WorldWideScience

Sample records for protein crystals developments

  1. Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  2. Disorder in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarage, James Braun, II

    1990-01-01

    Methods have been developed for analyzing the diffuse x-ray scattering in the halos about a crystal's Bragg reflections as a means of determining correlations in atomic displacements in protein crystals. The diffuse intensity distribution for rhombohedral insulin, tetragonal lysozyme, and triclinic lysozyme crystals was best simulated in terms of exponential displacement correlation functions. About 90% of the disorder can be accounted for by internal movements correlated with a decay distance of about 6A; the remaining 10% corresponds to intermolecular movements that decay in a distance the order of size of the protein molecule. The results demonstrate that protein crystals fit into neither the Einstein nor the Debye paradigms for thermally fluctuating crystalline solids. Unlike the Einstein model, there are correlations in the atomic displacements, but these correlations decay more steeply with distance than predicted by the Debye-Waller model for an elastic solid. The observed displacement correlations are liquid -like in the sense that they decay exponentially with the distance between atoms, just as positional correlations in a liquid. This liquid-like disorder is similar to the disorder observed in 2-D crystals of polystyrene latex spheres, and similar systems where repulsive interactions dominate; hence, these colloidal crystals appear to provide a better analogy for the dynamics of protein crystals than perfectly elastic lattices.

  3. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  4. Development of high-performance X-ray transparent crystallization plates for in situ protein crystal screening and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, Ahmed S. M.; Warkentin, Matthew [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (United States); Apker, Benjamin [MiTeGen LLC, Ithaca, New York (United States); Thorne, Robert E., E-mail: ret6@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (United States); MiTeGen LLC, Ithaca, New York (United States)

    2011-07-01

    An optically, UV and X-ray transparent crystallization plate suitable for in situ analysis has been developed. The plate uses contact line pinning rather than wells to confine the liquids. X-ray transparent crystallization plates based upon a novel drop-pinning technology provide a flexible, simple and inexpensive approach to protein crystallization and screening. The plates consist of open cells sealed top and bottom by thin optically, UV and X-ray transparent films. The plates do not need wells or depressions to contain liquids. Instead, protein drops and reservoir solution are held in place by rings with micrometre dimensions that are patterned onto the bottom film. These rings strongly pin the liquid contact lines, thereby improving drop shape and position uniformity, and thus crystallization reproducibility, and simplifying automated image analysis of drop contents. The same rings effectively pin solutions containing salts, proteins, cryoprotectants, oils, alcohols and detergents. Strong pinning by rings allows the plates to be rotated without liquid mixing to 90° for X-ray data collection or to be inverted for hanging-drop crystallization. The plates have the standard SBS format and are compatible with standard liquid-handling robots.

  5. Approaches to automated protein crystal harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deller, Marc C., E-mail: mdeller@scripps.edu; Rupp, Bernhard, E-mail: mdeller@scripps.edu

    2014-01-28

    Approaches to automated and robot-assisted harvesting of protein crystals are critically reviewed. While no true turn-key solutions for automation of protein crystal harvesting are currently available, systems incorporating advanced robotics and micro-electromechanical systems represent exciting developments with the potential to revolutionize the way in which protein crystals are harvested.

  6. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  7. Protein-crystal growth experiment (planned)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, S.; Asano, K.; Hashitani, T.; Kitakohji, T.; Nemoto, H.; Kitamura, S.

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a microgravity environment on protein crystal growth, a system was developed using 5 cubic feet Get Away Special payload canister. In the experiment, protein (myoglobin) will be simultaneously crystallized from an aqueous solution in 16 crystallization units using three types of crystallization methods, i.e., batch, vapor diffusion, and free interface diffusion. Each unit has two compartments: one for the protein solution and the other for the ammonium sulfate solution. Compartments are separated by thick acrylic or thin stainless steel plates. Crystallization will be started by sliding out the plates, then will be periodically recorded up to 120 hours by a still camera. The temperature will be passively controlled by a phase transition thermal storage component and recorded in IC memory throughout the experiment. Microgravity environment can then be evaluated for protein crystal growth by comparing crystallization in space with that on Earth.

  8. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Shibayama, Naoya, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp; Okabe, Takahiro [Division of Biophysics, Department of Physiology, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji, Shimotsuke 329-0498 (Japan); Happo, Naohisa [Department of Computer and Network Engineering, Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Asa-Minami-Ku, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Kimura, Koji [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Matsushita, Tomohiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Park, Sam-Yong [Drug Design Laboratory, Department of Medical Life Science, Yokohama City University, Suehiro, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Sasaki, Yuji C. [Department of Advanced Material Science, Graduate School of Frontier Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Hayashi, Kouichi, E-mail: ayana.sato@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: shibayam@jichi.ac.jp, E-mail: hayashi.koichi@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Frontier Research Institute for Materials Science, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α{sub 2}β{sub 2} tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm{sup 3}) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  9. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Okabe, Takahiro; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α_2β_2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm"3) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  10. Protein surface shielding agents in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hašek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization process can be controlled by protein surface shielding agents blocking undesirable competitive adhesion modes during non-equilibrium processes of deposition of protein molecules on the surface of growing crystalline blocks. The hypothesis is based on a number of experimental proofs from diffraction experiments and also retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. The molecules adhering temporarily on the surface of protein molecules change the propensity of protein molecules to deposit on the crystal surface in a definite position and orientation. The concepts of competitive adhesion modes and protein surface shielding agents acting on the surface of molecules in a non-equilibrium process of protein crystallization provide a useful platform for the control of crystallization. The desirable goal, i.e. a transient preference of a single dominating adhesion mode between protein molecules during crystallization, leads to uniform deposition of proteins in a crystal. This condition is the most important factor for diffraction quality and thus also for the accuracy of protein structure determination. The presented hypothesis is a generalization of the experimentally well proven behaviour of hydrophilic polymers on the surface of protein molecules of other compounds

  11. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrec, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    MORPHEUS II is a 96-condition initial crystallization screen formulated de novo. The screen incorporates reagents selected from the Protein Data Bank to yield crystals that are not observed in traditional conditions. In addition, the formulation facilitates the optimization and cryoprotection of crystals. High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions

  12. The MORPHEUS II protein crystallization screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorrec, Fabrice, E-mail: fgorrec@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-27

    MORPHEUS II is a 96-condition initial crystallization screen formulated de novo. The screen incorporates reagents selected from the Protein Data Bank to yield crystals that are not observed in traditional conditions. In addition, the formulation facilitates the optimization and cryoprotection of crystals. High-quality macromolecular crystals are a prerequisite for the process of protein structure determination by X-ray diffraction. Unfortunately, the relative yield of diffraction-quality crystals from crystallization experiments is often very low. In this context, innovative crystallization screen formulations are continuously being developed. In the past, MORPHEUS, a screen in which each condition integrates a mix of additives selected from the Protein Data Bank, a cryoprotectant and a buffer system, was developed. Here, MORPHEUS II, a follow-up to the original 96-condition initial screen, is described. Reagents were selected to yield crystals when none might be observed in traditional initial screens. Besides, the screen includes heavy atoms for experimental phasing and small polyols to ensure the cryoprotection of crystals. The suitability of the resulting novel conditions is shown by the crystallization of a broad variety of protein samples and their efficiency is compared with commercially available conditions.

