel: Effects of peak stress, strain rate and pulse duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Li, B.; Huang, J.Y. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Ma, H.H. [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Zhu, M.H. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Zhu, J., E-mail: zhujun01@163.com [College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Luo, S.N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2016-04-13

    We investigate spall damage of a mild carbon steel under high strain-rate loading, regarding the effects of peak stress, strain rate, and pulse duration on spall strength and damage, as well as related microstructure features, using gas gun plate impact, laser velocimetry, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis. Our experiments demonstrate strong dependences of spall strength on peak stress and strain rate, and its weak dependence on pulse duration. We establish numerical relations between damage and peak stress or pulse duration. Brittle and ductile spall fracture modes are observed at different loading conditions. Damage nucleates at grain boundaries and triple junctions, either as transgranular cleavage cracks or voids.

  2. Radiosensitizing effect of nitric oxide in tumor cells and experimental tumors irradiated with gamma rays and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policastro, Lucia L.; Duran, Hebe; Molinari, Beatriz L.; Somacal, Hector R.; Valda, Alejandro A.

    2003-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be a radiosensitizer of mammalian cells under hypoxic conditions. In a previous study, we demonstrated an enhancement in radiation response induced by NO in mouse tumor cells under aerobic conditions, with an increasing effect as a function of malignancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of NO in tumor cells and in experimental tumors irradiated with γ rays and proton beams. Irradiations were performed with a 137 Cs γ source and with proton beams generated by the TANDAR accelerator. Tumor cells were treated with the NO donor DETA-NO and the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was calculated using the α parameter of the survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model. Tumor cells irradiated with protons were radio sensitized by DETA-NO only in the more malignant cells irradiated with low LET protons (2.69±0.08 keV/μm). For higher LET protons there were no radiosensitizing effect. For human tumor cells pre-treated with DETA-NO and irradiated with γ rays, a significantly greater effect was demonstrated in the malignant cells (MCF-7) as compared with the near normal cells (HBL-100). Moreover, a significant decrease in tumor growth was demonstrated in mice pre-treated with the NO donor spermine and irradiated with γ rays and low LET protons as compared with mice irradiated without pre-treatment with the NO donor. In conclusion, we demonstrated a differential effect of NO as a radiosensitizer of malignant cells, both with γ rays and low LET protons. This selectivity, coupled to the in vivo inhibition of tumor growth, is of great interest for the potential use of NO releasing agents in radiotherapy. (author)

  3. EFFECTS OF CANNABIDIOL PLUS HYPOTHERMIA ON SHORT-TERM NEWBORN PIG BRAIN DAMAGE AFTER ACUTE HYPOXIA-ISCHEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Lafuente

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothermia is standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but near 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms to hypothermia and would improve neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate.Objective: To test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets.Methods: Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomized to receive 30 min after the insult: 1 normothermia- and vehicle-treated group; 2 normothermia- and cannabidiol-treated group; 3 hypothermia- and vehicle-treated group; and 4 hypothermia- and cannabidiol-treated group. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to qualify the number of neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate. Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress and expression of caspase-3 (apoptosis and TNFα (inflammation.Results: Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on histological damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone.Conclusion: Cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  4. Hygro thermal simulation to predict the risk of frost damage in masonry : effects of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aarle, M.A.P.; Schellen, H.L.; van Schijndel, A.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) climate change will result in an increase of air temperature and rainfall intensities for the Netherlands in winter in future. In this paper we investigate the effect of the risk of frost damage to masonry. The risk of frost damage

  5. Effect of physical damage and storage of pineapple fruits on their suitability for juice production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hounhouigan, M.H.; Linnemann, A.R.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Soumanou, M.M.; Trijp, van H.C.M.; Boekel, van T.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of physically damaged pineapples, variety “MD2,” that were stored for up to 9 days at 20C for the production of fresh pineapple juice. Fresh pineapples were bruised and cut in different ways. The study showed an interaction effect of the physical damage

  6. Effect of Intrafraction Prostate Motion on Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Delivery: A Quantitative Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shikui, E-mail: TangS@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact caused by the interplay between intrafraction prostate motion and the intermittent delivery of proton pencil beam scanning (PBS). Methods and Materials: A cohort of 10 prostate patients was treated with PBS using a bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. Bilateral intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were generated for comparison. Because beam-on time in PBS was intermittent, the actual beam-on time was determined from treatment logs. Prostate motion was generalized according to real-time Calypso tracking data from our previously reported prospective photon trial. We investigated potential dose deviations by considering the interplay effect resulting from the worst-case scenario motion and the PBS delivery sequence. Results: For both bilateral-field SFUD and IMPT plans, clinical target volume (CTV) D{sub 99}% coverage was degraded <2% owing to prostate intrafraction motion when averaged over the course of treatment, but was >10% for the worst fraction. The standard deviation of CTV D{sub 99}% distribution was approximately 1.2%. The CTV coverage of individual fields in SFUD plans degraded as time elapsed after the initial alignment, owing to prostate drift. Intensity-modulated proton therapy and SFUD demonstrated comparable results when bilateral opposed fields were used. Single-field SFUD plans that were repainted twice, which could reduce half of the treatment time, resulted in similar CTV coverage as bilateral-field plans. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate motion affects the actual delivered dose to CTV; however, when averaged over the course of treatment, CTV D{sub 99}% coverage degraded only approximately 2% even for the worst-case scenario. The IMPT plan results are comparable to those of the SFUD plan, and similar coverage can be achieved if treated by SFUD 1 lateral field per day when rescanning the field twice to shorten the treatment time and mitigate intrafraction motion.

  7. Two-proton emission half-lives in the effective liquid drop model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gonçalves

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Half-life for two-proton radioactivity of emitter nuclides of mass number A<70 has been calculated by using a phenomenological, effective liquid drop model (eldm which has been applied successfully to one-proton radioactivity, alpha decay, cluster radioactivity and cold fission processes. Following this approach, we estimate half-life values for several 2p-emitted nuclides and compare our results with predictions from other models, as well as the existing data in the literature, specifically the cases for 16Ne, 19Mg, 45Fe, 48Ni, 54Zn and 67Kr parent nuclei. It is seen that the eldm version adapted to deal with 2p-decay process reproduces the available experimental data quite satisfactorily, asserting that shell corrections and pairing effects for the ground state nucleus have been well incorporated into the model via the experimental mass excess values. The present estimates for half-lives show a number of nuclei with detectable 2p-emission mode, which predictions may serve as indicators for further experimental investigations.

  8. Antitumor effect of combination of the inhibitors of two new oncotargets: proton pumps and reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugini, Luana; Sciamanna, Ilaria; Federici, Cristina; Iessi, Elisabetta; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Fais, Stefano

    2017-01-17

    Tumor therapy needs new approaches in order to improve efficacy and reduce toxicity of the current treatments. The acidic microenvironment and the expression of high levels of endogenous non-telomerase reverse transcriptase (RT) are common features of malignant tumor cells. The anti-acidic proton pump inhibitor Lansoprazole (LAN) and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor Efavirenz (EFV) have shown independent antitumor efficacy. LAN has shown to counteract drug tumor resistance. We tested the hypothesis that combination of LAN and EFV may improve the overall antitumor effects. We thus pretreated human metastatic melanoma cells with LAN and then with EFV, both in 2D and 3D spheroid models. We evaluated the treatment effect by proliferation and cell death/apoptosis assays in classical and in pulse administration experiments. The action of EFV was negatively affected by the tumor microenvironmental acidity, and LAN pretreatment overcame the problem. LAN potentiated the cytotoxicity of EFV to melanoma cells and, when administered during the drug interruption period, prevented the replacement of tumor cell growth.This study supports the implementation of the current therapies with combination of Proton Pumps and Reverse Transcriptase inhibitors.

  9. Morphology Effect on Proton Dynamics in Nafion® 117 and Sulfonated Polyether Ether Ketone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Jun Xing; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Ahmad, Azizan; Daud, Wan Ramli Wan; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    We report results of our experimental and theoretical studies on the dynamics of proton conductivity in Nafion® 117 and self-fabricated sulfonated polyether ether ketone (SPEEK) membranes. Knowing that the presence of water molecules in the diffusion process results in a lower energy barrier, we determined the diffusion barriers and corresponding tunneling probabilities of Nafion® 117 and SPEEK system using a simple theoretical model that excludes the medium (water molecules) in the initial calculations. We then propose an equation that relates the membrane conductivity to the tunneling probability. We recover the effect of the medium by introducing a correction term into the proposed equation, which takes into account the effect of the proton diffusion distance and the hydration level. We have also experimentally verified that the proposed equation correctly explain the difference in conductivity between Nafion® 117 and SPEEK. We found that membranes that are to be operated in low hydration environments (high temperatures) need to be designed with short diffusion distances to enhance and maintain high conductivity.

  10. Carrier concentration effects on radiation damage in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Ando, K.; Uemura, C.

    1984-01-01

    Minority carrier diffusion length and carrier concentration studies have been made on room-temperature 1-MeV electron irradiated liquid-encapsulated Czochralski grown Zn-doped p-InP. The damage rate for the diffusion length and carrier removal rate due to irradiation have been found to strongly decrease with an increase in the carrier concentration in InP. These phenomena suggest that the induced defects interact with impurities in InP. A preliminary study on the annealing behavior has also been performed

  11. Proton disorder in cubic ice: Effect on the electronic and optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuio, Viviana; Pulci, Olivia; Cascella, Michele; Kupchak, Igor; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo

    2015-01-01

    The proton disorder in ice has a key role in several properties such as the growth mode, thermodynamical properties, and ferroelectricity. While structural phase transitions from proton disordered to proton ordered ices have been extensively studied, much less is known about their electronic and optical properties. Here, we present ab initio many body perturbation theory-based calculations of the electronic and optical properties of cubic ice at different levels of proton disorder. We compare our results with those from liquid water, that acts as an example of a fully (proton- and oxygen-)disordered system. We find that by increasing the proton disorder, a shrinking of the electronic gap occurs in ice, and it is smallest in the liquid water. Simultaneously, the excitonic binding energy decreases, so that the final optical gaps result to be almost independent on the degree of proton disorder. We explain these findings as an interplay between the local dipolar disorder and the electronic correlation

  12. Effective neutron-proton interaction in rare earth odd-odd nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisson, Jean-Paul.

    1975-01-01

    The effective neutron-proton interaction V(np) in the rare earth odd-odd deformed nuclei is studied. The parameters of the effective interaction are determined from least square fits of calculated matrix elements compared to the ones extracted from experiment. These fits show the existence of a long range repulsive component as well the importance of the even term of the tensor part of V(np). Some informations are obtained concerning the influence of the choice of the sample of experimental data, of the average field and finally, of the radial shape of the effective interaction. Some predictions are made concerning as yet unconfirmed V(np) matrix elements [fr

  13. Effect of low energy electron irradiation on DNA damage by Cu{sup 2+} ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Ah; Cho, Hyuck [Dept. of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yeun Soo [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The combined effect of the low energy electron (LEE) irradiation and Cu{sup 2+} ion on DNA damage was investigated. Lyophilized pBR322 plasmid DNA films with various concentrations (1–15 mM) of Cu{sup 2+} ion were independently irradiated by monochromatic LEEs with 5 eV. The types of DNA damage, single strand break (SSB) and double strand break (DSB), were separated and quantified by gel electrophoresis. Without electron irradiation, DNA damage was slightly increased with increasing Cu ion concentration via Fenton reaction. LEE-induced DNA damage, with no Cu ion, was only 6.6% via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process. However, DNA damage was significantly increased through the combined effect of LEE-irradiation and Cu ion, except around 9 mM Cu ion. The possible pathways of DNA damage for each of these different cases were suggested. The combined effect of LEE-irradiation and Cu ion is likely to cause increasing dissociation after elevated transient negative ion state, resulting in the enhanced DNA damage. For the decrease of DNA damage at around 9-mM Cu ion, it is assumed to be related to the structural stabilization due to DNA inter- and intra-crosslinks via Cu ion.

  14. The effect of higher order chromatin structure on DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, L.S.; Warters, R.L.; Higashikubo, R.

    1985-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin structure are thought to play an important role in various radiobiological end points, i.e., DNA damage, DNA damage repair and cell survival. The authors use here the isoleucine deprivation technique to decondense higher order chromatin structure and asses X-ray induced DNA damage, DNA damage repair and cell survival on cells with decondensed chromatin as compared to controls. This chromatin decondensation manifests itself as a 30 fold decrease in nuclear area occupied by heterochromatin, an increased rate of Micrococcal nuclease digestion, 15% increased ethidium bromide intercalation and an altered binding capacity of Hl histone. These chromatin/nuclear changes do not affect X-ray induced DNA damage as measured by the alkaline elution technique or cell survival but slows DNA damage repair by 2 fold. Therefore, even though the chromatin appears more accessible to DNA damage and repair processes, these particular nuclear changes do not affect the DNA damaging effects of X-rays and in addition, repair is not enhanced by the ''relaxed'' state of chromatin. It is proposed that the altered metabolic state of isoleucine deprived cells provides a less efficient system for the repair of X-ray induced DNA damage

  15. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  16. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  17. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor control probability

  18. A Green's Function Approach to Simulate DNA Damage by the Indirect Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cicinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage is of fundamental importance in the understanding of the effects of ionizing radiation. DNA is damaged by the direct effect of radiation (e.g. direct ionization) and by indirect effect (e.g. damage by.OH radicals created by the radiolysis of water). Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains. In the recent years, the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE) have been used extensively in biochemistry [1], notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space [2]. In our future work on DNA damage, we wish to use an approach based on the GFDE to refine existing models on the indirect effect of ionizing radiation on DNA. To do so, we will use the code RITRACKS [3] developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center to simulate the radiation track structure and calculate the position of radiolytic species after irradiation. We have also recently developed an efficient Monte-Carlo sampling algorithm for the GFDE of reversible reactions with an intermediate state [4], which can be modified and adapted to simulate DNA damage by free radicals. To do so, we will use the known reaction rate constants between radicals (OH, eaq, H,...) and the DNA bases, sugars and phosphates and use the sampling algorithms to simulate the diffusion of free radicals and chemical reactions with DNA. These techniques should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the formation of DNA damage and double-strand breaks.

  19. Electrochemical Approach for Analyzing Electrolyte Transport Properties and Their Effect on Protonic Ceramic Fuel Cell Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Nikolay; Lyagaeva, Julia; Vdovin, Gennady; Medvedev, Dmitry; Demin, Anatoly; Tsiakaras, Panagiotis

    2017-08-16

    The design and development of highly conductive materials with wide electrolytic domain boundaries are among the most promising means of enabling solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to demonstrate outstanding performance across low- and intermediate-temperature ranges. While reducing the thickness of the electrolyte is an extensively studied means for diminishing the total resistance of SOFCs, approaches involving an improvement in the transport behavior of the electrolyte membranes have been less-investigated. In the present work, a strategy for analyzing the electrolyte properties and their effect on SOFC output characteristics is proposed. To this purpose, a SOFC based on a recently developed BaCe 0.5 Zr 0.3 Dy 0.2 O 3-δ proton-conducting ceramic material was fabricated and tested. The basis of the strategy consists of the use of traditional SOFC testing techniques combined with the current interruption method and electromotive force measurements with a modified polarization-correction assessment. This allows one to determine simultaneously such important parameters as maximal power density; ohmic and polarization resistances; average ion transport numbers; and total, ionic, and electronic film conductivities and their activation energies. The proposed experimental procedure is expected to expand both fundamental and applied basics that could be further adopted to improve the technology of electrochemical devices based on proton-conducting electrolytes.

  20. The effect of polymer coatings on proton transverse relaxivities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, Matthew R J; House, Michael J; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy G; Huffstetler, Phillip P; Miles, William C; Goff, Jonathon D; Davis, Richey M; Riffle, Judy S

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their high magnetic susceptibilities. Here we investigate 19 polyether-coated magnetite nanoparticle systems comprising three series. All systems were synthesized from the same batch of magnetite nanoparticles. A different polyether was used for each series. Each series comprised systems with systematically varied polyether loadings per particle. A highly significant (p < 0.0001) linear correlation (r = 0.956) was found between the proton relaxivity and the intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering in the 19 particle systems studied. The intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering is sensitive to small number fractions of larger particles/aggregates. We conclude that the primary effect leading to differences in proton relaxivity between systems arises from the small degree of aggregation within the samples, which appears to be determined by the nature of the polymer and, for one system, the degree of polymer loading of the particles. For the polyether coatings used in this study, any changes in relaxivity from differences in water exclusion or diffusion rates caused by the polymer are minor in comparison with the changes in relaxivity resulting from variations in the degree of aggregation.

  1. The effect of polymer coatings on proton transverse relaxivities of aqueous suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Matthew R J; House, Michael J; Woodward, Robert C; St Pierre, Timothy G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Huffstetler, Phillip P; Miles, William C; Goff, Jonathon D; Davis, Richey M; Riffle, Judy S, E-mail: stpierre@physics.uwa.edu.au [Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-08-12

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents due to their high magnetic susceptibilities. Here we investigate 19 polyether-coated magnetite nanoparticle systems comprising three series. All systems were synthesized from the same batch of magnetite nanoparticles. A different polyether was used for each series. Each series comprised systems with systematically varied polyether loadings per particle. A highly significant (p < 0.0001) linear correlation (r = 0.956) was found between the proton relaxivity and the intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering in the 19 particle systems studied. The intensity-weighted average diameter measured by dynamic light scattering is sensitive to small number fractions of larger particles/aggregates. We conclude that the primary effect leading to differences in proton relaxivity between systems arises from the small degree of aggregation within the samples, which appears to be determined by the nature of the polymer and, for one system, the degree of polymer loading of the particles. For the polyether coatings used in this study, any changes in relaxivity from differences in water exclusion or diffusion rates caused by the polymer are minor in comparison with the changes in relaxivity resulting from variations in the degree of aggregation.

