WorldWideScience

Sample records for proton abundance ratio

  1. Study on strontium isotope abundance-ratio measurements by using a 13-MeV proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ki; Jang, Han; Lee, Goung-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The Rb-Sr dating method is used in dating Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks. This method measures the 87Rb and the 87Sr concentrations by using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) [J. Hefne et al., Inter. J. Phys. Sci. 3(1), 28 (2008)]. In addition, it calculates the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio to increase the reliability of Rb-Sr dating. In this study, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was measured by using a 13-MeV proton accelerator. Proton kinetic energies are in the range of tens of megaelectronvolts, and protons have large absorption cross-sections for ( p, n) reactions with most substances. After absorbing a proton with such a high kinetic energy, an element is converted into a nuclide with its atomic number increased by one via nuclear transmutation. These nuclides usually have short half-lives and return to the original state through radioactive decay. When a strontium sample is irradiated with protons, nuclear transmutation occurs; thus, the strontium isotope present in the sample changes to a yttrium isotope, which is an activated radioisotope. Based on this, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was calculated by analyzing the gamma-rays emitted by each yttrium isotope. The KIRAMS-13 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Center of Chosun University, where 13-MeV protons can be extracted, was utilized in our experiment. The 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratio was computed for samples irradiated with these protons, and the result was similar to the isotope ratio for the Standard Reference Material, i.e., 98.2 ± 3.4%. As part of the analysis, proton activation analyses were performed using 13-MeV protons, and the experimental results of this research suggest a possible approach for measuring the strontium-isotope abundance ratio of samples.

  2. Abundance Ratios in Dwarf Elliptical Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sen, Seyda; Peletier, Reynier F.; Toloba, Elisa; Mentz, Jaco J.

    The aim of this study is to determine abundance ratios and star formation histories (SFH) of dwarf ellipticals in the nearby Virgo cluster. We perform a stellar population analysis of 39 dEs and study them using index-index and scaling relations. We find an unusual behaviour where [Na/Fe] is

  3. Abundance ratios in dwarf elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Ş.; Peletier, R. F.; Boselli, A.; den Brok, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Lisker, T.; Mentz, J. J.; Paudel, S.; Salo, H.; Sybilska, A.; Toloba, E.; van de Ven, G.; Vazdekis, A.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2018-04-01

    We determine abundance ratios of 37 dwarf ellipticals (dEs) in the nearby Virgo cluster. This sample is representative of the early-type population of galaxies in the absolute magnitude range -19.0 originate from late-type dwarfs or small spirals. Na-yields appear to be very metal-dependent, in agreement with studies of giant ellipticals, probably due to the large dependence on the neutron-excess in stars. We conclude that dEs have undergone a considerable amount of chemical evolution, they are therefore not uniformly old, but have extended SFH, similar to many of the Local Group galaxies.

  4. LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-01-01

    Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS

  5. The C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in Comet Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Lindholm, E.; Wehinger, P.A.; Peterson, B.A.; Zucconi, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The individual (C-13)N rotational lines in Comet Halley are resolved using high-resolution spectra of the CN B2Sigma(+)-X2Sigma(+) (0,0) band. The observe C-12/C-13 abundance ratio excludes a site of origin for the comet near Uranus and Neptune and suggests a condensation environment quite distinct from other solar system bodies. Two theories are presented for the origin of Comet Halley. One theory suggest that the comet originated 4.5 Gyr ago in an inner Oort cloud at a heliocentric distance greater than 100 AU where chemical fractionation led to the C-13 enrichment in the CN parent molecule prior to condensation of the comet nucleus. According to the other, more plausible theory, the comet nucleus condensed relatively recently from the interstellar medium which has become enriches in C-13 and was subsequently gravitationally captured by the solar system. 107 refs

  6. On the electron to proton mass ratio and the proton structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinhammer, Ole L.

    2013-01-01

    We derive an expression for the electron to nucleon mass ratio from a reinterpreted lattice gauge theory Hamiltonian to describe interior baryon dynamics. We use the classical electron radius as our fundamental length scale. Based on expansions on trigonometric Slater determinants for a neutral s...... and d valence quarks of the proton....

  7. Raman scattering method and apparatus for measuring isotope ratios and isotopic abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, R.C.; Bloom, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    Raman scattering is used to measure isotope ratios and/or isotopic abundances. A beam of quasi-monochromatic photons is directed onto the sample to be analyzed, and the resulting Raman-scattered photons are detected and counted for each isotopic species of interest. These photon counts are treated mathematically to yield the desired isotope ratios or isotopic abundances

  8. Proton-pumping rhodopsins are abundantly expressed by microbial eukaryotes in a high-Arctic fjord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, Anna; Laughinghouse, Haywood D; Griffiths, Colin; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Gabrielsen, Tove M

    2018-02-01

    Proton-pumping rhodopsins provide an alternative pathway to photosynthesis by which solar energy can enter the marine food web. Rhodopsin genes are widely found in marine bacteria, also in the Arctic, and were recently reported from several eukaryotic lineages. So far, little is known about rhodopsin expression in Arctic eukaryotes. In this study, we used metatranscriptomics and 18S rDNA tag sequencing to examine the mid-summer function and composition of marine protists (size 0.45-10 µm) in the high-Arctic Billefjorden (Spitsbergen), especially focussing on the expression of microbial proton-pumping rhodopsins. Rhodopsin transcripts were highly abundant, at a level similar to that of genes involved in photosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses placed the environmental rhodopsins within disparate eukaryotic lineages, including dinoflagellates, stramenopiles, haptophytes and cryptophytes. Sequence comparison indicated the presence of several functional types, including xanthorhodopsins and a eukaryotic clade of proteorhodopsin. Transcripts belonging to the proteorhodopsin clade were also abundant in published metatranscriptomes from other oceanic regions, suggesting a global distribution. The diversity and abundance of rhodopsins show that these light-driven proton pumps play an important role in Arctic microbial eukaryotes. Understanding this role is imperative to predicting the future of the Arctic marine ecosystem faced by a changing light climate due to diminishing sea-ice. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sex ratios, mating frequencies and relative abundance of sympatric millipedes in the genus Chersastus (Diplopoda: Pachybolidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ian Cooper

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Three hypotheses exist for explaining climbing behavior in millipedes: 1 waterlogging, 2 detritus limiting, and 3 mate avoidance. Data of sex ratios, mating frequency and relative abundance are provided to suggest an alternative explanation for the pattern in sympatric forest millipedes. Sex ratio differences - from equality - were tested using a G-test comparing millipedes on and above ground. Mating frequencies were calculated based on the percentage of paired individuals. Relative abundance may correlate with male-biases in the sex ratios. All three factors suggest Chersastus inscriptus has a higher reproductive potential than C. anulatus. This is evidence for mating hotspots.

  10. Neutron-to-proton ratios in pA and π+-A interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayukov, Yu.D.; Degtyarenko, P.V.; Druzhinin, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of neutron and proton yields at 120 deg have been carried out in 7.5 GeV/c pA and in 1.4 GeV/c and 5.0 GeV/c π +- A interactions. The ratios of secondary neutrons to protons are considered in detail. The ratios depend on kinetic energy of secondary nucleons and this dependence is more pronounced for heavy nuclei. Dependence of this ratios on the incident particle charge and the asymmetry resulting from a different number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus are discussed

  11. Neutron-proton matrix element ratios of 21+ states in 58,60,62,64Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalik, R.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron-proton matrix element ratios (η) for 2 1 + states of even Ni isotopes are investigated within the framework of the shell model quasiparticle random-phase approximation. The special attention is devoted to the dependence of η ratios on the radial neutron and proton ground-state density-distribution differences (Δ np ). This dependence is found to be about 0.5Δ np . The theoretical η ratios are 14-23% greater than the hydrodynamical limit. The theoretical Δ np dependence of η ratios enable us to understand the empirical η ratio results. 20 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  12. A robust and accurate binning algorithm for metagenomic sequences with arbitrary species abundance ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Henry C M; Yiu, S M; Yang, Bin; Peng, Yu; Wang, Yi; Liu, Zhihua; Chen, Jingchi; Qin, Junjie; Li, Ruiqiang; Chin, Francis Y L

    2011-06-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing techniques, metagenomics, also known as environmental genomics, has emerged as an exciting research area that enables us to analyze the microbial environment in which we live. An important step for metagenomic data analysis is the identification and taxonomic characterization of DNA fragments (reads or contigs) resulting from sequencing a sample of mixed species. This step is referred to as 'binning'. Binning algorithms that are based on sequence similarity and sequence composition markers rely heavily on the reference genomes of known microorganisms or phylogenetic markers. Due to the limited availability of reference genomes and the bias and low availability of markers, these algorithms may not be applicable in all cases. Unsupervised binning algorithms which can handle fragments from unknown species provide an alternative approach. However, existing unsupervised binning algorithms only work on datasets either with balanced species abundance ratios or rather different abundance ratios, but not both. In this article, we present MetaCluster 3.0, an integrated binning method based on the unsupervised top--down separation and bottom--up merging strategy, which can bin metagenomic fragments of species with very balanced abundance ratios (say 1:1) to very different abundance ratios (e.g. 1:24) with consistently higher accuracy than existing methods. MetaCluster 3.0 can be downloaded at http://i.cs.hku.hk/~alse/MetaCluster/.

  13. What is Neptune's D/H ratio really telling us about its water abundance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Lakhlani, Gunjan

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the deep-water abundance of Neptune using a simple two-component (core + envelope) toy model. The free parameters of the model are the total mass of heavy elements in the planet (Z), the mass fraction of Z in the envelope (fenv), and the D/H ratio of the accreted building blocks (D/Hbuild).We systematically search the allowed parameter space on a grid and constrain it using Neptune's bulk carbon abundance, D/H ratio, and interior structure models. Assuming solar C/O ratio and cometary D/H for the accreted building blocks are forming the planet, we can fit all of the constraints if less than ˜15 per cent of Z is in the envelope (f_{env}^{median} ˜ 7 per cent), and the rest is locked in a solid core. This model predicts a maximum bulk oxygen abundance in Neptune of 65× solar value. If we assume a C/O of 0.17, corresponding to clathrate-hydrates building blocks, we predict a maximum oxygen abundance of 200× solar value with a median value of ˜140. Thus, both cases lead to oxygen abundance significantly lower than the preferred value of Cavalié et al. (˜540× solar), inferred from model-dependent deep CO observations. Such high-water abundances are excluded by our simple but robust model. We attribute this discrepancy to our imperfect understanding of either the interior structure of Neptune or the chemistry of the primordial protosolar nebula.

  14. Ionization ratios and elemental abundances in the atmosphere of 68 Tauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouina, A.; Monier, R.

    2017-12-01

    We have derived the ionization ratios of twelve elements in the atmosphere of the star 68 Tauri (HD 27962) using an ATLAS9 model atmosphere with 72 layers computed for the effective temperature and surface gravity of the star. We then computed a grid of synthetic spectra generated by SYNSPEC49 based on an ATLAS9 model atmosphere in order to model one high resolution spectrum secured by one of us (RM) with the échelle spectrograph SOPHIE at Observatoire de Haute Provence. We could determine the abundances of several elements in their dominant ionization stage, including those defining the Am phenomenon. We thus provide new abundance determinations for 68 Tauri using updated accurate atomic data retrieved from the NIST database which extend previous abundance works.

  15. Ratio of Pions to Protons & Neutral to Charged Interacting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Table I values for the NP ratio calculated on the basis of formula (2) are given in the second column within brackets. It is seen that the values obtained according to formula (2) are always higher than those according to formula (). It is seen from Table that the observed value of () 99 . . for NIP excludes the probability of ...

  16. THE HCN/HNC ABUNDANCE RATIO TOWARD DIFFERENT EVOLUTIONARY PHASES OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Mihwa; Lee, Jeong-Eun [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kee-Tae, E-mail: mihwajin.sf@gmail.com, E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ktkim@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-20

    Using the H{sup 13}CN and HN{sup 13}C J = 1–0 line observations, the abundance ratio of HCN/HNC has been estimated for different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), and ultracompact H ii regions (UCH iis). IRDCs were divided into “quiescent IRDC cores (qIRDCc)” and “active IRDC cores (aIRDCc),” depending on star formation activity. The HCN/HNC ratio is known to be higher at active and high temperature regions related to ongoing star formation, compared to cold and quiescent regions. Our observations toward 8 qIRDCc, 16 aIRDCc, 23 HMPOs, and 31 UCH iis show consistent results; the ratio is 0.97 (±0.10), 2.65 (±0.88), 4.17 (±1.03), and 8.96 (±3.32) in these respective evolutionary stages, increasing from qIRDCc to UCH iis. The change of the HCN/HNC abundance ratio, therefore, seems directly associated with the evolutionary stages of star formation, which have different temperatures. One suggested explanation for this trend is the conversion of HNC to HCN, which occurs effectively at higher temperatures. To test the explanation, we performed a simple chemical model calculation. In order to fit the observed results, the energy barrier of the conversion must be much lower than the value provided by theoretical calculations.

  17. Molecular abundances and C/O ratios in chemically evolving planet-forming disk midplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eistrup, Christian; Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2018-05-01

    Context. Exoplanet atmospheres are thought be built up from accretion of gas as well as pebbles and planetesimals in the midplanes of planet-forming disks. The chemical composition of this material is usually assumed to be unchanged during the disk lifetime. However, chemistry can alter the relative abundances of molecules in this planet-building material. Aims: We aim to assess the impact of disk chemistry during the era of planet formation. This is done by investigating the chemical changes to volatile gases and ices in a protoplanetary disk midplane out to 30 AU for up to 7 Myr, considering a variety of different conditions, including a physical midplane structure that is evolving in time, and also considering two disks with different masses. Methods: An extensive kinetic chemistry gas-grain reaction network was utilised to evolve the abundances of chemical species over time. Two disk midplane ionisation levels (low and high) were explored, as well as two different makeups of the initial abundances ("inheritance" or "reset"). Results: Given a high level of ionisation, chemical evolution in protoplanetary disk midplanes becomes significant after a few times 105 yr, and is still ongoing by 7 Myr between the H2O and the O2 icelines. Inside the H2O iceline, and in the outer, colder regions of the disk midplane outside the O2 iceline, the relative abundances of the species reach (close to) steady state by 7 Myr. Importantly, the changes in the abundances of the major elemental carbon and oxygen-bearing molecules imply that the traditional "stepfunction" for the C/O ratios in gas and ice in the disk midplane (as defined by sharp changes at icelines of H2O, CO2 and CO) evolves over time, and cannot be assumed fixed, with the C/O ratio in the gas even becoming smaller than the C/O ratio in the ice. In addition, at lower temperatures (C/O ratios of exoplanets to where and how the atmospheres have formed in a disk midplane, chemical evolution needs to be considered and

  18. Neutron-proton ratios of collective quadrupole matrix elements in even Fe and Cr isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antalik, R.

    1989-01-01

    M n /M p ratios are investigated within the QRPA framework for the low-lying quadrupole states and for isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in 54,56,58 Fe and 50,52,54 Cr. Theoretical results for 2 l ? + states are in good agreement with empirical ones obtained from recent proton and pion inelastic scattering studies. 16 refs.; 3 tabs

  19. Measurement of transparency ratios for protons from short-range correlated pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, O.; Hakobyan, H.; Shneor, R.; Piasetzky, E.; Weinstein, L. B.; Brooks, W. K.; May-Tal Beck, S.; Gilad, S.; Korover, I.; Beck, A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Arrington, J. R.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Mustapha, B.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, X.; Zonta, I.

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear transparency, Tp (A), is a measure of the average probability for a struck proton to escape the nucleus without significant re-interaction. Previously, nuclear transparencies were extracted for quasi-elastic A (e ,e‧ p) knockout of protons with momentum below the Fermi momentum, where the spectral functions are well known. In this Letter we extract a novel observable, the transparency ratio, Tp (A) /Tp(12 C), for knockout of high-missing-momentum protons from the breakup of short-range correlated pairs (2N-SRC) in Al, Fe and Pb nuclei relative to C. The ratios were measured at momentum transfer Q2 ⩾ 1.5(GeV /c) 2 and xB ⩾ 1.2 where the reaction is expected to be dominated by electron scattering from 2N-SRC. The transparency ratios of the knocked-out protons coming from 2N-SRC breakup are 20-30% lower than those of previous results for low missing momentum. They agree with Glauber calculations and agree with renormalization of the previously published transparencies as proposed by recent theoretical investigations. The new transparencies scale as A - 1 / 3, which is consistent with dominance of scattering from nucleons at the nuclear surface.

  20. A COMPARISON OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN SEP EVENTS IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Tylka, A. J.; Reames, D. V.

    2009-01-01

    The solar energetic (E > 1 MeV nucleon -1 ) particles (SEPs) observed in gradual events at 1 AU are assumed to be accelerated by coronal/interplanetary shocks from ambient thermal or suprathermal seed particles. If so, then the elemental abundances of SEPs produced in different solar wind (SW) stream types (transient, fast, and slow) might be systematically distinguished from each other. We look for these differences in SEP energy spectra and in elemental abundance ratios (including Mg/Ne and Fe/C, which compare low/high first ionization potential elements), in a large number of SEP time intervals over the past solar cycle. The SW regions are characterized by the three-component stream classification of Richardson et al. Our survey shows no significant compositional or energy spectral differences in the 5-10 MeV nucleon -1 range for SEP events of different SW stream types. This result extends the earlier finding that SEP events are observed frequently in fast SW streams, although their higher Alfven and SW flow speeds should constrain SEP production by coronal mass ejection-driven shocks in those regions. We discuss the implications of our results for shock seed populations and cross-field propagation.

  1. RECONSTRUCTING THE ACCRETION HISTORY OF THE GALACTIC STELLAR HALO FROM CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE RATIO DISTRIBUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Duane M.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Sen, Bodhisattva; Jessop, Will

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies of halo stars during the past two decades have placed some limits on the quantity and nature of accreted dwarf galaxy contributions to the Milky Way (MW) stellar halo by typically utilizing stellar phase-space information to identify the most recent halo accretion events. In this study we tested the prospects of using 2D chemical abundance ratio distributions (CARDs) found in stars of the stellar halo to determine its formation history. First, we used simulated data from 11 “MW-like” halos to generate satellite template sets (STSs) of 2D CARDs of accreted dwarf satellites, which are composed of accreted dwarfs from various mass regimes and epochs of accretion. Next, we randomly drew samples of ∼10 3–4 mock observations of stellar chemical abundance ratios ([α/Fe], [Fe/H]) from those 11 halos to generate samples of the underlying densities for our CARDs to be compared to our templates in our analysis. Finally, we used the expectation-maximization algorithm to derive accretion histories in relation to the STS used and the sample size. For certain STSs used we typically can identify the relative mass contributions of all accreted satellites to within a factor of two. We also find that this method is particularly sensitive to older accretion events involving low-luminosity dwarfs, e.g., ultra-faint dwarfs—precisely those events that are too ancient to be seen by phase-space studies of stars and too faint to be seen by high-z studies of the early universe. Since our results only exploit two chemical dimensions and near-future surveys promise to provide ∼6–9 dimensions, we conclude that these new high-resolution spectroscopic surveys of the stellar halo will allow us to recover its accretion history—and the luminosity function of infalling dwarf galaxies—across cosmic time

  2. RECONSTRUCTING THE ACCRETION HISTORY OF THE GALACTIC STELLAR HALO FROM CHEMICAL ABUNDANCE RATIO DISTRIBUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Duane M. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027 (United States); Sen, Bodhisattva; Jessop, Will, E-mail: duane@shao.ac.cn [Department of Statistics, Columbia University, New York City, NY 10027 (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Observational studies of halo stars during the past two decades have placed some limits on the quantity and nature of accreted dwarf galaxy contributions to the Milky Way (MW) stellar halo by typically utilizing stellar phase-space information to identify the most recent halo accretion events. In this study we tested the prospects of using 2D chemical abundance ratio distributions (CARDs) found in stars of the stellar halo to determine its formation history. First, we used simulated data from 11 “MW-like” halos to generate satellite template sets (STSs) of 2D CARDs of accreted dwarf satellites, which are composed of accreted dwarfs from various mass regimes and epochs of accretion. Next, we randomly drew samples of ∼10{sup 3–4} mock observations of stellar chemical abundance ratios ([α/Fe], [Fe/H]) from those 11 halos to generate samples of the underlying densities for our CARDs to be compared to our templates in our analysis. Finally, we used the expectation-maximization algorithm to derive accretion histories in relation to the STS used and the sample size. For certain STSs used we typically can identify the relative mass contributions of all accreted satellites to within a factor of two. We also find that this method is particularly sensitive to older accretion events involving low-luminosity dwarfs, e.g., ultra-faint dwarfs—precisely those events that are too ancient to be seen by phase-space studies of stars and too faint to be seen by high-z studies of the early universe. Since our results only exploit two chemical dimensions and near-future surveys promise to provide ∼6–9 dimensions, we conclude that these new high-resolution spectroscopic surveys of the stellar halo will allow us to recover its accretion history—and the luminosity function of infalling dwarf galaxies—across cosmic time.

  3. THE BORON-TO-CARBON ABUNDANCE RATIO AND GALACTIC PROPAGATION OF COSMIC RADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermeier, A.; Boyle, P.; Müller, D.; Hörandel, J.

    2012-01-01

    In two long-duration balloon flights in 2003 and 2006, the TRACER cosmic-ray detector has measured the energy spectra and the absolute intensities of the cosmic-ray nuclei from boron (Z = 5) to iron (Z = 26) up to very high energies. In particular, the second flight has led to results on the energy spectrum of the secondary boron nuclei, and on the boron abundance relative to that of the heavier primary parent nuclei, commonly quantified as the 'B/C abundance ratio'. The energy dependence of this ratio, now available up to about 2 TeV amu –1 , provides a measure for the energy dependence of cosmic-ray propagation through the Galaxy, and for the shape of the cosmic-ray source energy spectrum. We use a Leaky-Box approximation of cosmic-ray propagation to obtain constraints on the relevant parameters on the basis of the results of TRACER and of other measurements. This analysis suggests that the source energy spectrum is a relatively soft power law in energy E –α , with spectral exponent α = 2.37 ± 0.12, and that the propagation path length Λ(E) is described by a power law in energy with exponent δ = 0.53 ± 0.06, but may assume a constant residual value Λ 0 at high energy. The value of Λ 0 is not well constrained but should be less than about 0.8 g cm –2 . Finally, we compare the data with numerical solutions of a diffusive reacceleration model, which also indicates a soft source spectrum.

  4. The ratio of structure functions for the neutron and the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballintijn, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the ratio of the structure functions F 2 of the deuteron and the proton. The structure function ratio is measured by the NMC with high precision due to a dedicated target setup. In this thesis the analysis is presented of the data taken in 1989, which were obtained using incident muon energies of 120, 200 and 280 GeV. These data complement the results from earlier measurements performed in 1986 and 1987 which were obtained at 90 and 280 GeV incident muon energy. The newly determined structure function ratio, in a slightly extended range of the scaling parameter x, is compared to the previous one and is found to be in good agreement. All data are combined to give the most accurate determination of the structure function ratio to date. The results are used to determine the dependence of the structure function ratio on the value of Q 2 , the scale at which the nucleon is probed. Finally, the structure function ratios obtained at four different incident muon energies separately, are used to determine the difference R d -R p , where R is the ratio of cross sections for the absorption of longitudinally and transversely polarized virtual photons. The difference in R for the deuteron and the proton is related to differences in the gluon distribution. The result is compatible with a gluon distribution that is identical for the deuteron and the proton. The degree of equality of R d and R p is a measure for the correctness of the procedure to extract structure function ratios. The present result is R d -R p =0.02±0.02 and hence compatible with zero. (orig.)

  5. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. DETAILED ABUNDANCE RATIOS AT LARGE RADIUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Gunn, James E.; Raskutti, Sudhir [Department of Astrophysics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl [Department of Astronomy, UT Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 71712 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    We study the radial dependence in stellar populations of 33 nearby early-type galaxies with central stellar velocity dispersions σ{sub *} ∼> 150 km s{sup –1}. We measure stellar population properties in composite spectra, and use ratios of these composites to highlight the largest spectral changes as a function of radius. Based on stellar population modeling, the typical star at 2R{sub e} is old (∼10 Gyr), relatively metal-poor ([Fe/H] ≈ –0.5), and α-enhanced ([Mg/Fe] ≈ 0.3). The stars were made rapidly at z ≈ 1.5-2 in shallow potential wells. Declining radial gradients in [C/Fe], which follow [Fe/H], also arise from rapid star formation timescales due to declining carbon yields from low-metallicity massive stars. In contrast, [N/Fe] remains high at large radius. Stars at large radius have different abundance ratio patterns from stars in the center of any present-day galaxy, but are similar to average Milky Way thick disk stars. Our observations are thus consistent with a picture in which the stellar outskirts are built up through minor mergers with disky galaxies whose star formation is truncated early (z ≈ 1.5-2)

  6. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Colburn, Heather A.; Moran, James J.; Melville, Angela M.

    2009-12-01

    employing a quadrupole MS system for compound identification and an isotope ratio MS for measuring the stable isotope ratios of deuterium and hydrogen (D/H) in fatty acids. Finally, the method for analyzing the compound abundance data is included. This study indicates that removal of ricinoleic acid is a conserved consequence of each processing step we tested. Furthermore, the stable isotope D/H ratio of ricinoleic acid distinguished between two of the three castor seed sources. Concentrations of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucosamine and myo-inositol differentiated between crude or acetone extracted samples and samples produced by protein precipitation. Taken together these data illustrate the ability to distinguish between processes used to purify a ricin sample as well as potentially the source seeds.

  7. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2009-12-01

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio µpGEp/GMp in the range Q2 = 0.3–0.7 GeV2/c2 was performed using recoil polarimetry in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low Q2 range, previous data from LEDEX [5] along with many fits and calculations [2, 3, 4] indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. In this new measurement, with 80% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve <1% statistical uncertainty. Preliminary results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, indicating a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and strangeness form factors through parity violation experiments.

  8. Hyperfine Induced Transitions as Diagnostics of Low Density Plasmas and Isotopic Abundance ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brage, T.; Judge, P. G.; Aboussaid, A.; Godefroid, M. R.; Jonsson, P.; Leckrone, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    We propose a new diagnostics of isotope abundance ratios and electron densities for low density plasmas, in the form of J = 0 -> J(') = 0 radiative transitions. These are usually viewed as being allowed only through two-photon decay, but they may also be induced by the hyperfine (HPF) interaction in atomic ions. This predicts a companion line to the E1] and M2 lines in the UV0.01 multiplet of ions isoelectronic to beryllium (e.g. C III, N IV, O V and Fe XXII) or magnesium (e.g. Si II, Ca IX, Fe XV and Ni XVII). As an example the companion line to the well known lambda lambda 1906.7,1908.7 lines in C III will be at 1909.597 Angstroms, but only present in the (13) C isotope (which has nuclear spin different from zero). We present new and accurate decay rates for the nsnp (3P^oJ) -> ns(2) (1S_{J('}=0)) transitions in ions of the Be (n=2) and Mg (n=3) isoelectronic sequences. We show that the HPF induced decay rates for the J = 0 -> J(') = 0 transitions are many orders of magnitude larger than those for the competing two-photon processes and, when present, are typically one or two orders of magnitude smaller than the decay rates of the magnetic quadrupole ( J = 2-> J(') = 0) transitions for these ions. We show that several of these HPF-induced transitions are of potential astrophysical interest, in ions of C, N, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Cr, Fe and Ni. We highlight those cases that may be of particular diagnostic value for determining isotopic abundance ratios and/or electron densities from UV or EUV emission line data. We present our atomic data in the form of scaling laws so that, given the isotopic nuclear spin and magnetic moment, a simple expression yields estimates for HPF induced decay rates. We examine some UV solar and nebular data in the light of these new results and suggest possible cases for future study. We could not find evidence for the existence of HPF induced lines in the spectra we examined, but we demonstrate that existing data have come close to providing

  9. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE HF/H{sub 2} ABUNDANCE RATIO IN INTERSTELLAR GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seifahrt, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Richter, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We report the first detection of the v = 1-0, R(0) ro-vibrational transition of HF at 2.499385 {mu}m arising from interstellar gas. The line is seen in absorption toward three background sources-HD 154368, Elias 29, and AFGL 2136 IRS 1-all of which have reported H{sub 2} column densities determined from observations of H{sub 2}. This allows for the first direct determination of the HF/H{sub 2} abundance ratio. We find values of N(HF)/N(H{sub 2}) = 1.15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} and 0.69 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} for HD 154368 and Elias 29, respectively. The sight line toward AFGL 2136 IRS 1 also shows absorption from the v = 1-0, R(1) transition of HF, indicating warm, dense (n {sub H} {approx}> 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) gas, likely very close to the central protostar. Ascribing portions of the HF absorption to warm and cold gas, we find N(HF)/N(H{sub 2}) = (1.7-2.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} and (0.33-0.58) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} for the two components, respectively. Except for the warm component toward AFGL 2136 IRS 1, all observed HF/H{sub 2} ratios are well below N(HF)/N(H{sub 2}) = 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, the value predicted if nearly all gas phase fluorine is in the form of HF. Models of fluorine chemistry that account for depletion onto grains are able to reproduce the results toward HD 154368, but not in the cold, dense gas toward AFGL 2136 IRS 1 and Elias 29. Most likely, some combinations of simplifying assumptions made in the chemical models are responsible for these discrepancies.

  10. Use of proton-enhanced, natural abundance /sup 13/C NMR to study the molecular dynamics of model and biological membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornell, B A [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, North Ryde (Australia). Div. of Food Research; Keniry, M [Sydney Univ. (Australia). Dept. of Physical Chemistry; Hiller, R G [Macquarie Univ., North Ryde (Australia). School of Biological Sciences; Smith, R [La Trobe Univ., Bundoora (Australia). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1980-06-16

    Proton-enhanced NMR of the natural abundance /sup 13/C nuclei is used to study the lipid mobility in dispersions containing cholesterol, the polypeptide gramicidin A, and in membrane proparations derived from spinach chloroplasts and bovine brain myelin.

  11. Investigation of L X-ray intensity ratios in Pt induced by proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Manpuneet; Kaur, Mandeep; Mohan, Harsh; Jain, Arvind Kumar; Singh, Parjit S.; Vohra, Neelam; Sharma, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    A survey of literature on L X-ray parameters inspires us for taking up the present investigation. These parameters are useful to study atomic properties. In view of this, we report L X-ray intensity ratios for Pt, namely, L ℓ / L α , L β / L α and L γ / L α with proton collisions over the energy range 260 - 400 keV with an interval of 20 keV. The intention of research presented in this paper is to explore their energy dependence and comparison with theoretical calculations. These analyses will yield a data in the low energy region which assist in better clarity of proton induced X-ray emission phenomenon

  12. Exploring the 13CO/C18O abundance ratio towards Galactic young stellar objects and HII regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areal, M. B.; Paron, S.; Celis Peña, M.; Ortega, M. E.

    2018-05-01

    Aims: Determining molecular abundance ratios is important not only for the study of Galactic chemistry, but also because they are useful to estimate physical parameters in a large variety of interstellar medium environments. One of the most important molecules for tracing the molecular gas in the interstellar medium is CO, and the 13CO/C18O abundance ratio is usually used to estimate molecular masses and densities of regions with moderate to high densities. Nowadays isotope ratios are in general indirectly derived from elemental abundances ratios. We present the first 13CO/C18O abundance ratio study performed from CO isotope observations towards a large sample of Galactic sources of different natures at different locations. Methods: To study the 13CO/C18O abundance ratio, we used 12CO J = 3 - 2 data obtained from the CO High-Resolution Survey, 13CO and C18O J = 3 - 2 data from the 13CO/C18O (J = 3 - 2) Heterodyne Inner Milky Way Plane Survey, and some complementary data extracted from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope database. We analyzed a sample of 198 sources composed of young stellar objects (YSOs), and HII and diffuse HII regions as catalogued in the Red MSX Source Survey in 27.°5 ≤ l ≤ 46.°5 and |b|0.°5. Results: Most of the analyzed sources are located in the galactocentric distance range 4.0-6.5 kpc. We found that YSOs have, on average, lower 13CO/C18O abundance ratios than HII and diffuse HII regions. Taking into account that the gas associated with YSOs should be less affected by the radiation than in the case of the others sources, selective far-UV photodissociation of C18O is confirmed. The 13CO/C18O abundance ratios obtained in this work are systematically lower than those predicted from the known elemental abundance relations. These results will be useful in future studies of molecular gas related to YSOs and HII regions based on the observation of these isotopes.

  13. Study of nuclear effects in the deuteron and extraction of neutron to proton stucture function ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, A.; Rock, S.E.

    1991-06-01

    We performed a combined analysis of electron, muon, neutrino, and anti-neutrino deep inelastic scattering structure functions of hydrogen and deuterium, within the framework of quark-parton model. The neutron to proton structure function ratio was obtained using three different techniques: electron and muon scattering experiments on deuterium and hydrogen by using traditional Fermi motion corrections; extrapolation of the EMC effect on heavy targets to deuterium and free nucleons; and using Be and C data. At high x there is a disagreement between these data. 10 refs., 2 figs

  14. Impact Parameter Dependence of the Double Neutron/Proton Ratio of Nucleon Emissions in Isotopic Reaction Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xun-Chao, Zhang; Gao-Chan, Yong; Bao-An, Li; Lie-Wen, Chen

    2009-01-01

    Within the transport model IBUU04, we investigate the double neutron/proton ratio of free nucleons taken from two reaction systems using two Sn isotopes at a beam energy of 50 MeV/nucleon and with impact parameters 2 fm, 4 fm and 8 fm, respectively. It is found that the double neutron/proton ratio from peripheral collisions is more sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy than those from mid-central and central collisions. (nuclear physics)

  15. Extreme abundance ratios in the polluted atmosphere of the cool white dwarf NLTT 19868

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kawka, Adela; Vennes, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 458, č. 1 (2016), s. 325-331 ISSN 0035-8711 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : diffusion * stars * abundances Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  16. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Friel, Eileen D.

    2012-01-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [α/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance ( –1 ), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R GC GC > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age ( –1 ). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [α/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

  17. Utilization of glutamate/creatine ratios for proton spectroscopic diagnosis of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazany, Saman; Hesselink, John R.; Healy, John F.; Imbesi, Steven G.

    2007-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the potential of metabolites other than alanine to diagnose intracranial meningiomas on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Using a 1.5-T MR system the lesions were initially identified on FLAIR, and T1- and T2-weighted images. Employing standard point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) for single voxel proton MRS (TR 1500 ms, TE 30 ms, 128 acquisitions, voxel size 2 x 2 x 2 cm, acquisition time 3.12 min), MR spectra were obtained from 5 patients with meningiomas, from 20 with other intracranial lesions, and from 4 normal controls. Peak heights of nine resonances, including lipid, lactate, alanine, NAA (N-acetylaspartate), β/γ-Glx (glutamate + glutamine), creatine, choline, myo-inositol, and α-Glx/glutathione, were measured in all spectra. The relative quantity of each metabolite was measured as the ratio of its peak height to the peak height of creatine. Relative quantities of α-Glx/glutathione, β/γ-Glx, and total Glx/glutathione were significantly elevated in meningiomas compared to the 20 other intracranial lesions and the normal control brains. Alanine was found in four of five meningiomas, but lactate partially masked the alanine in three meningiomas. None of the other lesions or control brains showed an alanine peak. The one meningioma with no alanine and the three others with lactate had elevated Glx. While alanine is a relatively unique marker for meningioma, our results support the hypothesis that the combination of glutamate/creatine ratios and alanine on proton MRS is more specific and reliable for the diagnosis of meningiomas than alanine alone. (orig.)

  18. Utilization of glutamate/creatine ratios for proton spectroscopic diagnosis of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazany, Saman [University of California, School of Medicine, San Diego, CA (United States); Hesselink, John R.; Healy, John F.; Imbesi, Steven G. [UCSD Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Our purpose was to determine the potential of metabolites other than alanine to diagnose intracranial meningiomas on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Using a 1.5-T MR system the lesions were initially identified on FLAIR, and T1- and T2-weighted images. Employing standard point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) for single voxel proton MRS (TR 1500 ms, TE 30 ms, 128 acquisitions, voxel size 2 x 2 x 2 cm, acquisition time 3.12 min), MR spectra were obtained from 5 patients with meningiomas, from 20 with other intracranial lesions, and from 4 normal controls. Peak heights of nine resonances, including lipid, lactate, alanine, NAA (N-acetylaspartate), {beta}/{gamma}-Glx (glutamate + glutamine), creatine, choline, myo-inositol, and {alpha}-Glx/glutathione, were measured in all spectra. The relative quantity of each metabolite was measured as the ratio of its peak height to the peak height of creatine. Relative quantities of {alpha}-Glx/glutathione, {beta}/{gamma}-Glx, and total Glx/glutathione were significantly elevated in meningiomas compared to the 20 other intracranial lesions and the normal control brains. Alanine was found in four of five meningiomas, but lactate partially masked the alanine in three meningiomas. None of the other lesions or control brains showed an alanine peak. The one meningioma with no alanine and the three others with lactate had elevated Glx. While alanine is a relatively unique marker for meningioma, our results support the hypothesis that the combination of glutamate/creatine ratios and alanine on proton MRS is more specific and reliable for the diagnosis of meningiomas than alanine alone. (orig.)

  19. Study of the ratios of neutrino inclusive cross sections on neutron and proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, T.

    1980-01-01

    Here is a study of two bubble chamber experiments done at the CERN neutrino beams. The first, using 1 to 10 GeV neutrinos interacting in Gargamelle filled with propane, yields, after an original separation of neutron and proton interactions, to a cross section ratio of 2.07+-0.15 for charged current and 0.74+-0.15 for inelastic neutral current. The secondly using 15 to 200 GeV neutrinos reacting in BEBC filled with neon and implemented with a liquid hydrogen target, yields, by a comparison of both medium, to a cross section ratio of 1.98+-0.19 and to an indication of it increase as a function of the Bjorken x [fr

  20. Ex vivo validation of a stoichiometric dual energy CT proton stopping power ratio calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunhe; Ainsley, Christopher; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; McDonough, James; Solberg, Timothy D.; Lin, Alexander; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2018-03-01

    A major source of uncertainty in proton therapy is the conversion of Hounsfield unit (HU) to proton stopping power ratio relative to water (SPR). In this study, we measured and quantified the accuracy of a stoichiometric dual energy CT (DECT) SPR calibration. We applied a stoichiometric DECT calibration method to derive the SPR using CT images acquired sequentially at 80 kVp and 140 kVp . The dual energy index was derived based on the HUs of the paired spectral images and used to calculate the effective atomic number (Z eff), relative electron density ({{ρ }e} ), and SPRs of phantom and biological materials. Two methods were used to verify the derived SPRs. The first method measured the sample’s water equivalent thicknesses to deduce the SPRs using a multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) device. The second method utilized Gafchromic EBT3 film to directly compare relative ranges between sample and water after proton pencil beam irradiation. Ex vivo validation was performed using five different types of frozen animal tissues with the MLIC and three types of fresh animal tissues using film. In addition, the residual ranges recorded on the film were used to compare with those from the treatment planning system using both DECT and SECT derived SPRs. Bland-Altman analysis indicates that the differences between DECT and SPR measurement of tissue surrogates, frozen and fresh animal tissues has a mean of 0.07% and standard deviation of 0.58% compared to 0.55% and 1.94% respectively for single energy CT (SECT) and SPR measurement. Our ex vivo study indicates that the stoichiometric DECT SPR calibration method has the potential to be more accurate than SECT calibration under ideal conditions although beam hardening effects and other image artifacts may increase this uncertainty.

  1. Accurate prediction of the ammonia probes of a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Thiel, W.; Špirko, V.

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive study of the mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of 14NH3, 15NH3, 14ND3 and 15ND3 is carried out variationally using the TROVE approach. Variational calculations are robust and accurate, offering a new way to compute sensitivity coefficients. Particular attention is paid to the Δk = ±3 transitions between the accidentally coinciding rotation-inversion energy levels of the ν2 = 0+, 0-, 1+ and 1- states, and the inversion transitions in the ν4 = 1 state affected by the `giant' l-type doubling effect. These transitions exhibit highly anomalous sensitivities, thus appearing as promising probes of a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ. Moreover, a simultaneous comparison of the calculated sensitivities reveals a sizeable isotopic dependence which could aid an exclusive ammonia detection.

  2. High-precision comparison of the antiproton-to-proton charge-to-mass ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, S; Smorra, C; Mooser, A; Franke, K; Nagahama, H; Schneider, G; Higuchi, T; Van Gorp, S; Blaum, K; Matsuda, Y; Quint, W; Walz, J; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-08-13

    Invariance under the charge, parity, time-reversal (CPT) transformation is one of the fundamental symmetries of the standard model of particle physics. This CPT invariance implies that the fundamental properties of antiparticles and their matter-conjugates are identical, apart from signs. There is a deep link between CPT invariance and Lorentz symmetry--that is, the laws of nature seem to be invariant under the symmetry transformation of spacetime--although it is model dependent. A number of high-precision CPT and Lorentz invariance tests--using a co-magnetometer, a torsion pendulum and a maser, among others--have been performed, but only a few direct high-precision CPT tests that compare the fundamental properties of matter and antimatter are available. Here we report high-precision cyclotron frequency comparisons of a single antiproton and a negatively charged hydrogen ion (H(-)) carried out in a Penning trap system. From 13,000 frequency measurements we compare the charge-to-mass ratio for the antiproton (q/m)p- to that for the proton (q/m)p and obtain (q/m)p-/(q/m)p − 1 =1(69) × 10(-12). The measurements were performed at cyclotron frequencies of 29.6 megahertz, so our result shows that the CPT theorem holds at the atto-electronvolt scale. Our precision of 69 parts per trillion exceeds the energy resolution of previous antiproton-to-proton mass comparisons as well as the respective figure of merit of the standard model extension by a factor of four. In addition, we give a limit on sidereal variations in the measured ratio of baryonic antimatter, and it sets a new limit on the gravitational anomaly parameter of |α − 1| < 8.7 × 10(-7).

  3. Influence of Biofield Energy Treatment on Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Aniline Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Gopal; Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar; Trivedi, Dahryn; Branton, Alice

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 15N/14N ≡ (PM+1)/PM in aniline; and (PM+1)/PM and 81Br/79Br ≡ (PM+2)/PM in 4-bromoaniline using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Aniline and 4-bromoaniline samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control part remained as untreated, while the treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment. The treated samples we...

  4. Influence of Biofield Energy Treatment on Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Aniline Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi , Mahendra Kumar; Branton , Alice; Trivedi , Dahryn; Nayak , Gopal; Saikia , Gunin; Jana , Snehasis

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 15N/14N ≡ (PM+1)/PM in aniline; and (PM+1)/PM and 81Br/79Br ≡ (PM+2)/PM in 4-bromoaniline using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Aniline and 4-bromoaniline samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control part remained as untreated, while the treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment...

  5. Influence of Biofield Energy Treatment on Isotopic Abundance Ratio in Aniline Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra, Trivedi; Alice, Branton; Dahryn, Trivedi; Gopal, Nayak

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on the isotopic abundance of 13C/12C or 2H/1H or 15N/14N ≡ (PM+1)/PM in aniline; and (PM+1)/PM and 81Br/79Br ≡ (PM+2)/PM in 4-bromoaniline using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Aniline and 4-bromoaniline samples were divided into two parts: control and treated. The control part remained as untreated, while the treated part was subjected to Mr. Trivedi's biofield energy treatment. The treated samples we...

  6. Dose ratio proton radiography using the proximal side of the Bragg peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolan, P. J., E-mail: paul.doolan.09@ucl.ac.uk; Royle, G.; Gibson, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lu, H.-M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Prieels, D.; Bentefour, E. H. [Ion Beam Applications (IBA), 3 Chemin du Cyclotron, Louvain la Neuve B-1348 (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In recent years, there has been a movement toward single-detector proton radiography, due to its potential ease of implementation within the clinical environment. One such single-detector technique is the dose ratio method in which the dose maps from two pristine Bragg peaks are recorded beyond the patient. To date, this has only been investigated on the distal side of the lower energy Bragg peak, due to the sharp falloff. The authors investigate the limits and applicability of the dose ratio method on the proximal side of the lower energy Bragg peak, which has the potential to allow a much wider range of water-equivalent thicknesses (WET) to be imaged. Comparisons are made with the use of the distal side of the Bragg peak. Methods: Using the analytical approximation for the Bragg peak, the authors generated theoretical dose ratio curves for a range of energy pairs, and then determined how an uncertainty in the dose ratio would translate to a spread in the WET estimate. By defining this spread as the accuracy one could achieve in the WET estimate, the authors were able to generate lookup graphs of the range on the proximal side of the Bragg peak that one could reliably use. These were dependent on the energy pair, noise level in the dose ratio image and the required accuracy in the WET. Using these lookup graphs, the authors investigated the applicability of the technique for a range of patient treatment sites. The authors validated the theoretical approach with experimental measurements using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor active pixel sensor (CMOS APS), by imaging a small sapphire sphere in a high energy proton beam. Results: Provided the noise level in the dose ratio image was 1% or less, a larger spread of WETs could be imaged using the proximal side of the Bragg peak (max 5.31 cm) compared to the distal side (max 2.42 cm). In simulation, it was found that, for a pediatric brain, it is possible to use the technique to image a region with a

  7. The interstellar lithium abundance and the 7Li/6Li ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlet, R.; Dennefeld, M.

    1985-01-01

    The λ 6708 doublet of interstellar Li I has been observed at high spectral resolution (3.km s -1 ) and very good signal to noise ratio (∼ 4000) towards δ Sco and ζ Oph. Using a profile fitting method, we derive for the first time outside the solar system a 7 Li/ 6 Li ratio of 38 for a diffuse cloud in front of ζ Oph. Even the lower limit of the error bar is incompatible with the ratio measured in meteorites and is not explained by recent models of galactic evolution. The existence of a local inhomogeneity is suggested. Finally, as for other alkalis, lithium is depleted on to dust grains in the diffuse interstellar medium [fr

  8. Water Table Depth Reconstruction in Ombrotrophic Peatlands Using Biomarker Abundance Ratios and Compound-Specific Hydrogen Isotope Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J. E.; Jackson, S. T.; Booth, R. K.; Pendall, E. G.; Huang, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Sediment cores from ombrotrophic peat bogs provide sensitive records of changes in precipitation/evaporation (P/E) balance. Various proxies have been developed to reconstruct surface moisture conditions in peat bogs, including testate amoebae, plant macrofossils, and peat humification. Studying species composition of testate amoeba assemblages is time consuming and requires specialized training. Humification index can be influenced by environmental factors other than moisture balance. The plant macrofossil proxy is less quantitative and cannot be performed on highly decomposed samples. We demonstrate that the ratio of C23 alkane to C29 alkane abundance may provide a simple alternative or complementary means of tracking peatland water-table depth. Data for this proxy can be collected quickly using a small sample (100 mg dry). Water-table depth decreases during drought, and abundance of Sphagnum, the dominant peat-forming genus, decreases as vascular plants increase. Sphagnum moss produces mainly medium chain-length alkanes (C21-C25) while vascular plants (grasses and shrubs) produce primarily longer chain-length alkanes (C27-C31). Therefore, C23:C29 n-alkane ratios quantitatively track the water table depth fluctuations in peat bogs. We compared C23:C29 n-alkane ratios in a core from Minden Bog (southeastern Michigan) with water table depth reconstructions based on testate-amoeba assemblages and humification. The 184-cm core spans the past ~3kyr of continuous peat deposition in the bog. Our results indicate that the alkane ratios closely track the water table depth variations, with C29 most abundant during droughts. We also explored the use of D/H ratios in Sphagnum biomarkers as a water-table depth proxy. Compound-specific hydrogen isotope ratio analyses were performed on Sphagnum biomarkers: C23 and C25 alkane and C24 acid. Dry periods are represented in these records by an enrichment of deuterium in these Sphagnum-specific compounds. These events also correlate

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abundance ratio for 5 local stellar associations (Reddy+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A. B. S.; Lambert, D. L.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we have performed a homogeneous and a comprehensive abundance analysis using high-resolution spectroscopy. High-resolution and high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of the program stars were obtained during the nights of 2015 February 10-11 with the Robert G. Tull coude cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph (Tull et al. 1995PASP..107..251T) of the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith reflector at the McDonald Observatory. We employed a Tektronix 2048x2048 24 μm pixel, backside illuminated and anti-reflection coated CCD as a detector and an R2 echelle grating with 52.67 grooves/mm with exposures centred at 5060 Å. (7 data files).

  10. Measurement of the proton form factor ratio at low momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Moshe [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-08-01

    Experiment E08-007-II measured the proton elastic form factor ratio μGE=GM in the momentum transfer range of Q2 ~ 0.02 - 0.08 GeV2, the lowest ever measured by polarization transfer techniques. The experiment was performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia, USA during 2012. A polarized electron beam with energies of 1.1, 1.7, and 2.2 GeV was elastically scattered off a polarized solid NH3 target. The asymmetries between the cross section of positive and negative helicity states of the beam were determined. These asymmetries can be used to determine the form factor ratio. In this thesis, we present the asymmetry analysis of the experiment, discuss the main challenges and show preliminary results for part of the data. Preliminary asymmetries indicate an increase in the form factor ratio above unity. However, a complete analysis is required before any conclusion can be made. Further analysis is ongoing, and final asymmetry results and form factor extraction is expected during 2017. We also present first results for 14N asymmetries for elastic and quasi-elastic scattering. The measured asymmetries are in agreement with the shell model approximation, within the low accuracy of the measurement. A change in the asymmetry sign between the elastic and the quasi-elastic processes is seen, and should motivate further theoretical studies. These experimental asymmetries will also be useful for systematic studies of other experiments using polarized NH3 targets.