  13. Developing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors through Stereospecific Reactions in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Geremia, Silvano

    2016-10-31

    Protease inhibitors are key components in the chemotherapy of HIV infection. However, the appearance of viral mutants routinely compromises their clinical efficacy, creating a constant need for new and more potent inhibitors. Recently, a new class of epoxide-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease was investigated and the configuration of the epoxide carbons was demonstrated to play a crucial role in determining the binding affinity. Here we report the comparison between three crystal structures at near-atomic resolution of HIV-1 protease in complex with the epoxide-based inhibitor, revealing an in-situ epoxide ring opening triggered by a pH change in the mother solution of the crystal. Increased pH in the crystal allows a stereospecific nucleophile attack of an ammonia molecule onto an epoxide carbon, with formation of a new inhibitor containing amino-alcohol functions. The described experiments open a pathway for the development of new stereospecific protease inhibitors from a reactive lead compound.

  14. Developing HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors through Stereospecific Reactions in Protein Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folasade M. Olajuyigbe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Protease inhibitors are key components in the chemotherapy of HIV infection. However, the appearance of viral mutants routinely compromises their clinical efficacy, creating a constant need for new and more potent inhibitors. Recently, a new class of epoxide-based inhibitors of HIV-1 protease was investigated and the configuration of the epoxide carbons was demonstrated to play a crucial role in determining the binding affinity. Here we report the comparison between three crystal structures at near-atomic resolution of HIV-1 protease in complex with the epoxide-based inhibitor, revealing an in-situ epoxide ring opening triggered by a pH change in the mother solution of the crystal. Increased pH in the crystal allows a stereospecific nucleophile attack of an ammonia molecule onto an epoxide carbon, with formation of a new inhibitor containing amino-alcohol functions. The described experiments open a pathway for the development of new stereospecific protease inhibitors from a reactive lead compound.

  15. Protein crystal nucleation in pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi E

    2017-01-16

    The most powerful method for protein structure determination is X-ray crystallography which relies on the availability of high quality crystals. Obtaining protein crystals is a major bottleneck, and inducing their nucleation is of crucial importance in this field. An effective method to form crystals is to introduce nucleation-inducing heterologous materials into the crystallization solution. Porous materials are exceptionally effective at inducing nucleation. It is shown here that a combined diffusion-adsorption effect can increase protein concentration inside pores, which enables crystal nucleation even under conditions where heterogeneous nucleation on flat surfaces is absent. Provided the pore is sufficiently narrow, protein molecules approach its walls and adsorb more frequently than they can escape. The decrease in the nucleation energy barrier is calculated, exhibiting its quantitative dependence on the confinement space and the energy of interaction with the pore walls. These results provide a detailed explanation of the effectiveness of porous materials for nucleation of protein crystals, and will be useful for optimal design of such materials.

  16. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  17. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, Dalibor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 31-32 ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902; CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : pokeweed antiviral protein * flavodoxin-like protein * PSII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  18. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2003), s. 30-31 ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : antiviral proteins Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  19. Liquid nitrogen dewar for protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Gaseous Nitrogen Dewar apparatus developed by Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine for use aboard Mir and the International Space Station allows large quantities of protein samples to be crystallized in orbit. The specimens are contained either in plastic tubing (heat-sealed at each end). Biological samples are prepared with a precipitating agent in either a batch or liquid-liquid diffusion configuration. The samples are then flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen before crystallization can start. On orbit, the Dewar is placed in a quiet area of the station and the nitrogen slowly boils off (it is taken up by the environmental control system), allowing the proteins to thaw to begin crystallization. The Dewar is returned to Earth after one to four months on orbit, depending on Shuttle flight opportunities. The tubes then are analyzed for crystal presence and quality

  20. Protein Crystals as Novel Catalytic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, Alexey L.; Navia, Manuel A.

    2001-06-18

    In this era of molecular biology, protein crystallization is often considered to be a necessary first step in obtaining structural information through X-ray diffraction analysis. In a different light, protein crystals can also be thought of as materials, whose chemical and physical properties make them broadly attractive and useful across a larger spectrum of disciplines. The full potential of these protein crystalline materials has been severely restricted in practice, however, both by their inherent fragility, and by strongly held skepticism concerning their routine and predictable growth, formulation, and practical application. Fortunately, these problems have turned out to be solvable. A systematic exploration of the biophysics and biochemistry of protein crystallization has shown that one can dependably create new protein crystalline materials more or less at will. In turn, these crystals can be readily strengthened, both chemically and mechanically, to make them suitable for practical commercialization. Today, these novel materials are used as industrial catalysts on a commercial scale, in bioremediation and "green chemistry" applications, and in enantioselective chromatography of pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. In the near future, their utility will expand, to include the purification of protein drugs, formulation of direct protein therapeutics, and development of adjuvant-less vaccines.

  1. Crystallization of Spätzle, a cystine-knot protein involved in embryonic development and innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Anita; Neumann, Piotr [Institut für Biochemie und Biotechnologie, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Abteilung Physikalische Biotechnologie, Kurt-Mothes-Strasse 3, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Schierhorn, Angelika [Max-Planck-Institut für Proteinfaltung, Abteilung Massenspektrometrie, Kurt-Mothes-Strasse 3, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Stubbs, Milton T., E-mail: stubbs@biochemtech.uni-halle.de [Institut für Biochemie und Biotechnologie, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Abteilung Physikalische Biotechnologie, Kurt-Mothes-Strasse 3, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Mitteldeutsches Zentrum für Struktur und Dynamik der Proteine (MZP), Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2008-08-01

    Crystallization of the cystine-knot protein Spätzle occurred following serendipitous limited degradation of the pro-Spätzle propeptide during the crystallization experiment. The Spätzle protein is involved in both the definition of the dorsal–ventral axis during embryonic development and in the adult innate immune response. The disulfide-linked dimeric cystine-knot protein has been expressed as a proprotein in inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli and refolded in vitro by rapid dilution. Initial orthorhombic crystals that diffracted to 7 Å resolution were obtained after three months by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Optimization of the crystallization conditions resulted in orthorhombic crystals (space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.0, b = 59.2, c = 62.5 Å) that diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution in-house. The small volume of the asymmetric unit indicated that it was not possible for the crystals to contain the complete pro-Spätzle dimer. Mass spectrometry, N-terminal sequencing and Western-blot analysis revealed that the crystals contained the C-terminal disulfide-linked cystine-knot dimer. Comparison of various crystallization experiments indicated that degradation of the N-terminal prodomain was dependent on the buffer conditions.