  2. Effects of Alternating Hydrogenated and Protonated Segments in polymers on their Wettability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dennis; Traiphol, Rakchart; Cheng, Gang; Perahia, Dvora

    2003-03-01

    Polymers consisting of alternating hydrogenated and fluorinated segments exhibit unique interfacial characteristics governed by the components that dominate the interface. Presence of fluorine reduces the interfacial energy and is expected to decrease the adhesion to the polymer surface. Thin liquid crystalline (LC) layers of 4,4?-octyl-cyanobiphenyl, cast on top of a polymeric layer consisting of alternating methylstylbine protonated segments bridged by a fluorinated group was used as a mechanistic tool to study of interfacial effects on three parameters: wetting, interfacial alignment and surface induces structures. The liquid crystal cast on a low interfacial energy fluorinated polymeric film exhibits bulk homeotropic alignment as expected. However it fully wetted the polymer surface despite the incompatibility of the protonated LC and mainly fluorinated polymer interface. Further more, it was found to stabilize the interfacial Semitic layers to a higher temperature and induce different surface ordering that was not observed at the same temperature neither in the bulk nor at the interfaces with silicon or glass surface. These results indicate that the interfacial interactions of polymers with liquid crystals are a complex function of both surface energies and the interfacial structure of the polymer.

  3. Numerical study on channel size effect for proton exchange membrane fuel cell with serpentine flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaodong; Yan Weimon; Duan Yuanyuan; Weng Fangbor; Jung Guobin; Lee Chiyuan

    2010-01-01

    This work numerically investigates the effect of the channel size on the cell performance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with serpentine flow fields using a three-dimensional, two-phase model. The local current densities in the PEM, oxygen mass flow rates and liquid water concentrations at the interface of the cathode gas diffusion layer and catalyst layer were analyzed to understand the channel size effect. The predictions show that smaller channel sizes enhance liquid water removal and increase oxygen transport to the porous layers, which improve cell performance. Additionally, smaller channel sizes also provide more uniform current density distributions in the cell. However, as the channel size decreases, the total pressure drops across the cell increases, which leads to more pump work. With taking into account the pressure losses, the optimal cell performance occurs for a cell with a flow channel cross-sectional area of 0.535 x 0.535 mm 2 .

  4. The effect of nitrogen oxides in air on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Daijun; Ma Jianxin; Xu Lin; Wu Minzhong; Wang Haijiang

    2006-01-01

    The effects of NO x on the performance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell were investigated through the introduction of a mixture containing NO and NO 2 , in a ratio of 9:1, into the cathode stream of a single PEM fuel cell. The NO x concentrations used in the experiments were 1480 ppm, 140 ppm and 10 ppm, which cover a range of three orders. The experimental results obtained from the tests of durability, polarization, reversibility and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed a detrimental effect of NO x on the cell performance. The electrochemical measurements results suggested that the impacts of NO x are mainly resulted from the superposition of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), NO and HNO 2 oxidation reactions, and the increased cathodic impedance. Complete recovery of the cell performance was reached after operating the cell with clean air and then purging with N 2 for hours

  5. Single-particle And Collective Effects Of Cubic Nonlinearity In The Beam Dynamics Of Proton Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Tran Hy, J

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes some new studies of the effects of cubic nonlinearities arising from image-charge forces and octupole magnets on the transverse beam dynamics of proton synchrotrons and storage rings, and also a study of the damping of coherent oscillations using a feed-back damper. In the latter case, various corrective algorithms were modeled using linear one-turn maps. Kicks of fixed amplitude but appropriate sign were shown to provide linear damping and no coherent tune shift, though the rate predicted analytically was somewhat higher than that observed in simulations. This algorithm gave much faster damping (for equal power) than conventional proportional kicks, which damp exponentially. Two single-particle effects of the image-change force were investigated: distortion of the momentum dispersion function and amplitude dependence of the betatron tunes (resulting in tune spread). The former is calculated using transfer maps and the method of undetermined coefficients, the latter by solving the cubic ...

  6. Account of the effect of nuclear collision cascades in model of radiation damage of RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevorkyan, Yu.R.; Nikolaev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    A kinetic model is proposed for describing the effect of collision cascades in model of radiation damage of reactor pressure vessel steels. This is a closed system of equations which can be solved only by numerical methods in general case

  7. The effect of ancient DNA damage on inferences of demographic histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Erik; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, Marcus Thomas Pius

    2008-01-01

    The field of ancient DNA (aDNA) is casting new light on many evolutionary questions. However, problems associated with the postmortem instability of DNA may complicate the interpretation of aDNA data. For example, in population genetic studies, the inclusion of damaged DNA may inflate estimates o...... for a change in effective population size in this data set vanishes once the effects of putative damage are removed. Our results suggest that population genetic analyses of aDNA sequences, which do not accurately account for damage, should be interpreted with great caution....

  8. An evaluation of the effects of epidermal growth factor on irradiation lip mucosa damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan

    1994-01-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on lip mucosa damage by irradiation was explored in mice. EGF was administered in doses of 100 μg/kg/day using different schedules. Mucosal damage was assessed. The metaphase arrest method with vinblastine was used to evaluate the diurnal rhythm of mitosis. EGF in regimens employed did not protect the mouse lip epithelial cells from irradiation induced damage, but it has a demonstrable stimulatory effect on cell proliferation in lip mucosa which is dependent on the schedules of administration. The reasons and mechanisms are discussed

  9. Application of the Moessbauer spectroscopy to the investigation of the proton irradiation effects in several iron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopcewicz, M.; Kotlicki, A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study into the influence of proton irradiation on the Moessbauer effect in FeSO 4 x 7H 2 O, K 4 [Fe(CN) 6 ] x 3H 2 O and K 3 [Fe(CN) 6 ] are reported. In the interpretation of the effect observed, the 'spike' model was applied. Chemical decomposition processes due to proton irradiation and formation of the superparamagnetic state of metallic iron were investigated. A Moessbauer observation of interstitial Fe 2+ ions in irradiated FeSO 4 x 7H 2 O was made. (Z.S.)

  10. Effect of Hydroalcholic Extract of Curcuma longa on Adriamycin-Induced Renal Damage in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    R. Mohebbati; A.A. Abbasnezhad; A. Khajavi Rad; M. Haghshenas; M.R. Khazdeir

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Adriamycin is one of the anti-cancer medications. Nevertheless, the medication causes renal damage. Curcuma longa has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Curcuma longa on renal damage due to Adriamycin in the rat. Materials & Methods: In the experimental study, 32 male Wistar rats were studied. Via simple random method, the rats were divided into four groups including control, Adriamycin (5mg/Kg)...

  11. Cointegration approach for temperature effect compensation in Lamb-wave-based damage detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Phong B; Staszewski, Wieslaw J

    2013-01-01

    Lamb waves are often used in smart structures with integrated, low-profile piezoceramic transducers for damage detection. However, it is well known that the method is prone to contamination from a variety of interference sources including environmental and operational conditions. The paper demonstrates how to remove the undesired temperature effect from Lamb wave data. The method is based on the concept of cointegration that is partially built on the analysis of the non-stationary behaviour of time series. Instead of directly using Lamb wave responses for damage detection, two approaches are proposed: (i) analysis of cointegrating residuals obtained from the cointegration process of Lamb wave responses, (ii) analysis of stationary characteristics of Lamb wave responses before and after cointegration. The method is tested on undamaged and damaged aluminium plates exposed to temperature variations. The experimental results show that the method can: isolate damage-sensitive features from temperature variations, detect the existence of damage and classify its severity. (paper)

  12. Effects of High-Energy Proton-Beam Irradiation on the Magnetic Properties of ZnO Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    There are still many problem for the application due to its unstable magnetism state and too small magnetization values. Here we investigate magnetic properties of ZnO nanorods after high-energy proton-beam irradiation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement on temperature was made to identify intrinsic or extrinsic defects as well as to observe magnetic ordering after irradiation. Understanding the effects of proton beam irradiation on magnetic behavior may help to shed light on the mechanism responsible for the magnetic ordering in this material. We have investigated proton-beam irradiation effects on the magnetic properties of ZnO nanorods. After irradiation a broad ESR line is observed, indicating emergence of ferromagnetic ordering up to room temperature. In M-H curve, stronger coercive field is observed after irradiation.

  13. A Binary-Encounter-Bethe Approach to Simulate DNA Damage by the Direct Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage is of crucial importance in the understanding of the effects of ionizing radiation. The main mechanisms of DNA damage are by the direct effect of radiation (e.g. direct ionization) and by indirect effect (e.g. damage by.OH radicals created by the radiolysis of water). Despite years of research in this area, many questions on the formation of DNA damage remains. To refine existing DNA damage models, an approach based on the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model was developed[1]. This model calculates differential cross sections for ionization of the molecular orbitals of the DNA bases, sugars and phosphates using the electron binding energy, the mean kinetic energy and the occupancy number of the orbital. This cross section has an analytic form which is quite convenient to use and allows the sampling of the energy loss occurring during an ionization event. To simulate the radiation track structure, the code RITRACKS developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center is used[2]. This code calculates all the energy deposition events and the formation of the radiolytic species by the ion and the secondary electrons as well. We have also developed a technique to use the integrated BEB cross section for the bases, sugar and phosphates in the radiation transport code RITRACKS. These techniques should allow the simulation of DNA damage by ionizing radiation, and understanding of the formation of double-strand breaks caused by clustered damage in different conditions.

  14. Effect of water availability on tolerance of leaf damage in tall morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atala, Cristian; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2009-03-01

    Resource availability may limit plant tolerance of herbivory. To predict the effect of differential resource availability on plant tolerance, the limiting resource model (LRM) considers which resource limits plant fitness and which resource is mostly affected by herbivore damage. We tested the effect of experimental drought on tolerance of leaf damage in Ipomoea purpurea, which is naturally exposed to both leaf damage and summer drought. To seek mechanistic explanations, we also measured several morphological, allocation and gas exchange traits. In this case, LRM predicts that tolerance would be the same in both water treatments. Plants were assigned to a combination of two water treatments (control and low water) and two damage treatments (50% defoliation and undamaged). Plants showed tolerance of leaf damage, i.e., a similar number of fruits were produced by damaged and undamaged plants, only in control water. Whereas experimental drought affected all plant traits, leaf damage caused plants to show a greater leaf trichome density and reduced shoot biomass, but only in low water. It is suggested that the reduced fitness (number of fruits) of damaged plants in low water was mediated by the differential reduction of shoot biomass, because the number of fruits per shoot biomass was similar in damaged and undamaged plants. Alternative but less likely explanations include the opposing direction of functional responses to drought and defoliation, and resource costs of the damage-induced leaf trichome density. Our results somewhat challenge the LRM predictions, but further research including field experiments is needed to validate some of the preliminary conclusions drawn.

  15. Effects of microwave pulse-width damage on a bipolar transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhen-Yang; Chai Chang-Chun; Ren Xing-Rong; Yang Yin-Tang; Chen Bin; Zhao Ying-Bo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the pulse-width effects on the damage process of a typical bipolar transistor caused by high power microwaves (HPMs) through the injection approach. The dependences of the microwave damage power, P, and the absorbed energy, E, required to cause the device failure on the pulse width τ are obtained in the nanosecond region by utilizing the curve fitting method. A comparison of the microwave pulse damage data and the existing dc pulse damage data for the same transistor is carried out. By means of a two-dimensional simulator, ISE-TCAD, the internal damage processes of the device caused by microwave voltage signals and dc pulse voltage signals are analyzed comparatively. The simulation results suggest that the temperature-rising positions of the device induced by the microwaves in the negative and positive half periods are different, while only one hot spot exists under the injection of dc pulses. The results demonstrate that the microwave damage power threshold and the absorbed energy must exceed the dc pulse power threshold and the absorbed energy, respectively. The dc pulse damage data may be useful as a lower bound for microwave pulse damage data. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  16. Dose perturbation effect of metallic spinal implants in proton beam therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yingcui; Zhao, Li; Cheng, Chee-Wai; McDonald, Mark W; Das, Indra J

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dose perturbations for two metallic spinal screw implants in proton beam therapy in the perpendicular and parallel beam geometry. A 5.5 mm (diameter) by 45 mm (length) stainless steel (SS) screw and a 5.5 mm by 35 mm titanium (Ti) screw commonly used for spinal fixation were CT-scanned in a hybrid phantom of water and solid water. The CT data were processed with an orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm. Treatment plans were generated for each metal screw with a proton beam oriented, first parallel and then perpendicular, to the longitudinal axis of the screw. The calculated dose profiles were compared with measured results from a plane-parallel ion chamber and Gafchromic EBT2 films. For the perpendicular setup, the measured dose immediately downstream from the screw exhibited dose enhancement up to 12% for SS and 8% for Ti, respectively, but such dose perturbation was not observed outside the lateral edges of the screws. The TPS showed 5% and 2% dose reductions immediately at the interface for the SS nd Ti screws, respectively, and up to 9% dose enhancements within 1 cm outside of the lateral edges of the screws. The measured dose enhancement was only observed within 5 mm from the interface along the beam path. At deeper depths, the lateral dose profiles appeared to be similar between the measurement and TPS, with dose reduction in the screw shadow region and dose enhancement within 1-2 cm outside of the lateral edges of the metals. For the parallel setup, no significant dose perturbation was detected at lateral distance beyond 3 mm away from both screws. Significant dose discrepancies exist between TPS calculations and ion chamber and film measurements in close proximity of high-Z inhomogeneities. The observed dose enhancement effect with proton therapy is not correctly modeled by TPS. An extra measure of caution should be taken when evaluating dosimetry with spinal metallic implants.

  17. The effects of proton pump inhibitors on autonomic tone in patients with erosive and non-erosive esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E L; Perring, S; Khattab, A; Allenby-Smith, O

    2016-05-01

    Reduction in autonomic tone as measured by heart rate variability (HRV) has been associated with various inflammatory conditions including reflux disease. The nature of and permanence of this damage have not been fully assessed. Fourteen individuals with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and 10 individuals with erosive reflux disease (ERD) as identified on endoscopy were assessed for HRV prior to starting a course of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and 8 weeks from the start of PPI therapy. Reflux symptoms were significantly improved by PPI therapy (p = 0.001), with no significant difference in reflux symptoms between the NERD and ERD groups either before (p = 0.45) or following therapy (p = 0.17). The ERD group displayed reduced HRV prior to PPI therapy as compared with a non-symptomatic group. There was significant improvement of HRV resulting from PPI therapy in the ERD group as measured by inspiration/expiration ratio on forced breathing (p = 0.02), Valsalva ratio (p = 0.03), and extended metronome-guided breathing at 6 breaths per minute (p = 0.03). While a similar pattern was seen in the NERD group, the effects were not as strong and did not reach statistical significance. The results are consistent with a growing body of evidence that cardiac autonomic neuropathy as measured by HRV is associated with gastro-esophageal reflux disease and also suggest that successful treatment of the inflammation can lead to reversal of the deterioration of autonomic tone associated with that inflammation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. NMR Study of Solvation Effect on Geometry of Proton-Bound Homodimers of Increasing Size

    KAUST Repository

    Gurinov, Andrei A.; Denisov, Gleb S.; Borissova, Alexandra O.; Goloveshkin, Alexander S.; Greindl, Julian; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Shenderovich, Ilya G.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen bond geometries in the proton-bound homodimers of quinoline and acridine derivatives in an aprotic polar solution have been experimentally studied using 1H NMR at 120 K. The reported results show that increase of the dielec-tric permittivity of the medium results in contraction of the N…N distance. The degree of contraction depends on the homodimer's size and its substituent-specific solvation features. Neither of these effects can be reproduced using conven-tional implicit solvent models employed in computational studies. In general, the N…N distance in the homodimers of pyridine, quinoline, and acridine derivatives decreases in the sequence gas phase > solid state > polar solvent.

  19. Antiproton-proton annihilation into light neutral meson pairs within an effective meson theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Bystritskiy, Yury M.; Ahmadov, Azad I.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle

    2017-08-01

    Antiproton-proton annihilation into light neutral mesons in the few GeV energy domain is investigated in view of a global description of the existing data and predictions for future work at the Antiproton Annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). An effective meson model earlier developed, with mesonic and baryonic degrees of freedom in s , t , and u channels, is applied here to π0π0 production. Form factors with logarithmic s and t (u ) dependencies are applied. A fair agreement with the existing angular distributions is obtained. Applying SU(3) symmetry, it is straightforward to recover the angular distributions for π0η and η η production in the same energy range. A good agreement is generally obtained with all existing data.

  20. NMR Study of Solvation Effect on Geometry of Proton-Bound Homodimers of Increasing Size

    KAUST Repository

    Gurinov, Andrei A.

    2017-10-24

    Hydrogen bond geometries in the proton-bound homodimers of quinoline and acridine derivatives in an aprotic polar solution have been experimentally studied using 1H NMR at 120 K. The reported results show that increase of the dielec-tric permittivity of the medium results in contraction of the N…N distance. The degree of contraction depends on the homodimer\\'s size and its substituent-specific solvation features. Neither of these effects can be reproduced using conven-tional implicit solvent models employed in computational studies. In general, the N…N distance in the homodimers of pyridine, quinoline, and acridine derivatives decreases in the sequence gas phase > solid state > polar solvent.

  1. Multi-dimensional modeling of CO poisoning effects on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Hyun Chul; Lee, Kwan Soo; Um, Suk Kee

    2008-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), which is preferentially absorbed on the platinum catalyst layer of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), is extremely detrimental to cell performance. Essentially, the carbon monoxide absorption diminishes the cell's performance by blocking and reducing the number of catalyst sites available for the hydrogen oxidation reaction. In order to obtain a full understanding of CO poisoning characteristics and remediate CO-poisoned PEMFCs, a CO poisoning numerical model is developed and incorporated into a fully three-dimensional electrochemical and transport coupled PEMFC model. By performing CFD numerical simulations, this paper clearly demonstrates the CO poisoning mechanisms and characteristics of PEMFCs. The predictive capability for CO poisoning effects enables us to find major contributors to CO tolerance in a PEMFC and thus successfully integrate CO-resistant fuel cell systems

  2. 1-3 Nuclear In-medium Effects of Strange Particles in Proton-nucleus Collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng; Zhaoqing[1

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of the in-medium properties of strange particles from heavy-ion collisions is very complicated, since he nuclear density varies in the evolution of nucleus-nucleus collisions. To avoid the uncertainties of the baryon ensities during the stage of strange particle production, one can investigate proton-nucleus collisions where the uclear density is definite around the saturation density. Dynamics of strange particles produced in the protoninduced uclear the reactions near the threshold energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum olecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model. The in-medium modifications on particle production in densenuclear matter are considered through the corrections to the elementary cross sections via the effective mass and he mean-field potentials[1].