  11. Spot Scanning and Passive Scattering Proton Therapy: Relative Biological Effectiveness and Oxygen Enhancement Ratio in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Shingo; Yamada, Maho; Shibata, Hiroki; Yasui, Keisuke; Toshito, Toshiyuki; Omachi, Chihiro; Tatekawa, Kotoha; Manabe, Yoshihiko; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and contribution of the indirect effect of spot scanning proton beams, passive scattering proton beams, or both in cultured cells in comparison with clinically used photons. The RBE of passive scattering proton beams at the center of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) was determined from dose-survival curves in 4 cell lines using 6-MV X rays as controls. Survival of 2 cell lines after spot scanning and passive scattering proton irradiation was then compared. Biological effects at the distal end region of the SOBP were also investigated. The OER of passive scattering proton beams and 6 MX X rays were investigated in 2 cell lines. The RBE and OER values were estimated at a 10% cell survival level. The maximum degree of protection of radiation effects by dimethyl sulfoxide was determined to estimate the contribution of the indirect effect against DNA damage. All experiments comparing protons and X rays were made under the same biological conditions. The RBE values of passive scattering proton beams in the 4 cell lines examined were 1.01 to 1.22 (average, 1.14) and were almost identical to those of spot scanning beams. Biological effects increased at the distal end of the SOBP. In the 2 cell lines examined, the OER was 2.74 (95% confidence interval, 2.56-2.80) and 3.08 (2.84-3.11), respectively, for X rays, and 2.39 (2.38-2.43) and 2.72 (2.69-2.75), respectively, for protons (Pcells between X rays and protons). The maximum degree of protection was significantly higher for X rays than for proton beams (P<.05). The RBE values of spot scanning and passive scattering proton beams were almost identical. The OER was lower for protons than for X rays. The lower contribution of the indirect effect may partly account for the lower OER of protons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ORTHO-TO-PARA ABUNDANCE RATIO (OPR) OF AMMONIA IN 15 COMETS: OPRs OF AMMONIA VERSUS 14N/15N RATIOS IN CN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Jehin, Emmanuel; Manfroid, Jean; Hutsemekers, Damien; Arpigny, Claude

    2011-01-01

    The ortho-to-para abundance ratio (OPR) of cometary molecules is considered to be one of the primordial characteristics of cometary ices. We present OPRs of ammonia (NH 3 ) in 15 comets based on optical high-dispersion spectroscopic observations of NH 2 , which is a photodissociation product of ammonia in the gaseous coma. The observations were mainly carried out with the VLT/UVES. The OPR of ammonia is estimated from the OPR of NH 2 based on the observations of the NH 2 (0, 9, 0) vibronic band. The absorption lines by the telluric atmosphere are corrected and the cometary C 2 emission lines blended with NH 2 lines are removed in our analysis. The ammonia OPRs show a cluster between 1.1 and 1.2 (this corresponds to a nuclear spin temperature of ∼30 K) for all comets in our sample except for 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (73P/SW3). Comet 73P/SW3 (both B- and C-fragments) shows the OPR of ammonia consistent with nuclear spin statistical weight ratio (1.0) that indicates a high-temperature limit as nuclear spin temperature. We compared the ammonia OPRs with other properties ( 14 N/ 15 N ratios in CN, D/H ratios of water, and mixing ratios of volatiles). Comet 73P/SW3 is clearly different from the other comets in the plot of ammonia OPRs versus 14 N/ 15 N ratios in CN. The ammonia OPRs of 1.0 and lower 15 N-fractionation of CN in comet 73P/SW3 imply that icy materials in this comet formed under warmer conditions than other comets. Comets may be classified into two groups in the plot of ammonia OPRs against 14 N/ 15 N ratios in CN.

  13. 13C/12C natural abundance ratios as an indicator of changes in plant respiratory pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.N.

    1975-01-01

    Changes in metabolism which involve a shift in endogenous respiratory substrate can be detected from isotopic ratios of respired CO 2 . Various plant tissues including seedlings, flowers and storage tissues, which during development or in response to environmental stimulus experience a change in metabolism, have been examined. Respiratory CO 2 was collected in a series of traps from a stream of CO 2 -free air. Biochemical fractions were combusted at 800 0 C and the CO 2 recovered for analysis. Samples were then analyzed on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Due to large isotopic differences between lipid and carbohydrate fractions, change from one to the other as respiratory substrate can be detected. Storage starch in potato tuber seems not to be utilized for respiration until the stimulus for new growth is received. Similarly, the time of onset of lipid utilization in fatty seeds can be detected during germination. Flowering in the Araceae involves a great burst of carbohydrate-base respiration followed by a shift to lipid metabolism. The endogenous source of ethylene in peanuts and the extent of CO 2 refixation during photorespiration has also been estimated by this technique

  14. Constraint on a Varying Proton-Electron Mass Ratio 1.5 Billion Years after the Big Bang

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagdonaite, J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Murphy, M.T.; Withmore, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    A molecular hydrogen absorber at a lookback time of 12.4 billion years, corresponding to 10% of the age of the Universe today, is analyzed to put a constraint on a varying proton-electron mass ratio, μ. A high resolution spectrum of the J1443+2724 quasar, which was observed with the Very Large

  15. The neutron/proton ratio of squeezed-out nucleons and the high density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Gaochan; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2007-01-01

    Within a transport model it is shown that the neutron/proton ratio of squeezed-out nucleons perpendicular to the reaction plane, especially at high transverse momenta, in heavy-ion reactions induced by high energy neutron-rich nuclei can be a useful tool for studying the high density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy

  16. A Ratio-Analysis Method to the Dynamics of Excited State Proton Transfer: Pyranine in Water and Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Kalyanasis; Nandi, Nilanjana; Dolai, Suman; Bera, Avisek

    2018-06-05

    Emission spectrum of a fluorophore undergoing excited state proton transfer (ESPT) often exhibits two distinct bands each representing emissions from protonated and deprotonated forms. The relative contribution of the two bands, best represented by an emission intensity ratio (R) (intensity maximum of the protonated band / intensity maximum of the deprotonated band), is an important parameter which usually denotes feasibility or promptness of the ESPT process. However, the use of ratio is only limited to the interpretation of steady-state fluorescence spectra. Here, for the first time, we exploit the time-dependence of the ratio (R(t)), calculated from time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) at different times, to analyze ESPT dynamics. TRES at different times were fitted with a sum of two lognormal-functions representing each peaks and then, the peak intensity ratio, R(t) was calculated and further fitted with an analytical function. Recently, a time-resolved area-normalized emission spectra (TRANES)-based analysis was presented where the decay of protonated emission or the rise of deprotonated emission intensity conveniently accounts for the ESPT dynamics. We show that these two methods are equivalent but the new method provides more insights on the nature of the ESPT process.

  17. Measurement of the unaccompanied pion-proton flux ratio at 2,900 meters using a transition radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellsworth, R.W.; Ito, A.S.; MacFall, J.R.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R.E.; Tonwar, S.C.; Yodh, G.B.

    1975-01-01

    A transition radiation dedector and an ionization calorimeter have been used to measure the unaccompanied pion to proton flux ratio for energies greater than 400 and 600 GeV at an altitude of 2,900 meters. (orig./BJ) [de

  18. Systematic study of the π-/π+ ratio in heavy-ion collisions with the same neutron/proton ratio but different masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ming; Xiao Zhigang; Zhu Shengjiang; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Yong Gaochan

    2009-01-01

    A systematic study of the π - /π + ratio in heavy-ion collisions with the same neutron/proton ratio but different masses can help single out effects of the nuclear mean field on pion production. Based on simulations using the IBUU04 transport model, it is found that the π - /π + ratio in head-on collisions of 48 Ca+ 48 Ca, 124 Sn+ 124 Sn, and 197 Au+ 197 Au at beam energies from 0.25 to 0.6 GeV/nucleon increases with increasing the system size or decreasing the beam energies. A comprehensive analysis of the dynamical isospin fractionation and the π - /π + ratio as well as their time evolution and spatial distributions demonstrates clearly that the π - /π + ratio is an effective probe of the high-density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy.

  19. A tentative interpretation for the difference in the abundance ratios HCO(+)/CO and HCS(+)/CS in interstellar space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbi, D.; Hickman, A. P.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Berthier, G.

    1989-04-01

    It is shown here that the difference of two orders of magnitude between the values of the abundance ratios HCO(+)/CO and HCS(+)/CS in interstellar clouds can be directly related to the difference in the reaction rates of the dissociative recombination reactions of the positive ions. The potential energy curves of the systems (HCO+ + e-) and (HCS+ + e-) in Rydberg and dissociative valence states, as well as those of the positive ions CHO+ and HCS+, are computed by ab initio quantum chemistry methods. The potential surfaces of the two systems show striking differences, suggesting that the dissociative processes, direct and indirect, should be more efficient for HCO.

  20. A tentative interpretation for the difference in the abundance ratios HCO(+)/CO and HCS(+)/CS in interstellar space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbi, D.; Hickman, A.P.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Berthier, G.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown here that the difference of two orders of magnitude between the values of the abundance ratios HCO(+)/CO and HCS(+)/CS in interstellar clouds can be directly related to the difference in the reaction rates of the dissociative recombination reactions of the positive ions. The potential energy curves of the systems (HCO+ + e-) and (HCS+ + e-) in Rydberg and dissociative valence states, as well as those of the positive ions CHO+ and HCS+, are computed by ab initio quantum chemistry methods. The potential surfaces of the two systems show striking differences, suggesting that the dissociative processes, direct and indirect, should be more efficient for HCO. 23 refs

  1. SYSTEMATIC VARIATIONS IN CO2/H2O ICE ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN NEARBY GALAXIES FOUND WITH AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, M.; Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.; Onaka, T.; Shimonishi, T.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report CO 2 /H 2 O ice abundance ratios in seven nearby star-forming galaxies based on the AKARI near-infrared (2.5–5.0 μm) spectra. The CO 2 /H 2 O ice abundance ratios show clear variations between 0.05 and 0.2 with the averaged value of 0.14 ± 0.01. The previous study on M82 revealed that the CO 2 /H 2 O ice abundance ratios strongly correlate with the intensity ratios of the hydrogen recombination Brα line to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) 3.3 μm feature. In the present study, however, we find no correlation for the seven galaxies as a whole due to systematic differences in the relation between CO 2 /H 2 O ice abundance and Brα/PAH 3.3 μm intensity ratios from galaxy to galaxy. This result suggests that there is another parameter that determines the CO 2 /H 2 O ice abundance ratios in a galaxy in addition to the Brα/PAH 3.3 μm ratios. We find that the CO 2 /H 2 O ice abundance ratios positively correlate with the specific star formation rates of the galaxies. From these results, we conclude that CO 2 /H 2 O ice abundance ratios tend to be high in young star-forming galaxies

  2. Technical Note: On the calculation of stopping-power ratio for stoichiometric calibration in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ödén, Jakob [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-17176, Sweden and Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm SE-17176 (Sweden); Zimmerman, Jens; Nowik, Patrik; Poludniowski, Gavin, E-mail: gavin.poludniowski@karolinska.se [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-17176 (Sweden); Bujila, Robert [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-17176, Sweden and Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-10691 (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The quantitative effects of assumptions made in the calculation of stopping-power ratios (SPRs) are investigated, for stoichiometric CT calibration in proton therapy. The assumptions investigated include the use of the Bethe formula without correction terms, Bragg additivity, the choice of I-value for water, and the data source for elemental I-values. Methods: The predictions of the Bethe formula for SPR (no correction terms) were validated against more sophisticated calculations using the SRIM software package for 72 human tissues. A stoichiometric calibration was then performed at our hospital. SPR was calculated for the human tissues using either the assumption of simple Bragg additivity or the Seltzer-Berger rule (as used in ICRU Reports 37 and 49). In each case, the calculation was performed twice: First, by assuming the I-value of water was an experimentally based value of 78 eV (value proposed in Errata and Addenda for ICRU Report 73) and second, by recalculating the I-value theoretically. The discrepancy between predictions using ICRU elemental I-values and the commonly used tables of Janni was also investigated. Results: Errors due to neglecting the correction terms to the Bethe formula were calculated at less than 0.1% for biological tissues. Discrepancies greater than 1%, however, were estimated due to departures from simple Bragg additivity when a fixed I-value for water was imposed. When the I-value for water was calculated in a consistent manner to that for tissue, this disagreement was substantially reduced. The difference between SPR predictions when using Janni’s or ICRU tables for I-values was up to 1.6%. Experimental data used for materials of relevance to proton therapy suggest that the ICRU-derived values provide somewhat more accurate results (root-mean-square-error: 0.8% versus 1.6%). Conclusions: The conclusions from this study are that (1) the Bethe formula can be safely used for SPR calculations without correction terms; (2

  3. Technical Note: On the calculation of stopping-power ratio for stoichiometric calibration in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ödén, Jakob; Zimmerman, Jens; Nowik, Patrik; Poludniowski, Gavin; Bujila, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The quantitative effects of assumptions made in the calculation of stopping-power ratios (SPRs) are investigated, for stoichiometric CT calibration in proton therapy. The assumptions investigated include the use of the Bethe formula without correction terms, Bragg additivity, the choice of I-value for water, and the data source for elemental I-values. Methods: The predictions of the Bethe formula for SPR (no correction terms) were validated against more sophisticated calculations using the SRIM software package for 72 human tissues. A stoichiometric calibration was then performed at our hospital. SPR was calculated for the human tissues using either the assumption of simple Bragg additivity or the Seltzer-Berger rule (as used in ICRU Reports 37 and 49). In each case, the calculation was performed twice: First, by assuming the I-value of water was an experimentally based value of 78 eV (value proposed in Errata and Addenda for ICRU Report 73) and second, by recalculating the I-value theoretically. The discrepancy between predictions using ICRU elemental I-values and the commonly used tables of Janni was also investigated. Results: Errors due to neglecting the correction terms to the Bethe formula were calculated at less than 0.1% for biological tissues. Discrepancies greater than 1%, however, were estimated due to departures from simple Bragg additivity when a fixed I-value for water was imposed. When the I-value for water was calculated in a consistent manner to that for tissue, this disagreement was substantially reduced. The difference between SPR predictions when using Janni’s or ICRU tables for I-values was up to 1.6%. Experimental data used for materials of relevance to proton therapy suggest that the ICRU-derived values provide somewhat more accurate results (root-mean-square-error: 0.8% versus 1.6%). Conclusions: The conclusions from this study are that (1) the Bethe formula can be safely used for SPR calculations without correction terms; (2

  4. K X-ray production cross sections, Kβ/Kα ratios, and radiative Auger ratios for protons impacting low-Z elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipolla, Sam J.

    1999-01-01

    A Cockcroft-Walton accelerator was used to produce 50-300 keV protons to excite characteristic X-rays from thick targets of elements from Z=21 to 32, using an efficiency-calibrated Si(Li) detector equipped with an ultra-thin window. X-ray production cross sections were determined and compared with prevailing theories. Special attention was paid to accounting for the radiative Auger effects (RAE) in the analysis of the X-ray energy spectra. Ratios of RAE to K α and K β intensities, as well as K β /K α ratios, will be compared to theoretical values

  5. Kβ/ Kα intensity ratios for X-ray production in 3d metals by gamma-rays and protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuinya, C. R.; Padhi, H. C.

    1994-04-01

    Systematic measurements of Kβ/ Kα intensity ratios for X-ray production in 3d metals have been carried out using γ-ray and fast proton ionization methods. The measured ratios from proton ionization experiments indicate production of multivacancies in the L shell giving rise to higher Kβ/ Kα ratios compared to the present γRF results and 2 MeV proton ionization results of Perujo et al. [Perujo A., Maxwell J. A., Teesdale W. J. and Cambell J. L. (1987) J. Phys. B: Atom. Molec. Phys.20, 4973]. This is consistent with the SCA model calculation which gives increased simultaneous K- and L-shell ionization at 4 MeV. The present results from γRF experiments are in close agreement with the 2 MeV proton ionization results of Perujo et al. (1987) and also with the theoretical calculation of jankowski and Polasik [Jankowski K. and Polasik M. (1989) J. Phys. B: Atom. Molec. Optic. Phys. 22, 2369] but the theoretical results of Scofield [Scofield J. H. (1974a) Atom. Data Nucl. Data Tables14, 12] are somewhat higher.

  6. Effectiveness of leaded petrol phase-out in Tianjin, China based on the aerosol lead concentration and isotope abundance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wan; Liu Xiande; Zhao Liwei; Guo, Dongfa; Tian Xiaodan; Adams, Freddy

    2006-01-01

    The phase-out of leaded petrol has been a measure widely used to reduce atmospheric lead pollution. Since the 1980s, China began to promote unleaded petrol. In order to assess the effectiveness of the measure an isotope fingerprint technique was applied for aerosol samples in the city of Tianjin. After dilute acid leaching, the lead concentration and isotope abundance ratios were determined for 123 samples collected in Tianjin during eight years (1994-2001). The 206 Pb / 207 Pb ratio was lower in summer, when coal combustion emission was low and vehicle exhaust became more important, indicating that the 206 Pb / 207 Pb ratio of leaded petrol in Tianjin is lower than that of aerosol samples. The 206 Pb / 207 Pb ratio gradually increased from 1994 to 2001, a trend that suggests that the contribution from vehicle exhaust was diminishing. Overall, the measurements matched well with national statistical data of leaded and unleaded petrol production. After the nationwide switch to unleaded gasoline, comprehensive control measures are urgently needed to reduce air lead pollution in China, as aerosol lead reduced slightly but remains at a relatively high level

  7. Measurements of the Proton Elastic-Form-Factor Ratio μpGEp/GMp at Low Momentum Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ron, G.; Piasetzky, E.; Pomerantz, I.; Shneor, R.; Glister, J.; Lee, B.; Choi, Seonho; Kang, H.; Oh, Y.; Song, J.; Yan, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Armstrong, W.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Yao, H.; Arrington, J.; Solvignon, P.; Beck, A.; May-Tal Beck, S.

    2007-01-01

    High-precision measurements of the proton elastic form-factor ratio, μ p G E p /G M p , have been made at four-momentum transfer, Q 2 , values between 0.2 and 0.5 GeV 2 . The new data, while consistent with previous results, clearly show a ratio less than unity and significant differences from the central values of several recent phenomenological fits. By combining the new form-factor ratio data with an existing cross-section measurement, one finds that in this Q 2 range the deviation from unity is primarily due to G E p being smaller than expected

  8. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Xiaohui [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Experiment E08-007 measured the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM in the range of Q2 = 0.3-0.7(GeV/c)2 by recoil polarimetry. Data were taken in 2008 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. A 1.2 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton was detected in the left HRS in coincidence with the elasticly scattered electrons tagged by the BigBite spectrometer. The proton polarization was measured by the focal plane polarimeter (FPP). In this low Q2 region, previous measurement from Jefferson Lab Hall A (LEDEX) along with various fits and calculations indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. For this new measurement, the proposed statistical uncertainty (< 1%) was achieved. These new results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, which indicate a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the new results also have implications in determining the proton Zemach radius and the strangeness form factors from parity violation experiments.

  9. From direct detection to relic abundance: the case of proton-philic spin-dependent inelastic Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopel, Stefano; Yu, Hyeonhye, E-mail: scopel@sogang.ac.kr, E-mail: skyh2yu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    We discuss strategies to make inferences on the thermal relic abundance of a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) when the same effective dimension-six operator that explains an experimental excess in direct detection is assumed to drive decoupling at freeze-out, and apply them to the explicit scenario of WIMP inelastic up-scattering with spin-dependent couplings to protons (proton-philic Spin-dependent Inelastic Dark Matter, pSIDM), a phenomenological set-up containing two Dark Matter (DM) particles χ{sub 1} and χ{sub 2} with masses m {sub χ}= m {sub χ{sub 1}} and m {sub χ{sub 2}}= m {sub χ}+δ that we have shown in a previous paper to explain the DAMA effect in compliance with the constraints from other detectors. We also update experimental constraints on pSIDM, extend the analysis to the most general spin-dependent momentum-dependent interactions allowed by non-relativistic Effective Field Theory (EFT), and consider for the WIMP velocity distribution in our Galaxy f ( v ) both a halo-independent approach and a standard Maxwellian. Under these conditions we find that the DAMA effect can be explained in terms of the particle χ{sub 1} in compliance with all the other constraints for all the analyzed EFT couplings and also for a Maxwellian f ( v ). As far as the relic abundance is concerned, we show that the problem of calculating it by using direct detection data to fix the model parameters is affected by a strong sensitivity on f ( v ) and by the degeneracy between the WIMP local density ρ{sub χ} and the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, since ρ{sub χ} must be rescaled with respect to the observed DM density in the neighborhood of the Sun when the calculated relic density Ω is smaller than the observed one Ω{sub 0}. As a consequence, a DM direct detection experiment is not directly sensitive to the physical cut-off scale of the EFT, but on some dimensional combination that does not depend on the actual value of Ω. However, such degeneracy

  10. Measurement of L X-ray intensity ratios in tantalum by proton and Si-ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braich, J.S.; Dhal, B.B.; Singh, B.P.; Padhi, H.C.; Khurana, C.S.; Verma, H.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Lι, Lβ 1,4,6 , Lβ 2,15,3 , Lγ 1 , Lγ 2,3,6 and Lγ 4,4' , X-ray intensities relative to the Lα, caused by the impact of protons of energy 1 to 4.6 MeV and Si-ions of 70 to 98 MeV on Ta targets, h ave been measured. The results show that the intensity ratios drop significantly for all transitions except Lγ 2,3,6 /Lα with Si-ions of the same energy/amu as compared to those of protons. The experimental results have been compared with those based on the ECPSSR theoretical values. From the energy shift and change in the intensity ratios of various transitions caused by Si-ion impact, the number of outer shell vacancies in the M, N and O-shells simultaneous to that of L-shell have been estimat ed. (orig.)

  11. A Candidate Tidal Disruption Event in a Quasar at z = 2.359 from Abundance Ratio Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Dittmann, Alexander; Shen, Yue; Jiang, Linhua

    2018-05-01

    A small fraction of quasars show an unusually high nitrogen-to-carbon ratio (N/C) in their spectra. These “nitrogen-rich” (N-rich) quasars are a long-standing puzzle because their interstellar medium implies stellar populations with abnormally high metallicities. It has recently been proposed that N-rich quasars may result from tidal disruption events (TDEs) of stars by supermassive black holes. The rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the carbon–nitrogen–oxygen cycle in supersolar mass stars could naturally produce high N/C. However, the TDE hypothesis predicts that the N/C should change with time, which has never hitherto been observed. Here we report the discovery of the first N-rich quasar with rapid N/C variability that could be caused by a TDE. Two spectra separated by 1.7 years (rest-frame) show that the N III] λ1750/C III] λ1909 intensity ratio decayed by ∼86% ± 14% (1σ). Optical (rest-frame UV) light-curve and X-ray observations are qualitatively consistent with the TDE hypothesis; though, the time baseline falls short of a definitive proof. Putting the single-object discovery into context, statistical analyses of the ∼80 known N-rich quasars with high-quality archival spectra show evidence (at a 5σ significance level) of a decrease in N/C on timescales of >1 year (rest-frame) and a constant level of ionization (indicated by the C III] λ1909/C IV λ1549 intensity ratio). If confirmed, our results demonstrate the method of identifying TDE candidates in quasars via abundance ratio variability, opening a new window of TDE observations at high redshift (z > 2) with upcoming large-scale time-domain spectroscopic surveys.

  12. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Ingram, W.; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator’s stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent

  13. Effects of exposure to 56Fe particles of protons on fixed-ratio operant responding in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Buhler, L.L.; Jenkins, D.G.; Joseph, J.A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.

    2002-01-01

    On long-duration trips outside of the magnetosphere, astronauts will be exposed to protons and to heavy particles which can affect their performance of required tasks. It is essential to determine the range of behaviors that might be affected by exposure to these types of radiation in order to understand the nature of behavioral deficits and to develop effective countermeasures. The present experiment examined the ability of rats to make an operant response following exposure to protons (250 MeV, 4 Gy) or 56 Fe particles (1 GeV/n, 1 or 2 Gy). Following irradiation, rats were trained to press a lever in order to obtain food reinforcement. They were then placed on an ascending fixed-ratio schedule from FR-1 (each lever press rewarded with a food pellet) through FR-35 (35 lever presses required for 1 food pellet). Rats exposed to 4 Gy of protons or 1 Gy of 56 Fe particles responded similarly to controls, increasing their rate of responding as the ratio increased. However, rats exposed to 2 Gy of 56 Fe particles failed to increase their rate of responding at ratios greater than FR-20, indicating that rats exposed to 2 Gy of 56 Fe particles cannot respond appropriately to increasing work requirements. (author)

  14. The Photodissociation of HCN and HNC: Effects on the HNC/HCN Abundance Ratio in the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Alfredo [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada (UAM), Unidad Asociada a IFF-CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias Módulo 14, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid (Spain); Roncero, Octavio; Zanchet, Alexandre [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Agúndez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, José, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/ Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco E-28049 (Spain)

    2017-03-20

    The impact of the photodissociation of HCN and HNC isomers is analyzed in different astrophysical environments. For this purpose, the individual photodissociation cross sections of HCN and HNC isomers have been calculated in the 7–13.6 eV photon energy range for a temperature of 10 K. These calculations are based on the ab initio calculation of three-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surfaces of the 21 lower electronic states. The cross sections are then obtained using a quantum wave packet calculation of the rotational transitions needed to simulate a rotational temperature of 10 K. The cross section calculated for HCN shows significant differences with respect to the experimental one, and this is attributed to the need to consider non-adiabatic transitions. Ratios between the photodissociation rates of HCN and HNC under different ultraviolet radiation fields have been computed by renormalizing the rates to the experimental value. It is found that HNC is photodissociated faster than HCN by a factor of 2.2 for the local interstellar radiation field and 9.2 for the solar radiation field, at 1 au. We conclude that to properly describe the HNC/HCN abundance ratio in astronomical environments illuminated by an intense ultraviolet radiation field, it is necessary to use different photodissociation rates for each of the two isomers, which are obtained by integrating the product of the photodissociation cross sections and ultraviolet radiation field over the relevant wavelength range.

  15. Measurement of the ratio of charged current neutrino cross sections on neutrons and protons in the energy range 1-10 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, W.; Pohl, M.; Schultze, K.; Derange, B.; Francois, T.; Van Dam, P.; Jaffre, M.; Longuemare, C.; Pascaud, C.; Calimani, E.; Ciampolillo, S.; Mattioli, F.

    1978-01-01

    The charged current cross-section ratio R = sigma(γ+n)/sigma(γ+p), averaged over the energy range, 1-10 GeV, is determined by two independent methods. The combined value is R = 2.08+-0.15. Semi-inclusive proton production rates on both proton and neutron targets are presented. Event rates of exclusive channels on the proton target are also given. (Auth.)

  16. Decay properties of exotic N ≅ 28 S and Cl nuclei and the 48Ca/46Ca abundance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorlin, O.; Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Mueller, A.C.; Borrel, V.; Dogny, S.; Pougheon, F.; Anne, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Borcea, C.; Fifield, L.K.; Bazin, D.; Thielemann, F.K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    1992-01-01

    Beta-decay half-lives and β-delayed neutron-emission probabilities of the very neutron-rich nuclei 44 S and 45-47 Cl have been measured. These isotopes, which lie at or close to the N=28 magic shell were produced in interactions of a 60 MeV/u 48 Ca beam from GANIL (Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds) with a 64 Ni target and were separated by the doubly achromatic spectrometer LISE (Ligne d'Ions Super Epluches). Their decay was studied by a β-n time correlation measurement. The results are compared to recent model predictions and indicate a rapid weakening of the N=28 shell effect below 48 20 Ca 28 . The nuclear structure effects reflected in the decay properties of the exotic S and Cl isotopes may be the clue for the astrophysical understanding of the unusual 48 Ca/ 46 Ca abundance ratio measured in the solar system as well as the Ca-Ti-Cr anomalies observed in EK-inclusions of the Allende meteorite

  17. Deep proton writing of high aspect ratio SU-8 micro-pillars on glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebraert, Evert, E-mail: eebraert@b-phot.org; Rwamucyo, Ben; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-12-15

    Deep proton writing (DPW) is a fabrication technology developed for the rapid prototyping of polymer micro-structures. We use SU-8, a negative resist, spincoated in a layer up to 720 μm-thick in a single step on borosilicate glass, for irradiation with a collimated 12 MeV energy proton beam. Micro-pillars with a slightly conical profile are irradiated in the SU-8 layer. We determine the optimal proton fluence to be 1.02 × 10{sup 4} μm{sup −2}, with which we are able to repeatably achieve micro-pillars with a top-diameter of 138 ± 1 μm and a bottom-diameter of 151 ± 3 μm. The smallest fabricated pillars have a top-diameter of 57 ± 5 μm. We achieved a root-mean-square sidewall surface roughness between 19 nm and 35 nm for the fabricated micro-pillars, measured over an area of 5 × 63.7 μm. We briefly discuss initial testing of two potential applications of the fabricated micro-pillars. Using ∼100 μm-diameter pillars as waveguides for gigascale integration optical interconnect applications, has shown a 4.7 dB improvement in optical multimode fiber-to-fiber coupling as compared to the case where an air–gap is present between the fibers at the telecom wavelength of 1550 nm. The ∼140 μm-diameter pillars were used for mold fabrication with silicone casting. The resulting mold can be used for hydrogel casting, to obtain hydrogel replicas mimicking human tissue for in vitro bio-chemical applications.

  18. Measurement of the Ratio of the Neutron and Proton Structure Functions $F_2$ in Inelastic Muon Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Robert D. [UC, San Diego

    1992-01-01

    The ratio of the neutron and proton structure functions $F_2$ has been measured to very low $X_{bj}$ using inelastic muon scattering. Data were taken in 1990 using 475 GeV muons incident on hydrogen and deuterium targets. Electromagnetic calorimetry has been used to remove radiative backgrounds and muon-electron elastic scattering. Results of the measurement are presented which cover the kinematic region 0.0001 $\\le$ $X_{bj} \\le$ 0.4 and 0.1 GeV$^2$ /$c^2$ $\\le$ $Q^2$ $\\le$ 100.0 GeV$^2$ /c$^2$.

  19. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Deprotonated Peptides. Relative Abundance of Side-Chain Neutral Losses, Residue-Specific Product Ions, and Comparison with Protonated Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuxue; Neta, Pedatsur; Yang, Xiaoyu; Stein, Stephen E

    2018-03-01

    High-accuracy MS/MS spectra of deprotonated ions of 390 dipeptides and 137 peptides with three to six residues are studied. Many amino acid residues undergo neutral losses from their side chains. The most abundant is the loss of acetaldehyde from threonine. The abundance of losses from the side chains of other amino acids is estimated relative to that of threonine. While some amino acids lose the whole side chain, others lose only part of it, and some exhibit two or more different losses. Side-chain neutral losses are less abundant in the spectra of protonated peptides, being significant mainly for methionine and arginine. In addition to the neutral losses, many amino acid residues in deprotonated peptides produce specific negative ions after peptide bond cleavage. An expanded list of fragment ions from protonated peptides is also presented and compared with those of deprotonated peptides. Fragment ions are mostly different for these two cases. These lists of fragments are used to annotate peptide mass spectral libraries and to aid in the confirmation of specific amino acids in peptides. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. TU-FG-BRB-01: Dual Energy CT Proton Stopping Power Ratio Calibration and Validation with Animal Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Y; Yin, L; Ainsley, C; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Lin, A; Teo, B [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The conversion of Hounsfield Unit (HU) to proton stopping power ratio (SPR) is a main source of uncertainty in proton therapy. In this study, the SPRs of animal tissues were measured and compared with prediction from dual energy CT (DECT) and single energy CT (SECT) calibrations. Methods: A stoichiometric calibration method for DECT was applied to predict the SPR using CT images acquired at 80 kVp and 140 kVp. The dual energy index was derived based on the HUs of the paired spectral images and used to calculate the SPRs of the materials. Tissue surrogates with known chemical compositions were used for calibration, and animal tissues (pig brain, liver, kidney; veal shank, muscle) were used for validation. The materials were irradiated with proton pencil beams, and SPRs were deduced from the residual proton range measured using a multi-layer ion chamber device. In addition, Gafchromic EBT3 films were used to measure the distal dose profiles after irradiation through the tissue samples and compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system using both DECT and SECT predicted SPRs. Results: The differences in SPR between DECT prediction and measurement were −0.31±0.36% for bone, 0.47±0.42% for brain, 0.67±0.15% for liver, 0.51±0.52% for kidney, and −0.96±0.15% for muscle. The corresponding results using SECT were 3.1±0.12%, 1.90±0.45%, −0.66±0.11%, 2.33±0.21%, and −1.70±0.17%. In the film measurements, average distances between film and calculated distal dose profiles were 0.35±0.12 mm for DECT calibration and −1.22±0.12 mm for SECT calibration for a beam with a range of 15.79 cm. Conclusion: Our study indicates that DECT is superior to SECT for proton SPR prediction and has the potential to reduce the range uncertainty to less than 2%. DECT may permit the use of tighter distal and proximal range uncertainty margins for treatment, thereby increasing the precision of proton therapy.

  1. The physical conditions, metallicity and metal abundance ratios in a highly magnified galaxy at z = 3.6252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayliss, Matthew B. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rigby, Jane R. [Observational Cosmology Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sharon, Keren; Johnson, Traci [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wuyts, Eva [Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Gießenbachstrae, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany); Florian, Michael; Gladders, Michael D. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Oguri, Masamune, E-mail: mbayliss@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We present optical and near-IR imaging and spectroscopy of SGAS J105039.6+001730, a strongly lensed galaxy at z = 3.6252 magnified by >30×, and derive its physical properties. We measure a stellar mass of log(M{sub *}/M{sub ☉}) = 9.5 ± 0.35, star formation rates from [O II] λλ3727 and Hβ of 55 ± 25 and 84 ± 24 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, respectively, an electron density of n{sub e} ≤ 10{sup 3} cm{sup –2}, an electron temperature of T{sub e} ≤ 14,000 K, and a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.3 ± 0.1. The strong C III] λλ1907,1909 emission and abundance ratios of C, N, O, and Si are consistent with well-studied starbursts at z ∼ 0 with similar metallicities. Strong P Cygni lines and He II λ1640 emission indicate a significant population of Wolf-Rayet stars, but synthetic spectra of individual populations of young, hot stars do not reproduce the observed integrated P Cygni absorption features. The rest-frame UV spectral features are indicative of a young starburst with high ionization, implying either (1) an ionization parameter significantly higher than suggested by rest-frame optical nebular lines, or (2) differences in one or both of the initial mass function and the properties of ionizing spectra of massive stars. We argue that the observed features are likely the result of a superposition of star forming regions with different physical properties. These results demonstrate the complexity of star formation on scales smaller than individual galaxies, and highlight the importance of systematic effects that result from smearing together the signatures of individual star forming regions within galaxies.

  2. Variability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio on cosmological scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, M.; Reimers, D.

    2008-10-01

    The search for a possible variation of fundamental physical constants isnewsworthy more than ever. A multitude of methods were developed. So far theonly seemingly significant indication of a cosmological variation existsfor the proton-to-electron massratio as stated by Reinhold et al. [1]. The measuredindication of variation is based on the combined analysis of H2 absorptionsystems in the spectra of Q0405-443 and Q0347-383 at zabs=2.595 and zabs=3.025, respectively. The high resolution data of the latteris reanalyzed in this work to examine the influence of different fittingprocedures and further potential nonconformities. This analysis cannotreproduce the significance achieved by the previous works.

  3. Ratios of helicity amplitudes for exclusive ρ{sup 0} electroproduction on transversely polarized protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); University of Michigan, Randall Laboratory of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Akopov, N.; Elbakian, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Marukyan, H.; Petrosyan, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z.; Borissov, A.; Deconinck, W.; Holler, Y.; Rostomyan, A.; Zihlmann, B. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Aschenauer, E.C.; Nowak, W.D. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Augustyniak, W.; Marianski, B.; Trzcinski, A.; Zupranski, P. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Belostotski, S.; Kisselev, A.; Manaenkov, S.I.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); Blok, H.P. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bryzgalov, V.; Ivanilov, A.; Korotkov, V.; Salomatin, Y. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Capitani, G.P.; De Sanctis, E.; Muccifora, V.; Reolon, A.R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Ciullo, G.; Lenisa, P.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Statera, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Universita di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy); Contalbrigo, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); De Leo, R.; Lagamba, L.; Vilardi, I. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, Bari (Italy); Dueren, M. [Justus-Liebig Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Ellinghaus, F. [University of Colorado, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Boulder, CO (United States); Felawka, L. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, Gruppo Collegato Sanita, Rome (Italy); Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Gavrilov, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Goloskokov, S.V.; Shutov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Jackson, H.E.; Reimer, P.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Joosten, S. [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gent (Belgium); University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Kaiser, R.; Lehmann, I.; Rosner, G.; Seitz, B. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Karyan, G. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Kozlov, V.; Terkulov, A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kravchenko, P. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Leningrad Region (Russian Federation); Kroll, P.; Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Regensburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Regensburg (Germany); Lapikas, L. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lorenzon, W. [University of Michigan, Randall Laboratory of Physics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Miyachi, Y.; Shibata, T.A. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Movsisyan, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Nass, A.; Rith, K. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Riedl, C. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Ryckbosch, D.; Tytgat, M.; Haarlem, Y. van [Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gent (Belgium); Schnell, G. [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, Bilbao (Spain); Basque Foundation for Science, IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gent (Belgium); Truty, R. [University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Hulse, C. van [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, Bilbao (Spain); Ghent University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gent (Belgium); Yaschenko, S. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Physikalisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany); Collaboration: The HERMES Collaboration

    2017-06-15

    Exclusive ρ{sup 0}-meson electroproduction is studied by the HERMES experiment, using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron/positron beam of HERA and a transversely polarized hydrogen target, in the kinematic region 1.0 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 7.0 GeV{sup 2}, 3.0 GeV < W < 6.3 GeV, and -t{sup '} < 0.4 GeV{sup 2}. Using an unbinned maximum-likelihood method, 25 parameters are extracted. These determine the real and imaginary parts of the ratios of several helicity amplitudes describing ρ{sup 0}-meson production by a virtual photon. The denominator of those ratios is the dominant amplitude, the nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitude F{sub 0(1)/(2)0(1)/(2)}, which describes the production of a longitudinal ρ{sup 0}-meson by a longitudinal virtual photon. The ratios of nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitudes are found to be in good agreement with those from the previous HERMES analysis. The transverse target polarization allows for the first time the extraction of ratios of a number of nucleon-helicity-flip amplitudes to F{sub 0(1)/(2)0(1)/(2)}. Results obtained in a handbag approach based on generalized parton distributions taking into account the contribution from pion exchange are found to be in good agreement with these ratios. Within the model, the data favor a positive sign for the π - ρ transition form factor. By also exploiting the longitudinal beam polarization, a total of 71 ρ{sup 0} spin-density matrix elements is determined from the extracted 25 parameters, in contrast to only 53 elements as directly determined in earlier analyses. (orig.)

  4. Ratios of helicity amplitudes for exclusive ρ{sup 0} electroproduction on transversely polarized protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). 2. Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Lab. of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Collaboration: HERMES Collaboration; and others

    2017-06-13

    Exclusive ρ{sup 0}-meson electroproduction is studied by the HERMES experiment, using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron/positron beam of HERA and a transversely polarized hydrogen target, in the kinematic region 1.0 GeV{sup 2}ratios of several helicity amplitudes describing ρ{sup 0}-meson production by a virtual photon. The denominator of those ratios is the dominant amplitude, the nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitude F{sub 0(1)/(2)0(1)/(2)}, which describes the production of a longitudinal ρ{sup 0}-meson by a longitudinal virtual photon. The ratios of nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitudes are found to be in good agreement with those from the previous HERMES analysis. The transverse target polarization allows for the first time the extraction of ratios of a number of nucleon-helicity-flip amplitudes to F{sub 0(1)/(2)0(1)/(2)}. Results obtained in a handbag approach based on generalized parton distributions taking into account the contribution from pion exchange are found to be in good agreement with these ratios. Within the model, the data favor a positive sign for the π-ρ transition form factor. By also exploiting the longitudinal beam polarization, a total of 71 ρ{sup 0} spin-density matrix elements is determined from the extracted 25 parameters, in contrast to only 53 elements as directly determined in earlier analyses.

  5. Comprehensive analysis of proton range uncertainties related to patient stopping-power-ratio estimation using the stoichiometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Zhu, X. Ronald; Park, Peter C.; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe; Virshup, Gary; Clayton, James E.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze factors affecting proton stopping-power-ratio (SPR) estimations and range uncertainties in proton therapy planning using the standard stoichiometric calibration. The SPR uncertainties were grouped into five categories according to their origins and then estimated based on previously published reports or measurements. For the first time, the impact of tissue composition variations on SPR estimation was assessed and the uncertainty estimates of each category were determined for low-density (lung), soft, and high-density (bone) tissues. A composite, 95th percentile water-equivalent-thickness uncertainty was calculated from multiple beam directions in 15 patients with various types of cancer undergoing proton therapy. The SPR uncertainties (1σ) were quite different (ranging from 1.6% to 5.0%) in different tissue groups, although the final combined uncertainty (95th percentile) for different treatment sites was fairly consistent at 3.0-3.4%, primarily because soft tissue is the dominant tissue type in the human body. The dominant contributing factor for uncertainties in soft tissues was the degeneracy of Hounsfield numbers in the presence of tissue composition variations. To reduce the overall uncertainties in SPR estimation, the use of dual-energy computed tomography is suggested. The values recommended in this study based on typical treatment sites and a small group of patients roughly agree with the commonly referenced value (3.5%) used for margin design. By using tissue-specific range uncertainties, one could estimate the beam-specific range margin by accounting for different types and amounts of tissues along a beam, which may allow for customization of range uncertainty for each beam direction.

  6. An Essay on Numerology of the Proton to Electron Mass Ratio (Letters to Progress in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritov A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few mathematical expressions for calculation pro ton to electron mass ratio presented. Some of them are new and some are not. They have been analysed in terms of their simplicity, numerical significance and precision. Expressions are listed in the structured manner with comments. The close attention should be paid to a comparison of the formula similarity via their precision. A brief review of the different attempts in similar search is given.

  7. Ratios of helicity amplitudes for exclusive ρ0 electroproduction on transversely polarized proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manaenkov Serguei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exclusive ρ0-meson electroproduction is studied by the HERMES experiment, using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron/positron beam of HERA and a transversely polarized hydrogen target, in the kinematic region 1.0 GeV2 < Q2 < 7.0 GeV2, 3.0 GeV < W < 6.3 GeV, and −t′ < 0.4 GeV2. Using an unbinned maximum-likelihood method, 25 parameters are extracted. They determine the real and imaginary parts of the ratios of certain helicity amplitudes describing ρ0-meson production by a virtual photon, where the denominator is the dominant amplitude F012012${F_{0{1 \\over 2}}}_{0{1 \\over 2}}$. The latter is the nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitude, which describes the production of a longitudinal ρ0 meson by a longitudinal virtual photon. The transverse target polarization allows for the first time the extraction of ratios of a number of nucleon-helicity-flip amplitudes to F012012${F_{0{1 \\over 2}}}_{0{1 \\over 2}}$. The ratios of nucleon-helicity-non-flip amplitudes are found to be in good agreement with those from the previous HERMES analysis.

  8. Constraint on a varying proton-electron mass ratio 1.5 billion years after the big bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdonaite, J; Ubachs, W; Murphy, M T; Whitmore, J B

    2015-02-20

    A molecular hydrogen absorber at a lookback time of 12.4 billion years, corresponding to 10% of the age of the Universe today, is analyzed to put a constraint on a varying proton-electron mass ratio, μ. A high resolution spectrum of the J1443+2724 quasar, which was observed with the Very Large Telescope, is used to create an accurate model of 89 Lyman and Werner band transitions whose relative frequencies are sensitive to μ, yielding a limit on the relative deviation from the current laboratory value of Δμ/μ=(-9.5 ± 5.4(stat)± 5.3(syst))×10(-6).

  9. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobayyen, M.

    1986-01-01

    The ratios R νp and R a ntiν a ntip of the neutral current to charged current cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons have been measured in BEBC. For a total transverse momentum of the charged hadrons above 0.45 GeV/c and a charged multiplicity of at least 3, it was found that R νp = 0.384±0.024±0.015 and R a ntiν a nti p = 0.338±0.014±0.016, corresponding to a value of sin 2 θ W (M W ) a nti M a nti S of 0.225±0.030. 20 refs

  10. The isotopic abundance ratio 12C/13C in the solar atmosphere determined from CH-lines in the photospheric spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, Oe.

    1976-01-01

    The R-branch of the (0,0) vibrational band of the violet electronic transition A 2 Δ-X 2 PI of CH is analysed. Isotope wavelength shifts were measured on laboratory spectrograms. The method of synthesising the spectrum was used, and the molecular dissociation equilibrium through the photosphere was computed. 13 CH is not definitely identified in the photospheric spectrum and only upper limits of the 13 C abundance are deduced. The upper limits are sensitive to the local continuum level. A photospheric abundance ratio 12 C/ 13 C greater than the terrestrial value of 90 seems highly probable. (Auth.)

  11. Carbon and oxygen abundances in cool metal-rich exoplanet hosts: A case study of the C/O ratio of 55 Cancri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Cunha, Katia; Schuler, Simon C.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Smith, Verne V.

    2013-01-01

    The super-Earth exoplanet 55 Cnc e, the smallest member of a five-planet system, has recently been observed to transit its host star. The radius estimates from transit observations, coupled with spectroscopic determinations of mass, provide constraints on its interior composition. The composition of exoplanetary interiors and atmospheres are particularly sensitive to elemental C/O ratio, which to first order can be estimated from the host stars. Results from a recent spectroscopic study analyzing the 6300 Å [O I] line and two C I lines suggest that 55 Cnc has a carbon-rich composition (C/O = 1.12 ± 0.09). However, oxygen abundances derived using the 6300 Å [O I] line are highly sensitive to a Ni I blend, particularly in metal-rich stars such as 55 Cnc ([Fe/H] =0.34 ± 0.18). Here, we further investigate 55 Cnc's composition by deriving the carbon and oxygen abundances from these and additional C and O absorption features. We find that the measured C/O ratio depends on the oxygen lines used. The C/O ratio that we derive based on the 6300 Å [O I] line alone is consistent with the previous value. Yet, our investigation of additional abundance indicators results in a mean C/O ratio of 0.78 ± 0.08. The lower C/O ratio of 55 Cnc determined here may place this system at the sensitive boundary between protoplanetary disk compositions giving rise to planets with high (>0.8) versus low (<0.8) C/O ratios. This study illustrates the caution that must applied when determining planet host star C/O ratios, particularly in cool, metal-rich stars.

  12. Neutron to proton ratios of quasiprojectile and midrapidity emission in the 58Ni+58Ni reaction at 52 MeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theriault, D.; Vallee, A.; Gingras, L.; Larochelle, Y.; Roy, R.; April, A.; Beaulieu, L.; Grenier, F.; Lemieux, F.; Moisan, J.; St-Pierre, C.; Turbide, S.; Samri, M.; Borderie, B.; Rivet, M. F.; Bougault, R.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Durand, D.; Lecolley, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    By combining data from a charged particle 58 Ni+ 58 Ni experiment at 52 MeV/nucleon with an 36 Ar+ 58 Ni experiment at 50 MeV/nucleon for which free neutrons have been detected, an increase in the neutron to proton ratio of the whole nuclear material at midrapidity has been experimentally observed in the reaction 58 Ni+ 58 Ni at 52 MeV/nucleon. The neutron-to-proton ratio of the quasi-projectile emission is analyzed for the same reactions and is seen to decrease below the ratio of the initial system. Those observations suggest that an asymmetric exchange of neutrons and protons between the quasiprojectile and the midrapidity region exists

  13. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI - omega plot analysis of RF-spillover-corrected inverse CEST ratio asymmetry for simultaneous determination of labile proton ratio and exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renhua; Xiao, Gang; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Ran, Chongzhao; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to labile proton concentration and exchange rate, thus allowing measurement of dilute CEST agent and microenvironmental properties. However, CEST measurement depends not only on the CEST agent properties but also on the experimental conditions. Quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis has been proposed to address the limitation of the commonly used simplistic CEST-weighted calculation. Recent research has shown that the concomitant direct RF saturation (spillover) effect can be corrected using an inverse CEST ratio calculation. We postulated that a simplified qCEST analysis is feasible with omega plot analysis of the inverse CEST asymmetry calculation. Specifically, simulations showed that the numerically derived labile proton ratio and exchange rate were in good agreement with input values. In addition, the qCEST analysis was confirmed experimentally in a phantom with concurrent variation in CEST agent concentration and pH. Also, we demonstrated that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (P analysis can simultaneously determine labile proton ratio and exchange rate in a relatively complex in vitro CEST system. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Energy and CKT dependence of proton induced L subshell X-ray intensity ratios in elements 57≤Z≤92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakkar, Rohit; Sharma, Babita; Allawadhi, K.L.

    2006-01-01

    The dependence of L subshell X-ray intensity ratios on incident proton energy and the CK transitions has been investigated in elements 57≤Z≤92. The intensity ratio I(L α )/I(L l ) neither shows variation with energy nor any dependence on the CK transitions. In general, the ratios I(L α )/I(L β ) and I(L α )/I(L γ ), first increase with incident proton energy, attain a maximum value, then start decreasing and attain an almost constant value after a particular energy (ranging from about 4.6 MeV for La to 5.8 MeV for U). A comparison has been made among the intensity ratios evaluated using three different sets of parameters. A maximum difference of about 18% has been observed among the different values

  15. Limits on a gravitational field dependence of the proton-electron mass ratio from H2 in white dwarf stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdonaite, J; Salumbides, E J; Preval, S P; Barstow, M A; Barrow, J D; Murphy, M T; Ubachs, W

    2014-09-19

    Spectra of molecular hydrogen (H2) are employed to search for a possible proton-to-electron mass ratio (μ) dependence on gravity. The Lyman transitions of H2, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope towards white dwarf stars that underwent a gravitational collapse, are compared to accurate laboratory spectra taking into account the high temperature conditions (T∼13 000  K) of their photospheres. We derive sensitivity coefficients Ki which define how the individual H2 transitions shift due to μ dependence. The spectrum of white dwarf star GD133 yields a Δμ/μ constraint of (-2.7±4.7stat±0.2syst)×10(-5) for a local environment of a gravitational potential ϕ∼10(4) ϕEarth, while that of G29-38 yields Δμ/μ=(-5.8±3.8stat±0.3syst)×10(-5) for a potential of 2×10(4) ϕEarth.

  16. Anomalous phosphine sensitivity coefficients as probes for a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Špirko, V.

    2018-02-01

    A robust variational approach is used to investigate the sensitivity of the rotation-vibration spectrum of phosphine (PH3) to a possible cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ. Whilst the majority of computed sensitivity coefficients, T, involving the low-lying vibrational states acquire the expected values of T ≈ -1 and T ≈ -1/2 for rotational and ro-vibrational transitions, respectively, anomalous sensitivities are uncovered for the A1 - A2 splittings in the ν2/ν4, ν1/ν3 and 2ν _4^{ℓ=0}/2ν _4^{ℓ=2} manifolds of PH3. A pronounced Coriolis interaction between these states in conjunction with accidentally degenerate A1 and A2 energy levels produces a series of enhanced sensitivity coefficients. Phosphine is expected to occur in a number of different astrophysical environments and has potential for investigating a drifting constant. Furthermore, the displayed behaviour hints at a wider trend in molecules of C_{3v}(M) symmetry, thus demonstrating that the splittings induced by higher-order ro-vibrational interactions are well suited for probing μ in other symmetric top molecules in space, since these low-frequency transitions can be straightforwardly detected by radio telescopes.

  17. Toward a Determination of the Proton-Electron Mass Ratio from the Lamb-Dip Measurement of HD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L.-G.; Liu, A.-W.; Pachucki, K.; Komasa, J.; Sun, Y. R.; Wang, J.; Hu, S.-M.

