WorldWideScience

Sample records for protein oxidation implicated

  1. Abiotic Protein Fragmentation by Manganese Oxide: Implications for a Mechanism to Supply Soil Biota with Oligopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Patrick N; Chacon, Stephany S; Walter, Eric D; Bowden, Mark E; Washton, Nancy M; Kleber, Markus

    2016-04-05

    The ability of plants and microorganisms to take up organic nitrogen in the form of free amino acids and oligopeptides has received increasing attention over the last two decades, yet the mechanisms for the formation of such compounds in soil environments remain poorly understood. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to distinguish the reaction of a model protein with a pedogenic oxide (Birnessite, MnO2) from its response to a phyllosilicate (Kaolinite). Our data demonstrate that birnessite fragments the model protein while kaolinite does not, resulting in soluble peptides that would be available to soil biota and confirming the existence of an abiotic pathway for the formation of organic nitrogen compounds for direct uptake by plants and microorganisms. The absence of reduced Mn(II) in the solution suggests that birnessite acts as a catalyst rather than an oxidant in this reaction. NMR and EPR spectroscopies are shown to be valuable tools to observe these reactions and capture the extent of protein transformation together with the extent of mineral response.

  2. Nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron regulatory proteins: implication for cellular iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2002-01-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) that are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(.), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels and a decrease in ferritin synthesis. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and a dramatic increase in ferritin synthesis. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  3. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  4. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...... modulated by EDTA. This is ascribed to metal ion-protein interactions affecting the sites of initial oxidation. Hypochlorous acid gave low concentrations of released carbonyls, but high yields of protein-bound material. The peroxyl radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride...

  5. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...

  6. Oxidant/Antioxidant Balance in Animal Nutrition and Health: The Role of Protein Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Celi, Pietro; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress (OS), and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism, and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functi...

  7. Oxidant/antioxidant balance in animal nutrition and health: the role of protein oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro eCeli; Pietro eCeli; Gianfranco eGabai

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress, and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional m...

  8. Heat shock protein-27 protects human bronchial epithelial cells against oxidative stress–mediated apoptosis: possible implication in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merendino, Anna M.; Paul, Catherine; Vignola, Antonio M.; Costa, Maria A.; Melis, Mario; Chiappara, Giuseppina; Izzo, V.; Bousquet, J.; Arrigo, André-Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Inflammation of the human bronchial epithelium, as observed in asthmatics, is characterized by the selective death of the columnar epithelial cells, which desquamate from the basal cells. Tissue repair initiates from basal cells that resist inflammation. Here, we have evaluated the extent of apoptosis as well as the Hsp27 level of expression in epithelial cells from bronchial biopsy samples taken from normal and asthmatic subjects. Hsp27 is a chaperone whose expression protects against oxidative stress. We report that in asthmatic subjects the basal epithelium cells express a high level of Hsp27 but no apoptotic morphology. In contrast, apoptotic columnar cells are devoid of Hsp27 expression. Moreover, we observed a decreased resistance to hydrogen peroxide–induced apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial 16–HBE cells when they were genetically modified to express reduced levels of Hsp27. PMID:12482203

  9. Protein oxidation in muscle foods: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marianne; Heinonen, Marina; Baron, Caroline P.

    2011-01-01

    insight into the reactions involved in the oxidative modifications undergone by muscle proteins. Moreover, a variety of products derived from oxidized muscle proteins, including cross-links and carbonyls, have been identified. The impact of oxidation on protein functionality and on specific meat quality...... and consequences of Pox in muscle foods. The efficiency of different anti-oxidant strategies against the oxidation of muscle proteins is also reported.......Protein oxidation in living tissues is known to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of relevant degenerative diseases, whereas the occurrence and impact of protein oxidation (Pox) in food systems have been ignored for decades. Currently, the increasing interest among food scientists...

  10. Oxidant/Antioxidant Balance in Animal Nutrition and Health: The Role of Protein Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Pietro; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress (OS), and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism, and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional modifications. Protein oxidation seems to be involved in pathological conditions, such as respiratory diseases and parasitic infection; however, some studies also suggest that protein oxidation plays a crucial role in the regulation of important physiological functions, such as reproduction, nutrition, metabolism, lactation, gut health, and neonatal physiology. As the characterization of the mechanisms by which OS may influence metabolism and health is attracting considerable scientific interest, the aim of this review is to present veterinary scientists and clinicians with various aspects of oxidative damage to proteins.

  11. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2012-01-01

    of these proteins by MALDI tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI MS/MS). As a result we obtained 24 different proteins which can be categorized into the following groups: chaperones, energy metabolism, cytoskeleton/intermediate filaments, and protein translation/ribosome biogenesis. The special set of identified......, ubiquitinated proteins confirm the thesis that ubiquitination upon oxidative stress is no random process to degrade the mass of oxidized proteins, but concerns a special group of functional proteins....

  12. Factors Affecting Pro- and Anti-Oxidant Properties of Fragments of the b-Protein Precursor (bPP): Implication for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorn, Anne C.; Kalaria, Rajesh N.

    2000-06-01

    Oxidative stress may have a key pathogenetic role in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). While there is evidence that some amyloid-b (Ab) peptides can initiate oxidative stress at micromolar doses, there is also some evidence that oxidative stress increases the concentration of the b-protein precursor (bPP) and the potential for increased formation of the Ab peptides. The following studies were performed to test the hypothesis that fragments of bPP could be antioxidants and hence that oxidative stress might be an early event in AD. We found that several fragments of bPP, including the Ab peptides, inhibit ascorbate-stimulated lipid peroxidation (ASLP) in membrane fragment preparations of postmortem human brain. In contrast, other fragments of bPP enhance ASLP. These data indicate that bPP or fragments of bPP could play a key role in the redox status of cells and that alterations in bPP processing could have profound effects on the cellular response to oxidative stress.

  13. Post-Electrophoretic Identification of Oxidized Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Craig C; Talent, John M; Malakowsky, Christina A

    1999-01-01

    The oxidative modification of proteins has been shown to play a major role in a number of human diseases. However, the ability to identify specific proteins that are most susceptible to oxidative modifications is difficult. Separation of proteins using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) offers the analytical potential for the recovery, amino acid sequencing, and identification of thousands of individual proteins from cells and tissues. We have developed a method to allow underivatized proteins to be electroblotted onto PVDF membranes before derivatization and staining. Since both the protein and oxidation proteins are quantifiable, the specific oxidation index of each protein can be determined. The optimal sequence and conditions for the staining process are (a) electrophoresis, (b) electroblotting onto PVDF membranes, (c) derivatization of carbonyls with 2,4-DNP, (d) immunostaining with anti DNP antibody, and (e) protein staining with colloidal gold. PMID:12734585

  14. Protection of naturally occurring antioxidants against oxidative damages to protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hongping; Zhang Zhaoxia; Hao Shumei; Wang Wenfeng; Yao Side

    2006-01-01

    One of the most compelling theories explaining age-related deterioration is the free radical theory of aging. It has been shown that reactive oxygen species are involved in oxidative damages to biomolecules and this is related to a number of diseases. Proteins, the second most abundant components of cells (next to water by weight), are now increasingly recognized as major biological targets of oxidative damages. Convincing evidences have indicated that damages to protein have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cancer, and aging. Antioxidant has been the subject of great attention because they are known to lower the risk of cardiovascular and other diseases. Hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives (HCAs) are antioxidants abundant in tea, red wine, fruits, beverages and various medicinal plants. Results showed that they exhibit remarkable activity for scavenging oxidizing radicals and triplet states. The protective effects of four kinds of HCAs on oxidative damages to lysozyme were investigated in our lab. Protein damages induced by two different paradigms: riboflavin-sensitized photooxidation and hydroxyl ( . OH)-mediated oxidation, were investigated using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. HCAs were found to inhibit the cross-linking of protein induced by riboflavin-mediated photooxidation. HCAs also exhibited protection effect on lysozyme damage induced by γ-ray irradiation. The rate constants for quenching triplet state of riboflavin by lysozyme and HCAs were obtained using laser flash photolysis. The protective mechanism was proposed based on the dynamic study. HCAs were found to protect protein against oxidation by scavenging oxidizing species and repairing the damaged protein. (authors)

  15. Oxidant/antioxidant balance in animal nutrition and health: the role of protein oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eCeli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review examines the role that oxidative stress, and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional modifications. Protein oxidation seems to be involved in pathological conditions such as respiratory diseases and parasitic infection; however some studies also suggest that protein oxidation plays a crucial role in the regulation of important physiological functions such as reproduction, nutrition, metabolism, lactation, gut health and neonatal physiology. As the characterization of the mechanisms by which oxidative stress may influence metabolism and health is attracting considerable scientific interest, the aim of this review is to present veterinary scientists and clinicians with various aspects of oxidative damage to proteins.

  16. Protein cysteine oxidation in redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Henry Jay; Davies, Michael J; Krämer, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of critical signaling protein cysteines regulated by H2O2 has been considered to involve sulfenic acid (RSOH) formation. RSOH may subsequently form either a sulfenyl amide (RSNHR') with a neighboring amide, or a mixed disulfide (RSSR') with another protein cysteine or glutathione. Previ...

  17. Evidence for radical-oxidation of plasma proteins in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Davies, M.; Dean, R.; Fu, S.; Taurins, A.; Sullivans, D.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidation of proteins by radicals has been implicated in many pathological processes. The hydroxyl radical is known to generate protein-bound hydroxylated derivatives of amino acids, for example hydroxyvaline (from Val), hydroxyleucine (from Leu), o-tyrosine (from Phe), and DOPA (from Tyr). In this study, we have investigated the occurrence of these oxidised amino acids in human plasma proteins from both normal subjects and dialysis patients. By employing previously established HPLC methods [Fu et al. Biochemical Journal, 330, 233-239, 1998], we have found that oxidised amino acids exist in normal human plasma proteins (n=32). The level of these oxidised amino acids is not correlated to age. Similar levels of oxidised amino acids are found in the plasma proteins of the dialysis patients (n=6), but a more detailed survey is underway. The relative abundance of the oxidised amino acids is similar to that resulting from oxidation of BSA by hydroxy radicals or Fenton systems [Fu et al. Biochemical Journal, 333, 519-525, 1998]. The results suggest that metal-ion catalysed oxyl-radical chemistry may be a key contributor to the oxidative damage in plasma proteins in vivo in humans

  18. Chronic exposure to high glucose impairs bradykinin-stimulated nitric oxide production by interfering with the phospholipase-C-implicated signalling pathway in endothelial cells: evidence for the involvement of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Li, G D

    2004-12-01

    Overwhelming evidence indicates that endothelial cell dysfunction in diabetes is characterised by diminished endothelium-dependent relaxation, but the matter of the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. As nitric oxide (NO) production from the endothelium is the major player in endothelium-mediated vascular relaxation, we investigated the effects of high glucose on NO production, and the possible alterations of signalling pathways implicated in this scenario. NO production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)](i)) were assessed using the fluorescent probes 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate and fura-2 respectively. Exposure of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells to high glucose for 5 or 10 days significantly reduced NO production induced by bradykinin (but not by Ca(2+) ionophore) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This was probably due to an attenuation in bradykinin-induced elevations of [Ca(2+)](i) under these conditions, since a close correlation between [Ca(2+)](i) increases and NO generation was observed in intact bovine aortic endothelial cells. Both bradykinin-promoted intracellular Ca(2+) mobilisation and extracellular Ca(2+) entry were affected. Moreover, bradykinin-induced formation of Ins(1,4,5)P(3), a phospholipase C product leading to increases in [Ca(2+)](i), was also inhibited following high glucose culture. This abnormality was not attributable to a decrease in inositol phospholipids, but possibly to a reduction in the number of bradykinin receptors. The alterations in NO production, the increases in [Ca(2+)](i), and the bradykinin receptor number due to high glucose could be largely reversed by protein kinase C inhibitors and D: -alpha-tocopherol (antioxidant). Chronic exposure to high glucose reduces NO generation in endothelial cells, probably by impairing phospholipase-C-mediated Ca(2+) signalling due to excess protein kinase C activation. This defect in NO release may contribute to the diminished endothelium

  19. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Mei [Department of Physics, Institute of Quantitative Biology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Kang, Hongsuk; Luan, Binquan [Computational Biological Center, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Yang, Zaixing [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhou, Ruhong, E-mail: ruhong@us.ibm.com [Department of Physics, Institute of Quantitative Biology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Computational Biological Center, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  20. Potential disruption of protein-protein interactions by graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Mei; Kang, Hongsuk; Luan, Binquan; Yang, Zaixing; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a promising novel nanomaterial with a wide range of potential biomedical applications due to its many intriguing properties. However, very little research has been conducted to study its possible adverse effects on protein-protein interactions (and thus subsequent toxicity to human). Here, the potential cytotoxicity of GO is investigated at molecular level using large-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interaction mechanism between a protein dimer and a GO nanosheet oxidized at different levels. Our theoretical results reveal that GO nanosheet could intercalate between the two monomers of HIV-1 integrase dimer, disrupting the protein-protein interactions and eventually lead to dimer disassociation as graphene does [B. Luan et al., ACS Nano 9(1), 663 (2015)], albeit its insertion process is slower when compared with graphene due to the additional steric and attractive interactions. This study helps to better understand the toxicity of GO to cell functions which could shed light on how to improve its biocompatibility and biosafety for its wide potential biomedical applications.

  1. Hypochlorous and peracetic acid induced oxidation of dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkaert, Barbara; Mestdagh, Frédéric; Cucu, Tatiana; Aedo, Philip Roger; Ling, Shen Yan; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2011-02-09

    Hypochlorous and peracetic acids, both known disinfectants in the food industry, were compared for their oxidative capacity toward dairy proteins. Whey proteins and caseins were oxidized under well controlled conditions at pH 8 as a function of the sanitizing concentration. Different markers for protein oxidation were monitored. The results established that the protein carbonyl content was a rather unspecific marker for protein oxidation, which did not allow one to differentiate the oxidant used especially at the lower concentrations. Cysteine, tryptophan, and methionine were proven to be the most vulnerable amino acids for degradation upon hypochlorous and peracetic acid treatment, while tyrosine was only prone to degradation in the presence of hypochlorous acid. Hypochlorous acid induced oxidation gave rise to protein aggregation, while during peracetic acid induced oxidation, no high molecular weight aggregates were observed. Protein aggregation upon hypochlorous acid oxidation could primarily be linked to tryptophan and tyrosine degradation.

  2. Oxidation of Proteins in Plants-Mechanisms and Consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweetlove, Lee J; Møller, Ian M

    2009-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in plant cells can lead to a variety of modifications of proteins through oxidation of amino acid side groups. The widespread occurrence of such modifications is becoming appreciated as new proteomic approaches allow their systematic....... A view that such modifications could have signalling ramifications is emerging. However, in many cases there is a lack of information as to the effect of oxidation on protein activity or function. Severe protein oxidation is costly to the cell since oxidatively damaged proteins need to be degraded...... of modified proteins by affinity purification. Although there are several technical caveats with such approaches, they have been useful in documenting the extent of oxidative modification of proteins and have highlighted a number of proteins where oxidative modification is critical for protein function...

  3. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Jin

    Full Text Available Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40, i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better

  4. Increased nitration and carbonylation of proteins in MRL +/+ mice exposed to trichloroethene: Potential role of protein oxidation in autoimmunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gangduo; Wang Jianling; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2009-01-01

    Even though reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated as mediators of autoimmune diseases (ADs), little is known about contribution of protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) in the pathogenesis of such diseases. The focus of this study was, therefore, to establish a link between protein oxidation and induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmunity. To achieve this, female MRL +/+ mice were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 6 or 12 weeks (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4 th day). TCE treatment resulted in significantly increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT) and induction of iNOS in the serum at both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, but the response was greater at 12 weeks. Likewise, TCE treatment led to greater NT formation, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the livers and kidneys. Moreover, TCE treatment also caused significant increases (∼3 fold) in serum protein carbonyls (a marker of protein oxidation) at both 6 and 12 weeks. Significantly increased protein carbonyls were also observed in the livers and kidneys (2.1 and 1.3 fold, respectively) at 6 weeks, and to a greater extent at 12 weeks (3.5 and 2.1 fold, respectively) following TCE treatment. The increases in TCE-induced protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) were associated with significant increases in Th1 specific cytokine (IL-2, IFN-γ) release into splenocyte cultures. These results suggest an association between protein oxidation and induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response. The results present a potential mechanism by which oxidatively modified proteins could contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response and necessitates further investigations for clearly establishing the role of protein oxidation in the pathogenesis of ADs.

  5. Protein capped nanosilver free radical oxidation: role of biomolecule capping on nanoparticle colloidal stability and protein oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Manuel; Bohne, Cornelia; Oake, Jessy; Alarcon, Emilio I

    2018-05-03

    We studied the effect of human serum albumin protein capped spherical nanosilver on the nanoparticle stability upon peroxyl radical oxidation. The nanoparticle-protein composite is less prone to oxidation compared to the individual components. However, higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide were formed in the nanoparticle-protein system.

  6. Energy and environmental implications of novel protein production systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwardson, W; Lewis, C W; Slesser, M

    1981-04-01

    The energy requirements of many novel protein production systems are compared with an examination of the relevant environmental implications of these systems. The prospects for single cell protein, leaf protein, fish farming, fish protein concentrate, algal cultivation, and hydroponic plant growth systems are investigated. Single cell protein from carbohydrate substrates, algal protein, and fish protein seem to hold much promise, as they are technologically feasible for near-term implementation and do not require major energy inputs. (2 diagrams, 1 graph, 47 references, 6 tables)

  7. Protein oxidation in plant mitochondria as a stress indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, I.M.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2004-01-01

    oxidation of cysteine and methionine side chains is an important mechanism for regulating enzyme activity. Mitochondria from both mammalian and plant tissues contain a number of oxidised proteins, but the relative abundance of these post-translationally modified forms is as yet unknown......, as are the consequences of the modification for the properties and turnover time of the proteins. Specific proteins appear to be particularly vulnerable to oxidative carbonylation in the matrix of plant mitochondria; these include several enzymes of the Krebs cycle, glycine decarboxylase, superoxide dismutase and heat...... shock proteins. Plant mitochondria contain a number of different proteases, but their role in removing oxidatively damaged proteins is, as yet, unclear....

  8. Protein carbonylation and metal-catalyzed protein oxidation in a cellular perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rao, R S P

    2011-01-01

    Proteins can become oxidatively modified in many different ways, either by direct oxidation of amino acid side chains and protein backbone or indirectly by conjugation with oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates. While reversible oxidative modifications are thought...... to be relevant in physiological processes, irreversible oxidative modifications are known to contribute to cellular damage and disease. The most well-studied irreversible protein oxidation is carbonylation. In this work we first examine how protein carbonylation occurs via metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) in vivo...... and in vitro with an emphasis on cellular metal ion homeostasis and metal binding. We then review proteomic methods currently used for identifying carbonylated proteins and their sites of modification. Finally, we discuss the identified carbonylated proteins and the pattern of carbonylation sites in relation...

  9. [Characteristics of proteins synthesized by hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volova, T G; Barashkov, V A

    2010-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the biological value of proteins synthesized by hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms--the hydrogen bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus Z1 and Ralstonia eutropha B5786 and the CO-resistant strain of carboxydobacterium Seliberia carboxydohydrogena Z1062. Based on a number of significant parameters characterizing the biological value of a product, the proteins of hydrogen-oxidizing microorganisms have been found to occupy an intermediate position between traditional animal and plant proteins. The high total protein in biomass of these microorganisms, their complete amino acid content, and availability to proteolytic enzymes allow for us to consider these microorganisms as potential protein producers.

  10. A Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling Protein in Oxidative Stress Tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ow, David W.; Song, Wen

    2003-03-26

    Plants for effective extraction of toxic metals and radionuclides must tolerate oxidative stress. To identify genes that enhance oxidative stress tolerance, an S. pombe cDNA expression plasmid library was screened for the ability to yield hypertolerant colonies. Here, we report on the properties of one gene that confers hypertolerance to cadmium and oxidizing chemicals. This gene appears to be conserved in other organisms as homologous genes are found in human, mouse, fruitfly and Arabidopsis. The fruitfly and Arabidopsis genes likewise enhance oxidative stress tolerance in fission yeast. During oxidative stress, the amount of mRNA does not change, but protein fusions to GFP relocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The same pattern is observed with the Arabidopsis homologue-GFP fusion protein. This behavior suggests a signaling role in oxidative stress tolerance and these conserved proteins may be targets for engineering stress tolerant plants for phytoremediation.

  11. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  12. Implications of protein polymorphism on protein phase behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, J.; Schoot, van der P.P.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The phase behaviour of small globular proteins is often modeled by approximating them as spherical particles with fixed internal structure. However, changes in the local environment of a protein can lead to changes in its conformation rendering this approximation invalid. We present a simple

  13. Enhancement of nitrite on heme-induced oxidative reactions: A potential toxicological implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Naihao; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Jingjie; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Evidence to support the role of heme as major inducers of oxidative damage is increasingly present. Nitrite (NO(2)(-)) is one of the major end products of NO metabolism. Although the biological significance of heme/NO(2)(-)-mediated protein tyrosine nitration is a subject of great interest, the important roles of NO(2)(-) on heme-dependent redox reaction have been greatly underestimated. In this study, we investigated the influence of NO(2)(-) on heme -dependent oxidative reactions. It was found that NO(2)(-) had the capacity to act as a reducing agent to remove high oxidation states of heme iron. In the reduction of ferryl heme to ferric heme, NO(2)(-) was oxidized to a nitrating agent NO(2), and subsequently, tyrosine residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were nitrated. However, the presence of NO(2)(-) surprisingly exerted pro-oxidant effect on heme-H(2)O(2)-induced formation of BSA carbonyls at lower concentrations and enhanced the loss of HepG2 cell viability dose-dependently, which was probably due to the ability of this inorganic compound to efficiently enhance the peroxidase activity and oxidative degradation of heme. These data provide novel evidence that the dietary intake and experimental use of NO(2)(-) in vivo and in vitro would possess the pro-oxidant activity through interfering in heme-dependent oxidative reactions. Besides the classic role in protein tyrosine nitration, the deleterious effects on heme redox reactions may provide new insights into the toxicological implications of NO(2)(-) with cellular heme proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Triage of oxidation-prone proteins by Sqstm1/p62 within the mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minjung [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine and Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon-Si, Kyonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jaekyoon, E-mail: jkshin@med.skku.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine and Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Suwon-Si, Kyonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} The mitochondrion contains its own protein quality control system. {yields} p62 localizes within the mitochondria and forms mega-dalton sized complexes. {yields} p62 interacts with oxidation-prone proteins and the proteins of quality control. {yields} In vitro delivery of p62 improves mitochondrial functions. {yields} p62 is implicated as a participant in mitochondrial protein quality control. -- Abstract: As the mitochondrion is vulnerable to oxidative stress, cells have evolved several strategies to maintain mitochondrial integrity, including mitochondrial protein quality control mechanisms and autophagic removal of damaged mitochondria. Involvement of an autophagy adaptor, Sqstm1/p62, in the latter process has been recently described. In the present study, we provide evidence that a portion of p62 directly localizes within the mitochondria and supports stable electron transport by forming heterogeneous protein complexes. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) of mitochondrial proteins co-purified with p62 revealed that p62 interacts with several oxidation-prone proteins, including a few components of the electron transport chain complexes, as well as multiple chaperone molecules and redox regulatory enzymes. Accordingly, p62-deficient mitochondria exhibited compromised electron transport, and the compromised function was partially restored by in vitro delivery of p62. These results suggest that p62 plays an additional role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity at the vicinity of target machineries through its function in relation to protein quality control.

  15. Protein stress and stress proteins: implications in aging and disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-04-02

    Apr 2, 2007 ... (iii) modulating protein activity via stabilization and/or maturation to ... Resistance to any physical stress is correlated with longevity in many, if not all .... range of pathologies including cancer, diabetes, immune- problems and ...

  16. Photo-oxidation of proteins and its role in cataractogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Truscott, R J

    2001-01-01

    by the protein, or bound chromophore groups, thereby generating excited states (singlet or triplets) or radicals via photo-ionisation. The second major process involves indirect oxidation of the protein via the formation and subsequent reactions of singlet oxygen generated by the transfer of energy to ground...... state (triplet) molecular oxygen by either protein-bound, or other, chromophores. The basic principles behind these mechanisms of photo-oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins and the potential selectivity of damage are discussed. Emphasis is placed primarily on the intermediates...

  17. Structural basis of protein oxidation resistance: a lysozyme study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Girod

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistance to oxidative damage of six different parts of native and misfolded lysozyme by a targeted tandem/mass spectrometry approach of its tryptic fragments. The decay of the amount of each lysozyme fragment with increasing radiation dose is found to be a two steps process, characterized by a double exponential evolution of their amounts: the first one can be largely attributed to oxidation of specific amino acids, while the second one corresponds to further degradation of the protein. By correlating these results to the structural parameters computed from molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we find the protein parts with increased root-mean-square deviation (RMSD to be more susceptible to modifications. In addition, involvement of amino acid side-chains in hydrogen bonds has a protective effect against oxidation Increased exposure to solvent of individual amino acid side chains correlates with high susceptibility to oxidative and other modifications like side chain fragmentation. Generally, while none of the structural parameters alone can account for the fate of peptides during radiation, together they provide an insight into the relationship between protein structure and susceptibility to oxidation.

  18. Biochemistry and pathology of radical-mediated protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, R T; Fu, S; Stocker, R

    1997-01-01

    Radical-mediated damage to proteins may be initiated by electron leakage, metal-ion-dependent reactions and autoxidation of lipids and sugars. The consequent protein oxidation is O2-dependent, and involves several propagating radicals, notably alkoxyl radicals. Its products include several catego...

  19. Protein oxidation and degradation caused by particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Huang; Lee, Chun-Nin; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Yang, You-Lan; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Wu, Sheng-Ming; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2016-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) modulates the expression of autophagy; however, the role of selective autophagy by PM remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying mechanisms in protein oxidation and degradation caused by PM. Human epithelial A549 cells were exposed to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), urban dust (UD), and carbon black (CB; control particles). Cell survival and proliferation were significantly reduced by DEPs and UD in A549 cells. First, benzo(a)pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE) protein adduct was caused by DEPs at 150 μg/ml. Methionine oxidation (MetO) of human albumin proteins was induced by DEPs, UD, and CB; however, the protein repair mechanism that converts MetO back to methionine by methionine sulfoxide reductases A (MSRA) and B3 (MSRB3) was activated by DEPs and inhibited by UD, suggesting that oxidized protein was accumulating in cells. As to the degradation of oxidized proteins, proteasome and autophagy activation was induced by CB with ubiquitin accumulation, whereas proteasome and autophagy activation was induced by DEPs without ubiquitin accumulation. The results suggest that CB-induced protein degradation may be via an ubiquitin-dependent autophagy pathway, whereas DEP-induced protein degradation may be via an ubiquitin-independent autophagy pathway. A distinct proteotoxic effect may depend on the physicochemistry of PM.

  20. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of amino acids, peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Activated phagocytes generate the potent oxidant hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is known to react with a number of biological targets including proteins, DNA, lipids and cholesterol. Proteins are likely to be major targets for reactio...

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Facilitate Oxidation of Cysteine Residues of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Atsushi; Kameda, Tomoshi; Wada, Momoyo; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2017-10-19

    The adsorption of proteins onto nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) governs the early stages of nanoparticle uptake into biological systems. Previous studies regarding these adsorption processes have primarily focused on the physical interactions between proteins and nanoparticles. In this study, using reduced lysozyme and intact human serum albumin in aqueous solutions, we demonstrated that CNTs interact chemically with proteins. The CNTs induce the oxidation of cysteine residues of the proteins, which is accounted for by charge transfer from the sulfhydryl groups of the cysteine residues to the CNTs. The redox reaction simultaneously suppresses the intermolecular association of proteins via disulfide bonds. These results suggest that CNTs can affect the folding and oxidation degree of proteins in biological systems such as blood and cytosol.

  2. Antioxidant capacity and protein oxidation in cerebrospinal fluid of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, G; Piazza, S; Carlesi, C; Del Corona, A; Franzini, M; Pompella, A; Malvaldi, G; Mancuso, M; Paolicchi, A; Murri, L

    2007-05-01

    The causes of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. A bulk of evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction can be implicated in ALS pathogenesis. METHODS =: We assessed, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in plasma of 49 ALS patients and 8 controls, the amount of oxidized proteins (AOPP, advanced oxidation protein products), the total antioxidant capacity (FRA, the ferric reducing ability), and, in CSF, two oxidation products, the 4-hydroxynonenal and the sum of nitrites plus nitrates. The FRA was decreased (p = 0.003) in CSF, and AOPP were increased in both CSF (p = 0.0039) and plasma (p = 0.001) of ALS patients. The content of AOPP was differently represented in CSF of ALS clinical subsets, resulting in increase in the common and pseudopolyneuropathic forms (p < 0.001) and nearly undetectable in the bulbar form, as in controls. The sum of nitrites plus nitrates and 4-hydroxynonenal were unchanged in ALS patients compared with controls. Our results, while confirming the occurrence of oxidative stress in ALS, indicate how its effects can be stratified and therefore implicated differently in the pathogenesis of different clinical forms of ALS.

  3. Oxidative stress and pathology in muscular dystrophies: focus on protein thiol oxidation and dysferlinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jessica R; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Lemckert, Frances A; Arthur, Peter G; Grounds, Miranda D

    2013-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise more than 30 clinical disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for pathogenesis generally remains unknown. It is considered that disturbed levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the pathology of many muscular dystrophies. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress may cause cellular damage by directly and irreversibly damaging macromolecules such as proteins, membrane lipids and DNA; another major cellular consequence of reactive oxygen species is the reversible modification of protein thiol side chains that may affect many aspects of molecular function. Irreversible oxidative damage of protein and lipids has been widely studied in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and we have recently identified increased protein thiol oxidation in dystrophic muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This review evaluates the role of elevated oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other forms of muscular dystrophies, and presents new data that show significantly increased protein thiol oxidation and high levels of lipofuscin (a measure of cumulative oxidative damage) in dysferlin-deficient muscles of A/J mice at various ages. The significance of this elevated oxidative stress and high levels of reversible thiol oxidation, but minimal myofibre necrosis, is discussed in the context of the disease mechanism for dysferlinopathies, and compared with the situation for dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  4. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Zhou J; Mortimer, Gysell; Minchin, Rodney F; Schiller, Tara; Musumeci, Anthony; Martin, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO 2 , the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO 2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  5. A SIMPLE FLUORESCENT LABELING METHOD FOR STUDIES OF PROTEIN OXIDATION, PROTEIN MODIFICATION, AND PROTEOLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Andrew. M.; Davies, Kelvin. J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are sensitive to oxidation, and oxidized proteins are excellent substrates for degradation by proteolytic enzymes such as the Proteasome and the mitochondrial Lon protease. Protein labeling is required for studies of protein turnover. Unfortunately, most labeling techniques involve 3H or 14C methylation which is expensive, exposes researchers to radioactivity, generates large amounts of radioactive waste, and allows only single-point assays because samples require acid-precipitation. Alternative labeling methods, have largely proven unsuitable, either because the probe itself is modified by the oxidant(s) being studied, or because the alternative labeling techniques are too complex or too costly for routine use. What is needed is a simple, quick, and cheap labeling technique that uses a non-radioactive marker, that binds strongly to proteins, is resistant to oxidative modification, and emits a strong signal. We have devised a new reductive method for labeling free carboxyl groups of proteins with the small fluorophore 7-amino-4-methycoumarin (AMC). When bound to target proteins, AMC fluoresces very weakly but when AMC is released by proteinases, proteases, or peptidases, it fluoresces strongly. Thus, without acid-precipitation, the proteolysis of any target protein can be studied continuously, in multiwell plates. In direct comparisons, 3H-labeled proteins and AMC-labeled proteins exhibited essentially identical degradation patterns during incubation with trypsin, cell extracts, and purified proteasome. AMC-labeled proteins are well-suited to study increased proteolytic susceptibility following protein modification, since the AMC-protein bond is resistant to oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite, and is stable over time and to extremes of pH, temperature (even boiling), freeze-thawing, mercaptoethanol, and methanol. PMID:21988844

  6. Singlet oxygen-mediated protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, Adam; Bubb, William A; Hawkins, Clare Louise

    2002-01-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is generated by a number of enzymes as well as by UV or visible light in the presence of a sensitizer and has been proposed as a damaging agent in a number of pathologies including cataract, sunburn, and skin cancers. Proteins, and Cys, Met, Trp, Tyr and His side chains...... in particular, are major targets for 1O2 as a result of their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. In this study it is shown that long-lived peroxides are formed on free Tyr, Tyr residues in peptides and proteins, and model compounds on exposure to 1O2 generated by both photochemical and chemical....... These studies demonstrate that long-lived Tyr-derived peroxides are formed on proteins exposed to 1O2 and that these may promote damage to other targets via further radical generation....

  7. Implication of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Pilar; Ramiro-Cortijo, David; Reyes-Hernández, Cynthia G.; López de Pablo, Angel L.; González, M. Carmen; Arribas, Silvia M.

    2018-01-01

    Lifestyle and genetic background are well known risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A third contributing factor is suboptimal fetal development, due to nutrient or oxygen deprivation, placental insufficiency, or exposure to toxic substances. The fetus adapts to adverse intrauterine conditions to ensure survival; the immediate consequence is low birth weight (LBW) and the long-term effect is an increased susceptibility to develop CVD in adult life. This process is known as Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) or fetal programming of CVD. The influence of fetal life for the future cardiovascular health of the individual has been evidenced by numerous epidemiologic studies in populations suffering from starvation during intrauterine life. Furthermore, experimental animal models have provided support and enabled exploring the underlying mechanisms. Oxidative stress seems to play a central role in fetal programming of CVD, both in the response of the feto-placental unit to the suboptimal intrauterine environment and in the alterations of physiologic systems of cardiovascular control, ultimately leading to disease. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on the alterations in oxidative balance in response to fetal stress factors covering two aspects. Firstly, the evidence from human studies of the implication of oxidative stress in LBW induced by suboptimal conditions during intrauterine life, emphasizing the role of the placenta. In the second part we summarize data on specific redox alterations in key cardiovascular control organs induced by exposure to known stress factors in experimental animals and discuss the emerging role of the mitochondria. PMID:29875698

  8. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of proteins in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Activated phagocyte cells generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of H2O2 and the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Plasma proteins are major targets for HOCl, although little information is available about the mechanism(s) of oxidation. In this study the reaction of HOCl (at least 50 microM) with dil......Activated phagocyte cells generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of H2O2 and the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Plasma proteins are major targets for HOCl, although little information is available about the mechanism(s) of oxidation. In this study the reaction of HOCl (at least 50 micro......M) with diluted fresh human plasma has been shown to generate material that oxidizes 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid; these oxidants are believed to be chloramines formed from the reaction of HOCl with protein amine groups. Chloramines have also been detected with isolated plasma proteins treated with HOCl. In both...... more efficient. The reaction of fresh diluted plasma with HOCl also gives rise to protein-derived nitrogen-centred radicals in a time- and HOCl-concentration-dependent manner; these have been detected by EPR spin trapping. Identical radicals have been detected with isolated HOCl-treated plasma proteins...

  9. Fluorescent proteins such as eGFP lead to catalytic oxidative stress in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganini, Douglas; Leinisch, Fabian; Kumar, Ashutosh; Jiang, JinJie; Tokar, Erik J; Malone, Christine C; Petrovich, Robert M; Mason, Ronald P

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent proteins are an important tool that has become omnipresent in life sciences research. They are frequently used for localization of proteins and monitoring of cells [1,2]. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was the first and has been the most used fluorescent protein. Enhanced GFP (eGFP) was optimized from wild-type GFP for increased fluorescence yield and improved expression in mammalian systems [3]. Many GFP-like fluorescent proteins have been discovered, optimized or created, such as the red fluorescent protein TagRFP [4]. Fluorescent proteins are expressed colorless and immature and, for eGFP, the conversion to the fluorescent form, mature, is known to produce one equivalent of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) per molecule of chromophore [5,6]. Even though it has been proposed that this process is non-catalytic and generates nontoxic levels of H 2 O 2 [6], this study investigates the role of fluorescent proteins in generating free radicals and inducing oxidative stress in biological systems. Immature eGFP and TagRFP catalytically generate the free radical superoxide anion (O 2 •- ) and H 2 O 2 in the presence of NADH. Generation of the free radical O 2 •- and H 2 O 2 by eGFP in the presence of NADH affects the gene expression of cells. Many biological pathways are altered, such as a decrease in HIF1α stabilization and activity. The biological pathways altered by eGFP are known to be implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases associated with oxidative stress; therefore, it is critical that such experiments using fluorescent proteins are validated with alternative methodologies and the results are carefully interpreted. Since cells inevitably experience oxidative stress when fluorescent proteins are expressed, the use of this tool for cell labeling and in vivo cell tracing also requires validation using alternative methodologies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Analysis and Chemistry of Novel Protein Oxidation Markers in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Christian; Liehr, Kristin; Girndt, Matthias; Ulrich, Christof; Glomb, Marcus A

    2018-05-09

    Proteins continually undergo spontaneous oxidation reactions, which lead to changes in structure and function. The quantitative assessment of protein oxidation adducts provides information on the level of exposure to reactive precursor compounds with a high oxidizing potential and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present work, we introduce N 6 -(2-hydroxyethyl)lysine as a novel marker based on the ratio of glycolaldehyde and its oxidized form glyoxal. The high analytical potential was proven with a first set of patients undergoing hemodialysis versus healthy controls, in comparison with well-established parameters for oxidative stress. In vitro experiments with N 1 - t-BOC-lysine and N 1 - t-BOC-arginine enlightened the mechanistic relationship of glycolaldehyde and glyoxal. Oxidation was strongly dependent on the catalytic action of the ε-amino moiety of lysine. Investigations on the formation of N 6 -carboxymethyl lysine revealed glycolaldehyde-imine as the more reactive precursor, even though an additional oxidative step is required. As a result, a novel and very effective alternative mechanism was unraveled.

  11. Deposition of heated whey proteins on a chromium oxide surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, Th.; Verheul, M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Kruif, de C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Whey protein solutions were given different heat treatments after which their deposition on a chromium oxide surface (the outer layer of stainless steel) was measured by reflectometry. The deposition was studied under controlled flow conditions by using a stagnation point flow configuration. The

  12. Multiple pathogenic proteins implicated in neuronopathic Gaucher disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, You-hai; Xu, Kui; Sun, Ying; Liou, Benjamin; Quinn, Brian; Li, Rong-hua; Xue, Ling; Zhang, Wujuan; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Witte, David; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2014-08-01

    Gaucher disease, a prevalent lysosomal storage disease (LSD), is caused by insufficient activity of acid β-glucosidase (GCase) and the resultant glucosylceramide (GC)/glucosylsphingosine (GS) accumulation in visceral organs (Type 1) and the central nervous system (Types 2 and 3). Recent clinical and genetic studies implicate a pathogenic link between Gaucher and neurodegenerative diseases. The aggregation and inclusion bodies of α-synuclein with ubiquitin are present in the brains of Gaucher disease patients and mouse models. Indirect evidence of β-amyloid pathology promoting α-synuclein fibrillation supports these pathogenic proteins as a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, multiple proteins are implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic neuronopathic Gaucher disease (nGD). Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses showed significant amounts of β-amyloid and amyloid precursor protein (APP) aggregates in the cortex, hippocampus, stratum and substantia nigra of the nGD mice. APP aggregates were in neuronal cells and colocalized with α-synuclein signals. A majority of APP co-localized with the mitochondrial markers TOM40 and Cox IV; a small portion co-localized with the autophagy proteins, P62/LC3, and the lysosomal marker, LAMP1. In cultured wild-type brain cortical neural cells, the GCase-irreversible inhibitor, conduritol B epoxide (CBE), reproduced the APP/α-synuclein aggregation and the accumulation of GC/GS. Ultrastructural studies showed numerous larger-sized and electron-dense mitochondria in nGD cerebral cortical neural cells. Significant reductions of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate production and oxygen consumption (28-40%) were detected in nGD brains and in CBE-treated neural cells. These studies implicate defective GCase function and GC/GS accumulation as risk factors for mitochondrial dysfunction and the multi-proteinopathies (α-synuclein-, APP- and Aβ-aggregates) in nGD. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University

  13. Conservation of Oxidative Protein Stabilization in an Insect Homologue of Parkinsonism-Associated Protein DJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiusheng; Prahlad, Janani; Wilson, Mark A. (UNL)

    2012-08-21

    DJ-1 is a conserved, disease-associated protein that protects against oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in multiple organisms. Human DJ-1 contains a functionally essential cysteine residue (Cys106) whose oxidation is important for regulating protein function by an unknown mechanism. This residue is well-conserved in other DJ-1 homologues, including two (DJ-1{alpha} and DJ-1{beta}) in Drosophila melanogaster. Because D. melanogaster is a powerful model system for studying DJ-1 function, we have determined the crystal structure and impact of cysteine oxidation on Drosophila DJ-1{beta}. The structure of D. melanogaster DJ-1{beta} is similar to that of human DJ-1, although two important residues in the human protein, Met26 and His126, are not conserved in DJ-1{beta}. His126 in human DJ-1 is substituted with a tyrosine in DJ-1{beta}, and this residue is not able to compose a putative catalytic dyad with Cys106 that was proposed to be important in the human protein. The reactive cysteine in DJ-1 is oxidized readily to the cysteine-sulfinic acid in both flies and humans, and this may regulate the cytoprotective function of the protein. We show that the oxidation of this conserved cysteine residue to its sulfinate form (Cys-SO{sub 2{sup -}}) results in considerable thermal stabilization of both Drosophila DJ-1{beta} and human DJ-1. Therefore, protein stabilization is one potential mechanism by which cysteine oxidation may regulate DJ-1 function in vivo. More generally, most close DJ-1 homologues are likely stabilized by cysteine-sulfinic acid formation but destabilized by further oxidation, suggesting that they are biphasically regulated by oxidative modification.

  14. Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and Carbonylated Proteins as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Selected Atherosclerosis-Mediated Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna Gryszczyńska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The main question of this study was to evaluate the intensity of oxidative protein modification shown as advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP and carbonylated proteins, expressed as protein carbonyl content (C=O in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA, aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Design and Methods. The study was carried out in a group of 35 AAA patients and 13 AIOD patients. However, CKD patients were divided into two groups: predialysis (PRE included 50 patients or hemodialysis (HD consisted of 34 patients. AOPP and C=O were measured using colorimetric assay kit, while C-reactive protein concentration was measured by high-sensitivity assay (hsCRP. Results. The concentration of AOPP in both AAA and AIOD groups was higher than in PRE and HD groups according to descending order: AAA~AIOD > HD > PRE. The content of C=O was higher in the PRE group in comparison to AIOD and AAA according to the descending order: PRE~HD > AAA~AIOD. Conclusions. AAA, AIOD, and CKD-related atherosclerosis (PRE and HD contribute to the changes in the formation of AOPP and C=O. They may promote modification of proteins in a different way, probably due to the various factors that influence oxidative stress here.

  15. Protein Thiols as an Indication of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Rezaei Chianeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thiol is an organic compound that contain sulphhydryl group that have a critical role in preventing any involvement of oxidative stress in the cell. These defensive functions are generally considered to be carried out by the low molecular weight thiol glutathione and by cysteine residues in the active sites of proteins such as thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin. In addition, there are thiols exposed on protein surfaces that are not directly involved with protein function, although they can interact with the intracellular environment.The process of protection of the cell against an oxidative damage occur by thiol and cystein residue that has a low molecular weight. These residue are present in the active sites of a protein like, peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin. Apart from intracellular antioxidant defense mechanism by protein thiol, there are presence of thiol in outer surface of protein that are not involved with the function of protein, even though they can interact with intracellular part of the cell. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 443-456

  16. Effect of oxidative stress on homer scaffolding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Nepliouev

    Full Text Available Homer proteins are a family of multifaceted scaffolding proteins that participate in the organization of signaling complexes at the post-synaptic density and in a variety of tissues including striated muscle. Homer isoforms form multimers via their C-terminal coiled coil domains, which allows for the formation of a polymeric network in combination with other scaffolding proteins. We hypothesized that the ability of Homer isoforms to serve as scaffolds would be influenced by oxidative stress. We have found by standard SDS-PAGE of lysates from adult mouse skeletal muscle exposed to air oxidation that Homer migrates as both a dimer and monomer in the absence of reducing agents and solely as a monomer in the presence of a reducing agent, suggesting that Homer dimers exposed to oxidation could be modified by the presence of an inter-molecular disulfide bond. Analysis of the peptide sequence of Homer 1b revealed the presence of only two cysteine residues located adjacent to the C-terminal coiled-coil domain. HEK 293 cells were transfected with wild-type and cysteine mutant forms of Homer 1b and exposed to oxidative stress by addition of menadione, which resulted in the formation of disulfide bonds except in the double mutant (C246G, C365G. Exposure of myofibers from adult mice to oxidative stress resulted in decreased solubility of endogenous Homer isoforms. This change in solubility was dependent on disulfide bond formation. In vitro binding assays revealed that cross-linking of Homer dimers enhanced the ability of Homer 1b to bind Drebrin, a known interacting partner. Our results show that oxidative stress results in disulfide cross-linking of Homer isoforms and loss of solubility of Homer scaffolds. This suggests that disulfide cross-linking of a Homer polymeric network may contribute to the pathophysiology seen in neurodegenerative diseases and myopathies characterized by oxidative stress.

  17. Influence of early postmortem protein oxidation on beef quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, L J; Maddock, K R; Lonergan, S M; Huff-Lonergan, E

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of early postmortem protein oxidation on the color and tenderness of beef steaks. To obtain a range of oxidation levels, the longissimus lumborum muscles (LM) from both strip loins of 20 steers fed either a finishing diet with vitamin E (1,000 IU per steer daily, minimum of 126 d [VITE]; n = 10 steers) or fed the same finishing diet without vitamin E (CON; n = 10 steers) were used. Within 24 h after slaughter, the LM muscle from each carcass was cut into 2.54-cm-thick steaks and individually vacuum packaged. Steaks from each steer were assigned to a nonirradiated group or an irradiated group. Steaks were irradiated within 26 h postmortem, and were aged at 4 degrees C for 0, 1, 3, 7, and 14 d after irradiation. Steaks from each diet/irradiation/aging time treatment were used to determine color, shear force, and degree of protein oxidation (carbonyl content). Steaks from steers fed the VITE diet had higher (P irradiation, steaks that had been irradiated had lower (P Irradiated steaks, regardless of diet, had lower a* (P irradiated steaks compared to nonirradiated steaks at 0, 1, 3, and 7 d postirradiation. Immunoblot analysis showed that vitamin E supplementation decreased the number and extent of oxidized sarcoplasmic proteins. Protein carbonyl content was positively correlated with Warner-Bratzler shear force values. These results indicate that increased oxidation of muscle proteins early postmortem could have negative effects on fresh meat color and tenderness.

  18. Oxidized tissue proteins after intestinal reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schanaider Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyse if the carbonyl proteins measurement could be validated as a method that allows the identification of an intestinal oxidative stress after ischemia and reperfusion injury. METHODS: Twenty-five male Wistar rats (n =21 weighting 200 to 250g were divided into three groups. Group I - control (n = 10. Group II - sham (n = 5 and Group III (n = 10 subjected to 60 minutes of intestinal ischemia and equal period of reperfusion. For this purpose it was clamped the superior mesenteric artery in its distal third. Histological changes and carbonyl protein levels were determined in the samples of all groups. In group III, samples of both normal and reperfused ileal segment were studied. RESULTS: All the reperfused segments showed mucosal and submucosal swelling and inflammatory infiltrate of the lamina propria. Levels of carbonyl protein rose in group III, including in the non-ischemic segments. The sensitivity and specificity of the carbonyl protein tissue levels were respectively 94% and 88%. CONCLUSION: The carbonyl protein method is a useful biologic marker of oxidative stress after the phenomenon of intestinal ischemia and reperfusion in rats. It was also noteworthy that the effects of oxidative stress could be seen far from the locus of the primary injury.

  19. Oxidation-reduction reactions. Overview and implications for repository studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, Michael J.; Arthur, Randolph C.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikazu; Iwatsuki, Teruki

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a survey and review on oxidation-reduction ('redox') reactions, with particular emphasis on implications for disposal of high-level waste (HLW) in deep geological formations. As an overview, the focus is on basic principles, problems, and proposed research related specifically to the assessment of redox for a HLW repository in Japan. For a more comprehensive treatment of redox and the myriad associated issues, the reader is directed to the cited textbooks used as primary references in this report. Low redox conditions in deep geological formations is a key assumption in the 'Second Progress Report on Research and Development for the Geological Disposal of HLW in Japan' (hereafter called H12'). The release behavior of multi-valent radioelements (e.g., Tc, Se, U, Pu, Np), as well as daughter radioelements of these radioelements, from a deep geological repository are sensitively related to redox conditions. Furthermore, the performance of certain barrier materials, such as overpack and buffer, may be impacted by redox conditions. Given this importance, this report summarizes some key topics for future technical studies supporting site characterization and repository performance as follows: To fully test the conceptual models for system Eh, it will be necessary to measure and evaluate trace element and isotopic information of both coexisting groundwater and reactive minerals of candidate rocks. Because of importance of volatile species (e.g., O 2 , H 2 etc.) in redox reactions, and given the high total pressure of a repository located 500 to 1000 meter deep, laboratory investigations of redox will necessarily require use of pressurized test devices that can fully simulate repository conditions. The stability (redox capacity) of the repository system with respect to potential changes in redox boundary condition induced by oxidizing waters intrusion should be established experimentally. An overall conceptual model that unifies

  20. Imbalance of heterologous protein folding and disulfide bond formation rates yields runaway oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyo Keith EJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein secretory pathway must process a wide assortment of native proteins for eukaryotic cells to function. As well, recombinant protein secretion is used extensively to produce many biologics and industrial enzymes. Therefore, secretory pathway dysfunction can be highly detrimental to the cell and can drastically inhibit product titers in biochemical production. Because the secretory pathway is a highly-integrated, multi-organelle system, dysfunction can happen at many levels and dissecting the root cause can be challenging. In this study, we apply a systems biology approach to analyze secretory pathway dysfunctions resulting from heterologous production of a small protein (insulin precursor or a larger protein (α-amylase. Results HAC1-dependent and independent dysfunctions and cellular responses were apparent across multiple datasets. In particular, processes involving (a degradation of protein/recycling amino acids, (b overall transcription/translation repression, and (c oxidative stress were broadly associated with secretory stress. Conclusions Apparent runaway oxidative stress due to radical production observed here and elsewhere can be explained by a futile cycle of disulfide formation and breaking that consumes reduced glutathione and produces reactive oxygen species. The futile cycle is dominating when protein folding rates are low relative to disulfide bond formation rates. While not strictly conclusive with the present data, this insight does provide a molecular interpretation to an, until now, largely empirical understanding of optimizing heterologous protein secretion. This molecular insight has direct implications on engineering a broad range of recombinant proteins for secretion and provides potential hypotheses for the root causes of several secretory-associated diseases.

  1. Copper-mediated oxidative degradation of catecholamines and oxidative damage of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, P.R.; Harria, M.I.N.; Felix, J.M.; Hoffmann, M.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Degradative oxidation of catecholamines has been a matter of large interest in recent years due to the evidences associating their autoxidation with the etiology of neurotoxic and cardiotoxic processes. In this work we present data on the degradative oxidation of catecholamines of physiological importance: isoproterenol (IP), epinephrine (EP), norepinephrine (NEP), deoxyepinephrine (DEP) and dopamine (DA). The degradative oxidation of the catecholamines was followed by measurement of spectral changes and oxygen consumption by neutral aqueous solutions. The data show that Cu{sup 2+} strongly accelerated the rate of catecholamine oxidation, following the decreasing order; EP>DEP>IP>NEP>DA. The production of superoxide anion radical during catecholamine oxidation was very slow, even in the presence of Cu{sup 2+}. The ability of IP to induce damages on bovine serum albumin (BSA) was determined by measuring the formation of carbonyl-groups in the protein, detected by reduction with tritiated Na BH{sub 4}. The incubation of BSA with IP (50-500{mu}M), in the presence of 100{mu}M Cu{sup 2+} leaded to an increased and dose dependent {sup 3} H-incorporation by the oxidized protein. The production of oxidative damage by IP/Cu{sup 2+} was accompanied by marked BSA fragmentation, detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel dependent (25-400{mu}M IP) des appearance of the original BSA band and appearance of smaller fragments spread in the gel, when incubation has been done in the presence of 100{mu}M Cu{sup 2+}. These results suggest that copper-catalysed oxidative degradation of proteins induced by catecholamines might be critically involved in the toxic action of these molecules

  2. NITRIC OXIDE IMPLICATION IN THE CONTROL OF SEED DORMANCY AND GERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwann eArc

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Germination ability is regulated by a combination of environmental and endogenous signals with both synergistic and antagonistic effects. Nitric oxide (NO is a potent dormancy-releasing agent in many species, including Arabidopsis, and has been suggested to behave as an endogenous regulator of this physiological blockage. Distinct reports have also highlighted a positive impact of NO on seed germination under sub-optimal conditions. However, its molecular mode of action in the context of seed biology remains poorly documented. This review aims to focus on the implications of this radical in the control of seed dormancy and germination. The consequences of NO chemistry on the investigations on both its signaling and its targets in seeds are discussed. NO-dependant protein post-translational modifications are proposed as a key mechanism underlying NO signalling during early seed germination.

  3. Oxidatively Modified Proteins in the Serous Subtype of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifeh Mehrabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serous subtype of ovarian cancer is considered to originate from fallopian epithelium mucosa that has been exposed to physiological changes resulting from ovulation. Ovulation influences an increased in inflammation of epithelial ovarian cells as results of constant exposure of cells to ROS. The imbalance between ROS and antioxidant capacities, as well as a disruption of redox signaling, causes a wide range of damage to DNA, proteins, and lipids. This study applied spectrophotometric, dinitrophenylhydrazone (DNPH assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and Western blot analyses to assess the levels of oxidatively modified proteins in 100 primary serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma and normal/surrounding tissues. These samples were obtained from 56 Caucasian and 44 African-American patients within the age range of 61±10 years. Analyses showed that the levels of reactive protein carbonyl groups increased as stages progressed to malignancy. Additionally, the levels of protein carbonyls in serous ovarian carcinoma among African Americans are 40% (P<0.05 higher relative to Caucasian at similar advanced stages. Results suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the modification of carbonyl protein groups, leading to increased aggressiveness of epithelial ovarian tumors and may contribute to the disease's invasiveness among African Americans.

  4. Myofibrillar protein oxidation affects filament charges, aggregation and water-holding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, Yulong; Boeren, Sjef; Ertbjerg, Per

    2018-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HClO) is a strong oxidant that is able to mediate protein oxidation. In order to study the effect of oxidation on charges, aggregation and water-holding of myofibrillar proteins, extracted myofibrils were oxidized by incubation with different concentrations of HClO (0, 1, 5,

  5. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  6. Modification of aniline containing proteins using an oxidative coupling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Jacob M; Esser-Kahn, Aaron P; Francis, Matthew B

    2006-12-13

    A new bioconjugation reaction has been developed based on the chemoselective modification of anilines through an oxidative coupling pathway. Aryl amines were installed on the surface of protein substrates through lysine acylation reactions or through the use of native chemical ligation techniques. Upon exposure to NaIO4 in aqueous buffer, the anilines coupled rapidly to the aromatic rings of N,N-dialkyl-N'-acyl-p-phenylenediamines. The identities of the reaction products were confirmed using ESI-MS and through comparison to small molecule analogs. Control experiments indicated that none of the native amino acids participated in the reaction. The resulting bioconjugates were found to be stable toward hydrolysis from pH 4 to pH 11 and in the presence of many commonly used oxidants, reductants, and nucleophiles. A fluorescent phenylenediamine reagent was synthesized for the selective detection of aniline labeled proteins in mixtures, and the reaction was used to append the C-terminus of the green fluorescent protein with a single PEG chain. When combined with techniques for the incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins, this bioorthogonal coupling method should prove useful for a number of applications requiring a high degree of labeling specificity.

  7. Noncovalent binding of 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide to proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Osamu

    1979-01-01

    Binding of 4NQO to various kinds of enzymes or proteins was studied. Each one of proteins was mixed with 4NQO in 0.4 mM NaHCO 3 solution and eluted through Ultrogel AcA 22 column. Radioactivity of 14 C-labeled 4NQO found in protein fraction was measured. 4NQO bound hardly to polyglutamic acid and polyaspertic acid, somewhat to serum albumin, insulin, trypsin, RNA polymerase and DNA polymerase, and markedly to ureas which is an SH enzyme. Lactate dehydrogenase, one of SH enzymes, aggregated with 4NQO. The binding of SH enzyme with the N-oxide would be attributable to a noncovalent binding such as >N-O---H-S-, because 4NQO-urease binding yield markedly decreased in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate or cysteine, and also 4NQO-bound urease released 4NQO by the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate. (author)

  8. Noncovalent binding of 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide to proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, O [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1979-12-01

    Binding of 4NQO to various kinds of enzymes or proteins was studied. Each one of proteins was mixed with 4NQO in 0.4 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ solution and eluted through Ultrogel AcA 22 column. Radioactivity of /sup 14/C-labeled 4NQO found in protein fraction was measured. 4NQO bound hardly to polyglutamic acid and polyaspertic acid, somewhat to serum albumin, insulin, trypsin, RNA polymerase and DNA polymerase, and markedly to ureas which is an SH enzyme. Lactate dehydrogenase, one of SH enzymes, aggregated with 4NQO. The binding of SH enzyme with the N-oxide would be attributable to a noncovalent binding such as >N-O---H-S-, because 4NQO-urease binding yield markedly decreased in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate or cysteine, and also 4NQO-bound urease released 4NQO by the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate.

  9. Chemical modifications of therapeutic proteins induced by residual ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Louise; Sloey, Christopher; Zhang, Zhongqi; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Kim, Hyojin; Ren, Da; Kanapuram, Sekhar

    2015-02-01

    Ethylene oxide (EtO) is widely used in sterilization of drug product primary containers and medical devices. The impact of residual EtO on protein therapeutics is of significant interest in the biopharmaceutical industry. The potential for EtO to modify individual amino acids in proteins has been previously reported. However, specific identification of EtO adducts in proteins and the effect of residual EtO on the stability of therapeutic proteins has not been reported to date. This paper describes studies of residual EtO with two therapeutic proteins, a PEGylated form of the recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Peg-GCSF) and recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) formulated with human serum albumin (HSA). Peg-GCSF was filled in an EtO sterilized delivery device and incubated at accelerated stress conditions. Glu-C peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO reacted with Peg-GCSF and resulted in EtO modifications at two methionine residues (Met-127 and Met-138). In addition, tryptic peptide mapping and LC-MS analyses revealed residual EtO in plastic vials reacted with HSA in EPO formulation at Met-328 and Cys-34. This paper details the work conducted to understand the effects of residual EtO on the chemical stability of protein therapeutics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. [Effects of metal-catalyzed oxidation on the formation of advanced oxidation protein products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Peng, Ai; Zhu, Kai-Yuan; Yu, Hong; Ll, Xin-Hua; Li, Chang-Bin

    2008-03-11

    To explore the relationship between metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) and the formation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs). Specimens of human serum albumin (HSA) and pooled plasma were collected from 3 healthy volunteers and 4 uremia patients were divided into 3 groups: Group A incubated with copper sulfate solution of the concentrations of 0, 0.2, or 0.5 mmol/L, Group B, incubated with hydrogen peroxide 2 mmol/L, and Group C, incubated with copper sulfate 0.2 or 0.5 mmol/L plus hydrogen peroxide 2 mmol/L. 30 min and 24 h later the AOPP level was determined by ultraviolet visible spectrophotometry. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to observe the fragmentation effect on plasma proteins. Ninhydrin method was used to examine the protein fragments. The scavenging capacity of hydroxyl radical by macromolecules was measured so as to estimate the extent of damage for proteins induced by MCO. (1) The AOPP level of the HSA and plasma specimens of the uremia patients increased along with the increase of cupric ion concentration in a dose-dependent manner, especially in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (P < 0.05). (2) Aggregation of proteins was almost negligible in all groups, however, HPLC showed that cupric ion with or without hydrogen peroxide increased the fragments in the HAS specimens (with a relative molecular mass of 5000) and uremia patients' plasma proteins (with the molecular mass 7000). (3) The plasma AOPP level of the healthy volunteers was 68.2 micromol/L +/- 2.4 micromol/L, significantly lower than that of the uremia patients (158.5 micromol/L +/- 8.2 micromol/L). (4) The scavenging ability to clear hydroxyl radical by plasma proteins of the healthy volunteers was 1.38 -9.03 times as higher than that of the uremia patients. MCO contributes to the formation of AOPPs mainly through its fragmentation effect to proteins.