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Intravenous Proton Pump Inhibitors in High-Risk Bleeders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is unequivocal evidence that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs are currently the most effective acid suppressive agents available. Intravenous (IV formulations have been developed, although only IV pantoprazole is available in Canada. In patients presenting with serious upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding due to duodenal or gastric ulcers, it has always been believed that IV administration of acid-lowering agents would improve clinical outcomes. The reason behind this thinking is twofold. First, there is in vitro evidence that formed clots are more stable at or near neutral pH (1. Second, by administering the agent intravenously, suppression of acid production is achieved much more quickly, thereby promoting more rapid healing of the ulcer and reducing the risk of persistent or recurrent bleeding. Interestingly and surprisingly, however, the data for intravenous H2-blockers have been disappointing (2. This failure to demonstrate clinical benefit has never been fully explained.

  4. Impact of Intrafraction and Residual Interfraction Effect on Prostate Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Shikui; Deville, Curtiland; Tochner, Zelig; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; McDonough, James; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the impact of interplay effect and plan robustness associated with intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with weekly verification CTs underwent pencil beam scanning with the bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. A typical field had 10-15 energy layers and 500-1000 spots. According to their treatment logs, each layer delivery time was <1 s, with average time to change layers of approximately 8 s. Real-time intrafraction prostate motion was determined from our previously reported prospective study using Calypso beacon transponders. Prostate motion and beam delivering sequence of the worst-case scenario patient were synchronized to calculate the “true” dose received by the prostate. The intrafraction effect was examined by applying the worst-case scenario prostate motion on the planning CT, and the residual interfraction effect was examined on the basis of weekly CT scans. The resultant dose variation of target and critical structures was examined to evaluate the interplay effect. Results: The clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was degraded because of both effects. The CTV D 99 (percentage dose to 99% of the CTV) varied up to 10% relative to the initial plan in individual fractions. However, over the entire course of treatment the total dose degradation of D 99 was 2%-3%, with a standard deviation of <2%. Absolute differences between SFUD, intensity modulate proton therapy, and one-field-per-day SFUD plans were small. The intrafraction effect dominated over the residual interfraction effect for CTV coverage. Mean dose to the anterior rectal wall increased approximately 10% because of combined residual interfraction and intrafraction effects, the interfraction effect being dominant. Conclusions: Both intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion degrade CTV coverage within a clinically

  5. Impact of Intrafraction and Residual Interfraction Effect on Prostate Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shikui, E-mail: shktang@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Deville, Curtiland; Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); McDonough, James; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the impact of interplay effect and plan robustness associated with intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with weekly verification CTs underwent pencil beam scanning with the bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. A typical field had 10-15 energy layers and 500-1000 spots. According to their treatment logs, each layer delivery time was <1 s, with average time to change layers of approximately 8 s. Real-time intrafraction prostate motion was determined from our previously reported prospective study using Calypso beacon transponders. Prostate motion and beam delivering sequence of the worst-case scenario patient were synchronized to calculate the “true” dose received by the prostate. The intrafraction effect was examined by applying the worst-case scenario prostate motion on the planning CT, and the residual interfraction effect was examined on the basis of weekly CT scans. The resultant dose variation of target and critical structures was examined to evaluate the interplay effect. Results: The clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was degraded because of both effects. The CTV D{sub 99} (percentage dose to 99% of the CTV) varied up to 10% relative to the initial plan in individual fractions. However, over the entire course of treatment the total dose degradation of D{sub 99} was 2%-3%, with a standard deviation of <2%. Absolute differences between SFUD, intensity modulate proton therapy, and one-field-per-day SFUD plans were small. The intrafraction effect dominated over the residual interfraction effect for CTV coverage. Mean dose to the anterior rectal wall increased approximately 10% because of combined residual interfraction and intrafraction effects, the interfraction effect being dominant. Conclusions: Both intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion degrade CTV coverage within a

  6. Size Effect on Acoustic Emission Characteristics of Coal-Rock Damage Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coal-gas outburst, rock burst, and other mine dynamic disasters are closely related to the instability and failure of coal-rock. Coal-rock is the assemblies of mineral particles of varying sizes and shapes bonded together by cementing materials. The damage and rupture process of coal-rock is accompanied by acoustic emission (AE, which can be used as an effective means to monitor and predict the instability of coal-rock body. In this manuscript, considering the size effect of coal-rock, the influence of different height to diameter ratio on the acoustic emission characteristics of coal-rock damage evolution was discussed by microparticle flow PFC2D software platform. The results show that coal-rock size influences the uniaxial compressive strength, peak strain, and elastic modulus of itself; the size effect has little effect on the acoustic emission law of coal-rock damage and the effects of the size of coal-rock samples on acoustic emission characteristics are mainly reflected in three aspects: the triggering time of acoustic emission, the strain range of strong acoustic emission, and the intensity of acoustic emission; the damage evolution of coal-rock specimen can be divided into 4 stages: initial damage, stable development, accelerated development, and damage.

  7. Exponential Increase in Relative Biological Effectiveness Along Distal Edge of a Proton Bragg Peak as Measured by Deoxyribonucleic Acid Double-Strand Breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuaron, John J., E-mail: cuaronj@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chang, Chang [Texas Center for Proton Therapy, Irving, Texas (United States); Lovelock, Michael; Higginson, Daniel S. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mah, Dennis [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Somerset, New Jersey (United States); Cahlon, Oren; Powell, Simon [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the distal edge of the proton Bragg peak, using an in vitro assay of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: U2OS cells were irradiated within the plateau of a spread-out Bragg peak and at each millimeter position along the distal edge using a custom slide holder, allowing for simultaneous measurement of physical dose. A reference radiation signal was generated using photons. The DNA DSBs at 3 hours (to assess for early damage) and at 24 hours (to assess for residual damage and repair) after irradiation were measured using the γH2AX assay and quantified via flow cytometry. Results were confirmed with clonogenic survival assays. A detailed map of the RBE as a function of depth along the Bragg peak was generated using γH2AX measurements as a biological endpoint. Results: At 3 hours after irradiation, DNA DSBs were higher with protons at every point along the distal edge compared with samples irradiated with photons to similar doses. This effect was even more pronounced after 24 hours, indicating that the impact of DNA repair is less after proton irradiation relative to photons. The RBE demonstrated an exponential increase as a function of depth and was measured to be as high as 4.0 after 3 hours and as high as 6.0 after 24 hours. When the RBE-corrected dose was plotted as a function of depth, the peak effective dose was extended 2-3 mm beyond what would be expected with physical measurement. Conclusions: We generated a highly comprehensive map of the RBE of the distal edge of the Bragg peak, using a direct assay of DNA DSBs in vitro. Our data show that the RBE of the distal edge increases with depth and is significantly higher than previously reported estimates.

  8. Effect of Film Dressing on Acute Radiation Dermatitis Secondary to Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimura, Takeshi; Ogino, Takashi; Yoshiura, Takashi; Toi, Yuya; Kawabata, Michiko; Chuman, Ikuko; Wada, Kiyotaka; Kondo, Naoaki; Nagayama, Shinichi; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) is one of the most common adverse events of proton beam therapy (PBT), and there is currently no effective method to manage ARD. The purpose of this study was to examine the prophylactic effect of a film dressing using Airwall on PBT-induced ARD compared with standard skin managements. Methods and Materials: A total of 271 patients with prostate cancer who were scheduled for PBT at our center were divided into 2 groups based on their own requests: 145 patients (53%) chose Airwall (group A) and 126 patients (47%) received standard treatments (group B). We evaluated irradiated skin every other day during PBT and followed up once a week for a month after completion of PBT. Results: Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis were seen in 2, 122, 21, and 0 and 0, 65, 57, and 4 patients in groups A and B, respectively (P<.001). Numbers of days to grades 1 and 2 ARD development were 34.9 ± 14.3 and 54.7 ± 10.3 and 31.8 ± 11.3 and 54.4 ± 11.6 in groups A and B, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups. Eighteen patients (12%) in group A who experienced problems in the region covered with Airwall switched to standard skin care after peeling the film off. Conclusions: Film dressing using Airwall reduced the severity of ARD without delaying the response time of the skin to proton beam irradiation compared with standard skin management. Hence, film dressing is considered a promising measure for preventing ARD secondary to PBT.

  9. Effect of Film Dressing on Acute Radiation Dermatitis Secondary to Proton Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimura, Takeshi, E-mail: arimura-takeshi@medipolis.org [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Ogino, Takashi [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan); Yoshiura, Takashi [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima (Japan); Toi, Yuya; Kawabata, Michiko; Chuman, Ikuko; Wada, Kiyotaka; Kondo, Naoaki; Nagayama, Shinichi; Hishikawa, Yoshio [Medipolis Proton Therapy and Research Center, Ibusuki (Japan)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) is one of the most common adverse events of proton beam therapy (PBT), and there is currently no effective method to manage ARD. The purpose of this study was to examine the prophylactic effect of a film dressing using Airwall on PBT-induced ARD compared with standard skin managements. Methods and Materials: A total of 271 patients with prostate cancer who were scheduled for PBT at our center were divided into 2 groups based on their own requests: 145 patients (53%) chose Airwall (group A) and 126 patients (47%) received standard treatments (group B). We evaluated irradiated skin every other day during PBT and followed up once a week for a month after completion of PBT. Results: Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3 dermatitis were seen in 2, 122, 21, and 0 and 0, 65, 57, and 4 patients in groups A and B, respectively (P<.001). Numbers of days to grades 1 and 2 ARD development were 34.9 ± 14.3 and 54.7 ± 10.3 and 31.8 ± 11.3 and 54.4 ± 11.6 in groups A and B, respectively. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups. Eighteen patients (12%) in group A who experienced problems in the region covered with Airwall switched to standard skin care after peeling the film off. Conclusions: Film dressing using Airwall reduced the severity of ARD without delaying the response time of the skin to proton beam irradiation compared with standard skin management. Hence, film dressing is considered a promising measure for preventing ARD secondary to PBT.

  10. Effect of Mercuric Nitrate on Repair of Radiation-induced DNA Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paneka, Agnieszka; Antonina, Cebulska Wasilewska [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Han, Min; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    High concentrations of mercury can cause serious damage to the nervous system, immune system, kidneys and liver in humans. And mercury is toxic to developing embryos because mercury ions can penetrate the blood.placenta barrier to reach the embryo. Studies from human monitoring of occupational exposure to mercury vapours have shown that mercury can alter the ability of lymphocytes to repair radiation-induced DNA damage. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate, on the molecular and cytogenetic levels, the effect of exposure to mercury ions on the kinetics of the repair process of DNA damage induced by ionising radiation.

  11. Short- and medium-term atmospheric constituent effects of very large solar proton events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Jackman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar eruptions sometimes produce protons, which impact the Earth's atmosphere. These solar proton events (SPEs generally last a few days and produce high energy particles that precipitate into the Earth's atmosphere. The protons cause ionization and dissociation processes that ultimately lead to an enhancement of odd-hydrogen and odd-nitrogen in the polar cap regions (>60° geomagnetic latitude. We have used the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM3 to study the atmospheric impact of SPEs over the period 1963–2005. The very largest SPEs were found to be the most important and caused atmospheric effects that lasted several months after the events. We present the short- and medium-term (days to a few months atmospheric influence of the four largest SPEs in the past 45 years (August 1972; October 1989; July 2000; and October–November 2003 as computed by WACCM3 and observed by satellite instruments. Polar mesospheric NOx (NO+NO2 increased by over 50 ppbv and mesospheric ozone decreased by over 30% during these very large SPEs. Changes in HNO3, N2O5, ClONO2, HOCl, and ClO were indirectly caused by the very large SPEs in October–November 2003, were simulated by WACCM3, and previously measured by Envisat Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. WACCM3 output was also represented by sampling with the MIPAS averaging kernel for a more valid comparison. Although qualitatively similar, there are discrepancies between the model and measurement with WACCM3 predicted HNO3 and ClONO2 enhancements being smaller than measured and N2O5 enhancements being larger than measured. The HOCl enhancements were fairly similar in amounts and temporal variation in WACCM3 and MIPAS. WACCM3 simulated ClO decreases below 50 km, whereas MIPAS mainly observed increases, a very perplexing difference. Upper stratospheric

  12. Investigation on the effect of developed product and new food for radiation-induced skin damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Chun; Bae, Chun Sik; Kim, Se Ra; Lee, Hae Jun; Bang, Dae Won; Lee, Jin Hee; Kim, Joong Sun; Ki, Sun Ah; Song, Myung Seop [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    In vivo evaluation of the developed pilot product on the skin protection against UV irradiation and screening of new candidate materials. Project Results are Establishment of experimental methods for 3 morphological indices of UV-induced skin damages -Establishment of experimental methods for whitening effect evaluation -Evaluation of HemoHIM administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 1 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 2 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 3 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the TNBS-induced colitis -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the anti-wrinkle effects in the skin -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tissue (epidermal thickening, dermal cellularity, dermal cyst) -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tumor development

  13. Investigation on the effect of developed product and new food for radiation-induced skin damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong Chun; Bae, Chun Sik; Kim, Se Ra; Lee, Hae Jun; Bang, Dae Won; Lee, Jin Hee; Kim, Joong Sun; Ki, Sun Ah; Song, Myung Seop

    2007-07-01

    In vivo evaluation of the developed pilot product on the skin protection against UV irradiation and screening of new candidate materials. Project Results are Establishment of experimental methods for 3 morphological indices of UV-induced skin damages -Establishment of experimental methods for whitening effect evaluation -Evaluation of HemoHIM administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic administration on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoTonic skin application on the skin damage indices -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 1 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 2 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the inflammation stage 3 -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the antiinflamatory effects in the TNBS-induced colitis -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the anti-wrinkle effects in the skin -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tissue (epidermal thickening, dermal cellularity, dermal cyst) -Evaluation of HemoHIM on the protective effects on the skin tumor development

  14. Effectiveness of proton-beam irradiation of the pituitary gland in children with Itsenko-Cushing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukovskij, M.A.; Bukhman, A.I.; Levshina, R.B.; Kirpatovskaya, L.E.; Kolesnikova, G.S.; Pankova, S.S.; Lisovets, S.P.; Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow

    1990-01-01

    The results of the treatment of 20 children with Icenko-Cushing disease (ICD) by proton-beam irradiation of the pituitary glandare presented. The use of the medical proton beam of the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics found to be effective for the treatment of children with mild and average forms of ICD. Irradiation of the pituitary gland at a dose of 70-100 Gy is accompanied by general and local radiation reactions which are not dangerous for children. The time of development of remission after irradiation depends on a degree of severity and features of a course of disease

  15. The Possible "Proton Sponge " Effect of Polyethylenimine (PEI) Does Not Include Change in Lysosomal pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2013-01-01

    is still elusive. The "proton sponge " hypothesis remains the most generally accepted mechanism, although it is heavily debated. This hypothesis is associated with the large buffering capacity of PEI and other polycations, which has been interpreted to cause an increase in lysosomal pH even though...... no conclusive proof has been provided. In the present study, we have used a nanoparticle pH sensor that was developed for pH measurements in the endosomal/lysosomal pathway. We have carried out quantitative measurements of lysosomal pH as a function of PEI content and correlate the results to the "proton sponge...... " hypothesis. Our measurements show that PEI does not induce change in lysosomal pH as previously suggested and quantification of PEI concentrations in lysosomes makes it uncertain that the "proton sponge " effect is the dominant mechanism of polyplex escape.Molecular Therapy (2012); doi:10.1038/mt.2012.185....

  16. Quantum Effects for a Proton in a Low-Barrier, Double-Well Potential: Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of Acetylacetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyer, Vitaliy; Prince, Kevin C; Coreno, Marcello; Melandri, Sonia; Maris, Assimo; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther; Giuliano, Barbara M; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Carravetta, Vincenzo

    2018-02-01

    We have performed core level photoemission spectroscopy of gaseous acetylacetone, its fully deuterated form, and two derivatives, benzoylacetone and dibenzoylmethane. These molecules show intramolecular hydrogen bonds, with a proton located in a double-well potential, whose barrier height is different for the three compounds. This has allowed us to examine the effect of the double-well potential on photoemission spectra. Two distinct O 1s core hole peaks are observed, previously assigned to two chemical states of oxygen. We provide an alternative assignment of the double-peak structure of O 1s spectra by taking full account of the extended nature of the wave function associated with the nuclear motion of the proton, the shape of the ground and final state potentials in which the proton is located, and the nonzero temperature of the samples. The peaks are explained in terms of an unusual Franck-Condon factor distribution.

  17. Nanomorphology of graphene and CNT reinforced polymer and its effect on damage: Micromechanical numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontefisso, Alessandro; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2016-01-01

    of nanocomposites with inclusions of arbitrary and complex shapes. The effect of curved, zigzagged, snakelike shapes of real carbon nanotubes, as well as re-stacking of graphene on the damage evolution was studied in the computational experiments based on the developed code. The potential of hybrid (carbon...... nanotubes and graphene) nanoscale reinforcement was studied with view on its effect of damage resistance. It was demonstrated that idealized, cylinder like models of carbon nanotubes in polymers lead to an underestimation of the stress concentration and damage likelihood in the nanocomposites. The main...... damage mechanisms in CNT reinforced polymers are debonding and pull-out/fiber bridging, while in graphene reinforced polymers the main role is played by crack deviation and stack splitting, with following micro-crack merging. The potential of hybrid (carbon nanotubes and graphene) nanoscale reinforcement...

  18. Protonation of the polyethyleneimine and titanium particles and their effect on the electrophoretic mobility and deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Kok-Tee, E-mail: ktlau@utem.edu.my [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100, Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Anand, T. Joseph Sahaya [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100, Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Sorrell, Charles C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-10-01

    Proton activities of suspensions of Ti particles with added cationic polyelectrolyte as a function of acid additions have been investigated and compared in terms of the electrophoretic mobility and deposition yield. The proton activity in ethanol medium decreased with the addition of PEI polyelectrolyte and reduced further in the presence of Ti particles. The decrease in proton activity in the suspension indicates that protonation occurred on both the PEI molecules and Ti particles. It is proposed that the protonation of the amine groups of PEI and hydroxyl sites of Ti particle led to the formation of hydrogen bonding between the Ti particle and PEI molecules. Increase in the PEI and Ti with increasing acid addition translated to higher electrophoretic mobilities and deposition yield at low ranges of acetic acid addition (<0.75 vol%). - Highlights: • Protonation characteristics of polyelectrolytes and suspension particles are reported. • The protonation characteristics explained the electrophoretic mobility and yield results. • Adsorption mechanisms of protonated polyelectrolytes on the titanium particle is proposed. • Hydroxyl sites on the particles link the oxide particle and the polyelectrolyte molecules.