  2. Recent Progress and Development of Crystal Structure Analysis of Enzymes and Other Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanokura, Masaru; Nagata, Koji; Miyazono, Ken-Ichi; Miyakawa, Takuya; Okai, Masahiko

    Structural biology has made tremendous progress in this decade. Here we briefly introduce the Target Proteins Research Program, a national project promoted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan. The program aims to reveal the structure and function of proteins that are of great importance in both academic research and industrial application. We also summarize the results of structure-function analyses of (i) transcriptional regulatory proteins useful for the breading of drought and heat stress tolerant crops, (ii) useful enzymes for the production of chiral compounds, and (iii) useful enzymes for the degradation of environmental pollution substances. These results can be utilized in various areas of industries, to enhance food production, to improve the efficiency of pharmaceutical compound production, and to promote the bioremediation of contaminated soil and water.

  3. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  4. Lab-on-a-Chip Based Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark J.; Brasseur, Michael M.; Spearing, Scott F.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a novel technique with which we will grow protein crystals in very small volumes, utilizing chip-based, microfluidic ("LabChip") technology. This development, which is a collaborative effort between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Caliper Technologies Corporation, promises a breakthrough in the field of protein crystal growth. Our initial results obtained from two model proteins, Lysozyme and Thaumatin, show that it is feasible to dispense and adequately mix protein and precipitant solutions on a nano-liter scale. The mixtures have shown crystal growth in volumes in the range of 10 nanoliters to 5 microliters. In addition, large diffraction quality crystals were obtained by this method. X-ray data from these crystals were shown to be of excellent quality. Our future efforts will include the further development of protein crystal growth with LabChip(trademark) technology for more complex systems. We will initially address the batch growth method, followed by the vapor diffusion method and the liquid-liquid diffusion method. The culmination of these chip developments is to lead to an on orbit protein crystallization facility on the International Space Station. Structural biologists will be invited to utilize the on orbit Iterative Biological Crystallization facility to grow high quality macromolecular crystals in microgravity.

  5. Simulation of diffusion time of small molecules in protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremia, Silvano; Campagnolo, Mara; Demitri, Nicola; Johnson, Louise N

    2006-03-01

    A simple model for evaluation of diffusion times of small molecule into protein crystals has been developed, which takes into account the physical and chemical properties both of protein crystal and the diffusing molecules. The model also includes consideration of binding and the binding affinity of a ligand to the protein. The model has been validated by simulation of experimental set-ups of several examples found in the literature. These experiments cover a wide range of situations: from small to relatively large diffusing molecules, crystals having low, medium, or high protein density, and different size. The reproduced experiments include ligand exchange in protein crystals by soaking techniques. Despite the simplifying assumptions of the model, theoretical and experimental data are in agreement with available data, with experimental diffusion times ranging from a few seconds to several hours. The method has been used successfully for planning intermediate cryotrapping experiments in maltodextrin phosphorylase crystals.

  6. Electron crystallography of three dimensional protein crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, Dilyana

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes an investigation of the potential of electron diffraction for studying three dimensional sub-micro-crystals of proteins and pharmaceuticals. A prerequisite for using electron diffraction for structural studies is the predictable availability of tiny crystals. A method for

  7. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    This Final Technical Report for NASA Grant NAG8-774 covers the period from April 27, 1989 through December 31, 1992. It covers five main topics: fluid flow studies, the influence of growth conditions on the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals, control of nucleation, the growth of lysozyme by the temperature gradient method and graphoepitaxy of protein crystals. The section on fluid flow discusses the limits of detectability in the Schlieren imaging of fluid flows around protein crystals. The isocitrate lyase study compares crystals grown terrestrially under a variety of conditions with those grown in space. The controlling factor governing the morphology of the crystals is the supersaturation. The lack of flow in the interface between the drop and the atmosphere in microgravity causes protein precipitation in the boundary layer and a lowering of the supersaturation in the drop. This lowered supersaturation leads to improved crystal morphology. Preliminary experiments with lysozyme indicated that localized temperature gradients could be used to nucleate crystals in a controlled manner. An apparatus (thermonucleator) was designed to study the controlled nucleation of protein crystals. This apparatus has been used to nucleate crystals of materials with both normal (ice-water, Rochelle salt and lysozyme) and retrograde (horse serum albumin and alpha chymotrypsinogen A) solubility. These studies have lead to the design of an new apparatus that small and more compatible with use in microgravity. Lysozyme crystals were grown by transporting nutrient from a source (lysozyme powder) to the crystal in a temperature gradient. The influence of path length and cross section on the growth rate was demonstrated. This technique can be combined with the thermonucleator to control both nucleation and growth. Graphoepitaxy utilizes a patterned substrate to orient growing crystals. In this study, silicon substrates with 10 micron grooves were used to grow crystals of catalase

  8. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-01-01

    Complementary measurements using SONICC and TPE-UVF allow the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC

  9. The plug-based nanovolume Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdts, Cory J.; Elliott, Mark; Lovell, Scott; Mixon, Mark B.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Staker, Bart L.; Nollert, Peter; Stewart, Lance

    2008-01-01

    The Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS) is a new protein-crystallization technology used to generate nanolitre-sized crystallization experiments for crystal screening and optimization. Using the MPCS, diffraction-ready crystals were grown in the plastic MPCS CrystalCard and were used to solve the structure of methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase. The Microcapillary Protein Crystallization System (MPCS) embodies a new semi-automated plug-based crystallization technology which enables nanolitre-volume screening of crystallization conditions in a plasticware format that allows crystals to be easily removed for traditional cryoprotection and X-ray diffraction data collection. Protein crystals grown in these plastic devices can be directly subjected to in situ X-ray diffraction studies. The MPCS integrates the formulation of crystallization cocktails with the preparation of the crystallization experiments. Within microfluidic Teflon tubing or the microfluidic circuitry of a plastic CrystalCard, ∼10–20 nl volume droplets are generated, each representing a microbatch-style crystallization experiment with a different chemical composition. The entire protein sample is utilized in crystallization experiments. Sparse-matrix screening and chemical gradient screening can be combined in one comprehensive ‘hybrid’ crystallization trial. The technology lends itself well to optimization by high-granularity gradient screening using optimization reagents such as precipitation agents, ligands or cryoprotectants