  11. Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Kasimova, Marina R.; Krab, Klaas

    2005-01-01

    Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria NAD(P)H has a central position in respiratory metabolism. It is produced by a large number of enzymes, e.g. the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, in the mitochondrial matrix and is oxidised by, amongst others, the respiratory chain. Most...... of this NAD(P)H appears to be bound to proteins, in fact free NAD(P)H – an important parameter in metabolic regulation - has never been observed in mitochondria. We have estimated free and bound NAD(P)H in isolated plant mitochondria under different metabolic conditions. The fluorescence spectra of free...... and bound NADH was determined and used to deconvolute fluorescence spectra of actively respiring mitochondria. Most of the mitochondrial NADH is bound in states 2 and 4. The amount of free NADH is lower but relatively constant even increasing a little in state 3 where it is about equal to bound NADH...

  12. Stable markers of oxidant damage to proteins and their application in the study of human disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Fu, S; Wang, H

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of formation and the nature of the altered amino acid side chains formed on proteins subjected to oxidant attack are reviewed. The use of stable products of protein side chain oxidation as potential markers for assessing oxidative damage in vivo in humans is discussed. The methods...... developed in the authors laboratories are outlined, and the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques compared with other methodologies for assessing oxidative damage to proteins and other macromolecules. Evidence is presented to show that protein oxidation products are sensitive markers of oxidative...... damage, that the pattern of products detected may yield information as to the nature of the original oxidative insult, and that the levels of oxidized side-chains can, in certain circumstances, be much higher than those of other markers of oxidation such as lipid hydroperoxides....

  13. Graphene oxide as a protein matrix: influence on protein biophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Cancel, Griselle; Suazo-Dávila, Dámaris; Ojeda-Cruzado, Axel J; García-Torres, Desiree; Cabrera, Carlos R; Griebenow, Kai

    2015-10-19

    This study provides fundamental information on the influence of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and glycans on protein catalytic activity, dynamics, and thermal stability. We provide evidence of protein stabilization by glycans and how this strategy could be implemented when GO nanosheets is used as protein immobilization matrix. A series of bioconjugates was constructed using two different strategies: adsorbing or covalently attaching native and glycosylated bilirubin oxidase (BOD) to GO. Bioconjugate formation was followed by FT-IR, zeta-potential, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Enzyme kinetic parameters (k(m) and k(cat)) revealed that the substrate binding affinity was not affected by glycosylation and immobilization on GO, but the rate of enzyme catalysis was reduced. Structural analysis by circular dichroism showed that glycosylation did not affect the tertiary or the secondary structure of BOD. However, GO produced slight changes in the secondary structure. To shed light into the biophysical consequence of protein glycosylation and protein immobilization on GO nanosheets, we studied structural protein dynamical changes by FT-IR H/D exchange and thermal inactivation. It was found that glycosylation caused a reduction in structural dynamics that resulted in an increase in thermostability and a decrease in the catalytic activity for both, glycoconjugate and immobilized enzyme. These results establish the usefulness of chemical glycosylation to modulate protein structural dynamics and stability to develop a more stable GO-protein matrix.

  14. Protein and lipid oxidation affect the viscoelasticity of whey protein layers at the oil-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berton-Carabin, Claire C.; Schroder, Anja; Rovalino-Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin; Sagis, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Protein and lipid oxidation are prevailing issues that negatively affect the nutritional and sensory quality of food emulsions. It is probable that such oxidative modifications affect the functional properties of proteins, and in particular their ability to form densely packed, interconnected

  15. Formoterol attenuates increased oxidative stress and myosin protein loss in respiratory and limb muscles of cancer cachectic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Salazar-Degracia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscle mass loss and wasting are characteristic features of patients with chronic conditions including cancer. Therapeutic options are still scarce. We hypothesized that cachexia-induced muscle oxidative stress may be attenuated in response to treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor-selective agonist formoterol in rats. In diaphragm and gastrocnemius of tumor-bearing rats (108 AH-130 Yoshida ascites hepatoma cells inoculated intraperitoneally with and without treatment with formoterol (0.3 mg/kg body weight/day for seven days, daily subcutaneous injection, redox balance (protein oxidation and nitration and antioxidants and muscle proteins (1-dimensional immunoblots, carbonylated proteins (2-dimensional immunoblots, inflammatory cells (immunohistochemistry, and mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC complex activities were explored. In the gastrocnemius, but not the diaphragm, of cancer cachectic rats compared to the controls, protein oxidation and nitration levels were increased, several functional and structural proteins were carbonylated, and in both study muscles, myosin content was reduced, inflammatory cell counts were greater, while no significant differences were seen in MRC complex activities (I, II, and IV. Treatment of cachectic rats with formoterol attenuated all the events in both respiratory and limb muscles. In this in vivo model of cancer-cachectic rats, the diaphragm is more resistant to oxidative stress. Formoterol treatment attenuated the rise in oxidative stress in the limb muscles, inflammatory cell infiltration, and the loss of myosin content seen in both study muscles, whereas no effects were observed in the MRC complex activities. These findings have therapeutic implications as they demonstrate beneficial effects of the beta2 agonist through decreased protein oxidation and inflammation in cachectic muscles, especially the gastrocnemius.

  16. Oxidative inactivation of the endogenous antioxidant protein DJ-1 by the food contaminants 3-MCPD and 2-MCPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrke, Thorsten; Voss, Linn; Briese, Anja; Stephanowitz, Heike; Krause, Eberhard; Braeuning, Albert; Lampen, Alfonso

    2018-01-01

    3-Chloro-1,2-propanediol (3-MCPD) and 2-chloro-1,3-propanediol (2-MCPD) are heat-induced food contaminants being present either as free substances or as fatty acid esters in numerous foods. 3-MCPD was classified to be possibly carcinogenic to humans (category 2B) with kidney and testis being the primary target organs according to animal studies. A previous 28-day oral feeding study with rats revealed that the endogenous antioxidant protein DJ-1 was strongly deregulated at the protein level in kidney, liver, and testis of the experimental animals that had been treated either with 3-MCPD, 2-MCPD or their dipalmitate esters. Here we show that this deregulation is due to the oxidation of a conserved, redox-active cysteine residue (Cys106) of DJ-1 to a cysteine sulfonic acid which is equivalent to loss of function of DJ-1. Irreversible oxidation of DJ-1 is associated with a number of oxidative stress-related diseases such as Parkinson, cancer, and type II diabetes. It is assumed that 3-MCPD or 2-MCPD do not directly oxidize DJ-1, but that these substances induce the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which in turn trigger DJ-1 oxidation. The implications of 3-MCPD/2-MCPD-mediated ROS formation in vivo for the ongoing risk assessment of these compounds as well as the potential of oxidized DJ-1 to serve as a novel effect biomarker for 3-MCPD/2-MCPD toxicity are being discussed.

  17. Oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids by DOPA, protein-bound DOPA, and related catechol(amine)s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, David I; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Incubation of free 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), protein-bound DOPA (PB-DOPA) and related catechols with DNA, proteins and lipids has been shown to result in oxidative damage to the target molecule. This article reviews these reactions with particular emphasis on those that occur in the pres......Incubation of free 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), protein-bound DOPA (PB-DOPA) and related catechols with DNA, proteins and lipids has been shown to result in oxidative damage to the target molecule. This article reviews these reactions with particular emphasis on those that occur...... in the presence of molecular O(2) and redox-active metal ions (e.g. Fe(3+), Cu(2+), Cr(6+)), which are known to increase the rate of DOPA oxidation. The majority of oxidative damage appears to be mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and HO(.) radicals, though other DOPA oxidation products...

  18. Investigation on oxidative stress of nitric oxide synthase interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Meng; Xu, Qingxia; Xu, Yanquan; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Jiahe; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Numerous evidences indicate that excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from liver flukes trigger the generation of free radicals that are associated with the initial pathophysiological responses in host cells. In this study, we first constructed a Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs)-infected BALB/c mouse model and examined relative results respectively at 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) gradually decreased with lastingness of infection, while the transcriptional level of inducible NOS (iNOS) significantly increased. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in sera of infected mouse significantly increased versus the healthy control group. These results showed that the liver of C. sinensis-infected mouse was in a state with elevated levels of oxidation stress. Previously, C. sinensis NOS interacting protein coding gene (named CsNOSIP) has been isolated and recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) has been expressed in Escherichia coli, which has been confirmed to be a component present in CsESPs and confirmed to play important roles in immune regulation of the host. In the present paper, we investigated the effects of rCsNOSIP on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7, a murine macrophage cell line. We found that endotoxin-free rCsNOSIP significantly promoted the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after pretreated with rCsNOSIP, while the level of SOD decreased. Furthermore, rCsNOSIP could also increase the level of lipid peroxidation MDA. Taken together, these results suggested that CsNOSIP was a key molecule which was involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its reactive intermediates, and played an important role in oxidative stress during C. sinensis infection.

  19. Assessing protein oxidation by inorganic nanoparticles with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2013-03-01

    Growth in the nanotechnology industry is leading to increased production of engineered nanoparticles (NPs). This has given rise to concerns about the potential adverse and toxic effects to biological system and the environment. An important mechanism of NP toxicity is oxidative stress caused by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or via direct oxidation of biomolecules. In this study, a protein oxidation assay was developed as an indicator of biomolecule oxidation by NPs. The oxidation of the protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was evaluated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the protein carbonyl derivatives formed from protein oxidation. The results showed that some NPs such as Cu(0), CuO, Mn(2)O(3), and Fe(0) caused oxidation of BSA; whereas, many of the other NPs tested were not reactive or very slowly reactive with BSA. The mechanisms involved in the oxidation of BSA protein by the reactive NPs could be attributed to the combined effects of ROS-dependent and direct protein oxidation mechanisms. The ELISA assay is a promising method for the assessment of protein oxidation by NPs, which can provide insights on NP toxicity mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effects of UVB-induced oxidative stress on protein expression and specific protein oxidation in normal human epithelial keratinocytes: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Marco Federico

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UVB component of solar ultraviolet irradiation is one of the major risk factors for the development of skin cancer in humans. UVB exposure elicits an increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are responsible for oxidative damage to proteins, DNA, RNA and lipids. In order to examine the biological impact of UVB irradiation on skin cells, we used a parallel proteomics approach to analyze the protein expression profile and to identify oxidatively modified proteins in normal human epithelial keratinocytes. Results The expression levels of fifteen proteins - involved in maintaining the cytoskeleton integrity, removal of damaged proteins and heat shock response - were differentially regulated in UVB-exposed cells, indicating that an appropriate response is developed in order to counteract/neutralize the toxic effects of UVB-raised ROS. On the other side, the redox proteomics approach revealed that seven proteins - involved in cellular adhesion, cell-cell interaction and protein folding - were selectively oxidized. Conclusions Despite a wide and well orchestrated cellular response, a relevant oxidation of specific proteins concomitantly occurs in UVB-irradiated human epithelial Keratinocytes. These modified (i.e. likely dysfunctional proteins might result in cell homeostasis impairment and therefore eventually promote cellular degeneration, senescence or carcinogenesis.

  1. Circadian Rhythm Connections to Oxidative Stress: Implications for Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilking, Melissa; Ndiaye, Mary; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxygen and circadian rhythmicity are essential in a myriad of physiological processes to maintain homeostasis, from blood pressure and sleep/wake cycles, down to cellular signaling pathways that play critical roles in health and disease. If the human body or cells experience significant stress, their ability to regulate internal systems, including redox levels and circadian rhythms, may become impaired. At cellular as well as organismal levels, impairment in redox regulation and circadian rhythms may lead to a number of adverse effects, including the manifestation of a variety of diseases such as heart diseases, neurodegenerative conditions, and cancer. Recent Advances: Researchers have come to an understanding as to the basics of the circadian rhythm mechanism, as well as the importance of the numerous species of oxidative stress components. The effects of oxidative stress and dysregulated circadian rhythms have been a subject of intense investigations since they were first discovered, and recent investigations into the molecular mechanisms linking the two have started to elucidate the bases of their connection. Critical Issues: While much is known about the mechanics and importance of oxidative stress systems and circadian rhythms, the front where they interact has had very little research focused on it. This review discusses the idea that these two systems are together intricately involved in the healthy body, as well as in disease. Future Directions: We believe that for a more efficacious management of diseases that have both circadian rhythm and oxidative stress components in their pathogenesis, targeting both systems in tandem would be far more successful. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 192–208 PMID:23198849

  2. Role of protein and mRNA oxidation in seed dormancy and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hayat eel-maarouf-bouteau

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are key players in the regulation of seed germination and dormancy. Although their regulated accumulation is a prerequisite for germination, the cellular basis of their action remains unknown, but very challenging to elucidate due to the lack of specificity of these compounds that can potentially react with all biomolecules. Among these, nucleic acids and proteins are very prone to oxidative damage. RNA is highly sensitive to oxidation because of its single-stranded structure and the absence of a repair system. Oxidation of mRNAs induces their decay through processing bodies or results in the synthesis of aberrant proteins through altered translation. Depending on the oxidized amino acid, ROS damage of proteins can be irreversible (i.e. carbonylation thus triggering the degradation of the oxidized proteins by the cytosolic 20S proteasome or can be reversed through the action of thioredoxins, peroxiredoxins or glutaredoxins (cysteine oxidation or by methionine sulfoxide reductase (methionine oxidation. Seed dormancy alleviation in the dry state, referred to as after-ripening, requires both selective mRNA oxidation and protein carbonylation. Similarly, seed imbibition of non-dormant seeds is associated with targeted oxidation of a subset of proteins. Altogether, these specific features testify that such oxidative modifications play important role in commitment of the cellular functioning toward germination completion.

  3. Protein Oxidation in Aging: Does It Play a Role in Aging Progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeg, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: A constant accumulation of oxidized proteins takes place during aging. Oxidation of proteins leads to a partial unfolding and, therefore, to aggregation. Protein aggregates impair the activity of cellular proteolytic systems (proteasomes, lysosomes), resulting in further accumulation of oxidized proteins. In addition, the accumulation of highly crosslinked protein aggregates leads to further oxidant formation, damage to macromolecules, and, finally, to apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, protein oxidation seems to play a role in the development of various age-related diseases, for example, neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: The highly oxidized lipofuscin accumulates during aging. Lipofuscin formation might cause impaired lysosomal and proteasomal degradation, metal ion accumulation, increased reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Critical Issues: It is still unclear to which extent protein oxidation is involved in the progression of aging and in the development of some age-related diseases. Future Directions: An extensive knowledge of the effects of protein oxidation on the aging process and its contribution to the development of age-related diseases could enable further strategies to reduce age-related impairments. Strategies aimed at lowering aggregate formation might be a straightforward intervention to reduce age-related malfunctions of organs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 239–255. PMID:25178482

  4. Mass Spectrometry-Based Methods for Identifying Oxidized Proteins in Disease: Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Verrastro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many inflammatory diseases have an oxidative aetiology, which leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules, including proteins. It is now increasingly recognized that oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs of proteins affect cell signalling and behaviour, and can contribute to pathology. Moreover, oxidized proteins have potential as biomarkers for inflammatory diseases. Although many assays for generic protein oxidation and breakdown products of protein oxidation are available, only advanced tandem mass spectrometry approaches have the power to localize specific oxPTMs in identified proteins. While much work has been carried out using untargeted or discovery mass spectrometry approaches, identification of oxPTMs in disease has benefitted from the development of sophisticated targeted or semi-targeted scanning routines, combined with chemical labeling and enrichment approaches. Nevertheless, many potential pitfalls exist which can result in incorrect identifications. This review explains the limitations, advantages and challenges of all of these approaches to detecting oxidatively modified proteins, and provides an update on recent literature in which they have been used to detect and quantify protein oxidation in disease.

  5. Noncoding RNAs in protein clearance pathways: implications in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Several studies from model organisms suggest upregulation of pathways that clear this toxic protein may provide .... part of UPS have been genetically linked to neurodegener- ... tionally modified or any other misfolded protein are poten-.

  6. Individual whey protein components influence lipid oxidation dependent on pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    In emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used and the composition at the interface is therefore expected to be of great importance for the resulting oxidation. Previous studies have shown that individual whey protein...... by affecting the preferential adsorption of whey protein components at the interface. The aim of the study was to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 1% whey protein having either a high concentration of α-lactalbumin, a high concentration of β-lactoglobulin or equal...... amounts of the two. Emulsions were prepared at pH4 and pH7. Emulsions were characterized by their droplet sizes, viscosities, and contents of proteins in the water phase. Lipid oxidation was assessed by PV and secondary volatile oxidation products. Results showed that pH greatly influenced the oxidative...

  7. Detection of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation products in the extracellular matrix of human atherosclerotic plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Linton, Stuart M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation is believed to play a role in atherosclerosis. Oxidized lipids, sterols and proteins have been detected in early, intermediate and advanced human lesions at elevated levels. The spectrum of oxidized side-chain products detected on proteins from homogenates of advanced human lesions has...... been interpreted in terms of the occurrence of two oxidative mechanisms, one involving oxygen-derived radicals catalysed by trace transition metal ions, and a second involving chlorinating species (HOCl or Cl2), generated by the haem enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). As MPO is released extracellularly...... for 83-96% of the total oxidized protein side-chain products detected in these plaques. Oxidation of matrix components extracted from healthy artery tissue, and model proteins, with reagent HOCl is shown to give rise to a similar pattern of products to those detected in advanced human lesions...

  8. Protein oxidation and degradation during proliferative senescence of human MRC-5 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, N; Merker, K; von Zglinicki, T; Grune, T

    2000-03-01

    One of the highlights of age-related changes of cellular metabolism is the accumulation of oxidized proteins. The aging process on a cellular level can be treated either as the ongoing proliferation until a certain number of cell divisions is reached (the Hayflick limit) or as the aging of nondividing cells, that is, the age-related changes in cells without proliferation. The present investigation was undertaken to reveal the changes in protein turnover, proteasome activity, and protein oxidation status during proliferative senescence. We were able to demonstrate that the activity of the cytosolic proteasomal system declines dramatically during the proliferative senescence of human MRC-5 fibroblasts. Regardless of the loss in activity, it could be demonstrated that there are no changes in the transcription and translation of proteasomal subunits. This decline in proteasome activity was accompanied by an increased concentration of oxidized proteins. Cells at higher proliferation stages were no longer able to respond with increased degradation of endogenous [(35)S]-Met-radiolabeled proteins after hydrogen peroxide- or quinone-induced oxidative stress. It could be demonstrated that oxidized proteins in senescent human MRC-5 fibroblasts are not as quickly removed as they are in young cells. Therefore, our study demonstrates that the accumulation of oxidized proteins and decline in protein turnover and activity of the proteasomal system are not only a process of postmitotic aging but also occur during proliferative senescence and result in an increased half-life of oxidized proteins.

  9. Dietary Proteins, Developmental Programming, and Potential Implication in Maternal Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Jahan-mihan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proteins are known mainly based on their metabolic and nutritional functions including protein synthesis and a source of energy. In spite of various physiological properties attributed to proteins, their functions have neither been addressed by assessing quality of proteins nor by nutrition and dietetic practices. Methods: Studies were included if they were randomized animal studies, clinical trials and systematic reviews/meta-analysis published in English language. Results: The effect of maternal diet in general and dietary proteins in particular during development on health of offspring has been well-studied. Protein content as well as source of protein in the diet consumed during pregnancy and lactation influenced the risk of metabolic syndrome characteristics in offspring. Both high and low protein diets showed detrimental effects on health of offspring. Moreover, comparison of maternal casein-based diet with soy protein-based diet showed more favorable effect on body weight, body composition, blood pressure, and glucose metabolism in offspring. However, the role of maternal dietary proteins in developing the risk of metabolic syndrome characteristics in offspring in gestational obesity is still unclear and needs further study. Conclusions: Dietary proteins are determining factors in developmental programming. Both quantity and source of proteins in maternal diet influenced the development of metabolic syndrome characteristics in offspring. However, whether they have the same function in presence of gestational obesity is still unclear and needs further study.

  10. Mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in an acute transient mouse model of muscle degeneration: implications for muscular dystrophy and related muscle pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2014-01-03

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases.

  11. Influence of sodium nitrite on protein oxidation and nitrosation of sausages subjected to processing and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xianchao; Li, Chenyi; Jia, Xu; Guo, Yan; Lei, Na; Hackman, Robert M; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-06-01

    The influence of NaNO2 content on protein oxidation and nitrosation was investigated in cooked sausages at different concentrations (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg NaNO2/kg). Dependent on concentration, NaNO2 had both anti- and pro-oxidant effects on protein oxidation. The antioxidant effects of NaNO2 on the protein oxidation were evidenced by significantly lower carbonyl contents, higher free amines and lower surface hydrophobicities. The pro-oxidant effects of NaNO2 on protein oxidation resulted in a decrease of sulfhydryls and an increase of disulfide bonds. NaNO2 also improved the protein nitrosation inducing the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT). Moreover, 3-NT had significant correlations with parameters of protein oxidation, indicating that 3-NT may be a possible marker for protein oxidation. Results of this study contribute to an understanding of the impact of NaNO2 on food quality and help to identify optimal formulations of cured meat products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular basis for arsenic-Induced alteration in nitric oxide production and oxidative stress: implication of endothelial dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Yoshito; Pi Jingbo

    2004-01-01

    Accumulated epidemiological studies have suggested that prolonged exposure of humans to arsenic in drinking water is associated with vascular diseases. The exact mechanism of how this occurs currently unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), formed by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), plays a crucial role in the vascular system. Decreased availability of biologically active NO in the endothelium is implicated in the pathophysiology of several vascular diseases and inhibition of eNOS by arsenic is one of the proposed mechanism s for arsenic-induced vascular diseases. In addition, during exposure to arsenic, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can occur, resulting in oxidative stress, which is another major risk factor for vascular dysfunction. The molecular basis for decreased NO levels and increased oxidative stress during arsenic exposure is poorly understood. In this article, evidence for arsenic-mediated alteration in NO production and oxidative stress is reviewed. The results of a cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning and experimental animal studies to elucidate a potential mechanism for the impairment of NO formation and oxidative stress caused by prolonged exposure to arsenate in the drinking water are also reviewed

  13. A catalogue of human secreted proteins and its implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar Keerthikumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Under both normal and pathological conditions, cells secrete variety of proteins through classical and non-classical secretory pathways into the extracellular space. Majority of these proteins represent pathophysiology of the cell from which it is secreted. Recently, though more than 92% of the protein coding genes has been mapped by human proteome map project, but number of those proteins that constitutes secretome of the cell still remains elusive. Secreted proteins or the secretome can be accessible in bodily fluids and hence are considered as potential biomarkers to discriminate between healthy and diseased individuals. In order to facilitate the biomarker discovery and to further aid clinicians and scientists working in these arenas, we have compiled and catalogued secreted proteins from the human proteome using integrated bioinformatics approach. In this study, nearly 14% of the human proteome is likely to be secreted through classical and non-classical secretory pathways. Out of which, ~38% of these secreted proteins were found in extracellular vesicles including exosomes and shedding microvesicles. Among these secreted proteins, 94% were detected in human bodily fluids including blood, plasma, serum, saliva, semen, tear and urine. We anticipate that this high confidence list of secreted proteins could serve as a compendium of candidate biomarkers. In addition, the catalogue may provide functional insights in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions of the cell.

  14. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting

  15. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  16. Connection between markers of cholestasis and intensity of oxidative modification of proteins in patients with choledocholithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Damnjanović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the connection between cholestatic markers and the oxidative protein modification intensity in patients with choledocholithiasis. All the participants were subjected to clinical, laboratory and ultrasonic check-up at the Internal Department of the Military Hospital in Niš, Serbia. The parameters of oxidative stress: carbonyl groups, a measure of oxidative protein modification, and biochemical markers of cholestasis were determined by standard biochemical methods. The concentration of total (r=0.41, p<0.05, direct (r=0.49, p<+0.01 and indirect (r=0.41, p<0.05 bilirubin was in statistically significant positive linear correlation with the intensity of oxidative modification of proteins, while the other biochemical markers of cholestasis did not show such correlation. Total, direct and indirect bilirubins showed a significant positive correlation with oxidative protein modification, assessed through the levels of carbonyl groups in patients with choledocholithiasis.

  17. Recycling and Resistance of Petrogenic Particulate Organic Carbon: Implications from A Chemical Oxidation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Li, G.; Ji, J.

    2013-12-01

    Petrogenic particulate organic carbon (OCpetro) represents a small fraction of photosynthetic carbon which escapes pedogenic-petrogenic degradation and gets trapped in the lithosphere. Exhumation and recycling of OCpetro are of significant importance in the global carbon cycle because OCpetro oxidation represents a substantial carbon source to the atmosphere while the re-burial of OCpetro in sediment deposits has no net effect. Though studies have investigated various behaviors of OCpetro in the surface environments (e.g., riverine mobilization, marine deposition, and microbial remineralization), less attention has been paid to the reaction kinetics and structural transformations during OCpetro oxidation. Here we assess the OCpetro-oxidation process based on a chemical oxidation method adopted from soil studies. The employed chemical oxidation method is considered an effective simulation of natural oxidation in highly oxidative environments, and has been widely used in soil studies to isolate the inert soil carbon pool. We applied this chemical method to the OCpetro-enriched black shale samples from the middle-lower Yangtze (Changjiang) basin, China, and performed comprehensive instrumental analyses (element analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum, and Raman spectrum). We also conducted step-oxidizing experiments following fixed time series and monitored the reaction process in rigorously controlled lab conditions. In this work, we present our experiment results and discuss the implications for the recycling and properties of OCpetro. Particulate organic carbon concentration of black shale samples before and after oxidation helps to quantify the oxidability of OCpetro and constrain the preservation efficiency of OCpetro during fluvial erosion over large river basin scales. FTIR and Raman analyses reveal clear structural variations on atomic and molecular levels. Results from the step-oxidizing experiments provide detailed information about the reaction

  18. Ceruloplasmin (ferroxidase) oxidizes hydroxylamine probes: deceptive implications for free radical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganini, Douglas; Canistro, Donatella; Jiang, JinJie; Jang, JinJie; Stadler, Krisztian; Mason, Ronald P; Kadiiska, Maria B

    2012-10-01

    Ceruloplasmin (ferroxidase) is a copper-binding protein known to promote Fe(2+) oxidation in plasma of mammals. In addition to its classical ferroxidase activity, ceruloplasmin is known to catalyze the oxidation of various substrates, such as amines and catechols. Assays based on cyclic hydroxylamine oxidation are used to quantify and detect free radicals in biological samples ex vivo and in vitro. We show here that human ceruloplasmin promotes the oxidation of the cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine hydrochloride (CPH) and related probes in Chelex-treated phosphate buffer and rat serum. The reaction is suppressed by the metal chelators DTPA, EDTA, and desferal, whereas heparin and bathocuproine have no effect. Catalase or superoxide dismutase additions do not interfere with the CPH-oxidation yield, demonstrating that oxygen-derived free radicals are not involved in the CPH oxidation mediated by ceruloplasmin. Plasma samples immunodepleted of ceruloplasmin have lower levels of CPH oxidation, which confirms the role of ceruloplasmin (ferroxidase) as a biological oxidizing agent of cyclic hydroxylamines. In conclusion, we show that the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin is a possible biological source of artifacts in the cyclic hydroxylamine-oxidation assay used for reactive oxygen species detection and quantification. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Effectiveness of exercise and protein supplementation intervention on body composition, functional fitness, and oxidative stress among elderly Malays with sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Suzana; Kamaruddin, Norshafarina Shari; Badrasawi, Manal; Sakian, Noor Ibrahim Mohamed; Abd Manaf, Zahara; Yassin, Zaitun; Joseph, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia, characterized as muscle loss that occurs with aging, is a major health problem in an aging population, due to its implications on mobility, quality of life, and fall risk. Protein supplementation could improve the physical fitness by increasing protein anabolism, and exercise has a documented evidence of positive effect on functional status among the elderly. However, the combined effect of both protein supplementation and exercise has not been investigated among sarcopenic elderly in the Asian population. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effectiveness of exercise intervention and protein supplementation either alone or in combination for 12 weeks, on body composition, functional fitness, and oxidative stress among elderly Malays with sarcopenia. Sixty five sarcopenic elderly Malays aged 60-74 years were assigned to the control group, exercise group (ExG), protein supplementation group (PrG), or the combination of exercise and protein supplementation group. A significant interaction effect between body weight and body mass index (BMI) was observed, with the PrG (-2.1% body weight, -1.8% BMI) showing the highest reductions. Further, there was a decrease in % body fat (-4.5%) and an increase in fat-free mass (kg) (+5.7%) in the ExG after 12 weeks (P exercise program was found to improve muscle strength and body composition, while protein supplementation reduced body weight and increased upper body strength, among sarcopenic elderly in Malaysia.

  20. Oxidative Weathering of Archean Sulfides: Implications for the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Romaniello, S. J.; Reinhard, C.; Garcia-Robledo, E.; Revsbech, N. P.; Canfield, D. E.; Lyons, T. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    The first widely accepted evidence for oxidation of Earth's atmosphere and oceans occurs ~2.45 Ga immediately prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). A major line of evidence for this transition includes the abundances and isotopic variations of redox-sensitive transition metals in marine sediments (e.g., Fe, Mo, Re, Cr, and U). It is often assumed that oxidative weathering is required to liberate these redox-sensitive elements from sulfide minerals in the crust, and hence that their presence in early Archean marine sediments signifies that oxidative weathering was stimulated by small and/or transient "whiffs" of O2 in the environment.1 However, studies of crustal sulfide reactivity have not been conducted at O2 concentrations as low as those that would have prevailed when O2 began its rise during the late Archean (estimated at molybdenite oxidation kinetics at the nanomolar O2 concentrations that are relevant to late Archean environments. These measurements were made using recently developed, highly sensitive optical O2 sensors to monitor the rates at which the powdered minerals consumed dissolved O2 in a range of pH-buffered solutions.3Our data extend the range of experimental pyrite oxidation rates in the literature by three orders of magnitude from ~10-3 present atmospheric O2 to ~10-6. We find that molybdenite and pyrite oxidation continues to <1 nM O2 (4 x 10-6 present atmospheric O2). This implies that oxidative weathering of sulfides could occur under conditions which preserve MIF S fractionation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the rate law and reaction order of pyrite oxidation kinetics change significantly at nanomolar concentrations of O2 when compared to previous compilations.2 Our results provide new empirical data that should allow for more precise quantitative constraints on atmospheric pO2 based on the sedimentary rock record. 1Anbar, A.D. et al., 2007. Science, 317, i. 5846: 1903-1906. 2Williamson & Rimstidt, 1994. Geochim. et Cosmochim

  1. Unfolded protein response in filamentous fungi-implications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimel, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) represents a mechanism to preserve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis that is conserved in eukaryotes. ER stress caused by the accumulation of potentially toxic un- or misfolded proteins in the ER triggers UPR activation and the induction of genes important for protein folding in the ER, ER expansion, and transport from and to the ER. Along with this adaptation, the overall capacity for protein secretion is markedly increased by the UPR. In filamentous fungi, various approaches to employ the UPR for improved production of homologous and heterologous proteins have been investigated. As the effects on protein production were strongly dependent on the expressed protein, generally applicable strategies have to be developed. A combination of transcriptomic approaches monitoring secretion stress and basic research on the UPR mechanism provided novel and important insight into the complex regulatory cross-connections between UPR signalling, cellular physiology, and developmental processes. It will be discussed how this increasing knowledge on the UPR might stimulate the development of novel strategies for using the UPR as a tool in biotechnology.

  2. Thiol oxidation of hemolymph proteins in oysters Crassostrea brasiliana as markers of oxidative damage induced by urban sewage exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Rafael; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Dolores, Euler S; Mattos, Jacó J; Piazza, Clei E; Sasaki, Sílvio T; Taniguchi, Satie; Montone, Rosalinda C; Bícego, Márcia C; Dos Reis, Isis M M; Zacchi, Flávia L; Othero, Bárbara N M; Bastolla, Camila L V; Mello, Danielle F; Fraga, Ana Paula M; Wendt, Nestor; Toledo-Silva, Guilherme; Razzera, Guilherme; Dafre, Alcir L; de Melo, Cláudio M R; Bianchini, Adalto; Marques, Maria R F; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2017-07-01

    Urban sewage is a concerning issue worldwide, threatening both wildlife and human health. The present study investigated protein oxidation in mangrove oysters (Crassostrea brasiliana) exposed to seawater from Balneário Camboriú, an important tourist destination in Brazil that is affected by urban sewage. Oysters were exposed for 24 h to seawater collected close to the Camboriú River (CAM1) or 1 km away (CAM2). Seawater from an aquaculture laboratory was used as a reference. Local sewage input was marked by higher levels of coliforms, nitrogen, and phosphorus in seawater, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and fecal steroid in sediments at CAM1. Exposure of oysters to CAM1 caused marked bioaccumulation of LABs and decreased PAH and PCB concentrations after exposure to both CAM1 and CAM2. Protein thiol oxidation in gills, digestive gland, and hemolymph was evaluated. Lower levels of reduced protein thiols were detected in hemolymph from CAM1, and actin, segon, and dominin were identified as targets of protein thiol oxidation. Dominin susceptibility to oxidation was confirmed in vitro by exposure to peroxides and hypochlorous acid, and 2 cysteine residues were identified as potential sites of oxidation. Overall, these data indicate that urban sewage contamination in local waters has a toxic potential and that protein thiol oxidation in hemolymph could be a useful biomarker of oxidative stress in bivalves exposed to contaminants. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1833-1845. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. The stress response system of proteins: Implications for bioreactor scaleup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goochee, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    Animal cells face a variety of environmental stresses in large scale bioreactors, including periodic variations in shear stress and dissolved oxygen concentration. Diagnostic techniques were developed for identifying the particular sources of environmental stresses for animal cells in a given bioreactor configuration. The mechanisms by which cells cope with such stresses was examined. The individual concentrations and synthesis rates of hundreds of intracellular proteins are affected by the extracellular environment (medium composition, dissolved oxygen concentration, ph, and level of surface shear stress). Techniques are currently being developed for quantifying the synthesis rates and concentrations of the intracellular proteins which are most sensitive to environmental stress. Previous research has demonstrated that a particular set of stress response proteins are synthesized by mammalian cells in response to temperature fluctuations, dissolved oxygen deprivation, and glucose deprivation. Recently, it was demonstrated that exposure of human kidney cells to high shear stress results in expression of a completely distinct set of intracellular proteins.

  4. Oxidative stress in sickle cell disease; pathophysiology and potential implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Erfan; Biemond, Bart J; Otten, Hans-Martin; Brandjes, Dees P; Schnog, John-John B

    2011-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hemoglobinopathy characterized by hemolytic anemia, increased susceptibility to infections and vaso-occlusion leading to a reduced quality of life and life expectancy. Oxidative stress is an important feature of SCD and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ensuing organ damage in sickle cell patients. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the (end-)products of their oxidative reactions are potential markers of disease severity and could be targets for antioxidant therapies. This review will summarize the role of ROS in SCD and their potential implication for SCD management. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Conformational Heterogeneity in Antibody-Protein Antigen Recognition IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH AFFINITY PROTEIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Addis, P. W.; Hall, c. J.; Bruton, S.; Veverka, Václav; Wilkinson, I. C.; Muskett, F. W.; Renshaw, P. S.; Prosser, C. E.; Carrington, B.; Lawson, A. D. G.; Griffin, R.; Taylor, R. J.; Waters, L. C.; Henry, A. J.; Carr, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 10 (2014), s. 7200-7210 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : NMR * antibody * protein-protein interaction * protein conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.573, year: 2014

  6. Protein kinase A governs oxidative phosphorylation kinetics and oxidant emitting potential at complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Stephen Lark

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS is responsible for setting and maintaining both the energy and redox charges throughout the cell. Reversible phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins, particularly via the soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC/cyclic AMP (cAMP/Protein kinase A (PKA axis, has recently been revealed as a potential mechanism regulating the ETS. However, the governance of cAMP/PKA signaling and its implications on ETS function are incompletely understood. In contrast to prior reports using exogenous bicarbonate, we provide evidence that endogenous CO2 produced by increased tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle flux is insufficient to increase mitochondrial cAMP levels, and that exogenous addition of membrane permeant 8Br-cAMP does not enhance mitochondrial respiratory capacity. We also report important non-specific effects of commonly used inhibitors of sAC which preclude their use in studies of mitochondrial function. In isolated liver mitochondria, inhibition of PKA reduces complex I-, but not complex II-supported respiratory capacity. In permeabilized myofibers, inhibition of PKA lowers both the Km and Vmax for complex I-supported respiration as well as succinate-supported H2O2 emitting potential. In summary, the data provided here improve our understanding of how mitochondrial cAMP production is regulated, illustrate a need for better tools to examine the impact of sAC activity on mitochondrial biology, and suggest that cAMP/PKA signaling contributes to the governance of electron flow through complex I of the ETS.

  7. γ-Glutamyl semialdehyde and 2-amino-adipic semialdehyde: biomarkers of oxidative damage to proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daneshvar, B.; Frandsen, H.; Autrup, Herman

    1997-01-01

    proteins collected from eight different mammalian species was found to be inversely proportional to their maximum lifespan potential. The content of AAS in plasma proteins of untreated adult rats showed a positive correlation with the age of the rat. In young rats a negative correlation with age was found......Reactive oxygen species are formed in the body by several natural processes and by induced oxidative stress. The reactive oxygen species may react with the various biomolecules of the body, including proteins. In order to assess the impact of oxidative damage to proteins, we have tried to identify...

  8. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  9. Participation of Low Molecular Weight Electron Carriers in Oxidative Protein Folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Mandl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative protein folding is mediated by a proteinaceous electron relay system, in which the concerted action of protein disulfide isomerase and Ero1 delivers the electrons from thiol groups to the final acceptor. Oxygen appears to be the final oxidant in aerobic living organisms, although the existence of alternative electron acceptors, e.g. fumarate or nitrate, cannot be excluded. Whilst the protein components of the system are well-known, less attention has been turned to the role of low molecular weight electron carriers in the process. The function of ascorbate, tocopherol and vitamin K has been raised recently. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that these redox-active compounds can contribute to the functioning of oxidative folding. This review focuses on the participation of small molecular weight redox compounds in oxidative protein folding.

  10. Engineered Trx2p industrial yeast strain protects glycolysis and fermentation proteins from oxidative carbonylation during biomass propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Pastor Rocío

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast biomass production process, protein carbonylation has severe adverse effects since it diminishes biomass yield and profitability of industrial production plants. However, this significant detriment of yeast performance can be alleviated by increasing thioredoxins levels. Thioredoxins are important antioxidant defenses implicated in many functions in cells, and their primordial functions include scavenging of reactive oxygen species that produce dramatic and irreversible alterations such as protein carbonylation. Results In this work we have found several proteins specifically protected by yeast Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2p. Bidimensional electrophoresis and carbonylated protein identification from TRX-deficient and TRX-overexpressing cells revealed that glycolysis and fermentation-related proteins are specific targets of Trx2p protection. Indeed, the TRX2 overexpressing strain presented increased activity of the central carbon metabolism enzymes. Interestingly, Trx2p specifically preserved alcohol dehydrogenase I (Adh1p from carbonylation, decreased oligomer aggregates and increased its enzymatic activity. Conclusions The identified proteins suggest that the fermentative capacity detriment observed under industrial conditions in T73 wine commercial strain results from the oxidative carbonylation of specific glycolytic and fermentation enzymes. Indeed, increased thioredoxin levels enhance the performance of key fermentation enzymes such as Adh1p, which consequently increases fermentative capacity.

  11. Interaction of single and multi-layer graphene oxide with fetal bovine serum: assessing the protein corona formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franqui, Lidiane Silva; Farias, Marcelo Alexandre de; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Costa, Carlos Alberto; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Martinez, Diego Stefani Teodoro, E-mail: lidiane.franqui@pos.ft.unicamp.br [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Coluci, Vitor Rafael [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: When in contact with biological systems, nanomaterials surface adsorbs biomolecules present in the biological medium, mainly proteins, yielding a molecular coating 'protein corona' which affects the biological response and toxicity of the nanomaterials. Several factors can influence the protein corona formation, such as nanomaterial physicochemical properties and the nature of biological medium. In this work, we have performed a comparative study between the single and multi-layer graphene oxide nanomaterials (SL-GO and ML-GO, respectively) after their interaction with DMEM cell culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS). Bare GOs and FBS protein corona-coated GOs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The protein corona composition was characterized by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Our results showed that, after interaction with FBS, GO particle size increased due to the protein corona formation. Besides, the presence of proteins also has significantly increased the dispersion stability of SLGO and ML-GO over time. Whereas the main proteins have been identified in both SL-GO and ML-GO, SL-GO has adsorbed larger amounts of proteins than ML-GO. Finally, the number of GO layers influences its interactions with FBS proteins and dispersion stability in DMEM medium. These results point out implications for in vitro cytotoxicity assessment and biomedical applications of these promising carbon nanomaterials. (author)

  12. Interaction of single and multi-layer graphene oxide with fetal bovine serum: assessing the protein corona formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franqui, Lidiane Silva; Farias, Marcelo Alexandre de; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Costa, Carlos Alberto; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Martinez, Diego Stefani Teodoro; Coluci, Vitor Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Full text: When in contact with biological systems, nanomaterials surface adsorbs biomolecules present in the biological medium, mainly proteins, yielding a molecular coating 'protein corona' which affects the biological response and toxicity of the nanomaterials. Several factors can influence the protein corona formation, such as nanomaterial physicochemical properties and the nature of biological medium. In this work, we have performed a comparative study between the single and multi-layer graphene oxide nanomaterials (SL-GO and ML-GO, respectively) after their interaction with DMEM cell culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS). Bare GOs and FBS protein corona-coated GOs were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The protein corona composition was characterized by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Our results showed that, after interaction with FBS, GO particle size increased due to the protein corona formation. Besides, the presence of proteins also has significantly increased the dispersion stability of SLGO and ML-GO over time. Whereas the main proteins have been identified in both SL-GO and ML-GO, SL-GO has adsorbed larger amounts of proteins than ML-GO. Finally, the number of GO layers influences its interactions with FBS proteins and dispersion stability in DMEM medium. These results point out implications for in vitro cytotoxicity assessment and biomedical applications of these promising carbon nanomaterials. (author)

  13. Proteomic detection of oxidized and reduced thiol proteins in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddihy, Sarah L; Baty, James W; Brown, Kristin K; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation and reduction of cysteine residues is emerging as an important post-translational control of protein function. We describe a method for fluorescent labelling of either reduced or oxidized thiols in combination with two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2DE) to detect changes in the redox proteome of cultured cells. Reduced thiols are labelled with the fluorescent compound 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein. To monitor oxidized thiols, the reduced thiols are first blocked with N-ethyl-maleimide, then the oxidized thiols reduced with dithiothreitol and labelled with 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein. The method is illustrated by treating Jurkat T-lymphoma cells with hydrogen peroxide and monitoring increased labelling of oxidized thiol proteins. A decrease in labelling can also be detected, and this is attributed to the formation of higher oxidation states of cysteine that are not reduced by dithiothreitol.

  14. Oxidation of lipid and protein in horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus) mince and washed minces during processing and storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eymard, Sylvie; Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    : M1, M2 and M3, with one, two and three washing steps, respectively. The different products were characterised (i.e. lipid content, protein, water, iron, fatty acid profile and tocopherol content) and analysed for protein and lipid oxidation in order to investigate the impact of the washing steps...... was followed by determination of protein solubility, protein thiol groups and protein carbonyl groups using colorimetric methods as well as western blotting for protein carbonyl groups. Lipid and protein oxidation markers indicated that both lipid and protein oxidation took place during processing...

  15. Metabolism and Whole-Body Fat Oxidation Following Post-Exercise Carbohydrate or Protein Intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Ulrika Andersson; Pettersson, Stefan; Edin, Fredrik

    2018-01-01

    : Protein supplementation immediately post-exercise did not affect the doubling in whole body fat oxidation seen during a subsequent exercise trial 2 hours later. Neither did it affect resting fat oxidation during the post-exercise period despite increased insulin levels and attenuated ketosis. Carbohydrate...

  16. Unrestricted Mass Spectrometric Data Analysis for Identification, Localization, and Quantification of Oxidative Protein Modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rykær, Martin; Svensson, Birte; Davies, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    modifications based on so-called "dependent peptides". The strategy involves unrestricted database searches with rigorous filtering focusing on oxidative modifications. The approach was applied to bovine serum albumin and human serum proteins subjected to metal ion-catalyzed oxidation, resulting...

  17. Evidence for roles of radicals in protein oxidation in advanced human atherosclerotic plaque

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Stocker, R

    1998-01-01

    ) or oxidation has been obtained by immunochemical methods; the specificities of these antibodies are unclear. Here we present chemical determinations of six protein-bound oxidation products: dopa, o-tyrosine, m-tyrosine, dityrosine, hydroxyleucine and hydroxyvaline, some of which reflect particularly oxy...

  18. Characterization of the Bat proteins in the oxidative stress response of Leptospira biflexa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Philip E; Carroll, James A; Dorward, David W; Stone, Hunter H; Sarkar, Amit; Picardeau, Mathieu; Rosa, Patricia A

    2012-12-13

    Leptospires lack many of the homologs for oxidative defense present in other bacteria, but do encode homologs of the Bacteriodes aerotolerance (Bat) proteins, which have been proposed to fulfill this function. Bat homologs have been identified in all families of the phylum Spirochaetes, yet a specific function for these proteins has not been experimentally demonstrated. We investigated the contribution of the Bat proteins in the model organism Leptospira biflexa for their potential contributions to growth rate, morphology and protection against oxidative challenges. A genetically engineered mutant strain in which all bat ORFs were deleted did not exhibit altered growth rate or morphology, relative to the wild-type strain. Nor could we demonstrate a protective role for the Bat proteins in coping with various oxidative stresses. Further, pre-exposing L. biflexa to sublethal levels of reactive oxygen species did not appear to induce a general oxidative stress response, in contrast to what has been shown in other bacterial species. Differential proteomic analysis of the wild-type and mutant strains detected changes in the abundance of a single protein only - HtpG, which is encoded by the gene immediately downstream of the bat loci. The data presented here do not support a protective role for the Leptospira Bat proteins in directly coping with oxidative stress as previously proposed. L. biflexa is relatively sensitive to reactive oxygen species such as superoxide and H2O2, suggesting that this spirochete lacks a strong, protective defense against oxidative damage despite being a strict aerobe.

  19. Volatile profile, lipid oxidation and protein oxidation of irradiated ready-to-eat cured turkey meat products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xi; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-01-01

    Irradiation had little effects on the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values in ready-to-eat (RTE) turkey meat products, while it increased protein oxidation at 4.5 kGy. The volatile profile analyses indicated that the amount of sulfur compounds increased linearly as doses increased in RTE turkey meat products. By correlation analysis, a positive correlation was found between benzene/ benzene derivatives and alcohols with lipid oxidation, while aldehydes, ketones and alkane, alkenes and alkynes were positively correlated with protein oxidation. Principle component analysis showed that irradiated meat samples can be discriminated by two categories of volatile compounds: Strecker degradation products and radiolytic degradation products. The cluster analysis of volatile data demonstrated that low-dose irradiation had minor effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages (<1.5 kGy). However, as the doses increased, the differences between the irradiated and non-irradiated cured turkey products became significant. - Highlights: • Irradiation had little effects on lipid oxidation of ready-to-eat cured turkey. • 4.5 kGy irradiation increased protein oxidation. • Irradiated samples were isolated due to Strecker/radiolytic degradation products. • 1.5 kGy irradiation had limited effects on the volatile profile of turkey sausages. • Dimethyl disulfide can be used as a potential marker for irradiated meat products.

  20. Effect of pasteurization on the protein composition and oxidative stability of beer during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Marianne N; Hoff, Signe; Berner, Torben S; Lametsch, René; Andersen, Mogens L

    2012-12-19

    The impacts of pasteurization of a lager beer on protein composition and the oxidative stability were studied during storage at 22 °C for 426 days in the dark. Pasteurization clearly improved the oxidative stability of beer determined by ESR spectroscopy, whereas it had a minor negative effect on the volatile profile by increasing volatile compounds that is generally associated with heat treatment and a loss of fruity ester aroma. A faster rate of radical formation in unpasteurized beer was consistent with a faster consumption of sulfite. Beer proteins in the unpasteurized beer were more degraded, most likely due to proteolytic enzyme activity of yeast remnants and more precipitation of proteins was also observed. The differences in soluble protein content and composition are suggested to result in differences in the contents of prooxidative metals as a consequence of the proteins ability to bind metals. This also contributes to the differences in oxidative stabilities of the beers.

  1. The myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant hypothiocyanous acid inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases via oxidation of key cysteine residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cook, Naomi L.; Moeke, Cassidy H.; Fantoni, Luca I.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues is critical to cellular processes, and is regulated by kinases and phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs contain a redox-sensitive active site Cys residue, which is readily oxidized. Myeloperoxidase, released from activated leukocytes, catalyzes thiocyanate ion (SCN...

  2. Methionine sulfoxide profiling of milk proteins to assess the influence of lipids on protein oxidation in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, Johannes; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2016-06-15

    Thermal treatment of milk and milk products leads to protein oxidation, mainly the formation of methionine sulfoxide. Reactive oxygen species, responsible for the oxidation, can be generated by Maillard reaction, autoxidation of sugars, or lipid peroxidation. The present study investigated the influence of milk fat on methionine oxidation in milk. For this purpose, quantitative methionine sulfoxide profiling of all ten methionine residues of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, and αs1-casein was carried out by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry with scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS-sMRM). Analysis of defatted and regular raw milk samples after heating for up to 8 min at 120 °C and analysis of ultrahigh-temperature milk samples with 0.1%, 1.5%, and 3.5% fat revealed that methionine oxidation of the five residues of the whey proteins and of residues M 123, M 135, and M 196 of αs1-casein was not affected or even suppressed in the presence of milk fat. Only the oxidation of residues M 54 and M 60 of αs1-casein was promoted by lipids. In evaporated milk samples, formation of methionine sulfoxide was hardly influenced by the fat content of the samples. Thus, it can be concluded that lipid oxidation products are not the major cause of methionine oxidation in milk.

  3. Alkane oxidation by Pseudomonas oleovorans : genes and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, Jan Berthold

    1994-01-01

    This thesis deals with the molecular genetics and biochemistry of oxidation of medium chainlength alkanes by P. oleovorans, as part of a program to develop biotechnological processes, based on oxygenases.

  4. Lipid oxidation in omega-3 emulsions prepared with milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Andersen, Ulf

    An increasing body of evidence supports the health beneficial effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Therefore, incorporation of marine oils into foods has also gained an increasing interest. However, the highly unsaturated lipids present in marine oils are prone to lipid oxidation......, and their addition to foods is therefore limited by the development of unpleasant off-flavors. Hence, efficient strategies are necessary to protect the lipids and thereby make fish oil-enriched food products successful in the marketplace. In an attempt to increase the oxidative stability of fish oil-enriched food...... stable product. Thus, a better understanding of factors influencing lipid oxidation in delivery emulsions themselves is therefore needed to understand the differences observed between food systems. In oil-in-water emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface...

  5. Nanosilver pathophysiology in earthworms: Transcriptional profiling of secretory proteins and the implication for the protein corona

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Miclaus, Teodora; Engelmann, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Previously we have identified lysenin as a key protein constituent of the secretome from Eisenia fetida coelomocytes and revealed its critical importance in priming interactions between the cells and the protein corona around nanosilver. As alterations of the protein environment can directly affe...

  6. Reduced protein oxidation in Wistar rats supplemented with marine ω3 PUFAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Lucía; Pazos, Manuel; Gallardo, José M; Torres, Josep L; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Nogués, Rosa; Romeu, Marta; Medina, Isabel

    2013-02-01

    The potential effects of various dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6) ratios (1:1, 2:1, and 1:2, respectively) on protein redox states from plasma, kidney, skeletal muscle, and liver were investigated in Wistar rats. Dietary fish oil groups were compared with animals fed soybean and linseed oils, vegetable oils enriched in ω6 linoleic acid (LA; 18:2) and ω3 α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3), respectively. Fish oil treatments were effective at reducing the level of total fatty acids in plasma and enriching the plasmatic free fatty acid fraction and erythrocyte membranes in EPA and DHA. A proteomic approach consisting of fluorescein 5-thiosemicarbazide (FTSC) labeling of protein carbonyls, FTSC intensity visualization on 1-DE or 2-DE gels, and protein identification by MS/MS was used for the protein oxidation assessment. Albumin was found to be the most carbonylated protein in plasma for all dietary groups, and its oxidation level was significantly modulated by dietary interventions. Supplementation with an equal EPA:DHA ratio (1:1) showed the lowest oxidation score for plasma albumin, followed in increasing order of carbonylation by 1:2 proteins and cytosolic proteins from kidney and liver also indicated a protective effect on proteins for the fish oil treatments, the 1:1 ratio exhibiting the lowest protein oxidation scores. The effect of fish oil treatments at reducing carbonylation on specific proteins from plasma (albumin), skeletal muscle (actin), and liver (albumin, argininosuccinate synthetase, 3-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) was remarkable. This investigation highlights the efficiency of dietary fish oil at reducing in vivo oxidative damage of proteins compared to oils enriched in the 18-carbon polyunsaturated fatty acids ω3 ALA and ω6 LA, and such antioxidant activity may differ among different fish oil sources because of variations in EPA/DHA content. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum Advanced Oxidation Protein Products in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Possible Markers of Diagnostic Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh Nayyar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to measure the concentrations (levels ofserum total proteins and advanced oxidation protein products as markers of oxidantmediated protein damage in the sera of patients with oral cancers.Methods: The study consisted of the sera analyses of serum total protein andadvanced oxidation protein products’ levels in 30 age and sex matched controls, 60patients with reported pre-cancerous lesions and/or conditions and 60 patients withhistologically proven oral squamous cell carcinoma. One way analyses of variance wereused to test the difference between groups. To determine which of the two groups’ meanswere significantly different, the post-hoc test of Bonferroni was used. The results wereaveraged as mean ± standard deviation. In the above test, P values less than 0.05 weretaken to be statistically significant. The normality of data was checked before thestatistical analysis was performed.Results: The study revealed statistically significant variations in serum levels ofadvanced oxidation protein products (P<0.001. Serum levels of total protein showedextensive variations; therefore the results were largely inconclusive and statisticallyinsignificant.Conclusion: The results emphasize the need for more studies with larger samplesizes to be conducted before a conclusive role can be determined for sera levels of totalprotein and advanced oxidation protein products as markers both for diagnosticsignificance and the transition from the various oral pre-cancerous lesions and conditionsinto frank oral cancers.

  8. Protein Oxidation in the Lungs of C57BL/6J Mice Following X-Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshishat-Kupper, Michal; McCart, Elizabeth A.; Freedy, James G.; Tipton, Ashlee J.; Nagy, Vitaly; Kim, Sung-Yop; Landauer, Michael R.; Mueller, Gregory P.; Day, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    Damage to normal lung tissue is a limiting factor when ionizing radiation is used in clinical applications. In addition, radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are a major cause of mortality following accidental radiation exposure in humans. Although clinical symptoms may not develop for months after radiation exposure, immediate events induced by radiation are believed to generate molecular and cellular cascades that proceed during a clinical latent period. Oxidative damage to DNA is considered a primary cause of radiation injury to cells. DNA can be repaired by highly efficient mechanisms while repair of oxidized proteins is limited. Oxidized proteins are often destined for degradation. We examined protein oxidation following 17 Gy (0.6 Gy/min) thoracic X-irradiation in C57BL/6J mice. Seventeen Gy thoracic irradiation resulted in 100% mortality of mice within 127–189 days postirradiation. Necropsy findings indicated that pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis were the leading cause of mortality. We investigated the oxidation of lung proteins at 24 h postirradiation following 17 Gy thoracic irradiation using 2-D gel electrophoresis and OxyBlot for the detection of protein carbonylation. Seven carbonylated proteins were identified using mass spectrometry: serum albumin, selenium binding protein-1, alpha antitrypsin, cytoplasmic actin-1, carbonic anhydrase-2, peroxiredoxin-6, and apolipoprotein A1. The carbonylation status of carbonic anhydrase-2, selenium binding protein, and peroxiredoxin-6 was higher in control lung tissue. Apolipoprotein A1 and serum albumin carbonylation were increased following X-irradiation, as confirmed by OxyBlot immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. Our findings indicate that the profile of specific protein oxidation in the lung is altered following radiation exposure. PMID:28248270

  9. OXIDATIVE MODIFICATION OF PROTEINS AND GLUTATHIONE SYSTEM IN ADIPOCYTES UNDER DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Shakhristova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, diabetes ranks third in relation to medical and social significance after cardiovascular diseases and cancer and is the leading cause of blindness; it greatly increases the risk of myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, nephropathy and hypertension in patients with this disorder; therefore clinical and experimental studies aimed at investigation of diabetes emergence and development mechanisms are urgent.The aim of the study was to investigate the status of oxidative modification of proteins and glutathionedependent antioxidant defense system in adipocytes of rats with alloxan diabetes under conditions of oxidative stress.Material and methods. Development of type 1 diabetes was induced in rats by alloxan administration (90 mg/kg of body mass. Adipocytes were obtained from epididymal adipose tissue of rats. The level of carbonyl derivatives of proteins, oxidized tryptophan, bityrosine, general, reduced, oxygenated and protein-bound glutathione, as well as glutathione peroxidase activity in adipocytes of rats was determined.Results. In adipocytes of rats with alloxan diabetes, concentration of carbonyl derivatives of proteins, bityrosine and oxidized tryptophan increased on the background of redox-potential of glutathione system and glutathione peroxidase activity decrease.Conclusion. The obtained data indicate the activation of free-radical oxidation of proteins and reduction of antioxidant defense under conditions of oxidative stress in the adipose tissue of rats with alloxan diabetes; this process plays an important role in pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications development.

  10. 3-Hydroxylysine, a potential marker for studying radical-induced protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, B; Bubb, W A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    albumin (BSA) and human low-density lipoprotein (LDL)] and diseased human tissues (atherosclerotic plaques and lens cataractous proteins). This work was aimed at investigating oxidized lysine as a sensitive marker for protein oxidation, as such residues are present on protein surfaces, and are therefore...... likely to be particularly susceptible to oxidation by radicals in bulk solution. HO* attack on lysine in the presence of oxygen, followed by NaBH4 reduction, is shown to give rise to (2S)-3-hydroxylysine [(2S)-2,6-diamino-3-hydroxyhexanoic acid], (2S)-4-hydroxylysine [(2S)-2,6-diamino-4-hydroxyhexanoic...... acid], (2S, 5R)-5-hydroxylysine [(2S,5R)-2,6-diamino-5-hydroxyhexanoic acid], and (2S,5S)-5-hydroxylysine [(2S,5S)-2,6-diamino-5-hydroxyhexanoic acid]. 5-Hydroxylysines are natural products formed by lysyl oxidase and are therefore not good markers of radical-mediated oxidation. The other...

  11. Aqueous Oxidative Heck Reaction as a Protein-Labeling Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ourailidou, Marilena; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Baas, Bert-Jan; Jeronimus-Stratingh, Catherine; Gottumukkala, Aditya L.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Dekker, Frans

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of chemical reactions are being employed for bio-orthogonal ligation of detection labels to protein-bound functional groups. Several of these strategies, however, are limited in their application to pure proteins and are ineffective in complex biological samples such as cell

  12. Analysis of ribosomal protein gene structures: implications for intron evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many spliceosomal introns exist in the eukaryotic nuclear genome. Despite much research, the evolution of spliceosomal introns remains poorly understood. In this paper, we tried to gain insights into intron evolution from a novel perspective by comparing the gene structures of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (CRPs and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs, which are held to be of archaeal and bacterial origin, respectively. We analyzed 25 homologous pairs of CRP and MRP genes that together had a total of 527 intron positions. We found that all 12 of the intron positions shared by CRP and MRP genes resulted from parallel intron gains and none could be considered to be "conserved," i.e., descendants of the same ancestor. This was supported further by the high frequency of proto-splice sites at these shared positions; proto-splice sites are proposed to be sites for intron insertion. Although we could not definitively disprove that spliceosomal introns were already present in the last universal common ancestor, our results lend more support to the idea that introns were gained late. At least, our results show that MRP genes were intronless at the time of endosymbiosis. The parallel intron gains between CRP and MRP genes accounted for 2.3% of total intron positions, which should provide a reliable estimate for future inferences of intron evolution.