    2018-04-01

    Precision spectroscopy of the hydrogen molecule is a test ground of quantum electrodynamics (QED), and it may serve for the determination of fundamental constants. Using a comb-locked cavity ring-down spectrometer, for the first time, we observed the Lamb-dip spectrum of the R (1 ) line in the overtone of hydrogen deuteride (HD). The line position was determined to be 217 105 182.79 ±0.03stat±0.08syst MHz (δ ν /ν =4 ×10-10 ), which is the most accurate rovibrational transition ever measured in the ground electronic state of molecular hydrogen. Moreover, from calculations including QED effects up to the order meα6, we obtained predictions for this R (1 ) line as well as for the HD dissociation energy, which are less accurate but signaling the importance of the complete treatment of nonadiabatic effects. Provided that the theoretical calculation reaches the same accuracy, the present measurement will lead to a determination of the proton-to-electron mass ratio with a precision of 1.3 parts per billion.

  18. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios for neutrino and and antineutrino interactions on protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; O'Neale, S. W.; Hoffmann, E.; Haidt, D.; Klein, H.; Mittendorfer, J.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Schmid, P.; Wachsmuth, H.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Aderholz, M.; Deck, L.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Retter, M. L.; Saitta, B.; Shotton, P. N.; Towers, S. J.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.; Fitch, P. J.; Birmingham-Bonn-CERN-Imperial College-München(MPI)-Oxford-University College Collaboration

    1986-10-01

    The ratios Rvp and Rvp of the neutral current to charged current cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons have been measured in BEBC. The beam was the CERN SPS 400 GeV wideband beam. The bubble chamber, equipped with the standard External Muon Identifier, was surrounded with an additional plane of wire chambers (Internal Picket Fence), which was added to improve neutral current event identification. For a total transverse momentum of the charged hadrons above 0.45 GeV/ c and a charged multiplicity of at least 3, it was found that R vp = 0.384 ± 0.015 and R vp = 0.338 ± 0.014 ± 0.016, corresponding to a value of sin 2θ w(M woverlineMSof 0.225 ± 0.030 . Combining the results from hydrogen and an isoscalar target, the differences of the neutral current chiral coupling constants were found to be u2l- d2L = -0.080 ± 0.043 ± 0.012 and u2R- d2R = 0.021±0.055±0.028.

  19. Measurement of the neutral to charged current cross section ratios for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Hoffmann, E.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Retter, M.L.; Saitta, B.; Shotton, P.N.; Towers, S.J.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.; Fitch, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The ratios R vp and R vp of the neutral current to charged current cross sections for neutrino and antineutrino interactions on protons have been measured in BEBC. The beam was the CERN SPS 400 GeV wideband beam. The bubble chamber, equipped with the standard External Muon Identifier, was surrounded with an additional plane of wire chambers (Internal Picket Fence), which was added to improve neutral current event identification. For a total transverse momentum of the charged hadrons above 0.45 GeV/c and a charged multiplicity of at least 3, it was found that R vp =0.384±0.024±0.015 and R vp =0.338±0.014±0.016, corresponding to a value of sin 2 θ w (M w ) MS of 0.225±0.030. Combining the results from hydrogen and an isoscalar target, the differences of the neutral current chiral coupling constants were found to be u L 2 -d L 2 =-0.080±0.043±0.012 and u R 2 -d R 2 =0.021±0.055±0.028. (orig.)

  20. ON THE CARBON-TO-OXYGEN RATIO MEASUREMENT IN NEARBY SUN-LIKE STARS: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLANET FORMATION AND THE DETERMINATION OF STELLAR ABUNDANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent high-resolution spectroscopic analysis of nearby FGK stars suggests that a high C/O ratio of greater than 0.8, or even 1.0, is relatively common. Two published catalogs find C/O > 0.8 in 25%-30% of systems, and C/O > 1.0 in ∼6%-10%. It has been suggested that in protoplanetary disks with C/O > 0.8 that the condensation pathways to refractory solids will differ from what occurred in our solar system, where C/O = 0.55. The carbon-rich disks are calculated to make carbon-dominated rocky planets, rather than oxygen-dominated ones. Here we suggest that the derived stellar C/O ratios are overestimated. One constraint on the frequency of high C/O is the relative paucity of carbon dwarf stars (10 –3 -10 –5 ) found in large samples of low-mass stars. We suggest reasons for this overestimation, including a high C/O ratio for the solar atmosphere model used for differential abundance analysis, the treatment of a Ni blend that affects the O abundance, and limitations of one-dimensional LTE stellar atmosphere models. Furthermore, from the estimated errors on the measured stellar C/O ratios, we find that the significance of the high C/O tail is weakened, with a true measured fraction of C/O > 0.8 in 10%-15% of stars, and C/O > 1.0 in 1%-5%, although these are still likely overestimates. We suggest that infrared T-dwarf spectra could show how common high C/O is in the stellar neighborhood, as the chemistry and spectra of such objects would differ compared to those with solar-like abundances. While possible at C/O > 0.8, we expect that carbon-dominated rocky planets are rarer than others have suggested.

  1. Using SPIRAL (Single Pollen Isotope Ratio AnaLysis) to estimate C 3- and C 4-grass abundance in the paleorecord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David M.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Scholes, Daniel R.; Joshi, Neeraj; Pearson, Ann

    2008-05-01

    C 3 and C 4 grasses differ greatly in their responses to environmental controls and influences on biogeochemical processes (e.g. water, carbon, and nutrient cycling). Difficulties in distinguishing between these two functional groups of grasses have hindered paleoecological studies of grass-dominated ecosystems. Stable carbon isotopic analysis of individual grains of grass pollen using a spooling-wire microcombustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer holds promise for improving C 3 and C 4 grass reconstructions. This technique, SPIRAL (Single Pollen Isotope Ratio AnaLysis), has only been evaluated using pollen of known C 3 and C 4 grasses. To test the ability of SPIRAL to reproduce the abundance of C 3 and C 4 grasses on the landscape, we measured δ13C values of > 1500 individual grains of grass pollen isolated from the surface sediments of ten lakes in areas that span a large gradient of C 3- and C 4-grass abundance, as determined from vegetation surveys. Results indicate a strong positive correlation between the δ13C-based estimates of % C 4-grass pollen and the abundance of C 4 grasses on the landscape. The % C 4-grass pollen slightly underestimates the actual abundance of C 4 grasses at sites with high proportions of C 4 grasses, which can be corrected using regression analysis. Comparison of the % C 4-grass pollen with C/N and δ13C measurements of bulk organic matter illustrates the distinct advantages of grass-pollen δ13C as a proxy for distinguishing C 3 and C 4 shifts within the grass family. Thus SPIRAL promises to advance our understanding of grassland ecology and evolution.

  2. 3He/4He ratio, noble gas abundance and K-Ar dating of diamonds - an attempt to search for the records of early terrestrial history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozima, M.; Zashu, S.; Nitoh, O.

    1983-01-01

    The 3 He/ 4 He ratios measured in 27 Southern Africa diamond stones, four from Premier Mine and the rest of unidentified origin, range from 4.2 x 10 -8 to 3.2 x 10 -4 , with three stones above 1 x 10 -4 . We conclude that the initial helium isotopic ratio ( 3 He/ 4 He) 0 in the earth was significantly higher than that of the planetary helium-A ( 3 He/ 4 He = 1.42 x 10 -4 ), but close to the solar helium ( 3 He/ 4 He = approx. 4 x 10 -4 ). The apparent K-Ar ages for the twelve diamonds of unidentified origin show enormously old age, indicating excess argon-40. 3 He/ 4 He evolution in diamonds suggests that the diamonds with the high 3 He/ 4 He ratio (> 2 x 10 -4 ) may be as old as the earth. Noble gas elemental abundance in the diamonds relative to the air noble gas abundance shows monotonic decrease with a decreasing mass number. This paper discusses the implications of these observations on the early solar system and the origin of diamonds. (author)

  3. Constraints on the OH-to-H Abundance Ratio in Infrared-bright Galaxies Derived from the Strength of the OH 35 μm Absorption Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Myra; Veilleux, Sylvain; González-Alfonso, Eduardo; Spoon, Henrik; Sturm, Eckhard

    2018-02-01

    We analyze Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the OH 35 μm feature in 15 nearby (z ≲ 0.06) (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs). All objects exhibit OH 35 μm purely in absorption, as expected. The small optical depth of this transition makes the strength of this feature a good indicator of the true OH column density. The measured OH 35 μm equivalent widths imply an average OH column density and a 1-σ standard deviation to the mean of {N}{OH}=1.31+/- 0.22× {10}17 cm‑2. This number is then compared with the hydrogen column density for a typical optical depth at 35 μm of ∼0.5 and gas-to-dust ratio of 125 to derive an OH-to-H abundance ratio of {X}{OH}=1.01+/- 0.15× {10}-6. This abundance ratio is formally a lower limit. It is consistent with the values generally assumed in the literature. The OH 35 μm line profiles predicted from published radiative transfer models constrained by observations of OH 65, 79, 84, and 119 μm in 5 objects (Mrk 231, Mrk 273, IRAS F05189-2524, IRAS F08572+3915, and IRAS F20551-4250) are also found to be consistent with the IRS OH 35 μm spectra.

  4. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. High-precision optical measurements of 13C/12C isotope ratios in organic compounds at natural abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Richard N.; Kuramoto, Douglas S.; Haase, Christa; Tan, Sze M.; Crosson, Eric R.; Saad, Nabil M. R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system integrating a chromatographic separation technique, a catalytic combustor, and an isotopic 13C/12C optical analyzer is described for the isotopic analysis of a mixture of organic compounds. A demonstration of its potential is made for the geochemically important class of short-chain hydrocarbons. The system proved to be linear over a 3-fold injection volume dynamic range with an average precision of 0.95‰ and 0.67‰ for ethane and propane, respectively. The calibrated accuracy for methane, ethane, and propane is within 3‰ of the values determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), which is the current method of choice for compound-specific isotope analysis. With anticipated improvements, the low-cost, portable, and easy-to-use CRDS-based instrumental setup is poised to evolve into a credible challenge to the high-cost and complex IRMS-based technique. PMID:19564619

  6. Extracting real-crack properties from non-linear elastic behaviour of rocks: abundance of cracks with dominating normal compliance and rocks with negative Poisson ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Zaitsev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of examination of experimental data on non-linear elasticity of rocks using experimentally determined pressure dependences of P- and S-wave velocities from various literature sources are presented. Overall, over 90 rock samples are considered. Interpretation of the data is performed using an effective-medium description in which cracks are considered as compliant defects with explicitly introduced shear and normal compliances without specifying a particular crack model with an a priori given ratio of the compliances. Comparison with the experimental data indicated abundance (∼ 80 % of cracks with the normal-to-shear compliance ratios that significantly exceed the values typical of conventionally used crack models (such as penny-shaped cuts or thin ellipsoidal cracks. Correspondingly, rocks with such cracks demonstrate a strongly decreased Poisson ratio including a significant (∼ 45 % portion of rocks exhibiting negative Poisson ratios at lower pressures, for which the concentration of not yet closed cracks is maximal. The obtained results indicate the necessity for further development of crack models to account for the revealed numerous examples of cracks with strong domination of normal compliance. Discovering such a significant number of naturally auxetic rocks is in contrast to the conventional viewpoint that occurrence of a negative Poisson ratio is an exotic fact that is mostly discussed for artificial structures.

  7. ON THE INFERENCE OF THE COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE ζ FROM THE HCO{sup +}-to-DCO{sup +} ABUNDANCE RATIO: THE EFFECT OF NUCLEAR SPIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Le Gal, Romane; Hincelin, Ugo; Herbst, Eric [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Bergner, Jennifer B. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Öberg, Karin I., E-mail: shingledecker@virginia.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    The chemistry of dense interstellar regions was analyzed using a time-dependent gas–grain astrochemical simulation and a new chemical network that incorporates deuterated chemistry, taking into account nuclear spin states for the hydrogen chemistry and its deuterated isotopologues. With this new network, the utility of the [HCO{sup +}]/[DCO{sup +}] abundance ratio as a probe of the cosmic-ray ionization rate has been re-examined, with special attention paid to the effect of the initial value of the ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of molecular hydrogen. After discussing the use of the probe for cold cores, we compare our results with previous theoretical and observational results for a molecular cloud close to the supernova remnant W51C, which is thought to have an enhanced cosmic-ray ionization rate ζ caused by the nearby γ -ray source. In addition, we attempt to use our approach to estimate the cosmic-ray ionization rate for L1174, a dense core with an embedded star. Beyond the previously known sensitivity of [HCO{sup +}]/[DCO{sup +}] to ζ , we demonstrate its additional dependence on the initial OPR and, secondarily, on the age of the source, its temperature, and its density. We conclude that the usefulness of the [HCO{sup +}]/[DCO{sup +}] abundance ratio in constraining the cosmic-ray ionization rate in dense regions increases with the age of the source and the ionization rate as the ratio becomes far less sensitive to the initial value of the OPR.

  8. Helium abundance and speed difference between helium ions and protons in the solar wind from coronal holes, active regions, and quiet Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui; Madjarska, M. S.; Li, Bo; Xia, LiDong; Huang, ZhengHua

    2018-05-01

    Two main models have been developed to explain the mechanisms of release, heating and acceleration of the nascent solar wind, the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) models and reconnection-loop-opening (RLO) models, in which the plasma release processes are fundamentally different. Given that the statistical observational properties of helium ions produced in magnetically diverse solar regions could provide valuable information for the solar wind modelling, we examine the statistical properties of the helium abundance (AHe) and the speed difference between helium ions and protons (vαp) for coronal holes (CHs), active regions (ARs) and the quiet Sun (QS). We find bimodal distributions in the space of AHeand vαp/vA(where vA is the local Alfvén speed) for the solar wind as a whole. The CH wind measurements are concentrated at higher AHeand vαp/vAvalues with a smaller AHedistribution range, while the AR and QS wind is associated with lower AHeand vαp/vA, and a larger AHedistribution range. The magnetic diversity of the source regions and the physical processes related to it are possibly responsible for the different properties of AHeand vαp/vA. The statistical results suggest that the two solar wind generation mechanisms, WTD and RLO, work in parallel in all solar wind source regions. In CH regions WTD plays a major role, whereas the RLO mechanism is more important in AR and QS.

  9. The G_E/G_M-ratio of the proton by recoil polarization measurement in e+parrow e'+p

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjabi, Vina; Jones, Mark; Perdrisat, Charles F.; Quemener, Gilles

    1998-10-01

    The recently commissioned Hall A high resolution spectrometers (HRS) and the focal plane polarimeter (FPP) were used to obtain the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton, G_E/G_M. This form factor ratio is proportional to the measured ratio of the transverse, P_t, to longitudinal, P_l, components of the recoiling proton polarization. The method takes advantage of the precession of the proton magnetic moment in the hadron HRS, which rotates the longitudinal polarization component into the plane of the FPP analyzer; this allows simultaneous measurement of both components of the polarization. The ratio P_t/P_l is independent of both the electron beam polarization and the polarimeter analyzing power. Most of the data were obtained with polarized beams of 100 μ A with polarization of ~ 0.39 incident on the 15 cm cell of the high power LH2 target. We will report the results for G_E/GM at several values of Q^2 between 0.5 and 3.5 GeV^2.

  10. Dependence of isospin fractionation process on the neutron-proton ratio of a colliding system in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yongzhong; Liu Jianye; Fang Yutian; Guo Wenjun

    2004-01-01

    The degree of isospin fractionation is measured by the ratio of saturated neutron-proton: i.e. the ratio of gas phase (nucleon emission) to that of liquid phase (fragment emission) in heavy ion collisions. The authors have studied the dependence of the degree of isospin fractionation on the neutron-proton ratio in the colliding system by using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamical model. The calculated results show that the degree of isospin fractionation depends sensitively on the symmetry potential and weakly on the isospin effect of nucleon-nucleon cross section. In particular, the degree of isospin fractionation increases with increasing neutron-proton ratio in the colliding system for the neutron-rich system, in this process the neutron-rich gas phase and neutron-poor liquid phase are produced. The degree of isospin fractionation is very sensitive to the degree of symmetry potential. On the contrary, for the neutron-poor system the neutron-poor gas phase and neutron-rich liquid phase are produced. In this case, the degree of isospin fractionation is not sensitive to the symmetry potential. The authors also find that the role of momentum dependent interaction in the isospin fractionation process is not obvious. The authors propose that our calculated results can compared directly with the experimental data to get the information about the symmetry potential in the intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

  11. Stringent bounds to spatial variations of the electron-to-proton mass ratio in the Milky Way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molaro, P. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, 34143 I, Trieste (Italy); Levshakov, S.A. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya Str. 26, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kozlov, M.G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2009-10-15

    The ammonia method, recently proposed by Flambaum and Kozlov (2007) to probe variations of the electron-to-proton mass ratio, mu=m{sub e}/m{sub p}, is applied for the first time to dense prestellar molecular clouds in the Milky Way, allowing to test DELTAmu/mu at different galactocentric distances. High quality radio-astronomical observations are used to check the presence of possible relative radial velocity offsets between the inversion transition of NH{sub 3}(J,K)=(1,1), and the CCS J{sub N}=2{sub 1}-1{sub 0} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}J=1-0 rotational transitions. Carefully selected sample of 21 NH{sub 3}/CCS pairs observed in the Perseus molecular cloud provide the offset DELTAV{sub CCS-NH{sub 3}}=36+-7{sub stat}+-13.5{sub sys}ms{sup -1}. A similar offset of DELTAV=40.8+-12.9{sub stat}ms{sup -1} between NH{sub 3}(J,K)=(1,1) and N{sub 2}H{sup +}J=1-0 has been found in an isolated dense core L183 by Pagani et al. (2009). Overall these observations provide a safe bound of a maximum offset between ammonia and the other molecules at the level of DELTAV<=100m s{sup -1}. Being interpreted in terms of DELTAmu/mu, this bound corresponds to DELTAmu/mu<=1x10{sup -7}, which is an order of magnitude more sensitive than available extragalactic constraints. Taken at face value the measured DELTAV shows positive shifts between the line centers of NH{sub 3} and these two other molecules and suggest a real offset, which would imply a DELTAmu/muapprox4x10{sup -8}. If DELTAmu/mu follows the gradient of the local gravitational potential, then the obtained results are in conflict with laboratory atomic clock experiments in the solar system by approx5 orders of magnitude, thus requiring a chameleon-type scalar field model. New measurements involving other molecules and a wider range of objects along with verification of molecular rest frequencies are currently planned to confirm these first indications.

  12. Effects of concentrate-to-forage ratios and 2-methylbutyrate supplementation on ruminal fermentation, bacteria abundance and urinary excretion of purine derivatives in Chinese Simmental steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Liu, Q; Guo, G; Huo, W J; Pei, C X; Zhang, S L; Wang, H

    2018-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary concentrate levels and 2-methylbutyrate (2MB) supplementation on performance, ruminal fermentation, bacteria abundance, microbial enzyme activity and urinary excretion of purine derivatives (PD) in steers. Eight ruminally cannulated Simmental steers (12 months of age; 389 ± 3.7 kg of body weight) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Moderate-concentrate (400 g/kg diet [MC]) or high-concentrate (600 g/kg diet [HC]) diets were fed with or without 2MB (0 g/day [2MB-] or 15.0 g/day [2MB+]). Dry matter intake and average daily gain increased, but feed conversion ratio decreased with the HC diet or 2MB supplementation. Ruminal pH decreased, but total volatile fatty acid increased with the HC diet or 2MB supplementation. Molar proportion of acetate and acetate-to-propionate ratio decreased with the HC diet, but increased with 2MB supplementation. Propionate molar proportion and ruminal NH 3 -N content increased with the HC diet, but decreased with 2MB supplementation. Neutral detergent fibre degradability decreased with the HC diet, but increased with 2MB supplementation. Crude protein degradability increased with the HC diet or 2MB supplementation. Abundance of Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Fibrobacter succinogenes and Bufyrivibrio fibrisolvens as well as activities of carboxymethyl cellulase, cellobiase, xylanase and pectinase decreased with the HC diet, but increased with 2MB supplementation. However, abundance of Prevotella ruminicola and Ruminobacter amylophilus as well as activities of α-amylase and protease increased with the HC diet or 2MB supplementation. Total PD excretion also increased with the HC diet or 2MB supplementation. The results suggested that growth performance, ruminal fermentation, CP degradability and total PD excretion increased with increasing dietary concentrate level from 40% to 60% or 2MB supplementation. The

  13. The ratio R = dσL/dσT in heavy-quark pair leptoproduction as a probe of linearly polarized gluons in unpolarized proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremov, A. V.; Ivanov, N. Ya.; Teryaev, O. V.

    2018-05-01

    We study the Callan-Gross ratio R = dσL / dσT in heavy-quark pair leptoproduction, lN →l‧ Q Q bar X, as a probe of linearly polarized gluons inside unpolarized proton, where dσT (dσL) is the differential cross section of the γ* N → Q Q bar X process initiated by a transverse (longitudinal) virtual photon. Note first that the maximal value for the quantity R allowed by the photon-gluon fusion with unpolarized gluons is large, about 2. We calculate the contribution of the transverse-momentum dependent gluonic counterpart of the Boer-Mulders function, h1 ⊥g , describing the linear polarization of gluons inside unpolarized proton. Our analysis shows that the maximum value of the ratio R depends strongly on the gluon polarization; it varies from 0 to Q2/4m2 depending on h1⊥g . We conclude that the Callan-Gross ratio in heavy-quark pair leptoproduction is predicted to be large and very sensitive to the contribution of linearly polarized gluons. For this reason, future measurements of the longitudinal and transverse components of the charm and bottom production cross sections at the proposed EIC and LHeC colliders seem to be very promising for determination of the linear polarization of gluons inside unpolarized proton.

  14. Lanthanide(III) complexes of a mono(methylphosphonate) analogue of H4dota: the influence of protonation of the phosphonate moiety on the TSAP/SAP isomer ratio and the water exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudovský, Jakub; Cígler, Petr; Kotek, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Vojtísek, Pavel; Lukes, Ivan; Peters, Joop A; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2005-04-08

    A monophosphonate analogue of H4dota, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-4,7,10-tris(carboxymethyl)-1-methylphosphonic acid (H5do3aP), and its complexes with lanthanides were synthesized. Multinuclear NMR studies reveal that, in aqueous solution, lanthanide(III) complexes of the ligand exhibit structures analogous to those of H4dota complexes. Thus, the central ion is nine-coordinate, surrounded by four nitrogen atoms, three acetate and one phosphonate oxygen atoms, and one water molecule in an apical position. For complexes of H5do3aP with Ln(III) ions in the middle of the series, the abundance of the desired twisted square-antiprismatic (TSAP) isomer is higher than for the corresponding H4dota complexes. The TSAP/square-antiprismatic (SAP) isomer ratio is highly sensitive to protonation of the phosphonate group: a higher abundance of the TSAP isomer was found in acidic solutions. The microscopic protonation constants of the TSAP isomers are higher than those of the SAP isomers. The presence of one water molecule in the first coordination sphere of the complexes in the pH region studied (pH 2.5-7.0) is confirmed by 17O NMR spectroscopy. The results of a simultaneous fit of variable-temperature 17O NMR relaxation data and 1H NMRD profiles show that the residence time of water (tauM) in the Gd(III) complex is much smaller than for [Gd(dota)(H2O)]-. The exchange rate appears to be dependent on the pH of the solution. The values of tauM are 37, 40, and 14 ns at pH 2.5, 4.7, and 7.0, respectively. These observations can be explained by an extensive second-sphere hydrogen-bonding network that varies with the state of protonation of the phosphonate moiety. Upon protonation of the complex, the second-sphere hydration probably becomes more ordered, which may result in a decrease in penetrability and an increase in tauM. The relaxivity of the Gd(III) complex is almost independent of the pH and is equal to 4.7 s(-1) mM(-1) (20 MHz, pH 7 and 37 degrees C). The solid

  15. Ion-microprobe measurements of Mg, Ca, Ti and Fe isotopic ratios and trace element abundance in hibonite-bearing inclusions in primitive meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis reports the isotopic abundances of Mg, Ca, and Ti and rare earth element (REE) abundances in 19 hibonite-bearing inclusions from primative meteorites. The isotopic ratios of Fe were measured in one of the samples, Lance HH-1. These measurements were made by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (CAMECA IMS-3f). The novel hardware and software developments that made this work possible are described in detail. The samples were studied in thin section in order to investigate the relationship between the inclusions and their mineralogical environments. Inclusions from a number of different meteorites, specifically, Mighei, Murray, Murchison, Lance, Efremovka, Vigarano, Qingzhen, Dhajala, and Semarkona, were studied. The isotopes of Ca and Ti show large and correlated abundance anomalies in their most neutron-rich isotopes, 48 Ca and 50 Ti. The largest anomalies among the samples studied here are in the Murray inclusion MY-F6, with a 4.6% deficit in 48 Ca and a 5.2% deficit in 50 Ti, and Lance HH-1, with 3.3% and 6.0% deficits in 48 Ca and 50 Ti respectively. Correlated excesses of 48 Ca and 50 Ti, up to 2.4% and 1.4% respectively, are found in some other samples studied here. The fact that there is a correlation of isotopic anomalies in two different elements is clear evidence for a nucleosynthetic origin of these effects. Various possibilities for the origin of these isotopic anomalies are discussed and it is shown that a Cosmic Chemical Memory-like model of the incomplete mixing of dust grains from one or several supernovae is sufficient to explain the data. Magnesium isotopes show excesses of 26 Mg, attributable to the in-situ decay of 26 Al, in 7 of these inclusions

  16. Proton-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitenzahl, I.R.; Timmes, F.X.; Marin-Lafleche, A.; Brown, E.; Magkotsios, G.; Truran, J.

    2008-01-01

    Proton-rich material in a state of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is one of the least studied regimes of nucleosynthesis. One reason for this is that after hydrogen burning, stellar evolution proceeds at conditions of an equal number of neutrons and protons or at a slight degree of neutron-richness. Proton-rich nucleosynthesis in stars tends to occur only when hydrogen-rich material that accretes onto a white dwarf or a neutron star explodes, or when neutrino interactions in the winds from a nascent proto-neutron star or collapsar disk drive the matter proton-rich prior to or during the nucleosynthesis. In this Letter we solve the NSE equations for a range of proton-rich thermodynamic conditions. We show that cold proton-rich NSE is qualitatively different from neutron-rich NSE. Instead of being dominated by the Fe-peak nuclei with the largest binding energy per nucleon that have a proton-to-nucleon ratio close to the prescribed electron fraction, NSE for proton-rich material near freezeout temperature is mainly composed of 56Ni and free protons. Previous results of nuclear reaction network calculations rely on this nonintuitive high-proton abundance, which this Letter explains. We show how the differences and especially the large fraction of free protons arises from the minimization of the free energy as a result of a delicate competition between the entropy and nuclear binding energy.

  17. Hippocampal and neocortical metabolite ratio in patients with complex partial seizure: short TE and long TE techniques using single voxel proton MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Il; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Byung In; Lee, Seung Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho

    2000-01-01

    To compare hippocampal and neocortical metabolite ratios using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy with different echo times in patients with complex partial seizure. Using a GE Signa 1.5T scanner with STEAM and PRESS sequences, automated single voxel proton MRS was used to determine metabolite ratio differences in the hippocampus and neocortex of nine complex partial seizure patients (mesial temporal sclerosis (n=3D5), status epilepticus (n=3D1), tumor (n=3D1), cortical dysplasia (n=3D1), occipital lobe epilepsy (n=3D1)). A total of 20 examinations were performed in the region of the hippocampus (n=3D17), temporal neocortex (n=3D1), and parieto-occipital gray matter (n=3D1). Voxel size range was 5.2-17.4 cm 3 . The calculated creatine (Cr) peak was employed as an internal reference and the relative ratio of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) was calculated for both short and long echo times using an automated PROBE/SV (GE Medical Systems) package. Each NAA/Cho ratio obtained using both PRESS and STEAM techniques was compared by means of statistical analysis (paired Student t-test). Using PRESS (long TE, 272 ms), NAA/Cho ratios were successfully calculated in 16 of 20 examinations; in four this was not possible due to noise levels of the Cr and Cho peaks. Using STEAM (short TE, 30 ms) NAA/Cho ratios were successfully calculated in 19 of 20 examinations; in one, the Cho peak could not be measured. Using PRESS and STEAM, mean and standard deviations for the NAA/Cho ratio were 1.22±0.50 and 1.16±0.36, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in this ratio between the short and long TE method (p less than 0.01). In complex partial seizure patients, no significant metabolite differences were found between short and long echo times of single voxel proton MR spectroscopy. The metabolite ratio at different echo times can be reliably obtained using this simplified and automated PROBE/SV quantitation method. (author)

  18. Hippocampal and neocortical metabolite ratio in patients with complex partial seizure: short TE and long TE techniques using single voxel proton MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Il; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Byung In; Lee, Seung Ik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho [Medical College, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-08-01

    To compare hippocampal and neocortical metabolite ratios using single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy with different echo times in patients with complex partial seizure. Using a GE Signa 1.5T scanner with STEAM and PRESS sequences, automated single voxel proton MRS was used to determine metabolite ratio differences in the hippocampus and neocortex of nine complex partial seizure patients (mesial temporal sclerosis (n=3D5), status epilepticus (n=3D1), tumor (n=3D1), cortical dysplasia (n=3D1), occipital lobe epilepsy (n=3D1)). A total of 20 examinations were performed in the region of the hippocampus (n=3D17), temporal neocortex (n=3D1), and parieto-occipital gray matter (n=3D1). Voxel size range was 5.2-17.4 cm{sup 3}. The calculated creatine (Cr) peak was employed as an internal reference and the relative ratio of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) was calculated for both short and long echo times using an automated PROBE/SV (GE Medical Systems) package. Each NAA/Cho ratio obtained using both PRESS and STEAM techniques was compared by means of statistical analysis (paired Student t-test). Using PRESS (long TE, 272 ms), NAA/Cho ratios were successfully calculated in 16 of 20 examinations; in four this was not possible due to noise levels of the Cr and Cho peaks. Using STEAM (short TE, 30 ms) NAA/Cho ratios were successfully calculated in 19 of 20 examinations; in one, the Cho peak could not be measured. Using PRESS and STEAM, mean and standard deviations for the NAA/Cho ratio were 1.22{+-}0.50 and 1.16{+-}0.36, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in this ratio between the short and long TE method (p less than 0.01). In complex partial seizure patients, no significant metabolite differences were found between short and long echo times of single voxel proton MR spectroscopy. The metabolite ratio at different echo times can be reliably obtained using this simplified and automated PROBE/SV quantitation method. (author)

  19. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  20. Evidence of enrichment by individual SN from elemental abundance ratios in the very metal-poor dSph galaxy Boötes I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltzing, S.; Eriksson, K.; Kleyna, J.; Wilkinson, M. I.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We establish the mean metallicity from high-resolution spectroscopy for the recently found dwarf spheroidal galaxy Boötes I and test whether it is a common feature for ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies to show signs of inhomogeneous chemical evolution (e.g. as found in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy). Methods: We analyse high-resolution, moderate signal-to-noise spectra for seven red giant stars in the Boötes I dSph galaxy using standard abundance analysis techniques. In particular, we assume local thermodynamic equilibrium and employ spherical model atmospheres and codes that take the sphericity of the star into account when calculating the elemental abundances. Results: We confirm previous determinations of the mean metallicity of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy to be -2.3 dex. Whilst five stars are clustered around this metallicity, one is significantly more metal-poor, at -2.9 dex, and one is more metal-rich at, -1.9 dex. Additionally, we find that one of the stars, Boo-127, shows an atypically high [Mg/Ca] ratio, indicative of stochastic enrichment processes within the dSph galaxy. Similar results have previously only been found in the Hercules and Draco dSph galaxies and appear, so far, to be unique to this type of galaxy. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  1. Study of the electroforming technology for high-aspect ratio micro structure which was machined by using proton beam writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, N.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we develop the formation process of Ni electrodeposited micro patterns, which is used for MEMS devices or nano-imprinting. The purpose of my study is creating the new process of fabricating 3-D complicated micro-pattern or micro-devices using electroforming and proton beam writing. In general, 'Through mask process' (like a LIGA process) is usually used to fabricate Ni electrodeposited micro patterns for making MEMS devices or microfabricated-molds. The strong point of 'Through mask process' is the simple shape of the electrode. It makes the deposition process easy, because the electrodeposited films just glow up from the bottom to top surface of the mold. And the shape of the electrodeposited films is the same as the electrode pattern from the bottom to top, like a simple pillar shape. However, this process also has some problems. In case of using 'Through mask process', it is difficult to fabricate the complicated 3-D shaped structures, which are bended, parted or severed at some part of the structure between the bottom and top, like a device with a micro sensor or micro total analysis system. In order to overcome these limitations, we try to fabricate Ni electrodeposited micro patterns using 'the Damascene process' and proton beam writing. (author)

  2. Determination of the ratio r v = d v u v of the valence quark distributions in the proton from neutrino and antineutrino reactions on hydrogen and deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Klein, H.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Wachsmuth, H.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1994-12-01

    Based on a QCD analysis of the parton momentum distributions in the proton, the ratio r v = d v / u v of the d and u valence quark distributions is determined as function of x in the range 0.01< x<0.7. The analysis uses data from neutrino and antineutrino charged current interactions on hydrogen and deuterium, obtained with BEBC in the (anti)neutrino wideband beam of the CERN SPS. Since v mainly depends on the deuterium/hydrogen ratios of the normalised x-y-Q 2-distributions many systematic effects cancel. It is found that r v decreases with increasing x, and drops below the naive SU(6) expectation of 0.5 for x≳0.3. An extrapolation of r v to x=1 is consistent with the hypothesis r v (1)=0.

  3. A measurement of the {psi}' to J/{psi} production ratio in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, Muenchen (Germany); Adams, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Agari, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (DE)] (and others)

    2006-07-15

    Ratios of the {psi}' over the J/{psi} production cross sections in the dilepton channel for C, Ti and W targets have been measured in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. The {psi}' and J/{psi} states were reconstructed in both the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and the e{sup +}e{sup -} decay modes. The measurements covered the kinematic range -0.35{<=}x{sub F}{<=}0.1 with transverse momentum p{sub T}{<=}4.5 GeV/c. The {psi}' to J/{psi} production ratio is almost constant in the covered x{sub F} range and shows a slow increase with p{sub T}. The angular dependence of the ratio has been used to measure the difference of the {psi}' and J/{psi} polarization. All results for the muon and electron decay channels are in good agreement: their ratio, averaged over all events, is R{sub {psi}}{sub '}({mu})/R{sub {psi}}{sub '}(e)=1.00{+-}0.08{+-}0.04. This result constitutes a new, direct experimental constraint on the double ratio of branching fractions, (B'({mu}).B(e))/(B({mu}).B'(e)), of {psi}'' and J/{psi} in the two channels. (orig.)

  4. Proton form factor ratio, μpGEP/GMP from double spin asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha Pushpakumari [Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon representing the effect of its structure on its response to electromagnetic probes such as electrons. They are functions of the four-momentum transfer squared Q2 between the electron and the proton. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton up to Q2 = 5.66 (GeV/c)2 using the double spin asymmetry with a polarized beam and target. Experiment E07-003 (SANE, Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment) was carried out in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in 2009 to study the proton spin structure functions with a dynamically polarized ammonia target and longitudinally polarized electron beam. By detecting elastically scattered protons in the High-Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) in coincidence with the electrons in the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), elastic measurements were carried out in parallel. The elastic double spin asymmetry allows one to extract the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM at high-momentum transfer, Q2= 5.66 (GeV/c)2. In addition to the coincidence data, inclusively scattered electrons from the polarized ammonia target were detected by HMS, which allows to measure the beam-target asymmetry in the elastic region with the target spin nearly perpendicular to the momentum transfer, and to extract GpE/GpM at low Q2= 2.06 (GeV/c)2. This alternative measurement of GpE/GpM has verified and confirmed the dramatic discrepancy at high Q2 between the Rosenbluth and the recoil-polarization-transfer iv method with a different measurement technique and systematic uncertainties uncorrelated to those of the recoil-polarization measurements. The measurement of the form factor ratio at Q2 = 2

  5. High-aspect ratio microstructures in p-type GaAs and InP created by proton beam writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, F.; Spemann, D.; Butz, T.

    2011-01-01

    With proton beam writing (PBW) and subsequent electrochemical etching in HF-solution the creation of high-aspect ratio microstructures in p-type InP was performed for the first time. Microstructures with high surface quality as well as high-aspect ratio possessing lateral dimensions down to 1 μm were produced. Furthermore, free-standing microstructures were created in this material by a combined irradiation with 2.25 MeV protons and 1.125 MeV H 2 + molecules, were the smallest structure dimension of 0.6 μm was achieved for a horizontal needle. The creation of nearly perfect circular microstructures indicates that the crystal structure has little effect on the structuring process by PBW in this material. Moreover, the effect of reduced etching inside of closed irradiation patterns, already known from Si and GaAs, was observed also in InP. In further PBW experiments and subsequent electrochemical etching with KOH-solution p-type GaAs microstructures were produced. By using a 4-fold higher etch current density of 45 mA/cm 2 compared to former PBW experiments on this material the quality of the microstructures could be improved significantly leading to high aspect-ratio structures with minimum lateral sizes of ∼1 μm, nearly vertical side walls as well as circular microstructures. This shows the reduced influence of the crystal structure on the shape of the microstructures compared to experiments with lower etch current density where only flat microstructures with inclined side walls determined by the crystal structure could be created.

  6. The H+/O ratio of proton translocation linked to the oxidation of succinate by mitochondria. Reply to a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehninger, A L; Reynafarje, B; Hendler, R W; Shrager, R I

    1985-11-18

    Costa, L.E., Reynafarje, B. and Lehninger, A.L. [(1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 4802-4811] have reported 'second-generation' measurements of the H+/O ratio approaching 8.0 for vectorial H+ translocation coupled to succinate oxidation by rat liver mitochondria. In a Commentary in this Journal [Krab, K., Soos, J. and Wikström, M. (1984) FEBS Lett. 178, 187-192] it was concluded that the measurements of Costa et al. significantly overestimated the true H+/O stoichiometry. It is shown here that the mathematical simulation on which Krab et al. based this claim is faulty and that data reported by Costa et al. had already excluded the criticism advanced by Krab et al. Also reported are new data, obtained under conditions in which the arguments of Krab et al. are irrelevant, which confirm that the H+/O ratio for succinate oxidation extrapolated to level flow is close to 8.

  7. Seasonal dynamics of the copepod community in a tropical monsoonal estuary and the role of sex ratio in their abundance pattern

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vineetha, G.; Madhu, N.V.; Kusum, K.K.; Sooria, P.M.

    structure of copepods in the tropical monsoonal estuarine system.The ecological scenario in the Cochin estuary revealed that irrespective of the season, higher zooplankton abundance occurred in the mesohaline zone (MSZ; salinity 5–18) of the estuary, despite...

  8. Direct measurement of the initial proton extrusion to oxygen uptake ratio accompanying succinate oxidation by rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, O H; Shrager, R I; Bunow, B; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L; Hendler, R W

    1986-01-01

    The problem of obtaining very early ratios for the H+/O stoichiometry accompanying succinate oxidation by rat liver mitochondria was attacked using new techniques for direct measurement rather than extrapolations based on data obtained after mixing and the recovery of the electrode from initial injection of O2. Respiration was quickly initiated in a thoroughly mixed O2-containing suspension of mitochondria under a CO atmosphere by photolysis of the CO-cytochrome c oxidase complex-. Fast responding O2 and pH electrodes were used to collect data every 10 ms. The response time for each electrode was experimentally measured in each experiment and suitable corrections for electrode relaxations were made. With uncorrected data obtained after 0.8 s, the extrapolation back to zero time on the basis of single-exponential curve fitting confirmed values close to 8.0 as previously reported (Costa et al., 1984). The data directly obtained, however, indicate an initial burst in H+/O ratio that peaked to values of approximately 20 to 30 prior to 50 ms and which was no longer evident after 0.3 s. Newer information and considerations that place all extrapolation methods in question are discussed. PMID:3019443

  9. Measurement of the antiproton/proton ratio at TeV energies with the ARGO-YBJ detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Sciascio, Giuseppe; Iuppa, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons provide an important probe for the study of cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar space and to investigate the existence of Galactic dark matter. Cosmic rays are hampered by the Moon, therefore a deficit of cosmic rays in its direction is expected (the so-called Moon shadow). The Earth-Moon system acts as a magnetic spectrometer. In fact, due to the geomagnetic field the center of the Moon shifts westward by an amount depending on the primary cosmic ray energy. Paths of primary antiprotons are therefore deflected in an opposite sense in their way to the Earth. This effect allows, in principle, the search of antiparticles in the opposite direction of the observed Moon shadow. The ARGO-YBJ experiment, in stable data taking since November 2007 with an energy threshold of a few 100s of GeV, is observing the Moon shadow with high statistical significance. Using about 1 year data, an upper limit of the p-bar/p flux ratio in the few-TeV energy region is set to a few percent with a confidence level of 90%.

  10. Midrapidity antiproton-to-proton ratio in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 0.9$ and $7$~TeV measured by the ALICE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aamodt, K.; Abeysekara, U.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Abramyan, A.; Adamova, D.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A.G.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahn, S.U.; Akimoto, R.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Almaraz Avina, E.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anelli, G.; Angelov, V.; Anson, C.; Anticic, T.; Antinori, F.; Antinori, S.; Antipin, K.; Antonczyk, D.; Antonioli, P.; Anzo, A.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshauser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arceo, R.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I.C.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T.C.; Aysto, J.; Azmi, M.D.; Bablok, S.; Bach, M.; Badala, A.; Baek, Y.W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Ban, J.; Barbera, R.; Barnafoldi, G.G.; Barnby, L.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Barile, F.; Basile, M.; Basmanov, V.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; 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Zavada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zenin, A.; Zepeda, A.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zychacek, V.; Zynovyev, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ratio of the yields of antiprotons to protons in pp collisions has been measured by the ALICE experiment at $\\sqrt{s} = 0.9$ and $7$~TeV during the initial running periods of the Large Hadron Collider(LHC). The measurement covers the transverse momentum interval $0.45 < p_{\\rm{t}} < 1.05$~GeV/$c$ and rapidity $|y| < 0.5$. The ratio is measured to be $R_{|y| < 0.5} = 0.957 \\pm 0.006 (stat.) \\pm 0.014 (syst.)$ at $0.9$~TeV and $R_{|y| < 0.5} = 0.991 \\pm 0.005 (stat.) \\pm 0.014 (syst.)$ at $7$~TeV and it is independent of both rapidity and transverse momentum. The results are consistent with the conventional model of baryon-number transport and set stringent limits on any additional contributions to baryon-number transfer over very large rapidity intervals in pp collisions.

  11. Measurements of isomeric yield ratios of fission products from proton-induced fission on natU and 232Th via direct ion counting

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    Rakopoulos Vasileios

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Independent isomeric yield ratios (IYR of 81Ge, 96Y, 97Y, 97Nb, 128Sn and 130Sn have been determined in the 25 MeV proton-induced fission of natU and 232Th. The measurements were performed at the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL facility at the University of Jyväskylä. A direct ion counting measurement of the isomeric fission yield ratios was accomplished for the first time, registering the fission products in less than a second after their production. In addition, the IYRs of natU were measured by means of γ-spectroscopy in order to verify the consistency of the recently upgraded experimental setup. From the obtained results, indications of a dependence of the production rate on the fissioning system can be noticed. These data were compared with data available in the literature, whenever possible. Using the TALYS code and the experimentally obtained IYRs, we also deduced the average angular momentum of the fission fragments after scission.

  12. Material elemental decomposition in dual and multi-energy CT via a sparsity-dictionary approach for proton stopping power ratio calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenyang; Li, Bin; Chen, Liyuan; Yang, Ming; Lou, Yifei; Jia, Xun

    2018-04-01

    Accurate calculation of proton stopping power ratio (SPR) relative to water is crucial to proton therapy treatment planning, since SPR affects prediction of beam range. Current standard practice derives SPR using a single CT scan. Recent studies showed that dual-energy CT (DECT) offers advantages to accurately determine SPR. One method to further improve accuracy is to incorporate prior knowledge on human tissue composition through a dictionary approach. In addition, it is also suggested that using CT images with multiple (more than two) energy channels, i.e., multi-energy CT (MECT), can further improve accuracy. In this paper, we proposed a sparse dictionary-based method to convert CT numbers of DECT or MECT to elemental composition (EC) and relative electron density (rED) for SPR computation. A dictionary was constructed to include materials generated based on human tissues of known compositions. For a voxel with CT numbers of different energy channels, its EC and rED are determined subject to a constraint that the resulting EC is a linear non-negative combination of only a few tissues in the dictionary. We formulated this as a non-convex optimization problem. A novel algorithm was designed to solve the problem. The proposed method has a unified structure to handle both DECT and MECT with different number of channels. We tested our method in both simulation and experimental studies. Average errors of SPR in experimental studies were 0.70% in DECT, 0.53% in MECT with three energy channels, and 0.45% in MECT with four channels. We also studied the impact of parameter values and established appropriate parameter values for our method. The proposed method can accurately calculate SPR using DECT and MECT. The results suggest that using more energy channels may improve the SPR estimation accuracy. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Proton: the particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Proton: The Particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  15. Theoretical variance analysis of single- and dual-energy computed tomography methods for calculating proton stopping power ratios of biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, M; Zhu, X R; Mohan, R; Dong, L; Virshup, G; Clayton, J

    2010-01-01

    We discovered an empirical relationship between the logarithm of mean excitation energy (ln I m ) and the effective atomic number (EAN) of human tissues, which allows for computing patient-specific proton stopping power ratios (SPRs) using dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging. The accuracy of the DECT method was evaluated for 'standard' human tissues as well as their variance. The DECT method was compared to the existing standard clinical practice-a procedure introduced by Schneider et al at the Paul Scherrer Institute (the stoichiometric calibration method). In this simulation study, SPRs were derived from calculated CT numbers of known material compositions, rather than from measurement. For standard human tissues, both methods achieved good accuracy with the root-mean-square (RMS) error well below 1%. For human tissues with small perturbations from standard human tissue compositions, the DECT method was shown to be less sensitive than the stoichiometric calibration method. The RMS error remained below 1% for most cases using the DECT method, which implies that the DECT method might be more suitable for measuring patient-specific tissue compositions to improve the accuracy of treatment planning for charged particle therapy. In this study, the effects of CT imaging artifacts due to the beam hardening effect, scatter, noise, patient movement, etc were not analyzed. The true potential of the DECT method achieved in theoretical conditions may not be fully achievable in clinical settings. Further research and development may be needed to take advantage of the DECT method to characterize individual human tissues.

  16. Accurate prediction of H3O+ and D3O+ sensitivity coefficients to probe a variable proton-to-electron mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Polyansky, O. L.; Ovsyannikov, R. I.; Thiel, W.; Špirko, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mass sensitivity of the vibration-rotation-inversion transitions of H316O+, H318O+, and D316O+ is investigated variationally using the nuclear motion program TROVE (Yurchenko, Thiel & Jensen). The calculations utilize new high-level ab initio potential energy and dipole moment surfaces. Along with the mass dependence, frequency data and Einstein A coefficients are computed for all transitions probed. Particular attention is paid to the Δ|k| = 3 and Δ|k - l| = 3 transitions comprising the accidentally coinciding |J, K = 0, v2 = 0+> and |J, K = 3, v2 = 0-> rotation-inversion energy levels. The newly computed probes exhibit sensitivities comparable to their ammonia and methanol counterparts, thus demonstrating their potential for testing the cosmological stability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio. The theoretical TROVE results are in close agreement with sensitivities obtained using the non-rigid and rigid inverter approximate models, confirming that the ab initio theory used in the present study is adequate.

  17. Effects of in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections on stopping observable and ratio of free protons in heavy-ion collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Jun; Huang, Ching-Yuan [Sun Yat-sen University, Sino-French Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Zhuhai (China); Xie, Wen-Jie [Yuncheng University, Department of Physics, Yuncheng (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Zhang, Feng-Shou [Beijing Normal University, The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing (China); National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2016-07-15

    The effects of in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections on the stopping observable and ratio of free protons in heavy-ion collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon have been investigated within the framework of the IQMD+GEMINI model. Five kinds of in-medium corrections of nucleon-nucleon cross sections, which are considerably different in the referred energy and density, have been used in the model. It has been found that calculations of the stopping decrease when the in-medium cross sections decrease. Moreover, the ratio of free protons R{sub p} depends not only on the value of the in-medium factors but also on its isospin dependence. In order to investigate the isospin effect of in-medium factors on the ratio of free protons R{sub p}, the isospin dependence of in-medium factors has been adjusted and used in the model. The calculations have shown that the isospin dependence of in-medium factors does not impact the stopping, but impacts the ratio of free protons R{sub p}. When the in-medium factors relation f{sub nn}{sup med} > f{sub pp}{sup med} is used in the model, the calculated values of R{sub p} are larger than those in the f{sub nn}{sup med} < f{sub pp}{sup med} case. (orig.)

  18. Systematic variations of 87Sr/56Sr ratios, Sr compositions, selected major-oxide concentrations, and mineral abundances in piston cores from the Red Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boger, P.D.; Boger, J.L.; Faure, G.

    1980-01-01

    A mixing model is presented which relates the concentrations of Sr to the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios and concentrations of other elements contained in a mixture of two components. The model is applied to the measured 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios, Sr, CaO, Fe 2 O 3 and SiO 2 concentrations of the detrital fractions of sediment from three piston cores representing different depositional environments in the Red Sea. The sediment is shown to be a mixture of two components derived from old sialic rocks and young volcanic rocks of the surrounding land masses. One of the cores contained a third component which is identified as authigenic Fe 2 O 3 . Removal of this contaminant is shown to return the system to its original detrital constituents. (Auth.)

  19. Nearly constant ratio between the proton inertial scale and the spectrum break length scale in the plasma beta range from 0.2 to 1.4 in the solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Tu, C. Y.; He, J.; Wang, L.

    2017-12-01

    The spectrum break at the ion scale of the solar wind magnetic fluctuations are considered to give important clue on the turbulence dissipation mechanism. Among several possible mechanisms, the most notable ones are the two mechanisms that related respectively with proton thermal gyro-radius and proton inertial length. However, no definite conclusion has been given for which one is more reasonable because the two parameters have similar values in the normal plasma beta range. Here we do a statistical study for the first time to see if the two mechanism predictions have different dependence on the solar wind velocity and on the plasma beta in the normal plasma beta range in the solar wind at 1 AU. From magnetic measurements by Wind, Ulysses and Messenger, we select 60 data sets with duration longer than 8 hours. We found that the ratio between the proton inertial scale and the spectrum break scale do not change considerably with both varying the solar wind speed from 300km/s to 800km/s and varying the plasma beta from 0.2 to 1.4. The average value of the ratio times 2pi is 0.46 ± 0.08. However, the ratio between the proton gyro-radius and the break scale changes clearly. This new result shows that the proton inertial scale could be a single factor that determines the break length scale and hence gives a strong evidence to support the dissipation mechanism related to it in the normal plasma beta range. The value of the constant ratio may relate with the dissipation mechanism, but it needs further theoretical study to give detailed explanation.