  19. Protonation of the polyethyleneimine and titanium particles and their effect on the electrophoretic mobility and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Kok-Tee; Anand, T. Joseph Sahaya; Sorrell, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Proton activities of suspensions of Ti particles with added cationic polyelectrolyte as a function of acid additions have been investigated and compared in terms of the electrophoretic mobility and deposition yield. The proton activity in ethanol medium decreased with the addition of PEI polyelectrolyte and reduced further in the presence of Ti particles. The decrease in proton activity in the suspension indicates that protonation occurred on both the PEI molecules and Ti particles. It is proposed that the protonation of the amine groups of PEI and hydroxyl sites of Ti particle led to the formation of hydrogen bonding between the Ti particle and PEI molecules. Increase in the PEI and Ti with increasing acid addition translated to higher electrophoretic mobilities and deposition yield at low ranges of acetic acid addition (<0.75 vol%). - Highlights: • Protonation characteristics of polyelectrolytes and suspension particles are reported. • The protonation characteristics explained the electrophoretic mobility and yield results. • Adsorption mechanisms of protonated polyelectrolytes on the titanium particle is proposed. • Hydroxyl sites on the particles link the oxide particle and the polyelectrolyte molecules.

  20. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  1. Compendium of Current Total Ionizing Dose and Displacement Damage Results from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topper, Alyson D.; Campola, Michael J.; Chen, Dakai; Casey, Megan C.; Yau, Ka-Yen; Cochran, Donna J.; Label, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Mondy, Timothy K.; O'Bryan, Martha V.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Total ionizing dose and displacement damage testing was performed to characterize and determine the suitability of candidate electronics for NASA space utilization. Devices tested include optoelectronics, digital, analog, linear bipolar devices, and hybrid devices. Displacement Damage, Optoelectronics, Proton Damage, Single Event Effects, and Total Ionizing Dose.

  2. The contribution of endogenous and exogenous effects to radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

    1985-01-01

    Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 400 and 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous effects to the gamma-radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous both in the presence of 1 atmosphere of oxygen, and in anoxia. (author)

  3. Uncertainty quantification for proton–proton fusion in chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Carlsson, B.D. [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Ekström, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Forssén, C. [Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Platter, L., E-mail: lplatter@utk.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-09-10

    We compute the S-factor of the proton–proton (pp) fusion reaction using chiral effective field theory (χEFT) up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) and perform a rigorous uncertainty analysis of the results. We quantify the uncertainties due to (i) the computational method used to compute the pp cross section in momentum space, (ii) the statistical uncertainties in the low-energy coupling constants of χEFT, (iii) the systematic uncertainty due to the χEFT cutoff, and (iv) systematic variations in the database used to calibrate the nucleon–nucleon interaction. We also examine the robustness of the polynomial extrapolation procedure, which is commonly used to extract the threshold S-factor and its energy-derivatives. By performing a statistical analysis of the polynomial fit of the energy-dependent S-factor at several different energy intervals, we eliminate a systematic uncertainty that can arise from the choice of the fit interval in our calculations. In addition, we explore the statistical correlations between the S-factor and few-nucleon observables such as the binding energies and point-proton radii of {sup 2,3}H and {sup 3}He as well as the D-state probability and quadrupole moment of {sup 2}H, and the β-decay of {sup 3}H. We find that, with the state-of-the-art optimization of the nuclear Hamiltonian, the statistical uncertainty in the threshold S-factor cannot be reduced beyond 0.7%.

  4. Two-Photon Exchange Effects in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Myriam James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Two methods, Rosenbluth separation and polarization transfer, can be used to extract the proton form factor ratio μp GEp/GMp, but they do not yield the same results. It is thought that the disagreement is due to two photon exchange corrections to the differential cross sections. High precision proton Rosenbluth extractions were carried out at 102 kinematics points spanning 16 values of momentum transfer Q2, from 0.40 to 5.76 GeV2. Reduced cross sections were found to 1.1% or better for Q2 less than 3 GeV2 increasing to 4% at 5.76 GeV2 The form factor ratios were determined to 1:5-3% for Q2 < 1.5 GeV2, increasing to 9% by 3 GeV2 and rapidly above. Our data agrees with prior Rosenbluth, improving upon it the 1.0 - 2.0 GeV2 range to conclusively show a separation from polarization transfer where it had not been certain before. In addition, reduced cross sections at each Q2 were tested for nonlinearity in the angular variable. Such a departure from linearity would be a signature of two photon exchange effects, and prior data had not been sufficiently precise to show nonzero curvature. Our data begins to hint at negative curvature but does not yet show a significant departure from zero.

  5. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    in the skin tissue, but with significantly increased doses (up to 5000 Gy) compared to the average dose of 2 Gy, which was applied homogeneously in further skin samples for comparison. Gaussian-shaped minibeams of even larger sizes (σ=260 μm and 520 μm, inter-beam distance 1.8 mm) were analyzed in further experiments to evaluate the effect of increasing beam sizes as in deeper-lying tissues. Acute side effects were quantified via the MTT tissue viability test and the release of inflammatory proteins into the culture medium and showed improved results for minibeam compared to homogeneous irradiation. Genetic damage, an indicator for secondary tumor induction, was analyzed via the micronucleus test in the epidermal keratinocytes and was less than half for minibeams up to 180 μm size compared to homogeneous fields. Increasing minibeam sizes, i.e. increasing fractions of irradiated skin (receiving a dose higher than the average dose of 2 Gy) increased the number of micronuclei per divided cell, but never exceeded the genetic damage induced by a homogeneous dose distribution. A more authentic and representative in-vivo skin model, accounting for higher complexity with blood vessels, further cell types, follicles, glands and especially a working immune system, was used in the next step to further examine the side effects of minibeam radiotherapy compared to homogeneous irradiation. The central part of the ear of adult BALB/c mice was irradiated with 20 MeV protons, using an average dose of 60 Gy in a field of 7.2 x 7.2 mm{sup 2}. The 4 x 4 minibeams of nominal 6000 Gy had a size of 180 x 180 μm{sup 2} and inter-beam distances of 1.8 mm, as in previous in-vitro skin experiments. Minibeam irradiation induced no ear swelling or other visible skin reaction at any time, while significant ear swelling (up to 4-fold), skin reddening (erythema) and desquamation developed in homogeneously irradiated ears 3-4 weeks after irradiation. Loss of hair and sebaceous glands only

  6. Cavitation damage prediction for the JSNS mercury target vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naoe, Takashi, E-mail: naoe.takashi@jaea.go.jp; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Wakui, Takashi; Haga, Katsuhiro; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Takada, Hiroshi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-15

    The liquid mercury target system for the Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS) at the Materials and Life science experimental Facility (MLF) in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is designed to produce pulsed neutrons. The mercury target vessel in this system, which is made of type 316L stainless steel, is damaged by pressure wave-induced cavitation due to proton beam bombardment. Currently, cavitation damage is considered to be the dominant factor influencing the service life of the target vessel rather than radiation damage. In this study, cavitation damage to the interior surface of the target vessel was predicted on the basis of accumulated damage data from off-beam and on-beam experiments. The predicted damage was compared with the damage observed in a used target vessel. Furthermore, the effect of injecting gas microbubbles on cavitation damage was predicted through the measurement of the acoustic vibration of the target vessel. It was shown that the predicted depth of cavitation damage is reasonably coincident with the observed results. Moreover, it was confirmed that the injection of gas microbubbles had an effect on cavitation damage.

  7. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Demirag, Burak; Nas, Omer Fatih; Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih; Yazici, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade

  8. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information

  9. Effect of induced cross flow on flow pattern and performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Kui; Bachman, John; Zhou, Yibo; Park, Jae Wan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D numerical works to study the effect of cross flow on the PEMFC performance. • The cross flow ensure more evenly distributed water and oxygen in the CL. • The optimal net power output can be identified by controlling the back pressure. • Results confirm that present design is effective in improving performance. - Abstract: The cross flow in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) plays an important role in changing the transport pattern and performance. In this study, three-dimensional numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of induced cross flow on the flow pattern and performance of a PEMFC with a previously proposed and experimentally studied novel parallel flow channel design. The numerical results indicate that the liquid water and oxygen become more evenly distributed in the catalyst layer (CL) as the pressure difference between the low-pressure and high-pressure flow channels increases. It has been found that, in the low-pressure channels, the cross flow drives a convective flow from the CL to the flow channel resulting in improved liquid water removal. The optimal net power output can be identified by controlling the back pressure on the high-pressure flow channels. The numerical results confirm that this novel parallel flow channel design is effective in improving PEMFC performance

  10. Biological Effects of Neutron and Proton Irradiations. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Biological Effects of Neutron Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    During recent years the interest in biological effects caused by neutrons has been increasing steadily as a result of the rapid development of neutron technology and the great number of neutron sources being used. Neutrons, because of their specific physical characteristics and biological effects, form a special type of radiation hazard but, at the same time, are a prospective tool for applied radiobiology. This Symposium, held in Brookhaven at the invitation of the United States Government from 7-11 October 1963, provided an opportunity for scientists to discuss the experimental information at present available on the biological action of neutrons and to evaluate future possibilities. It was a sequel to the Symposium on Neutron Detection, Dosimetry and Standardization, which was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in December 1962 at Harwell. The Symposium was attended by 128 participants from 17 countries and 6 international organizations. Fifty-four papers were presented. The following subjects were discussed in various sessions: (1) Dosimetry. Estimation of absorbed dose of neutrons in biological material. (2) Biological effects of high-energy protons. (3) Cellular and genetic effects. (4) Pathology of neutron irradiation, including acute and chronic radiation syndromes (mortality, anatomical and histological changes, biochemical and metabolic disturbances) and delayed consequences. (5) Relative biological effectiveness of neutrons evaluated by different biological tests. A Panel on Biophysical Considerations in Neutron Experimentation, with special emphasis on informal discussions, was organized during the Symposium. The views of the Panel are recorded in Volume II of the Proceedings. Many reports were presented on the important subject of the relative effectiveness of the biological action of neutrons, as well as on the general pathology of neutron irradiation and the cellular and genetic effects related to it. Three survey papers considered

  11. Towards understanding the tandem mass spectra of protonated oligopeptides. 2: The proline effect in collision-induced dissociation of protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx = Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiholder, Christian; Suhai, Sándor; Harrison, Alex G; Paizs, Béla

    2011-06-01

    The product ion spectra of proline-containing peptides are commonly dominated by y(n) ions generated by cleavage at the N-terminal side of proline residues. This proline effect is investigated in the current work by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx includes Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp) in an electrospray/quadrupole/time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometer and by quantum chemical calculations on protonated Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala. The CID spectra of all investigated peptides show a dominant y(2) ion (Pro-Ala sequence). Our computational results show that the proline effect mainly arises from the particularly low threshold energy for the amide bond cleavage N-terminal to the proline residue, and from the high proton affinity of the proline-containing C-terminal fragment produced by this cleavage. These theoretical results are qualitatively supported by the experimentally observed y(2)/b(3) abundance ratios for protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx = Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp). In the post-cleavage phase of fragmentation the N-terminal oxazolone fragment with the Ala-Ala-Xxx sequence and Pro-Ala compete for the ionizing proton for these peptides. As the proton affinity of the oxazolone fragment increases, the y(2)/b(3) abundance ratio decreases.

  12. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheida Shaafi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries.

  13. Chapter 5. Damage, effects, and importance of dwarf mistletoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. W. Geils; F. G. Hawksworth

    2002-01-01

    All dwarf mistletoes are parasites that extract water, nutrients, and carbohydrates from the infected host; they are also pathogens that alter host physiology and morphology (Gill and Hawksworth 1961, Hawksworth and Wiens 1996). Disease or direct effects are reductions in diameter and height increment, survival, reproduction, and quality; witches’ brooms are formed in...

  14. Effect of normabaric hyperoxia treatment on neuronal damage ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality in most developing countries worldwide. At present, it is imperative to identify a treatment to address the devastating post-TBI consequences. Therefore, the present study has been performed to assess the specific effect of immediate exposure to normabaric hyperoxia ...

  15. Compositional effects on the development of damage structures in accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.M.

    A study of the development of dislocation structures in charged particle irradiated austenitic alloys has shown that the effects of irradiation and materials variables may be apparent at doses of the order approximately 1 dpa. Irradiation of identical specimens to much higher doses indicates that low and high dose behaviour are closely related

  16. Damage radiation alpha effects in sintered waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messi de Bernasconi, Norma B.; Prado, Miguel O.; Bevilacqua, Arturo M.; Arribere, Maria; Heredia, Arturo D.; Sanfilippo, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    We have subjected the borosilicate glass to thermal neutron irradiation in a reactor, with an accumulated fluence equivalent to approximately E3, E4, E5, y E6 years of waste disposal. We considered the following potential effects of accumulated alpha decay: a) Changes in the density; b) Changes in the dissolution rates; c) Changes in the microstructure of the sintered glass. (author)

  17. Effect of continuum damage mechanics on spring back prediction in metal forming processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayebi, Ali; Shahabi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    The influence of considering the variations in material properties was investigated through continuum damage mechanics according to the Lemaitre isotropic unified damage law to predict the bending force and spring back in V-bending sheet metal forming processes, with emphasis on Finite element (FE) simulation considerations. The material constants of the damage model were calibrated through a uniaxial tensile test with an appropriate and convenient repeating strategy. Holloman’s isotropic and Ziegler’s linear kinematic hardening laws were employed to describe the behavior of a hardening material. To specify the ideal FE conditions for simulating spring back, the effect of the various numerical considerations during FE simulation was investigated and compared with the experimental outcome. Results indicate that considering continuum damage mechanics decreased the predicted bending force and improved the accuracy of spring back prediction.

  18. Hepatoprotective effect of methanolic Tanacetum parthenium extract on CCl4-induced liver damage in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavar Mahmoodzadeh

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Tanacetum Parthenium Extract (TPE on Lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes, biochemical factors, and liver enzymes in the rats damaged by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4.54 male Wistar rats were divided into 9 groups each consisting of 6 rats. Two of the groups were control groups (normal and damage control groups, 4 of them were exposure groups which were respectively administered with 40, 80, and 120 mg/kg of TPE and silymarin for 14 days before being damaged by CCl4, and the other 3 groups were post-treatment groups which received 80 and 120 mg/kg of TPE and silymarin 2, 6, 24, and 48 h after being injected with CCl4. At the end of the study, biochemical factors, serum liver enzymes, malondialdehyde level, antioxidant enzymes, and liver morphology were assayed.Pre- and post-treatment with TPE could significantly decrease ALT, AST, ALP, TG, LDL, TC, and glucose levels and increase HDL, and albumin levels and catalase, SOD, and GPx activities compared to the CCl4-damaged control group.The results of this study are indicative of the antioxidant activity of TPE, its potential hepatoprotective effects, and its probable therapeutic properties for laboratory animals damaged by CCl4. Keywords: Tanacetum parthenium, Carbon tetrachloride, Oxidative stress, Antioxidant enzymes, Liver damage

  19. Differential effects of experimental and cold-induced hyperthyroidism on factors inducing rat liver oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, P; Pamplona, R; Ayala, V; De Rosa, R; Caldarone, G; Di Meo, S

    2006-03-01

    Thyroid hormone-induced increase in metabolic rates is often associated with increased oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of iodothyronines to liver oxidative stress in the functional hyperthyroidism elicited by cold, using as models cold-exposed and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3)- or thyroxine (T4)-treated rats. The hyperthyroid state was always associated with increases in both oxidative capacity and oxidative damage of the tissue. The most extensive damage to lipids and proteins was found in T3-treated and cold-exposed rats, respectively. Increase in oxygen reactive species released by mitochondria and microsomes was found to contribute to tissue oxidative damage, whereas the determination of single antioxidants did not provide information about the possible contribution of a reduced effectiveness of the antioxidant defence system. Indeed, liver oxidative damage in hyperthyroid rats was scarcely related to levels of the liposoluble antioxidants and activities of antioxidant enzymes. Conversely, other biochemical changes, such as the degree of fatty acid unsaturation and hemoprotein content, appeared to predispose hepatic tissue to oxidative damage associated with oxidative challenge elicited by hyperthyroid state. As a whole, our results confirm the idea that T3 plays a key role in metabolic changes and oxidative damage found in cold liver. However, only data concerning changes in glutathione peroxidase activity and mitochondrial protein content favour the idea that dissimilarities in effects of cold exposure and T3 treatment could depend on differences in serum levels of T4.