  13. Purification of reversibly oxidized proteins (PROP reveals a redox switch controlling p38 MAP kinase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J Templeton

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of cysteine residues of proteins is emerging as an important means of regulation of signal transduction, particularly of protein kinase function. Tools to detect and quantify cysteine oxidation of proteins have been a limiting factor in understanding the role of cysteine oxidation in signal transduction. As an example, the p38 MAP kinase is activated by several stress-related stimuli that are often accompanied by in vitro generation of hydrogen peroxide. We noted that hydrogen peroxide inhibited p38 activity despite paradoxically increasing the activating phosphorylation of p38. To address the possibility that cysteine oxidation may provide a negative regulatory effect on p38 activity, we developed a biochemical assay to detect reversible cysteine oxidation in intact cells. This procedure, PROP, demonstrated in vivo oxidation of p38 in response to hydrogen peroxide and also to the natural inflammatory lipid prostaglandin J2. Mutagenesis of the potential target cysteines showed that oxidation occurred preferentially on residues near the surface of the p38 molecule. Cysteine oxidation thus controls a functional redox switch regulating the intensity or duration of p38 activity that would not be revealed by immunodetection of phosphoprotein commonly interpreted as reflective of p38 activity.

  14. Oxidative stress and CCN1 protein in human skin connective tissue aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoping Qin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS is an important pathogenic factor involved in human aging. Human skin is a primary target of oxidative stress from ROS generated from both extrinsic and intrinsic sources, like ultraviolet irradiation (UV and endogenous oxidative metabolism. Oxidative stress causes the alterations of collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM, the hallmark of skin connective tissue aging. Age-related alteration of dermal collagenous ECM impairs skin structural integrity and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as poor wound healing and skin cancer. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of oxidative stress and CCN1 protein (first member of CCN family proteins, a critical mediator of oxidative stress-induced skin connective tissue aging.

  15. Plant-derived phenolics inhibit the accrual of structurally characterised protein and lipid oxidative modifications.

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    Arantza Soler-Cantero

    Full Text Available Epidemiological data suggest that plant-derived phenolics beneficial effects include an inhibition of LDL oxidation. After applying a screening method based on 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine-protein carbonyl reaction to 21 different plant-derived phenolic acids, we selected the most antioxidant ones. Their effect was assessed in 5 different oxidation systems, as well as in other model proteins. Mass-spectrometry was then used, evidencing a heterogeneous effect on the accumulation of the structurally characterized protein carbonyl glutamic and aminoadipic semialdehydes as well as for malondialdehyde-lysine in LDL apoprotein. After TOF based lipidomics, we identified the most abundant differential lipids in Cu(++-incubated LDL as 1-palmitoyllysophosphatidylcholine and 1-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Most of selected phenolic compounds prevented the accumulation of those phospholipids and the cellular impairment induced by oxidized LDL. Finally, to validate these effects in vivo, we evaluated the effect of the intake of a phenolic-enriched extract in plasma protein and lipid modifications in a well-established model of atherosclerosis (diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in hamsters. This showed that a dietary supplement with a phenolic-enriched extract diminished plasma protein oxidative and lipid damage. Globally, these data show structural basis of antioxidant properties of plant-derived phenolic acids in protein oxidation that may be relevant for the health-promoting effects of its dietary intake.

  16. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  17. A human phenome-interactome network of protein complexes implicated in genetic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Karlberg, Erik, Olof, Linnart; Størling, Zenia, Marian

    2007-01-01

    the known disease-causing protein as the top candidate, and in 870 intervals with no identified disease-causing gene, provides novel candidates implicated in disorders such as retinitis pigmentosa, epithelial ovarian cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, type...

  18. Effect of pomegranate peel extract on lipid and protein oxidation in beef meatballs during refrigerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Sebahattin Serhat; Soyer, Ayla; Işıkçı, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    Antioxidant effect of pomegranate peel extract (PE) to retard lipid and protein oxidation was investigated in meatballs during refrigerated storage at 4±1°C. Concentrated lyophilised water extract of pomegranate peel was incorporated into freshly minced beef meat at 0.5% and 1% concentrations and compared with 0.01% butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) as a reference and control (without any antioxidant). PE showed high phenolic content and antioxidant activity. In PE added samples, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) value, peroxide formation, loss of sulfhydryl groups and formation of protein carbonyls were lower than control (Pmeatballs prolonged the refrigerated storage up to 8 days. Addition of both 0.5 and 1% PE in meatballs reduced lipid and protein oxidation and improved sensory scores. These results indicated that PE was effective on retarding lipid and protein oxidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nitric oxide-related species-induced protein oxidation: reversible, irreversible, and protective effects on enzyme function of papain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väänänen, Antti J; Kankuri, Esko; Rauhala, Pekka

    2005-04-15

    Protein oxidation, irreversible modification, and inactivation may play key roles in various neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, we studied the effects of the potentially in vivo occurring nitric oxide-related species on two different markers of protein oxidation: protein carbonyl generation on bovine serum albumine (BSA) and loss of activity of a cysteine-dependent protease, papain, in vitro by using Angeli's salt, papanonoate, SIN-1, and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) as donors of nitroxyl, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, and nitrosonium ions, respectively. Angeli's salt, SIN-1, and papanonoate (0-1000 microM) all generated a concentration-dependent increase in carbonyl formation on BSA (107, 60, and 45%, respectively). GSNO did not affect carbonyl formation. Papain was inhibited by Angeli's salt, SIN-1, papanonoate, and GSNO with IC50 values of 0.62, 2.3, 54, and 80 microM, respectively. Angeli's salt (3.16 microM)-induced papain inactivation was only partially reversible, while the effects of GSNO (316 microM) and papanonoate (316 microM) were reversible upon addition of excess DTT. The Angeli's salt-mediated DTT-irreversible inhibition of papain was prevented by GSNO or papanonoate pretreatment, hypothetically through mixed disulfide formation or S-nitrosylation of the catalytically critical thiol group of papain. These results, for the first time, compare the generation of carbonyls in proteins by Angeli's salt, papanonoate, and SIN-1. Furthermore, these results suggest that S-nitrosothiols may have a novel function in protecting critical thiols from irreversible oxidative damage.

  20. Seasonal variability of oxidative stress markers in city bus drivers. Part II. Oxidative damage to lipids and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Pavel; Svecova, Vlasta; Milcova, Alena; Lnenickova, Zdena; Solansky, Ivo; Sram, Radim J

    2008-07-03

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the seasonal variability of markers of oxidative damage to lipids (15-F2t-isoprostane, 15-F2t-IsoP) and proteins (protein carbonyl levels) in 50 bus drivers and 50 controls from Prague, Czech Republic, and to identify factors affecting oxidative stress markers. The samples were collected in three seasons with different levels of air pollution. The exposure to environmental pollutants (carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, c-PAHs, particulate matter, PM2.5 and PM10, and volatile organic compounds, VOC) was monitored by personal and/or stationary monitors. For the analysis of both markers, ELISA techniques were used. The median levels of individual markers in bus drivers versus controls were as follows: 15-F2t-IsoP (nmol/mmol creatinine): winter 2005, 0.81 versus 0.68 (pbus drivers in winter seasons, but not in summer. Lipid peroxidation was positively correlated with c-PAHs and PM exposure; protein oxidation correlated negatively and was highest in summer suggesting another factor(s) affecting protein carbonyl levels.

  1. Zinc in the prevention of Fe2initiated lipid and protein oxidation

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    M. PAOLA ZAGO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we characterized the capacity of zinc to protect lipids and proteins from Fe2+-initiated oxidative damage. The effects of zinc on lipid oxidation were investigated in liposomes composed of brain phosphatidylcholine (PC and phosphatidylserine (PS at a molar relationship of 60:40 (PC:PS, 60:40. Lipid oxidation was evaluated as the oxidation of cis-parinaric acid or as the formation of 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS. Zinc protected liposomes from Fe2+ (2.5-50 muM-supported lipid oxidation. However, zinc (50 muM did not prevent the oxidative inactivation of glutamine synthelase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase when rat brain superntants were oxidized in the presence of 5 muM Fe2+ and 0.5 mM H2O2 .We also studied the interactions of zinc with epicatechin in the prevention of liid oxidation in liposomes. The simulaneous addition of 0.5 muM epicatechin (EC and 50 muM zinc or EC separately. Zinc (50 muM also protecte liposomes from the stimulatory effect of aluminum on Fe2+-initiated lipid oxidation. Zinc could play an important role as an antioxidant in biological systems, replacing iron and other metals with pro-oxidant activity from binding sites and interacting with other components of the oxidant defense system.

  2. Myeloperoxidase-mediated protein lysine oxidation generates 2-aminoadipic acid and lysine nitrile in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongqiao; Levison, Bruce S; Buffa, Jennifer A; Huang, Ying; Fu, Xiaoming; Wang, Zeneng; Gogonea, Valentin; DiDonato, Joseph A; Hazen, Stanley L

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies reveal 2-aminoadipic acid (2-AAA) is both elevated in subjects at risk for diabetes and mechanistically linked to glucose homeostasis. Prior studies also suggest enrichment of protein-bound 2-AAA as an oxidative post-translational modification of lysyl residues in tissues associated with degenerative diseases of aging. While in vitro studies suggest redox active transition metals or myeloperoxidase (MPO) generated hypochlorous acid (HOCl) may produce protein-bound 2-AAA, the mechanism(s) responsible for generation of 2-AAA during inflammatory diseases are unknown. In initial studies we observed that traditional acid- or base-catalyzed protein hydrolysis methods previously employed to measure tissue 2-AAA can artificially generate protein-bound 2-AAA from an alternative potential lysine oxidative product, lysine nitrile (LysCN). Using a validated protease-based digestion method coupled with stable isotope dilution LC/MS/MS, we now report protein bound 2-AAA and LysCN are both formed by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and the MPO/H 2 O 2 /Cl - system of leukocytes. At low molar ratio of oxidant to target protein N ε -lysine moiety, 2-AAA is formed via an initial N ε -monochloramine intermediate, which ultimately produces the more stable 2-AAA end-product via sequential generation of transient imine and semialdehyde intermediates. At higher oxidant to target protein N ε -lysine amine ratios, protein-bound LysCN is formed via initial generation of a lysine N ε -dichloramine intermediate. In studies employing MPO knockout mice and an acute inflammation model, we show that both free and protein-bound 2-AAA, and in lower yield, protein-bound LysCN, are formed by MPO in vivo during inflammation. Finally, both 2-AAA and to lesser extent LysCN are shown to be enriched in human aortic atherosclerotic plaque, a tissue known to harbor multiple MPO-catalyzed protein oxidation products. Collectively, these results show that MPO-mediated oxidation of protein lysyl

  3. Oxidative stress and production of bioactive monoterpene indole alkaloids: biotechnological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Hélio Nitta; Rau, Mariana Ritter; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano

    2014-02-01

    Monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) encompass plant natural products with important pharmacological relevance. They include the anti-tumoral MIAs found in Catharanthus roseus and Camptotheca acuminata. The often low yields of bioactive alkaloids in plants has prompted research to identify the factors regulating MIA production. Oxidative stress is a general response associated with biotic and abiotic stresses leading to several secondary responses, including elicitation of MIA production. These changes in secondary metabolism may take place directly or via second messengers, such as Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). H2O2 is the main ROS that participates in MIA biosynthesis. This review analyzes the links between oxidative stress, elicitation of bioactive MIA production and their potential roles in antioxidant defense, as well as exploring the implications to developing biotechnological strategies relevant for alkaloid supply.

  4. Effects of diet, packaging, and irradiation on protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, and color of raw broiler thigh meat during refrigerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, S; Zhang, W G; Lee, E J; Ma, C W; Ahn, D U

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of dietary treatment, packaging, and irradiation singly or in combination on the oxidative stability of broiler chicken thigh meat. A total of 120 four-week-old chickens were divided into 12 pens (10 birds/pen), and 4 pens of broilers were randomly assigned to a control oxidized diet (5% oxidized oil) or an antioxidant-added diet [500 IU of vitamin E + 200 mg/kg of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA)] and fed for 2 wk. After slaughter, thigh meats were separated, ground, packaged in either oxygen-permeable or oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, and irradiated at 0 or 3 kGy. Lipid oxidation (TBA-reactive substances), protein oxidation (carbonyl), and color of the meat were measured at 1, 4, and 7 d of refrigerated storage. The lipid and protein oxidation of thigh meats from birds fed the diet supplemented with antioxidants (vitamin E + BHA) was significantly lower than the lipid and protein oxidation of birds fed the control diet, whereas the lipid and protein oxidation of broilers fed the oxidized oil diet was higher than that of birds fed the control diet. Vacuum packaging slowed, but irradiation accelerated, the lipid and protein oxidation of thigh meat during storage. Dietary antioxidants (vitamin E + BHA) and irradiation treatments showed a stronger effect on lipid oxidation than on protein oxidation. A significant correlation between lipid and protein oxidation in meat was found during storage. Dietary supplementation of vitamin E + BHA and the irradiation treatment increased the lightness and redness of thigh meat, respectively. It is suggested that appropriate use of dietary antioxidants in combination with packaging could be effective in minimizing oxidative changes in irradiated raw chicken thigh meat.

  5. Heat Shock Proteins: Pathogenic Role in Atherosclerosis and Potential Therapeutic Implications

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    Arman Kilic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are a highly conserved group of proteins that are constitutively expressed and function as molecular chaperones, aiding in protein folding and preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. In the arterial wall, HSPs have a protective role under normal physiologic conditions. In disease states, however, HSPs expressed on the vascular endothelial cell surface can act as targets for detrimental autoimmunity due to their highly conserved sequences. Developing therapeutic strategies for atherosclerosis based on HSPs is challenged by the need to balance such physiologic and pathologic roles of these proteins. This paper summarizes the role of HSPs in normal vascular wall processes as well as in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The potential implications of HSPs in clinical therapies for atherosclerosis are also discussed.

  6. Protein Changes in Sulfur Mustard Exposure: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, P.; Jin, X.; Ray, R.

    2007-01-01

    Laminin-5, a heterotrimer of laminin α3, β3, and γ2 subunits, is a component of the skin basal epithelium. Laminin-5 functions as a ligand of the α3β1 and α6β4 integrins in epidermal keratinocytes to regulate cell adhesion, migration, morphogenesis, and assembly of basement membranes; thus it is essential for a stable attachment of the epidermis to the dermis and recovery of damaged skin. Sulfur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, is a vesicant chemical warfare and terrorism agent. Skin exposure to SM results in fluid-filled blisters; proposed mechanisms are inflammation, protease stimulation, basal cell death, and separation of the epidermis from the dermis apparently due to the degradation of attachment proteins like laminin-5. Therefore, we investigated the effects of SM exposure on the degradation of laminin-5 by exposing normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) to SM (0-300 μM, 1-24 hours). We found that SM degraded laminin-5 and its two subunits β3 and γ2, but not α3. Preincubation of cells with a serine protease inhibitor (PMSF), or a metalloprotease inhibitor (1, 10-phenanthroline) prior to SM exposure partially prevented SM-induced degradation of laminin-5 subunits, β3 and γ2. Regarding specificity, laminin-5 γ2 was degraded due to a bifunctional mustard compound like SM, but not due to the other alkylating agents tested. Our results support that laminin-5 degradation is an important mechanism of SM injury as well as a useful biomarker of SM exposure. This knowledge of the mechanism of laminin-5 degradation due to SM has potential application in developing cutaneous therapeutics against SM.(author)

  7. Implications of chronic daily anti-oxidant administration on the inflammatory response to intracortical microelectrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Stewart, Wade G.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Wong, Chun T.; Meador, William D.; Ziats, Nicholas P.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Oxidative stress events have been implicated to occur and facilitate multiple failure modes of intracortical microelectrodes. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a sustained concentration of an anti-oxidant and to reduce oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. Approach. Non-functional microelectrodes were implanted into the cortex of male Sprague Dawley rats for up to sixteen weeks. Half of the animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of the natural anti-oxidant resveratrol, at 30 mg kg-1. The study was designed to investigate the biodistribution of the resveratrol, and the effects on neuroinflammation/neuroprotection following device implantation. Main results. Daily maintenance of a sustained range of resveratrol throughout the implantation period resulted in fewer degenerating neurons in comparison to control animals at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Initial and chronic improvements in neuronal viability in resveratrol-dosed animals were correlated with significant reductions in local superoxide anion accumulation around the implanted device at two weeks after implantation. Controls, receiving only saline injections, were also found to have reduced amounts of accumulated superoxide anion locally and less neurodegeneration than controls at sixteen weeks post-implantation. Despite observed benefits, thread-like adhesions were found between the liver and diaphragm in resveratrol-dosed animals. Significance. Overall, our chronic daily anti-oxidant dosing scheme resulted in improvements in neuronal viability surrounding implanted microelectrodes, which could result in improved device performance. However, due to the discovery of thread-like adhesions, further work is still required to optimize a chronic anti-oxidant dosing regime for the application of intracortical microelectrodes.

  8. Protein Carbamylation: A Marker Reflecting Increased Age-Related Cell Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Carracedo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbamylation is a post-translational modification of proteins that may partake in the oxidative stress-associated cell damage, and its increment has been recently proposed as a “hallmark of aging”. The molecular mechanisms associated with aging are related to an increased release of free radicals. We have studied whether carbamylated proteins from the peripheral blood of healthy subjects are related to oxidative damage and aging, taking into account the gender and the immune profile of the subjects. The study was performed in healthy human volunteers. The detection of protein carbamylation and malondialdehyde (MDA levels was evaluated using commercial kits. The immune profile was calculated using parameters of immune cell function. The results show that the individuals from the elderly group (60–79 years old have increased carbamylated protein and MDA levels. When considered by gender, only men between 60 and 79 years old showed significantly increased carbamylated proteins and MDA levels. When those subjects were classified by their immune profile, the carbamylated protein levels were higher in those with an older immune profile. In conclusion, the carbamylation of proteins in peripheral blood is related to age-associated oxidative damage and to an aging functional immunological signature. Our results suggest that carbamylated proteins may play an important role at the cellular level in the aging process.

  9. Redox proteomics changes in the fungal pathogen Trichosporon asahii on arsenic exposure: identification of protein responses to metal-induced oxidative stress in an environmentally-sampled isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Ilyas

    Full Text Available Trichosporon asahii is a yeast pathogen implicated in opportunistic infections. Cultures of an isolate collected from industrial wastewater were exposed for 2 days to 100 mg/L sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 and cadmium (CdCl2. Both metals reduced glutathione transferase (GST activity but had no effect on superoxide dismutase or catalase. NaAsO2 exposure increased glutathione reductase activity while CdCl2 had no effect. Protein thiols were labeled with 5-iodoacetamido fluorescein followed by one dimensional electrophoresis which revealed extensive protein thiol oxidation in response to CdCl2 treatment but thiol reduction in response to NaAsO2. Two dimensional electrophoresis analyses showed that the intensity of some protein spots was enhanced on treatment as judged by SameSpots image analysis software. In addition, some spots showed decreased IAF fluorescence suggesting thiol oxidation. Selected spots were excised and tryptic digested for identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Twenty unique T. asahii proteins were identified of which the following proteins were up-regulated in response to NaAsO2: 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase, phospholipase B, alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, ATP synthase alpha chain, 20S proteasome beta-type subunit Pre3p and the hypothetical proteins A1Q1_08001, A1Q2_03020, A1Q1_06950, A1Q1_06913. In addition, the following showed decreased thiol-associated fluorescence consistent with thiol oxidation; aconitase; aldehyde reductase I; phosphoglycerate kinase; translation elongation factor 2; heat shock protein 70 and hypothetical protein A1Q2_04745. Some proteins showed both increase in abundance coupled with decrease in IAF fluorescence; 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase; homoserine dehydrogenase Hom6 and hypothetical proteins A1Q2_03020 and A1Q1_00754. Targets implicated in redox response included 10 unique metabolic enzymes, heat shock proteins, a component of the 20S proteasome and translation elongation factor 2. These data

  10. Fish proteins as targets of ferrous-catalyzed oxidation: identification of protein carbonyls by fluorescent labeling on two-dimensional gels and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Manuel; da Rocha, Angela Pereira; Roepstorff, Peter; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2011-07-27

    Protein oxidation in fish meat is considered to affect negatively the muscle texture. An important source of free radicals taking part in this process is Fenton's reaction dependent on ferrous ions present in the tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of cod muscle proteins in sarcoplasmic and myofibril fractions to in vitro metal-catalyzed oxidation and to point out protein candidates that might play a major role in the deterioration of fish quality. Extracted control proteins and proteins subjected to free radicals generated by Fe(II)/ascorbate mixture were labeled with fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide (FTSC) to tag carbonyl groups and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Consecutive visualization of protein carbonyl levels by capturing the FTSC signal and total protein levels by capturing the SyproRuby staining signal allowed us to quantify the relative change in protein carbonyl levels corrected for changes in protein content. Proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and homology-based searches. The results show that freshly extracted cod muscle proteins exhibit a detectable carbonylation background and that the incubation with Fe(II)/ascorbate triggers a further oxidation of both sarcoplasmic and myofibril proteins. Different proteins exhibited various degrees of sensitivity to oxidation processes. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), nucleoside diphosphate kinase B (NDK), triosephosphate isomerase, phosphoglycerate mutase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and enolase were the sarcoplasmic proteins most vulnerable to ferrous-catalyzed oxidation. Moreover, NDK, phosphoglycerate mutase, and GAPDH were identified in several spots differing by their pI, and those forms showed different susceptibilities to metal-catalyzed oxidation, indicating that post-translational modifications may change the resistance of proteins to oxidative damage. The Fe(II)/ascorbate treatment significantly

  11. Effectiveness of exercise and protein supplementation intervention on body composition, functional fitness, and oxidative stress among elderly Malays with sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Suzana Shahar,1 Norshafarina Shari Kamaruddin,2 Manal Badrasawi,1 Noor Ibrahim Mohamed Sakian,3 Zahara Abd Manaf,1 Zaitun Yassin,4 Leonard Joseph51Dietetic Programme, 2Biomedical Programme, 3Occupational Therapy Programme, School of Healthcare Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, 4Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, 5Department of Physiotherapy, School of Healthcare Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: Sarcopenia, characterized as muscle loss that occurs with aging, is a major health problem in an aging population, due to its implications on mobility, quality of life, and fall risk. Protein supplementation could improve the physical fitness by increasing protein anabolism, and exercise has a documented evidence of positive effect on functional status among the elderly. However, the combined effect of both protein supplementation and exercise has not been investigated among sarcopenic elderly in the Asian population. Thus, this study aimed to determine the effectiveness of exercise intervention and protein supplementation either alone or in combination for 12 weeks, on body composition, functional fitness, and oxidative stress among elderly Malays with sarcopenia. Sixty five sarcopenic elderly Malays aged 60-74 years were assigned to the control group, exercise group (ExG, protein supplementation group (PrG, or the combination of exercise and protein supplementation group. A significant interaction effect between body weight and body mass index (BMI was observed, with the PrG (-2.1% body weight, -1.8% BMI showing the highest reductions. Further, there was a decrease in % body fat (-4.5% and an increase in fat-free mass (kg (+5.7% in the ExG after 12 weeks (P < 0.05. The highest increments in lower and upper body strength were observed in the Pr

  12. Cross-linking by protein oxidation in the rapidly setting gel-based glues of slugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Andrew; Salt, Michael; Bell, Ashley; Zeitler, Matt; Litra, Noelle; Smith, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The terrestrial slug Arion subfuscus secretes a glue that is a dilute gel with remarkable adhesive and cohesive strength. The function of this glue depends on metals, raising the possibility that metal-catalyzed oxidation plays a role. The extent and time course of protein oxidation was measured by immunoblotting to detect the resulting carbonyl groups. Several proteins, particularly one with a relative molecular mass (Mr) of 165×103, were heavily oxidized. Of the proteins known to distinguish the glue from non-adhesive mucus, only specific size variants were oxidized. The oxidation appears to occur within the first few seconds of secretion. Although carbonyls were detected by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) in denatured proteins, they were not easily detected in the native state. The presence of reversible cross-links derived from carbonyls was tested for by treatment with sodium borohydride, which would reduce uncross-linked carbonyls to alcohols, but stabilize imine bonds formed by carbonyls and thus lead to less soluble complexes. Consistent with imine bond formation, sodium borohydride led to a 20–35% decrease in the amount of soluble protein with a Mr of 40–165 (×103) without changing the carbonyl content per protein. In contrast, the nucleophile hydroxylamine, which would competitively disrupt imine bonds, increased protein solubility in the glue. Finally, the primary amine groups on a protein with a Mr of 15×103 were not accessible to acid anhydrides. The results suggest that cross-links between aldehydes and primary amines contribute to the cohesive strength of the glue. PMID:21525316

  13. Electrospun fish protein fibers as a biopolymer-based carrier – implications for oral protein delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Protein-based electrospun fibers have emerged as novel nanostructured materials for tissue engineering and drug delivery due to their unique structural characteristics, biocompatibility and biodegradability. The aim of this study was to explore the use of electrospun fibers based on fish...... sarcoplasmic proteins as an oral delivery platform for biopharmaceuticals, using insulin as a model protein. Methods: Fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) were isolated from fresh cod and electrospun into nanomicrofibers using insulin as a model payload. The morphology of FSP fibers was characterized using...... differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers was followed by RP-HPLC and ELISA, and the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured before and after the experiment. Cell viability was assessed by the MTS/PMS assay. Results: Insulin was encapsulated in the electrospun FSP fibers with high efficiency, high...

  14. Highly sensitive detection for proteins using graphene oxide-aptamer based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Li, Qin; Li, Raoqi; Yan, Lirong; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Keping; Shi, Haixia

    2015-07-07

    In recent years, the detection of proteins by using bare graphene oxide (GO) to quench the fluorescence of fluorescein-labeled aptamers has been reported. However, the proteins can be adsorbed on the surface of bare GO to prevent the sensitivity from further being improved. In order to solve this problem, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-protected GO was used to prevent the proteins using thrombin as an example from nonspecific binding. The detection limit was improved compared to bare GO under the optimized ratio of GO to PEG concentration. The results show that our method is a promising technique for the detection of proteins.

  15. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Zhang, Qunye, E-mail: wz.zhangqy@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Li, Guorong, E-mail: grli@sdnu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Animal Resistant Biology, School of Life Sciences, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  16. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi; Zhang, Qunye; Li, Guorong

    2015-01-01

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation

  17. Preferential 5-Methylcytosine Oxidation in the Linker Region of Reconstituted Positioned Nucleosomes by Tet1 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizaki, Seiichiro; Zou, Tingting; Li, Yue; Han, Yong-Woon; Suzuki, Yuki; Harada, Yoshie; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-11-07

    Tet (ten-eleven translocation) family proteins oxidize 5-methylcytosine (mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC), 5-formylcytosine (fC), and 5-carboxycytosine (caC), and are suggested to be involved in the active DNA demethylation pathway. In this study, we reconstituted positioned mononucleosomes using CpG-methylated 382 bp DNA containing the Widom 601 sequence and recombinant histone octamer, and subjected the nucleosome to treatment with Tet1 protein. The sites of oxidized methylcytosine were identified by bisulfite sequencing. We found that, for the oxidation reaction, Tet1 protein prefers mCs located in the linker region of the nucleosome compared with those located in the core region. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Structural and functional characteristics of cGMP-dependent methionine oxidation in Arabidopsis thaliana proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2013-01-05

    Background: Increasing structural and biochemical evidence suggests that post-translational methionine oxidation of proteins is not just a result of cellular damage but may provide the cell with information on the cellular oxidative status. In addition, oxidation of methionine residues in key regulatory proteins, such as calmodulin, does influence cellular homeostasis. Previous findings also indicate that oxidation of methionine residues in signaling molecules may have a role in stress responses since these specific structural modifications can in turn change biological activities of proteins. Findings. Here we use tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics to show that treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana cells with a non-oxidative signaling molecule, the cell-permeant second messenger analogue, 8-bromo-3,5-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), results in a time-dependent increase in the content of oxidised methionine residues. Interestingly, the group of proteins affected by cGMP-dependent methionine oxidation is functionally enriched for stress response proteins. Furthermore, we also noted distinct signatures in the frequency of amino acids flanking oxidised and un-oxidised methionine residues on both the C- and N-terminus. Conclusions: Given both a structural and functional bias in methionine oxidation events in response to a signaling molecule, we propose that these are indicative of a specific role of such post-translational modifications in the direct or indirect regulation of cellular responses. The mechanisms that determine the specificity of the modifications remain to be elucidated. 2013 Marondedze et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Homogenization Pressure and Temperature Affect Protein Partitioning and Oxidative Stability of Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Barouh, Nathalie; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative stability of 10 % fish oil-in-water emulsions was investigated for emulsions prepared under different homogenization conditions. Homogenization was conducted at two different pressures (5 or 22.5 MPa), and at two different temperatures (22 and 72 °C). Milk proteins were used...... prior to homogenization did not have any clear effect on lipid oxidation in either of the two types of emulsions....

  20. Methionine sulfoxides in serum proteins as potential clinical biomarkers of oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Satoko Suzuki; Yoshio Kodera; Tatsuya Saito; Kazumi Fujimoto; Akari Momozono; Akinori Hayashi; Yuji Kamata; Masayoshi Shichiri

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases, and circulating biomarkers of its severity remains a topic of great interest for researchers. Our peptidomic strategy enables accurate and reproducible analysis of circulating proteins/peptides with or without post-translational modifications. Conventional wisdom holds that hydrophobic methionines exposed to an aqueous environment or experimental handling procedures are vulnerable to oxidation. However, we show that...

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins in normal mammary and breast cancer tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, Carol D; Thorngren, Daniel L; Nardulli, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    During the course of normal cellular metabolism, oxygen is consumed and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced. If not effectively dissipated, ROS can accumulate and damage resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. Enzymes involved in redox regulation and DNA repair dissipate ROS and repair the resulting damage in order to preserve a functional cellular environment. Because increased ROS accumulation and/or unrepaired DNA damage can lead to initiation and progression of cancer and we had identified a number of oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins that influence estrogen responsiveness of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it seemed possible that these proteins might be differentially expressed in normal mammary tissue, benign hyperplasia (BH), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer (IBC). Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of a number of oxidative stress proteins, DNA repair proteins, and damage markers in 60 human mammary tissues which were classified as BH, DCIS or IBC. The relative mean intensity was determined for each tissue section and ANOVA was used to detect statistical differences in the relative expression of BH, DCIS and IBC compared to normal mammary tissue. We found that a number of these proteins were overexpressed and that the cellular localization was altered in human breast cancer tissue. Our studies suggest that oxidative stress and DNA repair proteins not only protect normal cells from the damaging effects of ROS, but may also promote survival of mammary tumor cells

  2. Metformin induces oxidative stress in white adipocytes and raises uncoupling protein 2 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anedda, Andrea; Rial, Eduardo; González-Barroso, M Mar

    2008-10-01

    Metformin is a drug widely used to treat type 2 diabetes. It enhances insulin sensitivity by improving glucose utilization in tissues like liver or muscle. Metformin inhibits respiration, and the decrease in cellular energy activates the AMP-activated protein kinase that in turn switches on catabolic pathways. Moreover, metformin increases lipolysis and beta-oxidation in white adipose tissue, thereby reducing the triglyceride stores. The uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are transporters that lower the efficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. UCP2 is thought to protect against oxidative stress although, alternatively, it could play an energy dissipation role. The aim of this work was to analyse the involvement of UCP2 on the effects of metformin in white adipocytes. We studied the effect of this drug in differentiating 3T3-L1 adipocytes and found that metformin causes oxidative stress since it increases the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lowers the aconitase activity. Variations in UCP2 protein levels parallel those of ROS. Metformin also increases lipolysis in these cells although only when the levels of ROS and UCP2 have decreased. Hence, UCP2 does not appear to be needed to facilitate fatty acid oxidation. Furthermore, treatment of C57BL/6 mice with metformin also augmented the levels of UCP2 in epididymal white adipose tissue. We conclude that metformin treatment leads to the overexpression of UCP2 in adipocytes to minimize the oxidative stress that is probably due to the inhibition of respiration caused by the drug.

  3. Yeast aquaporin regulation by 4-hydroxynonenal is implicated in oxidative stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Claudia; Tartaro Bujak, Ivana; Mihaljević, Branka; Soveral, Graça; Cipak Gasparovic, Ana

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species, especially hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), contribute to functional molecular impairment and cellular damage, but also are necessary in normal cellular metabolism, and in low doses play stimulatory role in cell proliferation and stress resistance. In parallel, reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), are lipid peroxidation breakdown products which also contribute to regulation of numerous cellular processes. Recently, channeling of H 2 O 2 by some mammalian aquaporin isoforms has been reported and suggested to contribute to aquaporin involvement in cancer malignancies, although the mechanism by which these membrane water channels are implicated in oxidative stress is not clear. In this study, two yeast models with increased levels of membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and aquaporin AQY1 overexpression, respectively, were used to evaluate their interplay in cell's oxidative status. In particular, the aim of the study was to investigate if HNE accumulation could affect aquaporin function with an outcome in oxidative stress response. The data showed that induction of aquaporin expression by PUFAs results in increased water permeability in yeast membranes and that AQY1 activity is impaired by HNE. Moreover, AQY1 expression increases cellular sensitivity to oxidative stress by facilitating H 2 O 2 influx. On the other hand, AQY1 expression has no influence on the cellular antioxidant GSH levels and catalase activity. These results strongly suggest that aquaporins are important players in oxidative stress response and could contribute to regulation of cellular processes by regulation of H 2 O 2 influx. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(5):355-362, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. A PerR-like protein involved in response to oxidative stress in the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Li, Tao; Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing, E-mail: tianbing@zju.edu.cn; Hua, Yuejin, E-mail: yjhua@zju.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We report a novel PerR-like protein of Fur family in D. radiodurans that is not annotated in the current database. • drperR responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and functions as a negative regulator of katE and dps. • We provided implications on how to utilize sequenced genome data and the importance of genome data mining. • This study adds knowledge to complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans. - Abstract: Response and defense systems against reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the remarkable resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to oxidative stress induced by oxidants or radiation. However, mechanisms involved in ROS response and defense systems of D. radiodurans are not well understood. Fur family proteins are important in ROS response. Only a single Fur homolog is predicted by sequence similarity in the current D. radiodurans genome database. Our bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an additional guanine nucleotide in the genome of D. radiodurans that is not in the database, leading to the discovery of another Fur homolog DrPerR. Gene disruption mutant of DrPerR showed enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and increased catalase activity in cell extracts. Real-time PCR results indicated that DrPerR functions as a repressor of the catalase gene katE. Meanwhile, derepression of dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells) gene under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress by DrPerR point to its regulatory role in metal ions hemostasis. Thus, DrPerR might function as a Fur homolog protein which is involved in ROS response and defense. These results help clarify the complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans.

  5. A PerR-like protein involved in response to oxidative stress in the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Li, Tao; Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We report a novel PerR-like protein of Fur family in D. radiodurans that is not annotated in the current database. • drperR responses to H 2 O 2 and functions as a negative regulator of katE and dps. • We provided implications on how to utilize sequenced genome data and the importance of genome data mining. • This study adds knowledge to complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans. - Abstract: Response and defense systems against reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the remarkable resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to oxidative stress induced by oxidants or radiation. However, mechanisms involved in ROS response and defense systems of D. radiodurans are not well understood. Fur family proteins are important in ROS response. Only a single Fur homolog is predicted by sequence similarity in the current D. radiodurans genome database. Our bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an additional guanine nucleotide in the genome of D. radiodurans that is not in the database, leading to the discovery of another Fur homolog DrPerR. Gene disruption mutant of DrPerR showed enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and increased catalase activity in cell extracts. Real-time PCR results indicated that DrPerR functions as a repressor of the catalase gene katE. Meanwhile, derepression of dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells) gene under H 2 O 2 stress by DrPerR point to its regulatory role in metal ions hemostasis. Thus, DrPerR might function as a Fur homolog protein which is involved in ROS response and defense. These results help clarify the complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans

  6. Ligand exchange chromatography of free amino acids and proteins on porous microparticulate zirconium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, J.A.; Carr, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Lewis acid sites present on the underlying zirconium oxide particles are responsible for the unusual elution sequence for amino acids on copper loaded, phosphated zirconium oxide supports reported in an earlier study. To more thoroughly examine the effect of these strong Lewis acid sites in this paper. The authors have studied ligand exchange chromatography on copper loaded zirconium oxide particles. It is shown here that carboxylate functional groups on amino acid solutes strongly interact with surface Lewis acid sites. Addition of competing hard Lewis bases to the eluent attenuates these specific interactions. The result is a chromatographic system with high selectivity which is also suitable for ligand exchange chromatography of proteins

  7. Synergistic cooperation of PDI family members in peroxiredoxin 4-driven oxidative protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshimi; Kojima, Rieko; Okumura, Masaki; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Masui, Shoji; Maegawa, Ken-ichi; Saiki, Masatoshi; Horibe, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Mamoru; Inaba, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) harbors disulfide bond-generating enzymes, including Ero1α and peroxiredoxin 4 (Prx4), and nearly 20 members of the protein disulfide isomerase family (PDIs), which together constitute a suitable environment for oxidative protein folding. Here, we clarified the Prx4 preferential recognition of two PDI family proteins, P5 and ERp46, and the mode of interaction between Prx4 and P5 thioredoxin domain. Detailed analyses of oxidative folding catalyzed by the reconstituted Prx4-PDIs pathways demonstrated that, while P5 and ERp46 are dedicated to rapid, but promiscuous, disulfide introduction, PDI is an efficient proofreader of non-native disulfides. Remarkably, the Prx4-dependent formation of native disulfide bonds was accelerated when PDI was combined with ERp46 or P5, suggesting that PDIs work synergistically to increase the rate and fidelity of oxidative protein folding. Thus, the mammalian ER seems to contain highly systematized oxidative networks for the efficient production of large quantities of secretory proteins.

  8. Tacrine is implicated in oxidative stress in the laboratory guinea pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracmarova, Alzbeta; Bandouchova, Hana; Pikula, Jiri; Pohanka, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Tacrine was the first acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. The compound is not available for therapeutic purposes as it was withdrawn due to hepatotoxicity of its metabolites. The hepatotoxicity can be decreased by alternative ways of drug administration avoiding thus the first pass effect. The present study is aimed to investigate the influence of intramuscularly administrated tacrine on oxidative stress. Laboratory guinea pigs were exposed to tacrine at doses of 0-800 μg/kg. The animals were euthanized 1 and 24 hours after the exposure. Parameters such as ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), carbonylated proteins, caspase 3 activity, superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione reductase activity were assessed in the frontal, temporal and occipital lobe, cerebellum, liver, spleen, heart, and kidney. Moreover, levels of glucose, total and HDL cholesterol forms, triglycerides, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, total bilirubin, total protein, albumin and activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase were assessed in plasma samples. Activities of the enzymatic markers, level of carbonylated proteins in organs and levels of biochemical markers in plasma were only slightly influenced by tacrine. Dose-dependent elevation of the FRAP value was recognized in the brain tissues and the liver. The TBARS value was increased in the kidney and heart 1 and 24 hours, respectively, after exposure. In the study, the effect of tacrine on markers of oxidative stress was proved. Possible positive effects of tacrine on the antioxidant defence in the brain tissue were discussed.

  9. Attenuation of iron-binding proteins in ARPE-19 cells reduces their resistance to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Markus; Kurz, Tino

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress-related damage to retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is an important feature in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Iron-catalysed intralysosomal production of hydroxyl radicals is considered a major pathogenic factor, leading to lipofuscin formation with ensuing depressed cellular autophagic capacity, lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis. Previously, we have shown that cultured immortalized human RPE (ARPE-19) cells are extremely resistant to exposure to bolus doses of hydrogen peroxide and contain considerable amounts of the iron-binding proteins metallothionein (MT), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and ferritin (FT). According to previous findings, autophagy of these proteins depresses lysosomal redox-active iron. The aim of this study was to investigate whether up- or downregulation of these proteins would affect the resistance of ARPE-19 cells to oxidative stress. The sensitivity of ARPE-19 cells to H2 O2 exposure was tested following upregulation of MT, HSP70 and/or FT by pretreatment with ZnSO4 , heat shock or FeCl3 , as well as siRNA-mediated downregulation of the same proteins. Upregulation of MT, HSP70 and FT did not improve survival following exposure to H2 O2 . This was interpreted as existence of an already maximal protection. Combined siRNA-mediated attenuation of both FT chains (H and L), or simultaneous downregulation of all three proteins, made the cells significantly more susceptible to oxidative stress confirming the importance of iron-binding proteins. The findings support our hypothesis that the oxidative stress resistance exhibited by RPE cells may be explained by a high autophagic influx of iron-binding proteins that would keep levels of redox-active lysosomal iron low. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Uremic myopathy: Is oxidative stress implicated in muscle dysfunction in uremia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia eKaltsatou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is accompanied by progressive muscle weakness and premature fatigue, in part linked to hypokinesis and in part to uremic toxicity. These changes are associated with various detrimental biochemical and morphological alterations. All of these pathological parameters are collectively termed ureamic myopathy. Various interventions while helpful can’t fully remedy the pathological phenotype. Complex mechanisms that stimulate muscle dysfunction in uremia have been proposed, and oxidative stress could be implicated. Skeletal muscles continuously produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS at rest and more so during contraction. The aim of this mini review is to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how ROS and RNS generation might contribute to muscle dysfunction in uremia. Thus a systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. While few studies met our criteria their findings are discussed making reference to other available literature data. Oxidative stress can direct muscle cells into a catabolic state and chronic exposure to it leads to wasting. Moreover, redox disturbances can significantly affect force production per se. We conclude that oxidative stress can be in part responsible for some aspects of uremic myopathy. Further research is needed to discern clear mechanisms and to help efforts to counteract muscle weakness and exercise intolerance in uremic patients.

  11. Mechanisms and consequences of oxidative stress in lung disease: therapeutic implications for an aging populace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Louise

    2018-04-01

    The rapid expansion of the elderly population has led to the recent epidemic of age-related diseases, including increased incidence and mortality of chronic and acute lung diseases. Numerous studies have implicated aging and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases; however, despite recent advances in these fields, the specific contributions of aging and oxidative stress remain elusive. This review will discuss the consequences of aging on lung morphology and physiology, and how redox imbalance with aging contributes to lung disease susceptibility. Here, we focus on three lung diseases for which aging is a significant risk factor: acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Preclinical and clinical development for redox- and senescence-altering therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as scientific advancements that may direct current and future therapeutic development. A deeper understanding of how aging impacts normal lung function, redox balance, and injury-repair processes will inspire the development of new therapies to prevent and/or reverse age-associated pulmonary diseases, and ultimately increase health span and longevity. This review is intended to encourage basic, clinical, and translational research that will bridge knowledge gaps at the intersection of aging, oxidative stress, and lung disease to fuel the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for lung diseases that disproportionately afflict the elderly.

  12. Protein implicated in nonsyndromic mental retardation regulates protein kinase A (PKA) activity

    KAUST Repository

    Altawashi, Azza; Jung, Sung Yun; Liu, Dou; Su, Bing; Qin, Jun

    2012-01-01

    capacitytoformdendritesandsynapsesinculture. Atthebiochemical level,CC2D1Atransduces signals to the cyclic adenosine 3?,5?-monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway during neuronal cell differentiation. PKA activity is compromised, and the translocation of its catalytic subunit

  13. A single cysteine post-translational oxidation suffices to compromise globular proteins kinetic stability and promote amyloid formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Marinelli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidatively modified forms of proteins accumulate during aging. Oxidized protein conformers might act as intermediates in the formation of amyloids in age-related disorders. However, it is not known whether this amyloidogenic conversion requires an extensive protein oxidative damage or it can be promoted just by a discrete, localized post-translational modification of certain residues. Here, we demonstrate that the irreversible oxidation of a single free Cys suffices to severely perturb the folding energy landscape of a stable globular protein, compromise its kinetic stability, and lead to the formation of amyloids under physiological conditions. Experiments and simulations converge to indicate that this specific oxidation-promoted protein aggregation requires only local unfolding. Indeed, a large scale analysis indicates that many cellular proteins are at risk of undergoing this kind of deleterious transition; explaining how oxidative stress can impact cell proteostasis and subsequently lead to the onset of pathological states. Keywords: Protein oxidation, Protein misfolding, Protein aggregation, Oxidative stress, Post-translational modification

  14. Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shionoiri, Nozomi; Nogariya, Osamu; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tsuyo@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Feline calicivirus was inactivated electrochemically by a factor of >5 log. • The electrochemical treatment was performed at 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 15 min. • Electrochemical treatment caused oxidation of viral proteins. • Oxidation of viral proteins can lead to loss of viral structural integrity. - Abstract: Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.

  15. Storage stability of cauliflower soup powder: The effect of lipid oxidation and protein degradation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitio, Riikka; Orlien, Vibeke; Skibsted, Leif H

    2011-09-15

    Soups based on cauliflower soup powders, prepared by dry mixing of ingredients and rapeseed oil, showed a decrease in quality, as evaluated by a sensory panel, during the storage of the soup powder in the dark for up to 12weeks under mildly accelerated conditions of 40°C and 75% relative humidity. Antioxidant, shown to be effective in protecting the rapeseed bulk oil, used for the powder preparation, had no effect on storage stability of the soup powder. The freshly prepared soup powder had a relatively high concentration of free radicals, as measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, which decreased during storage, and most remarkably during the first two weeks of storage, with only marginal increase in lipid hydroperoxides as primary lipid oxidation products, and without any increase in secondary lipid oxidation products. Analyses of volatiles by SPME-GC-MS revealed a significant increase in concentrations of 2-methyl- and 3-methyl butanals, related to Maillard reactions, together with an increase in 2-acetylpyrrole concentration. The soup powders became more brown during storage, as indicated by a decreasing Hunter L-value, in accord with non-enzymatic browning reactions. A significant increase in the concentrations of dimethyl disulfide in soup powder headspace indicated free radical-initiated protein oxidation. Protein degradation, including Maillard reactions and protein oxidation, is concluded to be more important than lipid oxidation in determining the shelf-life of dry cauliflower soup powder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of sodium ascorbate and sodium nitrite on protein and lipid oxidation in dry fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, A; De Maere, H; Stavropoulou, D A; Rysman, T; Leroy, F; De Smet, S

    2016-11-01

    The effects of sodium nitrite and ascorbate on lipid and protein oxidation were studied during the ripening process of dry fermented sausages. Samples were taken at day 0, 2, 8, 14, 21 and 28 of ripening to assess lipid (malondialdehyde) and protein (carbonyls and sulfhydryl groups) oxidation. Sodium ascorbate and nitrite were separately able to reduce the formation of malondialdehyde. Their combined addition resulted in higher amounts of carbonyl compounds compared to their separate addition or the treatment without any of both compounds. Moreover, sodium nitrite limited the formation of γ-glutamic semialdehyde whereas sodium ascorbate showed a pro-oxidant effect. A loss of thiol groups was observed during ripening, which was not affected by the use of sodium ascorbate nor sodium nitrite. In conclusion, sodium nitrite and ascorbate affected protein and lipid oxidation in different manners. The possible pro-oxidant effect of their combined addition on carbonyl formation might influence the technological and sensory properties of these products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anesthesia with halothane and nitrous oxide alters protein and amino acid metabolism in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horber, F.F.; Krayer, S.; Rehder, K.; Haymond, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    General anesthesia in combination with surgery is known to result in negative nitrogen balance. To determine whether general anesthesia without concomitant surgery decreases whole body protein synthesis and/or increases whole body protein breakdown, two groups of dogs were studied: Group 1 (n = 6) in the conscious state and Group 2 (n = 8) during general anesthesia employing halothane (1.5 MAC) in 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. Changes in protein metabolism were estimated by isotope dilution techniques employing simultaneous infusions of [4,53H]leucine and alpha-[1-14C]-ketoisocaproate (KIC). Total leucine carbon flux was unchanged or slightly increased in the anesthetized animals when compared to the conscious controls, indicating only a slight increase in the rate of proteolysis. However, leucine oxidation was increased (P less than 0.001) by more than 80% in the anesthetized animals when compared with their conscious controls, whereas whole body nonoxidative leucine disappearance, an indicator of whole body protein synthesis, was decreased. The ratio of leucine oxidation to the nonoxidative rate of leucine disappearance, which provides an index of the catabolism of at least one essential amino acid in the postabsorptive state, was more than twofold increased (P less than 0.001) in the anesthetized animals regardless of the tracer employed. These studies suggest that the administration of anesthesia alone, without concomitant surgery, is associated with a decreased rate of whole body protein synthesis and increased leucine oxidation, resulting in increased leucine and protein catabolism, which may be underlying or initiating some of the protein wasting known to occur in patients undergoing surgery

  18. Circles within circles: crosstalk between protein Ser/Thr/Tyr-phosphorylation and Met oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Reversible posttranslational protein modifications such as phosphorylation of Ser/Thr/Tyr and Met oxidation are critical for both metabolic regulation and cellular signalling. Although these modifications are typically studied individually, herein we describe the potential for cross-talk...

  19. Oxidative changes in lipids, proteins, and antioxidants in yogurt during the shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citta, Anna; Folda, Alessandra; Scalcon, Valeria; Scutari, Guido; Bindoli, Alberto; Bellamio, Marco; Feller, Emiliano; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2017-11-01

    Oxidation processes in milk and yogurt during the shelf life can result in an alteration of protein and lipid constituents. Therefore, the antioxidant properties of yogurt in standard conditions of preservation were evaluated. Total phenols, free radical scavenger activity, degree of lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation were determined in plain and skim yogurts with or without fruit puree. After production, plain, skim, plain berries, and skim berries yogurts were compared during the shelf life up to 9 weeks. All types of yogurts revealed a basal antioxidant activity that was higher when a fruit puree was present but gradually decreased during the shelf life. However, after 5-8 weeks, antioxidant activity increased again. Both in plain and berries yogurts lipid peroxidation increased until the seventh week of shelf life and after decreased, whereas protein oxidation of all yogurts was similar either in the absence or presence of berries and increased during shelf life. During the shelf life, a different behavior between lipid and protein oxidation takes place and the presence of berries determines a protection only against lipid peroxidation.

  20. Quinone-induced protein handling changes: Implications for major protein handling systems in quinone-mediated toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Rui; Siegel, David; Ross, David

    2014-01-01

    Para-quinones such as 1,4-Benzoquinone (BQ) and menadione (MD) and ortho-quinones including the oxidation products of catecholamines, are derived from xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules. The effects of quinones on major protein handling systems in cells; the 20/26S proteasome, the ER stress response, autophagy, chaperone proteins and aggresome formation, have not been investigated in a systematic manner. Both BQ and aminochrome (AC) inhibited proteasomal activity and activated the ER stress response and autophagy in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. AC also induced aggresome formation while MD had little effect on any protein handling systems in N27 cells. The effect of NQO1 on quinone induced protein handling changes and toxicity was examined using N27 cells stably transfected with NQO1 to generate an isogenic NQO1-overexpressing line. NQO1 protected against BQ–induced apoptosis but led to a potentiation of AC- and MD-induced apoptosis. Modulation of quinone-induced apoptosis in N27 and NQO1-overexpressing cells correlated only with changes in the ER stress response and not with changes in other protein handling systems. These data suggested that NQO1 modulated the ER stress response to potentiate toxicity of AC and MD, but protected against BQ toxicity. We further demonstrated that NQO1 mediated reduction to unstable hydroquinones and subsequent redox cycling was important for the activation of the ER stress response and toxicity for both AC and MD. In summary, our data demonstrate that quinone-specific changes in protein handling are evident in N27 cells and the induction of the ER stress response is associated with quinone-mediated toxicity. - Highlights: • Unstable hydroquinones contributed to quinone-induced ER stress and toxicity

  1. Quinone-induced protein handling changes: Implications for major protein handling systems in quinone-mediated toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Rui; Siegel, David; Ross, David, E-mail: david.ross@ucdenver.edu

    2014-10-15

    Para-quinones such as 1,4-Benzoquinone (BQ) and menadione (MD) and ortho-quinones including the oxidation products of catecholamines, are derived from xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules. The effects of quinones on major protein handling systems in cells; the 20/26S proteasome, the ER stress response, autophagy, chaperone proteins and aggresome formation, have not been investigated in a systematic manner. Both BQ and aminochrome (AC) inhibited proteasomal activity and activated the ER stress response and autophagy in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. AC also induced aggresome formation while MD had little effect on any protein handling systems in N27 cells. The effect of NQO1 on quinone induced protein handling changes and toxicity was examined using N27 cells stably transfected with NQO1 to generate an isogenic NQO1-overexpressing line. NQO1 protected against BQ–induced apoptosis but led to a potentiation of AC- and MD-induced apoptosis. Modulation of quinone-induced apoptosis in N27 and NQO1-overexpressing cells correlated only with changes in the ER stress response and not with changes in other protein handling systems. These data suggested that NQO1 modulated the ER stress response to potentiate toxicity of AC and MD, but protected against BQ toxicity. We further demonstrated that NQO1 mediated reduction to unstable hydroquinones and subsequent redox cycling was important for the activation of the ER stress response and toxicity for both AC and MD. In summary, our data demonstrate that quinone-specific changes in protein handling are evident in N27 cells and the induction of the ER stress response is associated with quinone-mediated toxicity. - Highlights: • Unstable hydroquinones contributed to quinone-induced ER stress and toxicity.

  2. Enhanced synergism of antibiotics with zinc oxide nanoparticles against extended spectrum β-lactamase producers implicated in urinary tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhande, Rashmi M.; Khobragade, C. N.; Mane, R. S.; Bhande, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, enhanced synergistic bioactivity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) with β-lactam antibiotics were evaluated against a panel of clinically isolated extended spectrum β-lactamase producers implicated in urinary tract infections. Chemically synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles (15 nm) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmittance electron microscopy (HR-TEM), selective area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV–Visible spectrophotometry techniques. The antimicrobial potency (10 ± 0.66, 12, 11.33 ± 1.10, and 0.7 ± 0.66 mm inhibiting zone) and minimum inhibitory concentrations (80, 60, 30, 50 μg/ml) of ZnO NPs were tested separately whereas time–kill and membrane leakage assays were evaluated in combination with ZnO NPs+ cefotaxime, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, cefepime against the β-lactamase producer strains of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, S. paucimobilis, and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Time–kill curve dynamics of ZnO NPs with β-lactam antibiotics revealed enhanced bactericidal activity (50, 85, 58, 50 % fold inhibition) by delaying the exponential and stationary phases of all isolates when tested separately. Posttime–kill effect was studied on cell membrane by assaying leakage of reducing sugars (130.2, 124.7, 137, and 115.8 μg/bacterial dry weight of 1 mg (μg/mg) and proteins (15, 10, 16, 18 μg/mg). These assays revealed that membrane leakage was due to synergism of ZnO NPs+ β-lactam antibiotics which successfully damage cell membrane thereby leading to death of all ESBL producers. The results demonstrate the utilization of ZnO NPs as a potentiator of β-lactam antibiotics and suggest the possibility to use nanoparticles in a combination therapy to treat UTI.

  3. Enhanced synergism of antibiotics with zinc oxide nanoparticles against extended spectrum β-lactamase producers implicated in urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhande, Rashmi M.; Khobragade, C. N.; Mane, R. S.; Bhande, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, enhanced synergistic bioactivity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) with β-lactam antibiotics were evaluated against a panel of clinically isolated extended spectrum β-lactamase producers implicated in urinary tract infections. Chemically synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles (15 nm) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmittance electron microscopy (HR-TEM), selective area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-Visible spectrophotometry techniques. The antimicrobial potency (10 ± 0.66, 12, 11.33 ± 1.10, and 0.7 ± 0.66 mm inhibiting zone) and minimum inhibitory concentrations (80, 60, 30, 50 μg/ml) of ZnO NPs were tested separately whereas time-kill and membrane leakage assays were evaluated in combination with ZnO NPs+ cefotaxime, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, cefepime against the β-lactamase producer strains of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, S. paucimobilis, and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Time-kill curve dynamics of ZnO NPs with β-lactam antibiotics revealed enhanced bactericidal activity (50, 85, 58, 50 % fold inhibition) by delaying the exponential and stationary phases of all isolates when tested separately. Posttime-kill effect was studied on cell membrane by assaying leakage of reducing sugars (130.2, 124.7, 137, and 115.8 μg/bacterial dry weight of 1 mg (μg/mg) and proteins (15, 10, 16, 18 μg/mg). These assays revealed that membrane leakage was due to synergism of ZnO NPs+ β-lactam antibiotics which successfully damage cell membrane thereby leading to death of all ESBL producers. The results demonstrate the utilization of ZnO NPs as a potentiator of β-lactam antibiotics and suggest the possibility to use nanoparticles in a combination therapy to treat UTI.

  4. The recombination protein RAD52 cooperates with the excision repair protein OGG1 for the repair of oxidative lesions in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Maynard, Scott; Hashiguchi, Kazunari

    2009-01-01

    number of protein interactions have been identified for OGG1, while very few appear to have functional consequences. We report here that OGG1 interacts with the recombination protein RAD52 in vitro and in vivo. This interaction has reciprocal functional consequences as OGG1 inhibits RAD52 catalytic...... knockdown, and mouse cells lacking the protein via gene knockout showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Moreover, cells depleted of RAD52 show higher accumulation of oxidized bases in their genome than cells with normal levels of RAD52. Our results indicate that RAD52 cooperates with OGG1...... to repair oxidative DNA damage and enhances the cellular resistance to oxidative stress. Our observations suggest a coordinated action between these proteins that may be relevant when oxidative lesions positioned close to strand breaks impose a hindrance to RAD52 catalytic activities....

  5. Protein implicated in nonsyndromic mental retardation regulates protein kinase A (PKA) activity

    KAUST Repository

    Altawashi, Azza

    2012-02-28

    Mutation of the coiled-coil and C2 domain-containing 1A (CC2D1A) gene, which encodes a C2 domain and DM14 domain-containing protein, has been linked to severe autosomal recessive nonsyndromic mental retardation. Using a mouse model that produces a truncated form of CC2D1A that lacks the C2 domain and three of the four DM14 domains, we show that CC2D1A is important for neuronal differentiation and brain development. CC2D1A mutant neurons are hypersensitive to stress and have a reduced capacitytoformdendritesandsynapsesinculture. Atthebiochemical level,CC2D1Atransduces signals to the cyclic adenosine 3?,5?-monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway during neuronal cell differentiation. PKA activity is compromised, and the translocation of its catalytic subunit to the nucleus is also defective in CC2D1A mutant cells. Consistently, phosphorylation of the PKA target cAMP-responsive element-binding protein, at serine 133, is nearly abolished in CC2D1A mutant cells. The defects in cAMP/PKA signaling were observed in fibroblast, macrophage, and neuronal primary cells derived from the CC2D1A KO mice. CC2D1A associates with the cAMP-PKA complex following forskolin treatment and accumulates in vesicles or on the plasma membrane in wild-type cells, suggesting that CC2D1A may recruit the PKA complex to the membrane to facilitate signal transduction. Together, our data show that CC2D1A is an important regulator of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, which may be the underlying cause for impaired mental function in nonsyndromic mental retardation patients with CC2D1A mutation. 2012 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Extensive Lysine Methylation in Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea: Potential Implications for Protein Stability and Recombinant Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H. Botting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In eukarya and bacteria, lysine methylation is relatively rare and is catalysed by sequence-specific lysine methyltransferases that typically have only a single-protein target. Using RNA polymerase purified from the thermophilic crenarchaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus, we identified 21 methyllysines distributed across 9 subunits of the enzyme. The modified lysines were predominantly in α-helices and showed no conserved sequence context. A limited survey of the Thermoproteus tenax proteome revealed widespread modification with 52 methyllysines in 30 different proteins. These observations suggest the presence of an unusual lysine methyltransferase with relaxed specificity in the crenarchaea. Since lysine methylation is known to enhance protein thermostability, this may be an adaptation to a thermophilic lifestyle. The implications of this modification for studies and applications of recombinant crenarchaeal enzymes are discussed.