  10. X-ray transparent Microfluidics for Protein Crystallization and Biomineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opathalage, Achini

    Protein crystallization demands the fundamental understanding of nucleation and applying techniques to find the optimal conditions to achieve the kinetic pathway for a large and defect free crystal. Classical nucleation theory predicts that the nucleation occurs at high supersaturation conditions. In this dissertation we sought out to develop techniques to attain optimal supersaturation profile to a large defect free crystal and subject it to in-situ X-ray diffraction using microfluidics. We have developed an emulsion-based serial crystallographic technology in nanolitre-sized droplets of protein solution encapsulated in to nucleate one crystal per drop. Diffraction data are measured, one crystal at a time, from a series of room temperature crystals stored on an X-ray semi-transparent microfluidic chip, and a 93% complete data set is obtained by merging single diffraction frames taken from different un-oriented crystals. As proof of concept, the structure of Glucose Isomerase was solved to 2.1 A. We have developed a suite of X-ray semi-transparent micrfluidic devices which enables; controlled evaporation as a method of increasing supersaturation and manipulating the phase space of proteins and small molecules. We exploited the inherently high water permeability of the thin X-ray semi-transparent devices as a mean of increasing the supersaturation by controlling the evaporation. We fabricated the X-ray semi-transparent version of the PhaseChip with a thin PDMS membrane by which the storage and the reservoir layers are separated, and studies the phase transition of amorphous CaCO3.

  11. Methodology for fast evaluation of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Lúcia M. Carareto

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of the production and use of Bacillus thuringiensis in Brazil at a commercial scale faces certain difficulties, among them the establishment of efficient methodologies for the quantitation of toxic products to be commercialized. Presently, the amount of toxin is given in percentage by analyzing the samples total protein content. Such methodology however, does not measure the actual amount of active protein present in the product, since most strains express different endotoxin genes and might even produce b-toxin. Since the various types of toxins exhibit different antigenic characteristics, this work has as objective the utilization of fast immunological techniques to quantify the level of crystal protein. Crystal protein produced by a subspecies of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis was purified by ultracentrifugation and utilized to immunize rabbits and to produce hiperimmune sera. Such sera were latter used to evaluate the level of proteins on commercial bioinsecticide and on laboratory cultures of B. thuringiensis through the immunodot technique. The results were obtained by comparison of data obtained from reactions with known concentrations of crystal protein permitting to evaluate the level of such protein on various materials.

  12. Nonclassical nucleation pathways in protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2017-11-08

    Classical nucleation theory (CNT), which was established about 90 years ago, has been very successful in many research fields, and continues to be the most commonly used theory in describing the nucleation process. For a fluid-to-solid phase transition, CNT states that the solute molecules in a supersaturated solution reversibly form small clusters. Once the cluster size reaches a critical value, it becomes thermodynamically stable and favored for further growth. One of the most important assumptions of CNT is that the nucleation process is described by one reaction coordinate and all order parameters proceed simultaneously. Recent studies in experiments, computer simulations and theory have revealed nonclassical features in the early stage of nucleation. In particular, the decoupling of order parameters involved during a fluid-to-solid transition leads to the so-called two-step nucleation mechanism, in which a metastable intermediate phase (MIP) exists between the initial supersaturated solution and the final crystals. Depending on the exact free energy landscapes, the MIPs can be a high density liquid phase, mesoscopic clusters, or a pre-ordered state. In this review, we focus on the studies of nonclassical pathways in protein crystallization and discuss the applications of the various scenarios of two-step nucleation theory. In particular, we focus on protein solutions in the presence of multivalent salts, which serve as a model protein system to study the nucleation pathways. We wish to point out the unique features of proteins as model systems for further studies.

  13. Nonclassical nucleation pathways in protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fajun

    2017-11-01

    Classical nucleation theory (CNT), which was established about 90 years ago, has been very successful in many research fields, and continues to be the most commonly used theory in describing the nucleation process. For a fluid-to-solid phase transition, CNT states that the solute molecules in a supersaturated solution reversibly form small clusters. Once the cluster size reaches a critical value, it becomes thermodynamically stable and favored for further growth. One of the most important assumptions of CNT is that the nucleation process is described by one reaction coordinate and all order parameters proceed simultaneously. Recent studies in experiments, computer simulations and theory have revealed nonclassical features in the early stage of nucleation. In particular, the decoupling of order parameters involved during a fluid-to-solid transition leads to the so-called two-step nucleation mechanism, in which a metastable intermediate phase (MIP) exists between the initial supersaturated solution and the final crystals. Depending on the exact free energy landscapes, the MIPs can be a high density liquid phase, mesoscopic clusters, or a pre-ordered state. In this review, we focus on the studies of nonclassical pathways in protein crystallization and discuss the applications of the various scenarios of two-step nucleation theory. In particular, we focus on protein solutions in the presence of multivalent salts, which serve as a model protein system to study the nucleation pathways. We wish to point out the unique features of proteins as model systems for further studies.

  14. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  15. Ultratight crystal packing of a 10 kDa protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trillo-Muyo, Sergio [Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, Spanish Research Council CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, c/Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jasilionis, Andrius [Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio 21/27, 03101 Vilnius (Lithuania); Domagalski, Marcin J. [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Chruszcz, Maksymilian [University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Minor, Wladek [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Kuisiene, Nomeda [Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio 21/27, 03101 Vilnius (Lithuania); Arolas, Joan L.; Solà, Maria; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier, E-mail: xgrcri@ibmb.csic.es [Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, Spanish Research Council CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, c/Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-03-01

    The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase from G. thermoleovorans is reported; it is one of the most tightly packed protein structures reported to date. While small organic molecules generally crystallize forming tightly packed lattices with little solvent content, proteins form air-sensitive high-solvent-content crystals. Here, the crystallization and full structure analysis of a novel recombinant 10 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase are reported. The orthorhombic crystal contained only 24.5% solvent and is therefore among the most tightly packed protein lattices ever reported.

  16. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Hargreaves, David; O'Keefe, Simon; Wilson, Julie

    2015-10-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored.