  20. Nonvolatile field effect transistors based on protons and Si/SiO2Si structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, W.L.; Vanheusden, K.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Schwank, J.R.; Winokur, P.S.; Knoll, M.G.; Devine, R.A.B.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, the authors have demonstrated that annealing Si/SiO 2 /Si structures in a hydrogen containing ambient introduces mobile H + ions into the buried SiO 2 layer. Changes in the H + spatial distribution within the SiO 2 layer were electrically monitored by current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The ability to directly probe reversible protonic motion in Si/SiO 2 /Si structures makes this an exemplar system to explore the physics and chemistry of hydrogen in the technologically relevant Si/SiO 2 structure. In this work, they illustrate that this effect can be used as the basis for a programmable nonvolatile field effect transistor (NVFET) memory that may compete with other Si-based memory devices. The power of this novel device is its simplicity; it is based upon standard Si/SiO 2 /Si technology and forming gas annealing, a common treatment used in integrated circuit processing. They also briefly discuss the effects of radiation on its retention properties

  1. Proton pump inhibitors induce a caspase-independent antitumor effect against human multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Andrea; Iessi, Elisabetta; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Federici, Cristina; Fais, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy and is responsive to a limited number of drugs. Unfortunately, to date, despite the introduction of novel drugs, no relevant increase in survival rates has been obtained. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been shown to have significant antitumor action as single agents as well as in combination with chemotherapy. This study investigates the potential anti-tumor effectiveness of two PPIs, Lansoprazole and Omeprazole, against human MM cells. We found that Lansoprazole exerts straightforward efficacy against myeloma cells, even at suboptimal concentrations (50 µM), while Omeprazole has limited cytotoxic action. The Lansoprazole anti-MM effect was mostly mediated by a caspase-independent apoptotic-like cytotoxicity, with only a secondary anti-proliferative action. This study provides clear evidence supporting the use of Lansoprazole in the strive against MM with an efficacy proven much higher than current therapeutical approaches and without reported side effects. It is however conceivable that, consistent with the results obtained in other human tumors, Lansoprazole may well be combined with existing anti-myeloma therapies with the aim to improve the low level of efficacy of the current strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Contact behavior modelling and its size effect on proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Diankai; Peng, Linfa; Yi, Peiyun; Lai, Xinmin; Janßen, Holger; Lehnert, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Contact behavior between the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and bipolar plate (BPP) is of significant importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Most current studies on contact behavior utilize experiments and finite element modelling and focus on fuel cells with graphite BPPs, which lead to high costs and huge computational requirements. The objective of this work is to build a more effective analytical method for contact behavior in fuel cells and investigate the size effect resulting from configuration alteration of channel and rib (channel/rib). Firstly, a mathematical description of channel/rib geometry is outlined in accordance with the fabrication of metallic BPP. Based on the interface deformation characteristic and Winkler surface model, contact pressure between BPP and GDL is then calculated to predict contact resistance and GDL porosity as evaluative parameters of contact behavior. Then, experiments on BPP fabrication and contact resistance measurement are conducted to validate the model. The measured results demonstrate an obvious dependence on channel/rib size. Feasibility of the model used in graphite fuel cells is also discussed. Finally, size factor is proposed for evaluating the rule of size effect. Significant increase occurs in contact resistance and porosity for higher size factor, in which channel/rib width decrease.

  3. Effect of hydrophobic additive on oxygen transport in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunzhong; Li, Xiaohui; Wan, Zhaohui; Chen, Yanan; Tan, Jinting; Pan, Mu

    2018-03-01

    Oxygen transport resistance (OTR) is a critical factor influencing the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In this paper, an effective method to reduce the OTR of catalyst layers (CLs) by introducing a hydrophobic additive into traditional CLs is proposed. A low-molecular-weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is selected for its feasibility to prepare an emulsion, which is mixed with a traditional catalyst ink to successfully fabricate the CL with PTFE of 10 wt%. The PTFE film exists in the mesopores between the carbon particles. The limiting current of the hydrophobic CL was almost 4000 mA/cm2, which is 500 mA/cm2 higher than that of the traditional CL. PTFE reduces the OTR of the CL in the dry region by as much as 24 s/m compared to the traditional CL and expands the dry region from 2000 mA/cm2 in the traditional CL to 2500 mA/cm2. Furthermore, the CL with the hydrophobic agent can improve the oxygen transport in the wet region (>2000 mA/cm2) more effectively than that in the dry region. All these results indicate that the CL with the hydrophobic agent shows a superior performance in terms of optimizing water management and effectively reduces the OTR in PEMFCs.

  4. Radiosensitizing effect of nitric oxide in tumor cells and experimental tumors irradiated with gamma rays and proton beams; Efecto radiosensibilizador del oxido nitrico en celulas tumorales y en tumores experimentales irradiados con radiacion gamma y con haces de protones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policastro, Lucia L; Duran, Hebe; Molinari, Beatriz L [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Radiobiologia; Schuff, Juan A; Kreiner, Andres J; Burlon, Alejandro A; Debray, Mario E; Kesque, Jose M; Ozafran, Mabel J; Vazquez, Monica E [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, General San Martin (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Davidson, Jorge; Davidson, Miguel [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Somacal, Hector R; Valda, Alejandro A [Universidad Nacional de General San Martin , Villa Ballester (Argentina). Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia

    2003-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to be a radiosensitizer of mammalian cells under hypoxic conditions. In a previous study, we demonstrated an enhancement in radiation response induced by NO in mouse tumor cells under aerobic conditions, with an increasing effect as a function of malignancy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of NO in tumor cells and in experimental tumors irradiated with {gamma} rays and proton beams. Irradiations were performed with a {sup 137}Cs {gamma} source and with proton beams generated by the TANDAR accelerator. Tumor cells were treated with the NO donor DETA-NO and the sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was calculated using the {alpha} parameter of the survival curve fitted to the linear-quadratic model. Tumor cells irradiated with protons were radio sensitized by DETA-NO only in the more malignant cells irradiated with low LET protons (2.69{+-}0.08 keV/{mu}m). For higher LET protons there were no radiosensitizing effect. For human tumor cells pre-treated with DETA-NO and irradiated with {gamma} rays, a significantly greater effect was demonstrated in the malignant cells (MCF-7) as compared with the near normal cells (HBL-100). Moreover, a significant decrease in tumor growth was demonstrated in mice pre-treated with the NO donor spermine and irradiated with {gamma} rays and low LET protons as compared with mice irradiated without pre-treatment with the NO donor. In conclusion, we demonstrated a differential effect of NO as a radiosensitizer of malignant cells, both with {gamma} rays and low LET protons. This selectivity, coupled to the in vivo inhibition of tumor growth, is of great interest for the potential use of NO releasing agents in radiotherapy. (author)

  5. SU-E-J-143: Short- and Near-Term Effects of Proton Therapy On Cerebral White Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, J; Merchant, T; Ogg, R; Sabin, N; Hua, C [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Indelicato, D [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess early effects of proton therapy on the structural integrity of cerebral white matter in relation to the subsequent near-term development of such effects. Methods: Sixteen children (aged 2–19 years) with craniopharyngioma underwent proton therapy of 54 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) in a prospective therapeutic trial. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed at baseline before proton therapy and every 3 months thereafter. Tract-based spatial statics analysis of DTI data was performed to derive the fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial diffusivity (RD) in 26 volumes of interest (VOIs). The dose distributions were spatially normalized to identify VOIs prone to high doses. The longitudinal percentage changes of the FA and RD in these VOIs at 3 and 12 months from the baseline were calculated, and their relationships were evaluated. Results: The average dose was highest to the cerebral peduncle (CP), corticospinal tract (CST) in the pons, pontine crossing tract (PCT), anterior/posterior limbs of the internal capsule (ALIC/PLIC), and genu of the corpus callosum (GCC). It ranged from 33.3 GCE (GCC) to 49.7 GCE (CP). A mild but statistically significant (P<0.05) decline of FA was observed 3 months after proton therapy in all VOIs except the PLIC and ranged from −1.7% (ALIC) to −2.8% (PCT). A significant increase of RD was found in the CP (3.5%) and ALIC (2.1%). The average longitudinal change from the baseline was reduced at 12 months for most VOIs. However, the standard deviation increased, indicating that the temporal pattern varied individually. The follow-up measurements at 3 and 12 months correlated for the CP, CST, PCT, and GCC (P < 0.04). Conclusion: DTI data suggest early (3 months) effects of proton therapy on microstructures in the white matter. The subsequent follow-up indicated individual variation of the changes, which was partly implied by the early effects.

  6. Radioprotective effects of sodium arginate on radiation induced intestinal damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsugawa, Shigekazu; Yukawa, Yutaka; Abe, Mitsuyuki.

    1988-05-01

    Effects of sodium arginate were examined on radiation-induced intestinal death of mice and on the pathological changes of the ileum after whole or partial abdominal X-irradiation. BALB/c male mice (SPF, 7 approx. 8 week old, 21 approx. 28 g body weight) were irradiated with various doses of 10 MV of X-rays under general anesthesia (dose rate : 4 Gy/min). A radiation field covers either 2.5 or 5.0 cm width of abdomen from the anus. Sterilized water or 5 % sodium arginate solution (0.2 ml/body) was daily given per os through a stomach tube until the death of mice or 15 approx. 21 days after X-ray exposure. Intestinal death was examined daily. In another experiment, mice were daily sacrificed and pathological specimens were made. In order to study the effects of sodium arginate on peripheral blood circulation in the ileum after X-ray exposure, the microangiograms with Ba contrast media were also taken. Sodium arginate showed statistically significant radioprotective effects on intestinal death after 14.5 approx. 15.0 Gy of X-ray irradiation to the abdomen through a radiation field of 5.0 cm width or after 18.0 Gy of X-irradiation to the abdomen through a field of 2.5 cm width. The pathological studies suggest that the drug may protect the surface of the intestine against infection and potentiate the recovery processes of the mucosal membrane. This may elucidate the possible mechanisms of radioprotective effects of sodium arginate on esophagitis or on rectal ulcer induced by radiotherapy.

  7. A three-dimensional `Kaiser damage-memory' effect through true-triaxial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, P. G.; Browning, J.; Harland, S. R.; Healy, D.; Stuart, C.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Microcrack damage leading to failure in rocks evolves in response to differential loading. The vast majority of experimental studies investigate damage evolution, the `Kaiser damage-memory' effect, and rock failure using conventional triaxial stress states (σ1 > σ2 = σ3). Such stress states develop a crack population that displays cylindrical transverse isotropy. However, in nature the stress state is in general truly triaxial (σ1 > σ2 > σ3) and experiments that utilise such loading conditions can generate crack populations that display planar transverse isotropy which in turn influences properties such as permeability and strength. We investigate the evolution of crack damage under both conventional and true triaxial stress conditions using results from measurements made on cubic samples of sandstone deformed in three orthogonal directions with independently controlled stress paths. We have measured, simultaneously with stress and strain, the changes in ultrasonic compressional and shear wave velocities in the three principal directions, together with the bulk acoustic emission (AE) output. Changes in acoustic wave velocities are associated with both elastic closure and opening of pre-existing cracks, and the inelastic formation of new cracks. By contrast, AE is only associated with the inelastic growth of new crack damage and as such, we use the onset of AE to determine the initiation of new crack damage. By mapping these damage onsets under both conventional triaxial and true triaxial sequential cyclic loading, we have shown that `damage envelopes' evolve dynamically and can be pushed closer to the failure envelope. Whether a stress state has been `visited' before is key to determining and understanding damage states. Crack damage populations can be generated with multiple orientations depending on the arrangement of loading directions and hence principal stress directions. The sequential cyclic loading tests show that further damage in any one population

  8. A system for monitoring the radiation effects of a proton linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorkin, V. M., E-mail: skorkin@inr.ru; Belyanski, K. L.; Skorkin, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The system for real-time monitoring of radioactivity of a high-current proton linear accelerator detects secondary neutron emission from proton beam losses in transport channels and measures the activity of radionuclides in gas and aerosol emissions and the radiation background in the environment affected by a linear accelerator. The data provided by gamma, beta, and neutron detectors are transferred over a computer network to the central server. The system allows one to monitor proton beam losses, the activity of gas and aerosol emissions, and the radiation emission level of a linear accelerator in operation.

  9. Single-Spin Polarization Effects and the Determination of Timelike Proton Form Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S

    2003-10-24

    We show that measurements of the proton's polarization in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} p{bar p} strongly discriminate between analytic forms of models which fit the proton form factors in the spacelike region. In particular, the single-spin asymmetry normal to the scattering plane measures the relative phase difference between the timelike G{sub E} and G{sub M} form factors. The expected proton polarization in the timelike region is large, of order of several tens of percent.

  10. A framework for implementation of organ effect models in TOPAS with benchmarks extended to proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Méndez, J; Faddegon, B; Perl, J; Schümann, J; Paganetti, H; Shin, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a framework for modeling organ effects within TOPAS (TOol for PArticle Simulation), a wrapper of the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit that facilitates particle therapy simulation. The DICOM interface for TOPAS was extended to permit contour input, used to assign voxels to organs. The following dose response models were implemented: The Lyman–Kutcher–Burman model, the critical element model, the population based critical volume model, the parallel-serial model, a sigmoid-based model of Niemierko for normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability (TCP), and a Poisson-based model for TCP. The framework allows easy manipulation of the parameters of these models and the implementation of other models.As part of the verification, results for the parallel-serial and Poisson model for x-ray irradiation of a water phantom were compared to data from the AAPM Task Group 166. When using the task group dose-volume histograms (DVHs), results were found to be sensitive to the number of points in the DVH, with differences up to 2.4%, some of which are attributable to differences between the implemented models. New results are given with the point spacing specified. When using Monte Carlo calculations with TOPAS, despite the relatively good match to the published DVH’s, differences up to 9% were found for the parallel-serial model (for a maximum DVH difference of 2%) and up to 0.5% for the Poisson model (for a maximum DVH difference of 0.5%). However, differences of 74.5% (in Rectangle1), 34.8% (in PTV) and 52.1% (in Triangle) for the critical element, critical volume and the sigmoid-based models were found respectively.We propose a new benchmark for verification of organ effect models in proton therapy. The benchmark consists of customized structures in the spread out Bragg peak plateau, normal tissue, tumor, penumbra and in the distal region. The DVH’s, DVH point spacing, and results of the organ effect models are

  11. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y; Liao, Li; Zhu, Ronald X; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D; Lim, Gino; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-02-01

    To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Despite the presence of interplay effect, the

  12. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Wenhua; Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions: Despite

  13. SU-F-T-671: Effects of Collimator Material On Proton Minibeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E; Sandison, G; Cao, N; Stewart, R; Meyer, J; Eagle, J; Marsh, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric effects of collimator material on spatially modulated proton minibeams (pMBRT). Methods: pMBRT holds promise to exhibit shallow depth normal-tissue sparing effects similar to synchrotron based microbeams while also retaining potential for uniform dose distributions for tumor targets. TOPAS Monte Carlo simulations were performed for a 5cm thick multislit collimator with 0.3mm slits and 1mm center-to-center spacing for a 50.5MeV proton minibeam while varying collimator material between brass, tungsten, and iron. The collimator was placed both “flush” at the water phantom surface and at 5cm distance to investigate the effects on surface dose, peak-to-valley-dose-ratio (PVDR) and neutron contribution. Results: For flush placement, the neutron dose at the phantom surface for the tungsten collimator was approximately 20% higher than for brass and iron. This was not reflected in the overall surface dose, which was comparable for all materials due to the relatively low neutron contribution of <0.1%. When the collimator was retracted, the overall neutron contribution was essentially identical for all three collimators. Surface dose dropped by ∼40% for all collimator materials with air gap compared to being flush with the phantom surface. This surface dose reduction was at the cost of increase in valley dose for all collimator materials due to increased angular divergence of the mini-beams at the surface and their consequent geometric penumbra at depth. When the collimator was placed at distance from the phantom surface the PVDR decreased. The peak-to-entrance-dose ratio was highest for the iron collimator with 5cm air gap. Conclusion: The dosimetric difference between the collimator materials is minimal despite the relatively higher neutron contribution at the phantom surface for the tungsten collimator when placed flush. The air gap between the collimator and phantom surface strongly influences all dosimetry parameters due to

  14. Effects of stereochemistry on the rates of hydrogen--deuterium exchange of protons α to the nitrosamino group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, R.R.; Ng, L.K.

    1976-01-01

    Measurement of the rates of exchange of four benzylic protons of rigid dibenzazepine were made in tert-butyl alcohol-O-d containing potassium tert-butoxide at several concentrations. Each pseudoaxial proton exchanged 100-fold faster than its geminal partner (pseudoequatorial), likely as a result of a stereoelectronic effect. Each syn proton exchanged 1000-fold faster than the anti proton in the same biaryl environment. The lack of any significant effect of added crown either on the rate of exchange of either a syn or an antiproton indicates lack of involvement of the counterion. A suggested explanation for the unusual preference for syn exchange in this work is based on the symmetry properties of the anionic intermediate. This intermediate, like butadiene dianion, has an attractive interaction between the terminal atoms of the four-atom π system in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). This explanation is similar to that of Epiotis and co-workers, which accounts for the well-established preferential stability of cis over trans dihalo and dialkoxy ethylenes

  15. A novel nonlinear damage resonance intermodulation effect for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2017-04-01

    This paper is aimed at developing a theoretical model able to predict the generation of nonlinear elastic effects associated to the interaction of ultrasonic waves with the steady-state nonlinear response of local defect resonance (LDR). The LDR effect is used in nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy to enhance the excitation of the material damage at its local resonance, thus to dramatically increase the vibrational amplitude of material nonlinear phenomena. The main result of this work is to prove both analytically and experimentally the generation of novel nonlinear elastic wave effects, here named as nonlinear damage resonance intermodulation, which correspond to a nonlinear intermodulation between the driving frequency and the LDR one. Beside this intermodulation effect, other nonlinear elastic wave phenomena such as higher harmonics of the input frequency and superharmonics of LDR frequency were found. The analytical model relies on solving the nonlinear equation of motion governing bending displacement under the assumption of both quadratic and cubic nonlinear defect approximation. Experimental tests on a damaged composite laminate confirmed and validated these predictions and showed that using continuous periodic excitation, the nonlinear structural phenomena associated to LDR could also be featured at locations different from the damage resonance. These findings will provide new opportunities for material damage detection using nonlinear ultrasounds.