  7. Potential Biomarker of Myofibrillar Protein Oxidation in Raw and Cooked Ham: 3-Nitrotyrosine Formed by Nitrosation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xianchao; Li, Chenyi; Ullah, Niamat; Hackman, Robert M; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-12-30

    The stability of cured meat products is increased by the protection of its proteins from oxidation by sodium nitrite (NaNO2) during processing. This study investigated the effects of NaNO2 (0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) on the physiochemical and structural characteristics of myofibrillar protein (MP) in raw and cooked ham. The NaNO2 showed a dose-dependent antioxidant effect, by inhibiting carbonyl formation, dityrosine formation, and denaturation of MP, and a nitrosative effect, through the formation of 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT). The 3-NT content within MP of raw ham had distinct negative correlations with sulfhydryl content and surface hydrophobicity. The 3-NT content within MP of cooked ham had significantly negative correlations with carbonyl, sulfhydryl content and turbidity and had significantly positive correlations with disulfide content. These results indicated that 3-NT may be a potential marker for protein oxidation in raw and cooked cured meat products.

  8. Protein aggregation in food models: effect of γ-irradiation and lipid oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delincee, H.; Paul, P.

    1981-01-01

    Myoglobin and serum albumin have been irradiated in aqueous solution in the presence of varying amounts of carbohydrates and lipids, and the yield of protein aggregates has been determined by gel filtration. With myoglobin the formation of aggregates evolving from the reaction with oxidizing lipids was observed, which was not found for serum albumin. The production of protein-lipid complexes, in which lipid material was occluded in the high-molecular aggregates by physical forces was demonstrated. Gel filtration and gel electrophoresis, both in the presence of SDS, and thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed distinct structural differenes between the protein aggregates induced by irradiation and the aggregates formed by interaction with oxidizing lipids

  9. The Candida albicans stress response gene Stomatin-Like Protein 3 is implicated in ROS-induced apoptotic-like death of yeast phase cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A Conrad

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of SPFH (Stomatin, Prohibitin, Flotillin, HflK/HflC proteins in all domains of life suggests that their function would be conserved. However, SPFH functions are diverse with organism-specific attributes. SPFH proteins play critical roles in physiological processes such as mechanosensation and respiration. Here, we characterize the stomatin ORF19.7296/SLP3 in the opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans. Consistent with the localization of stomatin proteins, a Slp3p-Yfp fusion protein formed visible puncta along the plasma membrane. We also visualized Slp3p within the vacuolar lumen. Slp3p primary sequence analyses identified four putative S-palmitoylation sites, which may facilitate membrane localization and are conserved features of stomatins. Plasma membrane insertion sequences are present in mammalian and nematode SPFH proteins, but are absent in Slp3p. Strikingly, Slp3p was present in yeast cells, but was absent in hyphal cells, thus categorizing it as a yeast-phase specific protein. Slp3p membrane fluorescence significantly increased in response to cellular stress caused by plasma membrane, cell wall, oxidative, or osmotic perturbants, implicating SLP3 as a general stress-response gene. A slp3Δ/Δ homozygous null mutant had no detected phenotype when slp3Δ/Δ mutants were grown in the presence of a variety of stress agents. Also, we did not observe a defect in ion accumulation, filamentation, endocytosis, vacuolar structure and function, cell wall structure, or cytoskeletal structure. However, SLP3 over-expression triggered apoptotic-like death following prolonged exposure to oxidative stress or when cells were induced to form hyphae. Our findings reveal the cellular localization of Slp3p, and for the first time associate Slp3p function with the oxidative stress response.

  10. Stabilization of sulfide cations: mechanisms relevant to oxidation of peptides and proteins containing methionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrowski, K.; Hug, G.L.; Pogocki, D.; Horner, G.; Marciniak, B.; Schoneich, C.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfide radical cations (R 2 S +. ) have recently attracted considerable attention. In particular they are implicated in assorted biological electron transfers where they are likely intermediates in biological redox-processes. There is unambigous theoretical and experimental evidence that R 2 S +. can be stabilized through intramolecular complexation with nucleophiles that are present in neighboring groups. Reactions of this type are of special interest to biology when stabilization of sulfide radical cations derived from methionine, Met(>S +. ) occurs in peptides and proteins. The methionine (Met) residues in these biopolymers are susceptible to attack by Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) during oxidative stress and biological aging. Moreover, the pathogenesis of some neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's, Jacob-Creutzfeld's, and Parkinson's) seems to be strongly linked to the presence in brain tissue of β-amyloid peptide (βAP), human prion protein (hPrP), and an aggregated form of α-synuclein, respectively. These macro- molecules contain methionine(s) with βAP having a Met 35 residue in its C-terminal α-helical domain, hPrP having three out of nine Met-residues (namely Met 205 , Met 206 , and Met 213 ) located within its α-helical segments, and α-synuclein having four Met-residues. The effective neighboring-group interactions would likely involve nucleophilic functionalities in the side chain of amino acids residues. However, very often heteroatoms in peptide bonds are the only nucleophiles present in the vicinity of Met(>S +. ). In this regard, it was recently shown that such interactions play an important role in N-acetylmethione amide and in oligopeptides of the form N-Ac-Gly-Met-Gly and N-Ac-Gly-(Gly) 2 -Met-(Gly) 3 . Intramolecularly bonded sulfide radical cations, Met(>S +. ), were directly observed in these systems with the bonding partner being either the carbonyl oxygen or the amide nitrogen of a peptide bond. Cyclic dipeptides are suitable model

  11. Implication of volume changes in uranium oxides: A density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, B.; Szpunar, J.A.; Milman, V.; Goldberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    In severe nuclear accident scenarios (in air environments and high temperatures) UO 2 fuel pellets oxidise to produce uranium oxides with higher oxygen content, e.g., U 4 O 9 or U 3 O 8 . As a first step in investigating the microstructural changes following UO 2 oxidation to hexagonal high temperature phase of U 3 O 8 , density functional quantum mechanical calculations of the structure, elastic properties and electronic structure of U 3 O 8 have been performed. The calculated properties of hexagonal phase of U 3 O 8 are compared to those of the orthorhombic pseudo-hexagonal phase which is stable at room temperature. The total energy technique based on the local density approximation plus Hubbard U as implemented in the CASTEP code is used to investigate changes in the lattice constants. The first-principles calculations predict a 35-42% increase in volume per uranium atom as a result of the transformation from UO 2 to U 3 O 8 , in agreement with experimental data. The implications of this prediction on the linear expansion and fragmentation of fuel are discussed. (authors)

  12. Personalized disease-specific protein corona influences the therapeutic impact of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Raheb, Jamshid; Akhavan, Omid; Arjmand, Sareh; Mashinchian, Omid; Rahman, Masoud; Abdolahad, Mohammad; Serpooshan, Vahid; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-05-01

    The hard corona, the protein shell that is strongly attached to the surface of nano-objects in biological fluids, is recognized as the first layer that interacts with biological objects (e.g., cells and tissues). The decoration of the hard corona (i.e., the type, amount, and conformation of the attached proteins) can define the biological fate of the nanomaterial. Recent developments have revealed that corona decoration strongly depends on the type of disease in human patients from which the plasma is obtained as a protein source for corona formation (referred to as the `personalized protein corona'). In this study, we demonstrate that graphene oxide (GO) sheets can trigger different biological responses in the presence of coronas obtained from various types of diseases. GO sheets were incubated with plasma from human subjects with different diseases/conditions, including hypofibrinogenemia, blood cancer, thalassemia major, thalassemia minor, rheumatism, fauvism, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and pregnancy. Identical sheets coated with varying protein corona decorations exhibited significantly different cellular toxicity, apoptosis, and uptake, reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and nitrogen oxide levels. The results of this report will help researchers design efficient and safe, patient-specific nano biomaterials in a disease type-specific manner for clinical and biological applications.The hard corona, the protein shell that is strongly attached to the surface of nano-objects in biological fluids, is recognized as the first layer that interacts with biological objects (e.g., cells and tissues). The decoration of the hard corona (i.e., the type, amount, and conformation of the attached proteins) can define the biological fate of the nanomaterial. Recent developments have revealed that corona decoration strongly depends on the type of disease in human patients from which the plasma is obtained as a protein source for corona formation (referred

  13. Regulation of dsr genes encoding proteins responsible for the oxidation of stored sulfur in Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Frauke; Dobler, Nadine; Dahl, Christiane

    2010-03-01

    Sulfur globules are formed as obligatory intermediates during the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in many environmentally important photo- and chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It is well established that the so-called Dsr proteins are essential for the oxidation of zero-valent sulfur accumulated in the globules; however, hardly anything is known about the regulation of dsr gene expression. Here, we present a closer look at the regulation of the dsr genes in the phototrophic sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum. The dsr genes are expressed in a reduced sulfur compound-dependent manner and neither sulfite, the product of the reverse-acting dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrAB, nor the alternative electron donor malate inhibit the gene expression. Moreover, we show the oxidation of sulfur to sulfite to be the rate-limiting step in the oxidation of sulfur to sulfate as sulfate production starts concomitantly with the upregulation of the expression of the dsr genes. Real-time RT-PCR experiments suggest that the genes dsrC and dsrS are additionally expressed from secondary internal promoters, pointing to a special function of the encoded proteins. Earlier structural analyses indicated the presence of a helix-turn-helix (HTH)-like motif in DsrC. We therefore assessed the DNA-binding capability of the protein and provide evidence for a possible regulatory function of DsrC.

  14. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis of magnetite/graphene oxide/chitosan composite and its application for protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Nengsheng, E-mail: yensh@cnu.edu.cn; Xie, Yali; Shi, Pengzhi; Gao, Ting; Ma, Jichao

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a facile and novel strategy was developed to fabricate magnetite/graphene oxide/chitosan (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GO/CS) composite, and the composite was used as a magnetic adsorbent for the enrichment of protein, and followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. The phase composition, chemical structure and morphology of the composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Protein cytochrome c was chosen as model target to evaluate the adsorptive property of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GO/CS. After enrichment procedure and magnetic separation, protein bounded with the material was analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS without desorption. The results indicated that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GO/CS composite exhibited a good adsorptive capacity for protein, and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/GO/CS composite had a promising potential in magnetic separation research. - Highlights: • Magnetite/graphene oxide/chitosan composite was synthesized by novel route. • The composite was used as magnetic absorbent for protein enrichment. • The composite had excellent adsorption performance for protein enrichment.

  16. Myocardial Oxidative Metabolism and Protein Synthesis during Mechanical Circulatory Support by Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priddy, MD, Colleen M.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena; Bouchard, Bertrand; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides mechanical circulatory support essential for survival in infants and children with acute cardiac decompensation. However, ECMO also causes metabolic disturbances, which contribute to total body wasting and protein loss. Cardiac stunning can also occur which prevents ECMO weaning, and contributes to high mortality. The heart may specifically undergo metabolic impairments, which influence functional recovery. We tested the hypothesis that ECMO alters oxidative. We focused on the amino acid leucine, and integration with myocardial protein synthesis. We used a translational immature swine model in which we assessed in heart (i) the fractional contribution of leucine (FcLeucine) and pyruvate (FCpyruvate) to mitochondrial acetyl-CoA formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and (ii) global protein fractional synthesis (FSR) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature mixed breed Yorkshire male piglets (n = 22) were divided into four groups based on loading status (8 hours of normal circulation or ECMO) and intracoronary infusion [13C6,15N]-L-leucine (3.7 mM) alone or with [2-13C]-pyruvate (7.4 mM). ECMO decreased pulse pressure and correspondingly lowered myocardial oxygen consumption (~ 40%, n = 5), indicating decreased overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. However, FcLeucine was maintained and myocardial protein FSR was marginally increased. Pyruvate addition decreased tissue leucine enrichment, FcLeucine, and Fc for endogenous substrates as well as protein FSR. Conclusion: The heart under ECMO shows reduced oxidative metabolism of substrates, including amino acids, while maintaining (i) metabolic flexibility indicated by ability to respond to pyruvate, and (ii) a normal or increased capacity for global protein synthesis, suggesting an improved protein balance.

  17. HCV Core Protein Uses Multiple Mechanisms to Induce Oxidative Stress in Human Hepatoma Huh7 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Smirnova, Olga A.; Petrushanko, Irina Y.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Karpenko, Inna L.; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A.; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGFβ1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37–191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α. The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein. PMID:26035647

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of lipid and protein membrane components of erythrocytes oxidized with hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendanha, S.A.; Anjos, J.L.V.; Silva, A.H.M.; Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of spin labels was used to monitor membrane dynamic changes in erythrocytes subjected to oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The lipid spin label, 5-doxyl stearic acid, responded to dramatic reductions in membrane fluidity, which was correlated with increases in the protein content of the membrane. Membrane rigidity, associated with the binding of hemoglobin (Hb) to the erythrocyte membrane, was also indicated by a spin-labeled maleimide, 5-MSL, covalently bound to the sulfhydryl groups of membrane proteins. At 2% hematocrit, these alterations in membrane occurred at very low concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (50 µM) after only 5 min of incubation at 37°C in azide phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Lipid peroxidation, suggested by oxidative hemolysis and malondialdehyde formation, started at 300 µM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (for incubation of 3 h), which is a concentration about six times higher than those detected with the probes. Ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol protected the membrane against lipoperoxidation, but did not prevent the binding of proteins to the erythrocyte membrane. Moreover, the antioxidant (+)-catechin, which also failed to prevent the cross-linking of cytoskeletal proteins with Hb, was very effective in protecting erythrocyte ghosts from lipid peroxidation induced by the Fenton reaction. This study also showed that EPR spectroscopy can be useful to assess the molecular dynamics of red blood cell membranes in both the lipid and protein domains and examine oxidation processes in a system that is so vulnerable to oxidation.

  19. Moonlight-like proteins of the cell wall protect sessile cells of Candida from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Fujarte, Isela; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms of Candida species are associated with high morbidity and hospital mortality. Candida forms biofilms by adhering to human host epithelium through cell wall proteins (CWP) and simultaneously neutralizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during the respiratory burst by phagocytic cells. The purpose of this paper is to identify the CWP of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis expressed after exposure to different concentrations of H2O2 using a proteomic approach. CWP obtained from sessile cells, both treated and untreated with the oxidizing agent, were resolved by one and two-dimensional (2D-PAGE) gels and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Some of these proteins were identified and found to correspond to moonlighting CWP such as: (i) glycolytic enzymes, (ii) heat shock, (iii) OSR proteins, (iv) general metabolic enzymes and (v) highly conserved proteins, which are up- or down-regulated in the presence or absence of ROS. We also found that the expression of these CWP is different for each Candida species. Moreover, RT-PCR assays allowed us to demonstrate that transcription of the gene coding for Eno1, one of the moonlight-like CWP identified in response to the oxidant agent, is differentially regulated. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration that, in response to oxidative stress, each species of Candida, differentially regulates the expression of moonlighting CWP, which may protect the organism from the ROS generated during phagocytosis. Presumptively, these proteins allow the pathogen to adhere and form a biofilm, and eventually cause invasive candidiasis in the human host. We propose that, in addition to the antioxidant mechanisms present in Candida, the moonlighting CWP also confer protection to these pathogens from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidant production and SOD1 protein expression in single skeletal myofibers from Down syndrome mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M. Cowley

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a genetic condition caused by the triplication of chromosome 21. Persons with DS exhibit pronounced muscle weakness, which also occurs in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS. Oxidative stress is thought to be an underlying factor in the development of DS-related pathologies including muscle dysfunction. High-levels of oxidative stress have been attributed to triplication and elevated expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1; a gene located on chromosome 21. The elevated expression of SOD1 is postulated to increase production of hydrogen peroxide and cause oxidative injury and cell death. However, it is unknown whether SOD1 protein expression is associated with greater oxidant production in skeletal muscle from Ts65Dn mice. Thus, our objective was to assess levels of SOD1 expression and oxidant production in skeletal myofibers from the flexor digitorum brevis obtained from Ts65Dn and control mice. Measurements of oxidant production were obtained from myofibers loaded with 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH2-DA in the basal state and following 15 min of stimulated unloaded contraction. Ts65Dn myofibers exhibited a significant decrease in basal DCF emissions (p 0.05. Myofibers from Ts65Dn mice tended to be smaller and myonuclear domain was lower (p < 0.05. In summary, myofibers from Ts65Dn mice exhibited decreased basal DCF emissions that were coupled with elevated protein expression of SOD1. Stimulated contraction in isolated myofibers did not affect DCF emissions in either group. These findings suggest the skeletal muscle dysfunction in the adult Ts65Dn mouse is not associated with skeletal muscle oxidative stress.

  1. Protein oxidative stress markers in peritoneal fluids of women with deep infiltrating endometriosis are increased.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, Pietro; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Fiorese, Mauro; Marcellin, Louis; Lemarechal, Herve; Millischer, Anne-Elodie; Batteux, Frédéric; Borderie, Didier; Chapron, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Are protein oxidative stress markers [thiols, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites] in perioperative peritoneal fluid higher in women with histologically proven endometriosis when compared with endometriosis-free controls? Protein oxidative stress markers are significantly increased in peritoneal fluids from women with deep infiltrating endometriosis with intestinal involvement when compared with endometriosis-free controls. Endometriosis is a common gynaecologic condition characterized by an important inflammatory process. Various source of evidence support the role of oxidative stress in the development of endometriosis. We conducted a prospective laboratory study in a tertiary-care university hospital between January 2011 and December 2012, and included 235 non-pregnant women, younger than 42 year old, undergoing surgery for a benign gynaecological condition. After complete surgical exploration of the abdomino-pelvic cavity, 150 women with histologically proven endometriosis and 85 endometriosis-free controls women were enrolled. Women with endometriosis were staged according to a surgical classification in three different phenotypes of endometriosis: superficial peritoneal endometriosis (SUP), ovarian endometrioma (OMA) and deeply infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Perioperative peritoneal fluids samples were obtained from all study participants. Thiols, AOPP, protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites were assayed in all peritoneal samples. Concentrations of peritoneal AOPP were significantly higher in endometriosis patients than in the control group (median, 128.9 µmol/l; range, 0.3-1180.1 versus median, 77.8 µmol/l; range, 0.8-616.1; P peritoneal nitrates/nitrites were higher in endometriosis patients than in the control group (median, 24.8 µmol/l; range, 1.6-681.6 versus median, 18.5 µmol/l; range, 1.6-184.5; P peritoneal fluids protein AOPP and nitrates/nitrites were significantly increased only in DIE samples

  2. Photo-oxidation of cells generates long-lived intracellular protein peroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, Adam; Hawkins, Clare Louise; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is generated by several cellular, enzymatic, and chemical reactions as well as by exposure to UV or visible light in the presence of a sensitizer. Consequently, this oxidant has been proposed to be a damaging agent many pathologies. Proteins are major targets for singlet oxygen...... as a result of their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. In this study, we show that illumination of viable rose bengal-loaded THP-1 (human monocyte-like) cells with visible light gives rise to intracellular protein-derived peroxides. The peroxide yield increases with illumination time, requires....../2) about 4 h at 37 degrees C. Decomposition of protein peroxides formed within cells, or on isolated cellular proteins, by metal ions gives rise to radicals as detected by EPR spin trapping. These studies demonstrate that exposure of intact cells to visible light in the presence of a sensitizer leads...

  3. The p66(Shc adaptor protein controls oxidative stress response in early bovine embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean H Betts

    Full Text Available The in vitro production of mammalian embryos suffers from high frequencies of developmental failure due to excessive levels of permanent embryo arrest and apoptosis caused by oxidative stress. The p66Shc stress adaptor protein controls oxidative stress response of somatic cells by regulating intracellular ROS levels through multiple pathways, including mitochondrial ROS generation and the repression of antioxidant gene expression. We have previously demonstrated a strong relationship with elevated p66Shc levels, reduced antioxidant levels and greater intracellular ROS generation with the high incidence of permanent cell cycle arrest of 2-4 cell embryos cultured under high oxygen tensions or after oxidant treatment. The main objective of this study was to establish a functional role for p66Shc in regulating the oxidative stress response during early embryo development. Using RNA interference in bovine zygotes we show that p66Shc knockdown embryos exhibited increased MnSOD levels, reduced intracellular ROS and DNA damage that resulted in a greater propensity for development to the blastocyst stage. P66Shc knockdown embryos were stress resistant exhibiting significantly reduced intracellular ROS levels, DNA damage, permanent 2-4 cell embryo arrest and diminished apoptosis frequencies after oxidant treatment. The results of this study demonstrate that p66Shc controls the oxidative stress response in early mammalian embryos. Small molecule inhibition of p66Shc may be a viable clinical therapy to increase the developmental potential of in vitro produced mammalian embryos.

  4. Specificity protein 1-zinc finger protein 179 pathway is involved in the attenuation of oxidative stress following brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ying Chuang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available After sudden traumatic brain injuries, secondary injuries may occur during the following days or weeks, which leads to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Since ROS exacerbate brain damage, it is important to protect neurons against their activity. Zinc finger protein 179 (Znf179 was shown to act as a neuroprotective factor, but the regulation of gene expression under oxidative stress remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrated an increase in Znf179 protein levels in both in vitro model of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced ROS accumulation and animal models of traumatic brain injury. Additionally, we examined the sub-cellular localization of Znf179, and demonstrated that oxidative stress increases Znf179 nuclear shuttling and its interaction with specificity protein 1 (Sp1. Subsequently, the positive autoregulation of Znf179 expression, which is Sp1-dependent, was further demonstrated using luciferase reporter assay and green fluorescent protein (GFP-Znf179-expressing cells and transgenic mice. The upregulation of Sp1 transcriptional activity induced by the treatment with nerve growth factor (NGF led to an increase in Znf179 levels, which further protected cells against H2O2-induced damage. However, Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A, was shown to inhibit NGF effects, leading to a decrease in Znf179 expression and lower cellular protection. In conclusion, the results obtained in this study show that Znf179 autoregulation through Sp1-dependent mechanism plays an important role in neuroprotection, and NGF-induced Sp1 signaling may help attenuate more extensive (ROS-induced damage following brain injury.

  5. Protein Characterization of Javan Cobra (Naja sputatrix) Venom Following Sun Exposure and Photo-Oxidation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulistiyani; Biki, R. S.; Andrianto, D.

    2017-03-01

    Snake venom has always been known for its toxicity that can cause fatality, however, it is also one of the important biological resources to be used for disease treatment. In Indonesia, snake venom previously expose under the sun has been used for alternative treatment of some diseases such as dengue fever, atherosclerosis, cancer, and diabetes. There has been very little scientific evidence on the use of snake venom of Indonesia origin as well as its protein characteristic. Thus, the objective of this research is to characterize the protein content and the specific activity of the venom of Javan Cobra (N.sputatrix) when treated with sun exposure in comparison with photo-oxidation by ultraviolet. Qualitative analysis of protein contents was determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE). The L-amino acid oxidase activity (LAAO) and the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities were determined using spectrophotometry. The venom’s protein was separated into 5 main protein bands with molecular weight ranging from 14 to 108 kDa. A time course study showed that the venom lost 91% of its LAAO activity and 96% of PLA2 activity after 6 hours of sun exposure. UV photo-oxidation carried out for 3 hours decreased 91% of LAAO activity, and almost diminished all of PLA2 activity (99.8%). These findings suggest that the exposure of N. sputatrix venom under the sun and UV photo-oxidation decreased its toxicity as shown by the significant reduction of the enzymes activity, but did not affect the protein’s integrity. Therefore, these approaches produced N.sputatrix venom with less toxicity but still withheld other characters of intact proteins.

  6. Comparative time-courses of copper-ion-mediated protein and lipid oxidation in low-density lipoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Heather M; Baoutina, Anna; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Free radicals damage both lipids and proteins and evidence has accumulated for the presence of both oxidised lipids and proteins in aged tissue samples as well as those from a variety of pathologies including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease. Oxidation of the protein and lipid...

  7. Ribosome-dependent ATPase interacts with conserved membrane protein in Escherichia coli to modulate protein synthesis and oxidative phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    Full Text Available Elongation factor RbbA is required for ATP-dependent deacyl-tRNA release presumably after each peptide bond formation; however, there is no information about the cellular role. Proteomic analysis in Escherichia coli revealed that RbbA reciprocally co-purified with a conserved inner membrane protein of unknown function, YhjD. Both proteins are also physically associated with the 30S ribosome and with members of the lipopolysaccharide transport machinery. Genome-wide genetic screens of rbbA and yhjD deletion mutants revealed aggravating genetic interactions with mutants deficient in the electron transport chain. Cells lacking both rbbA and yhjD exhibited reduced cell division, respiration and global protein synthesis as well as increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting the ETC and the accuracy of protein synthesis. Our results suggest that RbbA appears to function together with YhjD as part of a regulatory network that impacts bacterial oxidative phosphorylation and translation efficiency.

  8. Analysis of zinc oxide nanoparticles binding proteins in rat blood and brain homogenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim KH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyu Hwan Shim,1 John Hulme,1 Eun Ho Maeng,2 Meyoung-Kon Kim,3 Seong Soo A An1 1Department of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Sungnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea; 2Department of Analysis, KTR, Kimpo, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea; 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University Medical School and College, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Nanoparticles (NPs are currently used in chemical, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and electronic products. Nevertheless, limited safety information is available for many NPs, especially in terms of their interactions with various binding proteins, leading to potential toxic effects. Zinc oxide (ZnO NPs are included in the formulation of new products, such as adhesives, batteries, ceramics, cosmetics, cement, glass, ointments, paints, pigments, and supplementary foods, resulting in increased human exposures to ZnO. Hence, we investigated the potential ZnO nanotoxic pathways by analyzing the adsorbed proteins, called protein corona, from blood and brain from four ZnO NPs, ZnOSM20(-, ZnOSM20(+, ZnOAE100(-, and ZnOAE100(+, in order to understand their potential mechanisms in vivo. Through this study, liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy technology was employed to identify all bound proteins. Totals of 52 and 58 plasma proteins were identified as being bound to ZnOSM20(- and ZnOSM20(+, respectively. For ZnOAE100(- and ZnOAE100(+, 58 and 44 proteins were bound, respectively. Similar numbers of proteins were adsorbed onto ZnO irrespective of size or surface charge of the nanoparticle. These proteins were further analyzed with ClueGO, a Cytoscape plugin, which provided gene ontology and the biological interaction processes of identified proteins. Interactions between diverse proteins and ZnO nanoparticles could result in an alteration of their functions, conformation, and clearance, eventually affecting many biological processes. Keywords: brain

  9. Decarboxylative alkylation for site-selective bioconjugation of native proteins via oxidation potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Steven; Liu, Chun; Kölmel, Dominik K; Qiao, Jennifer X; Zhang, Yong; Poss, Michael A; Ewing, William R; MacMillan, David W C

    2018-02-01

    The advent of antibody-drug conjugates as pharmaceuticals has fuelled a need for reliable methods of site-selective protein modification that furnish homogeneous adducts. Although bioorthogonal methods that use engineered amino acids often provide an elegant solution to the question of selective functionalization, achieving homogeneity using native amino acids remains a challenge. Here, we explore visible-light-mediated single-electron transfer as a mechanism towards enabling site- and chemoselective bioconjugation. Specifically, we demonstrate the use of photoredox catalysis as a platform to selectivity wherein the discrepancy in oxidation potentials between internal versus C-terminal carboxylates can be exploited towards obtaining C-terminal functionalization exclusively. This oxidation potential-gated technology is amenable to endogenous peptides and has been successfully demonstrated on the protein insulin. As a fundamentally new approach to bioconjugation this methodology provides a blueprint toward the development of photoredox catalysis as a generic platform to target other redox-active side chains for native conjugation.

  10. Decarboxylative alkylation for site-selective bioconjugation of native proteins via oxidation potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Steven; Liu, Chun; Kölmel, Dominik K.; Qiao, Jennifer X.; Zhang, Yong; Poss, Michael A.; Ewing, William R.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2018-02-01

    The advent of antibody-drug conjugates as pharmaceuticals has fuelled a need for reliable methods of site-selective protein modification that furnish homogeneous adducts. Although bioorthogonal methods that use engineered amino acids often provide an elegant solution to the question of selective functionalization, achieving homogeneity using native amino acids remains a challenge. Here, we explore visible-light-mediated single-electron transfer as a mechanism towards enabling site- and chemoselective bioconjugation. Specifically, we demonstrate the use of photoredox catalysis as a platform to selectivity wherein the discrepancy in oxidation potentials between internal versus C-terminal carboxylates can be exploited towards obtaining C-terminal functionalization exclusively. This oxidation potential-gated technology is amenable to endogenous peptides and has been successfully demonstrated on the protein insulin. As a fundamentally new approach to bioconjugation this methodology provides a blueprint toward the development of photoredox catalysis as a generic platform to target other redox-active side chains for native conjugation.

  11. Subchronic nandrolone administration reduces cardiac oxidative markers during restraint stress by modulating protein expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Barbara; Carriero, Vitina; Abbadessa, Giuliana; Penna, Claudia; Berchialla, Paola; De Francia, Silvia; Bracco, Enrico; Racca, Silvia

    2017-10-01

    Nandrolone decanoate (ND), an anabolic-androgenic steroid prohibited in collegiate and professional sports, is associated with detrimental cardiovascular effects through redox-dependent mechanisms. We previously observed that high-dose short-term ND administration (15 mg/kg for 2 weeks) did not induce left heart ventricular hypertrophy and, paradoxically, improved postischemic response, whereas chronic ND treatment (5 mg/kg twice a week for 10 weeks) significantly reduced the cardioprotective effect of postconditioning, with an increase in infarct size and a decrease in cardiac performance. We wanted to determine whether short-term ND administration could affect the oxidative redox status in animals exposed to acute restraint stress. Our hypothesis was that, depending on treatment schedule, ND may have a double-edged sword effect. Measurement of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal, two oxidative stress markers, in rat plasma and left heart ventricular tissue, revealed that the levels of both markers were increased in animals exposed to restraint stress, whereas no increase in marker levels was noted in animals pretreated with ND, indicating a possible protective action of ND against stress-induced oxidative damage. Furthermore, isolation and identification of proteins extracted from the left heart ventricular tissue samples of rats pretreated or not with ND and exposed to acute stress showed a prevalent expression of enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis and energy metabolism. Among other proteins, peroxiredoxin 6 and alpha B-crystallin, both involved in the oxidative stress response, were predominantly expressed in the left heart ventricular tissues of the ND-pretreated rats. In conclusion, ND seems to reduce oxidative stress by inducing the expression of antioxidant proteins in the hearts of restraint-stressed animals, thus contributing to amelioration of postischemic heart performance.

  12. Interfacial interactions between Skeletonema costatum extracellular organic matter and metal oxides: Implications for ceramic membrane filtration

    KAUST Repository

    Zaouri, Noor A

    2017-03-21

    In the current study, the interfacial interactions between the high molecular weight (HMW) compounds of Skeletonema costatum (SKC) extracellular organic matter (EOM) and ZrO2 or Al2O3, were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). HMW SKC-EOM was rigorously characterized and described as a hydrophilic organic compound mainly comprised of polysaccharide-like structures. Lipids and proteins were also observed, although in lower abundance. HMW SKC-EOM displayed attractive forces during approaching (i.e., leading to jump-to-contact events) and adhesion forces during retracting regime to both metal oxides at all solution conditions tested, where electrostatics and hydrogen bonding were suggested as dominant interacting mechanisms. However, the magnitude of these forces was significantly higher on ZrO2 surfaces, irrespective of cation type (Na+ or Ca2+) or concentration. Interestingly, while HMW SKC-EOM interacting forces to Al2O3 were practically insensitive to solution chemistry, the interactions between ZrO2 and HMW SKC-EOM increased with increasing cation concentration in solution. The structure, and lower charge, hydrophilicity, and density of hydroxyl groups on ZrO2 surface would play a key role on favoring zirconia associations with HMW SKC-EOM. The current results contribute to advance our fundamental understanding of Algogenic Organic Matter (AOM) interfacial interactions with metal oxides (i.e., AOM membrane fouling), and would highly assist in the proper selection of membrane material during episodic algal blooms.

  13. Interfacial interactions between Skeletonema costatum extracellular organic matter and metal oxides: Implications for ceramic membrane filtration

    KAUST Repository

    Zaouri, Noor A.; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Dramas, Laure; Garces, Daniel; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, the interfacial interactions between the high molecular weight (HMW) compounds of Skeletonema costatum (SKC) extracellular organic matter (EOM) and ZrO2 or Al2O3, were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). HMW SKC-EOM was rigorously characterized and described as a hydrophilic organic compound mainly comprised of polysaccharide-like structures. Lipids and proteins were also observed, although in lower abundance. HMW SKC-EOM displayed attractive forces during approaching (i.e., leading to jump-to-contact events) and adhesion forces during retracting regime to both metal oxides at all solution conditions tested, where electrostatics and hydrogen bonding were suggested as dominant interacting mechanisms. However, the magnitude of these forces was significantly higher on ZrO2 surfaces, irrespective of cation type (Na+ or Ca2+) or concentration. Interestingly, while HMW SKC-EOM interacting forces to Al2O3 were practically insensitive to solution chemistry, the interactions between ZrO2 and HMW SKC-EOM increased with increasing cation concentration in solution. The structure, and lower charge, hydrophilicity, and density of hydroxyl groups on ZrO2 surface would play a key role on favoring zirconia associations with HMW SKC-EOM. The current results contribute to advance our fundamental understanding of Algogenic Organic Matter (AOM) interfacial interactions with metal oxides (i.e., AOM membrane fouling), and would highly assist in the proper selection of membrane material during episodic algal blooms.

  14. Advanced oxidation protein products — biological marker of oxidative stress = Zaawansowane produkty utleniania białek – biologiczne markery stresu oksydacyjnego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cwynar

    2016-09-01

      ABSTRACT Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs are mostly derivatives of oxidatively modified albumin. The results of many experimental studies confirm intensification of oxidative modifications of proteins and an increase in concentration of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs in different pathological conditions, particularly those with well documented involvement of oxidative stress in their etiopathogenesis, but also those where its role is not yet well understood. Currently intensive research is carried out on the possibility of using AOPPs as useful indicators for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of diseases.   Keywords: advanced oxidation protein products, autoimmune disease, oxidative stress   STRESZCZENIE Zaawansowane produkty utleniania białek (AOPPs, to najczęściej pochodne zmodyfikowanej oksydacyjnie albuminy. Wyniki licznych badań doświadczalnych potwierdzają nasilenie oksydacyjnych modyfikacji białek i wzrost stężenia zaawansowanych produktów utleniania białek (AOPPs w różnych stanach patologicznych, szczególnie tych o dobrze udokumentowanym udziale stresu oksydacyjnego w ich etiopatogenezie, ale także takich, w których jego rola nie jest jeszcze dobrze poznana.. Obecnie trwają intensywne badania nad możliwością wykorzystania AOPPs, jako użytecznych wskaźników do diagnozowania, prognozowania oraz monitorowania chorób.   Słowa kluczowe: zaawansowane produkty utleniania białek, choroby autoimmunologiczne, stres oksydacyjny

  15. Proteins oxidation and autoantibodies' reactivity against hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde -oxidized thyroid antigens in patients' plasmas with Graves' disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mseddi, Malek; Ben Mansour, Riadh; Gargouri, Bochra; Mnif, Fatma; El Ghawi, Samir; Hammami, Boutheina; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Abid, Mohamed; Lassoued, Saloua

    2017-06-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate proteins oxidation in plasmas of two autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD): Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto Thyroiditis (HT), and to determine whether oxidative modification of thyroid antigens (T.Ag) enhanced the reactivity of autoantibodies in plasmas of AITD patients compared with the reactivity towards native T.Ag. Carbonyl and thiol groups and MDA-protein adducts were assessed spectrophotometric methods in plasmas of 74 AITD patients and 65 healthy controls. The reactivities immunoglobulin (Ig)G autoantibodies towards malondialdéhyde (MDA)-modified T.Ag, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-modified T.Ag, native T.Ag and native derm were checked by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Evaluation of oxidized proteins exhibited high levels of MDA bound to proteins and carbonyl groups, as well as reduced thiol level in plasmas of AITD patients by comparison to healthy controls (p thyroid stimulating hormone level in HT patients in the other (r = 0.65, p < 0.001). The data suggest that high production of H 2 O 2 probably occurred during hormone synthesis could contribute to protein oxidation in AITD and to create neoepitopes responsible for autoantibody reactivity's to H 2 O 2 -oxidized T.Ag enhancement. These results provide support to the involvement of oxidative stress in AITD development and/or exacerbation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Oxidative stress/damage induces multimerization and interaction of Fanconi anemia proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Jung; Ciccone, Samantha L M; Beck, Brian D; Hwang, Byounghoon; Freie, Brian; Clapp, D Wade; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2004-07-16

    Fanconi anemia (FANC) is a heterogeneous genetic disorder characterized by a hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, chromosomal instability, and defective DNA repair. Eight FANC genes have been identified so far, and five of them (FANCA, -C, -E, -F, and -G) assemble in a multinuclear complex and function at least in part in a complex to activate FANCD2 by monoubiquitination. Here we show that FANCA and FANCG are redox-sensitive proteins that are multimerized and/or form a nuclear complex in response to oxidative stress/damage. Both FANCA and FANCG proteins exist as monomers under non-oxidizing conditions, whereas they become multimers following H2O2 treatment. Treatment of cells with oxidizing agent not only triggers the multimeric complex of FANCA and FANCG in vivo but also induces the interaction between FANCA and FANCG. N-Ethylmaleimide treatment abolishes multimerization and interaction of FANCA and FANCG in vitro. Taken together, our results lead us to conclude that FANCA and FANCG uniquely respond to oxidative damage by forming complex(es) via intermolecular disulfide linkage(s), which may be crucial in forming such complexes and in determining their function.

  17. Oxidative Modification of Blood Serum Proteins in Multiple Sclerosis after Interferon Beta and Melatonin Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Adamczyk-Sowa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a disease involving oxidative stress (OS. This study was aimed at examination of the effect of melatonin supplementation on OS parameters, especially oxidative protein modifications of blood serum proteins, in MS patients. The study included 11 control subjects, 14 de novo diagnosed MS patients with the relapsing-remitting form of MS (RRMS, 36 patients with RRMS receiving interferon beta-1b (250 μg every other day, and 25 RRMS patients receiving interferon beta-1b plus melatonin (5 mg daily. The levels of N′-formylkynurenine, kynurenine, dityrosine, carbonyl groups, advanced glycation products (AGEs, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, and malondialdehyde were elevated in nontreated RRSM patients. N′-Formylkynurenine, kynurenine, AGEs, and carbonyl contents were decreased only in the group treated with interferon beta plus melatonin, while dityrosine and AOPP contents were decreased both in the group of patients treated with interferon beta and in the group treated with interferon beta-1b plus melatonin. These results demonstrate that melatonin ameliorates OS in MS patients supporting the view that combined administration of interferon beta-1b and melatonin can be more effective in reducing OS in MS patients than interferon beta-1b alone.

  18. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN OXIDATIVE MODIFICATION IN REDOX-REGULATION OF CASPASE-3 ACTIVITY IN BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES DURING OXIDATIVE STRESS IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Nosareva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of oxidative stress lies at the heart of many frequent and socially-important diseases. Blood lymphocytes are the cells which provide immunological control of our organism. As a result of their function implementation blood lymphocytes contact with different endogenic and exogenic factors, which can lead to active oxygen species production activation, macromolecules oxidative modification and to cell survival alteration. At the present time it is essential to expand and deepen the fundamental knowledge of blood lymphocytes apoptosis regulation peculiarities. The research objective was to establish the interaction among alterations of glutathione system condition, carbonylation level, protein glutathionylation and caspase-3 activity in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro.Material and Methods. The material for research was blood lymphocytes cultivated with addition of hydrogen peroxide in final concentration of 0,5 mmol and/or protein SH-group inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide – 5 mmol, protector – 5 mmol – 1,4-dithioerythritol. Reduced, oxidized and protein-bound glutathione concentration was measured by method of spectropho-tometry, additionally, the ratio size of reduced to oxidized thiol fraction was estimated. With help of enzymoimmunoassay the level of protein carbonyl derivatives was evaluated; caspase-3 activity was registered by spectrofluorometric method.Results. Protein SH-group blocking in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro was accompanied by protein-bound glutathione concentration rapid decrease in connection with increase of protein carbonyl derivatives content and caspase-3 activity. Protein SH-group protection in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro was accompanied by concentration increase of protein-bound glutathione and protein carbonyl derivatives under comparable values of enzyme activity under study.Conclusion. The carried out research shows that caspase-3 and protein

  19. Occurrence State and Molecular Structure Analysis of Extracellular Proteins with Implications on the Dewaterability of Waste-Activated Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Boran; Ni, Bing-Jie; Horvat, Kristine; Song, Liyan; Chai, Xiaoli; Dai, Xiaohu; Mahajan, Devinder

    2017-08-15

    The occurrence state and molecular structure of extracellular proteins were analyzed to reveal the influencing factors on the water-holding capacities of protein-like substances in waste-activated sludge (WAS). The gelation process of extracellular proteins verified that advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for WAS dewaterability improvement eliminated the water affinity of extracellular proteins and prevented these macromolecules from forming stable colloidal aggregates. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics identified that most of the extracellular proteins were originally derived from the intracellular part and the proteins originally located in the extracellular part were mainly membrane-associated. The main mechanism of extracellular protein transformation during AOPs could be represented by the damage of the membrane or related external encapsulating structure and the release of intracellular substances. For the selected representative extracellular proteins, the strong correlation (R 2 > 0.97, p proteins on the interstitial water removal from WAS.

  20. Experimental approach to controllably vary protein oxidation while minimizing electrode adsorption for boron-doped diamond electrochemical surface mapping applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Carlee S; Hettich, Robert L

    2013-01-02

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent (i.e., hydroxyl radicals) for these measurements; however, these approaches range significantly in their complexity and expense of operation. This research expands upon earlier work to enhance the controllability of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as an easily accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals in order to oxidize a range of intact proteins. Efforts to modulate the oxidation level while minimizing the adsorption of protein to the electrode involved the use of relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber. Additionally, a different cell activation approach using variable voltage to supply a controlled current allowed us to precisely tune the extent of oxidation in a protein-dependent manner. In order to gain perspective on the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface, studies were conducted to monitor protein concentration during electrolysis and gauge changes in the electrode surface between cell activation events. This report demonstrates the successful use of BDD electrochemistry for greater precision in generating a target number of oxidation events upon intact proteins.

  1. Glis family proteins are differentially implicated in the cellular reprogramming of human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seo-Young; Noh, Hye Bin; Kim, Hyeong-Taek; Lee, Kang-In; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2017-09-29

    The ground-breaking discovery of the reprogramming of somatic cells into pluripotent cells, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), was accomplished by delivering 4 transcription factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, into fibroblasts. Since then, several efforts have attempted to unveil other factors that are directly implicated in or might enhance reprogramming. Importantly, a number of transcription factors are reported to retain reprogramming activity. A previous study suggested Gli-similar 1 (Glis1) as a factor that enhances the reprogramming of fibroblasts during iPSC generation. However, the implication of other Glis members, including Glis2 and Glis3 (variants 1 and 2), in cellular reprogramming remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential involvement of human Glis family proteins, including hGlis1-3, in cellular reprogramming. Our results demonstrate that hGlis1, which is reported to reprogram human fibroblasts, promotes the reprogramming of human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs), indicating that the reprogramming activity of Glis1 is not cell type-specific. Strikingly, hGlis3 promoted the reprogramming of hADSCs as efficiently as hGlis1. On the contrary, hGlis2 showed a strong negative effect on reprogramming. Together, our results reveal clear differences in the cellular reprogramming activity among Glis family members and provide valuable insight into the development of a new reprogramming strategy using Glis family proteins.

  2. UVA Light-excited Kynurenines Oxidize Ascorbate and Modify Lens Proteins through the Formation of Advanced Glycation End Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Raghavan, Cibin T.; Johar, Kaid; Fan, Xingjun; Monnier, Vincent M.; Vasavada, Abhay R.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) contribute to lens protein pigmentation and cross-linking during aging and cataract formation. In vitro experiments have shown that ascorbate (ASC) oxidation products can form AGEs in proteins. However, the mechanisms of ASC oxidation and AGE formation in the human lens are poorly understood. Kynurenines are tryptophan oxidation products produced from the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO)-mediated kynurenine pathway and are present in the human lens. This study investigated the ability of UVA light-excited kynurenines to photooxidize ASC and to form AGEs in lens proteins. UVA light-excited kynurenines in both free and protein-bound forms rapidly oxidized ASC, and such oxidation occurred even in the absence of oxygen. High levels of GSH inhibited but did not completely block ASC oxidation. Upon UVA irradiation, pigmented proteins from human cataractous lenses also oxidized ASC. When exposed to UVA light (320–400 nm, 100 milliwatts/cm2, 45 min to 2 h), young human lenses (20–36 years), which contain high levels of free kynurenines, lost a significant portion of their ASC content and accumulated AGEs. A similar formation of AGEs was observed in UVA-irradiated lenses from human IDO/human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter-2 mice, which contain high levels of kynurenines and ASC. Our data suggest that kynurenine-mediated ASC oxidation followed by AGE formation may be an important mechanism for lens aging and the development of senile cataracts in humans. PMID:24798334

  3. A comparison of the endotoxin biosynthesis and protein oxidation pathways in the biogenesis of the outer membrane of Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susannah ePiek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope consists of an inner membrane (IM that surrounds the cytoplasm, and an asymmetrical outer-membrane (OM that forms a protective barrier to the external environment. The OM consists of lipopolysaccahride (LPS, phospholipids, outer membrane proteins (OMPs and lipoproteins. Oxidative protein folding mediated by periplasmic oxidoreductases is required for the correct biogenesis of the protein components, mainly constituents of virulence determinants such as pili, flagella and toxins, of the Gram-negative OM. Recently, periplasmic oxidoreductases have been implicated in LPS biogenesis of Escherichia coli and Neisseria meningitidis. Differences in OM biogenesis, in particular the transport pathways for endotoxin to the OM, the composition and role of the protein oxidation and isomerisation pathways and the regulatory networks that control them have been found in these two Gram-negative species suggesting that although form and function of the OM is conserved, these conserved pathways have been modified to suit the lifestyle of each organism.

  4. Analysis of protein oxidation in serum of fetal and newborn piglets and the influence of iron dextran on induction of protein carbonyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods were employed to evaluate serum biomarkers associated with protein oxidative stress and damage, to determine potential sources of metabolic stress in baby pigs. Protein carbonyls in serum were converted to dinitrophenyl (DNP) derivatives with DNP-hydrazine, precipitated with TCA, extracted i...

  5. Oxidative DNA Damage in Neurons: Implication of Ku in Neuronal Homeostasis and Survival

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    Daniela De Zio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative DNA damage is produced by reactive oxygen species (ROS which are generated by exogenous and endogenous sources and continuously challenge the cell. One of the most severe DNA lesions is the double-strand break (DSB, which is mainly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ pathway in mammals. NHEJ directly joins the broken ends, without using the homologous template. Ku70/86 heterodimer, also known as Ku, is the first component of NHEJ as it directly binds DNA and recruits other NHEJ factors to promote the repair of the broken ends. Neurons are particularly metabolically active, displaying high rates of transcription and translation, which are associated with high metabolic and mitochondrial activity as well as oxygen consumption. In such a way, excessive oxygen radicals can be generated and constantly attack DNA, thereby producing several lesions. This condition, together with defective DNA repair systems, can lead to a high accumulation of DNA damage resulting in neurodegenerative processes and defects in neurodevelopment. In light of recent findings, in this paper, we will discuss the possible implication of Ku in neurodevelopment and in mediating the DNA repair dysfunction observed in certain neurodegenerations.

  6. Characterization of the deleted in autism 1 protein family: implications for studying cognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Azhari; Harrop, Sean P; Bishop, Naomi E

    2011-01-19

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1) and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R) are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L), lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental retardation.

  7. Characterization of the deleted in autism 1 protein family: implications for studying cognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhari Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are a group of commonly occurring, highly-heritable developmental disabilities. Human genes c3orf58 or Deleted In Autism-1 (DIA1 and cXorf36 or Deleted in Autism-1 Related (DIA1R are implicated in ASD and mental retardation. Both gene products encode signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. As evolutionary medicine has emerged as a key tool for understanding increasing numbers of human diseases, we have used an evolutionary approach to study DIA1 and DIA1R. We found DIA1 conserved from cnidarians to humans, indicating DIA1 evolution coincided with the development of the first primitive synapses. Nematodes lack a DIA1 homologue, indicating Caenorhabditis elegans is not suitable for studying all aspects of ASD etiology, while zebrafish encode two DIA1 paralogues. By contrast to DIA1, DIA1R was found exclusively in vertebrates, with an origin coinciding with the whole-genome duplication events occurring early in the vertebrate lineage, and the evolution of the more complex vertebrate nervous system. Strikingly, DIA1R was present in schooling fish but absent in fish that have adopted a more solitary lifestyle. An additional DIA1-related gene we named DIA1-Like (DIA1L, lacks a signal peptide and is restricted to the genomes of the echinoderm Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and cephalochordate Branchiostoma floridae. Evidence for remarkable DIA1L gene expansion was found in B. floridae. Amino acid alignments of DIA1 family gene products revealed a potential Golgi-retention motif and a number of conserved motifs with unknown function. Furthermore, a glycine and three cysteine residues were absolutely conserved in all DIA1-family proteins, indicating a critical role in protein structure and/or function. We have therefore identified a new metazoan protein family, the DIA1-family, and understanding the biological roles of DIA1-family members will have implications for our understanding of autism and mental

  8. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins involved in the oxidative stress response.

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    Elio A Cino

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs are abundant in cells and have central roles in protein-protein interaction networks. Interactions between the IDP Prothymosin alpha (ProTα and the Neh2 domain of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, with a common binding partner, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1(Keap1, are essential for regulating cellular response to oxidative stress. Misregulation of this pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, premature aging and cancer. In order to understand the mechanisms these two disordered proteins employ to bind to Keap1, we performed extensive 0.5-1.0 microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the structure/dynamics of free-state ProTα and Neh2 and their thermodynamics of bindings. The results show that in their free states, both ProTα and Neh2 have propensities to form bound-state-like β-turn structures but to different extents. We also found that, for both proteins, residues outside the Keap1-binding motifs may play important roles in stabilizing the bound-state-like structures. Based on our findings, we propose that the binding of disordered ProTα and Neh2 to Keap1 occurs synergistically via preformed structural elements (PSEs and coupled folding and binding, with a heavy bias towards PSEs, particularly for Neh2. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms Neh2 and ProTα bind to Keap1, information that is useful for developing therapeutics to enhance the oxidative stress response.

  9. A Novel Drug Delivery Vesicle Development to Reverse Neurodegeneration: Analysis of the Interactions among Protein, Graphene Oxide and Liposome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraz, Md Alamin

    In this study, Liposome was decorated with graphene oxide (GO) to synthesize fully-biocompatible theranostic vesicle that can carry bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. Graphene oxide has been studied as one of the most promising platforms for promoting the growth and repair of neurons. Our graphene oxide based structure could account for the high efficiency of protein loading and deliver to the damaged neuron cell which can reverse the neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. The resultant vesicle exhibited high stability in aqueous solution. We investigated the protein adsorption capacity and protein interaction to carbon-based nanomaterials. The Liposome, graphene oxide and bovine serum albumin (BSA) are all biocompatible and hence will not trigger an immune response in vivo.

  10. Radiosensitivity modulating factors: Role of PARP-1, PARP-2 and Cdk5 proteins and chromatin implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudra, M.T.

    2011-12-01

    The post-translational modifications of DNA repair proteins and histone remodeling factors by poly(ADP-ribose)ylation and phosphorylation are essential for the maintenance of DNA integrity and chromatin structure, and in particular in response to DNA damaging produced by ionizing radiation (IR). Amongst the proteins implicated in these two processes are the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) and PARP-2, and the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk5: PARP-1 and 2 are involved in DNA single strand break (SSB) repair (SSBR) and Cdk5 depletion has been linked with increased cell sensitivity to PARP inhibition. We have shown by using HeLa cells stably depleted for either CdK5 or PARP-2, that the recruitment profile of PARP-1 and XRCC-1, two proteins involved in the short-patch (SP) SSBR sub-pathway, to DNA damage sites is sub-maximal and that of PCNA, a protein involved in the long-patch (LP) repair pathway, is increased in the absence of Cdk5 and decreased in the absence of PARP-2 suggesting that both Cdk5 and PARP-2 are involved in both SSBR sub-pathways. PARP-2 and Cdk5 also impact on the poly(ADP-ribose) levels in cells as in the absence of Cdk5 a hyper-activation of PARP-1 was found and in the absence of PARP-2 a reduction in poly(ADP-ribose) glyco-hydrolase (PARG) activity was seen. However, in spite of these changes no impact on the repair of SSBs induced by IR was seen in either the Cdk5 or PARP-2 depleted cells (Cdk5 KD or PARP-2 KD cells) but, interestingly, increased radiation sensitivity in terms of cell killing was noted in the Cdk5 depleted cells. We also found that Cdk5, PARP-2 and PARG were all implicated in the regulation of the recruitment and the dissociation of the chromatin-remodeling factor ALC1 from DNA damage sites suggesting a role for these three proteins in changes in chromatin structure after DNA photo-damage. These results, taken together with the observation that PARP-1 recruitment is sub-optimal in both Cdk5 KD and PARP-2 KD cells, show that

  11. An evaluation of heat on protein oxidation of soy protein isolate or soy protein isolate mixed with soybean oil and its consequences on redox status of broilers at early age

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    Xianglun Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of heat treatment and soybean oil inclusion on protein oxidation of soy protein isolate (SPI and of oxidized protein on redox status of broilers at an early age. Methods SPI mixed with soybean oil (SPIO heated at 100°C for 8 h was used to evaluate protein oxidation of SPI. A total of two hundred and sixteen 1-day-old Arbor Acres chicks were divided into 3 groups with 6 replicates of 12 birds, receiving basal diet (CON, heat-oxidized SPI diet (HSPI or mixture of SPI and 2% soybean oil diet (HSPIO for 21 d, respectively. Results Increased protein carbonyl, decreased protein sulfhydryl of SPI were observed as heating time increased in all treatments (p<0.05. Addition of 2% soybean oil increased protein carbonyl of SPI at 8 h heating (p<0.05. Dietary HSPI and HSPIO decreased the average daily gain of broilers as compared with the CON (p<0.05. Broilers fed HSPI and HSPIO exhibited decreased glutathione (GSH in serum, catalase activity and total sulfhydryl in liver and increased malondialdehyde (MDA and protein carbonyl in serum, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs in liver and protein carbonyl in jejunal mucosa as compared with that of the CON (p<0.05. Additionally, broilers receiving HSPIO showed decreased glutathione peroxidase activity (GSH-Px in serum, GSH and hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity in liver, GSH-Px activity in duodenal mucosa, GSH-Px activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging capacity in jejunal mucosa and increased AOPPs in serum, MDA and protein carbonyl in liver, MDA and AOPPs in jejunal mucosa (p<0.05. Conclusion Protein oxidation of SPI can be induced by heat and soybean oil and oxidized protein resulted in redox imbalance in broilers at an early age.

  12. Membrane-mediated oligomerization of G protein coupled receptors and its implications for GPCR function

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    Stefan Gahbauer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The dimerization or even oligomerization of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs causes ongoing, controversial debates about its functional role and the coupled biophysical, biochemical or biomedical implications. A continously growing number of studies hints to a relation between oligomerization and function of GPCRs and strengthens the assumption that receptor assembly plays a key role in the regulation of protein function. Additionally, progress in the structural analysis of GPCR-G protein and GPCR-ligand interactions allows to distinguish between actively functional and non-signalling complexes. Recent findings further suggest that the surrounding membrane, i.e. its lipid composition may modulate the preferred dimerization interface and as a result the abundance of distinct dimeric conformations. In this review, the association of GPCRs and the role of the membrane in oligomerization will be discussed. An overview of the different reported oligomeric interfaces is provided and their capability for signaling discussed. The currently available data is summarized with regard to the formation of GPCR oligomers, their structures and dependency on the membrane microenvironment as well as the coupling of oligomerization to receptor function.

  13. Interfacial interactions between Skeletonema costatum extracellular organic matter and metal oxides: Implications for ceramic membrane filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaouri, Noor; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Dramas, Laure; Garces, Daniel; Croue, Jean-Philippe

    2017-06-01

    In the current study, the interfacial interactions between the high molecular weight (HMW) compounds of Skeletonema costatum (SKC) extracellular organic matter (EOM) and ZrO 2 or Al 2 O 3 , were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). HMW SKC-EOM was rigorously characterized and described as a hydrophilic organic compound mainly comprised of polysaccharide-like structures. Lipids and proteins were also observed, although in lower abundance. HMW SKC-EOM displayed attractive forces during approaching (i.e., leading to jump-to-contact events) and adhesion forces during retracting regime to both metal oxides at all solution conditions tested, where electrostatics and hydrogen bonding were suggested as dominant interacting mechanisms. However, the magnitude of these forces was significantly higher on ZrO 2 surfaces, irrespective of cation type (Na + or Ca 2+ ) or concentration. Interestingly, while HMW SKC-EOM interacting forces to Al 2 O 3 were practically insensitive to solution chemistry, the interactions between ZrO 2 and HMW SKC-EOM increased with increasing cation concentration in solution. The structure, and lower charge, hydrophilicity, and density of hydroxyl groups on ZrO 2 surface would play a key role on favoring zirconia associations with HMW SKC-EOM. The current results contribute to advance our fundamental understanding of Algogenic Organic Matter (AOM) interfacial interactions with metal oxides (i.e., AOM membrane fouling), and would highly assist in the proper selection of membrane material during episodic algal blooms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Predicting Structure and Function for Novel Proteins of an Extremophilic Iron Oxidizing Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, K.; Zemla, A.; Banfield, J.; Thelen, M.

    2007-12-01

    Proteins isolated from uncultivated microbial populations represent the functional components of microbial processes and contribute directly to community fitness under natural conditions. Investigations into proteins in the environment are hindered by the lack of genome data, or where available, the high proportion of proteins of unknown function. We have identified thousands of proteins from biofilms in the extremely acidic drainage outflow of an iron mine ecosystem (1). With an extensive genomic and proteomic foundation, we have focused directly on the problem of several hundred proteins of unknown function within this well-defined model system. Here we describe the geobiological insights gained by using a high throughput computational approach for predicting structure and function of 421 novel proteins from the biofilm community. We used a homology based modeling system to compare these proteins to those of known structure (AS2TS) (2). This approach has resulted in the assignment of structures to 360 proteins (85%) and provided functional information for up to 75% of the modeled proteins. Detailed examination of the modeling results enables confident, high-throughput prediction of the roles of many of the novel proteins within the microbial community. For instance, one prediction places a protein in the phosphoenolpyruvate/pyruvate domain superfamily as a carboxylase that fills in a gap in an otherwise complete carbon cycle. Particularly important for a community in such a metal rich environment is the evolution of over 25% of the novel proteins that contain a metal cofactor; of these, one third are likely Fe containing proteins. Two of the most abundant proteins in biofilm samples are unusual c-type cytochromes. Both of these proteins catalyze iron- oxidation, a key metabolic reaction supporting the energy requirements of this community. Structural models of these cytochromes verify our experimental results on heme binding and electron transfer reactivity, and

  15. Pathogenic prion protein is degraded by a manganese oxide mineral found in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, F.; Johnson, C.J.; McKenzie, D.; Aiken, Judd M.; Pedersen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Prions, the aetiological agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, exhibit extreme resistance to degradation. Soil can retain prion infectivity in the environment for years. Reactive soil components may, however, contribute to the inactivation of prions in soil. Members of the birnessite family of manganese oxides (MnO2) rank among the strongest natural oxidants in soils. Here, we report the abiotic degradation of pathogenic prion protein (PrPTSE) by a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring birnessite minerals. Aqueous MnO2 suspensions degraded the PrPTSE as evidenced by decreased immunoreactivity and diminished ability to seed protein misfolding cyclic amplification reactions. Birnessite-mediated PrPTSE degradation increased as a solution's pH decreased, consistent with the pH-dependence of the redox potential of MnO2. Exposure to 5.6 mg MnO2 ml-1 (PrPTSE:MnO2=1 : 110) decreased PrPTSE levels by ???4 orders of magnitude. Manganese oxides may contribute to prion degradation in soil environments rich in these minerals. ?? 2009 SGM.