  20. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level2H-,13C- and15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Albertino, A.; Sauer, P.E.; Qi, H.; Molinie, R.; Mesnard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the S values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown S values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for ??13C and ??13N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: ??2Hnicotine -162 to -45%o, ??13Cnicotine -30.05 to +7.72%, ?? 15Nnicotine -6.03 to +33.62%; ??15N acetanilide +1-18 to +40.57%; ??13Curea -34.13 to +11.71%, ??15Nurea +0.26 to +40.61% (recommended ?? values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as the first organic nitrogen stable isotope reference materials for GC-IRMS that are available with different ??13N

  1. Nicotine, acetanilide and urea multi-level 2H-, 13C- and 15N-abundance reference materials for continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Albertino, Andrea; Sauer, Peter E; Qi, Haiping; Molinie, Roland; Mesnard, François

    2009-11-01

    Accurate determinations of stable isotope ratios require a calibration using at least two reference materials with different isotopic compositions to anchor the isotopic scale and compensate for differences in machine slope. Ideally, the delta values of these reference materials should bracket the isotopic range of samples with unknown delta values. While the practice of analyzing two isotopically distinct reference materials is common for water (VSMOW-SLAP) and carbonates (NBS 19 and L-SVEC), the lack of widely available organic reference materials with distinct isotopic composition has hindered the practice when analyzing organic materials by elemental analysis/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). At present only L-glutamic acids USGS40 and USGS41 satisfy these requirements for delta13C and delta15N, with the limitation that L-glutamic acid is not suitable for analysis by gas chromatography (GC). We describe the development and quality testing of (i) four nicotine laboratory reference materials for on-line (i.e. continuous flow) hydrogen reductive gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-IRMS), (ii) five nicotines for oxidative C, N gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass-spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS, or GC-IRMS), and (iii) also three acetanilide and three urea reference materials for on-line oxidative EA-IRMS for C and N. Isotopic off-line calibration against international stable isotope measurement standards at Indiana University adhered to the 'principle of identical treatment'. The new reference materials cover the following isotopic ranges: delta2H(nicotine) -162 to -45 per thousand, delta13C(nicotine) -30.05 to +7.72 per thousand, delta15N(nicotine) -6.03 to +33.62 per thousand; delta15N(acetanilide) +1.18 to +40.57 per thousand; delta13C(urea) -34.13 to +11.71 per thousand, delta15N(urea) +0.26 to +40.61 per thousand (recommended delta values refer to calibration with NBS 19, L-SVEC, IAEA-N-1, and IAEA-N-2). Nicotines fill a gap as

  2. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  3. Measurement of the proton form factors ratio GE/GM to Q2 = 5.6 GeV2 by recoil polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayou, Olivier [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the results of the experiment E99-007, which measured the ratio of the electric to magnetic form factors of the proton to the four momentum transfer square Q2 = 5.6 GeV2, by recoil polarimetry. Data were taken in 2000 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. A 4.6 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target. The polarization of the recoil proton was measured in the Focal Plane Polarimeter, located after one of the two High Resolution Spectrometers in the hall. The ratio of the transverse to longitudinal components of the recoil proton polarization is proportional to the ratio of the form factors. Elastic events were selected by detecting the scattered electron in a large acceptance lead-glass calorimeter. The main result of this experiment is the linear decrease of the form factor ratio with increasing Q2, corresponding to different spatial distributions of the electric charge and the magnetization. Numerous theoretical calculations show that relativistic effects, such as mixing of spin states due to Lorentz boosts, are important to account for the observed data in this critical intermediate kinematic region.

  4. CrossRef Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M  J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E  F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X  D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M  J; Chang, Y  H; Chen, A  I; Chen, G  M; Chen, H  S; Cheng, L; Chou, H  Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C  H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y  M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M  B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R  J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D  M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K  H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K  C; He, Z  H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T  H; Huang, H; Huang, Z  C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W  Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S  C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G  N; Kim, K  S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M  S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H  T; Lee, S  C; Leluc, C; Li, H  S; Li, J  Q; Li, Q; Li, T  X; Li, W; Li, Z  H; Li, Z  Y; Lim, S; Lin, C  H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S  Q; Lu, Y  S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J  Z; Lv, S  S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D  C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J  Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X  M; Qin, X; Qu, Z  Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P  G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J  S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S  M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E  S; Shan, B  S; Shi, J  Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J  W; Sun, W  H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X  W; Tang, Z  C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C  C; Ting, S  M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J  P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L  Q; Wang, N  H; Wang, Q  L; Wang, X; Wang, X  Q; Wang, Z  X; Wei, C  C; Weng, Z  L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R  Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y  J; Yu, Z  Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J  H; Zhang, S  D; Zhang, S  W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z  M; Zhu, Z  Q; Zhuang, H  L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×105 antiproton events and 2.42×109 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p¯, proton p, and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e− flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  5. A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen C. Piper

    2005-10-15

    The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

  6. Baryon production in proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, F.M.; Werner, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by the recent rapidity spectra of baryons and antibaryons in pp collisions at 158 GeV and the Ω-bar/Ω ratio discussion, we reviewed string formation mechanism and some string models. This investigation told us how color strings are formed in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions

  7. THE SEGUE STELLAR PARAMETER PIPELINE. V. ESTIMATION OF ALPHA-ELEMENT ABUNDANCE RATIOS FROM LOW-RESOLUTION SDSS/SEGUE STELLAR SPECTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Sun; Beers, Timothy C.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Lai, David K.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Morrison, Heather L.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; An, Deokkeun; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Yanny, Brian

    2011-01-01

    We present a method for the determination of [α/Fe] ratios from low-resolution (R = 2000) SDSS/SEGUE stellar spectra. By means of a star-by-star comparison with degraded spectra from the ELODIE spectral library and with a set of moderately high-resolution (R = 15, 000) and medium-resolution (R = 6000) spectra of SDSS/SEGUE stars, we demonstrate that we are able to measure [α/Fe] from SDSS/SEGUE spectra (with S/N>20/1) to a precision of better than 0.1 dex, for stars with atmospheric parameters in the range T eff = [4500, 7000] K, log g = [1.5, 5.0], and [Fe/H] = [-1.4, +0.3], over the range [α/Fe] = [-0.1, +0.6]. For stars with [Fe/H] 25/1). Over the full temperature range considered, the lowest metallicity star for which a confident estimate of [α/Fe] can be obtained from our approach is [Fe/H] ∼-2.5; preliminary tests indicate that a metallicity limit as low as [Fe/H] ∼-3.0 may apply to cooler stars. As a further validation of this approach, weighted averages of [α/Fe] obtained for SEGUE spectra of likely member stars of Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, and M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, and NGC 6791) exhibit good agreement with the values of [α/Fe] from previous studies. The results of the comparison with NGC 6791 imply that the metallicity range for the method may extend to ∼+0.5.

  8. Determining the Local Abundance of Martian Methane and its 13-C/l2-C and D/H Isotopic Ratios for Comparison with Related Gas and Soil Analysis on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Martian methane will require numerous complementary measurements from both in situ and remote sensing investigations and laboratory work to correlate planetary surface geophysics with atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Three instruments (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Gas Chromatograph (GC) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS)) with sophisticated sample handling and processing capability make up the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical chemistry suite on NASA s 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Leveraging off the SAM sample and gas processing capability that includes methane enrichment, TLS has unprecedented sensitivity for measuring absolute methane (parts-per-trillion), water, and carbon dioxide abundances in both the Martian atmosphere and evolved from heated soil samples. In concert with a wide variety of associated trace gases (e.g. SO2, H2S, NH3, higher hydrocarbons, organics, etc.) and other isotope ratios measured by SAM, TLS will focus on determining the absolute abundances of methane, water and carbon dioxide, and their isotope ratios: 13C/12C and D/H in methane; 13C/12C and 18O/17O/16O in carbon dioxide; and 18O/17O/16O and D/H in water. Measurements near the MSL landing site will be correlated with satellite (Mars Express, Mars 2016) and ground-based observations.

  9. Effect of nuclear reaction rates on primordial abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Abhishek; Basu, D.N.

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical predictions of the primordial abundances of elements in the big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) are dominated by uncertainties in the input nuclear reaction rates. The effect of modifying these reaction rates on light element abundance yields in BBN by replacing the thirty-five reaction rates out of the existing eighty-eight has been investigated. Also the study have been taken of these yields as functions of evolution time or temperature. Here it has been found that using these new reaction rates results in only a little increase in helium mass fraction over that obtained previously in BBN calculations. This allows insights into the role of the nuclear reaction rates in the setting of the neutron-to-proton ratio during the BBN epoch. We observe that most of these nuclear reactions have minimal effect on the standard BBN abundance yields of 6 Li and 7 Li

  10. Initial Report of a Prospective Dosimetric and Clinical Feasibility Trial Demonstrates the Potential of Protons to Increase the Therapeutic Ratio in Breast Cancer Compared With Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Julie A., E-mail: jbradley@floridaproton.org; Dagan, Roi; Ho, Meng Wei; Rutenberg, Michael; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between proton therapy (PT) and conventional radiation and determine the feasibility of PT for regional nodal irradiation (RNI) in women with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: From 2012 to 2014, 18 women (stage IIA-IIIB) requiring RNI prospectively enrolled on a pilot study. Median age was 51.8 years (range, 42-73 years). The cohort included breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and mastectomy patients and right- and left-sided cancers. Treatment targets and organs at risk were delineated on computed tomography scans, and PT and conventional plans were developed. Toxicity was prospectively recorded using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. A Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test compared the dose-volume parameters. The primary endpoint was a reduction in cardiac V5. Results: Median follow-up was 20 months (range, 2-31 months). For all patients, the PT plan better met the dosimetric goals and was used for treatment. Proton therapy alone was used for 10 patients (9 postmastectomy, 1 after BCT) and combined proton–photon in 8 (6 BCT, 2 postmastectomy with immediate expander reconstruction). Proton therapy improved coverage of level 2 axilla (P=.0005). Adequate coverage of internal mammary nodes was consistently achieved with PT (median D95, 50.3 Gy; range, 46.6-52.1 Gy) but not with conventional radiation therapy (median D95, 48.2 Gy; range, 40.8-55 Gy; P=.0005). Median cardiac V5 was 0.6% with PT and 16.3% with conventional radiation (P<.0001). Median ipsilateral lung V5 and V20 were improved with PT (median V5 35.3% vs 60.5% [P<.0001]; and median V20, 21.6% vs 35.5% [P<.0001]). Grade 3 dermatitis developed in 4 patients (22%), which was the only grade 3 toxicity. No grade 4+ toxicities developed. Conclusion: Proton therapy for RNI after mastectomy or BCT significantly improves cardiac dose, especially for left-sided patients, and lung V5 and V20 in all patients without excessive acute toxicity

  11. Technical note: Evaluation of the uncertainties in (choline+creatine)/citrate ratios measured by proton MR spectroscopic imaging in patients suspicious for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbyn, S.; Krssak, M.; Memarsadeghi, M.; Gholami, B.; Haitel, A.; Weber, M.; Helbich, T.H.; Trattnig, S.; Moser, E.; Gruber, S.

    2014-07-15

    The presented evaluation of the relative uncertainty (δ'CCC) of the (choline + creatine)/citrate (CC/C) ratios can provide objective information about the quality and diagnostic value of prostate MR spectroscopic imaging data. This information can be combined with the numeric values of CC/C ratios and provides metabolic-quality maps enabling accurate cancer detection and user-independent data evaluation. In addition, the prostate areas suffering most from the low precision of CC/C ratios (e. g., prostate base) were identified.

  12. Energy dependence of kaon-to-proton ratio fluctuations in central Pb+Pb collisions from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 6.3 to 17.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Beck, H.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Blume, C.; Bogusz, M.; Boimska, B.; Book, J.; Botje, M.; Buncic, P.; Cetner, T.; Christakoglou, P.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J.G.; Eckardt, V.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Friese, V.; Gazdzicki, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Hohne, C.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V.I.; Kollegger, T.; Kowalski, M.; Kresan, D.; Laszlo, A.; Lacey, R.; van Leeuwen, M.; Mackowiak, M.; Makariev, M.; Malakhov, A.I.; Mateev, M.; Melkumov, G.L.; Mitrovski, M.; Mrowczynski, St.; Nicolic, V.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A.D.; Peryt, W.; Pluta, J.; Prindle, D.; Puhlhofer, F.; Renfordt, R.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybczynski, M.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sikler, F.; Skrzypczak, E.; Slodkowski, M.; Stefanek, G.; Stock, R.; Strobele, H.; Susa, T.; Szuba, M.; Utvic, M.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G.I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranic, D.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.

    2011-01-01

    Kaons and protons carry large parts of two conserved quantities, strangeness and baryon number. It is argued that their correlation and thus also fluctuations are sensitive to conditions prevailing at the anticipated parton-hadron phase boundary. Fluctuations of the $(\\mathrm{K}^+ + \\mathrm{K}^-)/(\\mathrm{p}+\\bar{\\mathrm{p}})$ and $\\mathrm{K}^+/\\mathrm{p}$ ratios have been measured for the first time by NA49 in central Pb+Pb collisions at 5 SPS energies between $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 6.3~GeV and 17.3~GeV. Both ratios exhibit a change of sign in $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{dyn}}$, a measure of non-statistical fluctuations, around $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 8~GeV. Below this energy, $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{dyn}}$ is positive, indicating higher fluctuation compared to a mixed event background sample, while for higher energies, $\\sigma_{\\mathrm{dyn}}$ is negative, indicating correlated emission of kaons and protons. The results are compared to UrQMD calculations which which give a good description at the higher SPS energies, but fail to reproduc...

  13. Abundances in the Galactic bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbuy, B; Alves-Brito, A [Universidade de Sao Paulo, IAG, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Ortolani, S; Zoccali, M [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 2, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Hill, V; Gomez, A [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Melendez, J [Centro de AstrofIsica da Universidade de Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Asplund, M [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Postfach 1317, 85741 Garching (Germany); Bica, E [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970 (Brazil); Renzini, A [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Minniti, D [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)], E-mail: barbuy@astro.iag.usp.br

    2008-12-15

    The metallicity distribution and abundance ratios of the Galactic bulge are reviewed. Issues raised by recent work of different groups, in particular the high metallicity end, the overabundance of {alpha}-elements in the bulge relative to the thick disc and the measurement of giants versus dwarfs, are discussed. Abundances in the old moderately metal-poor bulge globular clusters are described.

  14. A Critical Proton MR Spectroscopy Marker of Alzheimer's Disease Early Neurodegenerative Change: Low Hippocampal NAA/Cr Ratio Impacts APOE ɛ4 Mexico City Children and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Melo-Sánchez, Gastón; Rodríguez-Díaz, Joel; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Styner, Martin; Mukherjee, Partha S; Lin, Weili; Jewells, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Severe air pollution exposures produce systemic, respiratory, myocardial, and brain inflammation and Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmarks in clinically healthy children. We tested whether hippocampal metabolite ratios are associated with contrasting levels of air pollution, APOE, and body mass index (BMI) in paired healthy children and one parent sharing the same APOE alleles. We used 1H-MRS to interrogate bilateral hippocampal single-voxel in 57 children (12.45 ± 3.4 years) and their 48 parents (37.5 ± 6.78 years) from a low pollution city versus Mexico City (MC). NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr metabolite ratios were analyzed. The right hippocampus NAA/Cr ratio was significantly different between cohorts (p = 0.007). The NAA/Cr ratio in right hippocampus in controls versus APOE ɛ4 MC children and in left hippocampus in MC APOE ɛ4 parents versus their children was significantly different after adjusting for age, gender, and BMI (p = 0.027 and 0.01, respectively). The NAA/Cr ratio is considered reflective of neuronal density/functional integrity/loss of synapses/higher pTau burden, thus a significant decrease in hippocampal NAA/Cr ratios may constitute a spectral marker of early neurodegeneration in young urbanites. Decreases in NAA/Cr correlate well with cognitive function, behavioral symptoms, and dementia severity; thus, since the progression of AD starts decades before clinical diagnosis, our findings support the hypothesis that under chronic exposures to fine particulate matter and ozone above the standards, neurodegenerative processes start in childhood and APOE ɛ4 carriers are at higher risk. Gene and environmental factors are critical in the development of AD and the identification and neuroprotection of young urbanites at high risk must become a public health priority.

  15. Ammonia abundances in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  16. The relationship between cognitive impairment and in vivo metabolite ratios in patients with clinical Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, A.D.; Rai, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Previous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies have shown increased myo-inositol (MI) and decreased N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels in the parieto-occipital lobes of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to those with other dementias and normal subjects. This study aimed to establish the quantitative relationship between metabolite ratios and degree of cognitive impairment in patients with mild to moderate AD and sub-cortical ischaemic vascular dementia (SIVD). Forty-four older people with clinical dementia were recruited from a memory clinic and followed up for 2.0-3.5 years; 20 cases were finally classified as probable AD, 18 as SIVD and 6 as mixed type. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and short echo time single voxel automated MRS from the mesial parieto-occipital lobes were performed at the time of initial referral. Spearman rank correlation coefficients were calculated for MMSE scores and measured metabolite ratios MI/Cr, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/MI. The AD group showed a significant correlation between MMSE and NAA/MI (r=0.54, P=0.014) and NAA/Cr (r=0.48, P=0.033), and a negative, non-significant association with MI/Cr (r=-0.41, P=0.072). MI/Cr was negatively correlated with NAA/Cr (r=-0.51, P=0.021). Neither Cho/Cr ratios nor age correlated with cognitive function. The SIVD group showed no correlation between any of the measured metabolite ratios and MMSE score. This study reinforces the specific association between reduced NAA and increased MI levels in the parieto-occipital region and cognitive impairment in AD. MRS may have a role in evaluating disease progression and therapeutic monitoring in AD, as new treatments become available. (orig.)

  17. Numerical study of the effect of relative humidity and stoichiometric flow ratio on PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell performance with various channel lengths: An anode partial flooding modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Lei; Cai, Qiong; Xu, Chenxi; Liu, Chunbo; Scott, Keith; Yan, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    A two dimensional, along the channel, non-isothermal, two-phase flow, anode partial flooding model was developed to investigate the effects of relative humidity, stoichiometric flow ratio and channel length, as well as their interactive influence, on the performance of a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell. Liquid water formation and transport at the anode due to the condensation of supersaturated anode gas initiated by hydrogen consumption was considered. The model considered the heat source/sink in terms of electrochemical reaction, Joule heating and latent heat due to water phase-transfer. The non-uniform temperature distributions inside the MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and channels at various stoichiometric flow ratios were demonstrated. The Peclet number was used to evaluate the contributions of advection and diffusion on liquid water and heat transport. Results indicated that higher anode relative humidity is required to the improved cell performance. As the decrease in the anode relative humidity and increase in channel length, the optimal cathode relative humidity was increased. The initial increase in stoichiometric flow ratio improved the limiting current densities. However, the further increases led to limited contributions. The Peclet number indicated that the liquid water transport through the electrode was mainly determined by the capillary diffusion mechanism. - Highlights: • Interactive effects of RH, stoichiometric flow ratio, channel length are studied. • Fully humidified anode is required to maintain the good cell performance. • Optimal RH_c is 30–40% for channel length of 1–10 cm at high current density. • Effect of stoichiometric flow ratio is more significant for longer channels. • Both liquid water and heat transport are diffusion dominated rather than advection.

  18. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al. [1989, ARAA, 27, 279], persists despite the addition of more O data and may betray the occurrence of a hiatus in star formation between the end of halo formation and

  19. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  20. Reduced concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and the NAA-creatine ratio in the basal ganglia in bipolar disorder: a study using 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mark A; Thomas, M Albert; Yue, Kenneth; Binesh, Nader; Davanzo, Pablo; Ventura, Joseph; O'Neill, Joseph; Guze, Barry; Curran, John G; Mintz, Jim

    2007-04-15

    The N-acetylaspartate (NAA) peak is prominent in the proton magnetic resonance spectrum and is thought to reflect neuron loss or dysfunction. This study was conducted to explore NAA biochemistry and its clinical correlates in mania. Subjects comprised 16 manic patients and 17 controls who underwent a structured diagnostic interview and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) acquisition. STEAM (1)H MRS (TR/TE/TM=2000/20/8 ms) was acquired at 3 Tesla from 2 x 2 x 2 cm(3) voxels in anterior cingulate (AC), right basal ganglia (BG), and left occipital-parietal white matter (OP). Absolute metabolite concentrations and ratios to creatine were calculated using the LC Model. The mean absolute concentrations of NAA and NAA-creatine ratio in the BG were significantly lower in manic subjects than in controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between NAA in the BG and the number of prior hospitalizations for mania. These data suggest BG pathology in mania and that NAA decrements may mark prior manic episode burden. Limitations of this study include small sample size and lack of tissue segmentation. Further study is encouraged to clarify state vs. trait aspects of NAA in bipolar disorder.

  1. Measurement of the #betta#sub(μ) and anti #betta#sub(μ)-nucleon charged current total cross sections, and the ratio of #betta#sub(μ) neutron to #betta#sub(μ) proton charged current total cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allasia, D.; Bisi, V.; Gamba, D.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Ramello, L.; Riccati, L.; Romero, A.; Bobisut, F.; Calimani, E.; Ciampolillo, S.; Huzita, H.; Loreti, M.; Sconza, A.; Bolognese, T.; Faccini-Turluer, M.L.; Louedec, C.; Mosca, L.; Vignaud, D.; Bonarelli, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Derkaoui, J.; Giacomelli, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Rossi, A.M.; Serra-Lugaresi, P.; Frodesen, A.G.; Halsteinslid, A.; Hornaes, A.

    1983-04-01

    This report contains an investigation performed by the Amsterdam-Bergen-Bologna-Padova-Pisa-Saclay-Torino collaboration. The total #betta#sub(μ)- and anti #betta#sub(μ)-nucleon charged current cross sections have been measured in BEBC filled with deuterium and exposed to the wide band neutrino and antineutrino beams at the CERN-SPS. Assuming a linear energy dependence for the cross sections, sigma = a Esub((anti #betta#)), the authors obtained the coefficients asub(#betta#N) = 0.60 +- 0.04 and asub(anti #betta#N) = 0.30 +- 0.02 (in units of 10 - 38 cm 2 /GeV), where the quoted error is mainly systematic. The ratio of the cross sections is sigmasub(anti #betta#N)/sigmasub(#betta#N) = 0.50 +- 0.03. They also determined the ratio of the charged current cross section for neutrino interactions on neutrons and protons R = sigmasub(#betta#n)/sigmasub(#betta#p) = 2.10 +- 0.08 (stat.) +- 0.22 (syst.). The dependence of R on the variables x, y and Esub(#betta#) is discussed. (Auth.)

  2. Abundances in galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, B.E.J.

    1991-01-01

    Standard (or mildly inhomogeneous) Big Bang nucleosynthesis theory is well confirmed by abundance measurements of light elements up to 7 Li and the resulting upper limit to the number of neutrino families confirmed in accelerator experiments. Extreme inhomogeneous models with a closure density in form of baryons seem to be ruled out and there is no evidence for a cosmic 'floor' to 9 Be or heavier elements predicted in some versions of those models. Galaxies show a correlation between luminous mass and abundance of carbon and heavier elements, usually attributed to escape of hot gas from shallow potential wells. Uncertainties include the role of dark matter and biparametric behaviour of ellipticals. Spirals have radial gradients which may arise from a variety of causes. In our own Galaxy one can distinguish three stellar populations - disk, halo and bulge - characterised by differing metallicity distribution functions. Differential abundance effects are found among different elements in stars as a function of metallicity and presumably age, notably in the ratio of oxygen and α-particle elements to iron. These may eventually be exploitable to set a time scale for the formation of the halo, bulge and disk. (orig.)

  3. Towards understanding the tandem mass spectra of protonated oligopeptides. 2: The proline effect in collision-induced dissociation of protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx = Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiholder, Christian; Suhai, Sándor; Harrison, Alex G; Paizs, Béla

    2011-06-01

    The product ion spectra of proline-containing peptides are commonly dominated by y(n) ions generated by cleavage at the N-terminal side of proline residues. This proline effect is investigated in the current work by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx includes Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp) in an electrospray/quadrupole/time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometer and by quantum chemical calculations on protonated Ala-Ala-Ala-Pro-Ala. The CID spectra of all investigated peptides show a dominant y(2) ion (Pro-Ala sequence). Our computational results show that the proline effect mainly arises from the particularly low threshold energy for the amide bond cleavage N-terminal to the proline residue, and from the high proton affinity of the proline-containing C-terminal fragment produced by this cleavage. These theoretical results are qualitatively supported by the experimentally observed y(2)/b(3) abundance ratios for protonated Ala-Ala-Xxx-Pro-Ala (Xxx = Ala, Ser, Leu, Val, Phe, and Trp). In the post-cleavage phase of fragmentation the N-terminal oxazolone fragment with the Ala-Ala-Xxx sequence and Pro-Ala compete for the ionizing proton for these peptides. As the proton affinity of the oxazolone fragment increases, the y(2)/b(3) abundance ratio decreases.

  4. Analysis of protein content in grain by proton activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohan, D.A.; Standing, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    The total protein content of grain is an important measure of its nutritional value. More than one million protein analyses are carried out each year in Canada alone. The traditional method of measurement has been the Kjeldahl chemical technique, which measures total nitrogen. A new method of protein analysis which also measures total nitrogen has been developed. A beam of 16 MeV protons strikes a sample of grain and produces radioactive 14 0 nuclei through the reaction 14 N(p,n) 14 0. The effective sample thickness is determined by the proton range. The 14 0 decay (tausub(1/2)=71sec) is detected off-line by its characteristic 2.31 MeV γ-ray. The total number of protons hitting the sample is measured by integrating the beam current. The ratio of the number of γ-rays counted to the total number of protons striking the sample determines the abundance of nitrogen. The measurement is unambiguous, since no other reaction can produce 14 0 at 16 MeV proton energy. A mechanized system for sample handling has been constructed. Samples are carried into the irradiation area on a conveyor belt, then back through a shielding wall into a counting area. The laboratory PDP 15/40 computer controls the entire operation. At present the system is being tested at a rate of about two samples per minute. (author)

  5. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickoff, S.; Tegler, S.C.; Engel, L.

    1991-01-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses. 64 refs

  6. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.C.; Engel, L.

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion. 88 refs

  7. CHLORINE ABUNDANCES IN COOL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A. [Indiana University Bloomington, Astronomy Department, Swain West 319, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States); Hinkle, K., E-mail: zmaas@indiana.edu, E-mail: cpilacho@indiana.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H{sup 35}Cl at 3.69851 μ m. The high-resolution L -band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with −0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] = (−0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [{sup 35}Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ∼0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl could be measured, a {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  8. Abundances in field dwarf stars. II. Carbon and nitrogen abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laird, J.B.

    1985-02-15

    Intermediate-dispersion spectra of 116 field dwarf stars, plus 10 faint field giants and 3 Hyades dwarfs, have been used to derive carbon and nitrogen abundances relative to iron. The program sample includes both disk and halo stars, spanning a range in (Fe/H) of +0.50 to -2.45. Synthetic spectra of CH and NH bands have been used to determine carbon and nitrogen abundances. The C/Fe ratio is solar over the range of metallicity studied, with an estimated intrinsic scatter of 0.10 dex. Down to (Fe/H)roughly-equal-1.8, below which the nitrogen abundance could not be measured, the N/Fe ratio is also constant for the majority of stars, indicating that nitrogen production is largely primary. Four halo stars are found to be enhanced in nitrogen relative to iron, by factors between 5 and 50, although their carbon abundances appear to be normal. These results are discussed in connection with the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the sites of C, N, and Fe nucleosynthesis. The results require that C, N, and Fe be produced in stars of similar mass. Our current understanding of N production, then, implies that most Type I supernovae have intermediate-mass progenitors. The nitrogen in the N-enhanced halo stars is very probably primordial, indicating that the interstellar medium at early epochs contained substantial inhomogeneities.

  9. Abundances in field dwarf stars. II. Carbon and nitrogen abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate-dispersion spectra of 116 field dwarf stars, plus 10 faint field giants and 3 Hyades dwarfs, have been used to derive carbon and nitrogen abundances relative to iron. The program sample includes both disk and halo stars, spanning a range in [Fe/H] of +0.50 to -2.45. Synthetic spectra of CH and NH bands have been used to determine carbon and nitrogen abundances. The C/Fe ratio is solar over the range of metallicity studied, with an estimated intrinsic scatter of 0.10 dex. Down to [Fe/H]roughly-equal-1.8, below which the nitrogen abundance could not be measured, the N/Fe ratio is also constant for the majority of stars, indicating that nitrogen production is largely primary. Four halo stars are found to be enhanced in nitrogen relative to iron, by factors between 5 and 50, although their carbon abundances appear to be normal. These results are discussed in connection with the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the sites of C, N, and Fe nucleosynthesis. The results require that C, N, and Fe be produced in stars of similar mass. Our current understanding of N production, then, implies that most Type I supernovae have intermediate-mass progenitors. The nitrogen in the N-enhanced halo stars is very probably primordial, indicating that the interstellar medium at early epochs contained substantial inhomogeneities

  10. Multiple marker abundance profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooper, Cornelia M.; Stevens, Tim J.; Saukkonen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    proteins and the scoring accuracy of lower-abundance proteins in Arabidopsis. NPAS was combined with subcellular protein localization data, facilitating quantitative estimations of organelle abundance during routine experimental procedures. A suite of targeted proteomics markers for subcellular compartment...

  11. Fine structure in deformed proton emitting nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A. A.; Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Ressler, J. J.; Schwartz, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-01-01

    In a recent experiment to study the proton radioactivity of the highly deformed 131 Eu nucleus, two proton lines were detected. The higher energy one was assigned to the ground-state to ground-state decay, while the lower energy, to the ground-state to the 2 + state decay. This constitutes the first observation of fine structure in proton radioactivity. With these four measured quantities, proton energies, half-life and branching ratio, it is possible to determine the Nilsson configuration of the ground state of the proton emitting nucleus as well as the 2 + energy and nuclear deformation of the daughter nucleus. These results will be presented and discussed

  12. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foote Robert L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Summary sentence Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy.

  13. The clinical case for proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, Robert L; Haddock, Michael G; Yan, Elizabeth; Laack, Nadia N; Arndt, Carola A S

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, several proton beam treatment programs have been implemented throughout the United States. Increasingly, the number of new programs under development is growing. Proton beam therapy has the potential for improving tumor control and survival through dose escalation. It also has potential for reducing harm to normal organs through dose reduction. However, proton beam therapy is more costly than conventional x-ray therapy. This increased cost may be offset by improved function, improved quality of life, and reduced costs related to treating the late effects of therapy. Clinical research opportunities are abundant to determine which patients will gain the most benefit from proton beam therapy. We review the clinical case for proton beam therapy. Proton beam therapy is a technically advanced and promising form of radiation therapy

  14. Protein proton-proton dynamics from amide proton spin flip rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Daniel S.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.

    2009-01-01

    Residue-specific amide proton spin-flip rates K were measured for peptide-free and peptide-bound calmodulin. K approximates the sum of NOE build-up rates between the amide proton and all other protons. This work outlines the theory of multi-proton relaxation, cross relaxation and cross correlation, and how to approximate it with a simple model based on a variable number of equidistant protons. This model is used to extract the sums of K-rates from the experimental data. Error in K is estimated using bootstrap methodology. We define a parameter Q as the ratio of experimental K-rates to theoretical K-rates, where the theoretical K-rates are computed from atomic coordinates. Q is 1 in the case of no local motion, but decreases to values as low as 0.5 with increasing domination of sidechain protons of the same residue to the amide proton flips. This establishes Q as a monotonous measure of local dynamics of the proton network surrounding the amide protons. The method is applied to the study of proton dynamics in Ca 2+ -saturated calmodulin, both free in solution and bound to smMLCK peptide. The mean Q is 0.81 ± 0.02 for free calmodulin and 0.88 ± 0.02 for peptide-bound calmodulin. This novel methodology thus reveals the presence of significant interproton disorder in this protein, while the increase in Q indicates rigidification of the proton network upon peptide binding, confirming the known high entropic cost of this process

  15. Proton decay theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay

  16. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  17. Proton Beam Writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajta, I.; Szilasi, S.Z.; Csige, I.; Baradacs, E.

    2005-01-01

    that of not-treated samples was enough to fully develop the radiation damaged structures. Proton beam micromachined channels in negative tone resist materials Tilted structures are very interesting for various applications, such as photonic crystals and gas/liquid handling on chips. The fabrication of thick tilted structures is a challenging task for the conventional (optical and electron beam) lithographic technologies. X-ray lithography has been proved capable to produce tilted structures of very fine resolution but at a very high cost due to the required delicate mask. The use of proton beam irradiation has already been proved very successful to the patterning of thick resist films with very high aspect ratio and vertical sidewalls [6]. Proton Beam Writing (PBW) is promising for the fabrication of tilted structures due to the fact that the proton beam does not broaden significantly (e.g. a 2MeV proton beam allows the patterning of 50 μm thick resist films). PBW is a direct write method, i.e. it is a maskless process which is an obvious advantage for research applications. In the present work the Atomki microprobe facility has been used to write long tilted structures by 2MeV protons. For the formation of the structures, two exposures have been carried out at +20 deg and -20 deg using a goniometer stage sample holder. The tilted structures were resolved in the negative tone resist materials SU-8 and ADEPR (an aqueous base developable chemically amplified resist). The length of the microchannels was varied between 100 μm and 1000 μm, the wall thickness was 10 μm. By applying the developed methodology it was possible to resolve the desired layout through the whole length of the channel. (author)

  18. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  19. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found inmany structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers.In this article, we explore this ...

  20. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Fibonacci numbers, golden ratio, Sanskrit prosody, solar panel. Abstract. Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found inmany ...

  1. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is sym- metrical and in proportion. If a face or a structure is in pro- portion, we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful. The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found in many structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers. In this article, we explore this ...

  2. Abundances in planetary nebulae near the galactic centre .1. Abundance determinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratag, MA; Pottasch, [No Value; Dennefeld, M; Menzies, J

    1997-01-01

    Abundance determinations of about 110 planetary nebulae, which are likely to be in the Galactic Bulge are presented. Plasma diagnostics have been performed by making use of the available forbidden line ratios combined with radio continuum measurements. Chemical abundances of He, O, N, Ne, S, Ar, and

  3. Correlations associated with small angle protons produced in proton- proton collisions at 31 GeV total energy

    CERN Document Server

    Albrow, M G; Barber, D P; Bogaerts, A; Bosnjakovic, B; Brooks, J R; Clegg, A B; Erné, F C; Gee, C N P; Locke, D H; Loebinger, F K; Murphy, P G; Rudge, A; Sens, Johannes C

    1973-01-01

    High energy inelastic protons with x=2 p/sub L//s/sup 1/2/>0.99 observed in 15.3/15.3 GeV proton-proton collisions at the CERN ISR are accompanied by particles whose angular distribution is confined to a narrow cone in the opposite direction. In contrast, lower energy protons (0.72ratio of the associated charged multiplicities is approximately 0.4. (3 refs).

  4. Proton and Helium Spectra from the CREAM-III Flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Y. S.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, M. H.; Lee, M. H.; Lee, S. E. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 20742 (United States); Anderson, T.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Mognet, S. I. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Barrau, A.; Derome, L. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, Grenoble (France); Jeon, J. A.; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, J.; Park, I. H. [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Link, J. T.; Mitchell, J. W. [Astrophysics Space Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Menchaca-Rocha, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Nutter, S. [Department of Physics, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY 41099 (United States); and others

    2017-04-10

    Primary cosmic-ray elemental spectra have been measured with the balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment since 2004. The third CREAM payload (CREAM-III) flew for 29 days during the 2007–2008 Antarctic season. Energies of incident particles above 1 TeV are measured with a calorimeter. Individual elements are clearly separated with a charge resolution of ∼0.12 e (in charge units) and ∼0.14 e for protons and helium nuclei, respectively, using two layers of silicon charge detectors. The measured proton and helium energy spectra at the top of the atmosphere are harder than other existing measurements at a few tens of GeV. The relative abundance of protons to helium nuclei is 9.53 ± 0.03 for the range of 1 TeV/n to 63 TeV/n. This ratio is considerably smaller than other measurements at a few tens of GeV/n. The spectra become softer above ∼20 TeV. However, our statistical uncertainties are large at these energies and more data are needed.

  5. Predicted versus observed cosmic-ray-produced noble gases in lunar samples: improved Kr production ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnier, S.; Hohenberg, C.M.; Marti, K.; Reedy, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    New sets of cross sections for the production of krypton isotopes from targets of Rb, Sr, Y, and Zr were constructed primarily on the bases of experimental excitation functions for Kr production from Y. These cross sections were used to calculate galactic-cosmic-ray and solar-proton production rates for Kr isotopes in the moon. Spallation Kr data obtained from ilmenite separates of rocks 10017 and 10047 are reported. Production rates and isotopic ratios for cosmogenic Kr observed in ten well-documented lunar samples and in ilmenite separates and bulk samples from several lunar rocks with long but unknown irradiation histories were compared with predicted rates and ratios. The agreements were generally quite good. Erosion of rock surfaces affected rates or ratios for only near-surface samples, where solar-proton production is important. There were considerable spreads in predicted-to-observed production rates of 83 Kr, due at least in part to uncertainties in chemical abundances. The 78 Kr/ 83 Kr ratios were predicted quite well for samples with a wide range of Zr/Sr abundance ratios. The calculated 80 Kr/ 83 Kr ratios were greater than the observed ratios when production by the 79 Br(n,γ) reaction was included, but were slightly undercalculated if the Br reaction was omitted; these results suggest that Br(n,γ)-produced Kr is not retained well by lunar rocks. The productions of 81 Kr and 82 Kr were overcalculated by approximately 10% relative to 83 Kr. Predicted-to-observed 84 Kr/ 83 ratios scattered considerably, possibly because of uncertainties in corrections for trapped and fission components and in cross sections for 84 Kr production. Most predicted 84 Kr and 86 Kr production rates were lower than observed. Shielding depths of several Apollo 11 rocks were determined from the measured 78 Kr/ 83 Kr ratios of ilmenite separates. 4 figures, 5 tables

  6. Good abundances from bad spectra - I. Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. Bryn; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1996-01-01

    Stellar spectra derived from multiple-object fibre-fed spectroscopic radial-velocity surveys, of the type feasible with, among other examples, AUTOFIB, 2dF, HYDRA, NESSIE, and the Sloan survey, differ significantly from those traditionally used for determination of stellar abundances. The spectra tend to be of moderate resolution (around 1A) and signal-to-noise ratio (around 10-20 per resolution element), and cannot usually have reliable continuum shapes determined over wavelength ranges in excess of a few tens of Angstroms. None the less, with care and a calibration of stellar effective temperature from photometry, independent of the spectroscopy, reliable iron abundances can be derived. We have developed techniques to extract true iron abundances and surface gravities from low-signal-to-noise ratio, intermediate-resolution spectra of G-type stars in the 4000-5000A wavelength region. Spectroscopic indices sensitive to iron abundance and gravity are defined from a set of narrow (few-several A wide) wavelength intervals. The indices are calibrated theoretically using synthetic spectra. Given adequate data and a photometrically determined effective temperature, one can derive estimates of the stellar iron abundance and surface gravity. We have also defined a single abundance indicator for the analysis of very low-signal-to-noise ratio spectra; with the further assumption of a value for the stellar surface gravity, this is able to provide useful iron abundance information from spectra having signal-to-noise ratios as low as 10 (1-A elements). The theoretical basis and calibration using synthetic spectra are described in this paper. The empirical calibration of these techniques by application to observational data is described in a separate paper (Jones, Wyse & Gilmore). The technique provides precise iron abundances, with zero-point correct to ~0.1 dex, and is reliable, with typical uncertainties being <~0.2 dex. A derivation of the in situ thick disc metallicity

  7. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  8. Sex ratios

    OpenAIRE

    West, Stuart A; Reece, S E; Sheldon, Ben C

    2002-01-01

    Sex ratio theory attempts to explain variation at all levels (species, population, individual, brood) in the proportion of offspring that are male (the sex ratio). In many cases this work has been extremely successful, providing qualitative and even quantitative explanations of sex ratio variation. However, this is not always the situation, and one of the greatest remaining problems is explaining broad taxonomic patterns. Specifically, why do different organisms show so ...

  9. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of 0, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  10. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  11. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  12. Proton radioactivity from proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, F.; Goncalves, M.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Duarte, S.B.; Garcia, F.; Rodriguez, O.

    1999-03-01

    Half-lives for proton emission from proton-rich nuclei have been calculated by using the effective liquid drop model of heavy-particle decay of nuclei. It is shown that this model is able to offer results or spontaneous proton-emission half-life-values in excellent agreement with the existing experimental data. Predictions of half-life-values for other possible proton-emission cases are present for null orbital angular momentum. (author)

  13. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    should be focused on relationships between demographic processes such as survival and recruitment, the two quantities responsible for changes in abundance, rather than simply on the magnitudes of these quantities. They describe a type of Jolly–Seber capture–recapture model that permits inference about the underlying relationship between per capita recruitment rates and survival rates (Link & Barker, this volume). Implementation used Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods and appeared to work well, yielding inferences about the relationship between recruitment and survival that were robust to selection of prior distribution. We believe that readers will find their arguments compelling, and we expect to see increased use of hierarchical modeling approaches in capture–recapture and related fields. Otto (presentation without paper) also recommended use of hierarchical models in analysis of multiple data sources dealing with population dynamics of North American mallards. He integrated survival inferences from ringing data, abundance information from aerial survey data, and recruitment information based on age ratios from a harvest survey. He used a Leslie matrix population projection model as an integrating framework and obtained estimates of breeding population size using all data.Otto’s approach also permitted inference about biases in estimated quantities. As with the work of Link & Barker (2004), we find Otto’s recommendation to use hierarchical models to integrate data from multiple sources to be very compelling. Alisauskas et al. (2004) report results of an analysis of capture–recapture data for a askatchewan population of white–winged scoters. They used the approach of Pradel (1996) to estimate population growth rate (See the PDF) directly. Estimates for 1975–1985 were quite low, but estimates for the recent period, 2000–2003,increased to values > 1. Parameter estimates for seniority, survival and per capita recruitment (Pradel, 1996) led to the

  14. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    our attention should be focused on relationships between demographic processes such as survival and recruitment, the two quantities responsible for changes in abundance, rather than simply on the magnitudes of these quantities. They describe a type of Jolly–Seber capture–recapture model that permits inference about the underlying relationship between per capita recruitment rates and survival rates (Link & Barker, this volume. Implementation used Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods and appeared to work well, yielding inferences about the relationship between recruitment and survival that were robust to selection of prior distribution. We believe that readers will find their arguments compelling, and we expect to see increased use of hierarchical modeling approaches in capture–recapture and related fields. Otto (presentation without paper also recommended use of hierarchical models in analysis of multiple data sources dealing with population dynamics of North American mallards. He integrated survival inferences from ringing data, abundance information from aerial survey data, and recruitment information based on age ratios from a harvest survey. He used a Leslie matrix population projection model as an integrating framework and obtained estimates of breeding population size using all data.Otto’s approach also permitted inference about biases in estimated quantities. As with the work of Link & Barker (2004, we find Otto’s recommendation to use hierarchical models to integrate data from multiple sources to be very compelling. Alisauskas et al. (2004 report results of an analysis of capture–recapture data for a askatchewan population of white–winged scoters. They used the approach of Pradel (1996 to estimate population growth rate (See the PDF directly. Estimates for 1975–1985 were quite low, but estimates for the recent period, 2000–2003,increased to values > 1. Parameter estimates for seniority, survival and per capita recruitment (Pradel, 1996

  15. Orion A helium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivilev, A.P.; Ershov, A.A.; Smirnov, G.T.; Sorochenko, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The 22.4-GHz (H,He)66-alpha and 36.5-GHz (H,He)56-alpha radio recombination lines have been observed at several Jaffe-Pankonin positions in the central part of the Orion A source. The measured relative abundance of ionized helium increases with distance, averaging 11.6 percent at peripheral points. The observed behavior is interpreted by a blister-type model nebula, which implies that Orion A has a true He abundance of 12 percent, is moving with a radial velocity of 5 km/sec, and is expanding. 18 references

  16. Proton and neutron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, S.

    1991-01-01

    New result on charged lepton scattering from hydrogen and deuterium targets by the BCDMS, NMC and SLAC collaborations have greatly increased our knowledge of the structure functions of protons and neutrons. The disagreement between the high energy muon scattering cross sections obtained by the EMC and BCDMS collaborations have been almost completely resolved by comparison with a global analysis of old and new SLAC data and a reanalysis of EMC data. We now have a consistent set of structure functions which covers an approximate range 1 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 200 (GeV/c) 2 and 0.07 ≤ x ≤ 0.7. The ratio of neutron to proton structure functions decreases with increasing Q 2 for values of x ≥ 0.1. The difference between proton and neutron structure functions approaches zero as x decreases, consistent with the expected √x behavior. (orig.)

  17. Proton movies

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A humorous short film made by three secondary school students received an award at a Geneva film festival. Even without millions of dollars or Hollywood stars at your disposal, it is still possible to make a good science fiction film about CERN. That is what three students from the Collège Madame de Staël in Carouge, near Geneva, demonstrated. For their amateur short film on the LHC, they were commended by the jury of the video and multimedia festival for schools organised by the "Media in education" service of the Canton of Geneva’s Public Education Department. The film is a spoof of a television news report on the LHC start-up. In sequences full of humour and imagination, the reporter conducts interviews with a very serious "Professor Sairne", some protons preparing for their voyage and even the neutrons that were rejected by the LHC. "We got the idea of making a film about CERN at the end of the summer," explains Lucinda Päsche, one of the three students. "We did o...

  18. Abundance analyses of thirty cool carbon stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Kazuhiko

    1985-01-01

    The results were previously obtained by use of the absolute gf-values and the cosmic abundance as a standard. These gf-values were found to contain large systematic errors, and as a result, the solar photospheric abundances were revised. Our previous results, therefore, must be revised by using new gf-values, and abundance analyses are extended for as many carbon stars as possible. In conclusion, in normal cool carbon stars heavy metals are overabundant by factors of 10 - 100 and rare-earth elements are overabundant by a factor of about 10, and in J-type cool carbon stars, C 12 /C 13 ratio is smaller, C 2 and CN bands and Li 6708 are stronger than in normal cool carbon stars, and the abundances of s-process elements with respect to Fe are nearly normal. (Mori, K.)

  19. Amplitude ratios in ρ0 leptoproductions and GPDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goloskokov S.V.

    2017-01-01

    Using the model results we calculate the ratio of different helicity amplitudes for a transversely polarized proton target to the leading twist longitudinal amplitude. Our results are close to the amplitude ratios measured by HERMES.

  20. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byungjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 110–746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, 138–736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 410–769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungyong [Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  1. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  2. Protonic transistors from thin reflecting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordinario, David D.; Phan, Long; Jocson, Jonah-Micah [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Nguyen, Tam [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Gorodetsky, Alon A., E-mail: alon.gorodetsky@uci.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ionic transistors from organic and biological materials hold great promise for bioelectronics applications. Thus, much research effort has focused on optimizing the performance of these devices. Herein, we experimentally validate a straightforward strategy for enhancing the high to low current ratios of protein-based protonic transistors. Upon reducing the thickness of the transistors’ active layers, we increase their high to low current ratios 2-fold while leaving the other figures of merit unchanged. The measured ratio of 3.3 is comparable to the best values found for analogous devices. These findings underscore the importance of the active layer geometry for optimum protonic transistor functionality.

  3. Compilation of solar abundance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauge, Oe.; Engvold, O.

    1977-01-01

    Interest in the previous compilations of solar abundance data by the same authors (ITA--31 and ITA--39) has led to this third, revised edition. Solar abundance data of 67 elements are tabulated and in addition upper limits for the abundances of 5 elements are listed. References are made to 167 papers. A recommended abundance value is given for each element. (JIW)

  4. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  5. Observational limits on the magnetic-monopole structure of protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, J.J.; Ficenec, J.R.; Teplitz, D.C.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1979-01-01

    We report the results of a search for absorption of 42-cm radiation in neutral galactic hydrogen. One explanation of a positive result would be the existence of a type of anomalous proton whose magnetic moment arises from a distribution of magnetic charge rather than from a distribution of circulating currents. No absorption of 42-cm radiation was seen; this implies an upper limit of 2.3 x 10 -4 for the abundance of this type of anomalous proton relative to protons which radiate at 21 cm. The observed absence of anomalous protons also implies an absence of primordial anomalous protons since they could not have been swept up by heavier elements during cosmic nucleosynthesis. The observation is sensitive only to anomalous protons with exactly the same value for their magnetic moment that conventional ones have

  6. Abundances in very metal-poor stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer Anne

    We measured the abundances of 35 elements in 22 field red giants and a red giant in the globular cluster M92. We found the [Zn/Fe] ratio increases with decreasing [Fe/H], reaching ~0.3 at [Fe/H] = -3.0. While this is a larger [Zn/Fe] than found by previous investigators, it is not sufficient to account for the [Zn/Fe] observed in the damped Lyα systems. We test different models for the production of the s-process elements by comparing our [Y/Zr] values, which have been produced by the r- process, to predictions of what the s-process does not produce. We find that the models of Arlandini et al. (1999), which calculate s-process production in a model AGB star, agree the best. We then look at the r-process abundances across a wide range in mass. The [Y/Ba] values for most of our stars cluster around -0.30, but there are three outliers with [Y/Ba] values up to 1 dex higher. Thus the heavy element abundances do not show the same pattern from Z = 39 to Z = 56. However, our abundances ratios from Pd (Z = 46) to Yb (Z = 70) are consistent with a scaled solar system r- process pattern, arguing that at least the heavy r- process elements are made in a universal pattern. If we assume that this same pattern hold through thorium, we can determine the ages of our stars from the present abundance of radioactive thorium and an initial thorium abundance based on the abundance of stable heavy elements. Our results for five stars are consistent with those stars being the same age. Our mean age is 10.8 +/- 2 Gyr. However that result depends critically on the assumed Th/stable ratio, which we adopt from models of the r-process. For an average age of 15 Gyrs, the initial Th/Eu ratio we would need is 0.590. Finally, the [element/Fe] ratios for elements in the iron group and lower do not show any dispersion, unlike for the r- process elements such as Y and Ba. Therefore the individual contributions of supernovae have been erased for the lighter elements.

  7. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  8. Anomalous behavior of tellurium abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B L

    1984-01-01

    The cosmic abundance of Te is larger than for any element with atomic number greater than 40, but it is one of the least abundant elements in the earth's lithosphere and it is one of the five elements never reported in sea water. On the other hand, it is the fourth most abundant element in the human body (after Fe, Zn and Rb), and is unusually abundant in human food. It is shown that the high abundance in human food combined with the low abundance in soil requires that it be picked up by plant roots very much more efficiently than any other trace element.