  17. Controlled in meso phase crystallization--a method for the structural investigation of membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kubicek

    Full Text Available We investigated in meso crystallization of membrane proteins to develop a fast screening technology which combines features of the well established classical vapor diffusion experiment with the batch meso phase crystallization, but without premixing of protein and monoolein. It inherits the advantages of both methods, namely (i the stabilization of membrane proteins in the meso phase, (ii the control of hydration level and additive concentration by vapor diffusion. The new technology (iii significantly simplifies in meso crystallization experiments and allows the use of standard liquid handling robots suitable for 96 well formats. CIMP crystallization furthermore allows (iv direct monitoring of phase transformation and crystallization events. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR crystals of high quality and diffraction up to 1.3 Å resolution have been obtained in this approach. CIMP and the developed consumables and protocols have been successfully applied to obtain crystals of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII from Halobacterium salinarum for the first time.

  18. The contribution of polystyrene nanospheres towards the crystallization of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Kallio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallization is a slow process of trial and error and limits the amount of solved protein structures. Search of a universal heterogeneous nucleant is an effort to facilitate crystallizability of proteins. METHODOLOGY: The effect of polystyrene nanospheres on protein crystallization were tested with three commercial proteins: lysozyme, xylanase, xylose isomerase, and with five research target proteins: hydrophobins HFBI and HFBII, laccase, sarcosine dimethylglycine N-methyltransferase (SDMT, and anti-testosterone Fab fragment 5F2. The use of nanospheres both in screening and as an additive for known crystallization conditions was studied. In screening, the addition of an aqueous solution of nanosphere to the crystallization drop had a significant positive effect on crystallization success in comparison to the control screen. As an additive in hydrophobin crystallization, the nanospheres altered the crystal packing, most likely due to the amphiphilic nature of hydrophobins. In the case of laccase, nanospheres could be used as an alternative for streak-seeding, which insofar had remained the only technique to produce high-diffracting crystals. With methyltransferase SDMT the nanospheres, used also as an additive, produced fewer, larger crystals in less time. Nanospheres, combined with the streak-seeding method, produced single 5F2 Fab crystals in shorter equilibration times. CONCLUSIONS: All in all, the use of nanospheres in protein crystallization proved to be beneficial, both when screening new crystallization conditions to promote nucleation and when used as an additive to produce better quality crystals, faster. The polystyrene nanospheres are easy to use, commercially available and close to being inert, as even with amphiphilic proteins only the crystal packing is altered and the nanospheres do not interfere with the structure and function of the protein.

  19. Bacterial interactions with proteins and cells relevant to the development of life-threatening endocarditis studied by use of a quartz-crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Ries, Philip; Canjuga, Denis; Mack, Carmen; Scheideler, Lutz; Schäffer, Tilman E; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Rupp, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Implant-related infections are a major challenge in clinical routine because of severe complications, for example infective endocarditis (IE). The purpose of this study was to investigate the real-time interaction of S. gordonii with proteins and cells important in the development of IE, in a flow system, by use of a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). Acoustic sensors were biologically modified by preconditioning with sterile saliva, platelet-poor plasma (PPP), or platelet-rich plasma (PRP), followed then by perfusion of a bacterial suspension. After perfusion, additional fluorescence and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies were performed. The surface structure of S. gordonii was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Compared with S. gordonii adhesion on the abiotic sensor surface following normal mass loading indicated by a frequency decrease, adhesion on saliva, PPP, or PRP-conditioned sensors resulted in an increase in frequency. Furthermore, adhesion induced slightly increased damping signals for saliva and PPP-coated sensors but a decrease upon bacterial adhesion to PRP, indicating the formation of a more rigid biofilm. Microscopic analysis confirmed the formation of dense and vital bacterial layers and the aggregation of platelets and bacteria. In conclusion, our study shows that the complex patterns of QCM output data observed are strongly dependent on the biological substrate and adhesion mechanisms of S. gordonii. Overall, QCM sheds new light on the pathways of such severe infections as IE.

  20. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Hargreaves, David; O’Keefe, Simon; Wilson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    In a large-scale study using data from the Protein Data Bank, some of the many reported findings regarding the crystallization of proteins were investigated. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored

  1. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, Jobie [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Hargreaves, David [AstraZeneca, Darwin Building, Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); O’Keefe, Simon [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Wilson, Julie, E-mail: julie.wilson@york.ac.uk [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-23

    In a large-scale study using data from the Protein Data Bank, some of the many reported findings regarding the crystallization of proteins were investigated. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored.

  2. Approach for growth of high-quality and large protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Hiroyoshi, E-mail: matsumura@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST (Japan); SOSHO Inc., Osaka 541-0053 (Japan); Sugiyama, Shigeru; Hirose, Mika; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Maruyama, Mihoko; Murai, Ryota [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST (Japan); Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST (Japan); SOSHO Inc., Osaka 541-0053 (Japan); Murakami, Satoshi [JST (Japan); SOSHO Inc., Osaka 541-0053 (Japan); Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Mori, Yusuke; Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST (Japan); SOSHO Inc., Osaka 541-0053 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    Three crystallization methods, including crystallization in the presence of a semi-solid agarose gel, top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) and a large-scale hanging-drop method, have previously been presented. In this study, crystallization has been further evaluated in the presence of a semi-solid agarose gel by crystallizing additional proteins. A novel crystallization method combining TSSG and the large-scale hanging-drop method has also been developed. Three crystallization methods for growing large high-quality protein crystals, i.e. crystallization in the presence of a semi-solid agarose gel, top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) and a large-scale hanging-drop method, have previously been presented. In this study the effectiveness of crystallization in the presence of a semi-solid agarose gel has been further evaluated by crystallizing additional proteins in the presence of 2.0% (w/v) agarose gel, resulting in complete gelification with high mechanical strength. In TSSG the seed crystals are hung by a seed holder protruding from the top of the growth vessel to prevent polycrystallization. In the large-scale hanging-drop method, a cut pipette tip was used to maintain large-scale droplets consisting of protein–precipitant solution. Here a novel crystallization method that combines TSSG and the large-scale hanging-drop method is reported. A large and single crystal of lysozyme was obtained by this method.