  16. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Duong, Chu Xuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2012-06-15

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (-/-) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (-/-) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (-/-) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Whey protein concentrate supplementation protects rat brain against aging-induced oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Geetika; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2018-05-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is a rich source of sulfur-containing amino acids and is consumed as a functional food, incorporating a wide range of nutritional attributes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of WPC on rat brain during aging. Young (4 months) and old (24 months) male Wistar rats were supplemented with WPC (300 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in terms of ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP), lipid hydroperoxide (LHP), total thiol (T-SH), protein carbonyl (PC), reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were measured in brain of control and experimental (WPC supplemented) groups. In addition, gene expression and histopathological studies were also performed. The results indicate that WPC augmented the level of FRAP, T-SH, and AChE in old rats as compared with the old control. Furthermore, WPC-treated groups exhibited significant reduction in LHP, PC, ROS, and NO levels in aged rats. WPC supplementation also downregulated the expression of inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6), and upregulated the expression of marker genes associated with autophagy (Atg3, Beclin-1, LC3B) and neurodegeneration (neuron specific enolase, Synapsin-I, MBP-2). The findings suggested WPC to be a potential functional nutritional food supplement that prevents the progression of age-related oxidative damage in Wistar rats.

  18. Mercury distribution and lipid oxidation in fish muscle: Effects of washing and isoelectric protein precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Y.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Ren, L.; Egelandsdal, B.; Richards, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all the mercury (Hg) in whole muscle from whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and walleye (Sander vitreus) was present as methyl mercury (MeHg). The Hg content in whole muscle from whitefish and walleye was 0.04-0.09 and 0.14-0.81 ppm, respectively. The myofibril fraction contained approximately three-fourths of the Hg in whitefish and walleye whole muscle. The sarcoplasmic protein fraction (e.g., press juice) was the next most abundant source of Hg. Isolated myosin, triacylglycerols, and cellular membranes contained the least Hg. Protein isolates prepared by pH shifting in the presence of citric acid did not decrease Hg levels. Addition of cysteine during washing decreased the Hg content in washed muscle probably through the interaction of the sulfhydryl group in cysteine with MeHg. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were lower during 2 ??C storage in isolates prepared by pH shifting compared to those of washed or unwashed mince from whole muscle. This was attributed to removing some of the cellular membranes by pH shifting. Washing the mince accelerated lipid peroxide formation but decreased secondary lipid oxidation products compared to that of the unwashed mince. This suggested that there was a lipid hydroperoxide generating system that was active upon dilution of aqueous antioxidants and pro-oxidants. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. Controlled formation of emulsion gels stabilized by salted myofibrillar protein under malondialdehyde (MDA)-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feibai; Sun, Weizheng; Zhao, Mouming

    2015-04-15

    This study presented the cold-set gelation of emulsions stabilized by salted myofibrillar protein (MP) under oxidative stress originated from malondialdehyde (MDA). Gel properties were compared over a range of MDA/NaCl concentrations including gel viscoelastic properties, strength, water-holding capacity (WHC), amount of protein entrapped, and microstructure. The oxidative stability of emulsion gels as indicated by lipid hydroperoxide was further determined and compared. Results indicated that emulsion stabilized by MP at swollen state under certain ionic strengths (0.2-0.6 M) was the premise of gel formation under MDA. In the presence of intermediate MDA concentrations (2.5-10 mM), the emulsion gels showed an improved elasticity, strength, WHC, and oxidative stability. This improvement should be mainly attributed to the enhanced protein-protein cross-linkings via MDA, which were homogeneously formed among absorbed and/or unabsorbed proteins, entrapping a greater amount and fractions of protein within network. Therefore, the oil droplets were better adherent to the gel matrix. Nevertheless, addition of high MDA concentrations (25-50 mM) led to the formation of excessive covalent bonds, which might break protein-protein bonds and trigger the desorption of protein from the interface. This ultimately caused "oil leak" phenomena as well as the collapse of gel structure and, thus, overall decreased gel properties and oxidative stability.

  20. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins kill bacteria by inducing oxidative, thiol, and metal stress.

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    Des Raj Kashyap

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs are a family of evolutionary conserved bactericidal innate immunity proteins, but the mechanism through which they kill bacteria is unclear. We previously proposed that PGRPs are bactericidal due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS, a mechanism of killing that was also postulated, and later refuted, for several bactericidal antibiotics. Here, using whole genome expression arrays, qRT-PCR, and biochemical tests we show that in both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis PGRPs induce a transcriptomic signature characteristic of oxidative stress, as well as correlated biochemical changes. However, induction of ROS was required, but not sufficient for PGRP killing. PGRPs also induced depletion of intracellular thiols and increased cytosolic concentrations of zinc and copper, as evidenced by transcriptome changes and supported by direct measurements. Depletion of thiols and elevated concentrations of metals were also required, but by themselves not sufficient, for bacterial killing. Chemical treatment studies demonstrated that efficient bacterial killing can be recapitulated only by the simultaneous addition of agents leading to production of ROS, depletion of thiols, and elevation of intracellular metal concentrations. These results identify a novel mechanism of bacterial killing by innate immunity proteins, which depends on synergistic effect of oxidative, thiol, and metal stress and differs from bacterial killing by antibiotics. These results offer potential targets for developing new antibacterial agents that would kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  1. Kinetics of oxidation of bilirubin and its protein complex by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, E. V.; Antina, E. V.

    2010-12-01

    A comparative study of oxidation reactions of bilirubin and its complex with albumin was carried out in aqueous solutions under the action of hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen at different pH values. Free radical oxidation of the pigment in both free and bound forms at pH 7.4 was shown not to lead to the formation of biliverdin, but to be associated with the decomposition of the tetrapyrrole chromophore into monopyrrolic products. The effective and true rate constants of the reactions under study were determined. It was assumed that one possible mechanism of the oxidation reaction is associated with the interaction of peroxyl radicals and protons of the NH groups of bilirubin molecules at the limiting stage with the formation of a highly reactive radical intermediate. The binding of bilirubin with albumin was found to result in a considerable reduction in the rate of the oxidation reaction associated with the kinetic manifestation of the protein protection effect. It was found that the autoxidation of bilirubin by molecular oxygen with the formation of biliverdin at the intermediate stage can be observed with an increase in the pH of solutions.

  2. Diacylglycerol kinase regulation of protein kinase D during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jun; Li Jing; Mourot, Joshua M.; Mark Evers, B.; Chung, Dai H.

    2008-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that protein kinase D (PKD) exerts a protective function during oxidative stress-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury; however, the exact role of DAG kinase (DGK)ζ, an isoform expressed in intestine, during this process is unknown. We sought to determine the role of DGK during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury and whether DGK acts as an upstream regulator of PKD. Inhibition of DGK with R59022 compound or DGKζ siRNA transfection decreased H 2 O 2 -induced RIE-1 cell apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and increased PKD phosphorylation. Overexpression of kinase-dead DGKζ also significantly increased PKD phosphorylation. Additionally, endogenous nuclear DGKζ rapidly translocated to the cytoplasm following H 2 O 2 treatment. Our findings demonstrate that DGK is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury. PKD activation is induced by DGKζ, suggesting DGK is an upstream regulator of oxidative stress-induced activation of the PKD signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells

  3. Cth2 Protein Mediates Early Adaptation of Yeast Cells to Oxidative Stress Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available Cth2 is an mRNA-binding protein that participates in remodeling yeast cell metabolism in iron starvation conditions by promoting decay of the targeted molecules, in order to avoid excess iron consumption. This study shows that in the absence of Cth2 immediate upregulation of expression of several of the iron regulon genes (involved in high affinity iron uptake and intracellular iron redistribution upon oxidative stress by hydroperoxide is more intense than in wild type conditions where Cth2 is present. The oxidative stress provokes a temporary increase in the levels of Cth2 (itself a member of the iron regulon. In such conditions Cth2 molecules accumulate at P bodies-like structures when the constitutive mRNA decay machinery is compromised. In addition, a null Δcth2 mutant shows defects, in comparison to CTH2 wild type cells, in exit from α factor-induced arrest at the G1 stage of the cell cycle when hydroperoxide treatment is applied. The cell cycle defects are rescued in conditions that compromise uptake of external iron into the cytosol. The observations support a role of Cth2 in modulating expression of diverse iron regulon genes, excluding those specifically involved in the reductive branch of the high-affinity transport. This would result in immediate adaptation of the yeast cells to an oxidative stress, by controlling uptake of oxidant-promoting iron cations.

  4. Differential proteomics analysis of the surface heterogeneity of dextran iron oxide nanoparticles and the implications for their in vivo clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simberg, Dmitri; Park, Ji-Ho; Karmali, Priya P; Zhang, Wan-Ming; Merkulov, Sergei; McCrae, Keith; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Sailor, Michael; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2009-08-01

    In order to understand the role of plasma proteins in the rapid liver clearance of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in vivo, we analyzed the full repertoire of SPIO-binding blood proteins using novel two-dimensional differential mass spectrometry approach. The identified proteins showed specificity for surface domains of the nanoparticles: mannan-binding lectins bound to the dextran coating, histidine-rich glycoprotein and kininogen bound to the iron oxide part, and the complement lectin and contact clotting factors were secondary binders. Nanoparticle clearance studies in knockout mice suggested that these proteins, as well as several previously identified opsonins, do not play a significant role in the SPIO clearance. However, both the dextran coat and the iron oxide core remained accessible to specific probes after incubation of SPIO in plasma, suggesting that the nanoparticle surface could be available for recognition by macrophages, regardless of protein coating. These data provide guidance to rational design of bioinert, long-circulating nanoparticles.

  5. Effect of surfactant in mitigating cadmium oxide nanoparticle toxicity: Implications for mitigating cadmium toxicity in environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmuri, Sricharani Rao [Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Selvaraj, Uthra [Department of Biotechnology, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Kumar, Vadivel Vinod [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip, E-mail: philip@biotech.sastra.edu [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Tsatsakis, Aristides Michael [Department of Forensic Sciences and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Scientific Educational Center of Nanotechnology, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690990 (Russian Federation); Golokhvast, Kirill Sergeevich [Scientific Educational Center of Nanotechnology, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690990 (Russian Federation); Raman, Thiagarajan, E-mail: raman@biotech.sastra.edu [Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases (CRID), School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India)

    2017-01-15

    Cadmium (Cd), classified as human carcinogen, is an extremely toxic heavy metal pollutant, and there is an increasing environmental concern for cadmium exposure through anthropogenic sources including cigarette smoke. Though Cd based nanoparticles such as cadmium oxide (CdO) are being widely used in a variety of clinical and industrial applications, the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles has not been well characterized. Herein we report the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles employing zebrafish as a model. Two different CdO nanoparticles were prepared, calcination of Cd(OH){sub 2} without any organic molecule (CdO-1) and calcination of Cd-citrate coordination polymer (CdO-2), to evaluate and compare the toxicity of these two different CdO nanoparticles. Results show that zebrafish exposed to CdO-2 nanoparticles expressed reduced toxicity as judged by lower oxidative stress levels, rescue of liver carboxylesterases and reduction in metallothionein activity compared to CdO-1 nanoparticles. Histopathological observations also support our contention that CdO-1 nanoparticles showed higher toxicity relative to CdO-2 nanoparticles. The organic unit of Cd-citrate coordination polymer might have converted into carbon during calcination that might have covered the surface of CdO nanoparticles. This carbon surface coverage can control the release of Cd{sup 2+} ions in CdO-2 compared to non-covered CdO-1 nanoparticles and hence mitigate the toxicity in the case of CdO-2. This was supported by atomic absorption spectrophotometer analyses of Cd{sup 2+} ions release from CdO-1 and CdO-2 nanoparticles. Thus the present study clearly demonstrates the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles in an aquatic animal and also indicates that the toxicity could be substantially reduced by carbon coverage. This could have important implications in terms of anthropogenic release and environmental pollution caused by Cd and human exposure to Cd{sup 2+} from sources such as cigarette smoke. - Highlights:

  6. Effect of surfactant in mitigating cadmium oxide nanoparticle toxicity: Implications for mitigating cadmium toxicity in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmuri, Sricharani Rao; Selvaraj, Uthra; Kumar, Vadivel Vinod; Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip; Tsatsakis, Aristides Michael; Golokhvast, Kirill Sergeevich; Raman, Thiagarajan

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), classified as human carcinogen, is an extremely toxic heavy metal pollutant, and there is an increasing environmental concern for cadmium exposure through anthropogenic sources including cigarette smoke. Though Cd based nanoparticles such as cadmium oxide (CdO) are being widely used in a variety of clinical and industrial applications, the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles has not been well characterized. Herein we report the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles employing zebrafish as a model. Two different CdO nanoparticles were prepared, calcination of Cd(OH) 2 without any organic molecule (CdO-1) and calcination of Cd-citrate coordination polymer (CdO-2), to evaluate and compare the toxicity of these two different CdO nanoparticles. Results show that zebrafish exposed to CdO-2 nanoparticles expressed reduced toxicity as judged by lower oxidative stress levels, rescue of liver carboxylesterases and reduction in metallothionein activity compared to CdO-1 nanoparticles. Histopathological observations also support our contention that CdO-1 nanoparticles showed higher toxicity relative to CdO-2 nanoparticles. The organic unit of Cd-citrate coordination polymer might have converted into carbon during calcination that might have covered the surface of CdO nanoparticles. This carbon surface coverage can control the release of Cd 2+ ions in CdO-2 compared to non-covered CdO-1 nanoparticles and hence mitigate the toxicity in the case of CdO-2. This was supported by atomic absorption spectrophotometer analyses of Cd 2+ ions release from CdO-1 and CdO-2 nanoparticles. Thus the present study clearly demonstrates the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles in an aquatic animal and also indicates that the toxicity could be substantially reduced by carbon coverage. This could have important implications in terms of anthropogenic release and environmental pollution caused by Cd and human exposure to Cd 2+ from sources such as cigarette smoke. - Highlights: • Toxicity of Cd

  7. Interaction of HTLV-1 Tax protein with calreticulin: implications for Tax nuclear export and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alefantis, Timothy; Flaig, Katherine E; Wigdahl, Brian; Jain, Pooja

    2007-05-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The HTLV-1 transcriptional transactivator protein Tax plays an integral role in virus replication and disease progression. Traditionally, Tax is described as a nuclear protein where it performs its primary role as a transcriptional transactivator. However, recent studies have clearly shown that Tax can also be localized to the cytoplasm where it has been shown to interact with a number of host transcription factors most notably NF-kappaB, constitutive expression of which is directly related to the T cell transforming properties of Tax in ATL patients. The presence of a functional nuclear export signal (NES) within Tax and the secretion of full-length Tax have also been demonstrated previously. Additionally, release of Tax from HTLV-1-infected cells and the presence of cell-free Tax was demonstrated in the CSF of HAM/TSP patients suggesting that the progression to HAM/TSP might be mediated by the ability of Tax to function as an extracellular cytokine. Therefore, in both ATL and HAM/TSP Tax nuclear export and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling may play a critical role, the mechanism of which remains unknown. In this study, we have demonstrated that the calcium binding protein calreticulin interacts with Tax by co-immunoprecipitation. This interaction was found to localize to a region at or near the nuclear membrane. In addition, differential expression of calreticulin was demonstrated in various cell types that correlated with their ability to retain cytoplasmic Tax, particularly in astrocytes. Finally, a comparison of a number of HTLV-1-infected T cell lines to non-infected T cells revealed higher expression of calreticulin in infected cells implicating a direct role for this protein in HTLV-1 infection.

  8. Determination of anisotropy constants of protein encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles by electron magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongyan; Klem, Michael T.; Sebby, Karl B.; Singel, David J.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2009-01-01

    Angle-dependent electron magnetic resonance was performed on 4.9, 8.0, and 19 nm iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within protein capsids and suspended in water. Measurements were taken at liquid nitrogen temperature after cooling in a 1 T field to partially align the particles. The angle dependence of the shifts in the resonance field for the iron oxide nanoparticles (synthesized within Listeria-Dps, horse spleen ferritin, and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus) all show evidence of a uniaxial anisotropy. Using a Boltzmann distribution for the particles' easy-axis direction, we are able to use the resonance field shifts to extract a value for the anisotropy energy, showing that the anisotropy energy density increases with decreasing particle size. This suggests that surface anisotropy plays a significant role in magnetic nanoparticles of this size

  9. Effects of power ultrasound on oxidation and structure of beef proteins during curing processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Da-Cheng; Zou, Yun-He; Cheng, Yu-Ping; Xing, Lu-Juan; Zhou, Guang-Hong; Zhang, Wan-Gang

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of power ultrasound intensity (PUS, 2.39, 6.23, 11.32 and 20.96Wcm(-2)) and treatment time (30, 60, 90 and 120min) on the oxidation and structure of beef proteins during the brining procedure with 6% NaCl concentration. The investigation was conducted with an ultrasonic generator with the frequency of 20kHz and fresh beef at 48h after slaughter. Analysis of TBARS (Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) contents showed that PUS treatment significantly increased the extent of lipid oxidation compared to static brining (Pgeneration of free radicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of anisotropy constants of protein encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles by electron magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hongyan [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Klem, Michael T.; Sebby, Karl B.; Singel, David J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Young, Mark [Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Douglas, Trevor [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Idzerda, Yves U. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Center for Bio-Inspired Nanomaterials, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)], E-mail: Idzerda@montana.edu

    2009-02-15

    Angle-dependent electron magnetic resonance was performed on 4.9, 8.0, and 19 nm iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within protein capsids and suspended in water. Measurements were taken at liquid nitrogen temperature after cooling in a 1 T field to partially align the particles. The angle dependence of the shifts in the resonance field for the iron oxide nanoparticles (synthesized within Listeria-Dps, horse spleen ferritin, and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus) all show evidence of a uniaxial anisotropy. Using a Boltzmann distribution for the particles' easy-axis direction, we are able to use the resonance field shifts to extract a value for the anisotropy energy, showing that the anisotropy energy density increases with decreasing particle size. This suggests that surface anisotropy plays a significant role in magnetic nanoparticles of this size.

  11. 18 kDa translocator proteinimplications in cell’s functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kołodziejczyk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial 18kDa Translocation Protein (TSPO was first identified in 1977 by its capability to bind benzodiazepines in peripheral tissues. It is more commonly known after its previous name – peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR as opposed to the central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR, from which it differs by location, structure and function. It is ubiquitous with highest expression in steroid-producing tissues, like adrenal cortex, ovaries, testicles, and placenta. The role of TSPO is crucial for living; its inactivation results in early embryonic-lethal phenotype in mice. TSPO has been implicated in various functions of cell, including steroidogenesis, cellular respiration, reactive oxygen species production, heme biosynthesis, immunomodulation, apoptosis, and cellular proliferation. TSPO has been shown to interact with other cellular proteins: 32 kDa voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC, 30 kDa adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT, cyclophilin D, hexokinase, creatinine kinase, diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI, phosphate carrier and Bcl-2 family. They are – involved in the formation and regulation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP at the junction of the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes. While the function and characteristics of the mPTP are known, its well defined, but its structure remains speculative. Changes in TSPO expression are associated with multiple disorders, including cancer, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders, atheromatosis, and others. – TSPO is able to bind cholesterol, porphyrins and other ligands with different affinity. The current knowledge of TSPO implicates its potential use as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target in different diseases and their therapies.

  12. 18 kDa translocator proteinimplications in cell’s functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kołodziejczyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial 18kDa Translocation Protein (TSPO was first identified in 1977 by its capability to bind benzodiazepines in peripheral tissues. It is more commonly known after its previous name – peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR as opposed to the central benzodiazepine receptor (CBR, from which it differs by location, structure and function. It is ubiquitous with highest expression in steroid-producing tissues, like adrenal cortex, ovaries, testicles, and placenta. The role of TSPO is crucial for living; its inactivation results in early embryonic-lethal phenotype in mice. TSPO has been implicated in various functions of cell, including steroidogenesis, cellular respiration, reactive oxygen species production, heme biosynthesis, immunomodulation, apoptosis, and cellular proliferation. TSPO has been shown to interact with other cellular proteins: 32 kDa voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC, 30 kDa adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT, cyclophilin D, hexokinase, creatinine kinase, diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI, phosphate carrier and Bcl-2 family. They are – involved in the formation and regulation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP at the junction of the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes. While the function and characteristics of the mPTP are known, its well defined, but its structure remains speculative. Changes in TSPO expression are associated with multiple disorders, including cancer, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders, atheromatosis, and others. – TSPO is able to bind cholesterol, porphyrins and other ligands with different affinity. The current knowledge of TSPO implicates its potential use as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target in different diseases and their therapies.

  13. Schizophrenia: Evidence Implicating Hippocampal GluN2B protein and REST Epigenetics in Psychosis Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, Carol A.; Zukin, R. Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus is strongly implicated in the psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia. Functionally, basal hippocampal activity (perfusion) is elevated in schizophrenic psychosis, as measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and with magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion techniques, while hippocampal activation to memory tasks is reduced. Subfield-specific hippocampal molecular pathology exists in human psychosis tissue which could underlie this neuronal hyperactivity, including increased GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in hippocampal CA3, along with increased postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) along with augmented dendritic spines on the pyramidal neuron apical dendrites. We interpret these observations to implicate a reduction in the influence of a ubiquitous gene repressor, repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in psychosis; REST is involved in the age-related maturation of the NMDA receptor from GluN2B- to GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors through epigenetic remodeling. These CA3 changes in psychosis leave the hippocampus liable to pathological increases in neuronal activity, feedforward excitation and false memory formation, sometimes with psychotic content. PMID:26211447

  14. Internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors: Implication in receptor function, physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calebiro, Davide; Godbole, Amod

    2018-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of membrane receptors and mediate the effects of numerous hormones and neurotransmitters. The nearly 1000 GPCRs encoded by the human genome regulate virtually all physiological functions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent human diseases such as thyroid disorders, hypertension or Parkinson's disease. As a result, 30-50% of all currently prescribed drugs are targeting these receptors. Once activated, GPCRs induce signals at the cell surface. This is often followed by internalization, a process that results in the transfer of receptors from the plasma membrane to membranes of the endosomal compartment. Internalization was initially thought to be mainly implicated in signal desensitization, a mechanism of adaptation to prolonged receptor stimulation. However, several unexpected functions have subsequently emerged. Most notably, accumulating evidence indicates that internalization can induce prolonged receptor signaling on intracellular membranes, which is apparently required for at least some biological effects of hormones like TSH, LH and adrenaline. These findings reveal an even stronger connection between receptor internalization and signaling than previously thought. Whereas new studies are just beginning to reveal an important physiological role for GPCR signaling after internalization and ways to exploit it for therapeutic purposes, future investigations will be required to explore its involvement in human disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Age- and gender-related alteration in plasma advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentrations in physiological ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Olczyk, Pawel; Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna; Kuznik-Trocha, Kornelia; Klimek, Katarzyna; Olczyk, Krystyna

    2012-02-13

    The authors studied the role of increased oxidative stress in the development of oxidative protein damage and extracellular matrix (ECM) components in ageing. The age- and gender-associated disturbances in connective tissue metabolism were evaluated by the plasma chondroitin sulphated glycosaminoglycans (CS-GAG) and non-sulphated GAG-hyaluronan (HA) measurements. Plasma concentration of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) was analysed in order to assess oxidative protein damage and evaluate the possible deleterious role of oxidative phenomenon on tissue proteoglycans' metabolism during the physiological ageing process. Sulphated and non-sulphated GAGs as well as AOPP were quantified in plasma samples from 177 healthy volunteers. A linear age-related decline of plasma CS-GAG level was found in this study (r=-0.46; page (r=0.44; page-dependent relationship has been shown in regard to AOPP. AOPP levels significantly increased with age (r=0.63; pphysiological ageing. A significant correlation was found between the concentrations of AOPP and both CS-GAG (r=-0.31; page changes in the ECM are reflected by CS-GAG and HA plasma levels. Strong correlations between AOPP and ECM components indicate that oxidative stress targets protein and non-protein components of the connective tissue matrix during human ageing.

  16. Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization improves oxidative stability and interfacial properties of soy protein isolate-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Avila, C; Trujillo, A J

    2016-10-15

    Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization (100-300MPa) has great potential for technological, microbiological and nutritional aspects of fluid processing. Its effect on the oxidative stability and interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 4% (w/v) of soy protein isolate and soybean oil (10 and 20%, v/v) were studied and compared to emulsions treated by conventional homogenization (15MPa). Emulsions were characterized by particle size, emulsifying activity index, surface protein concentration at the interface and by transmission electron microscopy. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were evaluated in emulsions upon storage. Emulsions with 20% oil treated at 100 and 200MPa exhibited the most oxidative stability due to higher amount of oil and protein surface load at the interface. This manuscript addresses the improvement in oxidative stability in emulsions treated by UHPH when compared to conventional emulsions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The induction of the oxidative burst in Elodea densa by sulfhydryl reagent does not depend on de novo protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amicucci, Enrica [Milan, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisiologia e Biochimica delle Piante

    1997-12-31

    In Elodea densa Planchon leaves, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and other sulfhydryl-binding reagents induce a marked and temporary increase of respiration that is insensitive to cyanide, hydroxamate and propylgallate and completely inhibited by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and by quinacrine. In this paper the author investigates whether the mechanism that causes the oxidative burst depends on the activation of preexisting oxidative systems or on the activation of de novo protein synthesis. The inhibitors used were cycloheximide (CHI) which inhibits protein synthesis in plant cells by depressing the incorporation of aminoacids into proteins and cordycepin, an effective inhibitor of mRNA synthesis. The data support the idea that the mechanism investigated depends on the activation of a long lived protein(s) and not on de novo protein synthesis.

  18. AMP-activated protein kinase: Role in metabolism and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmack, Greg; Defronzo, Ralph A; Musi, Nicolas

    2006-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an enzyme that works as a fuel gauge which becomes activated in situations of energy consumption. AMPK functions to restore cellular ATP levels by modifying diverse metabolic and cellular pathways. In the skeletal muscle, AMPK is activated during exercise and is involved in contraction-stimulated glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. In the heart, AMPK activity increases during ischaemia and functions to sustain ATP, cardiac function and myocardial viability. In the liver, AMPK inhibits the production of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides and stimulates fatty acid oxidation. Recent studies have shown that AMPK is involved in the mechanism of action of metformin and thiazolidinediones, and the adipocytokines leptin and adiponectin. These data, along with evidence that pharmacological activation of AMPK in vivo improves blood glucose homeostasis, cholesterol concentrations and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents, make this enzyme an attractive pharmacological target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, ischaemic heart disease and other metabolic diseases.

  19. S-nitrosylation of TRIM72 at cysteine 144 is critical for protection against oxidation-induced protein degradation and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohr, Mark J; Evangelista, Alicia M; Ferlito, Marcella; Steenbergen, Charles; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative stress and membrane damage following myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury are important contributors to cardiomyocyte death and the loss of myocardial function. Our previous study identified cysteine 144 (C144) of tripartite motif-containing protein 72 (TRIM72) as a potential site for S-nitrosylation (SNO). TRIM72 is a cardioprotective membrane repair protein that can be both activated and targeted for degradation by different oxidative modifications. Consistent with the potential regulation of TRIM72 by various oxidative modifications, we found that SNO levels increased at C144 of TRIM72 with ischemic preconditioning. Therefore, to investigate the role of C144 in the regulation of TRIM72 function, we mutated C144 of TRIM72 to a serine residue (TRIM72(C144S)), and expressed either TRIM72(WT) or TRIM72(C144S) in HEK-293 cells, which lack endogenous TRIM72, in order to examine the effect of this mutation on the functional stability of TRIM72 and on cell survival. We hypothesized that SNO of TRIM72 stabilizes the protein, thus allowing for membrane repair and enhanced cell survival. Upon treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), we found that TRIM72(WT) levels were decreased, but not TRIM72(C144S) and this correlated with increased H2O2-induced cell death in TRIM72(WT) cells. Additionally, we found that treatment with the cardioprotective S-nitrosylating agent S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), was able to preserve TRIM72(WT) protein levels and enhance TRIM72(WT)-mediated cell survival, but had no effect on TRIM72(C144S) levels. Consistent with our hypothesis, GSNO was also found to increase SNO levels and inhibit H2O2-induced irreversible oxidation for TRIM72(WT) without affecting TRIM72(C144S). In further support of our hypothesis, GSNO blocked the ischemia/reperfusion-induced decrease in TRIM72 levels and reduced infarct size in a Langendorff-perfused heart model. The results of these studies have important implications for cardioprotection and suggest that

  20. Protein-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: time efficient potential-water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoli, Chuka; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven; Rajarao-Kuttuva, Gunaratna

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience suggest that the existing issues involving water quality could be resolved or greatly improved using nanomaterials, especially magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for the development and use, in association with natural coagulant protein for water treatment. The nanoparticles size, morphology, structure, and magnetic properties were characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Purified Moringa oleifera protein was attached onto microemulsions-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MION) to form stable protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PMO+ME-MION). The turbidity removal efficiency in both synthetic and surface water samples were investigated and compared with the commonly used synthetic coagulant (alum) as well as PMO. More than 90 % turbidity could be removed from the surface waters within 12 min by magnetic separation of PMO+ME-MION; whereas gravimetrically, 70 % removal in high and low turbid waters can be achieved within 60 min. In contrast, alum requires 180 min to reduce the turbidity of low turbid water sample. These data support the advantage of separation with external magnetic field (magnetophoresis) over gravitational force. Time kinetics studies show a significant enhancement in ME-MION efficiency after binding with PMO implying the availability of large surface of the ME-MION. The coagulated particles (impurities) can be removed from PMO+ME-MION by washing with mild detergent or cleaning solution. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surface water turbidity removal using protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

  1. Protein-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: time efficient potential-water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okoli, Chuka [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Environmental Microbiology (Sweden); Boutonnet, Magali; Jaeras, Sven [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Chemical Technology (Sweden); Rajarao-Kuttuva, Gunaratna, E-mail: gkr@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Environmental Microbiology (Sweden)

    2012-10-15

    Recent advances in nanoscience suggest that the existing issues involving water quality could be resolved or greatly improved using nanomaterials, especially magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for the development and use, in association with natural coagulant protein for water treatment. The nanoparticles size, morphology, structure, and magnetic properties were characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Purified Moringa oleifera protein was attached onto microemulsions-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MION) to form stable protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PMO+ME-MION). The turbidity removal efficiency in both synthetic and surface water samples were investigated and compared with the commonly used synthetic coagulant (alum) as well as PMO. More than 90 % turbidity could be removed from the surface waters within 12 min by magnetic separation of PMO+ME-MION; whereas gravimetrically, 70 % removal in high and low turbid waters can be achieved within 60 min. In contrast, alum requires 180 min to reduce the turbidity of low turbid water sample. These data support the advantage of separation with external magnetic field (magnetophoresis) over gravitational force. Time kinetics studies show a significant enhancement in ME-MION efficiency after binding with PMO implying the availability of large surface of the ME-MION. The coagulated particles (impurities) can be removed from PMO+ME-MION by washing with mild detergent or cleaning solution. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surface water turbidity removal using protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

  2. Protein-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: time efficient potential-water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Chuka; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven; Rajarao-Kuttuva, Gunaratna

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience suggest that the existing issues involving water quality could be resolved or greatly improved using nanomaterials, especially magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for the development and use, in association with natural coagulant protein for water treatment. The nanoparticles size, morphology, structure, and magnetic properties were characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Purified Moringa oleifera protein was attached onto microemulsions-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MION) to form stable protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PMO+ME-MION). The turbidity removal efficiency in both synthetic and surface water samples were investigated and compared with the commonly used synthetic coagulant (alum) as well as PMO. More than 90 % turbidity could be removed from the surface waters within 12 min by magnetic separation of PMO+ME-MION; whereas gravimetrically, 70 % removal in high and low turbid waters can be achieved within 60 min. In contrast, alum requires 180 min to reduce the turbidity of low turbid water sample. These data support the advantage of separation with external magnetic field (magnetophoresis) over gravitational force. Time kinetics studies show a significant enhancement in ME-MION efficiency after binding with PMO implying the availability of large surface of the ME-MION. The coagulated particles (impurities) can be removed from PMO+ME-MION by washing with mild detergent or cleaning solution. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surface water turbidity removal using protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

  3. Counteraction of urea-induced protein denaturation by trimethylamine N-oxide: A chemical chaperone at atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bennion, Brian J.; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Proteins are very sensitive to their solvent environments. Urea is a common chemical denaturant of proteins, yet some animals contain high concentrations of urea. These animals have evolved an interesting mechanism to counteract the effects of urea by using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The molecular basis for the ability of TMAO to act as a chemical chaperone remains unknown. Here, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of a small globular protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, in 8 M urea ...

  4. Oxidative protein folding: from thiol-disulfide exchange reactions to the redox poise of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Devin A; Gannon, Shawn A; Thorpe, Colin

    2015-03-01

    This review examines oxidative protein folding within the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from an enzymological perspective. In protein disulfide isomerase-first (PDI-first) pathways of oxidative protein folding, PDI is the immediate oxidant of reduced client proteins and then addresses disulfide mispairings in a second isomerization phase. In PDI-second pathways the initial oxidation is PDI-independent. Evidence for the rapid reduction of PDI by reduced glutathione is presented in the context of PDI-first pathways. Strategies and challenges are discussed for determination of the concentrations of reduced and oxidized glutathione and of the ratios of PDI(red):PDI(ox). The preponderance of evidence suggests that the mammalian ER is more reducing than first envisaged. The average redox state of major PDI-family members is largely to almost totally reduced. These observations are consistent with model studies showing that oxidative protein folding proceeds most efficiently at a reducing redox poise consistent with a stoichiometric insertion of disulfides into client proteins. After a discussion of the use of natively encoded fluorescent probes to report the glutathione redox poise of the ER, this review concludes with an elaboration of a complementary strategy to discontinuously survey the redox state of as many redox-active disulfides as can be identified by ratiometric LC-MS-MS methods. Consortia of oxidoreductases that are in redox equilibrium can then be identified and compared to the glutathione redox poise of the ER to gain a more detailed understanding of the factors that influence oxidative protein folding within the secretory compartment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of different temperature-time combinations on lipid and protein oxidation of sous-vide cooked lamb loins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Mar; Antequera, Teresa; Armenteros, Monica; Ruiz, Jorge

    2014-04-15

    Forty-five lamb loins were subjected to sous-vide cooking at different combinations of temperature (60, 70 and 80 °C) and time (6, 12 and 24 h) to assess the effect on the oxidative stability of lipids and proteins. Heating induced both lipid and protein oxidation in lamb loins. Higher cooking temperature-time combinations increased conjugated dienes and decreased thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) values and hexanal. Total protein carbonyls increased throughout time at all cooking temperatures considered, while α-aminoadipic (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehydes (GGS) increased when cooking at 60 °C but not at 80 °C. Links between the decrease in secondary compounds from lipid oxidation due to cooking at higher temperatures and for longer times with the increased levels of 3-methylbutanal and greater differences between total protein carbonyls and AAS plus GGS were hypothesised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodegradable Magnetic Silica@Iron Oxide Nanovectors with Ultra-Large Mesopores for High Protein Loading, Magnetothermal Release, and Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Omar, Haneen

    2016-11-29

    The delivery of large cargos of diameter above 15 nm for biomedical applications has proved challenging since it requires biocompatible, stably-loaded, and biodegradable nanomaterials. In this study, we describe the design of biodegradable silica-iron oxide hybrid nanovectors with large mesopores for large protein delivery in cancer cells. The mesopores of the nanomaterials spanned from 20 to 60 nm in diameter and post-functionalization allowed the electrostatic immobilization of large proteins (e.g. mTFP-Ferritin, ~ 534 kDa). Half of the content of the nanovectors was based with iron oxide nanophases which allowed the rapid biodegradation of the carrier in fetal bovine serum and a magnetic responsiveness. The nanovectors released large protein cargos in aqueous solution under acidic pH or magnetic stimuli. The delivery of large proteins was then autonomously achieved in cancer cells via the silica-iron oxide nanovectors, which is thus a promising for biomedical applications.

  7. Proteomic Identification of Oxidized Proteins in Entamoeba histolytica by Resin-Assisted Capture: Insights into the Role of Arginase in Resistance to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Shahi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is an obligate protozoan parasite of humans, and amebiasis, an infectious disease which targets the intestine and/or liver, is the second most common cause of human death due to a protozoan after malaria. Although amebiasis is usually asymptomatic, E. histolytica has potent pathogenic potential. During host infection, the parasite is exposed to reactive oxygen species that are produced and released by cells of the innate immune system at the site of infection. The ability of the parasite to survive oxidative stress (OS is essential for a successful invasion of the host. Although the effects of OS on the regulation of gene expression in E. histolytica and the characterization of some proteins whose function in the parasite's defense against OS have been previously studied, our knowledge of oxidized proteins in E. histolytica is lacking. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we performed a large-scale identification and quantification of the oxidized proteins in oxidatively stressed E. histolytica trophozoites using resin-assisted capture coupled to mass spectrometry. We detected 154 oxidized proteins (OXs and the functions of some of these proteins were associated with antioxidant activity, maintaining the parasite's cytoskeleton, translation, catalysis, and transport. We also found that oxidation of the Gal/GalNAc impairs its function and contributes to the inhibition of E. histolytica adherence to host cells. We also provide evidence that arginase, an enzyme which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, is involved in the protection of the parasite against OS. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of OS as a critical regulator of E. histolytica's functions and indicate a new role for arginase in E. histolytica's resistance to OS.

  8. Nitrous oxide production by lithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and implications for engineered nitrogen-removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Kartik; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) form a crucial component in microbial nitrogen cycling in both natural and engineered systems. Under specific conditions, including transitions from anoxic to oxic conditions and/or excessive ammonia loading, and the presence of high nitrite (NO₂⁻) concentrations, these bacteria are also documented to produce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) gases. Essentially, ammonia oxidation in the presence of non-limiting substrate concentrations (ammonia and O₂) is associated with N₂O production. An exceptional scenario that leads to such conditions is the periodical switch between anoxic and oxic conditions, which is rather common in engineered nitrogen-removal systems. In particular, the recovery from, rather than imposition of, anoxic conditions has been demonstrated to result in N₂O production. However, applied engineering perspectives, so far, have largely ignored the contribution of nitrification to N₂O emissions in greenhouse gas inventories from wastewater-treatment plants. Recent field-scale measurements have revealed that nitrification-related N₂O emissions are generally far higher than emissions assigned to heterotrophic denitrification. In the present paper, the metabolic pathways, which could potentially contribute to NO and N₂O production by AOB have been conceptually reconstructed under conditions especially relevant to engineered nitrogen-removal systems. Taken together, the reconstructed pathways, field- and laboratory-scale results suggest that engineering designs that achieve low effluent aqueous nitrogen concentrations also minimize gaseous nitrogen emissions.

  9. SIRT1 sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells expressing hepatitis B virus X protein to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Cho, Il-Rae; Jhun, Byung Hak; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Up-regulation of SIRT1 protein and activity sensitizes Hep3B-HBX cells to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. ► Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for oxidation-induced apoptosis. ► Ectopic expression and enhanced activity of SIRT1 attenuate JNK phosphorylation. ► Inhibition of SIRT1 activity restores resistance to oxidation-induced apoptosis through JNK activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that SIRT1 deacetylase inhibits proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells expressing hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBX), by destabilization of β-catenin. Here, we report another role for SIRT1 in HBX-mediated resistance to oxidative stress. Ectopic expression and enhanced activity of SIRT1 sensitize Hep3B cells stably expressing HBX to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for sensitization of oxidation-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SIRT1 and treatment with resveratrol (a SIRT1 activator) attenuated JNK phosphorylation, which is a prerequisite for resistance to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 activity with nicotinamide inhibited the effect of resveratrol on JNK phosphorylation, leading to restoration of resistance to oxidation-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that up-regulation of SIRT1 under oxidative stress may be a therapeutic strategy for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma cells related to HBV through inhibition of JNK activation.

  10. Functional implications of the p.Cys680Arg mutation in the MLH1 mismatch repair protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Drost, Mark; Therkildsen, Christina

    2014-01-01

    >C missense mutation in exon 18 of the human MLH1 gene and biochemically characterization of the p.Cys680Arg mutant MLH1 protein to implicate it in the pathogenicity of the Lynch syndrome (LS). We show that the mutation is deficient in DNA mismatch repair and, therefore, contributing to LS in the carriers....

  11. Protein Biosensors Based on Polymer Nanowires, Carbon Nanotubes and Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeksoo Ji

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of biosensors using electrochemical methods is a promising application in the field of biotechnology. High sensitivity sensors for the bio-detection of proteins have been developed using several kinds of nanomaterials. The performance of the sensors depends on the type of nanostructures with which the biomaterials interact. One dimensional (1-D structures such as nanowires, nanotubes and nanorods are proven to have high potential for bio-applications. In this paper we review these three different kinds of nanostructures that have attracted much attention at recent times with their great performance as biosensors. Materials such as polymers, carbon and zinc oxide have been widely used for the fabrication of nanostructures because of their enhanced performance in terms of sensitivity, biocompatibility, and ease of preparation. Thus we consider polymer nanowires, carbon nanotubes and zinc oxide nanorods for discussion in this paper. We consider three stages in the development of biosensors: (a fabrication of biomaterials into nanostructures, (b alignment of the nanostructures and (c immobilization of proteins. Two different methods by which the biosensors can be developed at each stage for all the three nanostructures are examined. Finally, we conclude by mentioning some of the major challenges faced by many researchers who seek to fabricate biosensors for real time applications.

  12. Implications of the stability behavior of zinc oxide nanoparticles for toxicological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, Tobias; Oelschlägel, Kathrin; Potthoff, Annegret

    2014-08-01

    The increasing use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in sunscreens and other cosmetic products demands a risk assessment that has to be done in toxicological studies. Such investigations require profound knowledge of the behavior of ZnO in cell culture media. The current study was performed to get well-dispersed suspensions of a hydrophilic (ZnO-hydro) and a lipophilic coated (ZnO-lipo) ZnO nanomaterial for use in in vitro tests. Therefore, systematic tests were carried out with common dispersants (phosphate, lecithin, proteins) to elucidate chemical and physical changes of ZnO nanoparticles in water and physiological solutions (PBS, DMEM). Non-physiological stock suspensions were prepared using ultrasonication. Time-dependent changes of pH, conductivity, zeta potential, particle size and dissolution were recorded. Secondly, the stock suspensions were added to physiological media with or without albumin (BSA) or serum (FBS), to examine characteristics such as agglomeration and dissolution. Stable stock suspensions were obtained using phosphate as natural and physiological electrostatic stabilizing agent. Lecithin proved to be an effective wetting agent for ZnO-lipo. Although the particle size remained constant, the suspension changed over time. The pH increased as a result of ZnO dissolution and formation of zinc phosphate complexes. The behavior of ZnO in physiological media was found to depend strongly on the additives used. Applying only phosphate as additive, ZnO-hydro agglomerated within minutes. In the presence of lecithin or BSA/serum, agglomeration was inhibited. ZnO dissolution was higher under physiological conditions than in the stock suspension. Serum especially promoted this process. Using body-related dispersants (phosphate, lecithin) non-agglomerating stock suspensions of hydrophilic and lipophilic ZnO were prepared as a prerequisite to perform meaningful toxicological investigation. Both nanomaterials showed a non-negligible dissolution behavior

  13. Oxidative stress and S-100B protein in children with bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Enas A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial meningitis is often associated with cerebral compromise which may be responsible for neurological sequelae in nearly half of the survivors. Little is known about the mechanisms of CNS involvement in bacterial meningitis. Several studies have provided substantial evidence for the key role of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species in the complex pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. Methods In the present study, serum and CSF levels of NO, lipid peroxide (LPO (mediators for oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation; total thiol, superoxide dismutase (SOD (antioxidant mediators and S-100B protein (mediator of astrocytes activation and injury, were investigated in children with bacterial meningitis (n = 40. Albumin ratio (CSF/serum is a marker of blood-CSF barriers integrity, while mediator index (mediator ratio/albumin ratio is indicative of intrathecal synthesis. Results Compared to normal children (n = 20, patients had lower serum albumin but higher NO, LPO, total thiol, SOD and S-100B. The ratios and indices of NO and LPO indicate blood-CSF barriers dysfunction, while the ratio of S-100B indicates intrathecal synthesis. Changes were marked among patients with positive culture and those with neurological complications. Positive correlation was found between NO index with CSF WBCs (r = 0.319, p Conclusion This study suggests that loss of integrity of brain-CSF barriers, oxidative stress and S-100B may contribute to the severity and neurological complications of bacterial meningitis.

  14. Oxidative stress impairs the heat stress response and delays unfolded protein recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Adachi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental changes, air pollution and ozone depletion are increasing oxidative stress, and global warming threatens health by heat stress. We now face a high risk of simultaneous exposure to heat and oxidative stress. However, there have been few studies investigating their combined adverse effects on cell viability.Pretreatment of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 specifically and highly sensitized cells to heat stress, and enhanced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. H(2O(2 exposure impaired the HSP40/HSP70 induction as heat shock response (HSR and the unfolded protein recovery, and enhanced eIF2alpha phosphorylation and/or XBP1 splicing, land marks of ER stress. These H(2O(2-mediated effects mimicked enhanced heat sensitivity in HSF1 knockdown or knockout cells. Importantly, thermal preconditioning blocked H(2O(2-mediated inhibitory effects on refolding activity and rescued HSF1 +/+ MEFs, but neither blocked the effects nor rescued HSF1 -/- MEFs. These data strongly suggest that inhibition of HSR and refolding activity is crucial for H(2O(2-mediated enhanced heat sensitivity.H(2O(2 blocks HSR and refolding activity under heat stress, thereby leading to insufficient quality control and enhancing ER stress. These uncontrolled stress responses may enhance cell death. Our data thus highlight oxidative stress as a crucial factor affecting heat tolerance.

  15. Assessment of acute phase proteins and oxidative stress status of Nigerians using bleaching agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akibinu, M.O.; Arinola, O.G.; Afolabi, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    The disruption of primary innate immune function of the epidermal layer of the skin accounts for the susceptibility of individuals using bleaching agents to localized or systemic infections. This subverted innate immunity in these people may lead to other pathological conditions. The resultant effects of skin bleaching and phagocytes activation in response to infections have not been studied in Nigerians using bleaching agents. The present study therefore assessed the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, total antioxidant potential (TAP), total plasma peroxides (TPP), oxidative stress index (OSI) and malonaldehyde (MDA) in the users bleaching agents. Thirty (30) people who had used bleaching agents for average of 4.9 + 1.2 years participated in this study. They were recruited from various schools and markets within the city of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. Thirty apparently healthy staffs of University College Hospital Ibadan, Ibaadan, Nigeria, who had never used bleaching agents served as controls. All the subjects used for this study had no metabolic abnormality and tested negative to both HIV and hepatitis B infections. The mean value of TAP (p 0.20) when compared with the controls. Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are possible consequences of skin bleaching. The users of skin bleaching agents may need antioxidant therapies to avert the risks of oxidative stress. (author)

  16. Minimising protein oxidation in retail-packed minced beef using three-gas MA-packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Baussa Cano, Laura; Baron, Caroline P.

    beef. To establish whether three-gas MAP (O2, CO2 and N2), instead of two-gas MAP (O2 and CO2), would affect sensory attributes, shelf life, protein and lipid oxidation, minced beef was packed in MAP with either 40%, 50% or 80% O2 and 20% or 40% CO2 with N2 as filler gas. When comparing traditional MA-packaging......Minced beef is usually packed in high oxygen modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with a gas mixture consisting of 70-80% oxygen (O2) and 20-30% carbon dioxide (CO2). Unfortunately, this results in rubbery and less juicy beef patties with a more rancid flavour compared with fresh or nonoxygen packed...... (80% O2 + 20% CO2) with a low oxygen packaging atmosphere (40% O2 + 20% CO2 + 40% N2), the latter is seen to increase the meat oxidative stability during storage but decrease acceptability and shelf life. In contrast, high oxygen MAP (80% and 50% O2) results in more oxidation but a longer shelf life...

  17. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M; Rowe, John J

    2010-02-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 microg/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J.; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 μg/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity.

  19. Is automated kinetic measurement superior to end-point for advanced oxidation protein product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Osman; Inal, Berrin Bercik; Emre, Turker; Ozcan, Oguzhan; Altunoglu, Esma; Oguz, Gokce; Topkaya, Cigdem; Guvenen, Guvenc

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) was first described as an oxidative protein marker in chronic uremic patients and measured with a semi-automatic end-point method. Subsequently, the kinetic method was introduced for AOPP assay. We aimed to compare these two methods by adapting them to a chemistry analyzer and to investigate the correlation between AOPP and fibrinogen, the key molecule responsible for human plasma AOPP reactivity, microalbumin, and HbA1c in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM II). The effects of EDTA and citrate-anticogulated tubes on these two methods were incorporated into the study. This study included 93 DM II patients (36 women, 57 men) with HbA1c levels > or = 7%, who were admitted to the diabetes and nephrology clinics. The samples were collected in EDTA and in citrate-anticoagulated tubes. Both methods were adapted to a chemistry analyzer and the samples were studied in parallel. In both types of samples, we found a moderate correlation between the kinetic and the endpoint methods (r = 0.611 for citrate-anticoagulated, r = 0.636 for EDTA-anticoagulated, p = 0.0001 for both). We found a moderate correlation between fibrinogen-AOPP and microalbumin-AOPP levels only in the kinetic method (r = 0.644 and 0.520 for citrate-anticoagulated; r = 0.581 and 0.490 for EDTA-anticoagulated, p = 0.0001). We conclude that adaptation of the end-point method to automation is more difficult and it has higher between-run CV% while application of the kinetic method is easier and it may be used in oxidative stress studies.

  20. Homogenization conditions affect the oxidative stability of fish oil enriched milk emulsions: Oxidation linked to changes in protein composition at the oil-water interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke; Baron, Caroline; Bruni Let, Mette

    2007-01-01

    Fish oil was incorporated into milk under different homogenization temperatures (50 and 72 °C) and pressures (5, 15, and 22.5 MPa). Subsequently, the oxidative stability of the milk and changes in the protein composition of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were examined. Results showed...

  1. Structural and functional implications in the eubacterial ribosome as revealed by protein-rRNA and antibiotic contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann-Liebold, B; Uhlein, M; Urlaub, H; Müller, E C; Otto, A; Bischof, O

    1995-01-01

    Contact sites between protein and rRNA in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus were investigated at the molecular level using UV and 2-iminothiolane as cross-linkers. Thirteen ribosomal proteins (S3, S4, S7, S14, S17, L2, L4, L6, L14, L27, L28, L29, and L36) from these organisms were cross-linked in direct contact with the RNAs, and the peptide stretches as well as amino acids involved were identified. Further, the binding sites of puromycin and spiramycin were established at the peptide level in several proteins that were found to constitute the antibiotic-binding sites. Peptide stretches of puromycin binding were identified from proteins S7, S14, S18, L18, AND L29; those of spiramycin attachment were derived from proteins S12, S14, L17, L18, L27, and L35. Comparison of the RNA-peptide contact sites with the peptides identified for antibiotic binding and with those altered in antibiotic-resistant mutants clearly showed identical peptide areas to be involved and, hence, demonstrated the functional importance of these peptides. Further evidence for a functional implication of ribosomal proteins in the translational process came from complementation experiments in which protein L2 from Halobacterium marismortui was incorporated into the E. coli ribosomes that were active. The incorporated protein was present in 50S subunits and 70S particles, in disomes, and in higher polysomes. These results clearly demonstrate the functional implication of protein L2 in protein biosynthesis. Incorporation studies with a mutant of HmaL2 with a replacement of histidine-229 by glycine completely abolished the functional activity of the ribosome. Accordingly, protein L2 with histidine-229 is a crucial element of the translational machinery.

  2. Crystallographic studies with xenon and nitrous oxide provide evidence for protein-dependent processes in the mechanisms of general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraini, Jacques H; Marassio, Guillaume; David, Helene N; Vallone, Beatrice; Prangé, Thierry; Colloc'h, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms by which general anesthetics, including xenon and nitrous oxide, act are only beginning to be discovered. However, structural approaches revealed weak but specific protein-gas interactions. To improve knowledge, we performed x-ray crystallography studies under xenon and nitrous oxide pressure in a series of 10 binding sites within four proteins. Whatever the pressure, we show (1) hydrophobicity of the gas binding sites has a screening effect on xenon and nitrous oxide binding, with a threshold value of 83% beyond which and below which xenon and nitrous oxide, respectively, binds to their sites preferentially compared to each other; (2) xenon and nitrous oxide occupancies are significantly correlated respectively to the product and the ratio of hydrophobicity by volume, indicating that hydrophobicity and volume are binding parameters that complement and oppose each other's effects; and (3) the ratio of occupancy of xenon to nitrous oxide is significantly correlated to hydrophobicity of their binding sites. These data demonstrate that xenon and nitrous oxide obey different binding mechanisms, a finding that argues against all unitary hypotheses of narcosis and anesthesia, and indicate that the Meyer-Overton rule of a high correlation between anesthetic potency and solubility in lipids of general anesthetics is often overinterpreted. This study provides evidence that the mechanisms of gas binding to proteins and therefore of general anesthesia should be considered as the result of a fully reversible interaction between a drug ligand and a receptor as this occurs in classical pharmacology.

  3. High-throughput oxidation screen of antibody-drug conjugates by analytical protein A chromatography following IdeS digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buecheler, Jakob W; Winzer, Matthias; Weber, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2018-05-01

    Oxidation of protein therapeutics is a major chemical degradation pathway which may impact bioactivity, serum half-life and stability. Therefore, oxidation is a relevant parameter which has to be monitored throughout formulation development. Methods such as HIC, RPLC and LC/MS achieve a separation of oxidized and non-oxidized species by differences in hydrophobicity. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) although are highly more complex due to the heterogeneity in linker, drug, drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR) and conjugation site. The analytical protein A chromatography can provide a simple and fast alternative to these common methods. A miniature analytical protein A chromatography method in combination with an IdeS digest was developed to analyse ADCs. The IdeS digest efficiency of an IgG1 was monitored using SEC-HPLC and non-reducing SDS-PAGE. An antibody-fluorescent dye conjugate was conjugated at different dye-to-antibody ratios as model construct to mimic an ADC. With IdeS, an almost complete digest of a model IgG1 can be achieved (digested protein amount >98%). This enables subsequent analytical protein A chromatography, which consequently eliminates any interference of payload with the stationary phase. A novel high-throughput method for an interchain cysteine-linked ADC oxidation screens during formulation development was developed. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Oxidation and dissolution of UO{sub 2} in bicarbonate media: Implications for the spent nuclear fuel oxidative dissolution mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: francisco.javier.gimenez@upc.edu; Clarens, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Casas, I. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rovira, M. [CTM Centre Tecnologic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1. 08240 Manresa (Spain); Pablo, J. de [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bruno, J. [Enresa-Enviros Environmental Science and Waste Management Chair, UPC, Jordi Girona 1-3 B2, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-15

    The objective of this work is to study the UO{sub 2} oxidation by O{sub 2} and dissolution in bicarbonate media and to extrapolate the results obtained to improve the knowledge of the oxidative dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. The results obtained show that in the studied range the oxygen consumption rate is independent on the bicarbonate concentration while the UO{sub 2} dissolution rate does depend on. Besides, at 10{sup -4} mol dm{sup -3} bicarbonate concentration, the oxygen consumption rate is almost two orders of magnitude higher than the UO{sub 2} dissolution rate. These results suggest that at low bicarbonate concentration (<10{sup -2} mol dm{sup -3}) the alteration of the spent nuclear fuel cannot be directly derived from the measured uranium concentrations in solution. On the other hand, the study at low bicarbonate concentrations of the evolution of the UO{sub 2} surface at nanometric scale by means of the SFM technique shows that the difference between oxidation and dissolution rates is not due to the precipitation of a secondary solid phase on UO{sub 2}.

  5. Maternal protein restriction induced-hypertension is associated to oxidative disruption at transcriptional and functional levels in the medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito Alves, José L; de Oliveira, Jéssica M D; Ferreira, Diorginis J S; Barros, Monique A de V; Nogueira, Viviane O; Alves, Débora S; Vidal, Hubert; Leandro, Carol G; Lagranha, Cláudia J; Pirola, Luciano; da Costa-Silva, João H

    2016-12-01

    Maternal protein restriction during pregnancy and lactation predisposes the adult offspring to sympathetic overactivity and arterial hypertension. Although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, dysregulation of the oxidative balance has been proposed as a putative trigger of neural-induced hypertension. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between the oxidative status at transcriptional and functional levels in the medulla oblongata and maternal protein restriction induced-hypertension. Wistar rat dams were fed a control (normal protein; 17% protein) or a low protein ((Lp); 8% protein) diet during pregnancy and lactation, and male offspring was studied at 90 days of age. Direct measurements of baseline arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded in awakened offspring. In addition, quantitative RT-PCR was used to assess the mRNA expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and 2 (SOD2), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Glutamatergic receptors (Grin1, Gria1 and Grm1) and GABA(A)-receptor-associated protein like 1 (Gabarapl1). Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, CAT and SOD activities were examined in ventral and dorsal medulla. Lp rats exhibited higher ABP. The mRNA expression levels of SOD2, GPx and Gabarapl1 were down regulated in medullary tissue of Lp rats (Pmedulla. Taken together, our data suggest that maternal protein restriction induced-hypertension is associated with medullary oxidative dysfunction at transcriptional level and with impaired antioxidant capacity in the ventral medulla. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Advanced oxidation protein products and malondialdehyde - the new biological markers of oxidative stress - are elevated in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Tansel; Goktas, Bulent; Mutlu, Mehmet F; Mutlu, Ilknur; Bilgihan, Ayse; Erdem, Mehmet; Erdem, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) as markers for oxidative stress to evaluate cardiovascular risk in pre- and postmenopausal women and to compare the results with malondialde-hyde (MDA) levels. Twenty premenopausal women and 84 naturally postmenopausal patients were enrolled in the study. AOPP and MDA plasma levels were measured. The postmenopausal group was further subdivided into two groups: postmenopausal age of 40-49 and of 50-59 years. AOPP and MDA levels were compared between premenopausal, 40-49 and 50-59 year old menopausal women. Plasma AOPP and MDA levels in postmenopausal women were increased when compared with their premeno-pausal peers (123.83 ± 55.51 μmol/L vs. 61.59 ± 16.42 μmol/L and 6.50 ± 1.05 μmol/L vs. 5.98 ± 0.77 μmol/L; respectively). Mean plasma AOPP levels in the two menopausal age groups were both significantly higher from the premenopausal group (118.64 ± 59.1 μmol/L vs. 61.59 ± 16.42 μmol/L and 132.31 ± 48.97 μmol/L vs. 61.59 ± 16.42 μmol/L; respectively). No significant difference was found in mean AOPP levels between postmenopausal subjects of 40-49 and 50-59 years age (118.64 ± 59.12 μmol/L vs. 132.31 ± 48.97 μmol/L). Mean plasma MDA levels of each of two postmenopausal age groups were both significantly higher from the premenopausal group (6.50 ± 1.04 μmol/L vs. 5.98 ± 0.77 μmol/L and 6.50 ± 1.10 μmol/L vs. 5.98 ± 0.77 μmol/L; respectively). However, no statistically significant difference between the two postmenopausal age groups (6.50 ± 1.04 μmol/L vs. 6.50 ± 1.10 μmol/L) was found. AOPP and MDA levels are elevated in postmenopausal women as compared to their premenopausal peers, suggesting they can be used as markers for cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women.