  9. Resist materials for proton micromachining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Sanchez, J.L.; Xu, B.; Osipowicz, T.; Watt, F.

    1999-01-01

    The production of high aspect ratio microstructures is a potential growth area. The combination of deep X-ray lithography with electroforming and micromolding (i.e. LIGA) is one of the main techniques used to produce 3D microstructures. The new technique of proton micromachining employs focused MeV protons in a direct write process which is complementary to LIGA, e.g. micromachining with 2 MeV protons results in microstructures with a height of 63 μm and lateral sub-micrometer resolution in PMMA resist. The aim of this paper is to investigate the capabilities of proton micromachining as a lithographic technique. This involves the study of different types of resists. The dose distribution of high molecular weight PMMA is compared with three other types of resist: First the positive photo resist AZ P4620 will be discussed and then PMGI SF 23, which can be used as a deep UV, e-beam or X-ray resist. Finally SU-8, a new deep UV negative type of chemically amplified resist will be discussed. All these polymers are applied using the spin coating technique at thicknesses of between 1 and 36 μm

  10. Abundance, Excess, Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rox De Luca

    2016-02-01

    Her recent work focuses on the concepts of abundance, excess and waste. These concerns translate directly into vibrant and colourful garlands that she constructs from discarded plastics collected on Bondi Beach where she lives. The process of collecting is fastidious, as is the process of sorting and grading the plastics by colour and size. This initial gathering and sorting process is followed by threading the components onto strings of wire. When completed, these assemblages stand in stark contrast to the ease of disposability associated with the materials that arrive on the shoreline as evidence of our collective human neglect and destruction of the environment around us. The contrast is heightened by the fact that the constructed garlands embody the paradoxical beauty of our plastic waste byproducts, while also evoking the ways by which those byproducts similarly accumulate in randomly assorted patterns across the oceans and beaches of the planet.

  11. Carbon and oxygen abundances of field RR Lyrae stars. I. Carbon abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, D.; Manduca, A.; Deming, D.; Bell, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    From an analysis of KPNO 4-m echelle plates and simultaneous uvbyβ photometry, we have determined carbon abundances and carbon-to-iron ratios for a large number of field RR Lyrae stars having [Fe/H]> or approx. =-1.2. It is found that these field RR Lyrae stars: stars which are known to be in an advanced evolutionary state: have carbon-to-iron ratios which are similar to those of unevolved stars

  12. Influence of La/W ratio on electrical conductivity of lanthanum tungstate with high La/W ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, Gen; Shono, Yohei; Ushiyama, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yoshito; Otomo, Junichiro

    2017-01-01

    The proton-conducting properties of lanthanum tungstates (LWOs) with high La/W ratios were investigated using electrochemical measurements and quantum chemical calculations. Single phases of LWOs with high La/W ratios (6.3≤La/W≤6.7) were synthesized by high-temperature sintering at around 1700 °C. The electrical conductivity of LWO increased with increasing La/W ratio in the single-phase region. The LWO synthesized at the optimum sintering temperature and time, and with the optimum La/W ratio gave the maximum conductivity, i.e., 2.7×10 −3 S cm −1 with La/W=6.7 at 500 °C. Density functional theory calculations, using the nudged elastic band method, were performed to investigate the proton diffusion barrier. The results suggest that the proton diffusion paths around La sites have the lowest proton diffusion barrier. These findings improve our understanding of LWO synthesis and the proton-conducting mechanism and provide a strategy for improving proton conduction in LWOs. - Graphical abstract: The LWOs with high La/W ratios were synthesized for the first time. The optimum La/W ratio gave the maximum conductivity with La/W=6.7 at 500 °C. The proton diffusion paths were also considered with density functional theory calculations. - Highlights: • The proton-conducting properties of lanthanum tungstates (LWOs) were investigated. • Single phase LWOs with high La/W ratios (6.3≤La/W≤6.7) were synthesized successfully. • LWOs with the high La/W ratios showed high proton conductivity. • The DFT calculation suggested the lowest proton diffusion barrier in the path around La sites.

  13. Investigation of plutonium abundance and age analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huailong, Wu; Jian, Gong; Fanhua, Hao [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China). Inst. of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry

    2007-06-15

    Based on spectra analysis software, all of the plutonium material peak counts are analyzed. Relatively efficiency calibration is done by the non-coupling peaks of {sup 239}Pu. By using the known isotopes half life and yield, the coupling peaks counts are allocated by non-coupling peaks, consequently the atom ratios of each isotope are gotten. The formula between atom ratio and abundance or age is deduced by plutonium material isotopes decay characteristic. And so the abundance and age of plutonium material is gotten. After some re- peat measurements for a plutonium equipment are completed, a comparison between our analysis results and PC-FRAM and the owner's reference results are done. (authors)

  14. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis and lithium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vinay; Lahiri, Joydev; Bhowmick, Debasis; Basu, D.N.

    2017-01-01

    The predictions of the standard big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) theory depend on the astrophysical nuclear reaction rates and on additional three parameters, the number of flavours of light neutrinos, the neutron lifetime and the baryon-to-photon ratio in the uni- verse. The effect of the modification of thirty-five reaction rates on light element abundance yields in BBN was investigated earlier by us. In the present work we have replaced the neutron lifetime, baryon-to-photon ratio by the most recent values and further modified 3 He( 4 He,γ) 7 Be reaction rate which is used directly for estimating the formation of 7 Li as a result of β + decay by the most recent equation. We find that these modifications reduce the calculated abundance of 7 Li by ∼ 12%

  15. Spherical proton emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Semmes, P.B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Various theoretical approaches to proton emission from spherical nuclei are investigated, and it is found that all the methods employed give very similar results. The calculated decay widths are found to be qualitatively insensitive to the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential, i.e., changing the potential parameters over a fairly large range typically changes the decay width by no more than a factor of ∼3. Proton half-lives of observed heavy proton emitters are, in general, well reproduced by spherical calculations with the spectroscopic factors calculated in the independent quasiparticle approximation. The quantitative agreement with experimental data obtained in our study requires that the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential be chosen carefully. It also suggests that deformed proton emitters will provide invaluable spectroscopic information on the angular momentum decomposition of single-proton orbitals in deformed nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  17. Proton solvation and proton transfer in chemical and electrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, S.; Conway, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the proton solvation and characterization of the H 3 O + ion, proton transfer in chemical ionization processes in solution, continuous proton transfer in conductance processes, and proton transfer in electrode processes. Topics considered include the condition of the proton in solution, the molecular structure of the H 3 O + ion, thermodynamics of proton solvation, overall hydration energy of the proton, hydration of H 3 O + , deuteron solvation, partial molal entropy and volume and the entropy of proton hydration, proton solvation in alcoholic solutions, analogies to electrons in semiconductors, continuous proton transfer in conductance, definition and phenomenology of the unusual mobility of the proton in solution, solvent structure changes in relation to anomalous proton mobility, the kinetics of the proton-transfer event, theories of abnormal proton conductance, and the general theory of the contribution of transfer reactions to overall transport processes

  18. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  19. Twilight of Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, David

    2014-03-01

    Baby boomers enjoyed the most benign period in human history: fifty years of relative peace, cheap energy, plentiful grain supply, and a warming climate due to the highest solar activity for 8,000 years. The party is over - prepare for the twilight of abundance. David Archibald reveals the grim future the world faces on its current trajectory: massive fuel shortages, the bloodiest warfare in human history, a global starvation crisis, and a rapidly cooling planet. Archibald combines pioneering science with keen economic knowledge to predict the global disasters that could destroy civilization as we know it - disasters that are waiting just around the corner. But there's good news, too: We can have a good future if we prepare for it. Advanced, civilized countries can have a permanently high standard of living if they choose to invest in the technologies that will get them there. Archibald, a climate scientist as well as an inventor and a financial specialist, explains which scientific breakthroughs can save civilization in the coming crisis - if we can cut through the special interest opposition to these innovations and allow free markets to flourish.

  20. Evaluating the potential impact of proton carriers on syntrophic propionate oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste-Poinapen, Natacha M. S.; Turner, Mark S.; Rabaey, Korneel; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J.

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic propionic acid degradation relies on interspecies electron transfer (IET) between propionate oxidisers and electron acceptor microorganisms, via either molecular hydrogen, formate or direct transfers. We evaluated the possibility of stimulating direct IET, hence enhancing propionate oxidation, by increasing availability of proton carriers to decrease solution resistance and reduce pH gradients. Phosphate was used as a proton carrying anion, and chloride as control ion together with potassium as counter ion. Propionic acid consumption in anaerobic granules was assessed in a square factorial design with ratios (1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 0:1) of total phosphate (TP) to Cl-, at 1X, 10X, and 30X native conductivity (1.5 mS.cm-1). Maximum specific uptake rate, half saturation, and time delay were estimated using model-based analysis. Community profiles were analysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The strongest performance was at balanced (1:1) ratios at 10X conductivity where presumptive propionate oxidisers namely Syntrophobacter and Candidatus Cloacamonas were more abundant. There was a shift from Methanobacteriales at high phosphate, to Methanosaeta at low TP:Cl ratios and low conductivity. A lack of response to TP, and low percentage of presumptive electroactive organisms suggested that DIET was not favoured under the current experimental conditions.

  1. The Chemical Composition Contrast between M3 and M13 Revisited: New Abundances for 28 Giant Stars in M3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneden, Christopher; Kraft, Robert P.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peterson, Ruth C.; Fulbright, Jon P.

    2004-04-01

    We report new chemical abundances of 23 bright red giant members of the globular cluster M3, based on high-resolution (R~45,000) spectra obtained with the Keck I telescope. The observations, which involve the use of multislits in the HIRES Keck I spectrograph, are described in detail. Combining these data with a previously reported small sample of M3 giants obtained with the Lick 3 m telescope, we compare metallicities and [X/Fe] ratios for 28 M3 giants with a 35-star sample in the similar-metallicity cluster M13, and with Galactic halo field stars having [Fe/H]=A(Si), we derive little difference in [X/Fe] ratios in the M3, M13, or halo field samples. All three groups exhibit C depletion with advancing evolutionary state beginning at the level of the red giant branch ``bump,'' but the overall depletion of about 0.7-0.9 dex seen in the clusters is larger than that associated with the field stars. The behaviors of O, Na, Mg, and Al are distinctively different among the three stellar samples. Field halo giants and subdwarfs have a positive correlation of Na with Mg, as predicted from explosive or hydrostatic carbon burning in Type II supernova sites. Both M3 and M13 show evidence of high-temperature proton-capture synthesis from the ON, NeNa, and MgAl cycles, while there is no evidence for such synthesis among halo field stars. But the degree of such extreme proton-capture synthesis in M3 is smaller than it is in M13: the M3 giants exhibit only modest deficiencies of O and corresponding enhancements of Na, less extreme overabundances of Al, fewer stars with low Mg and correspondingly high Na, and no indication that O depletions are a function of advancing evolutionary state, as has been claimed for M13. We have also considered NGC 6752, for which Mg isotopic abundances have been reported by Yong et al. Giants in NGC 6752 and M13 satisfy the same anticorrelation of O abundances with the ratio (25Mg+26Mg)/24Mg, which measures the relative contribution of rare to

  2. Antimatter production in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleymans, J.; Kabana, S.; Kraus, I.; Oeschler, H.; Redlich, K.; Sharma, N.

    2011-01-01

    One of the striking features of particle production at high beam energies is the near-equal abundance of matter and antimatter in the central rapidity region. In this paper we study how this symmetry is reached as the beam energy is increased. In particular, we quantify explicitly the energy dependence of the approach to matter-antimatter symmetry in proton-proton and in heavy-ion collisions. Expectations are presented also for the production of more complex forms of antimatter such as antihypernuclei.

  3. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Scandale, Walter

    2014-01-01

    In the last five decades, proton–proton and proton–antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion–ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  4. Chemiosmotic Energy Conservation in Dinoroseobacter shibae: Proton Translocation Driven by Aerobic Respiration, Denitrification, and Photosynthetic Light Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kirchhoff

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dinoroseobacter shibae is an aerobic anoxygenic phototroph and able to utilize light energy to support its aerobic energy metabolism. Since the cells can also grow anaerobically with nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptor, we were interested in how the cells profit from photosynthesis during denitrification and what the steps of chemiosmotic energy conservation are. Therefore, we conducted proton translocation experiments and compared O2-, NO3-, and NO2- respiration during different light regimes and in the dark. We used wild type cells and transposon mutants with knocked-out nitrate- and nitrite- reductase genes (napA and nirS, as well as a mutant (ppsR impaired in bacteriochlorophyll a synthesis. Light had a positive impact on proton translocation, independent of the type of terminal electron acceptor present. In the absence of an electron acceptor, however, light did not stimulate proton translocation. The light-driven add-on to proton translocation was about 1.4 H+/e- for O2 respiration and about 1.1 H+/e- for NO3- and NO2-. We could see that the chemiosmotic energy conservation during aerobic respiration involved proton translocation, mediated by the NADH dehydrogenase, the cytochrome bc1 complex, and the cytochrome c oxidase. During denitrification the last proton translocation step of the electron transport was missing, resulting in a lower H+/e- ratio during anoxia. Furthermore, we studied the type of light-harvesting and found that the cells were able to channel light from the green–blue spectrum most efficiently, while red light has only minor impact. This fits well with the depth profiles for D. shibae abundance in the ocean and the penetration depth of light with different wavelengths into the water column.

  5. Proton Fast Ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M H; Freeman, R R; Hatchett, S P; MacKinnon, A J; Patel, P K; Snavely, R A; Stephens, R B

    2006-04-01

    Fast ignition (FI) by a laser generated ballistically focused proton beam is a more recently proposed alternative to the original concept of FI by a laser generated beam of relativistic electrons. It has potential advantages in less complex energy transport into dense plasma. Recent successful target heating experiments motivate further investigation of the feasibility of proton fast ignition. The concept, the physics and characteristics of the proton beams, the recent experimental work on focusing of the beams and heating of solid targets and the overall prospects for proton FI are discussed

  6. Proton decay: spectroscopic probe beyond the proton drip line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seweryniak, D; Davids, C N; Robinson, A; Woods, P J; Blank, B; Carpenter, M P; Davinson, T; Freeman, S J; Hammond, N; Hoteling, N; Janssens, R V F; Khoo, T L; Liu, Z; Mukherjee, G; Shergur, J; Sinha, S; Sonzogni, A A; Walters, W B; Woehr, A

    2005-01-01

    Proton decay has been transformed in recent years from an exotic phenomenon into a powerful spectroscopic tool. The frontiers of experimental and theoretical proton-decay studies will be reviewed. Different aspects of proton decay will be illustrated with recent results on the deformed proton emitter 135 Tb, the odd-odd deformed proton emitter 130 Eu, the complex fine structure in the odd-odd 146 Tm nucleus and on excited states in the transitional proton emitter 145 Tm

  7. Review of inelastic proton-proton reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Douglas Robert Ogston

    1973-01-01

    The most important new results on inelastic proton-proton scattering obtained with the new machines, I.S.R. and N.A.L., are: (1) The inelastic cross-section increases monotonically with energy from threshold to 1500 GeV/c. Above 6 GeV/c the energy variation has a s /sup +0.04/ behaviour. (2) Scaling is observed at I.S.R. energies in pion production. Confirmation is obtained of the hypothesis of limiting fragmentation. (3) The results are in general, consistent with the two-component model-one class of events being produced by diffraction dissociation and the other by a short-range-order process (e.g. the multiperipheral model). (4) There are indications that the protons have a granular structure; this from observation of secondaries of large transverse momenta. (33 refs).

  8. 4He abundances: Optical versus radio recombination line measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balser, Dana S.; Rood, Robert T.; Bania, T. M.

    2010-04-01

    Accurate measurements of the 4He/H abundance ratio are important in constraining Big Bang nucleosynthesis, models of stellar and Galactic evolution, and H ii region physics. We discuss observations of radio recombination lines using the Green Bank Telescope toward a small sample of H ii regions and planetary nebulae. We report 4He/H abundance ratio differences as high as 15-20% between optical and ratio data that are difficult to reconcile. Using the H ii regions S206 and M17 we determine 4He production in the Galaxy to be dY/dZ = 1.71 ± 0.86.

  9. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...... proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK (a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires....

  10. Energy abundance and economic progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurr, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the benefits of energy abundance and on the links between energy supply, economic growth and human welfare in the United States. It is argued that the restoration of energy abundance with dependable sources of supply should be a major national objective. (U.K.)

  11. Giving Protons a Boost

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first of LHC's superconducting radio-frequency cavity modules has passed its final test at full power in the test area of building SM18. These modules carry an oscillating electric field that will accelerate protons around the LHC ring and help maintain the stability of the proton beams.

  12. On the proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonda, L.; Ghirardi, G.C.; Weber, T.

    1983-07-01

    The problem of the proton decay is considered taking into account that in actual experiments there is an interaction of the proton with its environment which could imply an increase of its theoretical lifetime. It is seen that, by application of the time-energy uncertainty relation, no prolongation of the lifetime is obtained in this case. (author)

  13. Principles and Reality of Proton Therapy Treatment Allocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekelman, Justin E., E-mail: bekelman@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Asch, David A. [Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); The Wharton School and Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Tochner, Zelig [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Friedberg, Joseph [Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vaughn, David J. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rash, Ellen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Raksowski, Kevin [Department of Internal Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To present the principles and rationale of the Proton Priority System (PROPS), a priority points framework that assigns higher scores to patients thought to more likely benefit from proton therapy, and the distribution of PROPS scores by patient characteristics Methods and Materials: We performed multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between PROPS scores and receipt of proton therapy, adjusted for insurance status, gender, race, geography, and the domains that inform the PROPS score. Results: Among 1529 adult patients considered for proton therapy prioritization during our Center's ramp-up phase of treatment availability, PROPS scores varied by age, diagnosis, site, and other PROPS domains. In adjusted analyses, receipt of proton therapy was lower for patients with non-Medicare relative to Medicare health insurance (commercial vs Medicare: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.64; managed care vs Medicare: OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.28-0.56; Medicaid vs Medicare: OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.13-0.44). Proton Priority System score and age were not significantly associated with receipt of proton therapy. Conclusions: The Proton Priority System is a rationally designed and transparent system for allocation of proton therapy slots based on the best available evidence and expert opinion. Because the actual allocation of treatment slots depends mostly on insurance status, payers may consider incorporating PROPS, or its underlying principles, into proton therapy coverage policies.

  14. Principles and Reality of Proton Therapy Treatment Allocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Asch, David A.; Tochner, Zelig; Friedberg, Joseph; Vaughn, David J.; Rash, Ellen; Raksowski, Kevin; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present the principles and rationale of the Proton Priority System (PROPS), a priority points framework that assigns higher scores to patients thought to more likely benefit from proton therapy, and the distribution of PROPS scores by patient characteristics Methods and Materials: We performed multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between PROPS scores and receipt of proton therapy, adjusted for insurance status, gender, race, geography, and the domains that inform the PROPS score. Results: Among 1529 adult patients considered for proton therapy prioritization during our Center's ramp-up phase of treatment availability, PROPS scores varied by age, diagnosis, site, and other PROPS domains. In adjusted analyses, receipt of proton therapy was lower for patients with non-Medicare relative to Medicare health insurance (commercial vs Medicare: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.64; managed care vs Medicare: OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.28-0.56; Medicaid vs Medicare: OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.13-0.44). Proton Priority System score and age were not significantly associated with receipt of proton therapy. Conclusions: The Proton Priority System is a rationally designed and transparent system for allocation of proton therapy slots based on the best available evidence and expert opinion. Because the actual allocation of treatment slots depends mostly on insurance status, payers may consider incorporating PROPS, or its underlying principles, into proton therapy coverage policies

  15. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  16. PS proton source

    CERN Multimedia

    1959-01-01

    The first proton source used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron (PS) which started operation in 1959. This is CERN's oldest accelerator still functioning today (2018). It is part of the accelerator chain that supplies proton beams to the Large Hadron Collider. The source is a Thonemann type. In order to extract and accelerate the protons at high energy, a high frequency electrical field is used (140Mhz). The field is transmitted by a coil around a discharge tube in order to maintain the gas hydrogen in an ionised state. An electrical field pulse, in the order of 15kV, is then applied via an impulse transformer between anode and cathode of the discharge tube. The electrons and protons of the plasma formed in the ionised gas in the tube, are then separated. Currents in the order of 200mA during 100 microseconds have benn obtained with this type of source.

  17. PREFACE: Transport phenomena in proton conducting media Transport phenomena in proton conducting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikerling, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Proton transport phenomena are of paramount importance for acid-base chemistry, energy transduction in biological organisms, corrosion processes, and energy conversion in electrochemical systems such as polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The relevance for such a plethora of materials and systems, and the ever-lasting fascination with the highly concerted nature of underlying processes drive research across disciplines in chemistry, biology, physics and chemical engineering. A proton never travels alone. Proton motion is strongly correlated with its environment, usually comprised of an electrolyte and a solid or soft host material. For the transport in nature's most benign proton solvent and shuttle, water that is, insights from ab initio simulations, matured over the last 15 years, have furnished molecular details of the structural diffusion mechanism of protons. Excess proton movement in water consists of sequences of Eigen-Zundel-Eigen transitions, triggered by hydrogen bond breaking and making in the surrounding water network. Nowadays, there is little debate about the validity of this mechanism in water, which bears a stunning resemblance to the basic mechanistic picture put forward by de Grotthuss in 1806. While strong coupling of an excess proton with degrees of freedom of solvent and host materials facilitates proton motion, this coupling also creates negative synergies. In general, proton mobility in biomaterials and electrochemical proton conducting media is highly sensitive to the abundance and structure of the proton solvent. In polymer electrolyte membranes, in which protons are bound to move in nano-sized water-channels, evaporation of water or local membrane dehydration due to electro-osmotic coupling are well-known phenomena that could dramatically diminish proton conductivity. Contributions in this special issue address various vital aspects of the concerted nature of proton motion and they elucidate important structural and dynamic effects of solvent

  18. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed

  19. Pregalactic helium abundance and abundance gradients across our galaxy from planetary nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Odorico, S; Peimbert, M [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City. Instituto de Astronomia; Sabbadin, F [Padua Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Astronomia

    1976-03-01

    From the observations of planetary nebulae by Peimbert and Torres-Peimbert we have studied the radial gradients across our galaxy of the helium, oxygen and nitrogen abundance relative to hydrogen. The increase of the oxygen to hydrogen abundance ratio from a radial distance to the galactic center of 14 to 8 kpc is about a factor of 3 while that of the nitrogen to hydrogen ratio is about twice as large. By adopting oxygen as representative of the heavy elements it is found that the helium enrichment is coupled to the heavy metal enrichment by ..delta..Y/..delta..Zapproximately2.9 in close agreement with the value derived from H II regions. The pregalactic N(He)/N(H) value derived from planetary nebulae is 0.073+-0.008 also in agreement with the value derived from H II regions.

  20. Oxygen abundances in halo stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessell, Michael S.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Ruan, Kui

    1991-12-01

    The present study determines the oxygen abundance for a sample of metal-poor G dwarfs by analysis of OH lines between 3080 and 3200 A and the permitted high-excitation far-red O I triple. The oxygen abundances determined from the low-excitation OH lines are up to 0.55 dex lower than those measured from the high-excitation O I lines. The abundances for the far-red O I triplet lines agree with those rederived from Abia and Rebolo (1989), and the abundances from the OH lines in dwarfs and giants are in agreement with the rederived O abundances of Barbuy (1988) and others from the forbidden resonance O I line. Because the chi = 0.1.7 eV OH lines are formed in the same layers as the majority of Fe, Ti, and other neutral metal lines used for abundance analyses, it is argued that the OH lines and the forbidden O I line yield the true oxygen abundances relative to the metals.

  1. Proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, R.R.

    1978-04-01

    A discussion is given of proton storage ring beam dynamic characteristics. Topics considered include: (1) beam energy; (2) beam luminosity; (3) limits on beam current; (4) beam site; (5) crossing angle; (6) beam--beam interaction; (7) longitudinal instability; (8) effects of scattering processes; (9) beam production; and (10) high magnetic fields. Much of the discussion is related to the design parameters of ISABELLE, a 400 x 400 GeV proton---proton intersecting storage accelerator to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  2. ATLAS Forward Proton Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Grieco, Chiara; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system is the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The full two-arm setup was installed during the 2016/2017 EYETS. This allows measurements of processes with two forward protons: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. In 2017, AFP participated in the ATLAS high-luminosity data taking on the day-by-day basis. In addition, several special runs with reduced luminosity were taken. The poster will present the AFP detectors and the lessons learned from the last year operation and some performance from 2016 and 2017.

  3. Methyl chavicol: characterization of its biogenic emission rate, abundance, and oxidation products in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Bouvier-Brown

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments – a gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS, a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, and a thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG – and found to be abundant within and above Blodgett Forest. Methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO, a light- and temperature-dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4–68% of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72–10.2 μgCg−1 h−1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many plant species. This work suggests that methyl chavicol plays a significant role in the atmospheric chemistry of Blodgett Forest, and potentially other sites, and should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  4. Spectral unmixing: estimating partial abundances

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available techniques is complicated when considering very similar spectral signatures. Iron-bearing oxide/hydroxide/sulfate minerals have similar spectral signatures. The study focuses on how could estimates of abundances of spectrally similar iron-bearing oxide...

  5. Magellanic Clouds Cepheids: Thorium Abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeuncheol Jeong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the high-resolution spectra of 31 Magellanic Clouds Cepheid variables enabled the identification of thorium lines. The abundances of thorium were found with spectrum synthesis method. The calculated thorium abundances exhibit correlations with the abundances of other chemical elements and atmospheric parameters of the program stars. These correlations are similar for both Clouds. The correlations of iron abundances of thorium, europium, neodymium, and yttrium relative to the pulsational periods are different in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC, namely the correlations are negative for LMC and positive or close to zero for SMC. One of the possible explanations can be the higher activity of nucleosynthesis in SMC with respect to LMC in the recent several hundred million years.

  6. NEFSC Survey Indices of Abundance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Northeast Fisheries Survey Bottom trawl survey indices of abundance such as stratified mean number per tow or mean weight per tow by species stock. Includes indices...

  7. Abundance of boron in Vega and Sirius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praderie, F.; Boesgaard, A.M.; Milliard, B.; Pitois, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution (0.05 A) observations of the region of the B II resonance line (1362 A) have been made of Vega (AO V) and Sirius (Al V) with the Copernicus satellite. A strong B II feature is present in Vega, but only a weak line, due primarily to V III, is present is Sirius. An upper limit of B/H -12 is derived for Sirius from line-profile fitting. A local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthesis of the B II blend in Vega results in an abundance ratio B/H=1 x 10 -10 . Calculations of the effects of non--LTE on the line profile show that the LTE abundance would not be increased by more than 50% (B.H=1.5 x 10 -10 ) to account for departures from LTE. The B content of Vega probably represents the cosmic B abundance. The B deficiency in Sirius could result from interaction with the white-dwarf companion at an earlier stage in its evolution or from diffusion processes in the Sirius atmosphere.Difficult observations at 0.10 A resolution of subordinate lines from multiplet (3) of B II at 1624 A show that those lines are not present in Sirius; but the identification of B in Vega appears to be confirmed by the presence of weak lines at 1624 A in this star

  8. Absolute isotopic abundances of Ti in meteorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederer, F.R.; Papanastassiou, D.A.; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The absolute isotope abundance of Ti has been determined in Ca-Al-rich inclusions from the Allende and Leoville meteorites and in samples of whole meteorites. The absolute Ti isotope abundances differ by a significant mass dependent isotope fractionation transformation from the previously reported abundances, which were normalized for fractionation using 46 Ti/ 48 Ti. Therefore, the absolute compositions define distinct nucleosynthetic components from those previously identified or reflect the existence of significant mass dependent isotope fractionation in nature. We provide a general formalism for determining the possible isotope compositions of the exotic Ti from the measured composition, for different values of isotope fractionation in nature and for different mixing ratios of the exotic and normal components. The absolute Ti and Ca isotopic compositions still support the correlation of 50 Ti and 48 Ca effects in the FUN inclusions and imply contributions from neutron-rich equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium nucleosynthesis. The present identification of endemic effects at 46 Ti, for the absolute composition, implies a shortfall of an explosive-oxygen component or reflects significant isotope fractionation. Additional nucleosynthetic components are required by 47 Ti and 49 Ti effects. Components are also defined in which 48 Ti is enhanced. Results are given and discussed. (author)

  9. Elemental abundances of solar sibling candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramírez, I.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.; Roederer, I. U.; Wittenmyer, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  10. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  11. Electron - proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiik, B.H.

    1985-01-01

    Electron-proton storage rings allow us to study the interaction between the two basic constituents of matter, electrons and quarks at very short distances. Such machines were first discussed in connection with the ISR but the idea was abandoned because of the anticipated low counting rate. The interest in electron-proton storage rings was rekindeled by the discovery of large pointlike cross sections in lepton-hardon interactions and several/sup 2-15/ projects have been discussed during the past decade. However, despite a glorious past, which includes the discovery of quarks and neutral currents, and a multitude of proposals no electron-proton storage ring has ever been built. What we might learn by studying electron-proton collisions at high energies is discussed. After some brief comments on present proposals the proposed DESY ep project HERA is described as an example of how to realize such a machine

  12. Apparatus for proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors. 10 claims, 7 drawing figures

  13. Plant proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaxiola, Roberto A.; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde; Schumacher, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Chemiosmotic circuits of plant cells are driven by proton (H+) gradients that mediate secondary active transport of compounds across plasma and endosomal membranes. Furthermore, regulation of endosomal acidification is critical for endocytic and secretory pathways. For plants to react...

  14. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  15. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  16. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. Maskless proton beam writing in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom) and Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mistry@surrey.ac.uk; Gomez-Morilla, I. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Smith, R.C. [Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thomson, D. [Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Grime, G.W. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Webb, R.P. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gwilliam, R. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jeynes, C. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Cansell, A. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Merchant, M. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Kirkby, K.J. [Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a direct write technique that employs a focused MeV proton beam which is scanned in a pre-determined pattern over a target material which is subsequently electrochemically etched or chemically developed. By changing the energy of the protons the range of the protons can be changed. The ultimate depth of the structure is determined by the range of the protons in the material and this allows structures to be formed to different depths. PBW has been successfully employed on etchable glasses, polymers and semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). This study reports on PBW in p-type GaAs and compares experimental results with computer simulations using the Atlas (copy right) semiconductor device package from SILVACO. It has already been proven that hole transport is required for the electrochemical etching of GaAs using Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid, di-sodium salt). PBW in GaAs results in carrier removal in the irradiated regions and consequently minimal hole transport (in these regions) during electrochemical etching. As a result the irradiated regions are significantly more etch resistant than the non-irradiated regions. This allows high aspect ratio structures to be formed.

  18. Maskless proton beam writing in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, P.; Gomez-Morilla, I.; Smith, R.C.; Thomson, D.; Grime, G.W.; Webb, R.P.; Gwilliam, R.; Jeynes, C.; Cansell, A.; Merchant, M.; Kirkby, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    Proton beam writing (PBW) is a direct write technique that employs a focused MeV proton beam which is scanned in a pre-determined pattern over a target material which is subsequently electrochemically etched or chemically developed. By changing the energy of the protons the range of the protons can be changed. The ultimate depth of the structure is determined by the range of the protons in the material and this allows structures to be formed to different depths. PBW has been successfully employed on etchable glasses, polymers and semiconductor materials such as silicon (Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs). This study reports on PBW in p-type GaAs and compares experimental results with computer simulations using the Atlas (copy right) semiconductor device package from SILVACO. It has already been proven that hole transport is required for the electrochemical etching of GaAs using Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-m-benzenedisulfonic acid, di-sodium salt). PBW in GaAs results in carrier removal in the irradiated regions and consequently minimal hole transport (in these regions) during electrochemical etching. As a result the irradiated regions are significantly more etch resistant than the non-irradiated regions. This allows high aspect ratio structures to be formed

  19. PROTON MICROSCOPY AT FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Mariam, F. G.; Golubev, A. A.; Turtikov, V. I.; Varentsov, D.

    2009-01-01

    Proton radiography was invented in the 1990's at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as a diagnostic to study dynamic material properties under extreme pressures, strain and strain rate. Since this time hundreds of dynamic proton radiography experiments have been performed at LANL and a facility has been commissioned at the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in Russia for similar applications in dynamic material studies. Recently an international effort has investigated a new proton radiography capability for the study of dynamic material properties at the Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) located in Darmstadt, Germany. This new Proton microscope for FAIR(PRIOR) will provide radiographic imaging of dynamic systems with unprecedented spatial, temporal and density resolution, resulting in a window for understanding dynamic material properties at new length scales. It is also proposed to install the PRIOR system at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung before installation at FAIR for dynamic experiments with different drivers including high explosives, pulsed power and lasers. The design of the proton microscope and expected radiographic performance is presented.

  20. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  1. Energetic-particle abundances in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The abundances of elements and of He-3 in 90 solar electron events have been examined. It is found that the events fall into two distinct groups based upon their F/C ratio. Events in the F-rich group frequently have high He-3/He-4 ratios and are associated with type III and type V radio bursts in the parent flare. The F-poor events are associated with type IV bursts. These results on individual events support the conclusions of earlier work done with daily-averaged abundances.

  2. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a

  3. The Australian National Proton Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.; Rozenfeld, A.; Bishop, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Protons have been used in the treatment of cancer since 1954 and over 30,000 patients have been treated around the world. Their precise dose distribution allows the treatment of small tumours in critical locations such as the base of skull and orbit and is an alternative to stereotactic radiotherapy in other sites. With the development of hospital-based systems in the 1990's, common tumours such as prostate, breast and lung cancer can now also be treated using simple techniques. The therapeutic ratio is improved as the dose to the tumour can be increased while sparing normal tissues. The well defined high dose region and low integral dose compared with photon treatments is a particular advantage in children and other situations where long-term survival is expected and when used in combination with chemotherapy. In January 2002, the NSW Health Department initiated a Feasibility Study for an Australian National Proton Facility. This Study will address the complex medical, scientific, engineering, commercial and legal issues required to design and build a proton facility in Australia. The Facility will be mainly designed for patient treatment but will also provide facilities for biological, physical and engineering research. The proposed facility will have a combination of fixed and rotating beams with an energy range of 70-250 MeV. Such a centre will enable the conduct of randomised clinical trials and a comparison with other radiotherapy techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. Cost-utility comparisons with other medical treatments will also be made and further facilities developed if the expected benefit is confirmed. When patients are not being treated, the beam will be available for commercial and research purposes. This presentation will summarize the progress of the Study and discuss the important issues that need to be resolved before the Facility is approved and constructed

  4. Understanding and reducing statistical uncertainties in nebular abundance determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, R.; Stock, D. J.; Scicluna, P.

    2012-06-01

    Whenever observations are compared to theories, an estimate of the uncertainties associated with the observations is vital if the comparison is to be meaningful. However, many or even most determinations of temperatures, densities and abundances in photoionized nebulae do not quote the associated uncertainty. Those that do typically propagate the uncertainties using analytical techniques which rely on assumptions that generally do not hold. Motivated by this issue, we have developed Nebular Empirical Analysis Tool (NEAT), a new code for calculating chemical abundances in photoionized nebulae. The code carries out a standard analysis of lists of emission lines using long-established techniques to estimate the amount of interstellar extinction, calculate representative temperatures and densities, compute ionic abundances from both collisionally excited lines and recombination lines, and finally to estimate total elemental abundances using an ionization correction scheme. NEATuses a Monte Carlo technique to robustly propagate uncertainties from line flux measurements through to the derived abundances. We show that, for typical observational data, this approach is superior to analytic estimates of uncertainties. NEAT also accounts for the effect of upward biasing on measurements of lines with low signal-to-noise ratio, allowing us to accurately quantify the effect of this bias on abundance determinations. We find not only that the effect can result in significant overestimates of heavy element abundances derived from weak lines, but also that taking it into account reduces the uncertainty of these abundance determinations. Finally, we investigate the effect of possible uncertainties in R, the ratio of selective-to-total extinction, on abundance determinations. We find that the uncertainty due to this parameter is negligible compared to the statistical uncertainties due to typical line flux measurement uncertainties.

  5. Stellar oxygen abundances. I - A resolution to the 7774 A O I abundance discrepancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeremy R.

    1993-09-01

    We investigate the discrepancy between O/Fe abundance ratios of metal-poor stars derived from the 7774 A O I triplet and O/Fe ratios determined from other oxygen lines. We propose a possible resolution to this discrepancy which also eliminates the correlation of O/Fe and T(eff) found in a recent 7774 A O I analysis. The equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo (1989) are found to be systematically too high by 25 percent. Arguments are presented that current temperature estimates for halo stars are 150-200 K too low. Using the guidance of both model atmospheres and other empirical color-T(eff) relations, we construct new color temperature relations for metal-poor stars. These relations are tied to the temperature scale of Saxner & Hammarback (1985) for metal-rich stars. We use (b-y) and (V-K) indices to redetermine values of T(eff) for a handful of halo stars. (B-V)-T(eff) relations which do not take into account the effects of metallicity are found to be inadequate. Revised O/Fe ratios are determined using the new temperature scale. The mean abundance ratio of the reanalyzed halo dwarfs is about +0.52. There is no trend of O/Fe with Fe/H or T(eff).

  6. Solar /flare/ cosmic ray proton fluxes in the recent past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, T.R.; Nautiyal, C.M.; Padia, J.T.; Rao, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    A method for determining the average solar cosmic ray (SCR) proton fluxes which occurred in the last few million yr from He-3 samples from suitable lunar rocks is presented. Specimens removed from 0.3-1.5, 5-7, and 7-9 mm depths of the lunar surface were cleaned to reveal the feldspar grains of interest and heated for stepwise mass-spectrometric analyses. The 200 micron or greater grains were outgassed at 600, 1000, 1200, and 1600 C and noble gas data were recorded, along with isotopic ratio data. He-3 is assumed to have been degassed completely from rocks shocked by an impact event and diffusion losses are negligible due to the 90 C or less temperature exposures on the lunar surface. Thus the presence of He-3 is indicative of cosmic ray incidence, and known galactic cosmic ray production abundances for He-3 can be subtracted from the total He-3 observed, yielding the SCR flux results, which, when combined with exposure data, yield a history of SCR events

  7. Global abundance of planktonic heterotrophic protists in the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernice, Massimo C; Forn, Irene; Gomes, Ana; Lara, Elena; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Arrieta, Jesus M; del Carmen Garcia, Francisca; Hernando-Morales, Victor; MacKenzie, Roy; Mestre, Mireia; Sintes, Eva; Teira, Eva; Valencia, Joaquin; Varela, Marta M; Vaqué, Dolors; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Massana, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The dark ocean is one of the largest biomes on Earth, with critical roles in organic matter remineralization and global carbon sequestration. Despite its recognized importance, little is known about some key microbial players, such as the community of heterotrophic protists (HP), which are likely the main consumers of prokaryotic biomass. To investigate this microbial component at a global scale, we determined their abundance and biomass in deepwater column samples from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation using a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. HP were ubiquitously found at all depths investigated down to 4000 m. HP abundances decreased with depth, from an average of 72±19 cells ml−1 in mesopelagic waters down to 11±1 cells ml−1 in bathypelagic waters, whereas their total biomass decreased from 280±46 to 50±14 pg C ml−1. The parameters that better explained the variance of HP abundance were depth and prokaryote abundance, and to lesser extent oxygen concentration. The generally good correlation with prokaryotic abundance suggested active grazing of HP on prokaryotes. On a finer scale, the prokaryote:HP abundance ratio varied at a regional scale, and sites with the highest ratios exhibited a larger contribution of fungi molecular signal. Our study is a step forward towards determining the relationship between HP and their environment, unveiling their importance as players in the dark ocean's microbial food web. PMID:25290506

  8. Proton therapy in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities but with the development of more compact and reliable accelerators it is now possible to realistically plan for proton therapy in an Australian hospital. The Australian National Proton Project has been formed to look at the feasibility of a facility which would be primarily for patient treatment but would also be suitable for research and commercial applications. A detailed report will be produced by the end of the year. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. With the development of hospital-based facilities, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. . Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in

  9. Proton dynamics in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Veronica; De Milito, Angelo; Harguindey, Salvador; Reshkin, Stephan J; Wahl, Miriam L; Rauch, Cyril; Chiesi, Antonio; Pouysségur, Jacques; Gatenby, Robert A; Rivoltini, Licia; Fais, Stefano

    2010-06-15

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth.Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  10. Proton dynamics in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouysségur Jacques

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology.

  11. Polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized proton beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the presence of numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Careful and tedious minimization of polarization loss at each of these resonances allowed acceleration of polarized proton beams up to 22 GeV. It has been the hope that Siberian Snakes, which are local spin rotators inserted into ring accelerators, would eliminate these resonances and allow acceleration of polarized beams with the same ease and efficiency that is now routine for unpolarized beams. First tests at IUCF with a full Siberian Snake showed that the spin dynamics with a Snake can be understood in detail. The author now has results of the first tests of a partial Siberian Snake at the AGS, accelerating polarized protons to an energy of about 25 GeV. These successful tests of storage and acceleration of polarized proton beams open up new possibilities such as stored polarized beams for internal target experiments and high energy polarized proton colliders

  12. Journal of Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each published articleFree access to published articles for all readers without any access barriers or subscriptionThe views and opinions expressed in articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Journal of Proton Therapy.Authors are encouraged to submit articles for publication in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Proton Therapy by online or email to editor@protonjournal.comOfficial Website of Journal of Proton Therapy: http://www.protonjournal.org/

  13. Medical Proton Accelerator Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.

    2008-01-01

    A project for a medical proton accelerator for cancer treatment is outlined. The project is motivated by the need for a precise modality for cancer curing especially in children. Proton therapy is known by its superior radiation and biological effectiveness as compared to photon or electron therapy. With 26 proton and 3 heavy-ion therapy complexes operating worldwide only one (p) exists in South Africa, and none in south Asia and the Middle East. The accelerator of choice should provide protons with energy 75 MeV for eye treatment and 250 MeV for body treatment. Four treatment rooms are suggested: two with isocentric gantries, one with fixed beams and one for development. Passive scanning is recommended. The project can serve Middle East and North Africa with ∼ 400 million populations. The annual capacity of the project is estimated as 1,100 to be compared with expected radiation cases eligible for proton cancer treatment of not less than 200,000

  14. Proton relativistic model; Modelo relativistico do proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1996-12-31

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author) 42 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Proton beam writing for producing holographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ow, Y.S.; Breese, M.B.H.; Bettiol, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on the writing of computer generated hologram diffraction patterns using focused 2 MeV proton beam irradiation. These patterns were designed using a ray tracing algorithm and written directly into a thick polymethylmethacrylate layer. When the developed holographic pattern was illuminated with a 650 nm laser it produced a good reconstructed image. This work provides means of forming high-resolution, high aspect ratio holographic images in polymers for applications in data storage using switchable holography.

  16. Observation of elastic neutrino-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.; Entenberg, A.; Kozanecki, W.; Mann, A.K.; Reeder, D.D.; Rubbia, C.; Strait, J.; Sulak, L.; Williams, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    We have observed thirty events of the process νp→νp with a background expectations of seven events. The neutral-current to charged-current ratio sigma (νp→νp)/sigma (νn→μ - p) is measured to be 0.17 +- 0.05 for 0.3 2 2 where -q 2 is the square of the four-momentum transfer to the proton

  17. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature

  18. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  19. Chinook Abundance - Point Features [ds180

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  20. Steelhead Abundance - Linear Features [ds185

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  1. Steelhead Abundance - Point Features [ds184

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  2. Coho Abundance - Linear Features [ds183

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  3. Coho Abundance - Point Features [ds182

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The CalFish Abundance Database contains a comprehensive collection of anadromous fisheries abundance information. Beginning in 1998, the Pacific States Marine...

  4. Current-current interaction picture for proton-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, D.J.; Lo, S.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The authors propose that color current - color current interaction is reponsible for small angle elastic proton proton scattering at asymptotic energy. Excellent fits are obtained for all data above 12 GeV/c which covers twelve orders of magnitude

  5. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Pedersen, Morten Jeppe; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Veierskov, Bjarke

    2008-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells...... of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic...... molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological...

  6. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chu-Yu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-06-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant species was reported. We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240 members are separated into three families, i.e., Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, K(+) efflux antiporters, and cation/H(+) exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H(+) exchangers in the examined angiosperm species. Sliding window analysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and found most motifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  8. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references

  9. Diagnosis by proton bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, V.W.; Koehler, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Beams of monoenergetic protons or other charged ions are passed through the living human body to detect abnormalities and obstructions in body tissue, which abnormalities and obstructions are visualized as density variations in the particle image emerging from the body part under investigation. The particles used are preferably protons having an energy of 100 to 300 MeV, more especially 200 to 300 MeV. The method is of use in detecting inter alia tumors, blood clots, infarcts, soft tissue lesions and multiple sclerosis in patients without exposure to high radiation dosages. 6 claims, 2 drawing figures

  10. Do protons decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litchfield, P.J.

    1984-09-01

    The experimental status of proton decay is reviewed after the Leipzig International conference, July 1984. A brief comparative description of the currently active experiments is given. From the overall samples of contained events it can be concluded that the experiments are working well and broadly agree with each other. The candidates for proton decay from each experiment are examined. Although several experiments report candidates at a higher rate than expected from background calculations, the validity of these calculations is still open to doubt. (author)

  11. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  12. The distribution and abundance of the endangered Knysna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence, distribution and abundance of the endangered Knysna seahorse Hippocampus capensis in 10 estuaries on South Africa's warm temperate south coast, were investigated. Seahorses were found only in the Knysna, Swartvlei and Keurbooms estuaries. Sex ratios were even and, in most cases, more adults ...

  13. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung in a relativistic covariant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinus, Gerard Henk

    1998-01-01

    Proton-proton bremsstrahlung is one of the simplest processes involving the half off-shell NN interaction. Since protons are equally-charged particles with the same mass, electric-dipole radiation is suppressed and higher-order effects play an important role. Thus it is possible to get information

  14. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  15. Oxygen abundances in unevolved metal-poor stars - Interpretation and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abia, C.; Rebolo, R.

    1989-01-01

    The oxygen abundance has been determined by analysis of the O I infrared triplet in 30 unevolved field stars of metallicities in the range Fe/H abundance ratio between -0.2 and -3.5. The data show that the O/Fe abundance ratio increases monotonically as metallicity decreases from solar, reaching values in the range 1.0-1.2 at an Fe/H abundance ratio of about -2. The results, when compared with those already published for metal-deficient red giants, suggest that oxygen could have been depleted in the latter. A discussion of the O/Fe abundance ratios in connection with the chemical evolution of the Galaxy is also presented. 83 refs

  16. Progresses in proton radioactivity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, L. S., E-mail: flidia@ist.utl.pt [Center of Physics and Engineering of Advanced Materials, CeFEMA and Departamento de Física, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    In the present talk, we will discuss recent progresses in the theoretical study of proton radioactivity and their impact on the present understanding of nuclear structure at the extremes of proton stability.

  17. Proton Radiography (pRad)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose more than 300 dynamic experiments in support...

  18. Measurement of polarization-transfer to bound protons in carbon and its virtuality dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izraeli, D.; Brecelj, T.; Achenbach, P.; Ashkenazi, A.; Böhm, R.; Cohen, E. O.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Gilman, R.; Kolar, T.; Korover, I.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Mardor, I.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, U.; Olivenboim, M.; Piasetzky, E.; Ron, G.; Schlimme, B. S.; Schoth, M.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Štajner, S.; Strauch, S.; Thiel, M.; Weber, A.; Yaron, I.; A1 Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    We measured the ratio Px /Pz of the transverse to longitudinal components of polarization transferred from electrons to bound protons in 12C by the 12C (e → ,e‧ p →) process at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI). We observed consistent deviations from unity of this ratio normalized to the free-proton ratio, (Px /Pz) 12C /(Px /Pz) 1H, for both s- and p-shell knocked out protons, even though they are embedded in averaged local densities that differ by about a factor of two. The dependence of the double ratio on proton virtuality is similar to the one for knocked out protons from 2H and 4He, suggesting a universal behavior. It further implies no dependence on average local nuclear density.

  19. Parameters and abundances in luminous stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle Luck, R.

    2014-01-01

    Parameters and abundances for 451 stars of spectral types F, G, and K of luminosity classes I and II have been derived. Absolute magnitudes and E(B – V) have been derived for the warmer stars in order to investigate the galactic abundance gradient. The value found here: d[Fe/H]/dR ∼ –0.06 dex kpc –1 , agrees well with previous determinations. Stellar evolution indicators have also been investigated with the derived C/O ratios indicating that standard CN processing has been operating. Perhaps the most surprising result found in these supposedly relatively young intermediate-mass stars is that both [O/Fe] and [C/Fe] show a correlation with [Fe/H] much the same as found in older populations. While the stars were selected based on luminosity class, there does exist a significant [Fe/H] range in the sample. The likely explanation of this is that there is a significant range in age in the sample; that is, some of the sample are low-mass red-giant stars with types that place them within the selection criteria.

  20. Violent collisions of spinning protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krisch, A.D. [Michigan Univ., Spin Physics Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The author draws the history of polarized proton beams that has relied on experiments that took place in different accelerators like ZGS (zero gradient synchrotron, Argonne), AGS (Brookhaven) and Fermilab from 1973 till today. The first studies of the behavior and spin-manipulation of polarized protons helped in developing polarized beams around the world: Brookhaven now has 200 GeV polarized protons in the RHIC collider, perhaps someday the 7 TeV LHC at CERN might have polarized protons.