  3. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection. PMID:23999307

  4. Automating the application of smart materials for protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurshid, Sahir; Govada, Lata; EL-Sharif, Hazim F.; Reddy, Subrayal M.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2015-01-01

    The first semi-liquid, non-protein nucleating agent for automated protein crystallization trials is described. This ‘smart material’ is demonstrated to induce crystal growth and will provide a simple, cost-effective tool for scientists in academia and industry. The fabrication and validation of the first semi-liquid nonprotein nucleating agent to be administered automatically to crystallization trials is reported. This research builds upon prior demonstration of the suitability of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs; known as ‘smart materials’) for inducing protein crystal growth. Modified MIPs of altered texture suitable for high-throughput trials are demonstrated to improve crystal quality and to increase the probability of success when screening for suitable crystallization conditions. The application of these materials is simple, time-efficient and will provide a potent tool for structural biologists embarking on crystallization trials

  5. Protein crystals as scanned probes for recognition atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, Nissanka S; Hafner, Jason H

    2005-12-01

    Lysozyme crystal growth has been localized at the tip of a conventional silicon nitride cantilever through seeded nucleation. After cross-linking with glutaraldehyde, lysozyme protein crystal tips image gold nanoparticles and grating standards with a resolution comparable to that of conventional tips. Force spectra between the lysozyme crystal tips and surfaces covered with antilysozyme reveal an adhesion force that drops significantly upon blocking with free lysozyme, thus confirming that lysozyme crystal tips can detect molecular recognition interactions.

  6. Protein crystal structure analysis using synchrotron radiation at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa

    1999-01-01

    We can now obtain a detailed picture of protein, allowing the identification of individual atoms, by interpreting the diffraction of X-rays from a protein crystal at atomic resolution, 1.2 A or better. As of this writing, about 45 unique protein structures beyond 1.2 A resolution have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This review provides a simplified overview of how protein crystallographers use such diffraction data to solve, refine, and validate protein structures. (author)

  7. Automating the application of smart materials for protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Sahir; Govada, Lata; El-Sharif, Hazim F; Reddy, Subrayal M; Chayen, Naomi E

    2015-03-01

    The fabrication and validation of the first semi-liquid nonprotein nucleating agent to be administered automatically to crystallization trials is reported. This research builds upon prior demonstration of the suitability of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs; known as `smart materials') for inducing protein crystal growth. Modified MIPs of altered texture suitable for high-throughput trials are demonstrated to improve crystal quality and to increase the probability of success when screening for suitable crystallization conditions. The application of these materials is simple, time-efficient and will provide a potent tool for structural biologists embarking on crystallization trials.

  8. Powder diffraction from a continuous microjet of submicrometer protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, D A; Chapman, H N; Deponte, D; Doak, R B; Fromme, P; Hembree, G; Hunter, M; Marchesini, S; Schmidt, K; Spence, J; Starodub, D; Weierstall, U

    2008-11-01

    Atomic-resolution structures from small proteins have recently been determined from high-quality powder diffraction patterns using a combination of stereochemical restraints and Rietveld refinement [Von Dreele (2007), J. Appl. Cryst. 40, 133-143; Margiolaki et al. (2007), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 11865-11871]. While powder diffraction data have been obtained from batch samples of small crystal-suspensions, which are exposed to X-rays for long periods of time and undergo significant radiation damage, the proof-of-concept that protein powder diffraction data from nanocrystals of a membrane protein can be obtained using a continuous microjet is shown. This flow-focusing aerojet has been developed to deliver a solution of hydrated protein nanocrystals to an X-ray beam for diffraction analysis. This method requires neither the crushing of larger polycrystalline samples nor any techniques to avoid radiation damage such as cryocooling. Apparatus to record protein powder diffraction in this manner has been commissioned, and in this paper the first powder diffraction patterns from a membrane protein, photosystem I, with crystallite sizes of less than 500 nm are presented. These preliminary patterns show the lowest-order reflections, which agree quantitatively with theoretical calculations of the powder profile. The results also serve to test our aerojet injector system, with future application to femtosecond diffraction in free-electron X-ray laser schemes, and for serial crystallography using a single-file beam of aligned hydrated molecules.

  9. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The sequence of the cloned crystal protein gene showed almost complete homology with a mosquitocidal toxin gene from Bacillus .... diet or by topical application on food substrates as .... has very high similarity (99.74%) at DNA level with.

  10. The biochemistry of the protein crystal toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Fast

    1985-01-01

    The crystal consists of dimeric protein subunits. The monomer peptide chains are held together in the subunit and the subunit in the crystal by disulfide and non-covalent bonds. The monomer peptide has a molecular weight of about 130 kdaltons which, in the presence of proteases, is hydrolyzed to a protease-resistant-protein of 65 kda that is toxic both to larvae by...

  11. Some Aspects of Crystal Centering During X-ray High-throughput Protein Crystallography Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaponov, Yu. A.; Matsugaki, N.; Sasajima, K.; Igarashi, N.; Wakatsuki, S.

    A set of algorithms and procedures of a crystal loop centering during X-ray high-throughput protein crystallography experiment has been designed and developed. A simple algorithm of the crystal loop detection and preliminary recognition has been designed and developed. The crystal loop detection algorithm is based on finding out the crystal loop ending point (opposite to the crystal loop pin) using image cross section (digital image column) profile analysis. The crystal loop preliminary recognition procedure is based on finding out the crystal loop sizes and position using image cross section profile analysis. The crystal loop fine recognition procedure based on Hooke-Jeeves pattern search method with an ellipse as a fitting pattern has been designed and developed. The procedure of restoring missing coordinate of the crystal loop is described. Based on developed algorithms and procedures the optimal auto-centering procedure has been designed and developed. A procedure of optimal manual crystal centering (Two Clicks Procedure) has been designed and developed. Developed procedures have been integrated into control software system PCCS installed at crystallography beamlines Photon Factory BL5A and PF-AR NW12, KEK.

  12. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection

  13. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi, E-mail: kumasaka@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  14. Investigating the nucleation of protein crystals with hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadri, A [Departement ' Mecanismes et Macromolecules de la Synthese Proteique et Cristallogenese' UPR 9002, Institut de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Damak, M [Laboratoire de Chimie des Substances Naturelles, Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, BP 802, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Jenner, G [Laboratoire de Piezochimie Organique, UMR 7123, Faculte de Chimie, Universite Louis Pasteur, 1 rue Blaise Pascal, F-67008 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Lorber, B [Departement ' Mecanismes et Macromolecules de la Synthese Proteique et Cristallogenese' UPR 9002, Institut de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Giege, R [Departement ' Mecanismes et Macromolecules de la Synthese Proteique et Cristallogenese' UPR 9002, Institut de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire du CNRS, 15 rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2003-12-17

    Hydrostatic pressure in the 0.1-75 MPa range has been used as a non-invasive tool to study the crystallization process of the tetragonal crystal form of the protein thaumatin (M{sub r} 22 200). Crystals were prepared within agarose gel and at temperatures in the range from 283 to 303 K. The solubility, i.e. the concentration of soluble macromolecules remaining in equilibrium with the crystals, decreases when the pressure increases and when the temperature decreases. High pressure was used to probe the nucleation behaviour of thaumatin. The pressure dependence of the nucleation rate leads to an activation volume of -46.5cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1}. It is shown that an increase in pressure decreases the enthalpy, the entropy and the free energy of crystallization of thaumatin. The data are discussed in the light of the results of crystallographic analyses and of the structure of the protein.