  7. Magnetic solid-phase extraction of protein with deep eutectic solvent immobilized magnetic graphene oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaijia; Wang, Yuzhi; Ding, Xueqin; Huang, Yanhua; Li, Na; Wen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    As a new type of green solvent, four kinds of choline chloride (ChCl)-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been synthesized, and then a core-shell structure magnetic graphene oxide (Fe3O4-NH2@GO) nanoparticles have been prepared and coated with the ChCl-based DESs. Magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) based Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES was studied for the first time for the extraction of proteins. The characteristic results of vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) indicated the successful preparation of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES. The concentrations of proteins in studies were determined by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The advantages of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@DES in protein extraction were compared with Fe3O4-NH2@GO and Fe3O4-NH2, and Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol was selected as the suitable extraction solvent. The influence factors of the extraction process such as the pH value, the temperature, the extraction time, the concentration of protein and the amount of Fe3O4-NH2@GO@ChCl-glycerol were evaluated. Desorption experimental result showed 98.73% of BSA could be eluted from the solid extractant with 0.1 mol/L Na2HPO4 solution contained 1 mol/L NaCl. Besides, the conformation of BSA was not changed during the elution by the investigation of circular dichromism (CD) spectra. Furthermore, the analysis of real sample demonstrated that the prepared magnetic nanoparticles did have extraction ability on proteins in bovine whole blood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  9. Human proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA and their responses to oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Fujikane, Aya; Ito, Riyoko; Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I.; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → We performed comprehensive survey for proteins that bind to oxidized RNA. → HNRNPD and HNRNPC proteins were identified as oxidized RNA binding proteins. → Knockdown of HNRNPD/C expression caused increased sensitivity to H 2 O 2 . → Amounts of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to H 2 O 2 . -- Abstract: Exposure of cells to oxygen radicals damage various biologically important molecules. Among the oxidized bases produced in nucleic acids, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoguanine) is particularly important since it causes base mispairing. To ensure accurate gene expression, organisms must have a mechanism to discriminate 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from normal transcripts. We searched for proteins that specifically bind to 8-oxoguanine-containing RNA from human HeLa cell extracts, and the candidate proteins were identified using mass spectrometry. Among the identified candidates, splicing isoform 1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0 (HNRNPD) and splicing isoform C1 of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (HNRNPC) exhibited strong abilities to bind to oxidized RNA. The amount of HNRNPD protein rapidly decreased when cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, an agent that enhances oxidative stress. Moreover, the suppression of HNRNPD expression by siRNA caused cells to exhibit an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. The application of siRNA against HNRNPC also caused an increase in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Since no additive effect was observed with a combined addition of siRNAs for HNRNPD and HNRNPC, we concluded that the two proteins may function in the same mechanism for the accurate gene expression.

  10. Effect of curing agents on the oxidative and nitrosative damage to meat proteins during processing of fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, A; Morcuende, D; Estévez, M

    2014-07-01

    The effect of increasing concentrations of curing agents, ascorbate (0, 250, and 500 ppm), and nitrite (0, 75, and 150 ppm), on the oxidative and nitrosative damage to proteins during processing of fermented sausages was studied. The potential influence of these reactions on color and texture of the fermented sausages was also addressed. Nitrite had a pro-oxidant effect on tryptophan depletion and promoted the formation of protein carbonyls and Schiff bases. The nitration degree in the fermented sausages was also dependent on nitrite concentration. On the other hand, ascorbate acted as an efficient inhibitor of the oxidative and nitrosative damage to meat proteins. As expected, nitrite clearly favored the formation of the cured red color and ascorbate acted as an enhancer of color formation. Nitrite content was positively correlated with hardness. The chemistry behind the action of nitrite and ascorbate on muscle proteins during meat fermentation is thoroughly discussed. The results suggest that ascorbate (500 ppm) may be required to compensate the pro-oxidant impact of nitrite on meat proteins. This study provides insight on the action of curing agents on meat proteins during processing of fermented sausages. This chemistry background provides understanding of the potential influence of the oxidative and nitrosative damage to proteins on the quality of processed muscle foods. The study provides novel information on the impact of the combination of nitrite and ascorbate on the chemical deterioration of proteins and the influence on particular quality traits of fermented sausages. These data may be of interest for the design of cured muscle foods of enhanced quality. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. A Novel Peptide from Soybean Protein Isolate Significantly Enhances Resistance of the Organism under Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heran Ma

    Full Text Available Recent studies have indicated that protein hydrolysates have broad biological effects. In the current study we describe a novel antioxidative peptide, FDPAL, from soybean protein isolate (SPI. The aim of this study was to purify and characterize an antioxidative peptide from SPI and determine its antioxidative mechanism. LC-MS/MS was used to isolate and identify the peptide from SPI. The sequence of the peptide was determined to be Phe-Asp-Pro-Ala-Leu (FDPAL, 561 Da. FDPAL can cause significant enhancement of resistance to oxidative stress both in cells as well as simple organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans, FDPAL can up-regulate the expression of certain genes associated with resistance. The antioxidant activity of this peptide can be attributed to the presence of a specific amino acid sequence. Results from our work suggest that FDPAL can facilitate potential applications of proteins carrying this sequence in the nutraceutical, bioactive material and clinical medicine areas, as well as in cosmetics and health care products.

  12. Nitric Oxide Ameliorates Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Phytotoxicity in Wheat Seedlings: Implication of the Ascorbate–Glutathione Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Mishra, Rohit K.; Singh, Swati; Singh, Samiksha; Vishwakarma, Kanchan; Sharma, Shivesh; Singh, Vijay P.; Singh, Prashant K.; Prasad, Sheo M.; Dubey, Nawal K.; Pandey, Avinash C.; Sahi, Shivendra; Chauhan, Devendra K.

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates ameliorative effects of nitric oxide (NO) against zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) phytotoxicity in wheat seedlings. ZnONPs exposure hampered growth of wheat seedlings, which coincided with reduced photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm and qP), due to increased accumulation of zinc (Zn) in xylem and phloem saps. However, SNP supplementation partially mitigated the ZnONPs-mediated toxicity through the modulation of photosynthetic activity and Zn accumulation in xylem and phloem saps. Further, the results reveal that ZnONPs treatments enhanced levels of hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation (as malondialdehyde; MDA) due to severely inhibited activities of the following ascorbate–glutatione cycle (AsA–GSH) enzymes: ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, monodehydroascorbate reductase and dehydroascorbate reductase, and its associated metabolites ascorbate and glutathione. In contrast to this, the addition of SNP together with ZnONPs maintained the cellular functioning of the AsA–GSH cycle properly, hence lesser damage was noticed in comparison to ZnONPs treatments alone. The protective effect of SNP against ZnONPs toxicity on fresh weight (growth) can be reversed by 2-(4carboxy-2-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl- imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, a NO scavenger, and thus suggesting that NO released from SNP ameliorates ZnONPs toxicity. Overall, the results of the present study have shown the role of NO in the reducing of ZnONPs toxicity through the regulation of accumulation of Zn as well as the functioning of the AsA–GSH cycle. PMID:28220127

  13. Fish Proteins as Targets of Ferrous-Catalyzed Oxidation: Identification of Protein Carbonyls by Fluorescent Labeling on Two-Dimensional Gels and MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazos, Manuel; da Rocha, Angela Pereira; Roepstorff, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Protein oxidation in fish meat is considered to affect negatively the muscle texture. An important source of free radicals taking part in this process is Fenton's reaction dependent on ferrous ions present in the tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility of cod muscle pr...

  14. Histone H1- and other protein- and amino acid-hydroperoxides can give rise to free radicals which oxidize DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luxford, C; Morin, B; Dean, R T

    1999-01-01

    analysis has demonstrated that radicals from histone H1-hydroperoxides, and other protein and amino acid hydroperoxides, can also oxidize both free 2'-deoxyguanosine and intact calf thymus DNA to give the mutagenic oxidized base 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-oxod......Exposure of amino acids, peptides and proteins to radicals, in the presence of oxygen, gives high yields of hydroperoxides. These materials are readily decomposed by transition metal ions to give further radicals. We hypothesized that hydroperoxide formation on nuclear proteins, and subsequent...... decomposition of these hydroperoxides to radicals, might result in oxidative damage to associated DNA. We demonstrate here that exposure of histone H1 and model compounds to gamma-radiation in the presence of oxygen gives hydroperoxides in a dose-dependent manner. These hydroperoxides decompose to oxygen...

  15. Photooxidation of chloride by oxide minerals: implications for perchlorate on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D; Sambur, Justin B; Gelwicks, Melissa; Eggleston, Carrick M; Parkinson, B A

    2011-11-09

    We show that highly oxidizing valence band holes, produced by ultraviolet (UV) illumination of naturally occurring semiconducting minerals, are capable of oxidizing chloride ion to perchlorate in aqueous solutions at higher rates than other known natural perchlorate production processes. Our results support an alternative to atmospheric reactions leading to the formation of high concentrations of perchlorate on Mars.

  16. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Miao, Ji, E-mail: jmiao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhao, Qinjian, E-mail: qinjian_zhao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  17. Membrane protein resistance of oligo(ethylene oxide) self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Amit; Vanderah, David J; Vierling, Ryan; Crawshaw, Fay; Gallagher, D Travis; Walker, Marlon L

    2014-10-01

    As part of an effort to develop biointerfaces for structure-function studies of integral membrane proteins (IMPs) a series of oligo(ethylene oxide) self-assembled monolayers (OEO-SAMs) were evaluated for their resistance to protein adsorption (RPA) of IMPs on Au and Pt. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was used to determine SAM thicknesses and compare the RPA of HS(CH2)3O(CH2CH2O)6CH3 (1), HS(CH2)3O(CH2CH2O)6H (2), [HS(CH2)3]2CHO(CH2CH2O)6CH3 (3) and [HS(CH2)3]2CHO(CH2CH2O)6H (4), assembled from water. For both substrates, SAM thicknesses for 1 to 4 were found to be comparable indicating SAMs with similar surface coverages and OEO chain order and packing densities. Fibrinogen (Fb), a soluble plasma protein, and rhodopsin (Rd), an integral membrane G-protein coupled receptor, adsorbed to the SAMs of 1, as expected from previous reports, but not to the hydroxy-terminated SAMs of 2 and 4. The methoxy-terminated SAMs of 3 were resistant to Fb but, surprisingly, not to Rd. The stark difference between the adsorption of Rd to the SAMs of 3 and 4 clearly indicate that a hydroxy-terminus of the OEO chain is essential for high RPA of IMPs. The similar thicknesses and high RPA of the SAMs of 2 and 4 show the conditions of protein resistance (screening the underlying substrate, packing densities, SAM order, and conformational mobility of the OEO chains) defined from previous studies on Au are applicable to Pt. In addition, the SAMs of 4, exhibiting the highest resistance to Fb and Rd, were placed in contact with undiluted fetal bovine serum for 2h. Low protein adsorption (≈12.4ng/cm(2)), obtained under these more challenging conditions, denote a high potential of the SAMs of 4 for various applications requiring the suppression of non-specific protein adsorption. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Safety implications of a graphite oxidation accident in the compact ignition tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, B.J.; O'Brien, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the possible safety consequences of an air ingress accident for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) device. An experimental program was undertaken to determine oxidation rates of four nuclear grade graphites in air at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1800 C and flow velocities from 3 to 7 m/s. On the basis of these test results, an analytic model was developed to assess the extent of first wall/divertor protective tile oxidation and the amount of energy released from this oxidation. For CIT, a significant restriction to vacuum vessel air inflow will be provided by the air seals and walls of the surrounding test cells. Under these conditions, the graphite oxidation reaction inside the vacuum vessel will become oxygen starved within minutes of the onset of this event. Since significant oxidation rates were not achieved, the heat release did not elevate structural temperatures to levels of concern with regard to activated material release. 7 refs., 9 figs

  19. Are oxidized low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein markers of atherosclerosis in nephrotic children?

    OpenAIRE

    Rybi-Szumińska, A.; Wasilewska, A.; Michaluk-Skutnik, J.; Osipiuk-Remża, B.; Fiłonowicz, R.; Zając, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid disorders are known to be linked to disturbance in oxidative reactions and play an important role in the progression and complications of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). Aims The aim of this study was to assess oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) serum concentrations and other parameters of lipid metabolism in children with INS during relapse and remission of proteinuria. Methods The examination was performed on 23 childre...

  20. Hyperglycemia adversely modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase during anesthetic preconditioning through tetrahydrobiopterin- and heat shock protein 90-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Brzezinska, Anna K; Jager, Zachary; Sullivan, Corbin; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Du, Jianhai; Vladic, Nikolina; Shi, Yang; Warltier, David C; Pratt, Phillip F; Kersten, Judy R

    2010-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity is regulated by (6R-)5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and heat shock protein 90. The authors tested the hypothesis that hyperglycemia abolishes anesthetic preconditioning (APC) through BH4- and heat shock protein 90-dependent pathways. Myocardial infarct size was measured in rabbits in the absence or presence of APC (30 min of isoflurane), with or without hyperglycemia, and in the presence or absence of the BH4 precursor sepiapterin. Isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production was measured (ozone chemiluminescence) in human coronary artery endothelial cells cultured in normal (5.5 mm) or high (20 mm) glucose conditions, with or without sepiapterin (10 or 100 microm). APC decreased myocardial infarct size compared with control experiments (26 +/- 6% vs. 46 +/- 3%, respectively; P < 0.05), and this action was blocked by hyperglycemia (43 +/- 4%). Sepiapterin alone had no effect on infarct size (46 +/- 3%) but restored APC during hyperglycemia (21 +/- 3%). The beneficial actions of sepiapterin to restore APC were blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (47 +/- 2%) and the BH4 synthesis inhibitor N-acetylserotonin (46 +/- 3%). Isoflurane increased nitric oxide production to 177 +/- 13% of baseline, and this action was attenuated by high glucose concentrations (125 +/- 6%). Isoflurane increased, whereas high glucose attenuated intracellular BH4/7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2) (high performance liquid chromatography), heat shock protein 90-endothelial nitric oxide synthase colocalization (confocal microscopy) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation (immunoblotting). Sepiapterin increased BH4/BH2 and dose-dependently restored nitric oxide production during hyperglycemic conditions (149 +/- 12% and 175 +/- 9%; 10 and 100 microm, respectively). The results indicate that tetrahydrobiopterin and heat shock protein 90-regulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity play a central

  1. Macroautophagy-generated increase of lysosomal amyloid β-protein mediates oxidant-induced apoptosis of cultured neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Lin; Terman, Alexei; Hallbeck, Martin

    2011-01-01

    and accumulation of Aβ within lysosomes, induced apoptosis in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Cells under hyperoxia showed: (1) increased numbers of autophagic vacuoles that contained amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as Aβ monomers and oligomers, (2) increased reactive oxygen species production...... and resulting lysosomal Aβ accumulation are essential for oxidant-induced apoptosis in cultured neuroblastoma cells and provide additional support for the interactive role of oxidative stress and the lysosomal system in AD-related neurodegeneration....

  2. Evaluation of salivary oxidate stress biomarkers, nitric oxide and C-reactive protein in patients with oral lichen planus and burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Aznar-Cayuela, Cristina; Rubio, Camila P; Ceron, José J; López-Jornet, Pia

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress factors and C-reactive protein in the saliva of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) and burning mouth syndrome (BMS). This consecutive, cross-sectional study included 20 patients with OLP, 19 with burning mouth syndrome (BMS), and 31 control subjects. The oral cavity of each patient was examined and patients responded to a quality of life questionnaire (OHIP-14) and the xerostomia inventory. The following parameters were measured in whole non-stimulated saliva: trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC); total antioxidant capacity (TAC); cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC); ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP); C-reactive protein (CRP); nitric oxide; nitrates; and nitrites. The OLP group presented statistically significant differences in reactive oxygen species (ROS) (29 600 cps) in comparison with the control group (39 679 cps) (P < 0.05). In the BMS group, ROS was 29 707 cps with significant difference in comparison with the control group (P < 0.05). Significantly higher salivary nitric oxide (145.7 μmol) and nitrite (141.0 μmol) levels were found in OLP patients in comparison with control group (P < 0.05). Increases in nitric oxide and C-reactive protein were found in the saliva of OLP patients in comparison with BMS and control patients. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effect of the presence of protein on lipolysis and lipid oxidation occurring during in vitro digestion of highly unsaturated oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieva-Echevarría, Bárbara; Goicoechea, Encarnación; Guillén, María D

    2017-11-15

    The effect of the presence of ovalbumin and soy protein isolate on lipolysis and oxidation taking place during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of slightly oxidized sunflower and flaxseed oils was addressed. The extent of lipolysis, the molar proportions of acyl groups/fatty acids after digestion, and the oxidation products formed were studied by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The presence of proteins provoked a higher hydrolysis in triglycerides, a lower decrease of polyunsaturated chains, and a lower generation of oxidation compounds (conjugated dienes in chains having also hydroperoxy/hydroxy groups, epoxides and aldehydes); the formation of hydroxides was clearly favoured over that of hydroperoxides. Study of headspace composition by Solid Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry confirmed that oxidation advanced to a lesser extent in the presence of protein. Thus, amino acids/peptides released during digestion may show antioxidant properties, affecting not only the extent of lipid oxidation, but also reactions pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of protein degradation, protein oxidation, and μ-calpain activation between pale, soft, and exudative and red, firm, and nonexudative pork during postmortem aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y; Zhang, W G; Zhou, G H; Guo, B

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the differences in protein modifications between pale, soft, and exudative (PSE) and red, firm, and nonexudative (RFN) pork during postmortem (PM) aging. Longissimus dorsi (LD) including 8 PSE and 8 RFN muscles were individually removed from 16 carcasses. These 16 LD muscles were vacuum packaged at 24 h after slaughter and stored at 4°C for 1, 3, and 5 d. The centrifugation loss, drip loss, color, protein solubility, protein oxidation, protein degradation including desmin, troponin T, and integrin, and μ-calpain activation were determined. The pH of PSE samples was significantly lower than that of RFN samples at both 1 and 24 h PM (P 0.05). In addition, PSE pork presented a lower solubility of sarcoplasmic protein, myofibrillar protein, and total protein than RFN pork except the solubility of myofibrillar protein at d 1 (P firm, and nonexudative pork presented lower intensity of intact 80 kDa calpain and greater intensity of autolyzed 76 kDa product compared to PSE pork (P < 0.01). The results indicate that the degree of μ-calpain activation, the extent of protein degradation including desmin and integrin, and the level of protein solubility in PSE pork could contribute to its low water holding capacity during PM storage.

  5. Aerobic lineage of the oxidative stress response protein rubrerythrin emerged in an ancient microaerobic, (hyperthermophilic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Cardenas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rubrerythrins (RBRs are non-heme di-iron proteins belonging to the ferritin-like superfamily (FLSF. They are involved in oxidative stress defense as peroxide scavengers in a wide range of organisms. The vast majority of RBRs, including classical forms of this protein, contain a C-terminal rubredoxin-like domain involved in electron transport that is used during catalysis in anaerobic conditions. Rubredoxin is an ancient and large protein family of short length (<100 residues that contains a Fe-S center involved in electron transfer. However, functional forms of the enzyme lacking the rubredoxin-like domain have been reported (e.g., sulerythrin and ferriperoxin. In this study, phylogenomic evidence is presented that suggests that a complete lineage of rubrerythrins, lacking the rubredoxin-like domain, arose in an ancient microaerobic and (hyperthermophilic environments in the ancestors of the Archaea Thermoproteales and Sulfolobales. This lineage (termed the aerobic-type lineage subsequently evolved to become adapted to environments with progressively lower temperatures and higher oxygen concentrations via the acquisition of two co-localized genes, termed DUF3501 and RFO, encoding a conserved protein of unknown function and a predicted Fe-S oxidoreductase respectively. Proposed Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT events from these archaeal ancestors to Bacteria expanded the opportunities for further evolution of this RBR including adaption to lower temperatures. The second lineage (termed the cyanobacterial lineage is proposed to have evolved in cyanobacterial ancestors, maybe in direct response to the production of oxygen via oxygenic photosynthesis during the Great Oxygen Event (GOE. It is hypothesized that both lineages of RBR emerged in a largely anaerobic world with whiffs of oxygen and that their subsequent independent evolutionary trajectories allowed microorganisms to transition from this anaerobic world to an aerobic one.

  6. Mis-translation of a Computationally Designed Protein Yields an Exceptionally Stable Homodimer: Implications for Protein Engineering and Evolution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, Gautam; Watters, Alexander L.; Lunde, Bradley; Eletr, Ziad; Isern, Nancy G.; Roseman, Toby; Lipfert, Jan; Doniach, Sebastian; Tompa, Martin; Kuhlman, Brian; Stoddard, Barry L.; Varani, Gabriele; Baker, David

    2006-10-06

    We recently used computational protein design to create an extremely stable, globular protein, Top7, with a sequence and fold not observed previously in nature. Since Top7 was created in the absence of genetic selection, it provides a rare opportunity to investigate aspects of the cellular protein production and surveillance machinery that are subject to natural selection. Here we show that a portion of the Top7 protein corresponding to the final 49 C-terminal residues is efficiently mistranslated and accumulates at high levels in E. coli. We used circular dichroism spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, small-angle x-ray scattering, analytical ultra-centrifugation, and NMR spectroscopy to show that the resulting CFr protein adopts a compact, extremely-stable, obligate, symmetric, homo-dimeric structure. Based on the solution structure, we engineered an even more stable variant of CFr by disulfide-induced covalent circularisation that should be an excellent platform for design of novel functions. The accumulation of high levels of CFr exposes the high error rate of the protein translation machinery, and the rarity of correspondingly stable fragments in natural proteins implies a stringent evolutionary pressure against protein sub-fragments that can independently fold into stable structures. The symmetric self-association between two identical mistranslated CFr sub-units to generate an extremely stable structure parallels a mechanism for natural protein-fold evolution by modular recombination of stable protein sub-structures.

  7. Characterization of protein interactomes of DNA damages: application to oxidation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietras-Barbier, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Cyclo-nucleosides are complex DNA damages implying both bases and sugar residues. They are generated by free radicals, in particular by the effect of ionizing radiations, and are not easily covered by cellular mechanisms. Using a protein trapping technique on probes containing these injuries, the negative influence of cyclo-nucleosides on the recognition of its target sequence by a DREF transcription factor and on the interactions of PARP1 with DNA have been identified. Interactions between Fpg bacterial glycosylase and cyclo-nucleosides have been analysed and it has been found that this enzyme has an affinity for them, without excision activity. Finally, a Thermococcus gammatolerans radiation resistant archae has been studied: the formation of simple and complex oxidation injuries at strong radiation doses has been measured and the action mechanism of two new glycosylases has been explained. (author) [fr

  8. Identification of Oxidative Stress Related Proteins as Biomarkers for Lung Cancer and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amancio Carnero

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD commonly coexist in smokers, and the presence of COPD increases the risk of developing LC. Cigarette smoke causes oxidative stress and an inflammatory response in lung cells, which in turn may be involved in COPD and lung cancer development. The aim of this study was to identify differential proteomic profiles related to oxidative stress response that were potentially involved in these two pathological entities. Protein content was assessed in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL of 60 patients classified in four groups: COPD, COPD and LC, LC, and control (neither COPD nor LC. Proteins were separated into spots by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF. A total of 16 oxidative stress regulatory proteins were differentially expressed in BAL samples from LC and/or COPD patients as compared with the control group. A distinct proteomic reactive oxygen species (ROS protein signature emerged that characterized lung cancer and COPD. In conclusion, our findings highlight the role of the oxidative stress response proteins in the pathogenic pathways of both diseases, and provide new candidate biomarkers and predictive tools for LC and COPD diagnosis.

  9. Modulation of Protein Adsorption and Cell Proliferation on Polyethylene Immobilized Graphene Oxide Reinforced HDPE Bionanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Rahul; Naskar, Sharmistha; Bhaskar, Nitu; Bose, Suryasarathi; Basu, Bikramjit

    2016-05-18

    The uniform dispersion of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix, together with an enhancement of interfacial adhesion is indispensable toward achieving better mechanical properties in the nanocomposites. In the context to biomedical applications, the type and amount of nanoparticles can potentially influence the biocompatibility. To address these issues, we prepared high-density polyethylene (HDPE) based composites reinforced with graphene oxide (GO) by melt mixing followed by compression molding. In an attempt to tailor the dispersion and to improve the interfacial adhesion, we immobilized polyethylene (PE) onto GO sheets by nucleophilic addition-elimination reaction. A good combination of yield strength (ca. 20 MPa), elastic modulus (ca. 600 MPa), and an outstanding elongation at failure (ca. 70%) were recorded with 3 wt % polyethylene grafted graphene oxide (PE-g-GO) reinforced HDPE composites. Considering the relevance of protein adsorption as a biophysical precursor to cell adhesion, the protein adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were determined to realize three times higher equilibrium constant (Keq) for PE-g-GO-reinforced HDPE composites as compared to GO-reinforced composites. To assess the cytocompatibility, we grew osteoblast cell line (MC3T3) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on HDPE/GO and HDPE/PE-g-GO composites, in vitro. The statistically significant increase in metabolically active cell over different time periods in culture for up to 6 days in MC3T3 and 7 days for hMSCs was observed, irrespective of the substrate composition. Such observation indicated that HDPE with GO or PE-g-GO addition (up to 3 wt %) can be used as cell growth substrate. The extensive proliferation of cells with oriented growth pattern also supported the fact that tailored GO addition can support cellular functionality in vitro. Taken together, the experimental results suggest that the PE-g-GO in HDPE can effectively be utilized to enhance both mechanical and

  10. Delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and substance P using graphene oxide for bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La WG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wan-Geun La,1 Min Jin,1 Saibom Park,1,2 Hee-Hun Yoon,1 Gun-Jae Jeong,1 Suk Ho Bhang,1 Hoyoung Park,1,2 Kookheon Char,1,2 Byung-Soo Kim1,31School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2The National Creative Research Initiative Center for Intelligent Hybrids, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Institute of Bioengineering, Institute of Chemical Processes, Engineering Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of KoreaAbstract: In this study, we demonstrate that graphene oxide (GO can be used for the delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 and substance P (SP, and that this delivery promotes bone formation on titanium (Ti implants that are coated with GO. GO coating on Ti substrate enabled a sustained release of BMP-2. BMP-2 delivery using GO-coated Ti exhibited a higher alkaline phosphatase activity in bone-forming cells in vitro compared with bare Ti. SP, which is known to recruit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, was co-delivered using Ti or GO-coated Ti to further promote bone formation. SP induced the migration of MSCs in vitro. The dual delivery of BMP-2 and SP using GO-coated Ti showed the greatest new bone formation on Ti implanted in the mouse calvaria compared with other groups. This approach may be useful to improve osteointegration of Ti in dental or orthopedic implants.Keywords: bone morphogenetic protein-2, bone regeneration, graphene oxides, stem cell recruitment, substance P

  11. A synthetic peptide with the putative iron binding motif of amyloid precursor protein (APP does not catalytically oxidize iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Honarmand Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i by the incorporation of the Fe(III product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and - by implication - of APP should be re-evaluated.

  12. The reaction of monochloramine and hydroxylamine: implications for ammonia–oxidizing bacteria in chloraminated drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking water chloramine use may promote ammonia–oxidizing bacteria (AOB) growth because of naturally occurring ammonia, residual ammonia remaining from chloramine formation, and ammonia released from chloramine decay and demand. A rapid chloramine residual loss is often associa...

  13. Assessing the exposure and toxicological implications of environmental transformations of graphene oxide using in vitro methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene oxide (GO) and graphene-based nanoparticles are increasingly being used in biomedical, environmental, and industrial applications due to their distinct chemical and physical properties. Their widespread use and application can potentially result in mass release of GO to...

  14. Determinants of the acetate recovery factor: implications for estimation of 13C substrate oxidation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Schrauwen; E.E. Blaak; A.J.M. Wagenmakers; dr. Lars B. Borghouts; D.P.C. van Aggel-Leijssen

    2000-01-01

    The data of this study indicate that the acetate recovery factor, used in stable isotope research, needs to be deteremined in every subject, under similar conditions as used for the tracer-derived determination of substrate oxidation.

  15. Interaction of aromatic amines with iron oxides: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Uma; Singh, Gurinder; Kamaluddin

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of aromatic amines (aniline, p-chloroaniline, p-toludine and p-anisidine) with iron oxides (goethite, akaganeite and hematite) has been studied. Maximum uptake of amines was observed around pH 7. The adsorption data obtained at neutral pH were found to follow Langmuir adsorption. Anisidine was found to be a better adsorbate probably due to its higher basicity. In alkaline medium (pH > 8), amines reacted on goethite and akaganeite to give colored products. Analysis of the products by GC-MS showed benzoquinone and azobenzene as the reaction products of aniline while p-anisidine afforded a dimer. IR analysis of the amine-iron oxide hydroxide adduct suggests that the surface acidity of iron oxide hydroxides is responsible for the interaction. The present study suggests that iron oxide hydroxides might have played a role in the stabilization of organic molecules through their surface activity and in prebiotic condensation reactions.

  16. Alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a wave of global protein hyperacetylation: Implications in cancer cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Joo-In; Kwak, Jong-Young; Chung, Jay H.; Yun, Jeanho

    2007-01-01

    Protein acetylation modification has been implicated in many cellular processes but the direct evidence for the involvement of protein acetylation in signal transduction is very limited. In the present study, we found that an alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a robust and reversible hyperacetylation of both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins during the early phase of the cellular response to MMS. Notably, the acetylation level upon MMS treatment was strongly correlated with the susceptibility of cancer cells, and the enhancement of MMS-induced acetylation by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors was shown to increase the cellular susceptibility. These results suggest protein acetylation is important for the cell death signal transduction pathway and indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of cancer is relevant

  17. Seasonal Oxygen Dynamics in a Thermokarst Bog in Interior Alaska: Implications for Rates of Methane Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, R. B.; Moorberg, C.; Wong, A.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and wetlands represent the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere. However, much of the methane generated in anoxic wetlands never gets emitted to the atmosphere; up to >90% of generated methane can get oxidized to carbon dioxide. Thus, oxidation is an important methane sink and changes in the rate of methane oxidation can affect wetland methane emissions. Most methane is aerobically oxidized at oxic-anoxic interfaces where rates of oxidation strongly depend on methane and oxygen concentrations. In wetlands, oxygen is often the limiting substrate. To improve understanding of belowground oxygen dynamics and its impact on methane oxidation, we deployed two planar optical oxygen sensors in a thermokarst bog in interior Alaska. Previous work at this site indicated that, similar to other sites, rates of methane oxidation decrease over the growing season. We used the sensors to track spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentrations over the growing season. We coupled these in-situ oxygen measurements with periodic oxygen injection experiments performed against the sensor to quantify belowground rates of oxygen consumption. We found that over the season, the thickness of the oxygenated water layer at the peatland surface decreased. Previous research has indicated that in sphagnum-dominated peatlands, like the one studied here, rates of methane oxidation are highest at or slightly below the water table. It is in these saturated but oxygenated locations that both methane and oxygen are available. Thus, a seasonal reduction in the thickness of the oxygenated water layer could restrict methane oxidation. The decrease in thickness of the oxygenated layer coincided with an increase in the rate of oxygen consumption during our oxygen injection experiments. The increase in oxygen consumption was not explained by temperature; we infer it was due to an increase in substrate availability for oxygen consuming reactions and

  18. Catalysis by a de novo zinc-mediated protein interface: implications for natural enzyme evolution and rational enzyme engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der, Bryan S; Edwards, David R; Kuhlman, Brian

    2012-05-08

    Here we show that a recent computationally designed zinc-mediated protein interface is serendipitously capable of catalyzing carboxyester and phosphoester hydrolysis. Although the original motivation was to design a de novo zinc-mediated protein-protein interaction (called MID1-zinc), we observed in the homodimer crystal structure a small cleft and open zinc coordination site. We investigated if the cleft and zinc site at the designed interface were sufficient for formation of a primitive active site that can perform hydrolysis. MID1-zinc hydrolyzes 4-nitrophenyl acetate with a rate acceleration of 10(5) and a k(cat)/K(M) of 630 M(-1) s(-1) and 4-nitrophenyl phosphate with a rate acceleration of 10(4) and a k(cat)/K(M) of 14 M(-1) s(-1). These rate accelerations by an unoptimized active site highlight the catalytic power of zinc and suggest that the clefts formed by protein-protein interactions are well-suited for creating enzyme active sites. This discovery has implications for protein evolution and engineering: from an evolutionary perspective, three-coordinated zinc at a homodimer interface cleft represents a simple evolutionary path to nascent enzymatic activity; from a protein engineering perspective, future efforts in de novo design of enzyme active sites may benefit from exploring clefts at protein interfaces for active site placement.

  19. Photoreductive dissolution of iron oxides trapped in ice and its environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong; Hoffmann, Michael R; Yoon, Ho-Il; Park, Byong-Kwon

    2010-06-01

    The availability of iron has been thought to be a main limiting factor for the productivity of phytoplankton and related with the uptake of atmospheric CO(2) and algal blooms in fresh and sea waters. In this work, the formation of bioavailable iron (Fe(II)(aq)) from the dissolution of iron oxide particles was investigated in the ice phase under both UV and visible light irradiation. The photoreductive dissolution of iron oxides proceeded slowly in aqueous solution (pH 3.5) but was significantly accelerated in polycrystalline ice, subsequently releasing more bioavailable ferrous iron upon thawing. The enhanced photogeneration of Fe(II)(aq) in ice was confirmed regardless of the type of iron oxides [hematite, maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)), goethite (alpha-FeOOH)] and the kind of electron donors. The ice-enhanced dissolution of iron oxides was also observed under visible light irradiation, although the dissolution rate was much slower compared with the case of UV radiation. The iron oxide particles and organic electron donors (if any) in ice are concentrated and aggregated in the liquid-like grain boundary region (freeze concentration effect) where protons are also highly concentrated (lower pH). The enhanced photodissolution of iron oxides should occur in this confined boundary region. We hypothesized that electron hopping through the interconnected grain boundaries of iron oxide particles facilitates the separation of photoinduced charge pairs. The outdoor experiments carried out under ambient solar radiation of Ny-Alesund (Svalbard, 78 degrees 55'N) also showed that the generation of dissolved Fe(II)(aq) via photoreductive dissolution is enhanced when iron oxides are trapped in ice. Our results imply that the ice(snow)-covered surfaces and ice-cloud particles containing iron-rich mineral dusts in the polar and cold environments provide a source of bioavailable iron when they thaw.

  20. Dityrosine, 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), and radical formation from tyrosine residues on milk proteins with globular and flexible structures as a result of riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Trine Kastrup; Nielsen, Jacob Holm; Brown, Bronwyn

    2011-01-01

    Riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidative damage to protein Tyr residues has been examined to determine whether protein structure influences competing protein oxidation pathways in single proteins and protein mixtures. EPR studies resulted in the detection of Tyr-derived o-semiquione radicals, with thi......Riboflavin-mediated photo-oxidative damage to protein Tyr residues has been examined to determine whether protein structure influences competing protein oxidation pathways in single proteins and protein mixtures. EPR studies resulted in the detection of Tyr-derived o-semiquione radicals...

  1. Role of heat shock protein 90 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase during early anesthetic and ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amour, Julien; Brzezinska, Anna K; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Billstrom, Amie R; Zielonka, Jacek; Krolikowski, John G; Bienengraeber, Martin W; Warltier, David C; Pratt, Philip F; Kersten, Judy R

    2009-02-01

    Nitric oxide is known to be essential for early anesthetic preconditioning (APC) and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) of myocardium. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that Hsp90-eNOS interactions modulate APC and IPC. Myocardial infarct size was measured in rabbits after coronary occlusion and reperfusion in the absence or presence of preconditioning within 30 min of isoflurane (APC) or 5 min of coronary artery occlusion (IPC), and with or without pretreatment with geldanamycin or radicicol, two chemically distinct Hsp90 inhibitors, or N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a nonspecific nitric oxide synthase NOS inhibitor. Isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production was measured (ozone chemiluminescence) in human coronary artery endothelial cells or mouse cardiomyocytes, in the absence or presence of Hsp90 inhibitors or N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Interactions between Hsp90 and eNOS, and eNOS activation, were assessed with immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy. APC and IPC decreased infarct size (by 50% and 59%, respectively), and this action was abolished by Hsp90 inhibitors. N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester blocked APC but not IPC. Isoflurane increased nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells concomitantly with an increase in Hsp90-eNOS interaction (immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry). Pretreatment with Hsp90 inhibitors abolished isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production and decreased Hsp90-eNOS interactions. Isoflurane did not increase nitric oxide production in mouse cardiomyocytes, and eNOS was below the level of detection. The results indicate that Hsp90 plays a critical role in mediating APC and IPC through protein-protein interactions, and suggest that endothelial cells are important contributors to nitric oxide-mediated signaling during APC.

  2. Trimethylamine N-oxide stabilizes proteins via a distinct mechanism compared with betaine and glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi-Ting; Manson, Anthony C.; DeLyser, Michael R.; Noid, William G.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2017-01-01

    We report experimental and computational studies investigating the effects of three osmolytes, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), betaine, and glycine, on the hydrophobic collapse of an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). All three osmolytes stabilize collapsed conformations of the ELP and reduce the lower critical solution temperature (LSCT) linearly with osmolyte concentration. As expected from conventional preferential solvation arguments, betaine and glycine both increase the surface tension at the air–water interface. TMAO, however, reduces the surface tension. Atomically detailed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that TMAO also slightly accumulates at the polymer–water interface, whereas glycine and betaine are strongly depleted. To investigate alternative mechanisms for osmolyte effects, we performed FTIR experiments that characterized the impact of each cosolvent on the bulk water structure. These experiments showed that TMAO red-shifts the OH stretch of the IR spectrum via a mechanism that was very sensitive to the protonation state of the NO moiety. Glycine also caused a red shift in the OH stretch region, whereas betaine minimally impacted this region. Thus, the effects of osmolytes on the OH spectrum appear uncorrelated with their effects upon hydrophobic collapse. Similarly, MD simulations suggested that TMAO disrupts the water structure to the least extent, whereas glycine exerts the greatest influence on the water structure. These results suggest that TMAO stabilizes collapsed conformations via a mechanism that is distinct from glycine and betaine. In particular, we propose that TMAO stabilizes proteins by acting as a surfactant for the heterogeneous surfaces of folded proteins. PMID:28228526

  3. pH and Protein Sensing with Functionalized Semiconducting Oxide Nanobelt FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi; Yun, C. S.; Strouse, G. F.; Xiong, P.; Yang, R. S.; Wang, Z. L.

    2008-03-01

    We report solution pH sensing and selective protein detection with high-performance channel-limited field-effect transistors (FETs) based on single semiconducting oxide (ZnO and SnO2) nanobelts^1. The devices were integrated with PDMS microfluidic channels for analyte delivery and the source/drain contacts were passivated for in-solution sensing. pH sensing experiments were performed on FETs with functionalized and unmodified nanobelts. Functionalization of the nanobelts by APTES was found to greatly improve the pH sensitivity. The change in nanobelt conductance as functions of pH values at different gate voltages and ionic strengths showed high sensitivity and consistency. For the protein detection, we achieved highly selective biotinylation of the nanobelt channel with through APTES linkage. The specific binding of fluorescently-tagged streptavidin to the biotinylated nanobelt was verified by fluorescence microscopy; non-specific binding to the substrate was largely eliminated using PEG-silane passivation. The electrical responses of the biotinylated FETs to the streptavidin binding in PBS buffers of different pH values were systematically measured. The results will be presented and discussed. ^1Y. Cheng et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 093114 (2006). *Supported by NSF NIRT Grant ECS-0210332.

  4. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins may induce expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-3 in atherosclerotic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Moon Kyoo; Kim, Ji Young; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Kang, Mi Ae; Choi, Myung-Sook; Oh, Goo Taeg; Nam, Kyung Tak; Lee, Won-Ha; Park, Yong Bok

    2004-01-01

    Genes induced or suppressed by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) in human monocytic THP-1 cells were searched using the differential display reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. One of the differentially expressed (up-regulated) cDNA fragments was found to contain sequences corresponding to monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3). The stimulatory effect of the oxLDL on the expression of MCP-3 mRNA was both time- and dose-dependent. Treatment with GF109203X and genistein, inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase, respectively, had no effect on the induction of MCP-3 mRNA by oxLDL, while treatment with cycloheximide inhibited the induction. The induction was reproduced by the lipid components in oxLDL such as 9-HODE and 13-HODE, which are known to activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Introduction of an endogenous PPARγ ligand, 15d-PGJ2, in the culture of THP-1 cells resulted in the induction of MCP-3 gene expression. Furthermore, analyses of human atherosclerotic plaques revealed that the expressional pattern of MCP-3 in the regions of neointimal and necrotic core overlapped with that of PPARγ. These results suggest that oxLDL delivers its signal for MCP-3 expression via PPARγ, which may be further related to the atherogenesis

  5. The Neuron-Specific Protein TMEM59L Mediates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiuyang; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Lishan; Luo, Hong; Qian, Lingzhi; Fu, Xing; Liu, Yiqian; Gao, Yuehong; Niu, Mengxi; Meng, Jian; Zhang, Muxian; Bu, Guojun; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2017-08-01

    TMEM59L is a newly identified brain-specific membrane-anchored protein with unknown functions. Herein we found that both TMEM59L and its homolog, TMEM59, are localized in Golgi and endosomes. However, in contrast to a ubiquitous and relatively stable temporal expression of TMEM59, TMEM59L expression was limited in neurons and increased during development. We also found that both TMEM59L and TMEM59 interacted with ATG5 and ATG16L1, and that overexpression of them triggered cell autophagy. However, overexpression of TMEM59L induced intrinsic caspase-dependent apoptosis more dramatically than TMEM59. In addition, downregulation of TMEM59L prevented neuronal cell death and caspase-3 activation caused by hydrogen peroxide insults and reduced the lipidation of LC3B. Finally, we found that AAV-mediated knockdown of TMEM59L in mice significantly ameliorated caspase-3 activation, increased mouse duration in the open arm during elevated plus maze test, reduced mouse immobility time during forced swim test, and enhanced mouse memory during Y-maze and Morris water maze tests. Together, our study indicates that TMEM59L is a pro-apoptotic neuronal protein involved in animal behaviors such as anxiety, depression, and memory, and that TMEM59L downregulation protects neurons against oxidative stress.

  6. Biokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles: toxicokinetics, biological fates, and protein interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi SJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soo-Jin Choi,1 Jin-Ho Choy2 1Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women's University, 2Center for Intelligent Nano Bio Materials (CINBM, Department of Bioinspired Science and Department of Chemistry and Nanoscience, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Biokinetic studies of zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles involve systematic and quantitative analyses of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in plasma and tissues of whole animals after exposure. A full understanding of the biokinetics provides basic information about nanoparticle entry into systemic circulation, target organs of accumulation and toxicity, and elimination time, which is important for predicting the long-term toxic potential of nanoparticles. Biokinetic behaviors can be dependent on physicochemical properties, dissolution property in biological fluids, and nanoparticle–protein interaction. Moreover, the determination of biological fates of ZnO nanoparticles in the systemic circulation and tissues is critical in interpreting biokinetic behaviors and predicting toxicity potential as well as mechanism. This review focuses on physicochemical factors affecting the biokinetics of ZnO nanoparticles, in concert with understanding bioavailable fates and their interaction with proteins. Keywords: ZnO nanoparticles, biokinetics, distribution, excretion, fate, interaction

  7. Proteomics of the oxidative stress response induced by hydrogen peroxide and paraquat reveals a novel AhpC-like protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Nathan J; Scott, Nichollas E; Shin, Eun Hye H

    2011-01-01

    hypothetical antioxidant protein (PA3450) that shares sequence similarity with 1-Cys peroxiredoxins. Other induced proteins included known oxidative stress proteins (superoxide dismutase and catalase), as well as those involved in iron acquisition (siderophore biosynthesis and receptor proteins FpvA and Fpt...

  8. Impact of Oxidative Dissolution on Black Shale Fracturing: Implication for Shale Fracturing Treatment Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, L.; Chen, Q.; Kang, Y.; Cheng, Q.; Sheng, J.

    2017-12-01

    Black shales contain a large amount of environment-sensitive compositions, e.g., clay minerals, carbonate, siderite, pyrite, and organic matter. There have been numerous studies on the black shales compositional and pore structure changes caused by oxic environments. However, most of the studies did not focus on their ability to facilitate shale fracturing. To test the redox-sensitive aspects of shale fracturing and its potentially favorable effects on hydraulic fracturing in shale gas reservoirs, the induced microfractures of Longmaxi black shales exposed to deionized water, hydrochloric acid, and hydrogen peroxide at room-temperature for 240 hours were imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and CT-scanning in this paper. Mineral composition, acoustic emission, swelling, and zeta potential of the untreated and oxidative treatment shale samples were also recorded to decipher the coupled physical and chemical effects of oxidizing environments on shale fracturing processes. Results show that pervasive microfractures (Fig.1) with apertures ranging from tens of nanometers to tens of microns formed in response to oxidative dissolution by hydrogen peroxide, whereas no new microfracture was observed after the exposure to deionized water and hydrochloric acid. The trajectory of these oxidation-induced microfractures was controlled by the distribution of phyllosilicate framework and flaky or stringy organic matter in shale. The experiments reported in this paper indicate that black shales present the least resistance to crack initiation and subcritical slow propagation in hydrogen peroxide, a process we refer to as oxidation-sensitive fracturing, which are closely related to the expansive stress of clay minerals, dissolution of redox-sensitive compositions, destruction of phyllosilicate framework, and the much lower zeta potential of hydrogen peroxide solution-shale system. It could mean that the injection of fracturing water with strong oxidizing aqueous solution may

  9. Oxidized lipids enhance RANKL production by T lymphocytes: implications for lipid-induced bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Lucia S; Parhami, Farhad; Tintut, Yin; Kitchen, Christina M R; Demer, Linda L; Effros, Rita B

    2009-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic disease that is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Whereas osteoclasts and osteoblasts are the main regulators of bone homeostasis, recent studies underscore a key role for the immune system, particularly via activation-induced T lymphocyte production of receptor activator of NFkappaB ligand (RANKL). Well-documented as a mediator of T lymphocyte/dendritic cell interactions, RANKL also stimulates the maturation and activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Given that lipid oxidation products mediate inflammatory and metabolic disorders such as osteoporosis and atherosclerosis, and since oxidized lipids affect several T lymphocyte functions, we hypothesized that RANKL production might also be subject to modulation by oxidized lipids. Here, we show that short term exposure of both unstimulated and activated human T lymphocytes to minimally oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL), but not native LDL, significantly enhances RANKL production and promotes expression of the lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). The effect, which is also observed with 8-iso-Prostaglandin E2, an inflammatory isoprostane produced by lipid peroxidation, is mediated via the NFkappaB pathway, and involves increased RANKL mRNA expression. The link between oxidized lipids and T lymphocytes is further reinforced by analysis of hyperlipidemic mice, in which bone loss is associated with increased RANKL mRNA in T lymphocytes and elevated RANKL serum levels. Our results suggest a novel pathway by which T lymphocytes contribute to bone changes, namely, via oxidized lipid enhancement of RANKL production. These findings may help elucidate clinical associations between cardiovascular disease and decreased bone mass, and may also lead to new immune-based approaches to osteoporosis.

  10. Effects of Diabetes on Salivary Gland Protein Expression of Tetrahydrobiopterin and Nitric Oxide Synthesis and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cassandra R; Obi, Nneka; Epane, Elodie C; Akbari, Alexander A; Halpern, Leslie; Southerland, Janet H; Gangula, Pandu R

    2016-06-01

    Xerostomia is defined as dry mouth resulting from a change in the amount or composition of saliva and is often a major oral health complication associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). Studies have shown that xerostomia is more common in females at the onset of DM. Evidence suggests that nitric oxide (NO) plays a critical role in healthy salivary gland function. However, the specific mechanisms by which NO regulates salivary gland function at the onset of DM have yet to be determined. This study has two aims: 1) to determine whether protein expression or dimerization of NO synthase enzymes (neuronal [nNOS] and endothelial [eNOS]) are altered in the onset of diabetic xerostomia; and 2) to determine whether the changes in nNOS/eNOS protein expression or dimerization are correlated with changes in NO cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthetic enzymes (guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase-1 and dihydrofolate reductase). Functional and Western blot studies were performed in streptozotocin-induced and control Sprague-Dawley female rats with DM (type 1 [t1DM]) using standardized protocols. Confirmation of xerostomia was determined by increased water intake and decreased salivary flow rate. The results showed that in female rats with DM, salivary hypofunction is correlated with decreased submandibular and parotid gland sizes. The results also show a decrease in NOS and BH4 biosynthetic enzyme in submandibular glands. These results indicate that a decrease in submandibular NO-BH4 protein expression may provide insight pertaining to mechanisms for the development of hyposalivation in DM-induced xerostomia. Furthermore, understanding the role of the NO-BH4 pathway may give insight into possible treatment options for the patient with DM experiencing xerostomia.

  11. Biological water-oxidizing complex: a nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide in a protein environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Moghaddam, Atefeh Nemati; Yang, Young Nam; Aro, Eva-Mari; Carpentier, Robert; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2012-10-01

    The resolution of Photosystem II (PS II) crystals has been improved using isolated PS II from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus vulcanus. The new 1.9 Å resolution data have provided detailed information on the structure of the water-oxidizing complex (Umena et al. Nature 473: 55-61, 2011). The atomic level structure of the manganese-calcium cluster is important for understanding the mechanism of water oxidation and to design an efficient catalyst for water oxidation in artificial photosynthetic systems. Here, we have briefly reviewed our knowledge of the structure and function of the cluster.

  12. Effects of Curcumin on the Proliferation and Mineralization of Human Osteoblast-Like Cells: Implications of Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Pedrera-Zamorano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin (diferuloylmethane is found in the rhizomes of the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa L. and has been used for centuries as a dietary spice and as a traditional Indian medicine used to treat different conditions. At the cellular level, curcumin modulates important molecular targets: transcription factors, enzymes, cell cycle proteins, cytokines, receptors and cell surface adhesion molecules. Because many of the curcumin targets mentioned above participate in the regulation of bone remodeling, curcumin may affect the skeletal system. Nitric oxide (NO is a gaseous molecule generated from L-arginine during the catalization of nitric oxide synthase (NOS, and it plays crucial roles in catalization and in the nervous, cardiovascular and immune systems. Human osteoblasts have been shown to express NOS isoforms, and the exact mechanism(s by which NO regulates bone formation remain unclear. Curcumin has been widely described to inhibit inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production, at least in part via direct interference in NF-κB activation. In the present study, after exposure of human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63, we have observed that curcumin abrogated inducible NOS expression and decreased NO levels, inhibiting also cell prolifieration. This effect was prevented by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. Under osteogenic conditions, curcumin also decreased the level of mineralization. Our results indicate that NO plays a role in the osteoblastic profile of MG-63 cells.

  13. SIRT1 sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells expressing hepatitis B virus X protein to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srisuttee, Ratakorn [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Sang Seok [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Malilas, Waraporn; Moon, Jeong; Cho, Il-Rae [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jhun, Byung Hak [Department of Applied Nanoscience, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Horio, Yoshiyuki [Department of Pharmacology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo 060-8556 (Japan); Chung, Young-Hwa, E-mail: younghc@pusan.ac.kr [WCU, Department of Cogno-Mechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of SIRT1 protein and activity sensitizes Hep3B-HBX cells to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for oxidation-induced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression and enhanced activity of SIRT1 attenuate JNK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of SIRT1 activity restores resistance to oxidation-induced apoptosis through JNK activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that SIRT1 deacetylase inhibits proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells expressing hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBX), by destabilization of {beta}-catenin. Here, we report another role for SIRT1 in HBX-mediated resistance to oxidative stress. Ectopic expression and enhanced activity of SIRT1 sensitize Hep3B cells stably expressing HBX to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for sensitization of oxidation-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SIRT1 and treatment with resveratrol (a SIRT1 activator) attenuated JNK phosphorylation, which is a prerequisite for resistance to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 activity with nicotinamide inhibited the effect of resveratrol on JNK phosphorylation, leading to restoration of resistance to oxidation-induced apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that up-regulation of SIRT1 under oxidative stress may be a therapeutic strategy for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma cells related to HBV through inhibition of JNK activation.

  14. Rat Aquaporin-5 Is pH-Gated Induced by Phosphorylation and Is Implicated in Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Rodrigues

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-5 (AQP5 is a membrane water channel widely distributed in human tissues that was found up-regulated in different tumors and considered implicated in carcinogenesis in different organs and systems. Despite its wide distribution pattern and physiological importance, AQP5 short-term regulation was not reported and mechanisms underlying its involvement in cancer are not well defined. In this work, we expressed rat AQP5 in yeast and investigated mechanisms of gating, as well as AQP5’s ability to facilitate H2O2 plasma membrane diffusion. We found that AQP5 can be gated by extracellular pH in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, with higher activity at physiological pH 7.4. Moreover, similar to other mammalian AQPs, AQP5 is able to increase extracellular H2O2 influx and to affect oxidative cell response with dual effects: whereas in acute oxidative stress conditions AQP5 induces an initial higher sensitivity, in chronic stress AQP5 expressing cells show improved cell survival and resistance. Our findings support the involvement of AQP5 in oxidative stress and suggest AQP5 modulation by phosphorylation as a novel tool for therapeutics.

  15. Anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties of an enzymatic protein hydrolysate from yellow field pea seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Fatou; Vuong, Tri; Duarte, Jairo; Aluko, Rotimi E; Matar, Chantal

    2012-02-01

    Enzymatic protein hydrolysates of yellow pea seed have been shown to possess high anti-oxidant and anti-bacterial activities. The aim of this work was to confirm the anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating activities of an enzymatic protein hydrolysate of yellow field pea seeds. The anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of peptides from yellow field pea proteins (Pisum sativum L.) were investigated in LPS/IFN-γ-activated RAW 264.7 NO⁻ macrophages. The immunomodulating potential of pea protein hydrolysate (PPH) was then studied in a murine model. Pea protein hydrolysate, after a 12 h pre-treatment, showed significant inhibition of NO production by activated macrophages up to 20%. Moreover, PPH significantly inhibited their secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α- and IL-6, up to 35 and 80%, respectively. Oral administration of PPH in mice enhanced the phagocytic activity of their peritoneal macrophages and stimulated the gut mucosa immune response. The number of IgA+ cells was elevated in the small intestine lamina propria, accompanied by an increase in the number of IL-4+, IL-10+ and IFN-γ+ cells. This was correlated to up-regulation of IL-6 secretion by small intestine epithelial cells (IEC), probably responsible for B-cell terminal differentiation to IgA-secreting cells. Moreover, PPH might have increased IL-6 production in IECs via the stimulation of toll-like receptors (TLRs) family, especially TLR2 and TLR4 since either anti-TLR2 or anti-TLR4 was able to completely abolish PPH-induced IL-6 secretion. Enzymatic protein degradation confers anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating potentials to pea proteins, and the resulted peptides could be used as an alternative therapy for the prevention of inflammatory-related diseases.

  16. CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase and protein kinase C recognize different physical features of membranes: differential responses to an oxidized phosphatidylcholine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drobnies, A.E.; Davies, S.M.A.; Kraayenhof, R.; Epand, R.F.; Epand, R.M.; Cornell, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) and CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CT) are two examples of enzymes that are regulated by reversible binding to membranes, and this binding is influenced by membrane physical properties. CT activation by oxidized phosphatidylcholines was recently demonstrated and was

  17. Antioxidative Effect of Seaweed Extracts in Chilled Storage of Minced Atlantic Mackerel (Scomber scombrus): Effect on Lipid and Protein Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babakhani, Aria; Farvin, K. H Sabeena; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    In this study, antioxidant activity of absolute ethanol, 50 % ethanol and water extracts of two species of seaweeds namely, Fucus serratus and Polysiphonia fucoides were evaluated for their ability to retard lipid and protein oxidation in minced mackerel. Mackerel mince added with 0.5 g/kg of ext...

  18. Steam oxidation of 9-12%Cr steels. Critical evaluation and implications for practical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, J.; Quadakkers, W.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF); Bruycker, E. de; Huysmans, S. [Laborelec, Linkebeek (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    In new and future generation Power Plants, creep resistant steels selected for high-temperature components are subjected to a large variety of service environments. In many of these applications, water vapor has been found to substantially alter the technologically relevant properties mainly growth rate and adherence, of the surface oxides. Various data sets exist in the literature for steam oxidation for this type of steels, however these data show a substantial deviation. These differences can be related to e.g. ''batch to batch'' variation, oxidation conditions, surface treatment, difference between laboratory/power plants data, etc. Therefore these literature data need careful and critical verification when being used to estimate the long term materials behaviour in real power generation plants. The paper discusses the existing steam oxidation data for a number of selected steels, i.e. P91, P92 and VM12, thereby putting main emphasis on discussing the parameters which are responsible for observed variations in oxidation rates for the various types of materials. (orig.)

  19. Oligomerization of glycine and alanine catalyzed by iron oxides: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Uma; Bhushan, Brij; Bhattacharjee, G; Kamaluddin

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide minerals are probable constituents of the sediments present in geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They might have adsorbed different organic monomers (amino acids, nucleotides etc.) and catalyzed polymerization processes leading to the formation of the first living cell. In the present work we tested the catalytic activity of three forms of iron oxides (Goethite, Akaganeite and Hematite) in the intermolecular condensation of each of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine. The effect of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide on the oligomerization has also been studied. Oligomerization studies were performed for 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The products formed were characterized by HPLC and ESI-MS techniques. All three forms of iron oxides catalyzed peptide bond formation (23.2% of gly2 and 10.65% of ala2). The reaction was monitored every 7 days. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. Reaction at 120°C favors formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. It is also important to note that after 35 days of reaction, goethite produced dimer and trimer with the highest yield among the oxides tested. We suggest that the activity of goethite could probably be due to its high surface area and surface acidity.

  20. Oxidative stress and antioxidant status response of handball athletes: implications for sport training monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Douglas Popp; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; Campoio, Thais Regina; Guerra, Beatriz Alves; Otton, Rosemari

    2013-10-01

    The chronic exposure to regular exercise training seems to improve antioxidant defense systems. However, the intense physical training imposed on elite athletes may lead to overtraining associated with oxidative stress. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of different training loads and competition on oxidative stress, biochemical parameters and antioxidant enzymatic defense in handball athletes during 6-months of monitoring. Ten male elite handball athletes were recruited to the study. Blood samples were collected four times every six weeks throughout the season. During most intense periods of training and competitions there were significant changes in plasma indices of oxidative stress (increased TBARS and decreased thiols). Conversely, chronic adaptations to exercise training demonstrated a significant protective effect against oxidative stress in erythrocyte (decrease in TBARs and carbonyl group levels). Erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly increased, suggesting a training-induced antioxidant adaptation. Biomarkers of skeletal muscle damage were significantly increased during high-intensity training period (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase). No significant changes were observed in plasma IL-6, TNF-α and uric acid, whereas a significant reduction was found in the IL-1β concentration and gamma-glutamyl transferase activity. Oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarkers can change throughout the season in competitive athletes, reflecting the physical stress and muscle damage that occurs as the result of competitive handball training. In addition, these biochemical measurements can be applied in the physiological follow-up of athletes. © 2013.

  1. Potential Health Implications of the Consumption of Thermally-Oxidized Cooking Oils – a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falade Ayodeji Osmund

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cooking oils are an integral part of a human diet as they are used in almost all types of culinary practices. They serve as sources of lipids with a significant nutritive value and health benefits which can be attributed to their fatty acid compositions and biological antioxidants. However, cooking oils are usually subjected to thermal oxidation which occurs when fresh cooking oil is heated at high temperatures during various food preparations. Repeated use of cooking oils in the commercial food industry is also common to maximize profit. Thermal oxidation of edible oils had since attracted great attention of nutritionist and researchers given the deteriorative effect such as generation of very cytotoxic compounds, loss of carotenoid, phenolics and vitamins thus reducing the overall antioxidant properties of the oils. Furthermore, several in vivo studies had suggested that consumption of thermally-oxidized cooking oils might not be healthy as it might negatively influence the lipid profile (increased low density lipoprotein (LDL, decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL and elevated cholesterol level, haematological system (alteration in concentration of heamoglobin (Hb, packed cell volume (PCV, white blood cell (WBC count, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, kidney function, and induce lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress which have been associated with the pathogenesis of various degenerative diseases. Therefore, thermal oxidation seems not to provide any health benefit, as it deteriorates cooking oils and the consumption of the oils may predispose consumers to various disease conditions that may ensue from free radical generation, thereby having deleterious effect on human health.