  1. Neutron-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, P.

    1990-02-01

    Neutron-proton scattering as fundamental interaction process below and above hundred MeV is discussed. Quark model inspired interactions and phenomenological potential models are described. The seminar also indicates the experimental improvements for achieving new precise scattering data. Concluding remarks indicate the relevance of nucleon-nucleon scattering results to finite nuclei. (orig.) [de

  2. Radiotherapy : proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first phase of proton therapy at the National Accelerator Centre will be the development of a 200 MeV small-field horizontal beam radioneurosurgical facility in the south treatment vault. A progressive expansion of this facility is planned. The patient support and positioning system has been designed and developed by the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Surveying of the University of Cape Town to ensure the accurate positioning in the proton beam of the lesion to be treated. The basic components of the system are an adjustable chair, a series of video cameras and two computers. The specifications for the proton therapy interlock system require that the inputs to and the outputs from the system be similar to those of the neutron therapy system. Additional facilities such as a full diagnostic system which would assist the operators in the event of an error will also be provided. Dosimeters are required for beam monitoring, for monitor calibration and for determining dose distributions. Several designs of transmission ionization chambers for beam monitoring have been designed and tested, while several types of ionization chambers and diodes have been used for the dose distribution measurements. To facilitate the comparison of measured ranges and energy losses of proton beams in the various materials with tabled values, simple empirical approximations, which are sufficiently accurate for most applications, have been used. 10 refs., 10 fig., 4 tabs

  3. Proton Pulse Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, H C; Nilsson, G; Reitberger, T; Thuomas, K A

    1973-03-15

    A 5 MeV proton accelerator (Van de Graaff) has been used for pulse radiolysis of a number of organic gases and the transient spectra obtained from the alkanes methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and neopentane have tentatively been assigned to alkyl radicals. Some methodological aspects of this new technique are discussed

  4. The Melbourne proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legge, G.J.F.; McKenzie, C.D.; Mazzolini, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    A scanning proton microprobe is described which operates in ultra-high vacuum with a resolution of ten microns. The operating principles and main features of the design are discussed and the ability of such an instrument to detect trace elements down to a few ppm by mass is illustrated

  5. Proton microanalysis in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrec, J.P.

    Micro-analyses by nuclear reactions and atomic excitation are used to determine the distribution of fluorine and calcium in the needles of Abies Alba. Fluorine is detected by the nuclear reaction 19 F(p,α) 16 O at the 1.35 MeV resonance. Calcium is measured by its characteristic X-rays due to proton excitation [fr

  6. Proton transfer events in GFP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Donato, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.G.W.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; van Grondelle, R.; Groot, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton

  7. Simultaneous determination of 14N and 15N isotopes in opium by proton induced γ-ray emission technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritty Rao; Reddy, G.L.N.; Vikram Kumar, S.; Ramana, J.V.; Raju, V.S.; Sanjiv Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the simultaneous determination of 14 N and 15 N isotopes in opium by proton induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) technique. The isotopic ratio of 14 N and 15 N is a useful parameter for assigning provenance of (seized) illicit drugs. The measurement, non-destructive in nature, is performed on pellets made up of opium powders and is based on the prompt detection of 2.313 and 4.4 MeV γ-rays emanating from 14 N(p,p'γ) 14 N and 15 N(p,αγ) 12 C nuclear reactions respectively, induced simultaneously by 3.6-3.8 MeV proton beam. Positive as well as negative deviations from the natural isotopic abundance (99.63:0.37) were observed in the samples. The precision of the measurements is about 4%. The methodology provides an easy and rapid approach to determine the isotopic ratio of 14 N and 15 N and has been used for the first time in the analysis of opium. (author)

  8. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kadyshevskiy, Vladimir; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Kamal; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lokesh, Kumar; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seeder, Karin Soraya; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokohama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2015-05-27

    The measurement of primary $\\pi^{\\pm}$, K$^{\\pm}$, p and $\\overline{p}$ production at mid-rapidity ($|y| <$ 0.5) in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV performed with ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionization energy loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/$c$ for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/$c$ for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/$c$ for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with QCD-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Furthermore, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  9. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text] TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J; Adamová, D; Aggarwal, M M; Rinella, G Aglieri; Agnello, M; Agrawal, N; Ahammed, Z; Ahmed, I; Ahn, S U; Aimo, I; Aiola, S; Ajaz, M; Akindinov, A; Alam, S N; Aleksandrov, D; Alessandro, B; Alexandre, D; Molina, R Alfaro; Alici, A; Alkin, A; Alme, J; Alt, T; Altinpinar, S; Altsybeev, I; Prado, C Alves Garcia; Andrei, C; Andronic, A; Anguelov, V; Anielski, J; Antičić, T; Antinori, F; Antonioli, P; Aphecetche, L; Appelshäuser, H; Arcelli, S; Armesto, N; Arnaldi, R; Aronsson, T; Arsene, I C; Arslandok, M; Augustinus, A; Averbeck, R; Azmi, M D; Bach, M; Badalà, A; Baek, Y W; Bagnasco, S; Bailhache, R; Bala, R; Baldisseri, A; Ball, M; Pedrosa, F Baltasar Dos Santos; Baral, R C; Barbano, A M; Barbera, R; Barile, F; Barnaföldi, G G; Barnby, L S; Barret, V; Bartalini, P; Bartke, J; Bartsch, E; Basile, M; Bastid, N; Basu, S; Bathen, B; Batigne, G; Camejo, A Batista; Batyunya, B; Batzing, P C; Bearden, I G; Beck, H; Bedda, C; Behera, N K; Belikov, I; Bellini, F; Martinez, H Bello; Bellwied, R; Belmont, R; Belmont-Moreno, E; Belyaev, V; Bencedi, G; Beole, S; Berceanu, I; Bercuci, A; Berdnikov, Y; Berenyi, D; Bertens, R A; Berzano, D; Betev, L; Bhasin, A; Bhat, I R; Bhati, A K; Bhattacharjee, B; Bhom, J; Bianchi, L; Bianchi, N; Bianchin, C; Bielčík, J; Bielčíková, J; Bilandzic, A; Biswas, S; Bjelogrlic, S; Blanco, F; Blau, D; Blume, C; Bock, F; Bogdanov, A; Bøggild, H; Boldizsár, L; Bombara, M; Book, J; Borel, H; Borissov, A; Borri, M; Bossú, F; Botje, M; Botta, E; Böttger, S; Braun-Munzinger, P; Bregant, M; Breitner, T; Broker, T A; Browning, T A; Broz, M; Brucken, E J; Bruna, E; Bruno, G E; Budnikov, D; Buesching, H; Bufalino, S; Buncic, P; Busch, O; Buthelezi, Z; Buxton, J T; Caffarri, D; Cai, X; Caines, H; Diaz, L Calero; Caliva, A; Villar, E Calvo; Camerini, P; Carena, F; Carena, W; Castellanos, J Castillo; Castro, A J; Casula, E A R; Cavicchioli, C; Sanchez, C Ceballos; Cepila, J; Cerello, P; Chang, B; Chapeland, S; Chartier, M; Charvet, J L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Chelnokov, V; Cherney, M; Cheshkov, C; Cheynis, B; Barroso, V Chibante; Chinellato, D D; Chochula, P; Choi, K; Chojnacki, M; Choudhury, S; Christakoglou, P; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, S U; Cicalo, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Cleymans, J; Colamaria, F; Colella, D; Collu, A; Colocci, M; Balbastre, G Conesa; Valle, Z Conesa Del; Connors, M E; Contreras, J G; Cormier, T M; Morales, Y Corrales; Maldonado, I Cortés; Cortese, P; Cosentino, M R; Costa, F; Crochet, P; Albino, R Cruz; Cuautle, E; Cunqueiro, L; Dahms, T; Dainese, A; Danu, A; Das, D; Das, I; Das, S; Dash, A; Dash, S; De, S; Caro, A De; Cataldo, G de; Cuveland, J de; Falco, A De; Gruttola, D De; Marco, N De; Pasquale, S De; Deisting, A; Deloff, A; Dénes, E; D'Erasmo, G; Bari, D Di; Mauro, A Di; Nezza, P Di; Corchero, M A Diaz; Dietel, T; Dillenseger, P; Divià, R; Djuvsland, Ø; Dobrin, A; Dobrowolski, T; Gimenez, D Domenicis; Dönigus, B; Dordic, O; Dubey, A K; Dubla, A; Ducroux, L; Dupieux, P; Ehlers, R J; Elia, D; Engel, H; Erazmus, B; Erhardt, F; Eschweiler, D; Espagnon, B; Estienne, M; Esumi, S; Eum, J; Evans, D; Evdokimov, S; Eyyubova, G; Fabbietti, L; Fabris, D; Faivre, J; Fantoni, A; Fasel, M; Feldkamp, L; Felea, D; Feliciello, A; Feofilov, G; Ferencei, J; Téllez, A Fernández; Ferreiro, E G; Ferretti, A; Festanti, A; Figiel, J; Figueredo, M A S; Filchagin, S; Finogeev, D; Fionda, F M; Fiore, E M; Fleck, M G; Floris, M; Foertsch, S; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Fragiacomo, E; Francescon, A; Frankenfeld, U; Fuchs, U; Furget, C; Furs, A; Girard, M Fusco; Gaardhøje, J J; Gagliardi, M; Gago, A M; Gallio, M; Gangadharan, D R; Ganoti, P; Gao, C; Garabatos, C; Garcia-Solis, E; Gargiulo, C; Gasik, P; Germain, M; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Ghosh, P; Ghosh, S K; Gianotti, P; Giubellino, P; Giubilato, P; Dziadus, E Gladysz; Glässel, P; Ramirez, A Gomez; Zamora, P González; Gorbunov, S; Görlich, L; Gotovac, S; Grabski, V; Graczykowski, L K; Grelli, A; Grigoras, A; Grigoras, C; Grigoriev, V; Grigoryan, A; Grigoryan, S; Grinyov, B; Grion, N; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J F; Grossiord, J-Y; Grosso, R; Guber, F; Guernane, R; Guerzoni, B; Gulbrandsen, K; Gulkanyan, H; Gunji, T; Gupta, A; Gupta, R; Haake, R; Haaland, Ø; Hadjidakis, C; Haiduc, M; Hamagaki, H; Hamar, G; Hanratty, L D; Hansen, A; Harris, J W; Hartmann, H; Harton, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, S; Heckel, S T; Heide, M; Helstrup, H; Herghelegiu, A; Corral, G Herrera; Hess, B A; Hetland, K F; Hilden, T E; Hillemanns, H; Hippolyte, B; Hristov, P; Huang, M; Humanic, T J; Hussain, N; Hussain, T; Hutter, D; Hwang, D S; Ilkaev, R; Ilkiv, I; Inaba, M; Ionita, C; Ippolitov, M; Irfan, M; Ivanov, M; Ivanov, V; Izucheev, V; Jacobs, P M; Jahnke, C; Jang, H J; Janik, M A; Jayarathna, P H S Y; Jena, C; Jena, S; Bustamante, R T Jimenez; Jones, P G; Jung, H; Jusko, A; Kalinak, P; Kalweit, A; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kaplin, V; Kar, S; Uysal, A Karasu; Karavichev, O; Karavicheva, T; Karpechev, E; Kebschull, U; Keidel, R; Keijdener, D L D; Keil, M; Khan, K H; Khan, M M; Khan, P; Khan, S A; Khanzadeev, A; Kharlov, Y; Kileng, B; Kim, B; Kim, D W; Kim, D J; Kim, H; Kim, J S; Kim, M; Kim, M; Kim, S; Kim, T; Kirsch, S; Kisel, I; Kiselev, S; Kisiel, A; Kiss, G; Klay, J L; Klein, C; Klein, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kluge, A; Knichel, M L; Knospe, A G; Kobayashi, T; Kobdaj, C; Kofarago, M; Köhler, M K; Kollegger, T; Kolojvari, A; Kondratiev, V; Kondratyeva, N; Kondratyuk, E; Konevskikh, A; Kouzinopoulos, C; Kovalenko, O; Kovalenko, V; Kowalski, M; Kox, S; Meethaleveedu, G Koyithatta; Kral, J; Králik, I; Kravčáková, A; Krelina, M; Kretz, M; Krivda, M; Krizek, F; Kryshen, E; Krzewicki, M; Kubera, A M; Kučera, V; Kucheriaev, Y; Kugathasan, T; Kuhn, C; Kuijer, P G; Kulakov, I; Kumar, J; Kumar, L; Kurashvili, P; Kurepin, A; Kurepin, A B; Kuryakin, A; Kushpil, S; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Pointe, S L La; Rocca, P La; Fernandes, C Lagana; Lakomov, I; Langoy, R; Lara, C; Lardeux, A; Lattuca, A; Laudi, E; Lea, R; Leardini, L; Lee, G R; Lee, S; Legrand, I; Lehnert, J; Lemmon, R C; Lenti, V; Leogrande, E; Monzón, I León; Leoncino, M; Lévai, P; Li, S; Li, X; Lien, J; Lietava, R; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Lippmann, C; Lisa, M A; Ljunggren, H M; Lodato, D F; Loenne, P I; Loggins, V R; Loginov, V; Loizides, C; Lopez, X; Torres, E López; Lowe, A; Lu, X-G; Luettig, P; Lunardon, M; Luparello, G; Maevskaya, A; Mager, M; Mahajan, S; Mahmood, S M; Maire, A; Majka, R D; Malaev, M; Cervantes, I Maldonado; Malinina, L; Mal'Kevich, D; Malzacher, P; Mamonov, A; Manceau, L; Manko, V; Manso, F; Manzari, V; Marchisone, M; Mareš, J; Margagliotti, G V; Margotti, A; Margutti, J; Marín, A; Markert, C; Marquard, M; Martin, N A; Blanco, J Martin; Martinengo, P; Martínez, M I; Martínez García, G; Pedreira, M Martinez; Martynov, Y; Mas, A; Masciocchi, S; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Massacrier, L; Mastroserio, A; Masui, H; Matyja, A; Mayer, C; Mazer, J; Mazzoni, M A; Mcdonald, D; Meddi, F; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meninno, E; Pérez, J Mercado; Meres, M; Miake, Y; Mieskolainen, M M; Mikhaylov, K; Milano, L; Milosevic, J; Minervini, L M; Mischke, A; Mishra, A N; Miśkowiec, D; Mitra, J; Mitu, C M; Mohammadi, N; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Zetina, L Montaño; Montes, E; Morando, M; Godoy, D A Moreira De; Moretto, S; Morreale, A; Morsch, A; Muccifora, V; Mudnic, E; Mühlheim, D; Muhuri, S; Mukherjee, M; Müller, H; Mulligan, J D; Munhoz, M G; Murray, S; Musa, L; Musinsky, J; Nandi, B K; Nania, R; Nappi, E; Naru, M U; Nattrass, C; Nayak, K; Nayak, T K; Nazarenko, S; Nedosekin, A; Nellen, L; Ng, F; Nicassio, M; Niculescu, M; Niedziela, J; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaev, S; Nikulin, S; Nikulin, V; Noferini, F; Nomokonov, P; Nooren, G; Norman, J; Nyanin, A; Nystrand, J; Oeschler, H; Oh, S; Oh, S K; Ohlson, A; Okatan, A; Okubo, T; Olah, L; Oleniacz, J; Silva, A C Oliveira Da; Oliver, M H; Onderwaater, J; Oppedisano, C; Velasquez, A Ortiz; Oskarsson, A; Otwinowski, J; Oyama, K; Ozdemir, M; Pachmayer, Y; Pagano, P; Paić, G; Pajares, C; Pal, S K; Pan, J; Pandey, A K; Pant, D; Papikyan, V; Pappalardo, G S; Pareek, P; Park, W J; Parmar, S; Passfeld, A; Paticchio, V; Paul, B; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Costa, H Pereira Da; Filho, E Pereira De Oliveira; Peresunko, D; Lara, C E Pérez; Peskov, V; Pestov, Y; Petráček, V; Petrov, V; Petrovici, M; Petta, C; Piano, S; Pikna, M; Pillot, P; Pinazza, O; Pinsky, L; Piyarathna, D B; Płoskoń, M; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Pochybova, S; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Poghosyan, M G; Polichtchouk, B; Poljak, N; Poonsawat, W; Pop, A; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Porter, J; Pospisil, J; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puccio, M; Puddu, G; Pujahari, P; Punin, V; Putschke, J; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Raha, S; Rajput, S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Razazi, V; Read, K F; Real, J S; Redlich, K; Reed, R J; Rehman, A; Reichelt, P; Reicher, M; Reidt, F; Ren, X; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Rettig, F; Revol, J-P; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Ristea, C; Rivetti, A; Rocco, E; Cahuantzi, M Rodríguez; Manso, A Rodriguez; Røed, K; Rogochaya, E; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Romita, R; Ronchetti, F; Ronflette, L; Rosnet, P; Rossi, A; Roukoutakis, F; Roy, A; Roy, C; Roy, P; Montero, A J Rubio; Rui, R; Russo, R; Ryabinkin, E; Ryabov, Y; Rybicki, A; Sadovsky, S; Šafařík, K; Sahlmuller, B; Sahoo, P; Sahoo, R; Sahoo, S; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakai, S; Saleh, M A; Salgado, C A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Castro, X Sanchez; Šándor, L; Sandoval, A; Sano, M; Santagati, G; Sarkar, D; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schuchmann, S; Schukraft, J; Schulc, M; Schuster, T; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, R; Seeder, K S; Seger, J E; Sekiguchi, Y; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senosi, K; Seo, J; Serradilla, E; Sevcenco, A; Shabanov, A; Shabetai, A; Shadura, O; Shahoyan, R; Shangaraev, A; Sharma, A; Sharma, N; Shigaki, K; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siddhanta, S; Sielewicz, K M; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singha, S; Singhal, V; Sinha, B C; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Slupecki, M; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Snellman, T W; Søgaard, C; Soltz, R; Song, J; Song, M; Song, Z; Soramel, F; Sorensen, S; Spacek, M; Spiriti, E; Sputowska, I; Stassinaki, M Spyropoulou; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stefanek, G; Steinpreis, M; Stenlund, E; Steyn, G; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Suleymanov, M; Sultanov, R; Šumbera, M; Symons, T J M; Szabo, A; Toledo, A Szanto de; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szymanski, M; Takahashi, J; Tanaka, N; Tangaro, M A; Takaki, J D Tapia; Peloni, A Tarantola; Tariq, M; Tarzila, M G; Tauro, A; Muñoz, G Tejeda; Telesca, A; Terasaki, K; Terrevoli, C; Teyssier, B; Thäder, J; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Timmins, A R; Toia, A; Trogolo, S; Trubnikov, V; Trzaska, W H; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ullaland, K; Uras, A; Usai, G L; Utrobicic, A; Vajzer, M; Vala, M; Palomo, L Valencia; Vallero, S; Maarel, J Van Der; Hoorne, J W Van; Leeuwen, M van; Vanat, T; Vyvre, P Vande; Varga, D; Vargas, A; Vargyas, M; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vauthier, A; Vechernin, V; Veen, A M; Veldhoen, M; Velure, A; Venaruzzo, M; Vercellin, E; Limón, S Vergara; Vernet, R; Verweij, M; Vickovic, L; Viesti, G; Viinikainen, J; Vilakazi, Z; Baillie, O Villalobos; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Vinogradov, Y; Virgili, T; Vislavicius, V; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopyanov, A; Völkl, M A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S A; Volpe, G; Haller, B von; Vorobyev, I; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Vulpescu, B; Vyushin, A; Wagner, B; Wagner, J; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, Y; Watanabe, D; Weber, M; Weber, S G; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilde, M; Wilk, G; Wilkinson, J; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Winn, M; Yaldo, C G; Yamaguchi, Y; Yang, H; Yang, P; Yano, S; Yasnopolskiy, S; Yin, Z; Yokoyama, H; Yoo, I-K; Yurchenko, V; Yushmanov, I; Zaborowska, A; Zaccolo, V; Zaman, A; Zampolli, C; Zanoli, H J C; Zaporozhets, S; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zgura, I S; Zhalov, M; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhigareva, N; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, Z; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zimmermann, M B; Zinovjev, G; Zyzak, M

    The measurement of primary [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] production at mid-rapidity ([Formula: see text] 0.5) in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/[Formula: see text] for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/[Formula: see text] for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/[Formula: see text] for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Furthermore, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  10. Omega meson production in proton-proton collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Wissermann, M.; Brinkmann, K.; Dshemuchadse, S.

    2005-01-01

    The TOF spectrometer is an external experiment fed by the proton accelerator COSY, which is located at the Forschungszentrum Juelich, Germany. While this detector does not utilize a magnetic field for particle identification, it, however, stands out for its high acceptance (approx. 2π in the laboratory frame) and versatility. TOF measures the velocity-vectors of all charged particles, which then are used to completely reconstruct the event pattern. Due to the modular design of the TOF detector, its components can be assembled to ideally match different experimental requirements. This makes it a multipurpose device, which has shown results for many hadronic channels, starting from the pion threshold up to excess energies as high as 1GeV. One of the experimental programs is dedicated to the ω meson production. In proton-proton interactions, this channel has remained largely unstudied until the late 1990s. Then, first experimental data in the direct vicinity of the threshold and at an excess energy of ε=320 MeV became available. We have published data on ω production for two (intermediate) excess energies of ε=93 MeV and ε=173 MeV. In parallel, a considerable interest on the part of theory arose, since the reaction dynamics of ω-meson production in nucleon-nucleon collisions has an impact on many fields of modern physics. For example, there is an ongoing discussion whether 'missing resonances' may (help to) explain the phenomena observed in dense matter. These resonances would couple to the pω, but not to the pπ channel. Although predicted by many authors, until now no pω resonance was found experimentally; the strangeness content of the nucleon is still an open question. One possible key to an answer is the ratio of the total cross sections of ω to φ - mesons, which experimentally is about a factor of seven larger than simple SU predictions (often referred to as 'violation of the OZI-rule'). However, this comparison is only valid assuming similar

  11. ABUNDANCES IN THE LOCAL REGION. I. G AND K GIANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, R. Earle, E-mail: rel2@case.edu [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Parameters and abundances for 1133 stars of spectral types F, G, and K of luminosity class III have been derived. In terms of stellar parameters, the primary point of interest is the disagreement between gravities derived with masses determined from isochrones, and gravities determined from an ionization balance. This is not a new result per se, but the size of this sample emphasizes the severity of the problem. A variety of arguments led to the selection of the ionization-balance gravity as the working value. The derived abundances indicate that the giants in the solar region have Sun-like total abundances and abundance ratios. Stellar evolution indicators have also been investigated with the Li abundances and the [C/Fe] and C/O ratios, indicating that standard processing has been operating in these stars. The more salient result for stellar evolution is that the [C/Fe] data across the red-giant clump indicates the presence of mass-dependent mixing in accord with standard stellar evolution predictions.

  12. Australian national proton facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities and apart from the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory and some low energy machines for eye treatment, only small numbers of patients were treated in each centre and conditions were less than optimal. Limited beam time and lack of support facilities restricted the type of patient treated and conventional fractionation could not be used. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. Since the development of hospital-based facilities, such as the one in Loma Linda in California, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in the low dose volume is likely to be particularly

  13. Isotope ratio in stellar atmospheres and nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbuy, B.L.S.

    1987-01-01

    The determination of isotopic ratios in stellar atmospheres is studied. The isotopic shift of atomic and molecular lines of different species of a certain element is examined. CH and MgH lines are observed in order to obtain the 12 C: 13 C and 24 Mg: 25 Mg: 26 Mg isotpic ratios. The formation of lines in stellar atmospheres is computed and the resulting synthetic spectra are employed to determine the isotopic abundances. The results obtained for the isotopic ratios are compared to predictions of nucleosynthesis theories. Finally, the concept of primary and secondary element is discussed, and these definitions are applied to the observed variations in the abundance of elements as a function of metallicity. (author) [pt

  14. Protonation of pyridine. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahran, N F; Ghoniem, H; Helal, A I [Physics Dept., Nuclear Research Center, AEA., Cairo, (Egypt); Rasheed, N [Nuclear Material Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Field ionization mass spectra of pyridine is measured using 10{mu}m activated wire. protonation of pyridine, is observed as an intense peak in the mass spectra. Charge distribution of pyridine molecule is calculated using the modified neglect of diatomic overlap (MNDO) technique, and consequently proton attachment is proposed to be on the nitrogen atom. Temperature dependence of (M+H){sup +} ion is investigated and discussed. MNDO calculations of the protonated species are done, and the proton affinity of pyridine molecule is estimated. Time dependence of the field ionization process of pyridine and protonated ions are observed and discussed. 5 figs.

  15. Nuclear abundances and evolution of the interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wannier, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of molecular and elemental abundances in the interstellar medium (ISM) are reviewed, with special attention given to isotope ratios. The derivation of molecular isotope abundances for the ISM is discussed, along with H and C fractionation. Millimeter- and centimeter-wave spectra of giant clouds are examined with respect to isotope abundances of C, O, N, Si, S, and D. Evidence for the current enrichment of the ISM by mass loss from evolved stars is considered, together with chemical abundance gradients in H II regions and planetary nebulae. Cosmic-ray observations pertaining to abundances in the ISM are summarized, with emphasis on available results for Ne, Mg, Si, Fe, and Ni. The observations reviewed are shown to support arguments in favor of: (1) the cosmological production of D and He-3 (2) the production of the CNO elements by hydrostatic hydrogen burning (3) the nucleosynthesis of Ne, Mg, Si, S, Fe, and Ni as a result of He burning (4) solar abundances of interstellar S, Fe, and Ni and (5) a direct association between observed inhomogeneities in the ISM and mass loss from evolved stellar objects

  16. The Cosmic Abundance of 3He: Green Bank Telescope Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balser, Dana; Bania, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The Big Bang theory for the origin of the Universe predicts that during the first ~1,000 seconds significant amounts of the light elements (2H, 3He, 4He, and 7Li) were produced. Many generations of stellar evolution in the Galaxy modifies these primordial abundances. Observations of the 3He+ hyperfine transition in Galactic HII regions reveals a 3He/H abundance ratio that is constant with Galactocentric radius to within the uncertainties, and is consistent with the primordial value as determined from cosmic microwave background experiments (e.g., WMAP). This "3He Plateau" indicates that the net production and destruction of 3He in stars is approximately zero. Recent stellar evolution models that include thermohaline mixing, however, predict that 3He/H abundance ratios should slightly decrease with Galactocentric radius, or in places in the Galaxy with lower star formation rates. Here we discuss sensitive Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of 3He+ at 3.46 cm in a subset of our HII region sample. We develop HII region models and derive accurate 3He/H abundance ratios to better constrain these new stellar evolution models.

  17. Proton transfer events in GFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Mariangela; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Stuart, Thomas Cohen; Kennis, John T M; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-09-28

    Proton transfer is one of the most important elementary processes in biology. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) serves as an important model system to elucidate the mechanistic details of this reaction, because in GFP proton transfer can be induced by light absorption. Illumination initiates proton transfer through a 'proton-wire', formed by the chromophore (the proton donor), water molecule W22, Ser205 and Glu222 (the acceptor), on a picosecond time scale. To obtain a more refined view of this process, we have used a combined approach of time resolved mid-infrared spectroscopy and visible pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to resolve with atomic resolution how and how fast protons move through this wire. Our results indicate that absorption of light by GFP induces in 3 ps (10 ps in D(2)O) a shift of the equilibrium positions of all protons in the H-bonded network, leading to a partial protonation of Glu222 and to a so-called low barrier hydrogen bond (LBHB) for the chromophore's proton, giving rise to dual emission at 475 and 508 nm. This state is followed by a repositioning of the protons on the wire in 10 ps (80 ps in D(2)O), ultimately forming the fully deprotonated chromophore and protonated Glu222.

  18. Solar proton fluxes since 1956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of 56 Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of 22 Na and 55 Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity

  19. Properties of prompt muons produced by 28 GeV proton interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, W.M.; Lai, K.W.; Larsen, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    Prompt dimuon production from the interactions of 28.5 GeV protons with nuclear targets. The dimuon differential cross section dsigma/dx and the prompt muon to pion ratio are equal within errors to that found at an incident proton beam energy of 400 GeV. The atomic number dependence is found to be the same as that of the total proton nucleon cross section. The dimuon invariant mass distribution is presented. 13 references

  20. Photoproduction with a leading proton at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, C.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Ch.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broeker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Brueckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Buerger, J.; Buesser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, J.; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Fluegge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Graessler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoeting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Joensson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kaestli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, C.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Krueger, K.; Kuepper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, S.; Lueke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.-O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mueller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Nellen, G.; Newman, P.R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poeschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Raedel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoerner, T.; Schroeder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsuri n, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wuensch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; Nedden, M. zur

    2001-01-01

    The total cross section for the photoproduction process with a leading proton in the final state has been measured at γp centre-of-mass energies W of 91, 181 and 231 GeV. The measured cross sections apply to the kinematic range with the transverse momentum of the scattered proton restricted to p T ≤0.2 GeV and 0.68≤z≤0.88, where z=E p '/E p is the scattered proton energy normalised to the beam energy. The cross section dσ γp→Xp' (W,z)/dz is observed to be independent of W and z within the measurement errors and amounts to (8.05±0.06 (stat)±0.89 (syst)) μb on average. The data are well described by a Triple Regge model in which the process is mediated by a mixture of exchanges with an effective Regge trajectory of intercept α i (0)=0.33±0.04 (stat)±0.04 (syst). The total cross section for the interaction of the photon with this mixture (γα i →X) can be described by an effective trajectory of intercept α k (0)=0.99±0.01 (stat)±0.05 (syst). Predictions based on previous triple Regge analyses of pp→pX data assuming vertex factorisation are broadly consistent with the γp data. The measured cross sections are compared with deep inelastic scattering leading proton data in the same region of z and p T for photon virtuality Q 2 >2.5 GeV 2 . The ratio of the cross section for leading proton production to the total cross section is found to rise with Q 2

  1. Proton mass decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Chen, Ying; Draper, Terrence; Liang, Jian; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2018-03-01

    We report the results on the proton mass decomposition and also on the related quark and glue momentum fractions. The results are based on overlap valence fermions on four ensembles of Nf = 2 + 1 DWF configurations with three lattice spacings and volumes, and several pion masses including the physical pion mass. With 1-loop pertur-bative calculation and proper normalization of the glue operator, we find that the u, d, and s quark masses contribute 9(2)% to the proton mass. The quark energy and glue field energy contribute 31(5)% and 37(5)% respectively in the MS scheme at µ = 2 GeV. The trace anomaly gives the remaining 23(1)% contribution. The u, d, s and glue momentum fractions in the MS scheme are consistent with the global analysis at µ = 2 GeV.

  2. Proton solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaposhnikova, E.F.

    1979-01-01

    The observations of proton solar flares have been carried out in 1950-1958 using the extrablackout coronograph of the Crimea astrophysical observatory. The experiments permit to determine two characteristic features of flares: the directed motion of plasma injection flux from the solar depths and the appearance of a shock wave moving from the place of the injection along the solar surface. The appearance of the shock wave is accompanied by some phenomena occuring both in the sunspot zone and out of it. The consistent flash of proton flares in the other groups of spots, the disappearance of fibres and the appearance of eruptive prominences is accomplished in the sunspot zone. Beyond the sunspot zone the flares occur above spots, the fibres disintegrate partially or completely and the eruptive prominences appear in the regions close to the pole

  3. The Amsterdam proton microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis is to develop a microbeam setup such that small beam spot sizes can be produced routinely, and to investigate the capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE analysis. The development and performance of the Amsterdam proton microbeam setup are described. The capabilities of the setup for micro-PIXE are shown with an investigation into the presence of trace elements in human hair. (Auth.)

  4. Proton dosimetry comparison involving ionometry and calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delacroix, Sabine; Bridier, Andre; Mazal, Alexandre; Daures, Josiane; Ostrowsky, Aime; Nauraye, Catherine; Kacperek, Andre; Vynkier, Stephane; Brassard, Nicole; Habrand, Jean-Louis

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of the absorbed dose to tissue determined by various ionization chambers, Faraday cups, and an A-150 plastic calorimeter was performed in the 200 MeV proton beam of Orsay, France. Four European proton-therapy centers (Clatterbridge, UK, Louvain la Neuve, Belgium, and Nice and Orsay, France) participated in the comparison. An agreement of better than 1% was observed in the absorbed dose to A-150 measured with the different chambers of the participating groups. The mean ratio of the absorbed dose to A-150 determined with the calorimeter to that determined by the different ionization chambers in the different irradiation conditions was found to be 0.952 ± 0.007 [1 standard deviation (SD)] according to the code of practice used by all the participating centers, based on Janni's tables of stopping powers and a value of 35.2 J/Coulomb for (W air /e) p . A better agreement in the mean ratio calorimeter/chamber, 0.985 ± 0.007 (1 SD) is observed when using the proton stopping power ratio values recently published by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements in Report no. 49. The mean ratio of these doses determined in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine protocol and using the new recommended stopping power tables becomes 1.002 ± 0.007 (1 SD). Two Faraday cups agree in measured charge to within 0.8%; however, the calculation of dose is underestimated by up to 17%; compared with ion chamber measurements and seems to be very sensitive to measurement conditions, particularly to the distance to the collimator

  5. The proton radius puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesini, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    The FAMU (Fisica degli Atomi Muonici) experiment has the goal to measure precisely the proton Zemach radius, thus contributing to the solution of the so-called proton radius "puzzle". To this aim, it makes use of a high-intensity pulsed muon beam at RIKEN-RAL impinging on a cryogenic hydrogen target with an high-Z gas admixture and a tunable mid-IR high power laser, to measure the hyperfine (HFS) splitting of the 1S state of the muonic hydrogen. From the value of the exciting laser frequency, the energy of the HFS transition may be derived with high precision ( 10-5) and thus, via QED calculations, the Zemach radius of the proton. The experimental apparatus includes a precise fiber-SiPMT beam hodoscope and a crown of eight LaBr3 crystals and a few HPGe detectors for detection of the emitted characteristic X-rays. Preliminary runs to optimize the gas target filling and its operating conditions have been taken in 2014 and 2015-2016. The final run, with the pump laser to drive the HFS transition, is expected in 2018.

  6. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  7. WE-EF-303-09: Proton-Acoustic Range Verification in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Xiang, L [University of Oklahoma (OK), Norman, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We investigated proton-acoustic signals detection for range verification with current ultrasound instruments in typical clinical scenarios. Using simulations that included a realistic noise model, we determined the theoretical minimum dose required to generate detectable proton-acoustic signals. Methods: An analytical model was used to calculate the dose distributions and local pressure rise (per proton) for beams of different energy (100 and 160 MeV) and spot widths (1, 5, and 10 mm) in a water phantom. The acoustic waves propagating from the Bragg peak were modeled by the general 3D pressure wave equation and convolved with Gaussian kernels to simulate various proton pulse widths (0.1 – 10 ms). A realistic PZT ultrasound transducer (5 cm diameter) was simulated with a Butterworth band-pass filter, and ii) randomly generated noise based on a model of thermal noise in the transducer. The signal-to-noise ratio was calculated, determining the minimum number of protons and dose required per pulse. The maximum spatial resolution was also estimated from the signal spectrum. Results: The calculated noise in the transducer was 12–28 mPa, depending on the transducer center frequency (70–380 kHz). The minimum number of protons were on the order of 0.6–6 million per pulse, leading to 3–110 mGy dose per pulse at the Bragg peak, depending on the spot size. The acoustic signal consisted of lower frequencies for wider pulses, leading to lower noise levels, but also worse spatial resolution. The resolution was 1-mm for a 0.1-µs pulse width, but increased to 5-mm for a 10-µs pulse width. Conclusion: We have established minimum dose detection limits for proton-acoustic range validation. These limits correspond to a best case scenario with a large detector with no losses and only detector thermal noise. Feasible proton-acoustic range detection will require at least 10{sup 7} protons per pulse and pulse widths ≤ 1-µs.

  8. [Why proton therapy? And how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariat, Juliette; Habrand, Jean Louis; Lesueur, Paul; Chaikh, Abdulhamid; Kammerer, Emmanuel; Lecomte, Delphine; Batalla, Alain; Balosso, Jacques; Tessonnier, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Proton therapy is a radiotherapy, based on the use of protons, charged subatomic particles that stop at a given depth depending on their initial energy (pristine Bragg peak), avoiding any output beam, unlike the photons used in most of the other modalities of radiotherapy. Proton therapy has been used for 60 years, but has only become ubiquitous in the last decade because of recent major advances in particle accelerator technology. This article reviews the history of clinical implementation of protons, the nature of the technological advances that now allows its expansion at a lower cost. It also addresses the technical and physical specificities of proton therapy and the clinical situations for which proton therapy may be relevant but requires evidence. Different proton therapy techniques are possible. These are explained in terms of their clinical potential by explaining the current terminology (such as cyclotrons, synchrotrons or synchrocyclotrons, using superconducting magnets, fixed line or arm rotary with passive diffusion delivery or active by scanning) in basic words. The requirements associated with proton therapy are increased due to the precision of the depth dose deposit. The learning curve of proton therapy requires that clinical indications be prioritized according to their associated uncertainties (such as range uncertainties and movement in lung tumors). Many clinical indications potentially fall under proton therapy ultimately. Clinical strategies are explained in a paralleled manuscript. Copyright © 2018 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Financial Key Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on computing techniques starting from trial balance data regarding financial key ratios. There are presented activity, liquidity, solvency and profitability financial key ratios. It is presented a computing methodology in three steps based on a trial balance.

  10. Proton permeation of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D W

    1987-10-01

    Proton permeation of the lipid bilayer barrier has two unique features. First, permeability coefficients measured at neutral pH ranges are six to seven orders of magnitude greater than expected from knowledge of other monovalent cations. Second, proton conductance across planar lipid bilayers varies at most by a factor of 10 when pH is varied from near 1 to near 11. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this anomalous behavior: proton conductance related to contaminants of lipid bilayers, and proton translocation along transient hydrogen-bonded chains (tHBC) of associated water molecules in the membrane. The weight of evidence suggests that trace contaminants may contribute to proton conductance across planar lipid membranes at certain pH ranges, but cannot account for the anomalous proton flux in liposome systems. Two new results will be reported here which were designed to test the tHBC model. These include measurements of relative proton/potassium permeability in the gramicidin channel, and plots of proton flux against the magnitude of pH gradients. (1) The relative permeabilities of protons and potassium through the gramicidin channel, which contains a single strand of hydrogen-bonded water molecules, were found to differ by at least four orders of magnitude when measured at neutral pH ranges. This result demonstrates that a hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules can provide substantial discrimination between protons and other cations. It was also possible to calculate that if approximately 7% of bilayer water was present in a transient configuration similar to that of the gramicidin channel, it could account for the measured proton flux. (2) The plot of proton conductance against pH gradient across liposome membranes was superlinear, a result that is consistent with one of three alternative tHBC models for proton conductance described by Nagle elsewhere in this volume.

  11. Why the Real Part of the Proton-Proton Forward Scattering Amplitude Should be Measured at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bourrely, C.; Martin, Andre; Soffer, Jacques; Wu, Tai Tsun

    2006-01-01

    For the energy of 14 TeV, to be reached at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), we have had for some time accurate predictions for both the real and imaginary parts of the forward proton-proton elastic scattering amplitude. LHC is now scheduled to start operating in two years, and it is timely to discuss some of the important consequences of the measurements of both the total cross-section and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part. We stress the importance of measuring the real part of the proton-proton forward scattering amplitude at LHC, because a deviation from existing theoretical predictions could be a strong sign for new physics.

  12. Elemental abundances of intermediate-age open cluster NGC 3680

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschang, A. W.; De Silva, G. M.; Zucker, D. B.

    2012-06-01

    We present a new abundance analysis of the intermediate-age Galactic open cluster NGC 3680, based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio VLT/UVES spectroscopic data. Several element abundances are presented for this cluster for the first time, but most notably we derive abundances for the light and heavy s-process elements Y, Ba, La and Nd. The serendipitous measurement of the rare-earth r-process element Gd is also reported. This cluster exhibits a significant enhancement of Na in giants as compared to dwarfs, which may be a proxy for an O to Na anticorrelation as observed in Galactic globular clusters but not open clusters. We also observe a step-like enhancement of heavy s-process elements towards higher atomic number, contrary to expectations from asymptotic giant branch nucleosynthesis models, suggesting that the r process played a significant role in the generation of both La and Nd in this cluster.

  13. Probabilities of symmetric and asymmetric fission in the proton bombardment of Th{sup 232}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, B J [Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Chemistry Div., Harwell (United Kingdom); Brown, F; Butler, J P

    1957-08-01

    The ratio of symmetric to asymmetric fission in the proton bombardment of Th{sup 232} does not rise steadily with increasing proton energy; a periodic decrease in superposed upon the over-all increase. This is attributed to the changing pattern of various fission reactions, (p,f), (p,nf), etc. (author)

  14. MUSE: Measuring the proton radius with muon-proton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, Jan Christopher [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The proton radius has been measured so far using electron-proton scattering, electronic Hydrogen spectroscopy and muonic Hydrogen spectroscopy, the latter producing a much more accurate, but seven sigma different, result, leading to the now famous proton radius puzzle. The MUSE collaboration aims to complete the set of measurements by using muon scattering to determine the proton radius and to shed light on possible explanations of the discrepancy. The talk gives an overview of the experiment motivation and design and a status report on the progress.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper......A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR...

  16. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  17. Proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lomax, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy is an up-to-date guide to using proton and carbon ion therapy in modern cancer treatment. The book covers the physics and radiobiology basics of proton and ion beams, dosimetry methods and radiation measurements, and treatment delivery systems. It gives practical guidance on patient setup, target localization, and treatment planning for clinical proton and carbon ion therapy. The text also offers detailed reports on the treatment of pediatric cancers, lymphomas, and various other cancers. After an overview, the book focuses on the fundamental aspects of proton and carbon ion therapy equipment, including accelerators, gantries, and delivery systems. It then discusses dosimetry, biology, imaging, and treatment planning basics and provides clinical guidelines on the use of proton and carbon ion therapy for the treatment of specific cancers. Suitable for anyone involved with medical physics and radiation therapy, this book offers a balanced and critical assessment of state-of-the-art...

  18. Manufacturing of Three-dimensional Micro Structure Using Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suonggyu; Kwon, Wontae [Seoul University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The diameter of a proton beam emanating from the MC-50 cyclotron is about 2?3 mm with Gaussian distribution. This widely irradiated proton beam is not suitable for semiconductor etching, precise positioning, and micromachining, which require a small spot. In this study, a beam cutting method using a microhole is proposed as an economical alternative. We produced a microhole with aspect ratio, average diameter, and thickness of 428, 21 μm, and 9 mm, respectively, for cutting the proton beam. By using this high-aspect-ratio microhole, we conducted machinability tests on microstructures with sizes of tens of μm. Additionally, the results of simulation using GEANT4 and those of the actual experiment were compared and analyzed. The outcome confirmed the possibility of implementing a micro process technology for the fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures of 20 micron units using the MC-50 cyclotron with the microhole.

  19. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victoria, M.

    1995-01-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons

  20. The PIREX proton irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victoria, M. [Association EURATOM, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-10-01

    The proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) is a materials irradiation facility installed in a beam line of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Its main purpose is the testing of candidate materials for fusion reactor components. Protons of this energy produce simultaneously displacement damage and spallation products, amongst them helium and can therefore simulate any possible synergistic effects of damage and helium, that would be produced by the fusion neutrons.

  1. Search for proton decay: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1984-01-01

    In interpreting contained events observed in various proton decay detectors one can sometimes postulate, though usually not unambiguously, a potential decay mode of the proton, called a candidate. It is called a candidate, because for any individual event it is not possible to exclude the possibility that it is instead due to cosmic ray background, chiefly atmospheric neutrinos. Some consistency checks are proposed which could help establish proton decay, if it does occur in the presently accessible lifetime window

  2. Sea Quarks in the Proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimer Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The proton is a composite particle in which the binding force is responsible for the majority of its mass. To understand this structure, the distributions and origins of the quark-antiquark pairs produced by the strong force must be measured. The SeaQuest collaboration is using the Drell-Yan process to elucidate antiquark distributions in the proton and to study their modification when the proton is held within a nucleus.

  3. Beta-delayed proton emission in neutron-deficient lanthanide isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-two β-delayed proton precursors with 56≤Z≤71 and 63≤N≤83 were produced in heavy-ion reactions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory SuperHILAC and their radioactive decay properties studied at the on-line mass separation facility OASIS. Twenty-five isotopes and eight delayed proton branches were identified for the first time. Delayed proton energy spectra and proton coincident γ-ray and x-ray spectra were measured for all precursors. In a few cases, proton branching ratios were also determined. The precursor mass numbers were determined by the separator, while the proton coincident x-ray energies provided unambiguous Z identifications. The proton coincident γ-ray intensities were used to extract final state branching ratios. Proton emission from ground and isomeric states was observed in many cases. The majority of the delayed proton spectra exhibited the smooth bell-shaped distribution expected for heavy mass precursors. The experimental results were compared to statistical model calculations using standard parameter sets. Calculations using Nilsson model/RPA β-strength functions were found to reproduce the spectral shapes and branching ratios better than calculations using either constant or gross theory β-strength functions. Precursor half-life predictions from the Nilsson model/RPA β-strength functions were also in better agreement with the measured half-lives than were gross theory predictions. The ratios of positron coincident proton intensities to total proton intensities were used to determine Q/sub EC/-B/sub p/ values for several precursors near N=82. The statistical model calculations were not able to reproduce the experimental results for N=81 precursors. 154 refs., 82 figs., 19 tabs

  4. FLARE VERSUS SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY PROTONS IN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 10 5 ) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ∼2 × 10 3 , similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20–W90) SEP events.

  5. Determination of lunar ilmenite abundances from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Stephen M.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Singer, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    The mineral ilmenite (FeTiO3) was found in abundance in lunar mare soils returned during the Apollo project. Lunar ilmenite often contains greater than 50 weight-percent titanium dioxide (TiO2), and is a primary potential resource for oxygen and other raw materials to supply future lunar bases. Chemical and spectroscopic analysis of the returned lunar soils produced an empirical function that relates the spectral reflectance ratio at 400 and 560 nm to the weight percent abundance of TiO2. This allowed mapping of the lunar TiO2 distribution using telescopic vidicon multispectral imaging from the ground; however, the time variant photometric response of the vidicon detectors produced abundance uncertainties of at least 2 to 5 percent. Since that time, solid-state charge-coupled device (CCD) detector technology capable of much improved photometric response has become available. An investigation of the lunar TiO2 distribution was carried out utilizing groundbased telescopic CCD multispectral imagery and spectroscopy. The work was approached in phases to develop optimum technique based upon initial results. The goal is to achieve the best possible TiO2 abundance maps from the ground as a precursor to lunar orbiter and robotic sample return missions, and to produce a better idea of the peak abundances of TiO2 for benefaction studies. These phases and the results are summarized.

  6. Carbon and oxygen abundances across the Hertzsprung gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczak, Jens; Lambert, David L., E-mail: adamczak@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We derived atmospheric parameters and spectroscopic abundances for C and O for a large sample of stars located in the Hertzsprung gap in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in order to detect chemical peculiarities and get a comprehensive overview of the population of stars in this evolutionary state. We have observed and analyzed high-resolution spectra (R = 60,000) of 188 stars in the mass range 2-5 M{sub ☉} with the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory including 28 stars previously identified as Am/Ap stars. We find that the C and O abundances of the majority of stars in the Hertzsprung gap are in accordance with abundances derived for local lower-mass dwarfs but detect expected peculiarities for the Am/Ap stars. The C and O abundances of stars with T{sub eff} < 6500 K are slightly lower than for the hotter objects but the C/O ratio is constant in the analyzed temperature domain. No indication of an alteration of the C and O abundances of the stars by mixing during the evolution across the Hertzsprung gap could be found before the homogenization of their atmospheres by the first dredge-up.

  7. Carbon and oxygen abundances across the Hertzsprung gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczak, Jens; Lambert, David L.

    2014-01-01

    We derived atmospheric parameters and spectroscopic abundances for C and O for a large sample of stars located in the Hertzsprung gap in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in order to detect chemical peculiarities and get a comprehensive overview of the population of stars in this evolutionary state. We have observed and analyzed high-resolution spectra (R = 60,000) of 188 stars in the mass range 2-5 M ☉ with the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory including 28 stars previously identified as Am/Ap stars. We find that the C and O abundances of the majority of stars in the Hertzsprung gap are in accordance with abundances derived for local lower-mass dwarfs but detect expected peculiarities for the Am/Ap stars. The C and O abundances of stars with T eff < 6500 K are slightly lower than for the hotter objects but the C/O ratio is constant in the analyzed temperature domain. No indication of an alteration of the C and O abundances of the stars by mixing during the evolution across the Hertzsprung gap could be found before the homogenization of their atmospheres by the first dredge-up.

  8. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers

  9. Proton nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchazeaubeneix, J.C.; Faivre, J.C.; Garreta, D.

    1982-10-01

    Nuclear scattering of protons allows to radiograph objects with specific properties: direct 3- dimensional radiography, different information as compared to X-ray technique, hydrogen radiography. Furthermore, it is a well adapted method to gating techniques allowing the radiography of fast periodic moving systems. Results obtained on different objects (light and heavy materials) are shown and discussed. The dose delivery is compatible with clinical use, but at the moment, the irradiation time is too long between 1 and 4 hours. Perspectives to make the radiography faster and to get a practical method are discussed

  10. Proton nuclear scattering radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudinos, J.

    1982-04-01

    Nuclear scattering of protons allows to radiograph objects with specific properties: 3-dimensional radiography, different information as compared to X-ray technique, hydrogen radiography. Furthermore the nuclear scattering radiography (NSR) is a well adapted method to gating techniques allowing the radiography of fast periodic moving objects. Results obtained on phantoms, formalin fixed head and moving object are shown and discussed. The dose delivery is compatible with clinical use, but at the moment, the irradiation time is too long between 1 and 4 hours. Perspectives to make the radiograph faster and to get a practical method are discussed

  11. Proton relativistic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Wilson Roberto Barbosa de

    1995-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present a model for the nucleon, which is composed by three relativistic quarks interacting through a contract force. The nucleon wave-function was obtained from the Faddeev equation in the null-plane. The covariance of the model under kinematical null-plane boots is discussed. The electric proton form-factor, calculated from the Faddeev wave-function, was in agreement with the data for low-momentum transfers and described qualitatively the asymptotic region for momentum transfers around 2 GeV. (author)

  12. Helium-3 in Milky Way Reveals Abundance of Matter in Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    helium-3 remained constant. By concurrently measuring the amount of hydrogen (also created by the Big Bang) in the same areas, the scientists were able to determine the relative abundance of helium-3. "Since stellar processes appear to have little or no impact on the amount of helium-3 in the Galaxy, we were able to deduce two very important things," said Bania. "First, since our current models predict stellar production of helium-3, then we will need to rethink our understanding of the internal workings of stars like our Sun. Second, since helium-3 has not been created or destroyed in our Galaxy in any appreciable amounts, then what we detected is most likely equal to the abundance of primordial helium-3 created by the Big Bang." The scientists were able to use this discovery to calculate how much "normal" matter was created during the Big Bang. (Normal matter is anything made of baryons, subatomic particles that include neutrons and protons.) The researchers made these calculations by taking what they know of the composition of the Universe today, and essentially running time in reverse. In this case, the ratio of helium-3 to hydrogen gives the ratio of baryons to photons (the density of radiation) just after the Big Bang. By using the rate of expansion of the Universe, given by the Hubble Constant, the scientists could then infer just how much normal matter was produced during the Big Bang. "Our findings for helium-3 in fact support other studies that also constrain the amount of matter in the Universe," said Balser. "Taken together, these studies show that the matter that makes up stars, planets, and the visible Universe can only account for a small fraction of what we observe as the effects of gravity in the Universe." Dark matter, which can be both baryonic (dead stars, rocks, etc.) and non-baryonic, and other as-yet-unidentified forces appear to be the primary sources of the gravity that holds galaxies, and the larger structures of the Universe, together. "The

  13. Proton mobility on the surface of some acid salt crystal hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaroslavtsev, A.B.; Mirak'yan, A.L.; Chuvaev, V.F.; Sokolova, L.N.