  15. Investigating the nucleation of protein crystals with hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadri, A; Damak, M; Jenner, G; Lorber, B; Giege, R

    2003-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure in the 0.1-75 MPa range has been used as a non-invasive tool to study the crystallization process of the tetragonal crystal form of the protein thaumatin (M r 22 200). Crystals were prepared within agarose gel and at temperatures in the range from 283 to 303 K. The solubility, i.e. the concentration of soluble macromolecules remaining in equilibrium with the crystals, decreases when the pressure increases and when the temperature decreases. High pressure was used to probe the nucleation behaviour of thaumatin. The pressure dependence of the nucleation rate leads to an activation volume of -46.5cm 3 mol -1 . It is shown that an increase in pressure decreases the enthalpy, the entropy and the free energy of crystallization of thaumatin. The data are discussed in the light of the results of crystallographic analyses and of the structure of the protein

  16. The liquid protein phase in crystallization: a case study—intact immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; Malkin, Alexander J.; McPherson, Alexander

    2001-11-01

    A common observation by protein chemists has been the appearance, for many proteins in aqueous solutions, of oil like droplets, or in more extreme cases the formation of a second oil like phase. These may accompany the formation of precipitate in "salting out" or "salting in' procedures, but more commonly appear in place of any precipitate. Such phase separations also occur, with even greater frequency, in the presence of polymeric precipitants such as polyethyleneglycol (PEG). In general the appearance of a second liquid phase has been taken as indicative of protein aggregation, though an aggregate state distinctly different from that characteristic of amorphous precipitate. While the latter is thought to be composed of linear and branched assemblies, polymers of a sort, the oil phase suggests a more compact, three-dimensional, but fluid state. An important property of an alternate, fluid phase is that it can mediate transitions between other states, for example, between protein molecules free in solution and protein molecules immobilized in amorphous precipitate or crystals. The "liquid protein" phase can be readily observed in many crystallization experiments either prior to the appearance of visible crystals, or directly participating in the crystal growth process. In some cases the relationship between the liquid phase and developing crystals is intimate. Crystals grow directly from the liquid phase, or appear only after the visible formation of the liquid phase. We describe here our experience with a class of macromolecules, immunoglobulins, and particularly IDEC-151, an IgG specific for CD4 on human lymphocytes. This protein has been crystallized from a Jeffamine-LiSO 4 mother liquor and, its crystallization illustrates many of the features associated with the liquid protein, or protein rich phase.

  17. Protein crystal growth studies at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Long, Marianna M.; Moore, Karen M.; Harrington, Michael; McDonald, William T.; Smith, Craig D.; Bray, Terry; Lewis, Johanna; Crysel, William B.; Weise, Lance D.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) has been involved in fundamental studies of protein crystal growth (PCG) in microgravity and in our earth-based laboratories. A large group of co-investigators from academia and industry participated in these experiments by providing protein samples and by performing the x-ray crystallographic analysis. These studies have clearly demonstrated the usefulness of a microgravity environment for enhancing the quality and size of protein crystals. Review of the vapor diffusion (VDA) PCG results from nineteen space shuttle missions is given in this paper

  18. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenberg, René [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Delmas, Olivier [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J. [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Bourhy, Hervé [UPRE Lyssavirus Dynamics and Host Adaptation, WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, Institut Pasteur, 28 Rue du Docteur Roux, 75724 Paris CEDEX 15 (France); Grimes, Jonathan M., E-mail: jonathan@strubi.ox.ac.uk [Division of Structural Biology and Oxford Protein Production Facility, The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Oxford University, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  19. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-01-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6 1 22 or P6 5 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress

  20. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, A.A.; Kouwer, P.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a...

  1. Crystal Structure of a Lipid G Protein-Coupled Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Michael A; Roth, Christopher B; Jo, Euijung; Griffith, Mark T; Scott, Fiona L; Reinhart, Greg; Desale, Hans; Clemons, Bryan; Cahalan, Stuart M; Schuerer, Stephan C; Sanna, M Germana; Han, Gye Won; Kuhn, Peter; Rosen, Hugh; Stevens, Raymond C [Scripps; (Receptos)

    2012-03-01

    The lyso-phospholipid sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development and integrity, heart rate, and vascular tone and maturation by activating G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. Here, we present the crystal structure of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 fused to T4-lysozyme (S1P1-T4L) in complex with an antagonist sphingolipid mimic. Extracellular access to the binding pocket is occluded by the amino terminus and extracellular loops of the receptor. Access is gained by ligands entering laterally between helices I and VII within the transmembrane region of the receptor. This structure, along with mutagenesis, agonist structure-activity relationship data, and modeling, provides a detailed view of the molecular recognition and requirement for hydrophobic volume that activates S1P1, resulting in the modulation of immune and stromal cell responses.

  2. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Hau B.; Hung, Li-Wei; Yeates, Todd O.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    A strategy using a new split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a modular binding partner to form stable protein complexes with a target protein is presented. The modular split GFP may open the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants. A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP β-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization

  3. Protein crystal growth results from the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Moore, K. M.; Vanderwoerd, M.; Bray, T. L.; Smith, C.; Carson, M.; Narayana, S. V. L.; Rosenblum, W. M.; Carter, D.; Clark, A. D, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Protein crystal growth experiments have been performed by this laboratory on 18 Space Shuttle missions since April, 1985. In addition, a number of microgravity experiments also have been performed and reported by other investigators. These Space Shuttle missions have been used to grow crystals of a variety of proteins using vapor diffusion, liquid diffusion, and temperature-induced crystallization techniques. The United States Microgravity Laboratory - 1 mission (USML-1, June 25 - July 9, 1992) was a Spacelab mission dedicated to experiments involved in materials processing. New protein crystal growth hardware was developed to allow in orbit examination of initial crystal growth results, the knowledge from which was used on subsequent days to prepare new crystal growth experiments. In addition, new seeding hardware and techniques were tested as well as techniques that would prepare crystals for analysis by x-ray diffraction, a capability projected for the planned Space Station. Hardware that was specifically developed for the USML-1 mission will be discussed along with the experimental results from this mission.