  2. Sulfite-induced protein radical formation in LPS aerosol-challenged mice: Implications for sulfite sensitivity in human lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to (bisulfite (HSO3– and sulfite (SO32– has been shown to induce a wide range of adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. Studies have shown that peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of (bisulfite leads to formation of several reactive free radicals, such as sulfur trioxide anion (.SO3–, peroxymonosulfate (–O3SOO., and especially the sulfate (SO4. – anion radicals. One such peroxidase in neutrophils is myeloperoxidase (MPO, which has been shown to form protein radicals. Although formation of (bisulfite-derived protein radicals is documented in isolated neutrophils, its involvement and role in in vivo inflammatory processes, has not been demonstrated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate (bisulfite-derived protein radical formation and its mechanism in LPS aerosol-challenged mice, a model of non-atopic asthma. Using immuno-spin trapping to detect protein radical formation, we show that, in the presence of (bisulfite, neutrophils present in bronchoalveolar lavage and in the lung parenchyma exhibit, MPO-catalyzed oxidation of MPO to a protein radical. The absence of radical formation in LPS-challenged MPO- or NADPH oxidase-knockout mice indicates that sulfite-derived radical formation is dependent on both MPO and NADPH oxidase activity. In addition to its oxidation by the MPO-catalyzed pathway, (bisulfite is efficiently detoxified to sulfate by the sulfite oxidase (SOX pathway, which forms sulfate in a two-electron oxidation reaction. Since SOX activity in rodents is much higher than in humans, to better model sulfite toxicity in humans, we induced SOX deficiency in mice by feeding them a low molybdenum diet with tungstate. We found that mice treated with the SOX deficiency diet prior to exposure to (bisulfite had much higher protein radical formation than mice with normal SOX activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate the role of MPO and NADPH oxidase in (bisulfite-derived protein radical formation and show the involvement of

  3. Macrophage mitochondrial damage from StAR transport of 7-hydroperoxycholesterol: implications for oxidative stress-impaired reverse cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korytowski, Witold; Wawak, Katarzyna; Pabisz, Pawel; Schmitt, Jared C; Girotti, Albert W

    2014-01-03

    StAR family proteins in vascular macrophages participate in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We hypothesize that under pathophysiological oxidative stress, StARs will transport not only cholesterol to macrophage mitochondria, but also pro-oxidant cholesterol hydroperoxides (7-OOHs), thereby impairing early-stage RCT. Upon stimulation with dibutyryl-cAMP, RAW264.7 macrophages exhibited a strong time-dependent induction of mitochondrial StarD1 and plasma membrane ABCA1, which exports cholesterol. 7α-OOH uptake by stimulated RAW cell mitochondria (like cholesterol uptake) was strongly reduced by StarD1 knockdown, consistent with StarD1 involvement. Upon uptake by mitochondria, 7α-OOH (but not redox-inactive 7α-OH) triggered lipid peroxidation and membrane depolarization while reducing ABCA1 upregulation. These findings provide strong initial support for our hypothesis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Enhanced fatty acid oxidation and FATP4 protein expression after endurance exercise training in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Jordy, Andreas B; Sjøberg, Kim A

    2012-01-01

    ; however, it is not known whether this involves up-regulation of FATP1 and FATP4 protein. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate FATP1 and FATP4 protein expression in the vastus lateralis muscle from healthy human individuals and to what extent FATP1 and FATP4 protein expression were......FATP1 and FATP4 appear to be important for the cellular uptake and handling of long chain fatty acids (LCFA). These findings were obtained from loss- or gain of function models. However, reports on FATP1 and FATP4 in human skeletal muscle are limited. Aerobic training enhances lipid oxidation...

  5. Application of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation biomarkers for oxidative damage in mammalian cells. A comparison with two fluorescent probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orhan, H.; Gurer-Orhan, H.; Vriese, E.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Meerman, J.H.N.

    2006-01-01

    We recently developed two biomarker sets for oxidative damage: one for determination of lipid peroxidation (LPO) degradation products; acetaldehyde, propanal, butanal, pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, malondialdehyde and acetone, by a gas chromatography-electron capture detection

  6. Protein Requirements Are Elevated in Endurance Athletes after Exercise as Determined by the Indicator Amino Acid Oxidation Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kato

    Full Text Available A higher protein intake has been recommended for endurance athletes compared with healthy non-exercising individuals based primarily on nitrogen balance methodology. The aim of this study was to determine the estimated average protein requirement and recommended protein intake in endurance athletes during an acute 3-d controlled training period using the indicator amino acid oxidation method. After 2-d of controlled diet (1.4 g protein/kg/d and training (10 and 5km/d, respectively, six male endurance-trained adults (28±4 y of age; Body weight, 64.5±10.0 kg; VO2peak, 60.3±6.7 ml·kg-1·min-1; means±SD performed an acute bout of endurance exercise (20 km treadmill run prior to consuming test diets providing variable amounts of protein (0.2-2.8 g·kg-1·d-1 and sufficient energy. Protein was provided as a crystalline amino acid mixture based on the composition of egg protein with [1-13C]phenylalanine provided to determine whole body phenylalanine flux, 13CO2 excretion, and phenylalanine oxidation. The estimated average protein requirement was determined as the breakpoint after biphasic linear regression analysis with a recommended protein intake defined as the upper 95% confidence interval. Phenylalanine flux (68.8±8.5 μmol·kg-1·h-1 was not affected by protein intake. 13CO2 excretion displayed a robust bi-phase linear relationship (R2 = 0.86 that resulted in an estimated average requirement and a recommended protein intake of 1.65 and 1.83 g protein·kg-1·d-1, respectively, which was similar to values based on phenylalanine oxidation (1.53 and 1.70 g·kg-1·d-1, respectively. We report a recommended protein intake that is greater than the RDA (0.8 g·kg-1·d-1 and current recommendations for endurance athletes (1.2-1.4 g·kg-1·d-1. Our results suggest that the metabolic demand for protein in endurance-trained adults on a higher volume training day is greater than their sedentary peers and current recommendations for athletes based

  7. Lipids in the Assembly of Membrane Proteins and Organization of Protein Supercomplexes: Implications for Lipid-Linked Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, Mikhail; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Dowhan, William

    2008-01-01

    Lipids play important roles in cellular dysfunction leading to disease. Although a major role for phospholipids is in defining the membrane permeability barrier, phospholipids play a central role in a diverse range of cellular processes and therefore are important factors in cellular dysfunction and disease. This review is focused on the role of phospholipids in normal assembly and organization of the membrane proteins, multimeric protein complexes, and higher order supercomplexes. Since lipi...

  8. The involvement of wheat F-box protein gene TaFBA1 in the oxidative stress tolerance of plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Mei Zhou

    Full Text Available As one of the largest gene families, F-box domain proteins have been found to play important roles in abiotic stress responses via the ubiquitin pathway. TaFBA1 encodes a homologous F-box protein contained in E3 ubiquitin ligases. In our previous study, we found that the overexpression of TaFBA1 enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic plants. To investigate the mechanisms involved, in this study, we investigated the tolerance of the transgenic plants to oxidative stress. Methyl viologen was used to induce oxidative stress conditions. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis revealed that TaFBA1 expression was up-regulated by oxidative stress treatments. Under oxidative stress conditions, the transgenic tobacco plants showed a higher germination rate, higher root length and less growth inhibition than wild type (WT. The enhanced oxidative stress tolerance of the transgenic plants was also indicated by lower reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, malondialdehyde (MDA content and cell membrane damage under oxidative stress compared with WT. Higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX and peroxidase (POD, were observed in the transgenic plants than those in WT, which may be related to the upregulated expression of some antioxidant genes via the overexpression of TaFBA1. In others, some stress responsive elements were found in the promoter region of TaFBA1, and TaFBA1 was located in the nucleus, cytoplasm and plasma membrane. These results suggest that TaFBA1 plays an important role in the oxidative stress tolerance of plants. This is important for understanding the functions of F-box proteins in plants' tolerance to multiple stress conditions.

  9. Antioxidant activity of pomegranate peel extract on lipid and protein oxidation in beef meatballs during frozen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Sebahattin Serhat; Işıkçı, Fatma; Soyer, Ayla

    2017-07-01

    Antioxidant effect of pomegranate peel extract (PE) to retard lipid and protein oxidation in beef meatballs was investigated during frozen storage at -18±1°C. Concentrated and freeze dried aqueous extract of pomegranate peel was incorporated into freshly prepared meatball mix at 0.5% and 1.0% concentrations, and compared with 0.01% butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and control (without any antioxidant). In PE treated samples, particularly in high PE concentration, peroxide, malondialdehyde and carbonyl formation, loss of total protein solubility and sulfhydryl groups were significantly lower than control after 6months of storage. A diminution of both myofibrillar (MP) and sarcoplasmic (SP) proteins of high molecular weight was detected after 6months of the storage according to gel electrophoresis patterns. The 1.0% PE led to maintain colour intensity (C) and hue (h°) value. The results from sensory analyses revealed that PE addition to meatballs was effective on preventing rancid odour formation. Addition of both 0.5 and 1% PE in meatballs reduced lipid and protein oxidation and improved sensory scores. These results indicated that PE was effective on retarding lipid and protein oxidations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of aerobic exercise training at two different intensities in obesity and type 2 diabetes: implications for oxidative stress, low-grade inflammation and nitric oxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Mauricio; Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; O'Hagan, Ciara; Medlow, Paul; Davison, Gareth; Susta, Davide; Boreham, Colin; Newsholme, Philip; O'Donnell, Mark; Murphy, Colin; De Vito, Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of 16 weeks of aerobic training performed at two different intensities on nitric oxide (tNOx) availability and iNOS/nNOS expression, oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation in obese humans with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Twenty-five sedentary, obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) males (52.8 ± 7.2 years); 12 controls versus 13 T2DM were randomly allocated to four groups that exercised for 30 min, three times per week either at low (Fat-Max; 30-40% VO(2max)) or moderate (T(vent); 55-65 % VO(2max)) intensity. Before and after training, blood and muscle samples (v. lateralis) were collected. Baseline erythrocyte glutathione was lower (21.8 ± 2.8 vs. 32.7 ± 4.4 nmol/ml) and plasma protein oxidative damage and IL-6 were higher in T2DM (141.7 ± 52.1 vs. 75.5 ± 41.6 nmol/ml). Plasma catalase increased in T2DM after T(vent) training (from 0.98 ± 0.22 to 1.96 ± 0.3 nmol/min/ml). T2DM groups demonstrated evidence of oxidative damage in response to training (elevated protein carbonyls). Baseline serum tNOx were higher in controls than T2DM (18.68 ± 2.78 vs. 12.34 ± 3.56 μmol/l). Training at T(vent) increased muscle nNOS and tNOx in the control group only. Pre-training muscle nNOS was higher in controls than in T2DMs, while the opposite was found for iNOS. No differences were found after training for plasma inflammatory markers. Exercise training did not change body composition or aerobic fitness, but improved OS markers, especially when performed at T(vent). Non-diabetics responded to T(vent) training by increasing muscle nNOS expression and tNOx levels in skeletal muscle while these parameters did not change in T2DM, perhaps due to higher insulin resistance (unchanged after intervention).

  11. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkus Kristen A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  12. Circulating Autoantibodies in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Recognize Human Macular Tissue Antigens Implicated in Autophagy, Immunomodulation, and Protection from Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Iannaccone

    immune system in AMD pathogenesis, AAbs were identified in AMD sera, including early-stage disease. Identified targets may be mechanistically linked to AMD pathogenesis because the identified proteins are implicated in autophagy, immunomodulation, and protection from oxidative stress and apoptosis. In particular, a role in autophagy activation is shared by all five autoantigens, raising the possibility that the detected AAbs may play a role in AMD via autophagy compromise and downstream activation of the inflammasome. Thus, we propose that the detected AAbs provide further insight into AMD pathogenesis and have the potential to contribute to disease biogenesis and progression.

  13. Fatty acid oxidation in the human fetus: implications for fetal and adult disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oey, Nadia A.; Ruiter, Jos P. N.; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Ijlst, Lodewijk; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2006-01-01

    Studies in the last few years have shown a remarkably high activity of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) enzymes in human placenta. We have recently shown mRNA expression as well as enzymatic activity of long-chain FAO enzymes in the human embryo and fetus. In this study we show activity of the FAO enzymes

  14. Urban impacts on oxidative balance and their implications for animal signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce eHutton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Though many animal ornaments and signals are sensitive to and encode information about the oxidative balance (OB of individuals (e.g. antioxidant supplies/activity, reactive oxygen species, cellular oxidative damage/repair, often the environmental and/or physiological sources of such OB are unknown. Here we review the mechanistic underpinnings and functional consequences of how human urbanization drives antioxidant/oxidative status in animals and how this affects signal expression and use. Urban development is among the most recent, pervasive, and persistent human stressors on the planet and impacts many environmental and physiological parameters of animals. Here, we review literature on the potential effects of urbanization on OB and its linkage to signal expression and honesty in animals. Although we find that urbanization has strong negative effects on signal quality (e.g., visual, auditory, chemical and OB across a range of taxa, few urban ecophysiological studies address signals and oxidative stress in unison, and even fewer in a fitness context. We also highlight particular signal types, taxa, life-histories, and anthropogenic environmental modifications on which future work integrating OB, signals, and urbanization could be centered. Last, we examine the conceptual and empirical framework behind the idea that urban conditions may disentangle signal expression from honesty and affect plasticity and adaptedness of sexually selected traits and preferences in the city.

  15. High activity of fatty acid oxidation enzymes in human placenta: implications for fetal-maternal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oey, N. A.; den Boer, M. E. J.; Ruiter, J. P. N.; Wanders, R. J. A.; Duran, M.; Waterham, H. R.; Boer, K.; van der Post, J. A. M.; Wijburg, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    As the human fetus and placenta are considered to be primarily dependent on glucose oxidation for energy metabolism, the cause of the remarkable association between severe maternal pregnancy complications and the carriage of a fetus with an inborn error of mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid

  16. Metagenomic analysis of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity: implications for nitric oxide homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Embriette R; Andrade, Fernando; Vaksman, Zalman; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Jiang, Hong; Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Torregrossa, Ashley C; Tribble, Gena; Kaplan, Heidi B; Petrosino, Joseph F; Bryan, Nathan S

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota of the human lower intestinal tract helps maintain healthy host physiology, for example through nutrient acquisition and bile acid recycling, but specific positive contributions of the oral microbiota to host health are not well established. Nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis is crucial to mammalian physiology. The recently described entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has been shown to provide bioactive NO from dietary nitrate sources. Interestingly, this pathway is dependent upon oral nitrate-reducing bacteria, since humans lack this enzyme activity. This pathway appears to represent a newly recognized symbiosis between oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and their human hosts in which the bacteria provide nitrite and nitric oxide from nitrate reduction. Here we measure the nitrate-reducing capacity of tongue-scraping samples from six healthy human volunteers, and analyze metagenomes of the bacterial communities to identify bacteria contributing to nitrate reduction. We identified 14 candidate species, seven of which were not previously believed to contribute to nitrate reduction. We cultivated isolates of four candidate species in single- and mixed-species biofilms, revealing that they have substantial nitrate- and nitrite-reduction capabilities. Colonization by specific oral bacteria may thus contribute to host NO homeostasis by providing nitrite and nitric oxide. Conversely, the lack of specific nitrate-reducing communities may disrupt the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway and lead to a state of NO insufficiency. These findings may also provide mechanistic evidence for the oral systemic link. Our results provide a possible new therapeutic target and paradigm for NO restoration in humans by specific oral bacteria.

  17. Metagenomic analysis of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity: implications for nitric oxide homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embriette R Hyde

    Full Text Available The microbiota of the human lower intestinal tract helps maintain healthy host physiology, for example through nutrient acquisition and bile acid recycling, but specific positive contributions of the oral microbiota to host health are not well established. Nitric oxide (NO homeostasis is crucial to mammalian physiology. The recently described entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has been shown to provide bioactive NO from dietary nitrate sources. Interestingly, this pathway is dependent upon oral nitrate-reducing bacteria, since humans lack this enzyme activity. This pathway appears to represent a newly recognized symbiosis between oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and their human hosts in which the bacteria provide nitrite and nitric oxide from nitrate reduction. Here we measure the nitrate-reducing capacity of tongue-scraping samples from six healthy human volunteers, and analyze metagenomes of the bacterial communities to identify bacteria contributing to nitrate reduction. We identified 14 candidate species, seven of which were not previously believed to contribute to nitrate reduction. We cultivated isolates of four candidate species in single- and mixed-species biofilms, revealing that they have substantial nitrate- and nitrite-reduction capabilities. Colonization by specific oral bacteria may thus contribute to host NO homeostasis by providing nitrite and nitric oxide. Conversely, the lack of specific nitrate-reducing communities may disrupt the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway and lead to a state of NO insufficiency. These findings may also provide mechanistic evidence for the oral systemic link. Our results provide a possible new therapeutic target and paradigm for NO restoration in humans by specific oral bacteria.

  18. Role of manganese oxides in peptide synthesis: implication in chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Brij; Nayak, Arunima; Kamaluddin

    2017-10-01

    During the course of chemical evolution the role of metal oxides may have been very significant in catalysing the polymerization of biomonomers. The peptide bond formation of alanine (ala) and glycine (gly) in the presence of various oxides of manganese were performed for a period of 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The reaction was monitored every week. The products formed were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry techniques. Trace amount of oligomers was observed at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. It is important to note that very high temperatures of 120°C favoured the formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. Different types of manganese oxides [manganosite (MnO), bixbyite (Mn2O3), hausmannite (Mn3O4) and pyrolusite (MnO2)] were used as catalyst. The MnO catalysed glycine to cyclic (Gly)2, (Gly)2 and (Gly)3, and alanine, to cyclic (Ala)2 and (Ala)2. Mn3O4 also produced the same products but in lesser yield, while Mn2O3 and MnO2 produced cyclic anhydride of glycine and alanine with a trace amount of dimers and trimmers. Manganese of lower oxidation state is much more efficient in propagating the reaction than higher oxidation states. The possible mechanism of these reactions and the relevance of the results for the prebiotic chemistry are discussed.

  19. Microbial Iron Oxidation in the Arctic Tundra and Its Implications for Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jarrod J.; Benes, Joshua; Bowden, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The role that neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria play in the Arctic tundra is unknown. This study surveyed chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing communities at the North Slope of Alaska near Toolik Field Station (TFS) at Toolik Lake (lat 68.63, long −149.60). Microbial iron mats were common in submerged habitats with stationary or slowly flowing water, and their greatest areal extent is in coating plant stems and sediments in wet sedge meadows. Some Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) produce easily recognized sheath or stalk morphotypes that were present and dominant in all the mats we observed. The cool water temperatures (9 to 11°C) and reduced pH (5.0 to 6.6) at all sites kinetically favor microbial iron oxidation. A microbial survey of five sites based on 16S rRNA genes found a predominance of Proteobacteria, with Betaproteobacteria and members of the family Comamonadaceae being the most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs). In relative abundance, clades of lithotrophic FeOB composed 5 to 10% of the communities. OTUs related to cyanobacteria and chloroplasts accounted for 3 to 25% of the communities. Oxygen profiles showed evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis at the surface of some mats, indicating the coexistence of photosynthetic and FeOB populations. The relative abundance of OTUs belonging to putative Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) averaged around 11% in the sampled iron mats. Mats incubated anaerobically with 10 mM acetate rapidly initiated Fe reduction, indicating that active iron cycling is likely. The prevalence of iron mats on the tundra might impact the carbon cycle through lithoautotrophic chemosynthesis, anaerobic respiration of organic carbon coupled to iron reduction, and the suppression of methanogenesis, and it potentially influences phosphorus dynamics through the adsorption of phosphorus to iron oxides. PMID:26386054

  20. The Role of Dietary Protein and Fat in Glycaemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes: Implications for Intensive Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Megan; Bell, Kirstine J; O'Connell, Susan M; Smart, Carmel E; Shafat, Amir; King, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    A primary focus of the management of type 1 diabetes has been on matching prandial insulin therapy with carbohydrate amount consumed. However, even with the introduction of more flexible intensive insulin regimes, people with type 1 diabetes still struggle to achieve optimal glycaemic control. More recently, dietary fat and protein have been recognised as having a significant impact on postprandial blood glucose levels. Fat and protein independently increase the postprandial glucose excursions and together their effect is additive. This article reviews how the fat and protein in a meal impact the postprandial glycaemic response and discusses practical approaches to managing this in clinical practice. These insights have significant implications for patient education, mealtime insulin dose calculations and dosing strategies.

  1. Kinetic Stability of Proteins in Beans and Peas: Implications for Protein Digestibility, Seed Germination, and Plant Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke; Pittelli, Sandy; Church, Jennifer; Colón, Wilfredo

    2016-10-12

    Kinetically stable proteins (KSPs) are resistant to the denaturing detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Such resilience makes KSPs resistant to proteolytic degradation and may have arisen in nature as a mechanism for organismal adaptation and survival against harsh conditions. Legumes are well-known for possessing degradation-resistant proteins that often diminish their nutritional value. Here we applied diagonal two-dimensional (D2D) SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), a method that allows for the proteomics-level identification of KSPs, to a group of 12 legumes (mostly beans and peas) of agricultural and nutritional importance. Our proteomics results show beans that are more difficult to digest, such as soybean, lima beans, and various common beans, have high contents of KSPs. In contrast, mung bean, red lentil, and various peas that are highly digestible contain low amounts of KSPs. Identified proteins with high kinetic stability are associated with warm-season beans, which germinate at higher temperatures. In contrast, peas and red lentil, which are cool-season legumes, contain low levels of KSPs. Thus, our results show protein kinetic stability is an important factor in the digestibility of legume proteins and may relate to nutrition efficiency, timing of seed germination, and legume resistance to biotic stressors. Furthermore, we show D2D SDS-PAGE is a powerful method that could be applied for determining the abundance and identity of KSPs in engineered and wild legumes and for advancing basic research and associated applications.

  2. New insight into multifunctional role of peroxiredoxin family protein: Determination of DNA protection properties of bacterioferritin comigratory protein under hyperthermal and oxidative stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangmin, E-mail: taeinlee2011@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, 1 Kangwondaehak-gil, Chuncheon-si, Gangwon-do, 24341, South Korea (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jeong Min [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, 1 Kangwondaehak-gil, Chuncheon-si, Gangwon-do, 24341, South Korea (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Hyung Joong; Won, Jonghan [Advanced Nano Surface Research Group, Korea Basic Science Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hyun Suk, E-mail: hsjung@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, 1 Kangwondaehak-gil, Chuncheon-si, Gangwon-do, 24341, South Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-22

    Bacterioferritin comigratory protein (BCP) is a monomeric conformer acting as a putative thiol-dependent bacterial peroxidase, however molecular basis of DNA-protection via DNA-binding has not been clearly understood. In this study, we characterized the DNA binding properties of BCP using various lengths and differently shaped architectures of DNA. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and electron microscopy analysis showed that recombinant TkBCP bound to DNA of a circular shape (double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA) and a linear shape (16–1000 bp) as well as various architectures of DNA. In addition, DNA protection experiments indicated that TkBCP can protect DNA against hyperthermal and oxidative stress by removing highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) or by protecting DNA from thermal degradation. Based on these results, we suggest that TkBCP is a multi-functional DNA-binding protein which has DNA chaperon and antioxidant functions. - Highlights: • Bacterioferritin comigratory protein (BCP) protects DNA from oxidative stress by reducing ROS. • TkBCP does not only scavenge ROS, but also protect DNA from hyperthermal stress. • BCP potentially adopts the multi-functional role in DNA binding activities and anti-oxidant functions.

  3. New insight into multifunctional role of peroxiredoxin family protein: Determination of DNA protection properties of bacterioferritin comigratory protein under hyperthermal and oxidative stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangmin; Chung, Jeong Min; Yun, Hyung Joong; Won, Jonghan; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2016-01-01

    Bacterioferritin comigratory protein (BCP) is a monomeric conformer acting as a putative thiol-dependent bacterial peroxidase, however molecular basis of DNA-protection via DNA-binding has not been clearly understood. In this study, we characterized the DNA binding properties of BCP using various lengths and differently shaped architectures of DNA. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and electron microscopy analysis showed that recombinant TkBCP bound to DNA of a circular shape (double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA) and a linear shape (16–1000 bp) as well as various architectures of DNA. In addition, DNA protection experiments indicated that TkBCP can protect DNA against hyperthermal and oxidative stress by removing highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) or by protecting DNA from thermal degradation. Based on these results, we suggest that TkBCP is a multi-functional DNA-binding protein which has DNA chaperon and antioxidant functions. - Highlights: • Bacterioferritin comigratory protein (BCP) protects DNA from oxidative stress by reducing ROS. • TkBCP does not only scavenge ROS, but also protect DNA from hyperthermal stress. • BCP potentially adopts the multi-functional role in DNA binding activities and anti-oxidant functions.

  4. Oxidation and nitrosation of meat proteins under gastro-intestinal conditions: Consequences in terms of nutritional and health values of meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Pomélie, Diane; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Sayd, Thierry; Gatellier, Philippe

    2018-03-15

    The chemical changes (oxidation/nitrosation) of meat proteins during digestion lead to a decrease in their nutritional value. Moreover, oxidized and nitrosated amino acids are suspected to promote various human pathologies. To investigate the mechanisms and the kinetics of these endogenous protein modifications, we used a dynamic artificial digestive system (DIDGI®) that mimics the physicochemical conditions of digestion. The combined effect of meat cooking and endogenous addition of ascorbate and nitrite was evaluated on protein oxidation (by measuring carbonyl groups), protein nitrosation (by measuring nitrosamines), and proteolysis. Considerable carbonylation was observed in the digestive tract, especially under the acidic conditions of the stomach. Nitrosamines, caused by ammonia oxidation, were formed in conditions in which no nitrite was added, although the addition of nitrite in the model significantly increased their levels. Meat cooking and nitrite addition significantly decreased protein digestion. The interactions between all the changes affecting the proteins are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  6. Two-electron oxidation of cobalt phthalocyanines by thionyl chloride: Implications for lithium/thionyl chloride batteries. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, P.A.; Lever, A.B.

    1989-10-20

    Cyclic voltammetry, DPV and electronic spectroscopy are used to study the reaction between thionyl chloride and cobalt phthalocyanine. SOCl2 reacts with (Co(I)Tn Pc(2-)) and Co(II)Tn Pc(2-) to give two-electron oxidized species. Implications for Li/SOCl2 batteries are discussed. Thionyl chloride also forms a mono SOCl2 adduct with Co(II)TnPc(2-). Driving forces (Delta E values) were calculated for CoTnPc comproportionation and CoTnPc + SOCl2 reactions. Rest potential measurements of a Li/SOCl2 cells show that addition of AlCl3 stabilizes the LiCl product as LiAlCl4. A catalytic two-electron mechanism is indicated for the reduction of thionyl chloride in a Li/SOCl2/(CoTnPc,C) battery.

  7. C-Reactive Protein Impairs Dendritic Cell Development, Maturation, and Function: Implications for Peripheral Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel V. Jimenez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is the prototypical acute phase reactant, increasing in blood concentration rapidly and several-fold in response to inflammation. Recent evidence indicates that CRP has an important physiological role even at low, baseline levels, or in the absence of overt inflammation. For example, we have shown that human CRP inhibits the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in CRP transgenic mice by shifting CD4+ T cells away from the TH1 and toward the TH2 subset. Notably, this action required the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB, but did not require high levels of human CRP. Herein, we sought to determine if CRP’s influence in EAE might be explained by CRP acting on dendritic cells (DC; antigen presenting cells known to express FcγRIIB. We found that CRP (50 µg/ml reduced the yield of CD11c+ bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs and CRP (≥5 μg/ml prevented their full expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40. CRP also decreased the ability of BMDCs to stimulate antigen-driven proliferation of T cells in vitro. Importantly, if the BMDCs were genetically deficient in mouse FcγRIIB then (i the ability of CRP to alter BMDC surface phenotype and impair T cell proliferation was ablated and (ii CD11c-driven expression of a human FCGR2B transgene rescued the CRP effect. Lastly, the protective influence of CRP in EAE was fully restored in mice with CD11c-driven human FcγRIIB expression. These findings add to the growing evidence that CRP has important biological effects even in the absence of an acute phase response, i.e., CRP acts as a tonic suppressor of the adaptive immune system. The ability of CRP to suppress development, maturation, and function of DCs implicates CRP in the maintenance of peripheral T cell tolerance.

  8. Stress proteins and oxidative damage in a renal derived cell line exposed to inorganic mercury and lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacchiotti, Alessandra; Morandini, Fausta; Bettoni, Francesca; Schena, Ilaria; Lavazza, Antonio; Grigolato, Pier Giovanni; Apostoli, Pietro; Rezzani, Rita; Aleo, Maria Francesca

    2009-01-01

    A close link between stress protein up-regulation and oxidative damage may provide a novel therapeutic tool to counteract nephrotoxicity induced by toxic metals in the human population, mainly in children, of industrialized countries. Here we analysed the time course of the expression of several heat shock proteins, glucose-regulated proteins and metallothioneins in a rat proximal tubular cell line (NRK-52E) exposed to subcytotoxic doses of inorganic mercury and lead. Concomitantly, we used morphological and biochemical methods to evaluate metal-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative damage. In particular, as biochemical indicators of oxidative stress we detected reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS), total glutathione (GSH) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity. Our results clearly demonstrated that mercury increases ROS and RNS levels and the expressions of Hsp25 and inducible Hsp72. These findings are corroborated by evident mitochondrial damage, apoptosis or necrosis. By contrast, lead is unable to up-regulate Hsp72 but enhances Grp78 and activates nuclear Hsp25 translocation. Furthermore, lead causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, vacuolation and nucleolar segregation. Lastly, both metals stimulate the over-expression of MTs, but with a different time course. In conclusion, in NRK-52E cell line the stress response is an early and metal-induced event that correlates well with the direct oxidative damage induced by mercury. Indeed, different chaperones are involved in the specific nephrotoxic mechanism of these environmental pollutants and work together for cell survival.

  9. Locally Different Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Protein Levels in Ascending Aortic Aneurysms of Bicuspid and Tricuspid Aortic Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah A. Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Dysregulated expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS is observed in aortic aneurysms associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV. We determined eNOS protein levels in various areas in ascending aortic aneurysms. Methods and Results. Aneurysmal specimens were collected from 19 patients, 14 with BAV and 5 with tricuspid aortic valve (TAV. ENOS protein levels were measured in the outer curve (convexity, the opposite side (concavity, the distal and above the sinotubular junction (proximal aneurysm. Cultured aortic cells were treated with NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME and the amounts of 35 apoptosis-related proteins were determined. In patients with BAV, eNOS levels were significantly lower in the proximal aorta than in the concavity and distal aorta. ENOS protein levels were also lower in the convexity than in the concavity. While the convexity and distal aorta showed similar eNOS protein levels in BAV and TAV patients, levels were higher in TAV proximal aorta. Inhibition of NO synthesis in aneurysmal aortic cells by L-NAME led to a cytosolic increase in the levels of mitochondrial serine protease HTRA2/Omi. Conclusion. ENOS protein levels were varied at different areas of the aneurysmal aorta. The dysregulation of nitric oxide can lead to an increase in proapoptotic HTRA2/Omi.

  10. Analysis of electric moments of RNA-binding proteins: implications for mechanism and prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarai Akinori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-RNA interactions play important role in many biological processes such as gene regulation, replication, protein synthesis and virus assembly. Although many structures of various types of protein-RNA complexes have been determined, the mechanism of protein-RNA recognition remains elusive. We have earlier shown that the simplest electrostatic properties viz. charge, dipole and quadrupole moments, calculated from backbone atomic coordinates of proteins are biased relative to other proteins, and these quantities can be used to identify DNA-binding proteins. Closely related, RNA-binding proteins are investigated in this study. In particular, discrimination between various types of RNA-binding proteins, evolutionary conservation of these bulk electrostatic features and effect of conformational changes by complex formation are investigated. Basic binding mechanism of a putative RNA-binding protein (HI1333 from Haemophilus influenza is suggested as a potential application of this study. Results We found that similar to DNA-binding proteins (DBPs, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs also show significantly higher values of electric moments. However, higher moments in RBPs are found to strongly depend on their functional class: proteins binding to ribosomal RNA (rRNA constitute the only class with all three of the properties (charge, dipole and quadrupole moments being higher than control proteins. Neural networks were trained using leave-one-out cross-validation to predict RBPs from control data as well as pair-wise classification capacity between proteins binding to various RNA types. RBPs and control proteins reached up to 78% accuracy measured by the area under the ROC curve. Proteins binding to rRNA are found to be best distinguished (AUC = 79%. Changes in dipole and quadrupole moments between unbound and bound structures were small and these properties are found to be robust under complex formation. Conclusions Bulk electric

  11. The Influence of Hyperoxia On Heat Shock Proteins Expression and Nitric Oxide Synthase Activity – the Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szyller Jakub

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Any stay in an environment with an increased oxygen content (a higher oxygen partial pressure, pO2 and an increased pressure (hyperbaric conditions leads to an intensification of oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species (ROS damage the molecules of proteins, nucleic acids, cause lipid oxidation and are engaged in the development of numerous diseases, including diseases of the circulatory system, neurodegenerative diseases, etc. There are certain mechanisms of protection against unfavourable effects of oxidative stress. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems belong to them. The latter include, among others, heat shock proteins (HSP. Their precise role and mechanism of action have been a subject of intensive research conducted in recent years. Hyperoxia and hyperbaria also have an effect on the expression and activity of nitrogen oxide synthase (NOS. Its product - nitrogen oxide (NO can react with reactive oxygen species and contribute to the development of nitrosative stress. NOS occurs as isoforms in various tissues and exhibit different reactions to the discussed factors. The authors have prepared a brief review of research determining the effect of hyperoxia and hyperbaria on HSP expression and NOS activity.

  12. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  13. Metabolic Turnover of Synaptic Proteins: Kinetics, Interdependencies and Implications for Synaptic Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Laurie D.; Zuchman, Rina; Sorokina, Oksana; Müller, Anke; Dieterich, Daniela C.; Armstrong, J. Douglas; Ziv, Tamar; Ziv, Noam E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical synapses contain multitudes of proteins, which in common with all proteins, have finite lifetimes and therefore need to be continuously replaced. Given the huge numbers of synaptic connections typical neurons form, the demand to maintain the protein contents of these connections might be expected to place considerable metabolic demands on each neuron. Moreover, synaptic proteostasis might differ according to distance from global protein synthesis sites, the availability of distributed protein synthesis facilities, trafficking rates and synaptic protein dynamics. To date, the turnover kinetics of synaptic proteins have not been studied or analyzed systematically, and thus metabolic demands or the aforementioned relationships remain largely unknown. In the current study we used dynamic Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC), mass spectrometry (MS), Fluorescent Non–Canonical Amino acid Tagging (FUNCAT), quantitative immunohistochemistry and bioinformatics to systematically measure the metabolic half-lives of hundreds of synaptic proteins, examine how these depend on their pre/postsynaptic affiliation or their association with particular molecular complexes, and assess the metabolic load of synaptic proteostasis. We found that nearly all synaptic proteins identified here exhibited half-lifetimes in the range of 2–5 days. Unexpectedly, metabolic turnover rates were not significantly different for presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins, or for proteins for which mRNAs are consistently found in dendrites. Some functionally or structurally related proteins exhibited very similar turnover rates, indicating that their biogenesis and degradation might be coupled, a possibility further supported by bioinformatics-based analyses. The relatively low turnover rates measured here (∼0.7% of synaptic protein content per hour) are in good agreement with imaging-based studies of synaptic protein trafficking, yet indicate that the metabolic load

  14. Protective Effect of Surfactant Protein D in Pulmonary Vaccinia Virus Infection: Implication of A27 Viral Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Perino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV was used as a surrogate of variola virus (VARV (genus Orthopoxvirus, the causative agent of smallpox, to study Orthopoxvirus infection. VARV is principally transmitted between humans by aerosol droplets. Once inhaled, VARV first infects the respiratory tract where it could encounter surfactant components, such as soluble pattern recognition receptors. Surfactant protein D (SP-D, constitutively present in the lining fluids of the respiratory tract, plays important roles in innate host defense against virus infection. We investigated the role of SP-D in VACV infection and studied the A27 viral protein involvement in the interaction with SP-D. Interaction between SP-D and VACV caused viral inhibition in a lung cell model. Interaction of SP-D with VACV was mediated by the A27 viral protein. Binding required Ca2+ and interactions were blocked in the presence of excess of SP-D saccharide ligands. A27, which lacks glycosylation, directly interacted with SP-D. The interaction between SP-D and the viral particle was also observed using electron microscopy. Infection of mice lacking SP-D (SP-D-/- resulted in increased mortality compared to SP-D+/+ mice. Altogether, our data show that SP-D participates in host defense against the vaccinia virus infection and that the interaction occurs with the viral surface protein A27.

  15. Implications of red Panax ginseng in oxidative stress associated chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Mi Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The steaming process of Panax ginseng has been reported to increase its major known bioactive components, ginsenosides, and, therefore, its biological properties as compared to regular Panax ginseng. Biological functions of red Panax ginseng attenuating pro-oxidant environments associated with chronic diseases are of particular interest, since oxidative stress can be a key contributor to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Additionally, proper utilization of various biomarkers for evaluating antioxidant activities in natural products, such as ginseng, can also be important to providing validity to their activities. Thus, studies on the effects of red ginseng against various diseases as determined in cell lines, animal models, and humans were reviewed, along with applied biomarkers for verifying such effects. Limitations and future considerations of studying red ginseng were been discussed. Although further clinical studies are warranted, red ginseng appears to be beneficial for attenuating disease-associated symptoms via its antioxidant activities, as well as for preventing oxidative stress-associated chronic diseases.

  16. Beryllium Adsorption at Transition Aluminas: Implications for Environmental Science and Oxidation of Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-08-01

    It is demonstrated that?gamma- and?eta- aluminas (transition Al2O3 polytypes with defect spinel structure) can effectively capture beryllium atoms. Although the bulk crystal structures of these two oxides are characterized only by slight differences in cation vacancy distributions, the interaction of Be with the two polytypes are different. For gamma- Al2O3, the Be adsorption energy is high (~ 5 eV per atom), and all Be atoms are captured and trapped at the surface - all attempts to move Be in the subsurface region result in its expulsion back to the surface. On the other hand, for ?eta- alumina Be atoms can be captured both at the surface and in octahedrally-coordinated subsurface cation vacancies. This result implies that both alumina oxides could be successfully used for Be capture out of wastewater streams related to industrial processes of aluminum and alumina production. Also, the surface adsorption mechanism of Be at?gamma- Al2O3 explains why very small additions of Be (of the order of several ppm) to Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Si casting and wrought alloys prevent run-away oxidation of these materials in molten state, as well as ingot cracking. We also discuss possibilities to use other additives (e.g., Ca and Sr) yielding the same protective effect for aluminum alloys but which are less toxic than beryllium.

  17. Nitro-Oxidative Stress after Neuronal Ischemia Induces Protein Nitrotyrosination and Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tajes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is an acute vascular event that obstructs blood supply to the brain, producing irreversible damage that affects neurons but also glial and brain vessel cells. Immediately after the stroke, the ischemic tissue produces nitric oxide (NO to recover blood perfusion but also produces superoxide anion. These compounds interact, producing peroxynitrite, which irreversibly nitrates protein tyrosines. The present study measured NO production in a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, a murine glial (BV2, a human endothelial cell line (HUVEC, and in primary cultures of human cerebral myocytes (HC-VSMCs after experimental ischemia in vitro. Neuronal, endothelial, and inducible NO synthase (NOS expression was also studied up to 24 h after ischemia, showing a different time course depending on the NOS type and the cells studied. Finally, we carried out cell viability experiments on SH-SY5Y cells with H2O2, a prooxidant agent, and with a NO donor to mimic ischemic conditions. We found that both compounds were highly toxic when they interacted, producing peroxynitrite. We obtained similar results when all cells were challenged with peroxynitrite. Our data suggest that peroxynitrite induces cell death and is a very harmful agent in brain ischemia.

  18. DNA-hosted copper nanoclusters/graphene oxide based fluorescent biosensor for protein kinase activity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengke; Lin, Zihan; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Shan; Liu, Hua; Su, Xingguang

    2018-07-05

    A novel fluorescent biosensor for protein kinase activity (PKA) detection was designed by applying double-strands DNA-hosted copper nanoclusters (dsDNA-CuNCs) and graphene oxide (GO). One DNA strand of the dsDNA consisted of two domains, one domain can hybridize with another complementary DNA strand to stabilize the fluorescent CuNCs and another domain was adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) aptamer. ATP aptamer of the dsDNA-CuNCs would be spontaneously absorbed onto the GO surface through π-π stacking interactions. Thus GO can efficiently quench the fluorescence (FL) of dsDNA-CuNCs through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In the present of ATP, ATP specifically combined with ATP aptamer to form ATP-ATP aptamer binding complexes, which had much less affinity to GO, resulting in the fluorescence recovery of the system. Nevertheless, in the presence of PKA, ATP could be translated into ADP and ADP could not combine with ATP aptamer resulting in the fluorescence quenching of dsDNA-CuNCs again. According to the change of the fluorescence signal, PKA activity could be successfully monitored in the range of 0.1-5.0 U mL -1 with a detection limit (LOD) of 0.039 U mL -1 . Besides, the inhibitory effect of H-89 on PKA activity was studied. The sensor was performed for PKA activity detection in cell lysates with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidation of protein tyrosine or methionine residues: From the amino acid to the peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berges, J [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7616, Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, 75005 Paris (France); Trouillas, P [EA 4021 Faculte de Pharmacie, 2 Rue du Dr. Marcland, 87025 Limoges Cedex (France); Houee-Levin, C, E-mail: jb@lct.jussieu.fr, E-mail: patrick.trouillas@unilim.fr, E-mail: chantal.houee@u-psud.fr [Universite Paris Sud, UMR 8000, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, 91405 Orsay (France) (France)

    2011-01-01

    Methionine and tyrosine are competing targets of oxidizing free radicals in peptides or proteins. The first step is the addition of OH radicals either on the sulphur atom of methionine, followed by OH{sup -} elimination, or on the aromatic cycle of tyrosine. The next step can be stabilization of methionine radical cation by a two centre-three electron bond, or intramolecular electron transfer from tyrosine to the methionine radical cation. In this latter case a tyrosine radical is formed, which appears deprotonated. In a first step we have compared the stability of the OH radical adducts on Methionine or on Tyrosine. In agreement with experimental results, the thermodynamical data indicate that the OH adduct on Tyrosine and the radical cation are more stable than those on methionine. In a second step we have investigated the stabilization of the radical cations of Methionine by formation of intramolecular S:X two-center three-electron bond (X=S, N, O). Finally we have compared the spin densities on separated amino acids to that in a radical pentapeptide, methionine enkephalin. One observes a delocalisation of the orbital of the odd electron on the sulfur atom of Met and on the cycle of Tyr. The peptidic chain is also concerned.

  20. Oxidation of protein tyrosine or methionine residues: From the amino acid to the peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berges, J; Trouillas, P; Houee-Levin, C

    2011-01-01

    Methionine and tyrosine are competing targets of oxidizing free radicals in peptides or proteins. The first step is the addition of OH radicals either on the sulphur atom of methionine, followed by OH - elimination, or on the aromatic cycle of tyrosine. The next step can be stabilization of methionine radical cation by a two centre-three electron bond, or intramolecular electron transfer from tyrosine to the methionine radical cation. In this latter case a tyrosine radical is formed, which appears deprotonated. In a first step we have compared the stability of the OH radical adducts on Methionine or on Tyrosine. In agreement with experimental results, the thermodynamical data indicate that the OH adduct on Tyrosine and the radical cation are more stable than those on methionine. In a second step we have investigated the stabilization of the radical cations of Methionine by formation of intramolecular S:X two-center three-electron bond (X=S, N, O). Finally we have compared the spin densities on separated amino acids to that in a radical pentapeptide, methionine enkephalin. One observes a delocalisation of the orbital of the odd electron on the sulfur atom of Met and on the cycle of Tyr. The peptidic chain is also concerned.

  1. Cloning, expression, and characterization of recombinant nitric oxide synthase-like protein from Bacillus anthracis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midha, Shuchi; Mishra, Rajeev; Aziz, M.A.; Sharma, Meenakshi; Mishra, Ashish; Khandelwal, Puneet; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is amongst a family of evolutionarily conserved enzymes, involved in a multi-turnover process that results in NO as a product. The significant role of NO in various pathological and physiological processes has created an interest in this enzyme from several perspectives. This study describes for the first time, cloning and expression of a NOS-like protein, baNOS, from Bacillus anthracis, a pathogenic bacterium responsible for causing anthrax. baNOS was expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble and catalytically active enzyme. Homology models generated for baNOS indicated that the key structural features that are involved in the substrate and active site interaction have been highly conserved. Further, the behavior of baNOS in terms of heme-substrate interactions and heme-transitions was studied in detail. The optical perturbation spectra of the heme domain demonstrated that the ligands perturb the heme site in a ligand specific manner. baNOS forms a five-coordinate, high-spin complex with L-arginine analogs and a six-coordinate low-spin complex with inhibitor imidazole. Studies indicated that the binding of L-arginine, N ω -hydroxy-L-arginine, and imidazole produces various spectroscopic species that closely correspond to the equivalent complexes of mammalian NOS. The values of spectral binding constants further corroborated these results. The overall conservation of the key structural features and the correlation of heme-substrate interactions in baNOS and mammalian NOS, thus, point towards an interesting phenomenon of convergent evolution. Importantly, the NO generated by NOS of mammalian macrophages plays a potent role in antimicrobicidal activity. Because of the existence of high structural and behavioral similarity between mammalian NOS and baNOS, we propose that NO produced by B. anthracis may also have a pivotal pathophysiological role in anthrax infection. Therefore, this first report of characterization of a NOS-like protein

  2. A Drosophila protein family implicated in pheromone perception is related to Tay-Sachs GM2-activator protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostina, Elena; Xu, Aiguo; Lin, Heping; Pikielny, Claudio W

    2009-01-02

    Low volatility, lipid-like cuticular hydrocarbon pheromones produced by Drosophila melanogaster females play an essential role in triggering and modulating mating behavior, but the chemosensory mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Recently, we showed that the CheB42a protein, which is expressed in only 10 pheromone-sensing taste hairs on the front legs of males, modulates progression to late stages of male courtship behavior in response to female-specific cuticular hydrocarbons. Here we report that expression of all 12 genes in the CheB gene family is predominantly or exclusively gustatory-specific, and occurs in many different, often non-overlapping patterns. Only the Gr family of gustatory receptor genes displays a comparable variety of gustatory-specific expression patterns. Unlike Grs, however, expression of all but one CheB gene is sexually dimorphic. Like CheB42a, other CheBs may therefore function specifically in gustatory perception of pheromones. We also show that CheBs belong to the ML superfamily of lipid-binding proteins, and are most similar to human GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP). In particular, GM2-AP residues involved in ligand binding are conserved in CheBs but not in other ML proteins. Finally, CheB42a is specifically secreted into the inner lumen of pheromone-sensing taste hairs, where pheromones interact with membrane-bound receptors. We propose that CheB proteins interact directly with lipid-like Drosophila pheromones and modulate their detection by the gustatory signal transduction machinery. Furthermore, as loss of GM2-AP in Tay-Sachs disease prevents degradation of GM2 gangliosides and results in neurodegeneration, the function of CheBs in pheromone response may involve biochemical mechanisms critical for lipid metabolism in human neurons.

  3. A Drosophila Protein Family Implicated in Pheromone Perception Is Related to Tay-Sachs GM2-Activator Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostina, Elena; Xu, Aiguo; Lin, Heping; Pikielny, Claudio W.

    2009-01-01

    Low volatility, lipid-like cuticular hydrocarbon pheromones produced by Drosophila melanogaster females play an essential role in triggering and modulating mating behavior, but the chemosensory mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Recently, we showed that the CheB42a protein, which is expressed in only 10 pheromone-sensing taste hairs on the front legs of males, modulates progression to late stages of male courtship behavior in response to female-specific cuticular hydrocarbons. Here we report that expression of all 12 genes in the CheB gene family is predominantly or exclusively gustatory-specific, and occurs in many different, often non-overlapping patterns. Only the Gr family of gustatory receptor genes displays a comparable variety of gustatory-specific expression patterns. Unlike Grs, however, expression of all but one CheB gene is sexually dimorphic. Like CheB42a, other CheBs may therefore function specifically in gustatory perception of pheromones. We also show that CheBs belong to the ML superfamily of lipid-binding proteins, and are most similar to human GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP). In particular, GM2-AP residues involved in ligand binding are conserved in CheBs but not in other ML proteins. Finally, CheB42a is specifically secreted into the inner lumen of pheromone-sensing taste hairs, where pheromones interact with membrane-bound receptors. We propose that CheB proteins interact directly with lipid-like Drosophila pheromones and modulate their detection by the gustatory signal transduction machinery. Furthermore, as loss of GM2-AP in Tay-Sachs disease prevents degradation of GM2 gangliosides and results in neurodegeneration, the function of CheBs in pheromone response may involve biochemical mechanisms critical for lipid metabolism in human neurons. PMID:18952610

  4. Seasonal variability of oxidative stress markers in city bus drivers – Part II: Oxidative damage to lipids and proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Švecová, Vlasta; Milcová, Alena; Lněničková, Zdena; Solanský, I.; Šrám, Radim

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 642, 1-2 (2008), s. 21-27 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Air pollution * Oxidative stress * Bus drivers Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2008

  5. Fiber-bound nitrogen in gorilla diets: implications for estimating dietary protein intake of primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Jessica M; Chapman, Colin A; Pell, Alice N

    2008-07-01

    Protein is essential for living organisms, but digestibility of crude protein is poorly understood and difficult to predict. Nitrogen is used to estimate protein content because nitrogen is a component of the amino acids that comprise protein, but a substantial portion of the nitrogen in plants may be bound to fiber in an indigestible form. To estimate the amount of crude protein that is unavailable in the diets of mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei) in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, foods routinely eaten were analyzed to determine the amount of nitrogen bound to the acid-detergent fiber residue. The amount of fiber-bound nitrogen varied among plant parts: herbaceous leaves 14.5+/-8.9% (reported as a percentage of crude protein on a dry matter (DM) basis), tree leaves (16.1+/-6.7% DM), pith/herbaceous peel (26.2+/-8.9% DM), fruit (34.7+/-17.8% DM), bark (43.8+/-15.6% DM), and decaying wood (85.2+/-14.6% DM). When crude protein and available protein intake of adult gorillas was estimated over a year, 15.1% of the dietary crude protein was indigestible. These results indicate that the proportion of fiber-bound protein in primate diets should be considered when estimating protein intake, food selection, and food/habitat quality.

  6. Counteraction of urea-induced protein denaturation by trimethylamine N-oxide: a chemical chaperone at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennion, Brian J; Daggett, Valerie

    2004-04-27

    Proteins are very sensitive to their solvent environments. Urea is a common chemical denaturant of proteins, yet some animals contain high concentrations of urea. These animals have evolved an interesting mechanism to counteract the effects of urea by using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The molecular basis for the ability of TMAO to act as a chemical chaperone remains unknown. Here, we describe molecular dynamics simulations of a small globular protein, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, in 8 M urea and 4 M TMAO/8 M urea solutions, in addition to other control simulations, to investigate this effect at the atomic level. In 8 M urea, the protein unfolds, and urea acts in both a direct and indirect manner to achieve this effect. In contrast, introduction of 4 M TMAO counteracts the effect of urea and the protein remains well structured. TMAO makes few direct interactions with the protein. Instead, it prevents unfolding of the protein by structuring the solvent. In particular, TMAO orders the solvent and discourages it from competing with intraprotein H bonds and breaking up the hydrophobic core of the protein.

  7. Molecular Recognition of PTS-1 Cargo Proteins by Pex5p: Implications for Protein Mistargeting in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Mesa-Torres

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1, where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3–4 orders of magnitude reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state.

  8. Implication of oxidative stress in size-dependent toxicity of silica nanoparticles in kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passagne, Isabelle; Morille, Marie; Rousset, Marine; Pujalté, Igor; L'azou, Béatrice

    2012-09-28

    Silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO(2)) are one of the most popular nanomaterials used in industrial manufacturing, synthesis, engineering and medicine. While inhalation of nanoparticles causes pulmonary damage, nano-SiO(2) can be transported into the blood and deposit in target organs where they exert potential toxic effects. Kidney is considered as such a secondary target organ. However, toxicological information of their effect on renal cells and the mechanisms involved remain sparse. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of nano-SiO(2) of different sizes was investigated on two renal proximal tubular cell lines (human HK-2 and porcine LLC-PK(1)). The molecular pathways involved were studied with a focus on the involvement of oxidative stress. Nanoparticle characterization was performed (primary nanoparticle size, surface area, dispersion) in order to investigate a potential relationship between their physical properties and their toxic effects. Firstly, evidence of particle internalization was obtained by transmission electron microscopy and conventional flux cytometry techniques. The use of specific inhibitors of endocytosis pathways showed an internalization process by macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis for 100 nm nano-SiO(2) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were localized in vesicles. Toxicity was size- and time-dependent (24h, 48 h, 72 h). Indeed, it increased as nanoparticles became smaller. Secondly, analysis of oxidative stress based on the assessment of ROS (reactive oxygen species) production (DHE, dihydroethidium) or lipid peroxidation (MDA, malondialdehyde) clearly demonstrated the involvement of oxidative stress in the toxicity of 20 nm nano-SiO(2). The induction of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, GSTpi, thioredoxin reductase) could explain their lesser toxicity with 100 nm nano-SiO(2). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Implication of oxidative stress in size-dependent toxicity of silica nanoparticles in kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passagne, Isabelle; Morille, Marie; Rousset, Marine; Pujalté, Igor; L’Azou, Béatrice

    2012-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO 2 ) are one of the most popular nanomaterials used in industrial manufacturing, synthesis, engineering and medicine. While inhalation of nanoparticles causes pulmonary damage, nano-SiO 2 can be transported into the blood and deposit in target organs where they exert potential toxic effects. Kidney is considered as such a secondary target organ. However, toxicological information of their effect on renal cells and the mechanisms involved remain sparse. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of nano-SiO 2 of different sizes was investigated on two renal proximal tubular cell lines (human HK-2 and porcine LLC-PK 1 ). The molecular pathways involved were studied with a focus on the involvement of oxidative stress. Nanoparticle characterization was performed (primary nanoparticle size, surface area, dispersion) in order to investigate a potential relationship between their physical properties and their toxic effects. Firstly, evidence of particle internalization was obtained by transmission electron microscopy and conventional flux cytometry techniques. The use of specific inhibitors of endocytosis pathways showed an internalization process by macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis for 100 nm nano-SiO 2 nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were localized in vesicles. Toxicity was size- and time-dependent (24 h, 48 h, 72 h). Indeed, it increased as nanoparticles became smaller. Secondly, analysis of oxidative stress based on the assessment of ROS (reactive oxygen species) production (DHE, dihydroethidium) or lipid peroxidation (MDA, malondialdehyde) clearly demonstrated the involvement of oxidative stress in the toxicity of 20 nm nano-SiO 2 . The induction of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, GSTpi, thioredoxin reductase) could explain their lesser toxicity with 100 nm nano-SiO 2 .

  10. Less stress, more success? Oncological implications of surgery-induced oxidative stress.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, D P

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) possess important cell signalling properties. This contradicts traditional thought which associated ROS activity with cell death. Emerging evidence clearly demonstrates that ROS signalling acts as a key regulator in tumour cell survival and in the cellular processes required for tumour cells to successfully metastasise and proliferate. The discovery of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) family of enzymes in the last decade has unravelled much of the mystery surrounding how ROS are generated. Tumour cells are now known to express Nox enzymes which produce ROS required for cellular signalling. Activation of Nox enzymes occurs via interaction with proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, all of which are released following surgical trauma. As our understanding of the signalling capabilities of ROS grows, the oncological implications of ROS activity are gradually being revealed. Nox-derived ROS are known to play a central role in each step of the metastatic cascade including invasion, adhesion, angiogenesis and proliferation. This article describes how surgery creates a ROS-rich environment, which facilitates redox signalling, and also examines the role played by Nox enzymes in this process. The authors then explore current knowledge of the oncological implications of surgery-induced redox signalling, and discuss current and future therapeutic strategies targeted at ROS and Nox enzymes in cancer patients.

  11. Toxicity of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Research strategies and implications for nanomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lei; Jiang Ling-Ling; Zeng Yun; Liu Gang

    2013-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are one of the most versatile and safe nanoparticles in a wide variety of biomedical applications. In the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the potential adverse biological effects and safety issues associated with SPIONs, which is essential for the development of next-generation SPIONs and for continued progress in translational research. In this mini review, we summarize recent developments in toxicity studies on SPIONs, focusing on the relationship between the physicochemical properties of SPIONs and their induced toxic biological responses for a better toxicological understanding of SPIONs. (topical review - magnetism, magnetic materials, and interdisciplinary research)

  12. Regulation of Cytokine Production by the Unfolded Protein Response; Implications for Infection and Autoimmunity

    OpenAIRE

    Judith A. Smith; Judith A. Smith

    2018-01-01

    Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential cell function. To safeguard this process in the face of environmental threats and internal stressors, cells mount an evolutionarily conserved response known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Invading pathogens induce cellular stress that impacts protein folding, thus the UPR is well situated to sense danger and contribute to immune responses. Cytokines (inflammatory cytokines and interferons) critically mediate host defen...

  13. Identification, immunolocalization, and immunological characterization of nitric oxide synthase-interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Meng; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yanquan; Chen, Wenjun; Zhou, Chenhui; Chen, Xueqing; He, Lei; Xu, Jin; Liang, Chi; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-05-01

    Recently, accumulating evidences indicate that nitric oxide (NO) is a potent mediator with diverse roles in regulating cellular functions, signaling pathways, and variety of pathological processes. In the present study, using data from the published genomic for Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), we investigated a gene encoding nitric oxide synthase-interacting protein (NOSIP) of C. sinensis. Recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli BL21. The open reading frame of CsNOSIP comprises 867 bp which encodes 289 amino acids and shares 72.9, 45.2, 47, 46.4, and 45.8% identity with NOSIP from Schistosoma mansoni, Xenopus laevis, Rattus norvegicus, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the full-length sequence contains an eNOS-interacting domain and numerous B-cell epitopes. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that CsNOSIP differentially transcribed throughout the adult worms, metacercariae, and egg stages of C. sinensis, and were highly expressed in the adult worms. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that the rCsNOSIP could be detected by the serum from BALB/c mice infected with C. sinensis and the serum from BALB/c mice immunized with excretory/secretory products (ESPs). Furthermore, immunolocalization assay showed that CsNOSIP was specifically localized in the intestine, vitellarium, and eggs of adult worm. Both immunoblot and immunolocalization results demonstrated that CsNOSIP was one component of ESPs of C. sinensis, which could be supported by SignalP analysis. Moreover, analysis of the antibody subclass and cytokine profile demonstrated that subcutaneously immunized BALB/c mice with rCsNOSIP could significantly enhance serum IgG1 level and up-regulate expression of IL-4 and IL-6 in the splenocytes. Our results suggested that CsNOSIP was an important antigen exposed to host immune system and probably involved in immune regulation of host by inducing Th2-polarized immune response.

  14. Sample Stability and Protein Composition of Saliva: Implications for Its Use as a Diagnostic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Roelofsen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliva is an easy accessible plasma ultra-filtrate. Therefore, saliva can be an attractive alternative to blood for measurement of diagnostic protein markers. Our aim was to determine stability and protein composition of saliva. Protein stability at room temperature was examined by incubating fresh whole saliva with and without inhibitors of proteases and bacterial metabolism followed by Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization (SELDI analyses. Protein composition was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE fractionation of saliva proteins followed by digestion of excised bands and identification by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Results show that rapid protein degradation occurs within 30 minutes after sample collection. Degradation starts already during collection. Protease inhibitors partly prevented degradation while inhibition of bacterial metabolism did not affect degradation. Three stable degradation products of 2937 Da, 3370 Da and 4132 Da were discovered which can be used as markers to monitor sample quality. Saliva proteome analyses revealed 218 proteins of which 84 can also be found in blood plasma. Based on a comparison with seven other proteomics studies on whole saliva we identified 83 new saliva proteins. We conclude that saliva is a promising diagnostic fl uid when precautions are taken towards protein breakdown.

  15. Improvement of uptake of chrome tan on hide protein by basic oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashya, E.H.A.; Aggiagh, A.E.; Khedra, M.H.; El-Sayeda, N.H.E.