  16. Effects of impurities on radiation damage in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Ando, K.

    1986-01-01

    Strong impurity effects upon introduction and annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects in InP irradiated with 1-MeV electrons have been found. The main defect center of 0.37-eV hole trap H4 in p-InP, which must be due to a point defect, is annealed even at room temperature. Its annealing rate is found to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the preirradiation carrier concentration in InP. Moreover, the density of the hole trap H5 (E/sub v/+0.52 eV) in p-InP, which must be due to a point defect--impurity complex, increases with increase in the InP carrier concentration. These results suggest that the radiation-induced defects in InP must recover through long-range diffusion mediated by impurity atoms. A model is proposed in which point defects diffuse to sinks through impurities so as to disappear or bind impurities so as to form point defect--impurity complexes. In addition to the long-range diffusion mechanism, the possibility of charge-state effects responsible for the thermal annealing of radiation-induced defects in InP is also discussed

  17. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto [Univ. of the Basque Country, Leioa (Spain)

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  18. Damage effect of γ-rays on bacillus subtilis vegetative Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoming; Liu Fang; Zhang Jianguo; Yan Wanli; Zheng Chun; Li Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the damage effects of γ-rays at cell and molecular level, Bacillus subtilis vegetative cells were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays at different absorbed doses. The cell survival rate was examined with the standard plate-count method. The intracellular SOD activity was measured by SOD kit through xanthine oxidase method. DNA double-strand breaks were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The cell survival rate decreases when γ-rays dose increases. A clear relation could not be found between intracellular SOD activity and absorbed dose. The DNA release percentage value and break level value increase obviously with γ-rays dose. Cell survival rate is related to DNA double-strand breaks level. It can be concluded that γ-rays have obviously damage effect on Bacillus subtilis vegetative cell, and the damage effect changes with SOD activity and DSB. (authors)

  19. Effects of focused ion beam induced damage on the plasticity of micropillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Awady, Jaafar A.; Woodward, Christopher; Dimiduk, Dennis M.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2009-01-01

    The hardening effects of focused ion beam (FIB) induced damage produced during the fabrication of micropillars are examined by introducing a surface layer of nanosized obstacles into a dislocation dynamics simulation. The influence of the depth and strength of the obstacles as a function of pillar diameter is assessed parametrically. We show that for a selected set of sample sizes between 0.5 and 1.0 μm, the flow strength can increase by 10-20 %, for an obstacle strength of 750 MPa, and damage depth of 100 nm. On the other hand, for sizes larger and smaller than this range, the effect of damage is negligible. Results show that the obstacles formed during the FIB milling may be expected to alter the microstructure of micropillars, however, they have a negligible effect on the observed size-strength scaling laws.

  20. Device Simulation of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors: Radiation Damage Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourches, N.T.

    2009-01-01

    Vertexing for the future International Linear Collider represents a challenging goal because of the high spatial resolution required with low material budget and high ionizing radiation tolerance. CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) represent a good potential solution for this purpose. Up to now many MAPS sensors have been developed. They are based on various architectures and manufactured in different processes. However, up so far, the sensor diode has not been the subject of extensive modelization and simulation. Published simulation studies of sensor-signal formation have been less numerous than measurements on real sensors. This is a cause for concern because such sensor is physically based on the partially depleted diode, in the vicinity of which the electric field collects the minority carriers generated by an incident MIP (minimum ionizing particle). Although the microscopic mechanisms are well known and modelled, the global physical mechanisms for signal formation are not very rigorously established. This is partly due to the presence of a predominant diffusion component in the charge transport. We present here simulations mainly based on the S-PISCES code, in which physical mechanisms affecting transport are taken into account. Diffusion, influence of residual carrier concentration due to the doping level in the sensitive volume, and more importantly charge trapping due to deep levels in the active (detecting) layer are studied together with geometric aspects. The effect of neutron irradiation is studied to assess the effects of deep traps. A comparison with available experimental data, obtained on processed MAPS before or after neutron irradiation will be introduced. Simulated reconstruction of the Minimum Ionizing Particle (MIP) point of impact in two dimensions is also investigated. For further steps, guidelines for process choices of next Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors are introduced. (authors)

  1. Niclosamide is a proton carrier and targets acidic endosomes with broad antiviral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgeit, Andreas; McDowell, Robert; Moese, Stefan; Meldrum, Eric; Schwendener, Reto; Greber, Urs F

    2012-01-01

    Viruses use a limited set of host pathways for infection. These pathways represent bona fide antiviral targets with low likelihood of viral resistance. We identified the salicylanilide niclosamide as a broad range antiviral agent targeting acidified endosomes. Niclosamide is approved for human use against helminthic infections, and has anti-neoplastic and antiviral effects. Its mode of action is unknown. Here, we show that niclosamide, which is a weak lipophilic acid inhibited infection with pH-dependent human rhinoviruses (HRV) and influenza virus. Structure-activity studies showed that antiviral efficacy and endolysosomal pH neutralization co-tracked, and acidification of the extracellular medium bypassed the virus entry block. Niclosamide did not affect the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, but neutralized coated vesicles or synthetic liposomes, indicating a proton carrier mode-of-action independent of any protein target. This report demonstrates that physico-chemical interference with host pathways has broad range antiviral effects, and provides a proof of concept for the development of host-directed antivirals.

  2. Niclosamide is a proton carrier and targets acidic endosomes with broad antiviral effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Jurgeit

    Full Text Available Viruses use a limited set of host pathways for infection. These pathways represent bona fide antiviral targets with low likelihood of viral resistance. We identified the salicylanilide niclosamide as a broad range antiviral agent targeting acidified endosomes. Niclosamide is approved for human use against helminthic infections, and has anti-neoplastic and antiviral effects. Its mode of action is unknown. Here, we show that niclosamide, which is a weak lipophilic acid inhibited infection with pH-dependent human rhinoviruses (HRV and influenza virus. Structure-activity studies showed that antiviral efficacy and endolysosomal pH neutralization co-tracked, and acidification of the extracellular medium bypassed the virus entry block. Niclosamide did not affect the vacuolar H(+-ATPase, but neutralized coated vesicles or synthetic liposomes, indicating a proton carrier mode-of-action independent of any protein target. This report demonstrates that physico-chemical interference with host pathways has broad range antiviral effects, and provides a proof of concept for the development of host-directed antivirals.

  3. Status of experimental studies of electron cloud effects at the Los Alamos proton storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.; Browman, A.A.; Borden, M.J.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; McCrady, R.C.; Spickermann, T.J.; Zaugg, T.J.

    2004-01-01

    Various electron cloud effects (ECE) including the two-stream (e-p) instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have been studied extensively for the past five years with the goal of understanding the phenomena, mitigating the instability and ultimately increasing beam intensity. The specialized diagnostics used in the studies are two types of electron detectors, the retarding field analyzer and the electron sweepmg detector - which have been employed to measure characteristics of the electron cloud as functions of time, location in the ring and various influential beam parameters - plus a short stripline beam position monitor used to measure high frequency motion of the beam centroid. Highlights of this research program are summarized along with more detail on recent results obtained since the ECLOUD'02 workshop. Recent work mcludes a number of parametric studies of the various factors that affect the electron cloud signals, studies of the sources of initial or 'seed' electrons, additional observations of electron cloud dissipation after the beam pulse is extracted, studies of the 'first pulse instability' issue, more data on electron suppression as a cure for the instability, and observations of the effect of a one-turn weak kick on intense beams in the presence of a significant electron cloud.

  4. Effects of the residual proton-neutron interaction in the development of collectivity in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casten, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The widespread effects of the residual T=0 proton-neutron (p-n) interaction in the evolution of nuclear structure are discussed. Although these effects in inducing single nucleon configuration mixing, and hence in the development of non-spherical nuclear shapes, collectivity, and the associated shape and phase transitions have been known for four decades, it is only in recent years that their deep ramifications have become more fully appreciated. This had led to a unified phenomenological understanding of the role of the p-n interaction in nuclear collectivity and to, for example, the proposal of the N p N n scheme and the associated concept of the P factor, which is a normalized value of N p N n reflecting the average number of p-n interactions per valence nucleon. Simultaneously, experimentally-determined p-n matrix elements for many nuclei have been extracted: they disclose striking anomalies for N=Z nuclei, and intriguing microstructure. These developments and empirical results will be discussed along with microscopic calculations that can be used to interpret them. 18 refs., 13 figs

  5. Effect of Thermospheric Neutral Density upon Inner Trapped-belt Proton Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Diaz, Abel B.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to point out that a secular change in the Earth's atmospheric neutral density alters charged-particle lifetime in the inner trapped radiation belts, in addition to the changes recently reported as produced by greenhouse gases. Heretofore, changes in neutral density have been of interest primarily because of their effect on the orbital drag of satellites. We extend this to include the orbital lifetime of charged particles in the lower radiation belts. It is known that the charged-belt population is coupled to the neutral density of the atmosphere through changes induced by solar activity, an effect produced by multiple scattering off neutral and ionized atoms along with ionization loss in the thermosphere where charged and neutral populations interact. It will be shown here that trapped-belt flux J is bivariant in energy E and thermospheric neutral density , as J(E,rho). One can conclude that proton lifetimes in these belts are also directly affected by secular changes in the neutral species populating the Earth s thermosphere. This result is a consequence of an intrinsic property of charged-particle flux, that flux is not merely a function of E but is dependent upon density rho when a background of neutrals is present.

  6. Effect of flow field with converging and diverging channels on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabiyan-Rezaie, Navid; Arefian, Amir; Kermani, Mohammad J.; Noughabi, Amir Karimi; Abdollahzadeh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of converging and diverging channels on fuel cell performance. • Over rib flow is observed from converging channels to neighbors. • Proposed flow field enriches oxygen level and current density in catalyst layer. • Net output power is enhanced more than 16% in new flow field. - Abstract: In this study, a novel bipolar flow field design is proposed. This new design consists of placed sequentially converging and diverging channels. Numerical simulation of cathode side is used to investigate the effects of converging and diverging channels on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Two models of constant and variable sink/source terms were implemented to consider species consumption and production. The distribution of oxygen mole fraction in gas diffusion and catalyst layers as a result of transverse over rib velocity is monitored. The results indicate that the converging channels feed two diverging neighbors. This phenomenon is a result of the over rib velocity which is caused by the pressure difference between the neighboring channels. The polarization curves show that by applying an angle of 0.3° to the channels, the net electrical output power increases by 16% compared to the base case.

  7. Comparing of γ-ray, proton and neutron radiation effects on optoelectronics for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingkui; Tang Min; Meng Meng; Li Pengwei; Wen Ping; Li Haian; Tang Jiesen; Wang Sixin; Song Yamei

    2014-01-01

    We performed irradiation test on optoelectronics with γ-rays, proton and neutron. The electrical measurements were performed pre and after irradiation. The degradations induced by each radiation source was compared. (authors)

  8. Twist-3 effect from the longitudinally polarized proton for ALT in hadron production from pp collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Koike

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We compute the contribution from the longitudinally polarized proton to the twist-3 double-spin asymmetry ALT in inclusive (light hadron production from proton–proton collisions, i.e., p↑p→→hX. We show that using the relevant QCD equation-of-motion relation and Lorentz invariance relation allows one to eliminate the twist-3 quark-gluon correlator (associated with the longitudinally polarized proton in favor of one-variable twist-3 quark distributions and the (twist-2 transversity parton density. Including this result with the twist-3 pieces associated with the transversely polarized proton and unpolarized final-state hadron (which have already been calculated in the literature, we now have the complete leading-order cross section for this process.

  9. Isovector pairing effect on the particle-number projection two-proton separation energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Djamila; Kerrouchi, Slimane [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, Algiers (Algeria); Fellah, Mohamed; Allal, Nassima-Hosni [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, Algiers (Algeria); Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, Comena, Algiers (Algeria)

    2009-07-01

    The two-proton separation energy is studied by performing a particle-number projection with and without inclusion of the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing correlations. It is numerically evaluated for even-even rare-earth nuclei such that the np pairing parameter is non-zero. It is shown that the two-proton separation energy values calculated using the two approaches join, for almost all the considered elements, for the highest values of (N-Z). However, the results including the np pairing correlations are closest to the experimental data when available. Moreover, the two methods lead to the same prediction of the two-proton drip-line position, except for the Dysprosium and the Tungsten.

  10. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  11. Sperm DNA damage has a negative effect on early embryonic development following in vitro fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm DNA damage is recognized as an important biomarker of male infertility. To investigate this, sperm DNA damage was assessed by the sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD test in semen and motile spermatozoa harvested by combined density gradient centrifugation (DGC and swim-up in 161 couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF. Semen analysis and sperm DNA damage results were compared between couples who did or did not achieve pregnancy. The sperm DNA damage level was significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.05 and was negatively correlated with IVF outcomes. Logistic regression analysis confirmed that it was an independent predictor for achieving clinical pregnancy. The effects of different levels of sperm DNA damage on IVF outcomes were also compared. There were significant differences in day 3 embryo quality, blastocyst formation rate, and implantation and pregnancy rates (P < 0.05, but not in the basic fertilization rate between the two groups. Thus, sperm DNA damage as measured by the SCD appears useful for predicting the clinical pregnancy rate following IVF.

  12. Effects of stacking sequence on impact damage resistance and residual strength for quasi-isotropic laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dost, Ernest F.; Ilcewicz, Larry B.; Avery, William B.; Coxon, Brian R.

    1991-01-01

    Residual strength of an impacted composite laminate is dependent on details of the damage state. Stacking sequence was varied to judge its effect on damage caused by low-velocity impact. This was done for quasi-isotropic layups of a toughened composite material. Experimental observations on changes in the impact damage state and postimpact compressive performance were presented for seven different laminate stacking sequences. The applicability and limitations of analysis compared to experimental results were also discussed. Postimpact compressive behavior was found to be a strong function of the laminate stacking sequence. This relationship was found to depend on thickness, stacking sequence, size, and location of sublaminates that comprise the impact damage state. The postimpact strength for specimens with a relatively symmetric distribution of damage through the laminate thickness was accurately predicted by models that accounted for sublaminate stability and in-plane stress redistribution. An asymmetric distribution of damage in some laminate stacking sequences tended to alter specimen stability. Geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis was used to predict this behavior.

  13. Distinct effects of acute and chronic sleep loss on DNA damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, M L; Ribeiro, D A; Bergamaschi, C T; Alvarenga, T A; Silva, A; Zager, A; Campos, R R; Tufik, S

    2009-04-30

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate genetic damage induced in male rats by experimental sleep loss for short-term (24 and 96 h) and long-term (21 days) intervals, as well as their respective recovery periods in peripheral blood, brain, liver and heart tissue by the single cell gel (comet) assay. Rats were paradoxically deprived of sleep (PSD) by the platform technique for 24 or 96 h, or chronically sleep-restricted (SR) for 21 days. We also sought to verify the time course of their recovery after 24 h of rebound sleep. The results showed DNA damage in blood cells of rats submitted to PSD for 96 h. Brain tissue showed extensive genotoxic damage in PSD rats (both 24 and 96 h), though the effect was more pronounced in the 96 h group. Rats allowed to recover from the PSD-96 h and SR-21 days treatments showed DNA damage as compared to negative controls. Liver and heart did not display any genotoxicity activity. Corticosterone concentrations were increased after PSD (24 and 96 h) relative to control rats, whereas these levels were unaffected in the SR group. Collectively, these findings reveal that sleep loss was able to induce genetic damage in blood and brain cells, especially following acute exposure. Since DNA damage is an important step in events leading to genomic instability, this study represents a relevant contribution to the understanding of the potential health risks associated with sleep deprivation.

  14. Effectiveness of revascularization surgery evaluated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Masaaki; Ueda, Shin; Hondo, Hideki; Matsumoto, Keizo; Harada, Masafumi [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-08-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were used to evaluate chronic ischemic regions in 26 stroke patients before and 1, 3, and 6 months after revascularization surgery. The volume of interest for proton MRS was placed in an area including part of the frontal and temporal opercula, insular cortex, and basal ganglia. Twenty healthy volunteers served as controls for proton MRS. Patients were divided into three groups according to the preoperative proton MRS. Group A (n=12) had significantly lower N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) and N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratios on the operative side compared to those on the contralateral side, and also lower than those in normal subjects. In seven patients in Group A, postoperative serial proton MRS demonstrated no recovery of these ratios on the operative side. However, proton MRS of the other five patients indicated gradual improvement in these ratios on the operative side at 3 to 6 months after surgery, and SPECT indicated an increase in cerebral blood flow on the operative side in four of these five patients. In Group B (n=9), proton MRS and SPECT showed no laterality before revascularization and no remarkable change during the postoperative course. In Group C (n=5), NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr decreased on the contralateral side preoperatively. Two patients showed fluctuating values of NAA/Cho or NAA/Cr during the postoperative period. Serial proton MRS and SPECT Studies may be useful for the evaluation of revascularization surgery on ischemic regions. The efficacy of revascularization surgery on the metabolism may appear gradually within 3-6 months. (author)

  15. Proton irradiation effects of amorphous silicon solar cell for solar power satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yousuke; Oshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sasaki, Susumu; Kuroda, Hideo; Ushirokawa, Akio

    1997-03-01

    Flexible amorphous silicon(fa-Si) solar cell module, a thin film type, is regarded as a realistic power generator for solar power satellite. The radiation resistance of fa-Si cells was investigated by the irradiations of 3,4 and 10 MeV protons. The hydrogen gas treatment of the irradiated fa-Si cells was also studied. The fa-Si cell shows high radiation resistance for proton irradiations, compared with a crystalline silicon solar cell. (author)

  16. Effects of cavitation on damage calculations in ion-irradiated P7 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Farrens, S.N.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of voids on the depth-dependent damage energy in ion-irradiated metals. Corrections to the dose at the swelling peak will be used to obtain the swelling rate of ion-irradiated 316-type stainless steels. Samples of the P7 alloy were ion-irradiated to four fluence levels up to a peak dose level of 100 dpa at 650 0 C. The depth-dependent void parameters extracted in cross section were used to model the effect of voids on the depth-dependent damage produced during 14 MeV nickel ion irradiation. An increase in the range of damage produced from the original foil surface for the target containing voids was modeled as a first-order correction to the damage profile. A second-order effect, void straggling, was shown to cause a time-dependent decrease in the damage rate at the peak swelling depth. Corrections applied to the dose at the peak swelling depth yield swelling rates approaching 0.7%/dpa

  17. DNA-damage effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from urban area, evaluated in lung fibroblast cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calesso Teixeira, Elba; Pra, Daniel; Idalgo, Daniele; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas; Wiegand, Flavio

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to biomonitor the effect of PAH extracts from urban areas on the DNA of lung cell cultures. The analyses of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were performed in atmospheric PM 2.5 and PM 10 collected at three sampling sites with heavy traffic located in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre (MAPA) (Brazil). The concentrations of 16 major PAHs were determined according to EPA. Comet assay on V79 hamster lung cells was chosen for genotoxicity evaluation. Temperature, humidity, and wind speed were recorded. With regard to the damage index, higher levels were reported in the extract of particulate matter samples from the MAPA during the summer. High molecular weight compounds showed correlation with DNA damage frequency and their respective carcinogenicity. - Highlights: ► Cell line V79 was used to assess the effect of PAHs in PM 2.5 and PM 10 from urban area. ► Temperature showed a significant seasonal variation with the level of DNA damage. ► PAHs with higher molecular weight contributed to higher DNA damage levels. - DNA-damage effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from urban area, showed difference according to season

  18. Isotope effects for base-promoted, gas-phase proton transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, J.J.; Cheng, Xueheng

    1991-01-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most basic, the most common and the most important of chemical transformations; despite their apparent simplicity, much is unknown about this most fundamental of all chemical processes. Active interest in understanding the underlying principles of organic proton transfer reactions continues because of efforts being made to develop the theory of elementary chemical processes, because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry and because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry processes, because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry and because of the dynamic role played by proton transfers in biochemical transformations. As organic chemists, the authors have used the flowing afterglow technique to gain an appreciation of the fundamental issues involved in reaction mechanisms by examining such processes in a solvent-free environment under thermally-equilibrated (300 K) conditions. Recent characterization of the facile production of both acetate and the monoenolate anion from the interaction of hydroxide or fluoride with acetic acid reinforces the idea that much yet must be learned about proton transfers/proton abstractions in general. Earlier work by Riveros and co-workers on competitive H vs D abstraction from α-d 1 -toluenes and by Noest and Nibbering on competitive H vs D abstraction from α,α,α-d 3 -acetone, in combination with the acetic acid results, challenged the author's to assemble a comprehensive picture of the competitive nature of proton transfer reactions for anionic base-promoted processes

  19. Nonlinear damage effect in graphene synthesis by C-cluster ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rui; Zhang Zaodi; Wang Zesong; Wang Shixu; Wang Wei; Fu Dejun; Liu Jiarui

    2012-01-01

    We present few-layer graphene synthesis by negative carbon cluster ion implantation with C 1 , C 2 , and C 4 at energies below 20 keV. The small C-clusters were produced by a source of negative ion by cesium sputtering with medium beam current. We show that the nonlinear effect in cluster-induced damage is favorable for graphene precipitation compared with monomer carbon ions. The nonlinear damage effect in cluster ion implantation shows positive impact on disorder reduction, film uniformity, and the surface smoothness in graphene synthesis.