    1997-01-01

    Mobility of proton-containing groupings on the surface of Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 xH 2 O and InH(SO 4 ) 2 x4H 2 O crystals of different dispersion has been studied by 1 H NMR and conductometry methods. It is shown that translational mobility of proton-containing groupings on the surface is much greater than in the sample bulk. A ratio describing the dependence of protonic conductivity on particle sizes of the compounds considered is suggested and its applicability is demonstrated. An increase in conductivity with a decrease in anion proton-accepting ability is pointed out

  14. Dielectron production in proton-proton collisions with ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Markus Konrad

    2015-10-01

    Ultrarelativistic hadron collisions, such as delivered since a couple of years at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), provide new insights into the properties of strongly interacting matter at high temperatures and densities, which is expected to have existed a few of a millionth seconds after the big bang. Electromagnetic probes, such as leptons and photons, are emitted during the entire collision. Since they do not undergo strong interactions, they reflect the entire evolution of the collision. Pairs of leptons, so called dileptons, have the advantage compared to real photons, that they do not only carry momentum, but also have a non-zero invariant mass. The invariant mass spectrum of dileptons is a superposition of several components and allows to address different characteristics of the medium. To understand dielectron production in heavy-ion collisions, reference measurements in proton-proton (pp) collisions are necessary. pp collisions reflect the vacuum contribution of the particles produced in heavy-ion collisions. The analysis of pp collisions is an essential step towards the extraction of medium influences on the vector meson spectral functions and the thermal radiation in heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, the production of electron-positron pairs (dielectrons) in pp collisions at a collision energy of 7 TeV in the ALICE central barrel is analysed. ALICE has unique particle identification capabilities at low momentum. Electrons and positrons are identified with a high purity and combined to pairs. The invariant mass distribution of dielectrons is corrected for detector effects and the selection criteria in the analysis with Monte Carlo simulations. The dielectron invariant mass spectrum of known hadronic sources is calculated based on the cross sections measured in other decay channels using the known decay kinematics. This so called hadronic cocktail represents the dielectron spectrum at the moment of kinematic freeze-out and can be compared to the

  15. H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonanos, Nikolaos; Huijser, A.; Poulsen, Finn Willy

    2015-01-01

    The atomic mass ratio of ca. 2 between deuterium and hydrogen is the highest for any pair of stable isotopes and results in significant and measurable H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors containing these species. This paper discusses H/D isotope effects manifested in O-H/O-D...

  16. Proton decay in grand unified theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucha, W.

    1984-01-01

    Interactions which violate the conservation of baryon and lepton number represent an intrinsic part of all grand unified theories (GUTs) of strong and electroweak interactions. These new interactions - predicted within the framework of GUTs - generate B and L violating four-fermion interactions via the exchange of superheavy particles which cannot be ascribed a well-defined baryon or lepton number. The effective coupling constant of these four-fermion interactions might be large enough to make the proton decay detectable by the present generation of experiments. In this review the basic concepts of conventional as well as supersymmetric GUTs relevant for proton decay are sketched. The baryon number violating sector of grand unified theories is discussed in more detail. Special emphasis is laid on the various selection rules arising as consequences of low-energy gauge invariance and supersymmetry for proton decay. These selection rules already determine the coarse pattern of the resulting decay modes and branching ratios without any reference to or detailed knowledge of the underlying grand unified theory. Finally the numerous theoretical predictions are summarized and confronted with experiment. (Author)

  17. Low stoichiometry operation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell employing the interdigitated flow field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A multiphase fuel cell model based on computational fluid dynamics is used to investigate the possibility of operating a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at low stoichiometric flow ratios (ξ gases. A case study...

  18. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung towards the elastic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Castelijns, R.; Ermisch, K.; van Garderen, E.; Gašparić, I.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kiš, M.; Löhner, H.

    2005-05-01

    In oder to study proton-proton bremsstrahlung moving towards the elastic limit, a detection system, consisting of Plastic-ball and SALAD, was set up and an experiment at 190 MeV incident beam energy was performed. Here, the experimental setup and the data analysis procedure along with some results obtained in the measurement are discussed.

  19. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung towards the elastic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H.R.; Bacelar, J.C.S.; Castelijns, R.; Ermisch, K.; Garderen, E. van; Harakeh, M.N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kis, M.; Loehner, H.; Gasparic, I.

    2005-01-01

    In oder to study proton-proton bremsstrahlung moving towards the elastic limit, a detection system, consisting of Plastic-ball and SALAD, was set up and an experiment at 190 MeV incident beam energy was performed. Here, the experimental setup and the data analysis procedure along with some results obtained in the measurement are discussed

  20. Monitoring waterbird abundance in wetlands: The importance of controlling results for variation in water depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, F.; Afton, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Wetland use by waterbirds is highly dependent on water depth, and depth requirements generally vary among species. Furthermore, water depth within wetlands often varies greatly over time due to unpredictable hydrological events, making comparisons of waterbird abundance among wetlands difficult as effects of habitat variables and water depth are confounded. Species-specific relationships between bird abundance and water depth necessarily are non-linear; thus, we developed a methodology to correct waterbird abundance for variation in water depth, based on the non-parametric regression of these two variables. Accordingly, we used the difference between observed and predicted abundances from non-parametric regression (analogous to parametric residuals) as an estimate of bird abundance at equivalent water depths. We scaled this difference to levels of observed and predicted abundances using the formula: ((observed - predicted abundance)/(observed + predicted abundance)) ?? 100. This estimate also corresponds to the observed:predicted abundance ratio, which allows easy interpretation of results. We illustrated this methodology using two hypothetical species that differed in water depth and wetland preferences. Comparisons of wetlands, using both observed and relative corrected abundances, indicated that relative corrected abundance adequately separates the effect of water depth from the effect of wetlands. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  1. VVER-1000 dominance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance ratio, or more precisely, its closeness to unity, is important characteristic of large reactor. It allows evaluate beforehand the number of source iterations required in deterministic calculations of power spatial distribution. Or the minimal number of histories to be modeled for achievement of statistical error level desired in large core Monte Carlo calculations. In this work relatively simple approach for dominance ratio evaluation is proposed. It essentially uses core symmetry. Dependence of dominance ratio on neutron flux spatial distribution is demonstrated. (author)

  2. WWER-1000 dominance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance ratio, or more precisely, its closeness to unity, is important characteristic of large reactor. It allows evaluate beforehand the number of source iterations required in deterministic calculations of power spatial distribution. Or the minimal number of histories to be modeled for achievement of statistical error level desired in large core Monte Carlo calculations. In this work relatively simple approach for dominance ratio evaluation is proposed. It essentially uses core symmetry. Dependence of dominance ratio on neutron flux spatial distribution is demonstrated. (Authors)

  3. The FAIR proton linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, O.

    2015-01-01

    FAIR - the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe - constructed at GSI in Darmstadt comprises an international centre of heavy ion accelerators that will drive heavy ion and antimatter research. FAIR will provide worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities, allowing a large variety of fore-front research in physics and applied science. FAIR will deliver antiproton and ion beams of unprecedented intensities and qualities. The main part of the FAIR facility is a sophisticated accelerator system, which delivers beams to different experiments of the FAIR experimental collaborations - APPA, NuSTAR, CBM and PANDA - in parallel. Modern H-type cavities offer highest shunt impedances of resonant structures of heavy ion linacs at low beam energies < 20 MeV/u and enable the acceleration of intense proton and ion beams. One example is the interdigital H-type structure. The crossed-bar H-cavities extend these properties to high energies even beyond 100 MeV/u. Compared to conventional Alvarez cavities, these crossed-bar (CH) cavities feature much higher shunt impedance at low energies. The design of the proton linac is based on those cavities

  4. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  5. Berkeley Proton Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Bradner, H.; Franck, J.; Gordon, H.; Gow, J. D.; Marshall, L. C.; Oppenheimer, F. F.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; Richman, C.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1953-10-13

    A linear accelerator, which increases the energy of protons from a 4 Mev Van de Graaff injector, to a final energy of 31.5 Mev, has been constructed. The accelerator consists of a cavity 40 feet long and 39 inches in diameter, excited at resonance in a longitudinal electric mode with a radio-frequency power of about 2.2 x 10{sup 6} watts peak at 202.5 mc. Acceleration is made possible by the introduction of 46 axial "drift tubes" into the cavity, which is designed such that the particles traverse the distance between the centers of successive tubes in one cycle of the r.f. power. The protons are longitudinally stable as in the synchrotron, and are stabilized transversely by the action of converging fields produced by focusing grids. The electrical cavity is constructed like an inverted airplane fuselage and is supported in a vacuum tank. Power is supplied by 9 high powered oscillators fed from a pulse generator of the artificial transmission line type.

  6. Sharpening Sharpe Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    William N. Goetzmann; Jonathan E. Ingersoll Jr.; Matthew I. Spiegel; Ivo Welch

    2002-01-01

    It is now well known that the Sharpe ratio and other related reward-to-risk measures may be manipulated with option-like strategies. In this paper we derive the general conditions for achieving the maximum expected Sharpe ratio. We derive static rules for achieving the maximum Sharpe ratio with two or more options, as well as a continuum of derivative contracts. The optimal strategy has a truncated right tail and a fat left tail. We also derive dynamic rules for increasing the Sharpe ratio. O...

  7. Oxygen abundance in metal-poor dwarfs, derived from the forbidden line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spite, M.; Spite, F.

    1991-12-01

    The oxygen abundance is redetermined in a few metal-poor dwarfs, using the oxygen forbidden line at 630 nm rather than the oxygen triplet at 777 nm previously used by Abia and Rebolo (1989). The ratios form O/Fe are clearly lower than the previous ones and are in agreement with the ratios found in the metal-poor red giants, suggesting that no real difference exists between dwarfs and giants. Finally, it can be argued that, pending the acquisition of additional information, the oxygen abundances derived from the forbidden line are more reliable than the abundances found from the triplet.

  8. Construction and test of a polarized proton target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aures, R.

    1983-12-01

    This work describes experiments in which for the first time a proton target has been constructed which is polarized by the ''brute-force'' method. This method requires very low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The low temperatures (down to 10 mK) are obtained by a 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigerator, the magnetic field (up to 9 T) is produced by a superconducting split pair magnet. The proton target has a volume of about 18 cm 3 and consists of pressed titaniumhydride powder, which has a titanium/-hydrogen ratio of 1:1,96. The hydrogen content is 1,3 mol. Titaniumhydride has the advantage of sufficient heat conductivity at low temperatures and a very high proton density. The heat conductivity of the sample is measured, with and without the presence of a magnetic field. Thermodynamical measurements and adiabatic demagnetisation experiments proved quantitatively the polarization of the protons. The polarization of the proton has been measured in a transmission experiment using polarized neutrons of 1.2 MeV. The result shows a good agreement of theoretical and actual polarization. From the results it can be concluded, that this sample can be used successfully as a polarized proton target for neutron scattering experiments to measure spin-correlations. (orig.) [de

  9. Significant biases affecting abundance determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Roger

    2015-08-01

    I have developed two highly efficient codes to automate analyses of emission line nebulae. The tools place particular emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties. The first tool, ALFA, uses a genetic algorithm to rapidly optimise the parameters of gaussian fits to line profiles. It can fit emission line spectra of arbitrary resolution, wavelength range and depth, with no user input at all. It is well suited to highly multiplexed spectroscopy such as that now being carried out with instruments such as MUSE at the VLT. The second tool, NEAT, carries out a full analysis of emission line fluxes, robustly propagating uncertainties using a Monte Carlo technique.Using these tools, I have found that considerable biases can be introduced into abundance determinations if the uncertainty distribution of emission lines is not well characterised. For weak lines, normally distributed uncertainties are generally assumed, though it is incorrect to do so, and significant biases can result. I discuss observational evidence of these biases. The two new codes contain routines to correctly characterise the probability distributions, giving more reliable results in analyses of emission line nebulae.

  10. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  11. Proton resonance spectroscopy in 40Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warthen, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    The differential cross sections for the 39 K(p,p o ) 39 K and 39 K-(p,α o ) 36 Ar reactions have been measured for E p = 1.90 to 4.02 MeV at laboratory angles θ = 90 degree, 108 degree, 150 degree and 165 degree. Data were taken with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) KN Van de Graaff accelerator and the associated high resolution system. The targets consisted of 1-2 μg/cm 2 of potassium carbonate (K 2 CO 3 ), enriched to 99.97% 39 K, evaporated onto gold coated carbon backings. Excitation functions were measured in proton energy steps varying from 100 to 400 3V. The energy region studied corresponds to an excitation energy range in the 40 Ca nucleus of E x = 10.2 to 12.3 MeV. A multi-level multi-channel R-matrix based computer code was used to fit the experimental excitation functions. Resonance parameters obtained include resonance energy, spin, parity, partial widths, and channel spin and orbital angular momentum mixing ratios. Of the 248 resonances observed in the proton channel, 148 were also observed in the alpha channel. A fit to the observed level density yielded a nuclear temperature of 1.5 MeV. The data were compared with predictions of statistical theories of energy levels for both level spacing and reduced width distributions. The alpha reduced widths agree with the Porter-Thomas distribution and suggest that only 5-10% of the states with alpha widths were not observed. The summed strength in each of the alpha channels represents a significant fraction of the Wigner limit for these channels. The proton channels, on the other hand, generally have much smaller fractions. The two proton s-wave strength functions are equal and thus show no evidence for spin-exchange forces in the nucleon-nucleus interaction

  12. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, C. K.; Smith, D. H.

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers.

  14. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers

  15. Polarized Proton Collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mei; Alekseev, Igor G; Alessi, James; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Bravar, Alessandro; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Bunce, Gerry; Butler, John J; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Laster, Jonathan S; Lee, Roger C; Luccio, Alfredo U; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Makdisi, Yousef; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; McIntyre, Gary; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oddo, Peter; Oerter, Brian; Osamu, Jinnouchi; Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Satogata, Todd; Smith, Kevin T; Svirida, Dima; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Wilinski, Michelle; Zaltsman, Alex; Zelenski, Anatoli; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y

    2005-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider~(RHIC) provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC to avoid depolarizing resonances. In 2003, polarized proton beams were accelerated to 100~GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. RHIC polarized proton run experience demonstrates that optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limite...

  16. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to √s=500 GeV

  17. Protonic decay of oriented nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadmensky, S.G.

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of the multiparticle theory of protonic decay, the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented spherical and deformed nuclei in the laboratory frame and in the internal coordinate frame of deformed parent nuclei are constructed with allowance for symmetry with respect to time inversion. It is shown that, because of the deep-subbarrier character of protonic decay, the adiabatic approximation is not applicable to describing the angular distributions of protons emitted by oriented deformed nuclei and that the angular distribution of protons in the laboratory frame does not coincide with that in the internal coordinate frame. It is demonstrated that these angular distributions coincide only if the adiabatic and the semiclassical approximation are simultaneously valid

  18. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  19. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  20. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  1. Measurement of the North-South asymmetry in the solar proton albedo neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ifedili, S.O.

    1979-01-01

    The solar proton albedo neutron flux in the range 10 -2 --10 7 eV measured by a neutron detector on board the Ogo 6 satellite was examined for north-south asymmetry. For the solar proton event of December 19, 1969, the S/N ratio of the solar proton albedo neutron rate at geomagnetic latitude lambda>70 0 was 1.61 +- 0.27 during the event, while for the November 2, 1969, event at 40 0 0 and altitudes ranging from 700 km to 800 km the solar proton albedo neutron rate was 0.40 +- 0.10 count/s in the north and 0.00 +- 0.10 count/s in the south. During the solar proton event of December 18, 1969, the N/S ratio of the solar proton albedo neutron rate at lambda>70 0 was 1.00 +- 0.26. The results are consistent with the expected N-S asymmetry in the solar proton flux. An interplanetary proton anisotropy with the interplanetary magnetic field polarity away from the sun corresponded to larger fluxes of solar proton albedo neutrons at the north polar cap than at the south, while an interplanetary proton anisotropy with the interplanetary magnetic field polarity toward the sun corresponded to larger fluxes of solar proton albedo neutrons at the south polar cap than at the north. This evidence favors the direct access of solar protons to the earth's polar caps via the merged interplanetary and geomagnetic field lines

  2. Resist materials for proton beam writing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, J.A. van, E-mail: phyjavk@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Physics Department, 2 Science Drive 3, National University of Singapore, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Malar, P. [Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai 603203 (India); Wang, Y.H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Physics Department, 2 Science Drive 3, National University of Singapore, 117542 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PBW can now achieve 19 nm details in HSQ and 65 nm in PMMA. • A complete table of resist materials for PBW has been presented, including minimum feature size, achievable aspect ratio, suitability for electroplating and where available contrast of the resist. • PBW fabricated molds can now be used for single DNA molecule detection, single DNA manipulation and large scale Genome mapping. - Abstract: Proton beam writing (PBW) is a lithographic technique that has been developed since the mid 1990s, initially in Singapore followed by several groups around the world. MeV protons while penetrating materials will maintain a practically straight path. During the continued slowing down of a proton in material it will mainly interact with substrate electrons and transfer a small amount of energy to each electron, the induced secondary electrons will modify the molecular structure of resist within a few nanometers around the proton track. The recent demonstration of high aspect ratio sub 20 nm lithography in HSQ shows the potential of PBW. To explore the full capabilities of PBW, the understanding of the interaction of fast protons with different resist materials is important. Here we give an update of the growing number of resist materials that have been evaluated for PBW. In particular we evaluate the exposure and development strategies for the most promising resist materials like PMMA, HSQ, SU-8 and AR-P and compare their characteristics with respect to properties such as contrast and sensitivity. Besides an updated literature survey we also present new findings on AR-P and PMGI resists. Since PBW is a direct write technology it is important to look for fast ways to replicate micro and nanostructures. In this respect we will discuss the suitability and performance of several resists for Ni electroplating for mold fabrication in nano imprint technologies. We will summarize with an overview of proton resist characteristics like sensitivity, contrast

  3. Resist materials for proton beam writing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Malar, P.; Wang, Y.H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PBW can now achieve 19 nm details in HSQ and 65 nm in PMMA. • A complete table of resist materials for PBW has been presented, including minimum feature size, achievable aspect ratio, suitability for electroplating and where available contrast of the resist. • PBW fabricated molds can now be used for single DNA molecule detection, single DNA manipulation and large scale Genome mapping. - Abstract: Proton beam writing (PBW) is a lithographic technique that has been developed since the mid 1990s, initially in Singapore followed by several groups around the world. MeV protons while penetrating materials will maintain a practically straight path. During the continued slowing down of a proton in material it will mainly interact with substrate electrons and transfer a small amount of energy to each electron, the induced secondary electrons will modify the molecular structure of resist within a few nanometers around the proton track. The recent demonstration of high aspect ratio sub 20 nm lithography in HSQ shows the potential of PBW. To explore the full capabilities of PBW, the understanding of the interaction of fast protons with different resist materials is important. Here we give an update of the growing number of resist materials that have been evaluated for PBW. In particular we evaluate the exposure and development strategies for the most promising resist materials like PMMA, HSQ, SU-8 and AR-P and compare their characteristics with respect to properties such as contrast and sensitivity. Besides an updated literature survey we also present new findings on AR-P and PMGI resists. Since PBW is a direct write technology it is important to look for fast ways to replicate micro and nanostructures. In this respect we will discuss the suitability and performance of several resists for Ni electroplating for mold fabrication in nano imprint technologies. We will summarize with an overview of proton resist characteristics like sensitivity, contrast

  4. Proton femtoscopy at STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbroszczyk, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of two-particle femtoscopy provides a powerful tool to study the properties of matter created in heavy-ion collisions. Applied to identical and nonidentical hadron pairs, it makes the study of space-time evolution of the source in femtoscopic scale possible. Baryon femtoscopy allows extraction of the radii of produced sources which can be compared to those deduced from identical pion studies, providing additional information about source characteristics. In this paper we present the correlation functions obtained for protons and antiprotons for Au + Au collisions at √ s NN = 62.4 and 200 GeV. On the other hand, as STAR experiment participates in the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program, we present theoretical predictions of p - p , p-bar - p-bar and p - p-bar femtoscopic measurements, based on UrQMD simulation for √ s NN = 5-39 GeV

  5. Proton synchrotron accelerator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.J.N.

    1977-01-01

    This is the text of a series of lectures given as part of the CERN Academic Training Programme and primarily intended for young engineers and technicians in preparation for the running-in of the 400 GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Following the definition of basic quantities, the problems of betatron motion and the effect of momentum spread and orbital errors on the transverse motion of the beam are reviewed. Consideration is then given to multipole fields, chromaticity and non-linear resonances. After dealing with basic relations governing longitudinal beam dynamics, the space-charge, resistive-wall and other collective effects are treated, with reference to precautions in the SPS to prevent their occurrence. (Auth.)

  6. Proton decay: 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    Employing the current world average Λ/sub MS/ = 0.160 GeV as input, the minimal Georgi-Glashow SU(5) model predicts sin 2 theta/sub W/(m/sub W/) = 0.214, m/sub b//m/sub tau/ approx. = 2.8 and tau/sub p/ approx. = (0.4 approx. 12) x 10 29 yr. The first two predictions are in excellent agreement with experiment; but the implied proton lifetime is already somewhat below the present experimental bound. In this status report, uncertainties in tau/sub p/ are described and effects of appendages to the SU(5) model (such as new fermion generations, scalars, supersymmetry, etc.) are examined

  7. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    collide like and unlike sign helicity protons separately. It also requires understanding the ratio of the collision rates of these two portions of the beam exquisitely well. This is a long standing problem and, until recently, had threatened to severely restrict the ability of PHENIX to utilize the large data sets that have been acquired in the last two years to improve the constraints on DeltaG. We will conclude this thesis with a comprehensive overview of the relative luminosity systematic uncertainty and present a new framework within which this uncertainty can be determined. The measurement of the gluon contribution to the proton spin at the PHENIX experiment is a multi- faceted problem which requires a multi-faceted solution. This thesis describes several aspects of the solution as the single- and di-hadron measurements from MPC data are likely to provide the best constraints to Delta G at low-x for the next decade. Eventually, an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will be designed and commissioned that will further extend the kinematic reach of the polarized DIS experiments that motivated the spin program at RHIC. In the meantime, the goal of PHENIX in general, and the MPC in particular, is to glean as much information about the gluon polarization as possible before the EIC era arrives. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  8. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10 13 protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10 13 ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10 13 ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10 13 ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10 13 ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10 13 ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found

  9. BROOKHAVEN: Proton goal reached

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-09-15

    On March 30 the 35-year old Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) exceeded its updated design goal of 6 x 10{sup 13} protons per pulse (ppp), by accelerating 6.3 x 10{sup 13} ppp, a world record intensity. This goal was set 11 years ago and achieving it called for the construction of a new booster and the reconstruction of much of the AGS. The booster was completed in 1991, and reached its design intensity of 1.5 x 10{sup 13} ppp in 1993. The AGS reconstruction was finished in 1994, and by July of that year the AGS claimed a new US record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 4 x 10{sup 13} ppp, using four booster pulses. Reaching the design intensity was scheduled for 1995. In 1994, the AGS had seemed to be solidly limited to 4 x 10{sup 13} ppp, but in 1995 the operations crew, working on their own in the quiet of the owl shift, steadily improved the intensity, regularly setting new records, much to the bemusement of the machine physicists. The physicists, however, did contribute. A second harmonic radiofrequency cavity in the booster increased the radiofrequency bucket area for capture, raising the booster intensity from 1.7 to 2.1 x 10{sup 13} ppp. In the AGS, new radiofrequency power supplies raised the available voltage from 8 to 13 kV, greatly enhancing the beam loading capabilities of the system. A powerful new transverse damping system successfully controlled instabilities that otherwise would have destroyed the beam in less than a millisecond. Also in the AGS, 35th harmonic octupole resonances were found.

  10. Stabilities of protonated water-ammonia clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundén, A. E. K.; Støchkel, K.; Hvelplund, P.; Brøndsted Nielsen, S.; Dynefors, B.; Hansen, K.

    2018-05-01

    Branching ratios of water and ammonia evaporation have been measured for spontaneous evaporation from protonated mixed clusters H+(H2O)n(NH3)m in the size range 0 ≤ n ≤ 11 and 0 ≤ m ≤ 7. Mixed clusters evaporate water except for clusters containing six or more ammonia molecules, indicating the formation of a stable core of one ammonium ion surrounded by four ammonia molecules and a second shell consisting predominantly of water. We relate evaporative branching ratios to free energy differences between the products of competing channels and determine the free energy differences for clusters with up to seven ammonia molecules. Clusters containing up to five ammonia molecules show a very strong scaling of these free energy differences.

  11. Proton microprobe analysis of pancreatic. beta. cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindh, U [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Gustaf Werner Inst.; Juntti-Berggren, L; Berggren, P O; Hellman, B [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    Freeze-dried pancreas sections from obese hyperglycemic mice were subjected to proton bombardment and the elemental contents in the ..beta.. cells and the exocrine part were obtained from the characteristic X-rays emitted. Quantitative data were provided for 18 different elements. The mole ratio between K and Na exceeded 10, implying that neither the sample preparation nor the irradiation had induced significant diffuse changes. With the demonstration of this high K/Na ratio it seems likely that also the ..beta.. cells are equipped with an efficient Na/sup +//K/sup +/ pump. The ..beta.. cells contained about 70 mmoles Cl per litre cell water. Observed amounts of Ca and Mg were equivalent to those previously recorded by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy. The significant role of Zn for the storage of insulin was emphasized by the demonstration of 3 times as much of this element in the ..beta.. cells as compared with the exocrine pancreas. In addition, the sensitivity of the proton microprobe enabled measurements of various trace elements such as Rb, Cr, Cu, Al and Pb not previously demonstrated in the pancreatic ..beta.. cells.

  12. The Importance of Protons in Reactive Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeece, C. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of pH in aqueous chemistry is evident; yet, its role in reactive transport is complex. Consider a column flow experiment through silica glass beads. Take the column to be saturated and flowing with solution of a distinct pH. An instantaneous change in the influent solution pH can yield a breakthrough curve with both a rarefaction and shock component (composite wave). This behavior is unique among aqueous ions in transport and is more complex than intuition would tell. Analysis of the hyperbolic limit of this physical system can explain these first order transport phenomenon. This analysis shows that transport behavior is heavily dependent on the shape of the adsorption isotherm. Hence it is clear that accurate surface chemistry models are important in reactive transport. The proton adsorption isotherm has nonconstant concavity due to the proton's ability to partition into hydroxide. An eigenvalue analysis shows that an inflection point in the adsorption isotherm allows the development of composite waves. We use electrostatic surface complexation models to calculate realistic proton adsorption isotherms. Surface characteristics such as specific surface area, and surface site density were determined experimentally. We validate the model by comparison against silica glass bead flow through experiments. When coupled to surface complexation models, the transport equation captures the timing and behavior of breakthrough curves markedly better than with commonly used Langmuir assumptions. Furthermore, we use the adsorption isotherm to predict, a priori, the transport behavior of protons across pH composition space. Expansion of the model to multicomponent systems shows that proton adsorption can force composite waves to develop in the breakthrough curves of ions that would not otherwise exhibit such behavior. Given the abundance of reactive surfaces in nature and the nonlinearity of chemical systems, we conclude that building a greater understanding of

  13. The gas/solid methane abundance ratio toward deeply embedded protostars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogert, ACA; Helmich, EP; van Dishoeck, EF; Schutte, WA

    1998-01-01

    We present the detection of re-vibrational absorption lines of the deformation mode of gaseous CH4 toward the massive protostars W 33A, and NGC 7538 : IRS9, using the SWS spectrometer an board of the Infrared Space Observatory. The observed lines indicate that the CH4 gas is warm (T similar to N 90

  14. Two proton decay in 12O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumawat, M.; Singh, U.K.; Jain, S.K.; Saxena, G.; Kaushik, M.; Aggarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity was observed experimentally in the decay of 45 Fe, 54 Zn and 48 Ni. From then many theoretical studies of one and two-proton radioactivity have been carried out within the framework of different models including RMF+BCS approach for medium mass region. Towards light mass region proton-proton correlations were observed in two-proton decay of 19 Mg and 16 Ne. Recently, different mechanism of two-proton emission from proton-rich nuclei 23 Al and 22 Mg has been investigated and transition from direct to sequential two-proton decay in sd shell nuclei is observed. Encouraged with these recent studies of two proton emission in light mass nuclei, we have applied our RMF+BCS approach for the study of two proton emission in light mass region and in this paper we present our result of two proton emission in 12 O

  15. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  16. Difference and ratio plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Holmskov, U; Bro, Peter

    1995-01-01

    and systemic lupus erythematosus from another previously published study (Macanovic, M. and Lachmann, P.J. (1979) Clin. Exp. Immunol. 38, 274) are also represented using ratio plots. Our observations indicate that analysis by regression analysis may often be misleading....... hitherto unnoted differences between controls and patients with either rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. For this we use simple, but unconventional, graphic representations of the data, based on difference plots and ratio plots. Differences between patients with Burkitt's lymphoma...

  17. s-Processing from MHD-induced mixing and isotopic abundances in presolar SiC grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, S.; Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Vescovi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Zucchini, A.; Frondini, F.

    2018-01-01

    In the past years the observational evidence that s-process elements from Sr to Pb are produced by stars ascending the so-called Asymptotic Giant Branch (or "AGB") could not be explained by self-consistent models, forcing researchers to extensive parameterizations. The crucial point is to understand how protons can be injected from the envelope into the He-rich layers, yielding the formation of 13C and then the activation of the 13C (α,n)16O reaction. Only recently, attempts to solve this problem started to consider quantitatively physically-based mixing mechanisms. Among them, MHD processes in the plasma were suggested to yield mass transport through magnetic buoyancy. In this framework, we compare results of nucleosynthesis models for Low Mass AGB Stars (M≲ 3M⊙), developed from the MHD scenario, with the record of isotopic abundance ratios of s-elements in presolar SiC grains, which were shown to offer precise constraints on the 13C reservoir. We find that n-captures driven by magnetically-induced mixing can indeed account for the SiC data quite well and that this is due to the fact that our 13C distribution fulfils the above constraints rather accurately. We suggest that similar tests should be now performed using different physical models for mixing. Such comparisons would indeed improve decisively our understanding of the formation of the neutron source.

  18. Chemical Abundance Analysis of Moving Group W11450 (Latham 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Julia E.; Martens, Kylee; Frinchaboy, Peter M.

    2016-12-01

    We present elemental abundances for all seven stars in Moving Group W11450 (Latham 1) to determine if they may be chemically related. These stars appear to be both spatially and kinematically related, but no spectroscopic abundance analysis exists in literature. Abundances for eight elements were derived via equivalent width analyses of high-resolution (R ˜ 60,000), high-signal-to-noise ratio ( ˜ 100) spectra obtained with the Otto Struve 2.1 m telescope and the Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph at McDonald Observatory. The large star-to-star scatter in metallicity, -0.55 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤slant 0.06 dex (σ = 0.25), implies these stars were not produced from the same chemically homogeneous molecular cloud, and are therefore not part of a remnant or open cluster as previously proposed. Prior to this analysis, it was suggested that two stars in the group, W11449 and W11450, are possible wide binaries. The candidate wide binary pair show similar chemical abundance patterns with not only iron but with other elements analyzed in this study, suggesting the proposed connection between these two stars may be real.

  19. H II region in NGC 6744: Spectrophotometry and chemical abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talent, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Spectrophotometry of emission lines in the lambdalambda3700--6800 spectral range is presented for An H II region in an outer arm of NGC6744, a southern hemisphere galaxy of type SAB(r)bc II. The electron temperature, derived from the [O III] lines and assuming N/sub e/ = 100 cm -3 , was found to be 9,630 +- 450 K. Ionic abundances, derived in the usual fashion from the measured line strengths, were corrected to total relative number abundances by application of the standard ionization correction factor (ICF) scheme and by comparison to models. The derived abundances, relative to log Hequivalent12.00, are log He = 10.96 +- 0.06, log N = 7.34 +- 0.26, log O log O = 8.44 +- 0.10, log Ne = 7.80 +- 0.16, and log S = 6.75 +- 0.28. The NGC 6744 H II region abundances, and various ratios, are compared to similar data for H II regions in the SMC, LMC, and the Perseus arm of the Galaxy,. From the comparison it is suggested that the histories of nucleosynthesis in the outer regions of NGC 6744 and the Galaxy could have been quite similar

  20. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasselquist, Sten; Holtzman, Jon; Shetrone, Matthew; Smith, Verne; Nidever, David L.; McWilliam, Andrew; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Tang, Baitian; Beers, Timothy C.; Majewski, Steven R.; Anguiano, Borja; Tissera, Patricia B.; Alvar, Emma Fernández; Carigi, Leticia; Delgado Inglada, Gloria; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Battaglia, Giuseppina; García-Hernández, D. A.; Almeida, Andres; Frinchaboy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze thechemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] ≳ −0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function.

  1. Terrestrial aurora: astrophysical laboratory for anomalous abundances in stellar systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Roth

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The unique magnetic structure of the terrestrial aurora as a conduit of information between the ionosphere and magnetosphere can be utilized as a laboratory for physical processes at similar magnetic configurations and applied to various evolutionary phases of the solar (stellar system. The most spectacular heliospheric abundance enhancement involves the 3He isotope and selective heavy elements in impulsive solar flares. In situ observations of electromagnetic waves on active aurora are extrapolated to flaring corona in an analysis of solar acceleration processes of 3He, the only element that may resonate strongly with the waves, as well as heavy ions with specific charge-to-mass ratios, which may resonate weaker via their higher gyroharmonics. These results are applied to two observed anomalous astrophysical abundances: (1 enhanced abundance of 3He and possibly 13C in the late stellar evolutionary stages of planetary nebulae; and (2 enhanced abundance of the observed fossil element 26Mg in meteorites as a decay product of radioactive 26Al isotope due to interaction with the flare-energized 3He in the early solar system.

  2. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselquist, Sten; Holtzman, Jon [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Shetrone, Matthew [University of Texas at Austin, McDonald Observatory, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States); Smith, Verne; Nidever, David L. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); McWilliam, Andrew [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Tang, Baitian [Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Majewski, Steven R.; Anguiano, Borja [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Tissera, Patricia B. [Department of Physics, Universidad Andres Bello, 700 Fernandez Concha (Chile); Alvar, Emma Fernández; Carigi, Leticia; Delgado Inglada, Gloria [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70264, Ciudad de México, 04510 (Mexico); Allende Prieto, Carlos; Battaglia, Giuseppina; García-Hernández, D. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Almeida, Andres [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de La Serena, Cisternas 1200, La Serena (Chile); Frinchaboy, Peter, E-mail: sten@nmsu.edu, E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu, E-mail: shetrone@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: vsmith@email.noao.edu [Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); and others

    2017-08-20

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze thechemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] ≳ −0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function.

  3. GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-09-20

    Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

  4. Golden ratio beauty as scientific function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Olsen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Normally when one is considering the golden ratio in the history of ideas, one is often looking at it as an aesthetic principle – usually associated with Greek art, sculpture and mathematics. However, in recent years the prevalence of the golden ratio within a broad range of scientific disciplines has brought its role in the perfection of science to the forefront. I would like to collapse these two areas by proposing a somewhat novel way of looking at the aesthetics of the golden ratio: its pervasive expression in scientific form and function is the basis of the aesthetics in the world. Therefore, science contains the same mathematical beauty as found in artistic expression. The golden ratio guides the Chaos Border of Kolmogorov, Arnold, and Moser (KAM theorem and it can be found hidden in all elementary particles, and even in the proportions of dark matter and energy relative to visible matter and energy. It is evident in the structure and growth functions of plants and animals and it can be found in the physiological functions of humans. It now appears that without the golden ratio, we would not have the form or function of the proton, cell, athlete, horse, species, planet, solar system or galaxy.

  5. ROLE OF THE CORONAL ALFVÉN SPEED IN MODULATING THE SOLAR-WIND HELIUM ABUNDANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.-M., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The helium abundance He/H in the solar wind is relatively constant at ∼0.04 in high-speed streams, but varies in phase with the sunspot number in slow wind, from ∼0.01 at solar minimum to ∼0.04 at maximum. Suggested mechanisms for helium fractionation have included frictional coupling to protons and resonant interactions with high-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations. We compare He/H measurements during 1995–2015 with coronal parameters derived from source-surface extrapolations of photospheric field maps. We find that the near-Earth helium abundance is an increasing function of the magnetic field strength and Alfvén speed v {sub A} in the outer corona, while being only weakly correlated with the proton flux density. Throughout the solar cycle, fast wind is associated with short-term increases in v {sub A} near the source surface; resonance with Alfvén waves, with v {sub A} and the relative speed of α -particles and protons decreasing with increasing heliocentric distance, may then lead to enhanced He/H at 1 au. The modulation of helium in slow wind reflects the tendency for the associated coronal Alfvén speeds to rise steeply from sunspot minimum, when this wind is concentrated around the source-surface neutral line, to sunspot maximum, when the source-surface field attains its peak strengths. The helium abundance near the source surface may represent a balance between collisional decoupling from protons and Alfvén wave acceleration.

  6. High intensity proton accelerator and its application (Proton Engineering Center)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1995-01-01

    A plan called PROTON ENGINEERING CENTER has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities and a beam shape and storage ring based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA. The research facilities planned are OMEGA·Nuclear Energy Development Facility, Neutron Facility for Material Irradiation, Nuclear Data Experiment Facility, Neutron Factory, Meson Factory, Spallation Radioisotope Beam Facility, and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutrons, π-mesons, muons, and unstable isotopes originated from the protons are available for promoting the innovative research of nuclear energy and basic science and technology. (author)

  7. The underlying event in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, F.

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, studies of the underlying event in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s) = 10 TeV are presented. Crucial ingredient to underlying event models are multiple parton-parton scatters in single proton-proton collisions. The feasibility of measuring the underlying event was investigated with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using charged particles and charged-particle jets. Systematic uncertainties of the underlying event measurement due to detector misalignment and imperfect track reconstruction are found to be negligible after {integral}Ldt=1 pb{sup -1} of data are available. Different model predictions are compared with each other using fully simulated Monte Carlo samples. It is found, that distinct models differ strongly enough to tell them apart with early data. (orig.)

  8. Proton-proton elastic scattering measurements at COSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdasarian, Zara [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    To construct the reliable phase shift analysis (PSA) that can successfully describe the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction it is necessary to measure variety of experimental observables for both proton-proton (pp) and neutron-proton (np) elastic scattering. The polarized beams and targets at COSY-ANKE facility allow a substantial contribution to the existing database. The experiment was carried out in April 2013 at ANKE using a transversely polarized proton beam incident on an unpolarized hydrogen cluster target. Six beam energies of T{sub p}=0.8,1.6,1.8,2.0,2.2,2.4 GeV were used. The aim of this talk is to present the preliminary results for the analyzing power (A{sub y}) for the pp elastic scattering in the so-far unexplored 5 <θ{sub cm}<30 angular range. Our measurements are also compared to the world data and current partial wave solutions.

  9. Where is the proton's spin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future. 33 refs

  10. Acceleration of polarized proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1998-01-01

    The acceleration of polarized beams in circular accelerators is complicated by the numerous depolarizing spin resonances. Using a partial Siberian snake and a rf dipole that ensure stable adiabatic spin motion during acceleration has made it possible to accelerate polarized protons to 25 GeV at the Brookhaven AGS. Full Siberian snakes are being developed for RHIC to make the acceleration of polarized protons to 250 GeV possible. A similar scheme is being studied for the 800 GeV HERA proton accelerator

  11. Where is the proton's spin?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    There has been much recent excitement arising from the claim by the EMC collaboration that none of the proton's spin is carried by quarks. There are many textbooks, including those written by some members of this audience, which assert that the proton's spin is carried by quarks. I will review the history of deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons from polarized protons, culminating in this most recent dramatic claim. I will show that, for the last decade, data have appeared consistent with predictions of the quark model and highlight what the new and potentially exciting data are. I will conclude with suggestions for the future

  12. Measurement of proton autoneutralization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.

    1984-09-01

    A proton space charge having multi-MeV kinetic energy was injected through a thin ground plane to extract electrons and produce a time-dependent autoneutralization space potential. An electon-emitting floating-potential resistive divider was used to measure the space potential during 20 ns of the proton current pulse. During this time, proton kinetic energy fell from 10.6 MeV to 8.5 MeV and thus the space potential (taken as 1.09 x the floating potential) fell from 5.8 kV to 4.6 kV

  13. Scattering of intermediate energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumeaux, Alain.

    1980-06-01

    The scattering of 1 GeV protons appears to be a powerful means of investigating nuclear matter. We worked with SPESI and the formalism of Kerman-Mc Manus and Thaler. The amplitude of nucleon-nucleon scattering was studied as were the aspects of 1 GeV proton scattering (multiple scattering, absorption, spin-orbit coupling, N-N amplitude, KMT-Glauber comparison, second order effects). The results of proton scattering on 16 O, the isotopes of calcium, 58 Ni, 90 Zr and 208 Pb are given [fr

  14. Aspects of the fundamental theory of proton-proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A

    1973-01-01

    After recalling the existence of a high energy bound on proton-proton total cross-sections, the author discusses the various phenomena which occur when these cross-sections rise and especially when they have the qualitative behaviour of the bound: rising elastic cross- sections, shrinking diffraction peak, validity of the Pomeranchuk theorem for total and elastic cross-sections, existence of a positive real part of the forward amplitude at high energies. (16 refs).

  15. Proton-proton elastic scattering at ultrahigh energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, M.; Shaukat, M.A.; Fazal-e-Aleem

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results on proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies are discussed in the context of the comments by Chou and Yang. There does not appear to be any tendency that the experimental results would agree with the predictions of the geometrical model even at ultrahigh energies. The angular distribution structure as described by using the dipole pomeron is consistent with the experimental data at presently available high energies and predicts results quite different from the geometrical model. (author)

  16. Proton-proton elastic scattering at ultrahigh energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Shaukat, M.A.; Fazal-e-Aleem (University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1981-05-30

    Recent experimental results on proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies are discussed in the context of the comments by Chou and Yang. There does not appear to be any tendency that the experimental results would agree with the predictions of the geometrical model even at ultrahigh energies. The angular distribution structure as described by using the dipole pomeron is consistent with the experimental data at presently available high energies and predicts results quite different from the geometrical model.

  17. Leading proton production in e+p collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Krakauer, D.; Loizides, J.H.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Antonioli, P.; Anzivino, G.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Crittenden, J.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.F.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K.C.; Wang, M.; Weber, A.; Bailey, D.S.; Brook, N.H.; Cole, J.E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G.P.; Heath, H.F.; Namsoo, T.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Wing, M.; Ayad, R.; Capua, M.; Iannotti, L.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J.Y.; Kim, Y.K.; Lee, J.H.; Lim, I.T.; Pac, M.Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Ning, Y.; Paganis, S.; Ren, Z.; Schmidke, W.B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A.M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Behrens, U.; Bloch, I.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Derrick, M.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Goettlicher, P.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.F.; Hillert, S.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kramberger, G.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Loehr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M.C.; Polini, A.; Raval, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Wessoleck, H.; Wichmann, R.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P.G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Raach, H.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P.J.; Doyle, A.T.; Glasman, C.; Hamilton, J.; Hanlon, S.; Lupi, A.; Saxon, D.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Gialas, I.; Bodmann, B.; Carli, T.; Holm, U.; Klimek, K.; Krumnack, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Salehi, H.; Stonjek, S.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Goncalo, R.; Long, K.R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D.B.; Tapper, A.D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A.N.; Boos, E.G.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; Gonzalez, O.; Labarga, L.; Del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terron, J.; Vazquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Gliga, S.; Lainesse, S.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D.G.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R.K.; Ermolov, P.F.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Katkov, I.I.; Khein, L.A.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Kuzmin, V.A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Proskuryakov, A.S.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Vlasov, N.N.; Zotkin, S.A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Pellegrino, A.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J.J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Bruemmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L.S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Kim, C.L.; Ling, T.Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Ferrando, J.; Grzelak, G.; Patel, S.; Rigby, M.; Sutton, M.R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Heaphy, E.A.; Oh, B.Y.; Saull, P.R.B.; Whitmore, J.J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J.C.; Barberis, E.; Heusch, C.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J.T.; Sadrozinski, H.F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D.C.; Park, I.H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kagawa, S.; Kohno, T.; Tawara, T.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Patel, S.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M.I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G.M.; Martin, J.F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J.M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T.W.; Lightwood, M.S.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Nowak, R.J.; Pawlak, J.M.; Smalska, B.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L.K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Kcira, D.; Lammers, S.; Li, L.; Reeder, D.D.; Savin, A.A.; Smith, W.H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Straub, P.B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C.D.; Fourletov, S.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.

    2003-01-01

    Events with a final-state proton carrying a large fraction of the proton beam momentum, x L >0.6, and the square of the transverse momentum p T 2 2 , have been studied in e + p collisions with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Data with different photon virtualities were used: Q 2 2 , 0.1 2 2 and 3 2 2 , corresponding to integrated luminosities of 0.9, 1.85 and 3.38 pb -1 . The cross sections are given as a function of x L , p T 2 , Q 2 and the Bjorken scaling variable, x. The ratio of the cross section for leading proton production to the inclusive e + p cross section shows only a mild dependence on Q 2 and on x. In the region 0.6 L L

  18. Proton structure functions in the dipole picture of BFKL dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navelet, H.; Wallon, S.

    1996-06-01

    The F 2 , F G , R=F L /F T proton structure functions are derived in the QCD dipole picture. Assuming k T and renormalization-group factorization, we relate deep-inelastic proton scattering to deep-inelastic onium scattering. We get a three-parameter fit of the 1994 H1 data in the low-x, moderate Q 2 range. The ratios F G /F 2 and R are predicted without further adjustment. The dipole picture of BFKL dynamics is shown to provide a relevant model for quantitatively describing the proton structure functions at HERA. The predictions for F 2 and F G are compatible with next-to-leading DGLAP analysis, while R is expected to be significantly lower at very small x. (orig.)

  19. Investigation of high-energy-proton effects in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.; Snead, C.L. Jr.; Todosow, M.

    1997-01-01

    Specimens of 1100 aluminum were exposed to several fluences of 23.5-GeV protons at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Although this energy is above those currently being proposed for spallation-neutron applications, the results can be viewed as indicative of trends and other microstructural evolution with fluence that take place with high-energy proton exposures such as those associated with an increasing ratio of gas generation to dpa. TEM investigation showed significantly larger bubble size and lower density of bubbles compared with lower-energy proton results. Additional testing showed that the tensile strength increased with fluence as expected, but the microhardness decreased, a result for which an intepretation is still under investigation

  20. Proton GE/GM from beam-target asymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark Jones; Aram Aghalaryan; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Razmik Asaturyan; Frederic Bloch; Werner Boeglin; Peter Bosted; Cedric Carasco; Roger Carlini; Jinseok Cha; Jian-Ping Chen; Michael Christy; Leon Cole; Luminita Coman; Donald Crabb; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; James Dunne; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Howard Fenker; Emil Frlez; David Gaskell; Liping Gan; Javier Gomez; Bitao Hu; Juerg Jourdan; Christopher Keith; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Andreas Klein; Laird Kramer; Yongguang Liang; Jechiel Lichtenstadt; Richard Lindgren; David Mack; Paul McKee; Dustin McNulty; David Meekins; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Kristoff Normand; Blaine Norum; Dinko Pocanic; Yelena Prok; Brian Raue; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Daniela Rohe; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Nikolai Savvinov; Bradley Sawatzky; Mikell Seely; Ingo Sick; Karl Slifer; C. Smith; Gregory Smith; S. Stepanyan; Liguang Tang; Shigeyuki Tajima; Giuseppe Testa; William Vulcan; Kebin Wang; Glen Warren; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; Lulin Yuan; Junho Yun; Markus Zeier; Hong Guo Zhu

    2006-01-01

    The ratio of the proton's electric to magnetic form factor, G E /G M , can be extracted in elastic electron-proton scattering by measuring either cross sections, beam-target asymmetry or recoil polarization. Separate determinations of G E /G M by cross sections and recoil polarization observables disagree for Q 2 > 1 (GeV/c) 2 . Measurement by a third technique might uncover an unknown systematic error in either of the previous measurements. The beam-target asymmetry has been measured for elastic electron-proton scattering at Q 2 = 1.51 (GeV/c) 2 for target spin orientation aligned perpendicular to the beam momentum direction. This is the largest Q 2 at which G E /G M has been determined by a beam-target asymmetry experiment. The result, μG E /G M = 0.884 +/- 0.027 +/- 0.029, is compared to previous world data

  1. System for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, I.M.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Trotsenko, V.I.; Chechetenko, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    The system for measuring the proton polarization in a polarized target representing the high-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described Q-meter with series connection and a circuit for measuring system resonance characteristic is used for NMR-absorption signal recording. Measuring coil is produced of a strip conductor in order to obtain uniform system sensitivity to polarization state in all target volume and improve signal-to-noise ratio. Polarization measuring system operates ion-line with the M-6000 computer. The total measuring error for the value of free proton polarization in target taking into account the error caused by local depolarization of working substance under irradiation by high-intense photon beam is <= 6%. Long-term application of the described system for measuring the proton polarization in the LUEh-20000 accelerator target used in the pion photoproduction experiments has demonstrated its high reliability

  2. Abundance Tomography of Type Ia Supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, M.; Mazzali, P.A.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of early time spectra of Type Ia Supernovae is presented. A new method to derive a detailed abundance distribution of the SN ejecta through comparison with synthetic spectra, called 'Abundance Tomography' is introduced and applied to the normal SN Ia 2002bo. Conclusions regarding the explosion mechanism are drawn

  3. Diversity, composition and abundance of macroinvertebrates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    these genera were found at all sampling stations as shown in Table 2. Out of the orders sampled, Hemiptera, Pulmonata and. Coleoptera had the highest number of genera with 5, 4 and 4, respectively. In terms of relative abundance, dipterans and Pulmonata were the most abundant while. Hydracarina (water mites) were ...

  4. Resource Abundance and Resource Dependence in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, K.; Magnus, J.R.; Wang, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reconsiders the ‘curse of resources’ hypothesis for the case of China, and distinguishes between resource abundance, resource rents, and resource dependence. Resource abundance and resource rents are shown to be approximately equivalent, and their association with resource dependence

  5. Determinants of distribution, abundance and reproductive success ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... while local vegetation structure determines the abundance of locally established populations. The abundance of trees affects nest site availability and breeding success, based on observations at two oases. Blackbird nests were usually situated on pomegranate trees and olive trees. The Common Blackbird is a successful ...

  6. Diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, J.F.M.F.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Witte, H.; van Duyl, F.C.

    2013-01-01

    We analysed the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) and Bacteria (AOB) in the shallow warm-water sponge Halisarca caerulea and the deep cold-water sponges Higginsia thielei and Nodastrella nodastrella. The abundance of AOA and AOB was analysed using catalyzed reporter

  7. Fluorine Abundances of AGB Stars in Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, A.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Hinkle, K. H.; Nowotny, W.