    2005-01-01

    Three basic oxides were used to improve uptake of chrome tan as well as shrinkage temperature of the tanned leather. In addition, the skin quality is one of the most important factors taking into consideration. Three basic oxides, named magnesium oxide, manganese oxide and sodium bicarbonate. The process was optimized taking into the account the shaking rate, chrome concentration (%), initial ph, basic oxides concentration, temperature and contact time. The optimum conditions for exhaustion, fixation, shrinkage temperature as well as skin quality showed that agitation rate of 150 rpm, chrome concentration of 16%, initial ph of 2.5, basic oxide concentration of 4% magnesium oxide, temperature of 35 degree C and contact time of 24 hr. The best results obtained are 88% exhaustion, 90.03% fixation and 109 degree C shrinkage temperature in aqueous medium

  16. High-resolution imaging of redox signaling in live cells through an oxidation-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Labate, Valentina; Mele, Marina

    2008-01-01

    We present the application of a redox-sensitive mutant of the yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) to image, with elevated sensitivity and high temporal and spatial resolution, oxidative responses of eukaryotic cells to pathophysiological stimuli. The method presented, based on the ratiometric...... quantitation of the distribution of fluorescence by confocal microscopy, allows us to draw real-time "redox maps" of adherent cells and to score subtle changes in the intracellular redox state, such as those induced by overexpression of redox-active proteins. This strategy for in vivo imaging of redox...

  17. Cigarette smoking impairs nitric oxide-mediated cerebral blood flow increase: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Toda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral blood flow is mainly regulated by nitrergic (parasympathetic, postganglionic nerves and nitric oxide (NO liberated from endothelial cells in response to shear stress and stretch of vasculature, whereas sympathetic vasoconstrictor control is quite weak. On the other hand, peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow are mainly controlled by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves; endothelium-derived NO and nitrergic nerves play some roles as vasodilator factors. Cigarette smoking impairs NO synthesis in cerebral vascular endothelial cells and nitrergic nerves leading to interference with cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in the brain. Smoking-induced cerebral hypoperfusion is induced by impairment of synthesis and actions of NO via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/neuronal NOS (nNOS inhibition and by increased production of oxygen radicals, resulting in decreased actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle. Nicotine acutely and chronically impairs the action of endothelial NO and also inhibits nitrergic nerve function in chronic use. Impaired cerebral blood supply promotes the synthesis of amyloid β that accelerates blood flow decrease. This vicious cycle is thought to be one of the important factors involving in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Quitting smoking is undoubtedly one of the important ways to prevent and delay the genesis or slow the progress of impaired cognitive function and AD.

  18. Oxidant enhancement in martian dust devils and storms: implications for life and habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Sushil K; Wong, Ah-San; Renno, Nilton O; Farrell, William M; Delory, Gregory T; Sentman, Davis D; Cummer, Steven A; Marshall, John R; Rafkin, Scot C R; Catling, David C

    2006-06-01

    We investigate a new mechanism for producing oxidants, especially hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), on Mars. Large-scale electrostatic fields generated by charged sand and dust in the martian dust devils and storms, as well as during normal saltation, can induce chemical changes near and above the surface of Mars. The most dramatic effect is found in the production of H2O2 whose atmospheric abundance in the "vapor" phase can exceed 200 times that produced by photochemistry alone. With large electric fields, H2O2 abundance gets large enough for condensation to occur, followed by precipitation out of the atmosphere. Large quantities of H2O2 would then be adsorbed into the regolith, either as solid H2O2 "dust" or as re-evaporated vapor if the solid does not survive as it diffuses from its production region close to the surface. We suggest that this H2O2, or another superoxide processed from it in the surface, may be responsible for scavenging organic material from Mars. The presence of H2O2 in the surface could also accelerate the loss of methane from the atmosphere, thus requiring a larger source for maintaining a steady-state abundance of methane on Mars. The surface oxidants, together with storm electric fields and the harmful ultraviolet radiation that readily passes through the thin martian atmosphere, are likely to render the surface of Mars inhospitable to life as we know it.

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Asthma: Implications for Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hemachandra Reddy

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a complex, inflammatory disorder characterized by airflow obstruction of variable degrees, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, and airway inflammation. Asthma is caused by environmental factors and a combination of genetic and environmental stimuli. Genetic studies have revealed that multiple loci are involved in the etiology of asthma. Recent cellular, molecular, and animal-model studies have revealed several cellular events that are involved in the progression of asthma, including: increased Th2 cytokines leading to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the airway, and an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial dysfunction in the activated inflammatory cells, leading to tissue injury in the bronchial epithelium. Further, aging and animal model studies have revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are involved and play a large role in asthma. Recent studies using experimental allergic asthmatic mouse models and peripheral cells and tissues from asthmatic humans have revealed antioxidants as promising treatments for people with asthma. This article summarizes the latest research findings on the involvement of inflammatory changes, and mitochondrial dysfunction/oxidative stress in the development and progression of asthma. This article also addresses the relationship between aging and age-related immunity in triggering asthma, the antioxidant therapeutic strategies in treating people with asthma.

  20. Factors influencing the oxidation of cysteamine and other thiols: implications for hyperthermic sensitization and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaglow, J.E.; Issels, R.W.; Gerweck, L.E.; Varnes, M.E.; Jacobson, B.; Mittchell, J.B.; Russo, A.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the factors influencing the oxygen uptake and peroxide formation for cysteamine (MEA) and other thiols in serum-supplemented modified McCoy's 5A, a well-known medium used to cultivate a variety of cells in vitro, have been studied. The oxidation of MEA and cysteine in modified McCoy's 5A has been compared with that in Ham's F-12, MEM, and phosphate-buffered saline. The ability to produce peroxide is dependent upon the temperature, the concentration of thiol, the presence of copper ions, and pH of the medium. Catalase also reduces the oxygen uptake for all thiols. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was found to stimulate the oxygen uptake in the case of MEA and cysteine, but had little or no effect with DTT and glutathione. The combined presence of SOD and catalase resulted in less inhibition of oxygen uptake than that obtained by catalase alone. Alkaline pH was found to enhance the oxidation of cysteine and MEA. The results indicate that many problems may arise when thiols are added to various media. A major consideration is concerned with the production of peroxide, superoxide, and reduced trace metal intermediates. The presence of these intermediates may result in the production of hydroxyl radical intermediates as well as the eventual oxygen depletion from the medium

  1. Clay mineral formation under oxidized conditions and implications for paleoenvironments and organic preservation on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainey, Seth R; Hausrath, Elisabeth M; Adcock, Christopher T; Tschauner, Oliver; Hurowitz, Joel A; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Xiao, Yuming; Bartlett, Courtney L

    2017-11-01

    Clay mineral-bearing locations have been targeted for martian exploration as potentially habitable environments and as possible repositories for the preservation of organic matter. Although organic matter has been detected at Gale Crater, Mars, its concentrations are lower than expected from meteoritic and indigenous igneous and hydrothermal reduced carbon. We conducted synthesis experiments motivated by the hypothesis that some clay mineral formation may have occurred under oxidized conditions conducive to the destruction of organics. Previous work has suggested that anoxic and/or reducing conditions are needed to synthesize the Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite at low temperatures. In contrast, our experiments demonstrated the rapid formation of Fe-rich clay minerals of variable crystallinity from aqueous Fe 3+ with small amounts of aqueous Mg 2+ . Our results suggest that Fe-rich clay minerals such as nontronite can form rapidly under oxidized conditions, which could help explain low concentrations of organics within some smectite-containing rocks or sediments on Mars.

  2. Androgen Induces Adaptation to Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Treatment with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jehonathan H. Pinthus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for prostate cancer (PC. The postulated mechanism of action for radiation therapy is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Adjuvant androgen deprivation (AD therapy has been shown to confer a survival advantage over radiation alone in high-risk localized PC. However, the mechanism of this interaction is unclear. We hypothesize that androgens modify the radioresponsiveness of PC through the regulation of cellular oxidative homeostasis. Using androgen receptor (AR+ 22rv1 and AR− PC3 human PC cell lines, we demonstrated that testosterone increased basal reactive oxygen species (bROS levels, resulting in dose-dependent activation of phospho-p38 and pAKT, increased expression of clusterin, catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase. Similar data were obtained in three human PC xenografts; WISH-PC14, WISH-PC23, CWR22, growing in testosterone-supplemented or castrated SCID mice. These effects were reversible through AD or through incubation with a reducing agent. Moreover, testosterone increased the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutases, glutathione reductase. Consequently, AD significantly facilitated the response of AR+ cells to oxidative stress challenge. Thus, testosterone induces a preset cellular adaptation to radiation through the generation of elevated bROS, which is modified by AD. These findings provide a rational for combined hormonal and radiation therapy for localized PC.

  3. Clay mineral formation under oxidized conditions and implications for paleoenvironments and organic preservation on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gainey, Seth R.; Hausrath, Elisabeth M.; Adcock, Christopher T.; Tschauner, Oliver; Hurowitz, Joel A.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Xiao, Yuming; Bartlett, Courtney L. (CIW); (UNLV); (CIT); (SBU)

    2017-11-01

    Clay mineral-bearing locations have been targeted for martian exploration as potentially habitable environments and as possible repositories for the preservation of organic matter. Although organic matter has been detected at Gale Crater, Mars, its concentrations are lower than expected from meteoritic and indigenous igneous and hydrothermal reduced carbon. We conducted synthesis experiments motivated by the hypothesis that some clay mineral formation may have occurred under oxidized conditions conducive to the destruction of organics. Previous work has suggested that anoxic and/or reducing conditions are needed to synthesize the Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite at low temperatures. In contrast, our experiments demonstrated the rapid formation of Fe-rich clay minerals of variable crystallinity from aqueous Fe3+ with small amounts of aqueous Mg2+. Our results suggest that Fe-rich clay minerals such as nontronite can form rapidly under oxidized conditions, which could help explain low concentrations of organics within some smectite-containing rocks or sediments on Mars.

  4. A Bacterial Biosensor for Oxidative Stress Using the Constitutively Expressed Redox-Sensitive Protein roGFP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Arias-Barreiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A highly specific, high throughput-amenable bacterial biosensor for chemically induced cellular oxidation was developed using constitutively expressed redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein roGFP2 in E. coli (E. coli-roGFP2. Disulfide formation between two key cysteine residues of roGFP2 was assessed using a double-wavelength ratiometric approach. This study demonstrates that only a few minutes were required to detect oxidation using E. coli-roGFP2, in contrast to conventional bacterial oxidative stress sensors. Cellular oxidation induced by hydrogen peroxide, menadione, sodium selenite, zinc pyrithione, triphenyltin and naphthalene became detectable after 10 seconds and reached the maxima between 80 to 210 seconds, contrary to Cd2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, Zn2+ and sodium arsenite, which induced the oxidation maximum immediately. The lowest observable effect concentrations (in ppm were determined as 1.0 x 10−7 (arsenite, 1.0 x 10−4 (naphthalene, 1.0 x 10−4 (Cu2+, 3.8 x 10−4 (H2O2, 1.0 x 10−3 (Cd2+, 1.0 x 10−3 (Zn2+, 1.0 x 10−2 (menadione, 1.0 (triphenyltin, 1.56 (zinc pyrithione, 3.1 (selenite and 6.3 (Pb2+, respectively. Heavy metal-induced oxidation showed unclear response patterns, whereas concentration-dependent sigmoid curves were observed for other compounds. In vivo GSH content and in vitro roGFP2 oxidation assays together with E. coli-roGFP2 results suggest that roGFP2 is sensitive to redox potential change and thiol modification induced by environmental stressors. Based on redox-sensitive technology, E. coli-roGFP2 provides a fast comprehensive detection system for toxicants that induce cellular oxidation.

  5. A novel Geobacteraceae-specific outer membrane protein J (OmpJ is essential for electron transport to Fe (III and Mn (IV oxides in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiffer Marianne

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metal reduction is thought to take place at or near the bacterial outer membrane and, thus, outer membrane proteins in the model dissimilatory metal-reducing organism Geobacter sulfurreducens are of interest to understand the mechanisms of Fe(III reduction in the Geobacter species that are the predominant Fe(III reducers in many environments. Previous studies have implicated periplasmic and outer membrane cytochromes in electron transfer to metals. Here we show that the most abundant outer membrane protein of G. sulfurreducens, OmpJ, is not a cytochrome yet it is required for metal respiration. Results When outer membrane proteins of G. sulfurreducens were separated via SDS-PAGE, one protein, designated OmpJ (outer membrane protein J, was particularly abundant. The encoding gene, which was identified from mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments, is present in other Geobacteraceae, but not in organisms outside this family. The predicted localization and structure of the OmpJ protein suggested that it was a porin. Deletion of the ompJ gene in G. sulfurreducens produced a strain that grew as well as the wild-type strain with fumarate as the electron acceptor but could not grow with metals, such as soluble or insoluble Fe (III and insoluble Mn (IV oxide, as the electron acceptor. The heme c content in the mutant strain was ca. 50% of the wild-type and there was a widespread loss of multiple cytochromes from soluble and membrane fractions. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of mutant cells revealed an unusually enlarged periplasm, which is likely to trigger extracytoplasmic stress response mechanisms leading to the degradation of periplasmic and/or outer membrane proteins, such as cytochromes, required for metal reduction. Thus, the loss of the capacity for extracellular electron transport in the mutant could be due to the missing c-type cytochromes, or some more direct, but as yet unknown, role of OmpJ in metal

  6. Nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions regulate thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) expression and thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1) nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Fernando Toshio; Batista, Wagner Luiz; Sartori, Adriano; Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Masutani, Hiroshi; Arai, Roberto Jun; Yodoi, Junji; Stern, Arnold; Monteiro, Hugo Pequeno

    2013-01-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX-1) is a multifunctional protein that controls the redox status of other proteins. TRX-1 can be found in the extracellular milieu, cytoplasm and nucleus, and it has distinct functions in each environment. Previously, we studied the intracellular localization of TRX-1 and its relationship with the activation of the p21Ras-ERK1/2 MAP Kinases signaling pathway. In situations where this pathway was activated by stress conditions evoked by a nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), TRX-1 accumulated in the nuclear compartment due to nitrosylation of p21Ras and activation of downstream ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Presently, we demonstrate that ERK1/2 MAP Kinases activation and spatial distribution within cells trigger TRX-1 nuclear translocation through down-regulation of the physiological inhibitor of TRX-1, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein (TXNIP). Once activated by the oxidants, SNAP and H₂O₂, the ERK1/2 MAP kinases migrate to the nucleus. This is correlated with down-regulation of TXNIP. In the presence of the MEK inhibitors (PD98059 or UO126), or in cells transfected with the Protein Enriched in Astrocytes (PEA-15), a cytoplasmic anchor of ERK1/2 MAP kinases, TRX-1 nuclear migration and TXNIP down-regulation are no longer observed in cells exposed to oxidants. On the other hand, over-expression of TXNIP abolishes nuclear migration of TRX-1 under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions, whereas gene silencing of TXNIP facilitates nuclear migration even in the absence of stress conditions. Studies based on the TXNIP promoter support this regulation. In conclusion, changes in TRX-1 compartmentalization under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions are dependent on the expression levels of TXNIP, which are regulated by cellular compartmentalization and activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases.

  7. Nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions regulate thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP expression and thioredoxin-1 (TRX-1 nuclear localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Toshio Ogata

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin (TRX-1 is a multifunctional protein that controls the redox status of other proteins. TRX-1 can be found in the extracellular milieu, cytoplasm and nucleus, and it has distinct functions in each environment. Previously, we studied the intracellular localization of TRX-1 and its relationship with the activation of the p21Ras-ERK1/2 MAP Kinases signaling pathway. In situations where this pathway was activated by stress conditions evoked by a nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP, TRX-1 accumulated in the nuclear compartment due to nitrosylation of p21Ras and activation of downstream ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Presently, we demonstrate that ERK1/2 MAP Kinases activation and spatial distribution within cells trigger TRX-1 nuclear translocation through down-regulation of the physiological inhibitor of TRX-1, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein (TXNIP. Once activated by the oxidants, SNAP and H₂O₂, the ERK1/2 MAP kinases migrate to the nucleus. This is correlated with down-regulation of TXNIP. In the presence of the MEK inhibitors (PD98059 or UO126, or in cells transfected with the Protein Enriched in Astrocytes (PEA-15, a cytoplasmic anchor of ERK1/2 MAP kinases, TRX-1 nuclear migration and TXNIP down-regulation are no longer observed in cells exposed to oxidants. On the other hand, over-expression of TXNIP abolishes nuclear migration of TRX-1 under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions, whereas gene silencing of TXNIP facilitates nuclear migration even in the absence of stress conditions. Studies based on the TXNIP promoter support this regulation. In conclusion, changes in TRX-1 compartmentalization under nitrosative/oxidative stress conditions are dependent on the expression levels of TXNIP, which are regulated by cellular compartmentalization and activation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinases.

  8. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Reale

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD, have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-, which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a

  9. Repeated exposures to roadside particulate matter extracts suppresses pulmonary defense mechanisms, resulting in lipid and protein oxidative damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Michal; Porat, Ziv; Rudich, Assaf; Schauer, James J.; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities and urban canyons can be harmful to the exposed population. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to health effects are not yet elucidated. It is postulated that exposure to repeated, small, environmentally relevant concentrations can affect lung homeostasis. This study examines the impact of repeated exposures to urban PM on mouse lungs with focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. Aqueous extracts from collected urban PM were administered to mice by 5 repeated intra-tracheal instillations (IT). Multiple exposures, led to an increase in cytokine levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the blood serum, indicating a systemic reaction. Lung mRNA levels of antioxidant/phase II detoxifying enzymes decreased by exposure to the PM extract, but not when metals were removed by chelation. Finally, disruption of lung tissue oxidant-inflammatory/defense balance was evidenced by increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation. Unlike response to a single IT exposure to the same dose and source of extract, multiple exposures result in lung oxidative damage and a systemic inflammatory reaction. These could be attributed to compromised capacity to activate the protective Nrf2 tissue defense system. It is suggested that water-soluble metals present in urban PM, potentially from break and tire wear, may constitute major drivers of the pulmonary and systemic responses to multiple exposure to urban PM. - Highlights: • Repeated exposure to urban PM cause systemic inflammation and oxidative damage to lung tissue lipids and proteins. • Repeated exposure to these PM extracts decreased transcription of Nrf2 protective genes. • Single as opposed to repeated exposure, induced confined lung response accompanied by activated defense mechanisms. • Metals, potentially from break and tire wear, drive the pulmonary response with exposure to urban PM. - Repeated exposures to urban PM water extracts

  10. Rational design of an EGF-IL18 fusion protein: Implication for developing tumor therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jianxin; Peng Ying; Meng Zhefeng; Jin Liqin; Lu Yongsui; Guan Minxin

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a proinflammatory cytokine. This protein has a role in regulating immune responses and exhibits significant anti-tumor activities. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is an important growth factor that plays a central role in the regulation of cell cycle and differentiation. It was proposed that a targeted delivery of IL-18 by generation of IL-18-EGF fusion protein might decrease adverse effects and result in enhancing cytotoxic and antitumor activities. In the present study, a fusion protein, consisting of EGFR binding domain fused to human IL-18 mature peptide via a linker peptide of (Gly 4 Ser) 3, was constructed and expressed in the insect cell line Sf9 using Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. We showed that the purified recombinant fusion protein induced similar levels of IFN-γ to that of native IL-18 protein in human PBMC in the presence of ConA. Furthermore, EGF receptor competitive test in human epithelial cancer A431 cell line showed that EGF-IL18 fusion protein can specifically bind with EGFR by competing with native EGF protein. These suggest that this rationally designed protein can be further developed as novel tumor therapeutics

  11. Identification of oxidized protein hydrolase as a potential prodrug target in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGoldrick, Christopher A; Jiang, Yu-Lin; Paromov, Victor; Brannon, Marianne; Krishnan, Koyamangalath; Stone, William L

    2014-01-01

    Esterases are often overexpressed in cancer cells and can have chiral specificities different from that of the corresponding normal tissues. For this reason, ester prodrugs could be a promising approach in chemotherapy. In this study, we focused on the identification and characterization of differentially expressed esterases between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells. Cellular lysates from LNCaP, DU 145, and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines, tumorigenic RWPE-2 prostate epithelial cells, and non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells were separated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (n-PAGE) and the esterase activity bands visualized using α-naphthyl acetate or α-naphthyl-N-acetylalaninate (ANAA) chiral esters and Fast Blue RR salt. The esterases were identified using nanospray LC/MS-MS tandem mass spectrometry and confirmed by Western blotting, native electroblotting, inhibition assays, and activity towards a known specific substrate. The serine protease/esterase oxidized protein hydrolase (OPH) was overexpressed in COS-7 cells to verify our results. The major esterase observed with the ANAA substrates within the n-PAGE activity bands was identified as OPH. OPH (EC 3.4.19.1) is a serine protease/esterase and a member of the prolyl oligopeptidase family. We found that LNCaP lysates contained approximately 40% more OPH compared to RWPE-1 lysates. RWPE-2, DU145 and PC3 cell lysates had similar levels of OPH activity. OPH within all of the cell lysates tested had a chiral preference for the S-isomer of ANAA. LNCaP cells were stained more intensely with ANAA substrates than RWPE-1 cells and COS-7 cells overexpressing OPH were found to have a higher activity towards the ANAA and AcApNA than parent COS-7 cells. These data suggest that prodrug derivatives of ANAA and AcApNA could have potential as chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of prostate cancer tumors that overexpress OPH

  12. Protein Oxidation Levels After Different Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkcu, Ummuhani Ozel; Yuksel, Nilay; Novruzlu, Sahin; Yalinbas, Duygu; Bilgihan, Ayse; Bilgihan, Kamil

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity, and total sulfhydryl (TSH) levels in rabbit corneas after different corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) methods. Eighteen eyes of 9 adult New Zealand rabbits were divided into 3 groups of 6 eyes. The standard CXL group was continuously exposed to UV-A at a power setting of 3 mW/cm for 30 minutes. The accelerated CXL (A-CXL) group was continuously exposed to UV-A at a power setting of 30 mW/cm for 3 minutes. The pulse light-accelerated CXL (PLA-CXL) group received UV-A at a power setting of 30 mW/cm for 6 minutes of pulsed exposure (1 second on, 1 second off). Corneas were obtained after 1 hour of UV-A exposure, and 360-degree keratotomy was performed. SOD enzyme activity, AOPP, and TSH levels were measured in the corneal tissues. Compared with the standard CXL and A-CXL groups (133.2 ± 8.5 and 140.2 ± 6.2 μmol/mg, respectively), AOPP levels were found to be significantly increased in the PLA-CXL group (230.7 ± 30.2 μmol/mg) (P = 0.005 and 0.009, respectively). SOD enzyme activities and TSH levels did not differ between the groups (P = 0.167 and 0.187, respectively). CXL creates covalent bonds between collagen fibers because of reactive oxygen species. This means that more oxygen concentration during the CXL method will produce more reactive oxygen species and, thereby, AOPP. This means that in which CXL method occurs in more oxygen concentration that will produce more reactive oxygen species and thereby AOPP. This study demonstrated that PLA-CXL results in more AOPP formation than did standard CXL and A-CXL.

  13. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Mitochondrial Oxidative Enzyme Impairment and Restoration in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Angel, Thomas E.; Lewis, Michael P.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Wiedner, Susan D.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-10-24

    High-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and concomitant development of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is not clear whether mitochondrial dysfunction is a direct effect of a HFD or if the mitochondrial function is reduced with increased HFD duration. We hypothesized that the function of mitochondrial oxidative and lipid metabolism functions in skeletal muscle mitochondria for HFD mice are similar or elevated relative to standard diet (SD) mice, thereby IR is neither cause nor consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction. We applied a chemical probe approach to identify functionally reactive ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of C57Bl/6J mice fed HFD or SD chow for 2-, 8-, or 16-weeks; feeding time points known to induce IR. A total of 293 probe-labeled proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, of which 54 differed in abundance between HFD and SD mice. We found proteins associated with the TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and lipid metabolism were altered in function when comparing SD to HFD fed mice at 2-weeks, however by 16-weeks HFD mice had TCA cycle, β-oxidation, and respiratory chain function at levels similar to or higher than SD mice.

  14. Bioactive Proteins in Human Milk: Health, Nutrition, and Implications for Infant Formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Breast milk confers many benefits to the newborn and developing infant. There is substantial support for better long-term outcomes, such as less obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, in breastfed compared with formula-fed infants. More short-term outcomes, such as incidence and duration of illness, nutrient status, and cognitive development during the first year of life also demonstrate benefits of breastfeeding. Several proteins in breast milk, including lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin, milk fat globule membrane proteins, and osteopontin, have been shown to have bioactivities that range from involvement in the protection against infection to the acquisition of nutrients from breast milk. In some cases, bovine counterparts of these proteins exert similar bioactivities. It is possible by dairy technology to add protein fractions highly enriched in these proteins to infant formula. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Two novel Mesocestoides vogae fatty acid binding proteins--functional and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvite, Gabriela; Canclini, Lucía; Corvo, Ileana; Esteves, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    This work describes two new fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) identified in the parasite platyhelminth Mesocestoides vogae (syn. corti). The corresponding polypeptide chains share 62% identical residues and overall 90% similarity according to CLUSTALX default conditions. Compared with Cestoda FABPs, these proteins share the highest similarity score with the Taenia solium protein. M. vogae FABPs are also phylogenetically related to the FABP3/FABP4 mammalian FABP subfamilies. The native proteins were purified by chromatographical procedures, and apparent molecular mass and isoelectric point were determined. Immunolocalization studies determined the localization of the expression of these proteins in the larval form of the parasite. The genomic exon-intron organization of both genes is also reported, and supports new insights on intron evolution. Consensus motifs involved in splicing were identified.

  16. Generation of Oxygen Free Radicals by Proflavine: Implication in Protein Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour K.M. Gatasheh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Proflavine, an acridine dye, is a known DNA intercalating agent. In the present study, we show that proflavine alone on photoillumination can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS. These proflavine-derived ROS cause damage to proteins, and this effect is enhanced when the divalent metal ion Cu (II is included in the reaction. Bathocuproine, a specific Cu (I sequestering agent, when present in the reaction mixture containing Cu (II, was found to inhibit the protein degradation, showing that Cu (I is an essential intermediate in the reaction. The effect of several scavengers of ROS such as superoxide dismutase, sodium azide, potassium iodide, and thiourea were examined on the protein damaging reaction. Potassium iodide was found to be the most effective in inhibiting protein damage followed by sodium azide and thiourea. Our results indicate the involvement of superoxide, singlet oxygen, triplet oxygen, and hydroxyl radicals in proflavine-induced damage to proteins.

  17. Periodontal Pathogens and Atherosclerosis: Implications of Inflammation and Oxidative Modification of LDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kurita-Ochiai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is well accepted to play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, and recent studies have demonstrated an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, causative agents of destructive chronic inflammation in the periodontium, can accelerate atheroma deposition in animal models. Emerging evidence suggests that vaccination against virulence factors of these pathogens and anti-inflammatory therapy may confer disease resistance. In this review, we focus on the role of inflammatory mechanisms and oxidative modification in the formation and activation of atherosclerotic plaques accelerated by P. gingivalis or A. actinomycetemcomitans in an ApoE-deficient mouse model and high-fat-diet-fed mice. Furthermore, we examine whether mucosal vaccination with a periodontal pathogen or the anti-inflammatory activity of catechins can reduce periodontal pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  18. The yeast metacaspase is implicated in oxidative stress response in frataxin-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Auchère, Françoise; Brossas, Caroline; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Boggetto, Nicole; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Madeo, Frank; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-01-20

    Friedreich ataxia is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease and is caused by reduced expression of mitochondrial frataxin. Frataxin depletion causes impairment in iron-sulfur cluster and heme biosynthesis, disruption of iron homeostasis and hypersensitivity to oxidants. Currently no pharmacological treatment blocks disease progression, although antioxidant therapies proved to benefit patients. We show that sensitivity of yeast frataxin-deficient cells to hydrogen peroxide is partially mediated by the metacaspase. Metacaspase deletion in frataxin-deficient cells results in recovery of antioxidant capacity and heme synthesis. In addition, our results suggest that metacaspase is associated with mitochondrial respiration, intracellular redox control and genomic stability. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gut luminal endogenous protein: implications for the determination of ileal amino acid digestibility in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moughan, Paul J; Rutherfurd, Shane M

    2012-08-01

    The true ileal digestibility assay provides the most informative measure of digestibility to assess bioavailability of amino acids in foods for humans. To determine 'true' estimates of ileal amino acid digestibility, requires that endogenous amino acids present in digesta at the terminal ileum be quantified. The amounts of endogenous amino acids in ileal digesta can be determined after feeding an animal or human a protein-free diet (traditional approach) or by various methods after giving a protein-containing diet. When the protein-free method has been applied with adult human subjects an overall mean value (three separate studies) for endogenous ileal nitrogen flow of 800 mg N/d has been reported. This value is considerably lower than a comparable value obtained after feeding protein of 1852 mg N/d (mean of four separate studies), and thus endogenous ileal N and amino acids should be measured under conditions of protein alimentation. There is some confusion concerning the terminology used to define digestibility, with the term "true" digestibility having different adopted meanings. Here, true amino acid digestibility is defined as apparent amino acid digestibility corrected for the basal amino acid losses determined after giving either a protein-free or a protein-containing diet. Basal losses should be determined at a defined dry-matter and protein intake. The protein-free diet approach to determining endogenous amino acids is considered unphysiological and basal losses refer to ileal endogenous amino acid flows associated with digesta dry-matter flow, and not including "specific" effects of dietary factors such as non starch polysaccharides and anti nutritional factors. Arguments are advanced that the enzyme hydrolysed protein/ultra filtration method may be suitable for routine application with a cannulated pig model, to obtain physiologically-valid basal estimates of ileal endogenous amino acids to allow calculation of true ileal amino acid digestibility in the

  20. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in High-Temperature Acidic Geothermal Springs and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux M. Meslé

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, superoxide (O2•-, and hydroxyl radicals (OH• are produced in natural waters via ultraviolet (UV light-induced reactions between dissolved oxygen (O2 and organic carbon, and further reaction of H2O2 and Fe(II (i.e., Fenton chemistry. The temporal and spatial dynamics of H2O2 and other dissolved compounds [Fe(II, Fe(III, H2S, O2] were measured during a diel cycle (dark/light in surface waters of three acidic geothermal springs (Beowulf Spring, One Hundred Springs Plain, and Echinus Geyser Spring; pH = 3–3.5, T = 68–80°C in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. In situ analyses showed that H2O2 concentrations were lowest (ca. 1 μM in geothermal source waters containing high dissolved sulfide (and where oxygen was below detection and increased by 2-fold (ca. 2–3 μM in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III-oxide mat formation down the water channel. Small increases in dissolved oxygen and H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux, but not consistently across all springs sampled. Iron-oxide microbial mats were sampled for molecular analysis of ROS gene expression in two primary autotrophs of acidic Fe(III-oxide mat ecosystems: Metallosphaera yellowstonensis (Archaea and Hydrogenobaculum sp. (Bacteria. Expression (RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response genes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, peroxidases of the primary autotrophs were used to evaluate possible changes in transcription across temporal, spatial, and/or seasonal samples. Data presented here documented the presence of H2O2 and general correlation with dissolved oxygen. Moreover, two dominant microbial populations expressed ROS response genes throughout the day, but showed less expression of key genes during peak sunlight. Oxidative stress response genes (especially external peroxidases were highly-expressed in microorganisms within Fe(III-oxide mat communities, suggesting a significant role for these proteins during survival and growth in

  1. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of damaged macromolecules, including irreversibly oxidized proteins, is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing. Failure of protein homesotasis is a major contributor to the age-related accumulation of damaged proteins. In skeletal muscle, tissue maintenance and regeneration...... phenotype. In addition, these findings highlight the molecular mechanisms implicated in satellite cells dysfunction during ageing, paving the road for future therapeutic interventions aimed at preventing oxidative modifications of proteins and/or stimulating their elimination....

  2. An Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Carlee S; Hettich, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent – hydroxyl radicals – for these measurements; however, these approaches range significantly in their complexity and expense of operation. This research expands upon earlier work to enhance the controllability of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as an easily accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals in order to oxidize a range of intact proteins. Efforts to modulate oxidation level while minimizing the adsorption of protein to the electrode involved the use of relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber. Additionally, a different cell activation approach using variable voltage to supply a controlled current allowed us to precisely tune the extent of oxidation in a protein-dependent manner. In order to gain perspective on the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface, studies were conducted to monitor protein concentration during electrolysis and gauge changes in the electrode surface between cell activation events. This report demonstrates the successful use of BDD electrochemistry for greater precision in generating a target number of oxidation events upon intact proteins. PMID:23210708

  3. Effects of heat on meat proteins - Implications on structure and quality of meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornberg, E

    2005-07-01

    Globular and fibrous proteins are compared with regard to structural behaviour on heating, where the former expands and the latter contracts. The meat protein composition and structure is briefly described. The behaviour of the different meat proteins on heating is discussed. Most of the sarcoplasmic proteins aggregate between 40 and 60 °C, but for some of them the coagulation can extend up to 90°C. For myofibrillar proteins in solution unfolding starts at 30-32°C, followed by protein-protein association at 36-40°C and subsequent gelation at 45-50°C (conc.>0.5% by weight). At temperatures between 53 and 63°C the collagen denaturation occurs, followed by collagen fibre shrinkage. If the collagen fibres are not stabilised by heat-resistant intermolecular bonds, it dissolves and forms gelatine on further heating. The structural changes on cooking in whole meat and comminuted meat products, and the alterations in water-holding and texture of the meat product that it leads to, are then discussed.

  4. Bioinformatics and structural characterization of a hypothetical protein from Streptococcus mutans: implication of antibiotic resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Nan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available As an oral bacterial pathogen, Streptococcus mutans has been known as the aetiologic agent of human dental caries. Among a total of 1960 identified proteins within the genome of this organism, there are about 500 without any known functions. One of these proteins, SMU.440, has very few homologs in the current protein databases and it does not fall into any protein functional families. Phylogenetic studies showed that SMU.440 is related to a particular ecological niche and conserved specifically in some oral pathogens, due to lateral gene transfer. The co-occurrence of a MarR protein within the same operon among these oral pathogens suggests that SMU.440 may be associated with antibiotic resistance. The structure determination of SMU.440 revealed that it shares the same fold and a similar pocket as polyketide cyclases, which indicated that it is very likely to bind some polyketide-like molecules. From the interlinking structural and bioinformatics studies, we have concluded that SMU.440 could be involved in polyketide-like antibiotic resistance, providing a better understanding of this hypothetical protein. Besides, the combination of multiple methods in this study can be used as a general approach for functional studies of a protein with unknown function.

  5. Role of Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase, and cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Mouse Stem Cell Cardiac Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Spinelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Nitric oxide (NO can trigger cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs, indicating a cardiogenic function of the NO synthetizing enzyme(s (NOS. However, the involvement of the NO/NOS downstream effectors soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC and cGMP activated protein kinase I (PKG-I is less defined. Therefore, we assess the involvement of the entire NO/NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway during cardiac differentiation process. Methods. Mouse ESCs were differentiated toward cardiac lineages by hanging drop methodology for 21 days. NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway was studied quantifying genes, proteins, enzymatic activities, and effects of inhibition during differentiation. Percentages of beating embryoid bodies (mEBs were evaluated as an index of cardiogenesis. Results and Discussion. Genes and protein expression of enzymes were increased during differentiation with distinctive kinetics and proteins possessed their enzymatic functions. Exogenous administered NO accelerated whereas the blockade of PKG-I strongly slowed cardiogenesis. sGC inhibition was effective only at early stages and NOS blockade ineffective. Of NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway, PKG-I seems to play the prominent role in cardiac maturation. Conclusion. We concluded that exogenous administered NO and other pharmacological strategies able to increase the activity of PKG-I provide new tools to investigate and promote differentiation of cardiogenic precursors.

  6. Protein adsorption at the electrified air-water interface: implications on foam stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Rumpel, Armin; Walter, Johannes; Dombrowski, Jannika; Kulozik, Ulrich; Braunschweig, Björn; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2012-05-22

    The surface chemistry of ions, water molecules, and proteins as well as their ability to form stable networks in foams can influence and control macroscopic properties such as taste and texture of dairy products considerably. Despite the significant relevance of protein adsorption at liquid interfaces, a molecular level understanding on the arrangement of proteins at interfaces and their interactions has been elusive. Therefore, we have addressed the adsorption of the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) at the air-water interface with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry. SFG provides specific information on the composition and average orientation of molecules at interfaces, while complementary information on the thickness of the adsorbed layer can be obtained with ellipsometry. Adsorption of charged BSA proteins at the water surface leads to an electrified interface, pH dependent charging, and electric field-induced polar ordering of interfacial H(2)O and BSA. Varying the bulk pH of protein solutions changes the intensities of the protein related vibrational bands substantially, while dramatic changes in vibrational bands of interfacial H(2)O are simultaneously observed. These observations have allowed us to determine the isoelectric point of BSA directly at the electrolyte-air interface for the first time. BSA covered air-water interfaces with a pH near the isoelectric point form an amorphous network of possibly agglomerated BSA proteins. Finally, we provide a direct correlation of the molecular structure of BSA interfaces with foam stability and new information on the link between microscopic properties of BSA at water surfaces and macroscopic properties such as the stability of protein foams.

  7. Implication of the Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Cyclophilin B Protein in the Transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakala, Surapathrudu; Ghanim, Murad

    2016-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a single-stranded (ssDNA) begomoviruses that causes severe damage to tomato and several other crops worldwide. TYLCV is exclusively transmitted by the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci in a persistent circulative and propagative manner. Previous studies have shown that the transmission, retention, and circulation of TYLCV in its vector involves interaction with insect and endosymbiont proteins, which aid in the transmission of the virus, or have a protective role in response to the presence of the virus in the insect body. However, only a low number of such proteins have been identified. Here, the role of B. tabaci Cyclophilin B (CypB) in the transmission of TYLCV protein was investigated. Cyclophilins are a large family of cellular prolyl isomerases that have many molecular roles including facilitating protein-protein interactions in the cell. One cyclophilin protein has been implicated in aphid-luteovirus interactions. We demonstrate that the expression of CypB from B. tabaci is altered upon TYLCV acquisition and retention. Further experiments used immunocapture-PCR and co-immunolocalization and demonstrated a specific interaction and colocalization between CypB and TYLCV in the the midgut, eggs, and salivary glands. Membrane feeding of anti-CypB antibodies and TYLCV-infected plants showed a decrease in TYLCV transmission, suggesting a critical role that CypB plays in TYLCV transmission. Further experiments, which used membrane feeding with the CypB inhibitor Cyclosporin A showed decrease in CypB-TYLCV colocalization in the midgut and virus transmission. Altogether, our results indicate that CypB plays an important role in TYLCV transmission by B. tabaci .

  8. Implication of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci Cyclophilin B protein in the transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surapathrudu Kanakala

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV is a single-stranded (ssDNA begomoviruses that causes severe damage to tomato and several other crops worldwide. TYLCV is exclusively transmitted by the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci in a persistent circulative and propagative manner. Previous studies have shown that the transmission, retention and circulation of TYLCV in its vector involves interaction with insect and endosymbiont proteins, which aid in the transmission of the virus, or have a protective role in response to the presence of the virus in the insect body. However, only a low number of such proteins have been identified. Here, the role of B. tabaci Cyclophilin B (CypB in the transmission of TYLCV protein was investigated. Cyclophilins (Cyps are a large family of cellular prolyl isomerases that have many molecular roles including facilitating protein-protein interactions in the cell. One cyclophilin protein has been implicated in aphid-luteovirus interactions. We demonstrate that the expression of CypB from B. tabaci is altered upon TYLCV acquisition and retention. Further experiments used immunocapture-PCR and co-immunolocalization and demonstrated a specific interaction and colocalization between CypB and TYLCV in the the midgut, eggs and salivary glands. Membrane feeding of anti-CypB antibodies and TYLCV infected plants showed a decrease in TYLCV transmission, suggesting a critical role that CypB plays in TYLCV transmission. Further experiments, which used membrane feeding with the CypB inhibitor Cyclosporin A (CsA showed decrease in CypB-TYLCV colocalization in the midgut and virus transmission. Altogether, our results indicate that CypB plays an important role in TYLCV transmission by B. tabaci.

  9. The lysosomal enzyme receptor protein (LERP is not essential, but is implicated in lysosomal function in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina Hasanagic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The lysosomal enzyme receptor protein (LERP of Drosophila melanogaster is the ortholog of the mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (Man 6-P receptor, which mediates trafficking of newly synthesized lysosomal acid hydrolases to lysosomes. However, flies lack the enzymes necessary to make the Man 6-P mark, and the amino acids implicated in Man 6-P binding by the mammalian receptor are not conserved in LERP. Thus, the function of LERP in sorting of lysosomal enzymes to lysosomes in Drosophila is unclear. Here, we analyze the consequence of LERP depletion in S2 cells and intact flies. RNAi-mediated knockdown of LERP in S2 cells had little or no effect on the cellular content or secretion of several lysosomal hydrolases. We generated a novel Lerp null mutation, LerpF6, which abolishes LERP protein expression. Lerp mutants have normal viability and fertility and display no overt phenotypes other than reduced body weight. Lerp mutant flies exhibit a 30–40% decrease in the level of several lysosomal hydrolases, and are hypersensitive to dietary chloroquine and starvation, consistent with impaired lysosome function. Loss of LERP also enhances an eye phenotype associated with defective autophagy. Our findings implicate Lerp in lysosome function and autophagy.

  10. The mechanism of vapor phase hydration of calcium oxide: implications for CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudłacz, Krzysztof; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos

    2014-10-21

    Lime-based sorbents are used for fuel- and flue-gas capture, thereby representing an economic and effective way to reduce CO2 emissions. Their use involves cyclic carbonation/calcination which results in a significant conversion reduction with increasing number of cycles. To reactivate spent CaO, vapor phase hydration is typically performed. However, little is known about the ultimate mechanism of such a hydration process. Here, we show that the vapor phase hydration of CaO formed after calcination of calcite (CaCO3) single crystals is a pseudomorphic, topotactic process, which progresses via an intermediate disordered phase prior to the final formation of oriented Ca(OH)2 nanocrystals. The strong structural control during this solid-state phase transition implies that the microstructural features of the CaO parent phase predetermine the final structural and physicochemical (reactivity and attrition) features of the product hydroxide. The higher molar volume of the product can create an impervious shell around unreacted CaO, thereby limiting the efficiency of the reactivation process. However, in the case of compact, sintered CaO structures, volume expansion cannot be accommodated in the reduced pore volume, and stress generation leads to pervasive cracking. This favors complete hydration but also detrimental attrition. Implications of these results in carbon capture and storage (CCS) are discussed.

  11. Sulfur diffusion in dacitic melt at various oxidation states: Implications for volcanic degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lierenfeld, Matthias Bernhard; Zajacz, Zoltán; Bachmann, Olivier; Ulmer, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The diffusivity of S in a hydrous dacitic melt (4.5-6.0 wt.% H2O) has been investigated in the temperature (T) and pressure (P) range of 950 °C to 1100 °C and 200 to 250 MPa, respectively. Three series of experiments were conducted at relatively low oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions [0.8 log units below fayalite-magnetite-quartz equilibrium (FMQ -0.8); referred to as "low fO2"] and high fO2 conditions (FMQ +2.5; referred to as "high fO2") to determine if the diffusivity of S is affected by its oxidation state and speciation. Sulfur concentration profiles were measured by electron microprobe and the diffusion coefficient (D) was calculated by fitting these profiles. Sulfur diffusion is approximately one order of magnitude faster when S is dominantly present as sulfide species (low fO2) in comparison to the sulfate dominated experiments (high fO2). The following Arrhenian equations were obtained for high and low fO2 conditions at 200 MPa: high fO2: D = 10-5.92±0.86 * exp ({-137.3±21.5 kJ/mol}/{RT}) low fO2: D = 10-5.18±1.39 * exp ({-125.7±34.4 kJ/mol}/{RT}) where D is the average diffusion coefficient in m2 s-1, R is the gas constant in 8.3144 J mol-1 K-1 and T is the temperature in K. Our results demonstrate for the first time in natural melts that S diffusion is strongly sensitive to fO2. Our S diffusivities under low fO2 conditions are only slightly slower of those found for H2O, suggesting that S can be rather efficiently purged from reduced dacitic melts during volcanic eruptions. However, for more oxidized systems (e.g. subduction zones), S diffusion will be much slower and will hinder equilibrium syn-eruptive degassing during rapid decompression. Therefore, we conclude that the "excess" measured during many explosive volcanic eruptions in arcs is dominantly derived from S-rich bubble accumulation in the eruptible portion of the magma reservoir.

  12. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Gao, George F.; Tien Po

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC 50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  13. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  14. The spread of prion-like proteins by lysosomes and tunneling nanotubes: Implications for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2017-09-04

    Progression of pathology in neurodegenerative diseases is hypothesized to be a non-cell-autonomous process that may be mediated by the productive spreading of prion-like protein aggregates from a "donor cell" that is the source of misfolded aggregates to an "acceptor cell" in which misfolding is propagated by conversion of the normal protein. Although the proteins involved in the various diseases are unrelated, common pathways appear to be used for their intercellular propagation and spreading. Here, we summarize recent evidence of the molecular mechanisms relevant for the intercellular trafficking of protein aggregates involved in prion, Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases. We focus in particular on the common roles that lysosomes and tunneling nanotubes play in the formation and spreading of prion-like assemblies. © 2017 Victoria and Zurzolo.

  15. Positive selection neighboring functionally essential sites and disease-implicated regions of mammalian reproductive proteins.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Claire C

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reproductive proteins are central to the continuation of all mammalian species. The evolution of these proteins has been greatly influenced by environmental pressures induced by pathogens, rival sperm, sexual selection and sexual conflict. Positive selection has been demonstrated in many of these proteins with particular focus on primate lineages. However, the mammalia are a diverse group in terms of mating habits, population sizes and germ line generation times. We have examined the selective pressures at work on a number of novel reproductive proteins across a wide variety of mammalia. RESULTS: We show that selective pressures on reproductive proteins are highly varied. Of the 10 genes analyzed in detail, all contain signatures of positive selection either across specific sites or in specific lineages or a combination of both. Our analysis of SP56 and Col1a1 are entirely novel and the results show positively selected sites present in each gene. Our findings for the Col1a1 gene are suggestive of a link between positive selection and severe disease type. We find evidence in our dataset to suggest that interacting proteins are evolving in symphony: most likely to maintain interacting functionality. CONCLUSION: Our in silico analyses show positively selected sites are occurring near catalytically important regions suggesting selective pressure to maximize efficient fertilization. In those cases where a mechanism of protein function is not fully understood, the sites presented here represent ideal candidates for mutational study. This work has highlighted the widespread rate heterogeneity in mutational rates across the mammalia and specifically has shown that the evolution of reproductive proteins is highly varied depending on the species and interacting partners. We have shown that positive selection and disease are closely linked in the Col1a1 gene.

  16. Interaction of HTLV-1 Tax protein with the calreticulin: Implications for Tax nuclear export and secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Alefantis, Timothy; Flaig, Katherine E.; Wigdahl, Brian; Jain, Pooja

    2007-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The HTLV-1 transcriptional transactivator protein Tax plays an integral role in virus replication and disease progression. Traditionally, Tax is described as a nuclear protein where it performs its primary role as a transcriptional transactivator. However, recent studies have clearly shown that Tax can also be localized to t...

  17. Evolutionary Implications of Metal Binding Features in Different Species’ Prion Protein: An Inorganic Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego La Mendola

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion disorders are a group of fatal neurodegenerative conditions of mammals. The key molecular event in the pathogenesis of such diseases is the conformational conversion of prion protein, PrPC, into a misfolded form rich in β-sheet structure, PrPSc, but the detailed mechanistic aspects of prion protein conversion remain enigmatic. There is uncertainty on the precise physiological function of PrPC in healthy individuals. Several evidences support the notion of its role in copper homeostasis. PrPC binds Cu2+ mainly through a domain composed by four to five repeats of eight amino acids. In addition to mammals, PrP homologues have also been identified in birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish. The globular domain of protein is retained in the different species, suggesting that the protein carries out an essential common function. However, the comparison of amino acid sequences indicates that prion protein has evolved differently in each vertebrate class. The primary sequences are strongly conserved in each group, but these exhibit a low similarity with those of mammals. The N-terminal domain of different prions shows tandem amino acid repeats with an increasing amount of histidine residues going from amphibians to mammals. The difference in the sequence affects the number of copper binding sites, the affinity and the coordination environment of metal ions, suggesting that the involvement of prion in metal homeostasis may be a specific characteristic of mammalian prion protein. In this review, we describe the similarities and the differences in the metal binding of different species’ prion protein, as revealed by studies carried out on the entire protein and related peptide fragments.

  18. Free-Standing Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Superlattices Constructed with Engineered Protein Containers Show in Crystallo Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Marcel; Künzle, Matthias; Beck, Tobias

    2017-12-11

    The construction of defined nanostructured catalysts is challenging. In previous work, we established a strategy to assemble binary nanoparticle superlattices with oppositely charged protein containers as building blocks. Here, we show that these free-standing nanoparticle superlattices are catalytically active. The metal oxide nanoparticles inside the protein scaffold are accessible for a range of substrates and show oxidase-like and peroxidase-like activity. The stable superlattices can be reused for several reaction cycles. In contrast to bulk nanoparticle-based catalysts, which are prone to aggregation and difficult to characterize, nanoparticle superlattices based on engineered protein containers provide an innovative synthetic route to structurally defined heterogeneous catalysts with control over nanoparticle size and composition. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta and Oxidative Stress Interplay: Implications in Tumorigenesis and Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstić, Jelena; Trivanović, Drenka; Mojsilović, Slavko; Santibanez, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and oxidative stress/Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) both have pivotal roles in health and disease. In this review we are analyzing the interplay between TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. They have contradictory roles in cancer progression since both can have antitumor effects, through the induction of cell death, senescence and cell cycle arrest, and protumor effects by contributing to cancer cell spreading, proliferation, survival, and metastasis. TGF-β can control ROS production directly or by downregulating antioxidative systems. Meanwhile, ROS can influence TGF-β signaling and increase its expression as well as its activation from the latent complex. This way, both are building a strong interplay which can be taken as an advantage by cancer cells in order to increment their malignancy. In addition, both TGF-β and ROS are able to induce cell senescence, which in one way protects damaged cells from neoplastic transformation but also may collaborate in cancer progression. The mutual collaboration of TGF-β and ROS in tumorigenesis is highly complex, and, due to their differential roles in tumor progression, careful consideration should be taken when thinking of combinatorial targeting in cancer therapies. PMID:26078812

  20. Micro-layers of polystyrene film preventing metal oxidation: implications in cultural heritage conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambi, Francesca; Carretti, Emiliano; Dei, Luigi; Baglioni, Piero

    2014-12-01

    Protection of surfaces directly exposed to the detrimental action of degradative agents (i.e. oxygen, air pollutants and bacteria) is one of the most important challenges in the field of conservation of works of art. Metallic objects are subjected to specific surface corrosion phenomena that, over the years, make mandatory the research of innovative materials that should avoid the direct contact between the metal surface and the weathering agents. In this paper, the set-up, characterisation and application of a new reversible material for preserving metal artefacts are reported. Micro-layers constituted of low-adhesive polystyrene (PS) films obtained from recycling waste packaging materials made of expanded PS were studied. The morphology and thickness of PS films were characterised by optical, atomic force and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A further check on thickness was carried out by means of visible spectrophotometry doping the films with a hydrophobic dye. Thermal properties of the PS micro-layers were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry coupled with optical microscopy. Permeability of the PS films to water vapour was also determined. The potential of the low-adhesive PS films, that enabled an easy removal in case of film deterioration, for preventing metal oxidation was investigated on brass specimens by simulating standard artificial corrosion programmes. Morphological and chemical (coupling the energy-dispersive X-rays spectrometry to SEM measurements) analyses carried out on these metal samples showed promising results in terms of surface protection against corrosion.

  1. Structural and sequence analysis of imelysin-like proteins implicated in bacterial iron uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingping Xu

    Full Text Available Imelysin-like proteins define a superfamily of bacterial proteins that are likely involved in iron uptake. Members of this superfamily were previously thought to be peptidases and were included in the MEROPS family M75. We determined the first crystal structures of two remotely related, imelysin-like proteins. The Psychrobacter arcticus structure was determined at 2.15 Å resolution and contains the canonical imelysin fold, while higher resolution structures from the gut bacteria Bacteroides ovatus, in two crystal forms (at 1.25 Å and 1.44 Å resolution, have a circularly permuted topology. Both structures are highly similar to each other despite low sequence similarity and circular permutation. The all-helical structure can be divided into two similar four-helix bundle domains. The overall structure and the GxHxxE motif region differ from known HxxE metallopeptidases, suggesting that imelysin-like proteins are not peptidases. A putative functional site is located at the domain interface. We have now organized the known homologous proteins into a superfamily, which can be separated into four families. These families share a similar functional site, but each has family-specific structural and sequence features. These results indicate that imelysin-like proteins have evolved from a common ancestor, and likely have a conserved function.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Human, FIC-Domain Containing Protein HYPE and Implications for Its Functions

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    Bunney, Tom D.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein, HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized. Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of autoAMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition. PMID:25435325

  3. Dissecting protein loops with a statistical scalpel suggests a functional implication of some structural motifs.

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    Regad, Leslie; Martin, Juliette; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2011-06-20

    One of the strategies for protein function annotation is to search particular structural motifs that are known to be shared by proteins with a given function. Here, we present a systematic extraction of structural motifs of seven residues from protein loops and we explore their correspondence with functional sites. Our approach is based on the structural alphabet HMM-SA (Hidden Markov Model - Structural Alphabet), which allows simplification of protein structures into uni-dimensional sequences, and advanced pattern statistics adapted to short sequences. Structural motifs of interest are selected by looking for structural motifs significantly over-represented in SCOP superfamilies in protein loops. We discovered two types of structural motifs significantly over-represented in SCOP superfamilies: (i) ubiquitous motifs, shared by several superfamilies and (ii) superfamily-specific motifs, over-represented in few superfamilies. A comparison of ubiquitous words with known small structural motifs shows that they contain well-described motifs as turn, niche or nest motifs. A comparison between superfamily-specific motifs and biological annotations of Swiss-Prot reveals that some of them actually correspond to functional sites involved in the binding sites of small ligands, such as ATP/GTP, NAD(P) and SAH/SAM. Our findings show that statistical over-representation in SCOP superfamilies is linked to functional features. The detection of over-represented motifs within structures simplified by HMM-SA is therefore a promising approach for prediction of functional sites and annotation of uncharacterized proteins.

  4. Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Systems for Controlled Protein and Peptide Delivery: Future Implications for Ocular Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlumba, Pakama; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-07-30

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides have become notable in the drug delivery arena for their compatibility with the human body as well as their high potency. However, their biocompatibility and high potency does not negate the existence of challenges resulting from physicochemical properties of proteins and peptides, including large size, short half-life, capability to provoke immune responses and susceptibility to degradation. Various delivery routes and delivery systems have been utilized to improve bioavailability, patient acceptability and reduce biodegradation. The ocular route remains of great interest, particularly for responsive delivery of macromolecules due to the anatomy and physiology of the eye that makes it a sensitive and complex environment. Research in this field is slowly gaining attention as this could be the breakthrough in ocular drug delivery of macromolecules. This work reviews stimuli-responsive polymeric delivery systems, their use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides as well as examples of proteins and peptides used in the treatment of ocular disorders. Stimuli reviewed include pH, temperature, enzymes, light, ultrasound and magnetic field. In addition, it discusses the current progress in responsive ocular drug delivery. Furthermore, it explores future prospects in the use of stimuli-responsive polymers for ocular delivery of proteins and peptides. Stimuli-responsive polymers offer great potential in improving the delivery of ocular therapeutics, therefore there is a need to consider them in order to guarantee a local, sustained and ideal delivery of ocular proteins and peptides, evading tissue invasion and systemic side-effects.

  5. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate heat shock proteins and organ specific markers expression in mice male accessory organs.

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    Sundarraj, Kiruthika; Raghunath, Azhwar; Panneerselvam, Lakshmikanthan; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2017-02-15

    With increased industrial utilization of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe 2 O 3 -NPs), concerns on adverse reproductive health effects following exposure have been immensely raised. In the present study, the effects of Fe 2 O 3 -NPs exposure in the seminal vesicle and prostate gland were studied in mice. Mice were exposed to two different doses (25 and 50 mg/kg) of Fe 2 O 3 -NPs along with the control and analyzed the expressions of heat shock proteins (HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90) and organ specific markers (Caltrin, PSP94, and SSLP1). Fe 2 O 3 -NPs decreased food consumption, water intake, and organo-somatic index in mice with elevated iron levels in serum, urine, fecal matter, seminal vesicle and prostate gland. FTIR spectra revealed alterations in the functional groups of biomolecules on Fe 2 O 3 -NPs treatment. These changes are accompanied by increased lactate dehydrogenase levels with decreased total protein and fructose levels. The investigation of oxidative stress biomarkers demonstrated a significant increase in reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content and glutathione peroxidase with a concomitant decrement in the glutathione and ascorbic acid in the male accessory organs which confirmed the induction of oxidative stress. An increase in NADPH-oxidase-4 with a decrease in glutathione-S-transferase was observed in the seminal vesicle and prostate gland of the treated groups. An alteration in HSP60, HSP70, HSP90, Caltrin, PSP94, and SSLP1 expression was also observed. Moreover, accumulation of Fe 2 O 3 -NPs brought pathological changes in the seminal vesicle and prostate gland of treated mice. These findings provide evidence that Fe 2 O 3 -NPs could be an environmental risk factor for reproductive disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Direct evidence of iNOS-mediated in vivo free radical production and protein oxidation in acetone-induced ketosis

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    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dallas, Shannon; Duma, Danielle; Mason, Ronald P.; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic patients frequently encounter ketosis that is characterized by the breakdown of lipids with the consequent accumulation of ketone bodies. Several studies have demonstrated that reactive species are likely to induce tissue damage in diabetes, but the role of the ketone bodies in the process has not been fully investigated. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with novel spin-trapping and immunological techniques has been used to investigate in vivo free radical formation in a murine model of acetone-induced ketosis. A six-line EPR spectrum consistent with the α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone radical adduct of a carbon-centered lipid-derived radical was detected in the liver extracts. To investigate the possible enzymatic source of these radicals, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase knockout mice were used. Free radical production was unchanged in the NADPH oxidase knockout but much decreased in the iNOS knockout mice, suggesting a role for iNOS in free radical production. Longer-term exposure to acetone revealed iNOS overexpression in the liver together with protein radical formation, which was detected by confocal microscopy and a novel immunospin-trapping method. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation as a consequence of persistent free radical generation after 21 days of acetone treatment in control and NADPH oxidase knockout but not in iNOS knockout mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acetone administration, a model of ketosis, can lead to protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation through a free radical-dependent mechanism driven mainly by iNOS overexpression. PMID:18559982

  7. The diagnostic and prognostic importance of oxidative stress biomarkers and acute phase proteins in Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Wael M; Buczinski, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic importance of oxidative stress biomarkers and acute phase proteins in urinary tract infection (UTI) in camels. We describe the clinical, bacteriological and biochemical findings in 89 camels. Blood and urine samples from diseased (n = 74) and control camels (n = 15) were submitted to laboratory investigations. The urine analysis revealed high number of RBCS and pus cells. The concentrations of serum and erythrocytic malondialdehyde (sMDA & eMDA), Haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), Ceruloplasmin (Cp), fibrinogen (Fb), albumin, globulin and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were higher in diseased camels when compared to healthy ones. Catalase, super oxide dismutase and glutathione levels were lower in diseased camels when compared with control group. Forty one of 74 camels with UTI were successfully treated. The levels of malondialdehyde, catalase, super oxide dismutase, glutathione, Hp, SAA, Fb, total protein, globulin and IL-6 were associated with the odds of treatment failure. The MDA showed a great sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) in predicting treatment failure (Se 85%/Sp 100%) as well as the SAA (Se 92%/Sp 87%) and globulin levels (Se 85%/Sp 100%) when using the cutoffs that maximizes the sum of Se + Sp. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that two models had a high accuracy to predict failure with the first model including sex, sMDA and Hp as covariates (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.92) and a second model using sex, SAA and Hp (AUC = 0.89). Conclusively, the oxidative stress biomarkers and acute phase proteins could be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in camel UTI management. Efforts should be forced to investigate such biomarkers in other species with UTI.

  8. [Environment of tryptophan residues in proteins--a factor for stability to oxidative nitrosylation. I. Analysis of primary structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beda, N V; Nedospasov, A A

    2001-01-01

    Micellar catalysis und