  20. An integrated field-effect microdevice for monitoring membrane transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes via lateral proton diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Felix Schaffhauser

    Full Text Available An integrated microdevice for measuring proton-dependent membrane activity at the surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes is presented. By establishing a stable contact between the oocyte vitelline membrane and an ion-sensitive field-effect (ISFET sensor inside a microperfusion channel, changes in surface pH that are hypothesized to result from facilitated proton lateral diffusion along the membrane were detected. The solute diffusion barrier created between the sensor and the active membrane area allowed detection of surface proton concentration free from interference of solutes in bulk solution. The proposed sensor mechanism was verified by heterologously expressing membrane transport proteins and recording changes in surface pH during application of the specific substrates. Experiments conducted on two families of phosphate-sodium cotransporters (SLC20 & SLC34 demonstrated that it is possible to detect phosphate transport for both electrogenic and electroneutral isoforms and distinguish between transport of different phosphate species. Furthermore, the transport activity of the proton/amino acid cotransporter PAT1 assayed using conventional whole cell electrophysiology correlated well with changes in surface pH, confirming the ability of the system to detect activity proportional to expression level.

  1. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells: its relevance to environmental effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, A.; Elkind, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Assessment of the potential biological hazards associated with energy production technologies involves the quantitation of risk on the basis of dose-effect dependencies, from which, it is hoped, some safety guidelines can be developed. Our current knowledge of the biological importance of damage/repair processes stems by and large from radiation studies which clearly demonstrate that cellular response to radiation depends upon the ability of cells to repair the damage. Apparently, the same is true for cellular response to different chemical agents. Drawing upon our experiences from radiation studies, we demonstrate the relevance of ongoing repair processes, as evident in the studies of radiation induced cell killing and neoplastic transformation, to the type of risk estimates that might be associated with the hazards from energy production technologies. The effect of repair on cell survival is considered. It is evident from our studies that in the region of small doses, repair of damage relative to cell lethality is of importance in estimating the magnitude of effect. Aside from the cytotoxic effects in terms of cell killing, one of the greatest concerns associated with energy production is the potential of a given technology, or its effluents, to produce cancer. It is therefore of importance to quantify the risk in this context of damage registration and possible effect of repair on damage expression. It has been generally established that exposure of normal cells in culture to a variety of known carcinogens results in neoplastic transformation. Our observations with C3H/10T1/2 cells in culture lend direct evidence for the hypothesis that reduced tumor incidences at low dose rates of radiation could be due to the repair of induced damage

  2. Kinetic isotope effects and tunnelling in the proton-transfer reaction between 4-nitrophenylnitromethane and tetramethylguanidine in various aprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldin, E.F.; Mateo, S.

    1975-01-01

    Rates and equilibrium constants have been determined for the proton-transfer reaction of 4-nitrophenylnitromethane, NO 2 C 6 H 4 CH 2 NO 2 , and its αα-deuterated analogue NO 2 C 6 H 4 CD 2 NO 2 , with the strong base tetramethylguanidine [HN=C(NMe 2 ) 2 ), at temperatures between -60 0 C and +65 0 in a range of aprotic solvents. Spectrophotometry and the stopped-flow technique were used. The reaction is a simple proton-transfer process leading to an ion-pair. The kinetic isotope effects are correlated with the polarity of the solvents, as measured by the dielectric constant or by the empirical parameter Esub(T). In the less polar solvents they are exceptionally large. In toluene, for example, at 25 0 C the rate ratio ksup(H)/ksup(D) = 45 +- 2, the activation energy difference Esub(a)sup(D) - Esub(a)sup(H) =4.3 +- 0.3 kcal molsup(-1) (16 kJ molsup(-1), and the ratio of the pre-exponential factors logsub(10) (Asup(D)/Asup(H)) = 1.5 +- 0.2+ and even larger values of logsub(10)(Asup(D)/Asup(H)) are found for mesitylene (1.94 +- 0.06) and cyclohexane (2.4 +- 0.2). Positive deviations from linear Arrhenius plots are found for these solvents. Tunnelling is the only interpretation that cannot account for these results. For the more polar solvents (dielectric constant 7 to 37), the isotope effects are closer to the range predicted by semi-classical theory. The isotope effects in all solvents have been fitted to Bell's equation for a parabolic barrier, and the barrier dimensions calculated for each solvent. The suggested interpretation of the results is that the solvent-solute interactions affect the height of the barrier and that motions of solvent molecules are coupled with the motion of the proton in the more polar solvents but not in the less polar ones; reorganization of solvent molecules accompanies the proton-transfer in the more polar solvents, but only electron-polarization in the less polar. Tunnelling has large effects in the less polar solvents, where the

  3. Effect of free-particle collisions in high energy proton and pion-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, N.P. Jr.

    1975-07-01

    The effect of free-particle collisions in simple ''knockout'' reactions of the form (a,aN) and in more complex nuclear reactions of the form (a,X) was investigated by using protons and pions. Cross sections for the 48 Ti(p,2p) 47 Sc and the 74 Ge(p,2p) 73 Ga reactions were measured from 0.3 to 4.6 GeV incident energy. The results indicate a rise in (p,2p) cross section for each reaction of about (25 +- 3) percent between the energies 0.3 and 1.0 GeV, and are correlated to a large increase in the total free-particle pp scattering cross sections over the same energy region. Results are compared to previous (p,2p) excitation functions in the GeV energy region and to (p,2p) cross section calculations based on a Monte Carlo intranuclear cascade-evaporation model. Cross section measurements for (π/sup +-/, πN) and other more complex pion-induced spallation reactions were measured for the light target nuclei 14 N, 16 O, and 19 F from 45 to 550 MeV incident pion energy. These measurements indicate a broad peak in the excitation functions for both (π,πN) and (π,X) reactions near 180 MeV incident energy. This corresponds to the large resonances observed in the free-particle π + p and π - p cross sections at the same energy. Striking differences in (π,πN) cross section magnitudes are observed among the light nuclei targets. The experimental cross section ratio sigma(π - ,π - n)/sigma(π + ,πN) at 180 MeV is 1.7 +- 0.2 for all three targets. The experimental results are compared to previous pion and analogous proton-induced reactions, to Monte Carlo intranuclear cascade-evaporation calculations, and to a semi-classical nucleon charge exchange model. (108 references) (auth)

  4. Effectiveness of different rescanning techniques for scanned proton radiotherapy in lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwall, E.; Glimelius, L.; Hynning, E.

    2018-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a tumour type thought to be well-suited for proton radiotherapy. However, the lung region poses many problems related to organ motion and can for actively scanned beams induce severe interplay effects. In this study we investigate four mitigating rescanning techniques: (1) volumetric rescanning, (2) layered rescanning, (3) breath-sampled (BS) layered rescanning, and (4) continuous breath-sampled (CBS) layered rescanning. The breath-sampled methods will spread the layer rescans over a full breathing cycle, resulting in an improved averaging effect at the expense of longer treatment times. In CBS, we aim at further improving the averaging by delivering as many rescans as possible within one breathing cycle. The interplay effect was evaluated for 4D robustly optimized treatment plans (with and without rescanning) for seven NSCLC patients in the treatment planning system RayStation. The optimization and final dose calculation used a Monte Carlo dose engine to account for the density heterogeneities in the lung region. A realistic treatment delivery time structure given from the IBA ScanAlgo simulation tool served as basis for the interplay evaluation. Both slow (2.0 s) and fast (0.1 s) energy switching times were simulated. For all seven studied patients, rescanning improves the dose conformity to the target. The general trend is that the breath-sampled techniques are superior to layered and volumetric rescanning with respect to both target coverage and variability in dose to OARs. The spacing between rescans in our breath-sampled techniques is set at planning, based on the average breathing cycle length obtained in conjunction with CT acquisition. For moderately varied breathing cycle lengths between planning and delivery (up to 15%), the breath-sampled techniques still mitigate the interplay effect well. This shows the potential for smooth implementation at the clinic without additional motion monitoring equipment.

  5. Effects of trapped proton flux anisotropy on dose rates in low Earth orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badhwar, G.D.; Kushin, V.V.; Akatov, Yu A.; Myltseva, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) have a rather narrow pitch angle distribution and exhibit east-west anisotropy. In low Earth orbits, the E-W effect results in different amounts of radiation dose received by different sections of the spacecraft. This effect is best studied on missions in which the spacecraft flies in a fixed orientation. The magnitude of the effect depends on the particle energy and altitude through the SAA. In this paper, we describe a clear example of this effect from measurements of radiation dose rates and linear energy transfer spectra made on Space Shuttle flight STS-94 (28.5 deg. inclination x 296 km altitude). The ratio of dose rates from the two directions at this location in the mid-deck was 2.7. As expected from model calculations, the spectra from the two directions are different, that is the ratio is energy dependent. The data can be used to distinguish the anisotropy models. The flight carried an active tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and passive thermoluminscent detectors (TLDs), and two types of nuclear emulsions. Using nuclear emulsions, charged particles and secondary neutron energy spectra were measured. The combined galactic cosmic radiation+trapped charged particle lineal energy spectra measured by the TEPC and the linear energy transfer spectrum measured by nuclear emulsions are in good agreement. The charged particle absorbed dose rates varied from 112 to 175 μGy/day, and dose equivalent rates from 264.3 to 413 μSv/day. Neutrons in the 1-10 MeV contributed a dose rate of 3.7 μGy/day and dose equivalent rate of 30.8 μSv/day, respectively

  6. Effects of trapped proton flux anisotropy on dose rates in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G D; Kushin, V V; Akatov YuA; Myltseva, V A

    1999-06-01

    Trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) have a rather narrow pitch angle distribution and exhibit east-west anisotropy. In low Earth orbits, the E-W effect results in different amounts of radiation dose received by different sections of the spacecraft. This effect is best studied on missions in which the spacecraft flies in a fixed orientation. The magnitude of the effect depends on the particle energy and altitude through the SAA. In this paper, we describe a clear example of this effect from measurements of radiation dose rates and linear energy transfer spectra made on Space Shuttle flight STS-94 (28.5 degree inclination x 296 km altitude). The ratio of dose rates from the two directions at this location in the mid-deck was 2.7. As expected from model calculations, the spectra from the two directions are different, that is the ratio is energy dependent. The data can be used to distinguish the anisotropy models. The flight carried an active tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and passive thermoluminscent detectors (TLDs), and two types of nuclear emulsions. Using nuclear emulsions, charged particles and secondary neutron energy spectra were measured. The combined galactic cosmic radiation+trapped charged particle lineal energy spectra measured by the TEPC and the linear energy transfer spectrum measured by nuclear emulsions are in good agreement. The charged particle absorbed dose rates varied from 112 to 175 microGy/day, and dose equivalent rates from 264.3 to 413 microSv/day. Neutrons in the 1-10 MeV contributed a dose rate of 3.7 microGy/day and dose equivalent rate of 30.8 microSv/day, respectively.

  7. Protonation effects on the UV/Vis absorption spectra of imatinib: a theoretical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grante, Ilze; Actins, Andris; Orola, Liana

    2014-08-14

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of protonation effects on the UV/Vis absorption spectra of imatinib showed systematic changes of absorption depending on the pH, and a new absorption band appeared below pH 2. These changes in the UV/Vis absorption spectra were interpreted using quantum chemical calculations. The geometry of various imatinib cations in the gas phase and in ethanol solution was optimized with the DFT/B3LYP method. The resultant geometries were compared to the experimentally determined crystal structures of imatinib salts. The semi-empirical ZINDO-CI method was employed to calculate the absorption lines and electronic transitions. Our study suggests that the formation of the extra near-UV absorption band resulted from an increase of imatinib trication concentration in the solution, while the rapid increase of the first absorption maximum could be attributed to both the formation of imatinib trication and tetracation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Parameter-free effective field theory calculation for the solar proton-fusion and hep processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.S. Park; L.E. Marcucci; R. Schiavilla; M. Viviani; A. Kievsky; S. Rosati; K. Kubodera; D.P. Min; M. Rho

    2002-01-01

    Spurred by the recent complete determination of the weak currents in two-nucleon systems up to Ο(Q 3 ) in heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, we carry out a parameter-free calculation of the threshold S-factors for the solar pp (proton-fusion) and hep processes in an effective field theory that combines the merits of the standard nuclear physics method and systematic chiral expansion. The power of the EFT adopted here is that one can correlate in a unified formalism the weak-current matrix elements of two-, three- and four-nucleon systems. Using the tritium β-decay rate as an input to fix the only unknown parameter in the theory, we can evaluate the threshold S factors with drastically improved precision; the results are S pp (0) = 3.94 x (1 ± 0.004) x 10 -25 MeV-b and S hep (0) = (8.6 ± 1.3) x 10 -20 keV-b. The dependence of the calculated S-factors on the momentum cutoff parameter Λ has been examined for a physically reasonable range of Λ. This dependence is found to be extremely small for the pp process, and to be within acceptable levels for the hep process, substantiating the consistency of our calculational scheme

  9. Overutilization of proton pump inhibitors: a review of cost-effectiveness and risk [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J; Goldberg, Kathleen L; Inadomi, John M

    2009-03-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are superior to histamine-2 receptor antagonists for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and erosive esophagitis. Antisecretory therapy (AST), however, accounts for significant cost expenditure in the United States including over-the-counter and prescription formulations. Moreover, emerging data illustrate the potential risks associated with long-term PPI therapy including variations in bioavailability of common medications, vitamin B12 deficiency, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, community-acquired pneumonia, and hip fracture. For these reasons, it is imperative to use the lowest dose of drug necessary to achieve desired therapeutic goals. This may entail the use of step-down, step-off, or on-demand PPI therapy for the treatment of GERD. In addition, PPIs are the most commonly used medications for stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP), despite little evidence to support their use. Compounding this problem is evidence that patients erroneously administered SUP are often discharged on long-term PPI therapy. Pharmacy-driven step-down orders, limitation of the use of PPIs for SUP in non-ICU settings, and meticulous chart review to ensure that hospitalized patients are not discharged home on a PPI without an appropriate indication are interventions that can ensure proper PPI utilization with minimal of risk and optimization of cost-effectiveness.

  10. Proton beam effects on phenolic-based composites reinforced with nanopowders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhay, B.; Minamisawa, R.; Zheng, B.; Budak, S.; Ila, D.

    2007-01-01

    We have introduced various nanopowders in the precursor of glassy polymeric carbon (GPC) and studied the electrical properties as well as the chemical structure. In general the GPC ware produced at Alabama A and M University (AAMU) is used for making crucibles, heat exchangers and for prosthetic devices because of its biocompatibility and inertness. GPC ware at AAMU is synthesized from a phenolic resin solution from Georgia Pacific in a pyrolyzer system at temperatures between 100 deg, C and 2800 deg, C. The heat treatment includes several stages: gelling, curing, postcuring, precarbonization and carbonization. The fabrication of GPC is complicated because of the high production rate of gaseous products in critical temperature ranges where out-diffusion is relatively slow. Special care should be taken in temperature programming to avoid kilning faults and misshapen or porous GPC end results [H. Maleki, L.R. Holland, G.M. Jenkins, et al., Carbon 35 (1997) 227]. In this work we have introduced 1 wt% of SiC, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Al 2 O 3 to the precursor, pyrolyzed composites to 1000 deg, C and studied the effect of 1 MeV and 3 MeV proton bombardment on the final products

  11. WE-H-BRA-05: Investigation of LET Spectral Dependence of the Biological Effects of Therapeutic Protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, F; Bronk, L; Kerr, M; Wang, X; Li, Y; Peeler, C; Sahoo, N; Patel, D; Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dependence of biologic effect (BE) of therapeutic protons on LET spectra by comparing BEs with equal dose-averaged LET (LETd) derived from different LET spectra using high-throughput in vitro clonogenic survival assays. Methods: We used Geant4 to design the relevant experimental setups and perform the dose, LETd, and LET spectra calculations for spot-scanning protons. The clonogenic assay was performed using the H460 lung cancer cell line cultured in 96-well plates. In the first experimental setup (S1), cells were irradiated using 127.4 MeV protons with a 93.22 mm Lucite buildup resulting in a LETd value of 3.4 keV/µm in the cell layer. In the second experimental setup (S2), cells were irradiated by a combination of 127.4 MeV and 136.4 MeV protons with a 96.61 mm Lucite buildup. The LETd values in the cell layer were 11.4 keV/µm and 1.5 keV/µm respectively, but an average LETd of 3.4 keV/µm was obtained by adjusting the relative fluence of each beam. Ten discrete dose levels with 0.5 Gy increments were delivered. Results: In the two setups, the energies or LET spectra were different but resulted in identical LETd values. We quantified the dose contributions from high-LET (≥10 keV/µm, threshold determined by previous experiments) events in the LET spectra separately for these two setups as 3.2% and 10.5%. The biologic effects at each identical dose level yielded statistically significant different survival curves (extra sum-of-squares F-test, P<0.0001). The second setup with a higher contribution from high-LET events exhibited the higher biologic effect with a dose enhancement factor of 1.17±0.03 at 0.10 surviving fraction. Conclusion: The dose-averaged LET may not be an accurate indicator of the biological effects of protons. Detailed LET spectra may need to be considered explicitly to accurately quantify the biologic effects of protons. Funding Support: U19 CA021239-35, R21 CA187484-01 and MDACC-IRG.