    2015-08-01

    We have measured the abundance of fluorine, [F/Fe], in a number of AGB stars in stellar clusters have correlated the results with their C/O ratios. This allows us to investigate the change in the fluorine abundance along the evolution on the giant branch. The target list includes primarily O-rich stars in three LMC globular clusters - NGC 1806, NGC 1846 and NGC 1978 - as well as Rup 106 and 47 Tuc in our Galaxy. The observational data were obtained with the PHOENIX spectrograph, and the COMA code was used for modelling the synthetic spectra. Within individual clusters, we find consistent [F/Fe] values at similar C/O for most of our target stars.

  8. Elemental abundance and analyses with coadded DAO spectrograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    One can improve the quality of elemental abundance analyses by using higher signal-to-noise data than has been the practice at high resolution. The procedures developed at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory to coadd high-dispersion coude spectrograms are used with a minimum of 10 6.5 A mm -1 IIa-O spectrograms of each of three field horizontal-branch (FHB)A stars to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the photographic data over a considerable wavelength region. Fine analyses of the sharp-lined prototype FHB stars HD 109995 and 161817 show an internal consistency which justifies this effort. Their photospheric elemental abundances are similar to those of Population II globular cluster giants. (author)

  9. Stellar pulsation and the abundance of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, E.G.

    1978-01-01

    It has been suggested that the appearance of nonvariable stars within the Cepheid strip could be explained by a range in the helium abundance of Population I stars. In order to study this possibility, spectra were obtained of the main-sequence B stars in the galactic cluster NGC 129, which contains a nonvariable Cepheid-strip star, and M25, which contains a relatively hot Cepheid. Unfortunately, several of the stars in these clusters turn out to be helium-weak stars. In NGC 129 two stars which appear normal give a normal abundance, while in M25 all of the observed stars have abnormally low abundances. The significance of the low abundance in M25 is not clear. The abundance in NGC 129 is not low enough to support the above suggestion. 4 figures, 2 tables

  10. Proton radiotherapy: some perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirn, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    A news article highlighting the use of protons in radiotherapy is presented. Development of stereotaxic radiosurgery is the result of contributions from physicists, radiologists, and neurosurgeons, says Jacob Fabrikant, MD, head of the Arteriovenous Malformation Program at the University of California's Lawrence Berkeley laboratory. It also appears to have been the product of Harvard University (Boston) and University of California (Berkeley) cooperation. Robert R. Wilson, PhD, now a professor emeritus at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, is credited with proposing the medical use of charged particles. Wilson, a physicist, says that the idea occurred to him while he was at Berkeley in the mid-1940's, designing the cyclotron to be built at Harvard. Although he was aware of their work, he does not remember discussing it with Robert Stone, MD, or John Lawrence, MD, who only a few years earlier at Berkeley had begun the initial medical experiments with neutrons. Wilson says that it simply occurred to him that in certain instances charged particles had two advantages over x-rays

  11. Polarized protons at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Physics case is presented for the use of polarized protons at RHIC for one or two months each year. This would provide a facility with polarizations of approx-gt 50% high luminosity ∼2.0 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 , the possibility of both longitudinal and transverse polarization at the interaction regions, and frequent polarization reversal for control of systematic errors. The annual integrated luminosity for such running (∼10 6 sec per year) would be ∫ Ldt = 2 x 10 38 cm -2 -- roughly 20 times the total luminosity integrated in ∼ 10 years of operation of the CERN Collider (∼10 inverse picobarns, 10 37 cm -2 ). This facility would be unique in the ability to perform parity-violating measurements and polarization test of QCD. Also, the existence of p-p collisions in a new energy range would permit the study of ''classical'' reactions like the total cross section and elastic scattering, etc., and serve as a complement to measurements from p-bar p colliders. 11 refs

  12. A theoretical and experimental investigation of the proton magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancke, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    This study comprises the investigation of the properties of the proton magnetometer based on the free precession of protons. The basic principle of the free precession of protons in the earth's magnetic field is described and the most important factors affecting this free precession are examined. It is shown that very important parameters to keep in mind are the polarization time and the magnitude of the polarization field. A discussion of the errors of a proton magnetometer built on the periodometer principles is given and it is shown that the error in counting of the number of precession periods during the time of measurement contributes most to the total error. The magnitude of this error depends on the signal-to-noise ratio, the instability of the operating threshold of the discriminator of the period counter, it's operating time and the tuning accuracy of the sensor to the precession frequency. The penetration to a magnetometer input of variable magnetic and electric interferences, their influence on the phase of the useful signal, and the resulting measurement errors are examined and methods of reducing the effects of interferences are discussed. The optimization of sensor design is very important in the development of proton magnetometers. The coil geometry, physical size, the working substance and the polarization design are important parameters. The selection of a method for processing the precession signal of a proton magnetometer is examined, given a sensor and signal amplifier with fixed parameters. A method is proposed and compared with known methods. Measurement errors are computed for various signal-to-noise ratios and times of observation of the precession signal, and it is shown that the proposed method is superior to conventional methods found in commercial instruments

  13. New measurement of G_E/GM for the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segel, Ralph

    2003-10-01

    Recent polarization transfer measurements of the ratio of the proton electric to magnetic form factor, G E /G_M, find μ_pG E /GM = 1 - 0.13Q ^2 while a long series of L-T separations are fit by μ_pG_E/GM ≈ 1. Jefferson Lab experiment E01-001 used a new technique for making L-T separations that greatly reduces the dominant systematic uncertainties present in previous determinations. Protons from ep scattering were measured over a wide range in ɛ at Q^2 = 2.64, 3.20 and 4.10 GeV^2 and, simultaneously, protons scattered at Q^2 = 0.5 GeV^2 were measured over a small range in ɛ. The Q^2 = 0.5 GeV^2 measurements provided an internal monitor and only kinematic factors and ratios of simultaneously measured cross sections enter into the determinations of G_E/G_M. Measuring the proton cross sections has the advantage that for the same Q^2, count rates change very little with ɛ and also proton momentum is the same at all ɛ thus eliminating the effect of any momentum-dependent inefficiencies. Neither of these is true for L-T separations performed by measuring electron cross sections. Furthermore, the radiative corrections for the proton cross sections are a factor of about 2.5 smaller. All previous L-T separations measured electron cross sections and none had the advantage of an internal monitor. Therefore, the results of E01-001 stringently test whether systematic uncertainties in previous L-T separations may have been sufficient to explain the discrepancy with the recent polarization transfer results.

  14. Proton-proton and deuteron-deuteron correlations in interactions of relativistic helium nuclei with protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galazka-Friedman, J.; Sobczak, T.; Stepaniak, J.; Zielinski, I.P.; Bano, M.; Hlavacova, J.; Martinska, G.; Patocka, J.; Seman, M.; Sandor, L.; Urban, J.

    1993-01-01

    The reactions 4 Hep→pp+X, 3 Hep→pp+X and 4 Hep→ddp have been investigated and the correlation function has been measured for protons and deuterons with small relative momenta. Strong positive correlation has been observed for protons related mainly to the final state interactions in 1 S 0 state. The root mean square radius of the proton source calculated from the correlation function has been found to be equal to (1.7±0.3) fm and (2.1±0.3) fm for 4 He and 3 He respectively. It agrees with the known radii of these nuclei. (orig.)

  15. Dynamics of Anti-Proton -- Protons and Anti-Proton -- Nucleus Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Galoyan, A; Uzhinsky, V

    2016-01-01

    A short review of simulation results of anti-proton-proton and anti-proton-nucleus interactions within the framework of Geant4 FTF (Fritiof) model is presented. The model uses the main assumptions of the Quark-Gluon-String Model or Dual Parton Model. The model assumes production and fragmentation of quark-anti-quark and diquark-anti-diquark strings in the mentioned interactions. Key ingredients of the model are cross sections of string creation processes and an usage of the LUND string fragmentation algorithm. They allow one to satisfactory describe a large set of experimental data, especially, a strange particle production, Lambda hyperons and K mesons.

  16. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  17. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2005-01-01

    The PI of this project was Jeff Scargle of NASA/Ames. Co-I's were Alma Connors of Eureka Scientific/Wellesley, and myself. Part of the work was subcontracted to Eureka Scientific via SAO, with Vinay Kashyap as PI. This project was originally assigned grant number NCC2-1206, and was later changed to NCC2-1350 for administrative reasons. The goal of the project was to obtain, derive, and develop statistical and data analysis tools that would be of use in the analyses of high-resolution, high-sensitivity data that are becoming available with new instruments. This is envisioned as a cross-disciplinary effort with a number of "collaborators" including some at SA0 (Aneta Siemiginowska, Peter Freeman) and at the Harvard Statistics department (David van Dyk, Rostislav Protassov, Xiao-li Meng, Epaminondas Sourlas, et al). We have developed a new tool to reliably measure the metallicities of thermal plasma. It is unfeasible to obtain high-resolution grating spectra for most stars, and one must make the best possible determination based on lower-resolution, CCD-type spectra. It has been noticed that most analyses of such spectra have resulted in measured metallicities that were significantly lower than when compared with analyses of high- resolution grating data where available (see, e.g., Brickhouse et al., 2000, ApJ 530,387). Such results have led to the proposal of the existence of so-called Metal Abundance Deficient, or "MAD" stars (e.g., Drake, J.J., 1996, Cool Stars 9, ASP Conf.Ser. 109, 203). We however find that much of these analyses may be systematically underestimating the metallicities, and using a newly developed method to correctly treat the low-counts regime at the high-energy tail of the stellar spectra (van Dyk et al. 2001, ApJ 548,224), have found that the metallicities of these stars are generally comparable to their photospheric values. The results were reported at the AAS (Sourlas, Yu, van Dyk, Kashyap, and Drake, 2000, BAAS 196, v32, #54.02), and at the

  18. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomà, C; Meer, D; Safai, S; Lorentini, S

    2014-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences—of the order of 3%—were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth—i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers—rather than cylindrical chambers—for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. (paper)

  19. On the proton radius problem

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, M. M.; Santopinto, E.

    2013-01-01

    The recent values of the proton charge radius obtained by means of muonic-hydrogen laser spectroscopy are about $4\\%$ different from the electron scattering data. It has been suggested that the proton radius is actually measured in different frames and that, starting from a non relativistic quark model calculation, the Lorentz transformation of the form factors accounts properly for the discepancy. We shall show that the relation between the charge radii measured in different frames can be de...

  20. Empirical relationships between gas abundances and UV selective extinction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    Several studies of gas-phase abundances in lines of sight through the outer edges of dense clouds are summarized. These lines of sight have 0.4 less than E(B-V) less than 1.1 and have inferred spatial densities of a few hundred cm(-3). The primary thrust of these studies has been to compare gaseous abundances in interstellar clouds that have various types of peculiar selective extinction. To date, the most notable result has been an empirical relationship between the CN/Fe I abundance ratio and the depth of the 2200 A extinction bump. It is not clear whether these two parameters are linearly correlated or the data are organized into two discrete ensembles. Based on 19 samples lines of sight that have a CN/Fe I abundance ratio greater than 0.3 (dex) appear to have a shallow 2.57 plus or minus 0.55 bump compared to 3.60 plus or minus 0.36 for other dense clouds and compared to the 3.6 Seaton (1979) average. The difference in the strength of the extinction bump between these two ensembles is 1.03 plus or minus 0.23. Although a high-resolution IUE survey of dense clouds is far from complete, the few lines of sight with shallow extinction bumps all show preferential depletion of certain elements, while those lines of sight with normal 2200 A bumps do not. Ca II, Cr II, and Mn II appear to exhibit the strongest preferential depletion. Fe II and Si II depletions also appear to be enhanced somewhat. It should be noted that Copernicus data suggest all elements, including the so-called nondepletors, deplete in diffuse clouds (Snow and Jenkins 1980, Joseph 1988). Those lines of sight through dense clouds that have normal 2200 A extinction bumps appear to be extensions of the depletions found in the diffuse interstellar medium

  1. Proton therapy project at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Karasawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Particle radiation which might present steeper dose distribution has received much attention as the third particle facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. Proton conformation with sharp fall-off is considered to be the radiation beam suitable for confining high doses to a target volume without complications and for verifying which factor out of high RBE or physical dose distribution is more essential for local control in malignant tumors. This paper discusses the current status of the spot scanning method, which allows three dimensional conformation radiotherapy, and preliminary results. Preliminary dose distribution with proton conformation technique was acquired by modifying a computer program for treatment planning in pion treatment. In a patient with prostate carcinoma receiving both proton and pion radiation therapy, proton conformation was found to confine high doses to the target area and spare both the bladder and rectum well; and pion therapy was found to deliver non-homogeneous radiation to these organs. Although there are some obstacles in the proton project at PSI, experimental investigations are encouraging. The dynamic spot scanning method with combination of the kicker magnet, wobbler magnet, range shifter, patient transporter, and position sensitive monitor provides highly confined dose distribution, making it possible to increase total doses and thus to improve local control rate. Proton confirmation is considered to be useful for verifying possible biological effectiveness of negative pion treatment of PSI as well. (N.K.)

  2. When the proton becomes larger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has just confirmed that, at high energy, protons behave as if they were becoming larger. In more technical terms, their total cross-section – a parameter linked to the proton-proton interaction probability – increases with energy. This phenomenon, expected from previous measurements performed at much lower energy, has now been confirmed for the first time at the LHC’s unprecedented energy.   One arm of a TOTEM T2 detector during its installation at interaction point 5. A composite particle like the proton is a complex system that in no way resembles a static Lego construction: sub-components move inside and interactions keep the whole thing together, but in a very dynamic way. This partly explains why even the very common proton can still be hiding secrets about its nature, decades after its discovery. One way of studying the inner properties of protons is to observe how they interact with each other, which, in technical terms, i...

  3. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, Sten; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Smith, Verne V.; Holtzman, Jon A.; McWilliam, Andrew; APOGEE Team

    2018-06-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze the chemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] > -0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function. We then exploit the unique chemical abundance patters of the Sgr core to trace stars belonging to the Sgr tidal streams elsewhere in the Milky Way.

  4. Oxygen isotopic abundances in the atmospheres of seven red giant stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Lambert, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Abundances ratios of the oxygen isotopes have been measured in α Tau, β And, μ Gem, α Her, β Peg, γ Dra, and α Boo. In all the stars the 16 O/ 18 O ratios are similar; the mean value is 475, which is consistent with the solar system value 16 O/ 18 O = 490. The 16 O/ 17 O ratios range from approx.1000 for β Peg and α Boo to 16 O/ 17 O = 160 for β And

  5. The rectilinear Steiner ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PO de Wet

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The rectilinear Steiner ratio was shown to be 3/2 by Hwang [Hwang FK, 1976, On Steiner minimal trees with rectilinear distance, SIAM Journal on Applied Mathematics, 30, pp. 104– 114.]. We use continuity and introduce restricted point sets to obtain an alternative, short and self-contained proof of this result.

  6. Off-axis dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams during proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. R.; Collums, T. L.; Zheng, Y.; Monson, J.; Benton, E. R.

    2013-11-01

    The production of secondary neutrons is an undesirable byproduct of proton therapy and it is important to quantify the contribution from secondary neutrons to patient dose received outside the treatment volume. The purpose of this study is to investigate the off-axis dose equivalent from secondary neutrons experimentally using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) at ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK. In this experiment, we placed several layers of CR-39 PNTD laterally outside the treatment volume inside a phantom and in air at various depths and angles with respect to the primary beam axis. Three different proton beams with max energies of 78, 162 and 226 MeV and 4 cm modulation width, a 5 cm diameter brass aperture, and a small snout located 38 cm from isocenter were used for the entire experiment. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed based on the experimental setup using a simplified snout configuration and the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The measured ratio of secondary neutron dose equivalent to therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranged from 0.3 ± 0.08 mSv Gy-1 for 78 MeV proton beam to 37.4 ± 2.42 mSv Gy-1 for 226 MeV proton beam. Both experiment and simulation showed a similar decreasing trend in dose equivalent with distance to the central axis and the magnitude varied by a factor of about 2 in most locations. H/D was found to increase as the energy of the primary proton beam increased and higher H/D was observed at 135° compared to 45° and 90°. The overall higher H/D in air indicates the predominance of external neutrons produced in the nozzle rather than inside the body.

  7. Off-axis dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams during proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M R; Collums, T L; Monson, J; Benton, E R; Zheng, Y

    2013-01-01

    The production of secondary neutrons is an undesirable byproduct of proton therapy and it is important to quantify the contribution from secondary neutrons to patient dose received outside the treatment volume. The purpose of this study is to investigate the off-axis dose equivalent from secondary neutrons experimentally using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) at ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK. In this experiment, we placed several layers of CR-39 PNTD laterally outside the treatment volume inside a phantom and in air at various depths and angles with respect to the primary beam axis. Three different proton beams with max energies of 78, 162 and 226 MeV and 4 cm modulation width, a 5 cm diameter brass aperture, and a small snout located 38 cm from isocenter were used for the entire experiment. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed based on the experimental setup using a simplified snout configuration and the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The measured ratio of secondary neutron dose equivalent to therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranged from 0.3 ± 0.08 mSv Gy −1  for 78 MeV proton beam to 37.4 ± 2.42 mSv Gy −1  for 226 MeV proton beam. Both experiment and simulation showed a similar decreasing trend in dose equivalent with distance to the central axis and the magnitude varied by a factor of about 2 in most locations. H/D was found to increase as the energy of the primary proton beam increased and higher H/D was observed at 135° compared to 45° and 90°. The overall higher H/D in air indicates the predominance of external neutrons produced in the nozzle rather than inside the body. (paper)

  8. The excess flux in the cosmic submillimeter background radiation and the primordial deuterium abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Guessoum, N.; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD

    1989-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) show an enhanced flux in the submillimeter regime, compared to the spectrum of a 2.7 K blackbody. Thermal Comptonization of the relic radiation by a hot nonrelativistic plasma has long been known to produce distortions in the CBR spectrum, similar to what has now been observed. Heating of the primeval plasma to temperatures T ∼ 10 6 - 10 8 K could result from the injection of subcosmic ray protons at epoch z ∼ 10--100. The intensity of the subcosmic ray flux that provide conditions needed to explain the submillimeter excess by thermal Comptonization also leads to the production of cosmologically significant amounts of deuterium in collisions between subcosmic ray protons and primordial protons and α-particles. However, the amount of lithium produced through α-α reactions is in conflict with the observed Li abundance. If lithium is depleted, for example, by processing through Population II stars, arguments for the baryon content of the universe based on primordial deuterium and He abundances are weakened. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Heteronuclear proton assisted recoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paëpe, Gaël; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Loquet, Antoine; Eddy, Matt; Megy, Simon; Böckmann, Anja; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a theoretical framework for understanding the heteronuclear version of the third spin assisted recoupling polarization transfer mechanism and demonstrate its potential for detecting long-distance intramolecular and intermolecular 15N-13C contacts in biomolecular systems. The pulse sequence, proton assisted insensitive nuclei cross polarization (PAIN-CP) relies on a cross term between 1H-15N and 1H-13C dipolar couplings to mediate zero- and/or double-quantum 15N-13C recoupling. In particular, using average Hamiltonian theory we derive effective Hamiltonians for PAIN-CP and show that the transfer is mediated by trilinear terms of the form N±C∓Hz (ZQ) or N±C±Hz (DQ) depending on the rf field strengths employed. We use analytical and numerical simulations to explain the structure of the PAIN-CP optimization maps and to delineate the appropriate matching conditions. We also detail the dependence of the PAIN-CP polarization transfer with respect to local molecular geometry and explain the observed reduction in dipolar truncation. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of PAIN-CP in structural studies with 15N-13C spectra of two uniformly 13C,15N labeled model microcrystalline proteins—GB1, a 56 amino acid peptide, and Crh, a 85 amino acid domain swapped dimer (MW = 2 × 10.4 kDa). The spectra acquired at high magic angle spinning frequencies (ωr/2π > 20 kHz) and magnetic fields (ω0H/2π = 700-900 MHz) using moderate rf fields, yield multiple long-distance intramonomer and intermonomer 15N-13C contacts. We use these distance restraints, in combination with the available x-ray structure as a homology model, to perform a calculation of the monomer subunit of the Crh protein.

  10. NEW RADIAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS FOR NGC 628 AND NGC 2403

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Croxall, Kevin V. [Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Marble, Andrew R. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Smith, J. D. [Ritter Astrophysical Observatory, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Gordon, Karl [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Garnett, Donald R., E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: croxall.5@osu.edu, E-mail: amarble@nso.edu, E-mail: jd.smith@utoledo.edu, E-mail: kgordon@stsci.edu, E-mail: robk@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by recent interstellar medium studies, we present high quality MMT and Gemini spectroscopic observations of H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 628 and NGC 2403 in order to measure their chemical abundance gradients. Using long-slit and multi-object mask optical spectroscopy, we obtained measurements of the temperature sensitive auroral lines [O III] λ4363 and/or [N II] λ5755 at a strength of 4σ or greater in 11 H II regions in NGC 628 and 7 regions in NGC 2403. These observations allow us, for the first time, to derive an oxygen abundance gradient in NGC 628 based solely on 'direct' oxygen abundances of H II regions: 12 + log(O/H) = (8.43 ± 0.03) + (–0.017 ± 0.002) × R{sub g} (dex kpc{sup –1}), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of σ = 0.10 dex, from 14 regions with a radial coverage of ∼2-19 kpc. This is a significantly shallower slope than found by previous 'strong-line' abundance studies. In NGC 2403, we derive an oxygen abundance gradient of 12 + log(O/H) = (8.48 ± 0.04) + (–0.032 ± 0.007)× R{sub g} (dex kpc{sup –1}), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of σ = 0.07 dex, from seven H II with a radial coverage of ∼1-10 kpc. Additionally, we measure the N, S, Ne, and Ar abundances. We find the N/O ratio decreases with increasing radius for the inner disk, but reaches a plateau past R{sub 25} in NGC 628. NGC 2403 also has a negative N/O gradient with radius, but we do not sample the outer disk of the galaxy past R{sub 25} and so do not see evidence for a plateau. This bi-modal pattern measured for NGC 628 indicates dominant contributions from secondary nitrogen inside of the R{sub 25} transition and dominantly primary nitrogen farther out. As expected for α-process elements, S/O, Ne/O, and Ar/O are consistent with constant values over a range in oxygen abundance.

  11. Abundances, Ionization States, Temperatures, and FIP in Solar Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2018-04-01

    The relative abundances of chemical elements and isotopes have been our most effective tool in identifying and understanding the physical processes that control populations of energetic particles. The early surprise in solar energetic particles (SEPs) was 1000-fold enhancements in {}3He/{}4He from resonant wave-particle interactions in the small "impulsive" SEP events that emit electron beams that produce type III radio bursts. Further studies found enhancements in Fe/O, then extreme enhancements in element abundances that increase with mass-to-charge ratio A/Q, rising by a factor of 1000 from He to Au or Pb arising in magnetic reconnection regions on open field lines in solar jets. In contrast, in the largest SEP events, the "gradual" events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by fast, wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Averaging many events provides a measure of solar coronal abundances, but A/Q-dependent scattering during transport causes variations with time; thus if Fe scatters less than O, Fe/O is enhanced early and depleted later. To complicate matters, shock waves often reaccelerate impulsive suprathermal ions left over or trapped above active regions that have spawned many impulsive events. Direct measurements of ionization states Q show coronal temperatures of 1-2 MK for most gradual events, but impulsive events often show stripping by matter traversal after acceleration. Direct measurements of Q are difficult and often unavailable. Since both impulsive and gradual SEP events have abundance enhancements that vary as powers of A/Q, we can use abundances to deduce the probable Q-values and the source plasma temperatures during acceleration, ≈3 MK for impulsive SEPs. This new technique also allows multiple spacecraft to measure temperature variations across the face of a shock wave, measurements otherwise unavailable and provides a new understanding of abundance variations in the element He. Comparing coronal abundances from SEPs

  12. Multifactorial Understanding of Ion Abundance in Tandem Mass Spectrometry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Zeeshan; Southey, Bruce R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2013-01-29

    In a bottom-up shotgun approach, the proteins of a mixture are enzymatically digested, separated, and analyzed via tandem mass spectrometry. The mass spectra relating fragment ion intensities (abundance) to the mass-to-charge are used to deduce the amino acid sequence and identify the peptides and proteins. The variables that influence intensity were characterized using a multi-factorial mixed-effects model, a ten-fold cross-validation, and stepwise feature selection on 6,352,528 fragment ions from 61,543 peptide ions. Intensity was higher in fragment ions that did not have neutral mass loss relative to any mass loss or that had a +1 charge state. Peptide ions classified for proton mobility as non-mobile had lowest intensity of all mobility levels. Higher basic residue (arginine, lysine or histidine) counts in the peptide ion and low counts in the fragment ion were associated with lower fragment ion intensities. Higher counts of proline in peptide and fragment ions were associated with lower intensities. These results are consistent with the mobile proton theory. Opposite trends between peptide and fragment ion counts and intensity may be due to the different impact of factor under consideration at different stages of the MS/MS experiment or to the different distribution of observations across peptide and fragment ion levels. Presence of basic residues at all three positions next to the fragmentation site was associated with lower fragment ion intensity. The presence of proline proximal to the fragmentation site enhanced fragmentation and had the opposite trend when located distant from the site. A positive association between fragment ion intensity and presence of sulfur residues (cysteine and methionine) on the vicinity of the fragmentation site was identified. These results highlight the multi-factorial nature of fragment ion intensity and could improve the algorithms for peptide identification and the simulation in tandem mass spectrometry experiments.

  13. Abundance variations in solar active regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, K. T.; Lemen, J. R.; Linford, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    The diversity in the published values of coronal abundances is unsettling, especially as the range of results seems to be beyond the quoted uncertainties. Measurements of the relative abundance of iron and neon derived from soft X-ray spectra of active regions are presented. From a data base of over 200 spectra taken by the Solar Maximum Mission Flat Crystal Spectrometer, it is found that the relative abundance can vary by as much as a factor of about 7 and can change on timescales of less than 1 h.

  14. Generation of quasi-monoenergetic protons from a double-species target driven by the radiation pressure of an ultraintense laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pae, Ki Hong [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chul Min, E-mail: chulmin@gist.ac.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Chang Hee, E-mail: chnam@gist.ac.kr [Center for Relativistic Laser Science, Institute for Basic Science, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Photon Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In laser-driven proton acceleration, generation of quasi-monoenergetic proton beams has been considered a crucial feature of the radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) scheme, but the required difficult physical conditions have hampered its experimental realization. As a method to generate quasi-monoenergetic protons under experimentally viable conditions, we investigated using double-species targets of controlled composition ratio in order to make protons bunched in the phase space in the RPA scheme. From a modified optimum condition and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we showed by varying the ion composition ratio of proton and carbon that quasi-monoenergetic protons could be generated from ultrathin plane targets irradiated with a circularly polarized Gaussian laser pulse. The proposed scheme should facilitate the experimental realization of ultrashort quasi-monoenergetic proton beams for unique applications in high field science.

  15. Delayed protons and properties of proton-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    The object of the investigation is to study the properties of proton-rich nuclei. The emphasis in the proposed survey is made on investigations in the range of Z > 50. Measurement of the total energy in emission of delayed protons (DP) enables one to determine the difference between the masses of initial and final isotopes. The statistical model of the DP emission is used for describing the proton spectrum. A comparison of the DP experimental and theoretical spectra shows that the presence of local resonances in the strength functions of the β dacay is rather a rule than an exception. Studies into the fine structure of the proton spectra supply information of the density of nuclei considerably removed from the β-stability line at the excitation energies of 3-7 MeV. The aproaches for retrieval of nuclear information with the aid of proton radiators developed so far can serve as a good basis for systematic investigation over a wide range of A and Z

  16. Sea level muon spectrum and muon charge ratio derived from CERN results for nucleon-nucleus inelastic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, D P

    1979-01-01

    The sea level cosmic ray spectrum and muon charge ratio have been estimated by using the energy moments of the cross section for proton- air inelastic collisions. These energy moments have been determined by interpolation from CERN results for proton-nucleus inelastic interactions in pion production. The derived results are compared with previous work. (26 refs).

  17. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Mamta [Nuclear Science Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2006-07-15

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line.

  18. Two-proton radioactivity in proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta

    2006-01-01

    Two-proton radioactivity in extremely proton-rich fp shell nuclei at high spins is investigated in a theoretical framework. Separation energy and entropy fluctuate with spin and hence affect the location of the proton drip line

  19. Fabrication and optimization of a fiber-optic radiation sensor for proton beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.W.; Yoo, W.J.; Seo, J.K.; Heo, J.Y.; Moon, J.; Park, J.-Y.; Hwang, E.J.; Shin, D.; Park, S.-Y.; Cho, H.-S.; Lee, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor for proton therapy dosimetry and measured the output and the peak-to-plateau ratio of scintillation light with various kinds of organic scintillators in order to select an organic scintillator appropriate for measuring the dose of a proton beam. For the optimization of an organic scintillator, the linearity between the light output and the stopping power of a proton beam was evaluated for two different diameters of the scintillator, and the angular dependency and standard deviation of the light pulses were investigated for four different scintillator lengths. We also evaluated the linearity between the light output and the dose rate and monitor units of a proton generator, respectively. The relative depth-dose curve of the proton beam was obtained and corrected using Birk's theory.

  20. External proton and Li beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Juan A.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Debray, Mario E.; Kesque, Jose M.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Stoliar, Pablo A.; Naab, Fabian; Ozafran, Mabel J.; Vazquez, Monica E.; Perez de la Hoz, A.; Somacal, Hector; Valda, Alejandro; Canevas, S.; Ruffolo, M.; Tasat, D.R.; Muhlmann, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    In the frame of a feasibility study to introduce proton therapy in Argentina in a collaborative agreement between the Physics and Radiobiology Departments of the National Atomic Energy Commission or Argentina and the Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay, France, external proton and Li beams were produced at the TANDAR accelerator in Buenos Aires. The specific aim of this work was to start radiobiology studies on cell cultures and small laboratory animals. In particular we seek to determine here the relative biological effectiveness, RBE, for proton and Li beams as a function of energy for different tumor and normal cell lines. The 24 MeV proton beam was diffused using a 25 μm gold foil and extracted through a Kapton window to obtain a homogeneous field (constant to 95%) of about 7 cm in diameter. Measurements were carried out with quasi-monoenergetic beams (of 20.2 ± 0.07 MeV, 2.9 ± 0.10 MeV y 1.5 ± 0.1 MeV for protons and 21.4 ± 0.4 MeV for Lithium). Proton fluence and Bragg peaks were measured. The dose delivered in each case was monitored on-line with a calibrated transmission ionization chamber. Three cell lines PDV, PDVC 57 and V 79 (as a reference) were irradiated with γ-rays, proton and lithium beams with linear energy transfer (LET) from 2 to 100 keV/μm. RBE values in the range of 1.2-5.9 were obtained. In addition preliminary studies on chromosomal aberrations and viability of alveolar macrophages were carried out. (author)

  1. Transformer ratio enhancement experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, W.; Power, J. G.; Kanareykin, A.; Neasheva, E.; Altmark, A.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a multibunch scheme for efficient acceleration based on dielectric wakefield accelerator technology was outlined in J.G. Power, W. Gai, A. Kanareykin, X. Sun. PAC 2001 Proceedings, pp. 114-116, 2002. In this paper we present an experimental program for the design, development and demonstration of an Enhanced Transformer Ratio Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator (ETR-DWA). The principal goal is to increase the transformer ratio R, the parameter that characterizes the energy transfer efficiency from the accelerating structure to the accelerated electron beam. We present here an experimental design of a 13.625 GHz dielectric loaded accelerating structure, a laser multisplitter producing a ramped bunch train, and simulations of the bunch train parameters required. Experimental results of the accelerating structure bench testing and ramped pulsed train generation with the laser multisplitter are shown as well. Using beam dynamic simulations, we also obtain the focusing FODO lattice parameters

  2. Intake to Production Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazaroff, William; Weschler, Charles J.; Little, John C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data are available to assess human exposure to thousands of chemicals currently in commerce. Information that relates human intake of a chemical to its production and use can help inform understanding of mechanisms and pathways that control exposure and support efforts...... to protect public health.OBJECTIVES: We introduce the intake-to-production ratio (IPR) as an economy-wide quantitative indicator of the extent to which chemical production results in human exposure.METHODS: The IPR was evaluated as the ratio of two terms: aggregate rate of chemical uptake in a human......(n-butyl) phthalate, 1,040 ppm for para-dichlorobenzene, 6,800 ppm for di(isobutyl) phthalate, 7,700 ppm for diethyl phthalate, and 8,000-24,000 ppm (range) for triclosan.CONCLUSION: The IPR is well suited as an aggregate metric of exposure intensity for characterizing population-level exposure to synthesized...

  3. Study of the proton-proton elastic scattering at high energies through eikonal models; Estudo do espalhamento elastico proton-proton a altas energias atraves de modelos eiconais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martini, Alvaro Favinha

    1995-12-31

    The proton-proton elastic scattering in the center of mass energy region 23 to 63 GeV is investigated through a multiple diffraction model. As an introduction to the subject, a detailed review of the fundamental basis of the Multiple Diffraction Formalism and a survey of the multiple diffraction models (geometrical) currently used are presented. The goal of this investigation is to reformulate one of these models, which makes use of an elementary (parton-parton) amplitude purely imaginary and is not able to predict the {rho}-parameter (the ratio of the forward real and imaginary parts of the hadronic amplitude). Introducing a real part for the elementary amplitude proportional to the imaginary part, improvements in the formalism are obtained. It is shown that this new approach is able to reproduce all experimental data on differential and integrated cross sections (total, elastic and inelastic), but not the {rho}-parameter as function of the energy. Then, starting from fitting of this parameter an overall reproduction of the physical observables is obtained, with the exception of the dip region (diffractive minimum in the differential cross section) overall description are also not firmly reached in all these models. Finally, alternatives to improve the results in a future research are suggested and discussed. (author) 69 refs., 69 figs., 20 tabs.

  4. National Cancer Database Analysis of Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); O' Connell, Kelli [Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Yuan [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Gillespie, Theresa W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); McDonald, Mark W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Pillai, Rathi N. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Patel, Kirtesh R.; Patel, Pretesh R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Belani, Chandra P. [Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Pennsylvania University, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and predictors associated with proton radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the National Cancer Database. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried to capture patients with stage I-IV NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation from 2004 to 2012. A logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors for utilization of proton radiation therapy. The univariate and multivariable association with overall survival were assessed by Cox proportional hazards models along with log–rank tests. A propensity score matching method was implemented to balance baseline covariates and eliminate selection bias. Results: A total of 243,822 patients (photon radiation therapy: 243,474; proton radiation therapy: 348) were included in the analysis. Patients in a ZIP code with a median income of <$46,000 per year were less likely to receive proton treatment, with the income cohort of $30,000 to $35,999 least likely to receive proton therapy (odds ratio 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.90]; P=.011). On multivariate analysis of all patients, non-proton therapy was associated with significantly worse survival compared with proton therapy (hazard ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.06-1.39]; P<.01). On propensity matched analysis, proton radiation therapy (n=309) was associated with better 5-year overall survival compared with non-proton radiation therapy (n=1549), 22% versus 16% (P=.025). For stage II and III patients, non-proton radiation therapy was associated with worse survival compared with proton radiation therapy (hazard ratio 1.35 [95% CI 1.10-1.64], P<.01). Conclusions: Thoracic radiation with protons is associated with better survival in this retrospective analysis; further validation in the randomized setting is needed to account for any imbalances in patient characteristics, including positron emission tomography–computed tomography staging.

  5. Detailed abundances in stars belonging to ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    François, P.; Monaco, L.; Villanova, S.; Catelan, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Bellazzini, M.; Bidin, C. Moni; Marconi, G.; Geisler, D.; Sbordone, L.

    2012-01-01

    We report preliminary results concerning the detailed chemical composition of metal poor stars belonging to close ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (hereafter UfDSphs). The abundances have been determined thanks to spectra obtained with X-Shooter, a high efficiency spectrograph installed on one of the ESO VLT units. The sample of ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal stars have abundance ratios slightly lower to what is measured in field halo star of the same metallicity.We did not find extreme abundances in...

  6. Proton-proton Scattering Above 3 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Sibirtsev, J. Haidenbauer, H.-W. Hammer S. Krewald ,Ulf-G. Meissner

    2010-01-01

    A large set of data on proton-proton differential cross sections, analyzing powers and the double-polarization parameter A{sub NN} is analyzed employing the Regge formalism. We find that the data available at proton beam momenta from 3 GeV/c to 50 GeV/c exhibit features that are very well in line with the general characteristics of Regge phenomenology and can be described with a model that includes the {rho}, {omega}, f{sub 2}, and a{sub 2} trajectories and single-Pomeron exchange. Additional data, specifically for spin-dependent observables at forward angles, would be very helpful for testing and refining our Regge model.

  7. Palaeoceanographic implications of abundance and mean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temporal variation in abundance and mean proloculus diameter of the benthic foraminiferal species. Epistominella ... sediments, ice cores, tree rings, corals, etc. are used. ..... Deep-sea foraminifera in the South Atlantic Ocean: Eco- logy and ...

  8. Chinook Abundance - Linear Features [ds181

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The dataset 'ds181_Chinook_ln' is a product of the CalFish Adult Salmonid Abundance Database. Data in this shapefile are collected from stream sections or reaches...

  9. SWFSC/MMTD: Vaquita Abundance Survey 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1997, the Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) conducted a survey designed to estimate the abundance of vaquita, the Gulf of California harbor porpoise...

  10. Abundance estimation of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates a spectral unmixing method for estimating the partial abundance of spectrally similar minerals in complex mixtures. The method requires formulation of a linear function of individual spectra of individual minerals. The first...

  11. Heavy element abundances of Nova Cygni 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferland, G.J.; Shields, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    McDonald observations of the nebular phase of the outburst of Nova Cygni 1975 are analyzed to measure the abundances of several heavy elements. A new analytical procedure is used to derive the electron density and temperature from the emission line intensities of [O III], [Ne III], and He I observed between days 40 and 120. These physical conditions are used to derive the abundances. We find that Fe has approximately a solar abundance, whereas C, N, O, and Ne are enhanced by factors approx.20 to 100. The enhanced abundance of neon was theoretically unexpected.The derived physical conditions and line intensities are compared with predictions of an equilibrium photoionization model. The model successfully predicts the intensities of He I, [O III], and [Ne III]; but it underestimates the strength of [Ne V] and [Fe VII], which may originate in a mechanically heated ''subcoronal'' line region

  12. Chemical Abundances in SFG and DLA

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; König, Brigitte; Cherinka, Brian

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the chemical abundances of local star-forming galaxies which cause Damped Lyman Alpha lines. A metallicity versus redshift diagram is constructed, on which the chemical abundances of low-redshift star-forming galaxy populations are compared with those of high-redshift Damped Lyman Alpha systems. We disucss two types of experiments on individual star-forming galaxies. In the first, the Damped Lyman Alpha line is created against an internal ultraviolet light source generated by a...

  13. Composition and abundance of tree regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd F. Hutchinson; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland; Charles T. Scott

    2003-01-01

    The composition and abundance of tree seedlings and saplings in the four study areas in southern Ohio were related to soil moisture via a GIS-derived integrated moisture index and to soil texture and fertility. For seedlings, the total abundance of small stems (less than 30 cm tall) was significantly greater on xeric plots (81,987/ha) than on intermediate (54,531/ha)...

  14. Abundance of lithium in Pleiades F stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilachowski, C.A.; Booth, J.; Hobbs, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    The abundance of lithium has been determined for 18 stars in the Pleiades cluster with spectral types from A7V to G0V. The pronounced dip in the lithium abundance among the mid-F stars which has been reported for other, older star clusters is not present in the Pleiades. The removal of lithium from the surfaces of middle-F dwarfs therefore occurs principally after about 100 Myr on the main sequence. 25 references

  15. Proton-proton reaction rates at extreme energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Motohiko

    1993-01-01

    Results on proton-antiproton reaction rates (total cross-section) at collision energies of 1.8 TeV from experiments at Fermilab have suggested a lower rate of increase with energy compared to the extrapolation based on results previously obtained at CERN's proton-antiproton collider (CERN Courier, October 1991). Now an independent estimate of the values for the proton-proton total cross-section for collision energies from 5 to 30 TeV has been provided by the analysis of cosmic ray shower data collected over ten years at the Akeno Observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research of University of Tokyo. These results are based on the inelastic cross-section for collisions of cosmic ray protons with air nuclei at energies in the range10 16-18 eV. A new extensive air shower experiment was started at Akeno, 150 km west of Tokyo, in 1979 with a large array of detectors, both on the ground and under a 1-metre concrete absorber. This measured the total numbers of electrons and muons of energies above 1GeV for individual showers with much better accuracy than before. Data collection was almost continuous for ten years without any change in the triggering criteria for showers above10 16 eV. The mean free path for proton-air nuclei collisions has been determined from the zenith angle of the observed frequency of air showers which have the same effective path length for development in the atmosphere and the same primary energy

  16. Determination of helium and oxygen abundances in gaseous nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronik, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    A new method of determining the abudance of helium and oxygen is proposed. It is based on the statement that functions of atomic distribution with states of ionization may be determined to the sufficient precision by the amount of atoms in two states of ionization. The abudance of helium atoms in nebulae is determined with most probability, since of three possible states of ionization two states with the overwhelming majority atoms may be directly observed. The amount of He++ ions is determined from He 2 recombination lines, and the amount of He+ ions is from He1 lines. The total abudance of He atoms can be found from the observed ratios of I(4686)/I(Hsub(β)) and I(4471)/I(Hsub(β)) at any degree of ionization. These ratios slightly depend on the electron temperature. For oxygen, unlike helium, the observed ratios depend on the electron temperature of gas, and at high densities they also depend on the density of electrons (it is necessary to take account of deactivation of the excited level by electron impacts). Constructed are curves of equal abundance He/H=const for determining He/H according to the ratios observed I(4686)/I(Hsub(β)) and I(4471)/I(Hsub(β)) and curves of equal abudance O/H=const for determining O/H according to the ratios observed I(3727)/I(Hsub(/b)) and I(Nsub(1)+Nsub(2))/I(Hsub(β)), corrected preliminarily for density and temperature

  17. The Structure of the Proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  18. LHC Report: Ions cross protons

    CERN Multimedia

    Reyes Alemany Fernandez for the LHC team

    2013-01-01

    The LHC starts the New Year facing a new challenge: proton-lead collisions in the last month before the shutdown in mid-February.    The first stable beams were achieved on 20 January with 13 individual bunches per beam. In the next fill, the first bunch-trains were injected and stable beams were achieved with 96 proton on 120 ion bunches.  This fill was very important because we were able to study the so-called moving long-range beam-beam encounters. Long-range encounters, which are also seen in proton-proton runs, occur when the bunches in the two beams “see” each other as they travel in the same vacuum chamber at either side of the experiments.  The situation becomes more complicated with proton-lead ions because the two species have different revolution times (until the frequencies are locked at top energy- see “Cogging exercises”) and thus these encounters move. We found that this effect does not cause significant beam losses...

  19. High energy proton PIXE [HEPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, J.S.C.

    1993-01-01

    Studies of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) have been widespread and detailed in recent years and despite the fact that most data obtained are from low energy 1-3 MeV experiments, the value of higher energy proton work with its emphasis on K X-ray emission has become more marked as time has progressed. The purpose of this review paper is to outline the history of analysis using high energy protons and to compare and contrast the results obtained with those from lower energy analysis using more firmly established analytical techniques. The work described will concentrate exclusively on proton induced processes and will attempt to outline the rationale for selecting an energy, greater than 20 and up to 70 MeV protons for initiating particles. The relative ease and accuracy of the measurements obtained will be addressed. Clearly such X-ray studies should be seen as complementing low energy work in many instances rather than competing directly with them. However, it will be demonstrated that above a Z value of approximately 20, K X-ray analysis using high energy protons is the only way to go in this type of analysis. (author)

  20. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver, E-mail: jasmina@physics.ucf.edu [Planetary Sciences Group, Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  1. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  2. ATLAS proton-proton event containing four muons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event with four identified muons from a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. This event is consistent with coming from two Z particles decaying: both Z particles decay to two muons each. Such events are produced by Standard Model processes without Higgs particles. They are also a possible signature for Higgs particle production, but many events must be analysed together in order to tell if there is a Higgs signal. This view is a zoom into the central part of the detector. The four muons are picked out as red tracks. Other tracks and deposits of energy in the calorimeters are shown in yellow.

  3. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  4. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jingyu; et al.

    2015-07-12

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  5. Concept for a Future Super Proton-Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jingyu; Chai, Weiping; Chen, Fusan; Chen, Nian; Chou, Weiren; Dong, Haiyi; Gao, Jie; Han, Tao; Leng, Yongbin; Li, Guangrui; Gupta, Ramesh; Li, Peng; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Baiqi; Liu, Yudong; Lou, Xinchou; Luo, Qing; Malamud, Ernie; Mao, Lijun; Palmer, Robert B.; Peng, Quanling; Peng, Yuemei; Ruan, Manqi; Sabbi, GianLuca; Su, Feng; Su, Shufang; Stratakis, Diktys; Sun, Baogeng; Wang, Meifen; Wang, Jie; Wang, Liantao; Wang, Xiangqi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Ming; Xing, Qingzhi; Xu, Qingjin; Xu, Hongliang; Xu, Wei; Witte, Holger; Yan, Yingbing; Yang, Yongliang; Yang, Jiancheng; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yuhong; Zheng, Shuxin; Zhu, Kun; Zhu, Zian; Zou, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at LHC, new large colliders are being studied by the international high-energy community to explore Higgs physics in detail and new physics beyond the Standard Model. In China, a two-stage circular collider project CEPC-SPPC is proposed, with the first stage CEPC (Circular Electron Positron Collier, a so-called Higgs factory) focused on Higgs physics, and the second stage SPPC (Super Proton-Proton Collider) focused on new physics beyond the Standard Model. This paper discusses this second stage.

  6. Parity Non-Conservation in Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, V.R.; B.F. Gibson; J.A. Carlson; R. Schiavilla

    2002-01-01

    The parity non-conserving longitudinal asymmetry in proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering is calculated in the lab-energy range 0-350 MeV using contemporary, realistic strong-interaction potentials combined with a weak-interaction potential comprised of rho- and omega-meson exchanges as exemplified by the DDH model. Values for the rho- and omega-meson coupling constants, h rho rho rho and h rho rho omega , are determined from comparison with the measured asymmetries at 13.6 MeV, 45 MeV, and 221 MeV

  7. Proton MR spectroscopy in idiopathic spasmodic torticollis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federico, F.; Lucivero, V.; Simone, I.L.; Defazio, G.; De Salvia, R.; Mezzapesa, D.M.; Petruzzellis, M.; Tortorella, C.; Livrea, P. [Dept. of Neurology and Psychiatry, Bari (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), localised to the basal ganglia, was used to determine changes in metabolite levels in idiopathic spasmodic torticollis (IST). We examined nine patients and 13 healthy subjects. The mean values ({+-} SD) of peak area ratios were: IST: N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA)/choline-containing compounds (Cho) 1.79 {+-} 0.39, NAA/creatine and phosphocreatine compounds (Cr) 1.61 {+-} 0.38, Cho/Cr 0.91 {+-} 0.19; controls: NAA/Cho 2.07 {+-} 0.35, NAA/Cr 1.82 {+-} 0.31, Cho/Cr 0.89 {+-} 0.12. Statistical analysis showed that NAA/Cho and NAA/Cr were significantly lower in patients than in controls (P = 0.0304 and 0.0431, respectively). These results indicate a reduction in NAA, and suggest striatal involvement in the pathogenesis IST. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of $B_c^+$ production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew Christopher; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Production of $B_c^+$ mesons in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is studied with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $2.0~{\\rm fb^{-1}}$ recorded by the LHCb experiment. The ratio of production cross-sections times branching fractions between the $B_c^+\\to J/\\psi \\pi^+$ and $B^+\\to J/\\psi K^+$ decays is measured as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity in the regions $0 < p_{\\rm T} < 20{\\rm GeV}/c$ and $2.0 < y < 4.5$. The ratio integrated within this kinematic range is measured to be $(0.683\\,\\pm\\,0.018\\,\\pm\\,0.009)\\%$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  9. Measurement of Bc+ Production in Proton-Proton Collisions at √[s]=8  TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2015-04-03

    Production of Bc+ mesons in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is studied with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.0  fb-1 recorded by the LHCb experiment. The ratio of production cross sections times branching fractions between the Bc+→J/ψπ+ and B+→J/ψK+ decays is measured as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity in the regions 0ratio in this kinematic range is measured to be (0.683±0.018±0.009)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  10. Conceptual design of proton beam window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraoku, Takuji; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ishikura, Syuichi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    In a MW-scale neutron scattering facility coupled with a high-intensity proton accelerator, a proton beam window is installed as the boundary between a high vacuum region of the proton beam transport line and a helium environment around the target assembly working as a neutron source. The window is cooled by water so as to remove high volumetric heat generated by the proton beam. A concept of the flat-type proton beam window consisting of two plates of 3 mm thick was proposed, which was found to be feasible under the proton beam power of 5 MW through thermal-hydraulic and structural strength analyses. (authors)

  11. The Reference Return Ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Jeppe; Faber Frandsen, Tove

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new journal impact measure called The Reference Return Ratio (3R). Unlike the traditional Journal Impact Factor (JIF), which is based on calculations of publications and citations, the new measure is based on calculations of bibliographic investments (references) and returns...... (citations). A comparative study of the two measures shows a strong relationship between the 3R and the JIF. Yet, the 3R appears to correct for citation habits, citation dynamics, and composition of document types - problems that typically are raised against the JIF. In addition, contrary to traditional...

  12. Potential support ratios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Søren; Canudas-Romo, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    The ‘prospective potential support ratio’ has been proposed by researchers as a measure that accurately quantifies the burden of ageing, by identifying the fraction of a population that has passed a certain measure of longevity, for example, 17 years of life expectancy. Nevertheless......, the prospective potential support ratio usually focuses on the current mortality schedule, or period life expectancy. Instead, in this paper we look at the actual mortality experienced by cohorts in a population, using cohort life tables. We analyse differences between the two perspectives using mortality models...

  13. Family symmetries and proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Kaplan, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    The proton decay modes p → K 0 e + and p → K 0 μ + may be visible in certain supersymmetric theories, and if seen would provide evidence for new flavor physics at extremely short distances. These decay modes can arise from the dimension five operator (Q 1 Q 1 Q 2 L 1,2 ), where Q i and L i are i th generation quark and lepton superfields respectively. Such an operator is not generated at observable levels due to gauge or Higgs boson exchange in a minimal GUT. However in theories that explain the fermion mass hierarchy, it may be generated at the Planck scale with a strength such that the decays p → K 0 ell + are both compatible with the proton lifetime and visible at Super-Kamiokande. Observable proton decay can even occur in theories without unification

  14. The search for proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; McGrew, C.; Mohapatra, R.; Peterson, E.; Cline, D.B.

    1994-01-01