  12. Muscle damage and repeated bout effect induced by enhanced eccentric squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coratella, Giuseppe; Chemello, Alessandro; Schena, Federico

    2016-12-01

    Muscle damage and repeated bout effect have been studied after pure eccentric-only exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate muscle damage and repeated bout effect induced by enhanced eccentric squat exercise using flywheel device. Thirteen healthy males volunteered for this study. Creatine kinase blood activity (CK), quadriceps isometric peak torque and muscle soreness were used as markers of muscle damage. The dependent parameters were measured at baseline, immediately after and each day up to 96 hours after the exercise session. The intervention consisted of 100 repetitions of enhanced eccentric squat exercise using flywheel device. The same protocol was repeated after 4 weeks. After the first bout, CK and muscle soreness were significantly greater (P0.05), while isometric peak torque and muscle soreness returned to values similar to baseline after respectively 48 and 72 hours. All muscle damage markers were significantly lower after second compared to first bout. The enhanced eccentric exercise induced symptoms of muscle damage up to 96 hours. However, it provided muscle protection after the second bout, performed four weeks later. Although it was not eccentric-only exercise, the enhancement of eccentric phase provided muscle protection.

  13. Protective effects of Curcuma longa against neurobehavioral and neurochemical damage caused by cerium chloride in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Yamina; Nciri, Riadh; Brahmi, Noura; Saidi, Saber; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Alwasel, Saleh; Aldahmash, Waleed; El Feki, Abdelfatteh; Allagui, Mohamed Salah

    2018-05-07

    Cerium chloride (CeCl 3 ) is considered an environmental pollutant and a potent neurotoxic agent. Medicinal plants have many bioactive compounds that provide protection against damage caused by such pollutants. Curcuma longa is a bioactive compound-rich plant with very important antioxidant properties. To study the preventive and healing effects of Curcuma longa on cerium-damaged mouse brains, we intraperitoneally injected cerium chloride (CeCl 3 , 20 mg/kg BW) along with Curcuma longa extract, administrated by gavage (100 mg/kg BW), into mice for 60 days. We then examined mouse behavior, brain tissue damage, and brain oxidative stress parameters. Our results revealed a significant modification in the behavior of the CeCl 3 -treated mice. In addition, CeCl 3 induced a significant increment in lipid peroxidation, carbonyl protein (PCO), and advanced oxidation protein product levels, as well as a significant reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity remarkably increased in the brain of CeCl 3 -treated mice. Histopathological observations confirmed these results. Curcuma longa attenuated CeCl 3 -induced oxidative stress and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes. It also decreased AChE activity in the CeCl 3 -damaged mouse brain that was confirmed by histopathology. In conclusion, this study suggests that Curcuma longa has a neuroprotective effect against CeCl 3 -induced damage in the brain.

  14. The neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment on laser-induced retinal damage in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnevskia-Dai, Victoria; Belokopytov, Mark; Dubinsky, Galina; Nachum, Gal; Avni, Isaac; Belkin, Michael; Rosner, Mordechai

    2005-04-01

    Retinal damage induced by mechanical trauma, ischemia or laser photocoagulation increases considerably by secondary degeneration processes. The spread of damage may be ameliorated by neuroprotection that is aimed at reducing the extent of the secondary degeneration and promote healing processes. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment consists of inspiration of oxygen at higher than one absolute atmospheric pressure. Improved neural function was observed in patients with acute brain trauma or ischemia treated with HBO. This study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on laser induced retinal damage in a rat model. Standard argon laser lesions were created in 25 pigmented rats divided into three groups: Ten rats were treated immediately after the irradiation with HBO three times during the first 24 hr followed by 12 consecutive daily treatments. Five rats received a shorter treatment regimen of 10 consecutive HBO treatments. The control group (10 rats) underwent the laser damage with no additional treatment. The retinal lesions were evaluated 20 days after the injury. All outcome measures were improved by the longer HBO treatment (Ptreatment was less effective, showing an increase only in nuclei density at the central area of lesion (Pretinal damage in a rat model. In the range of HBO exposures studied, longer exposure provides more neuroprotection. These results encourage further evaluation of the potential therapeutic use of hyperbaric oxygen in diseases and injuries of the retina.

  15. Surface roughness effect on the metallic bipolar plates of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chien-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Various degrees of roughness are caused by the sandblasting method. ► An improper surface modification depletes the PEMFC performance severely. ► The AC impedance are used to assess the fuel gas transfer effect. ► The Warburg resistance form in the coarse flow channel surface. - Abstract: Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is a promising candidate as energy systems. However, the stability and lifetime of cells are still important issues. The effect of surface roughness on metallic bipolar plate is discussed in this paper. Various roughness on the bulk surface are obtained by the sandblasting method. The grain sizes of sand are selected as 50, 100 and 200 μm. The Ac impedance experiment results show that the bipolar plate roughness and carbon paper porosity are well matched when the surface roughness is within 1–2 μm. Superior condition decreases the contact resistance loss in the fuel cell. The high frequency resistance of the coarse surface was larger than that of the substrate by around 5 mΩ. Furthermore, a new arc was formed at the low frequency region. Hence, the unmatch roughness condition of the bipolar plate significantly increases the contact resistance and mass transfer resistance. This paper develops a sequential approach to study an optimum surface roughness by combining the whole performance (I–V) curve and AC impedance result. It benefits us to quantify the contact and mass transfer resistance exists in the PEMFC. The proposed surface treatment improves the surface effect and promotes the implement of potential metallic bipolar plate in near future

  16. SU-F-T-673: Effects of Cardiac Induced Brain Pulsations On Proton Minibeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eagle, J; Marsh, S [University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Canterbury (New Zealand); Lee, E; Meyer, J [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of internal motion within the brain on spatially modulated proton minibeam radiation therapy (pMRT) for small animal research. Methods: The peak-to-valley dose ratio (PVDR) is an essential dosimetric factor for pMRT. Motion of an animal brain caused by cardiac-induced pulsations (CIP) can impact dose deposition. For synchrotron generated high dose rate X-ray microbeams this effect is evaded due to the quasi-instantaneous delivery. By comparison, pMRT potentially suffers increased spread due to lower dose rates. However, for a given dose rate it is less susceptible to beam spread than microbeams, due to the spatial modulation being an order of magnitude larger. Monte Carlo simulations in TOPAS were used to model the beam spread for a 50.5MeV pMRT beam. Motion effects were simulated for a 50mm thick brass collimator with 0.3mm slit width and 1.0mm center-to-center spacing in a water phantom. The maximum motion in a rat brain due to CIP has been reported to be 0.06mm. Motion was simulated with a peak amplitude in the range 0–0.2mm. Results: The impact of 0.06mm peak motion was minimal and reduced the PVDR by about 1% at a depth of 10mm. For 0.2mm peak motion the PVDR was reduced by 16% at a depth of 10mm. Conclusion: For the pMRT beam the magnitude of cardiac-induced brain motion has minimal impact on the PVDR for the investigated collimator geometry. For more narrow beams the effect is likely to be larger. This indicates that delivery of pMRT to small animal brains should not be affected considerably by beamlines with linac compatible dose rates.

  17. Electron attachment to the guanine-cytosine nucleic acid base pair and the effects of monohydration and proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Jaeger, Heather M; Compaan, Katherine R; Schaefer, Henry F

    2012-05-17

    The guanine-cytosine (GC) radical anion and its interaction with a single water molecule is studied using ab initio and density functional methods. Z-averaged second-order perturbation theory (ZAPT2) was applied to GC radical anion for the first time. Predicted spin densities show that the radical character is localized on cytosine. The Watson-Crick monohydrated GC anion is compared to neutral GC·H2O, as well as to the proton-transferred analogue on the basis of structural and energetic properties. In all three systems, local minima are identified that correspond to water positioned in the major and minor grooves of macromolecular DNA. On the anionic surface, two novel structures have water positioned above or below the GC plane. On the neutral and anionic surfaces, the global minimum can be described as water interacting with the minor groove. These structures are predicted to have hydration energies of 9.7 and 11.8 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Upon interbase proton-transfer (PT), the anionic global minimum has water positioned in the major groove, and the hydration energy increases to 13.4 kcal mol(-1). PT GC·H2O(•-) has distonic character; the radical character resides on cytosine, while the negative charge is localized on guanine. The effects of proton transfer are further investigated through the computed adiabatic electron affinities (AEA) of GC and monohydrated GC, and the vertical detachment energies (VDE) of the corresponding anions. Monohydration increases the AEAs and VDEs by only 0.1 eV, while proton-transfer increases the VDEs substantially (0.8 eV). The molecular charge distribution of monohydrated guanine-cytosine radical anion depends heavily on interbase proton transfer.

  18. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP3-02: Benchmarks of a Proton Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) Model for DNA Double Strand Break (DSB) Induction in the FLUKA, MCNP, TOPAS, and RayStation™ Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Streitmatter, S [University of Utah Hospitals, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Traneus, E [RAYSEARCH LABORATORIES AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Moskvin, V [St. Jude Children’s Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Schuemann, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Validate implementation of a published RBE model for DSB induction (RBEDSB) in several general purpose Monte Carlo (MC) code systems and the RayStation™ treatment planning system (TPS). For protons and other light ions, DSB induction is a critical initiating molecular event that correlates well with the RBE for cell survival. Methods: An efficient algorithm to incorporate information on proton and light ion RBEDSB from the independently tested Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) has now been integrated into MCNP (Stewart et al. PMB 60, 8249–8274, 2015), FLUKA, TOPAS and a research build of the RayStation™ TPS. To cross-validate the RBEDSB model implementation LET distributions, depth-dose and lateral (dose and RBEDSB) profiles for monodirectional monoenergetic (100 to 200 MeV) protons incident on a water phantom are compared. The effects of recoil and secondary ion production ({sub 2}H{sub +}, {sub 3}H{sub +}, {sub 3}He{sub 2+}, {sub 4}He{sub 2+}), spot size (3 and 10 mm), and transport physics on beam profiles and RBEDSB are examined. Results: Depth-dose and RBEDSB profiles among all of the MC models are in excellent agreement using a 1 mm distance criterion (width of a voxel). For a 100 MeV proton beam (10 mm spot), RBEDSB = 1.2 ± 0.03 (− 2–3%) at the tip of the Bragg peak and increases to 1.59 ± 0.3 two mm distal to the Bragg peak. RBEDSB tends to decrease as the kinetic energy of the incident proton increases. Conclusion: The model for proton RBEDSB has been accurately implemented into FLUKA, MCNP, TOPAS and the RayStation™TPS. The transport of secondary light ions (Z > 1) has a significant impact on RBEDSB, especially distal to the Bragg peak, although light ions have a small effect on (dosexRBEDSB) profiles. The ability to incorporate spatial variations in proton RBE within a TPS creates new opportunities to individualize treatment plans and increase the therapeutic ratio. Dr. Erik Traneus is employed full-time as a Research Scientist

  19. Effects of proton irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV protons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 9th power P/sq cm-sec and fluences of 10 to the 10th power, 10 to the 11th power, 10 to the 12th power and 3 X 10 to the 12th power P/sq cm. I-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, 65 C and 165 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was taken as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. Degradation occurred for both uncovered 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm cells. Efficiencies are generally higher than those of comparable U.S. cells tested earlier. Damage (loss in maximum power efficiency) with proton fluence is somewhat higher for 10 ohm-cm cells, measured at the three temperatures, for fluences above 2 X 10 to the 11th power P/sq cm. Cell efficiency, as expected, changes drastically with temperature.

  20. Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage effects in a 316LN austenitic alloy for a high power spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Rao, G.R.; Hunn, J.D.; Rice, P.M.; Lewis, M.B.; Cook, S.W.; Farrell, K.; Mansur, L.K.

    1997-09-01

    Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe ++ , 360 keV He + , and 180 keV H + to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of ∼ 1 microm. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss

  1. Triple Ion-Beam Studies of Radiation Damage Effects in a 316LN Austenitic Alloy for a High Power Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.

    2001-01-01

    Austenitic 316LN alloy was ion-irradiated using the unique Triple Ion Beam Facility (TIF) at ORNL to investigate radiation damage effects relevant to spallation neutron sources. The TIF was used to simulate significant features of GeV proton irradiation effects in spallation neutron source target materials by producing displacement damage while simultaneously injecting helium and hydrogen at appropriately high gas/dpa ratios. Irradiations were carried out at 80, 200, and 350 C using 3.5 MeV Fe 2 , 360 keV He + , and 180 keV H + to accumulate 50 dpa by Fe, 10,000 appm of He, and 50,000 appm of H. Irradiations were also carried out at 200 C in single and dual ion beam modes. The specific ion energies were chosen to maximize the damage and the gas accumulation at a depth of ∼ 1 microm. Variations in microstructure and hardness of irradiated specimens were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a nanoindentation technique, respectively. TEM investigation yielded varying damage defect microstructures, comprising black dots, faulted and unfaulted loops, and a high number density of fine bubbles (typically less than 1 nm in diameter). With increasing temperature, faulted loops had a tendency to unfault, and bubble microstructure changed from a bimodal size distribution to a unimodal distribution. Triple ion irradiations at the three temperatures resulted in similar increases in hardness of approximately a factor of two. Individually, Fe and He ions resulted in a similar magnitude of hardness increase, whereas H ions showed only a very small effect. The present study has yielded microstructural information relevant to spallation neutron source conditions and indicates that the most important concern may be radiation induced hardening and associated ductility loss

  2. Effect of a mechanical damage on permeability and moisture diffusivity of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picandet, V.

    2001-12-01

    The effect of a mechanical damage on transfer parameters of concrete is an original point of view on the coupling between damage and durability. The studied transfer parameters, permeability and moisture diffusivity, allow to characterize the transport ability of a porous media to convey gases or water (liquid and vapour). The theoretical framework of the measurement of these parameters and its applications to concrete is pointed out. The experimental studies are carried on three types of concrete: ordinary concrete, high performance concrete, and high performance steel fiber reinforced concrete. Two kinds of damage are considered and generated in samples: - A continuous damage of the medium, obtained by cyclic uniaxial loading. It is characterized by a loss of stiffness and results in a diffuse microcracking.- A discrete or localised damage, obtained by a diametrical compression of cylindrical specimens. It is characterized by the presence of identifiable and measurable cracks. Measurements of gas permeability are taken using a constant head, Cembureau type, permeameter. For cracked samples, the procedure and analysis of the results are changed in order to make the evaluation of their gas and water permeability. The simple imbibition and positive head imbibition are the disturbances of the moisture equilibrium, which allow the evaluation of the material diffusivity. The local moisture contents of the specimen are measured using a gamma-ray attenuation method. The analysis of profiles using Boltzmann's transformation leads to the moisture diffusivity and then to the water permeability coefficients. Measurements of gas and water permeability are compared in both cases of considered damage. In the first case, a damage - permeability relationship dependent on the fluid of percolation but valid for all concrete types studied could be worked out. (author)

  3. The effect of dithiothreitol on radiation-induced genetic damage in Arabidopsis thaliana (L) Heynh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellaert, L.M.W.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made on the effect of dithiothreitol (DTT; present during irradiation) on M 1 ovule sterility, M 2 embryonic lethals, M 2 chlorophyll mutants and M 2 viable mutants induced with fast neutrons or X-rays in Arabidopsis thaliana. DTT provides considerable protection against both fast-neutron and X-ray induced genetic damage. However, a higher protection was observed against M 1 ovule sterility, than against embryonic lethals, chlorophylls and viable mutants. This implies a significant DTT-induced spectral shift (0.01 < p < 0.05), i.e. a shift in the relative frequencies of the different genetic parameters. This spectral shift is explained on the basis of a specific DTT protection against radiation-induced strand breaks, and by differences in the ratio strand breaks/base damage for the genetic parameters concerned, i.e. a higher ratio for ovule sterility than for the other parameters. The induction of the genetic damage by ionizing radiation, either with or without DTT, is described by a mathematical model, which includes both strand breaks and base damage. The model shows that the resolving power of a test for a 'mutation'spectral shift depends on the relative values of the strandbreak reduction factor of -SH compounds and on the ratio strand breaks/base damage of the genetic parameters. For each genetic parameter the DTT damage reduction factor (DRF) is calculated per irradiation dose, and in addition the average (over-all doses) ratio strand breaks/base damage. (orig.)

  4. Can We Advance Proton Therapy for Prostate? Considering Alternative Beam Angles and Relative Biological Effectiveness Variations When Comparing Against Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, Tracy, E-mail: tunderwood@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Moteabbed, Maryam; Zietman, Anthony; Efstathiou, Jason; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: For prostate treatments, robust evidence regarding the superiority of either intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy is currently lacking. In this study we investigated the circumstances under which proton therapy should be expected to outperform IMRT, particularly the proton beam orientations and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) assumptions. Methods and Materials: For 8 patients, 4 treatment planning strategies were considered: (A) IMRT; (B) passively scattered standard bilateral (SB) proton beams; (C) passively scattered anterior oblique (AO) proton beams, and (D) AO intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). For modalities (B)-(D) the dose and linear energy transfer (LET) distributions were simulated using the TOPAS Monte Carlo platform and RBE was calculated according to 3 different models. Results: Assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1, our imple