  4. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing Linear Epitope: Illustration by Three Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Proteins of Genetically Modified Cotton, Maize, and Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Ning, Xiangxue; Wang, Baomin; Liu, Yunjun; Li, Qing X

    2017-11-22

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac, Cry1Ia1, and Cry1Ie are δ-endotoxin insecticidal proteins widely implemented in genetically modified organisms (GMO), such as cotton, maize, and potato. Western blot assay integrates electrophoresis separation power and antibody high specificity for monitoring specific exogenous proteins expressed in GMO. Procedures for evoking monoclonal antibody (mAb) for Western blot were poorly documented. In the present study, Cry1Ac partially denatured at 100 °C for 5 min was used as an immunogen to develop mAbs selectively recognizing a linear epitope of Cry1Ac for Western blot. mAb 5E9C6 and 3E6E2 selected with sandwich ELISA strongly recognized the heat semidenatured Cry1Ac. Particularly, 3E6E2 recognized both E. coli and cotton seed expressed Cry1Ac in Western blot. Such strategy of using partially denatured proteins as immunogens and using sandwich ELISA for mAb screening was also successfully demonstrated with production of mAbs against Cry1Ie for Western blot assay in maize.

  5. The role of shape vs. patches in protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Jens; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    Proteins fold into a multitude of three-dimensional native structures. The structures of over 100,000 known proteins are deposited in the protein data bank, and most of them have been determined through X-ray crystallography. We ask the question if the role of shape in protein crystallization can be isolated using simulation. Current computational studies show that patchy complementary contacts stabilize experimentally observed P212121 crystal structures for relatively globular protein using spherical protein models. Here we study an anisotropic rigid shape model of green fluorescent protein based on a coarse-grained representation of the atomic coordinates. Using GPU-accelerated molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the experimentally found crystal structure can be stabilized in self-assembly by using complementary attractive patches, confirming the earlier findings. However, we discuss the additional roles of solvent mediated and electrostatic interactions, depletion effects and the self-assembly properties of a purely hard shape model in stabilizing different assemblies. Our findings shed light on fundamental assembly mechanisms in colloidal systems with many competing interactions.

  6. Crystallization of bi-functional ligand protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Claudia; Vera, Laura; Devel, Laurent; Catalani, Maria Pia; Czarny, Bertrand; Cassar-Lajeunesse, Evelyn; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Dive, Vincent; Stura, Enrico Adriano

    2013-06-01

    Homodimerization is important in signal transduction and can play a crucial role in many other biological systems. To obtaining structural information for the design of molecules able to control the signalization pathways, the proteins involved will have to be crystallized in complex with ligands that induce dimerization. Bi-functional drugs have been generated by linking two ligands together chemically and the relative crystallizability of complexes with mono-functional and bi-functional ligands has been evaluated. There are problems associated with crystallization with such ligands, but overall, the advantages appear to be greater than the drawbacks. The study involves two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-12 and MMP-9. Using flexible and rigid linkers we show that it is possible to control the crystal packing and that by changing the ligand-enzyme stoichiometric ratio, one can toggle between having one bi-functional ligand binding to two enzymes and having the same ligand bound to each enzyme. The nature of linker and its point of attachment on the ligand can be varied to aid crystallization, and such variations can also provide valuable structural information about the interactions made by the linker with the protein. We report here the crystallization and structure determination of seven ligand-dimerized complexes. These results suggest that the use of bi-functional drugs can be extended beyond the realm of protein dimerization to include all drug design projects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Anna J.; Armour, Wes; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R.; Horrell, Sam; McAuley, Katherine E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-01-01

    The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolec...

  8. A chemical library to screen protein and protein-ligand crystallization using a versatile microfluidic platform

    OpenAIRE

    Gerard , Charline ,; Ferry , Gilles; Vuillard , Laurent ,; Boutin , Jean ,; Ferte , Nathalie ,; Grossier , Romain ,; Candoni , Nadine ,; Veesler , Stéphane ,

    2018-01-01

    Here, we describe a plug-and-play microfluidic platform, suitable for protein crystallization. The droplet factory is designed to generate hundreds of droplets as small as a few nanoliters (2 to 10nL) for screening and optimization of crystallization conditions. Commercially-available microfluidic junctions and tubing are combined to create the appropriate geometry. In addition, a " chemical library " is produced in tubing. The microfluidic geometry for a " crystallization agent-based chemica...

  9. Two types of amorphous protein particles facilitate crystal nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tomoya; Kimura, Yuki; Vekilov, Peter G; Furukawa, Erika; Shirai, Manabu; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Van Driessche, Alexander E S; Tsukamoto, Katsuo

    2017-02-28

    Nucleation, the primary step in crystallization, dictates the number of crystals, the distribution of their sizes, the polymorph selection, and other crucial properties of the crystal population. We used time-resolved liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to perform an in situ examination of the nucleation of lysozyme crystals. Our TEM images revealed that mesoscopic clusters, which are similar to those previously assumed to consist of a dense liquid and serve as nucleation precursors, are actually amorphous solid particles (ASPs) and act only as heterogeneous nucleation sites. Crystalline phases never form inside them. We demonstrate that a crystal appears within a noncrystalline particle assembling lysozyme on an ASP or a container wall, highlighting the role of heterogeneous nucleation. These findings represent a significant departure from the existing formulation of the two-step nucleation mechanism while reaffirming the role of noncrystalline particles. The insights gained may have significant implications in areas that rely on the production of protein crystals, such as structural biology, pharmacy, and biophysics, and for the fundamental understanding of crystallization mechanisms.

  10. Protein sensing by nanofluidic crystal and its signal enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Jianming; Du, Hongtan; Wang, Wei; Chu, Ming; Wang, Yuedan; Li, Haichao; Alice Zhang, Haixia; Wu, Wengang; Li, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Nanofluidics has a unique property that ionic conductance across a nanometer-sized confined space is strongly affected by the space surface charge density, which can be utilized to construct electrical read-out biosensor. Based on this principle, this work demonstrated a novel protein sensor along with a sandwich signal enhancement approach. Nanoparticles with designed aptamer onside are assembled in a suspended micropore to form a 3-dimensional network of nanometer-sized interstices, named as nanofluidic crystal hereafter, as the basic sensing unit. Proteins captured by aptamers will change the surface charge density of nanoparticles and thereby can be detected by monitoring the ionic conductance across this nanofluidic crystal. Another aptamer can further enlarge the variations of the surface charge density by forming a sandwich structure (capturing aptamer/protein/signal enhancement aptamer) and the read-out conductance as well. The preliminary experimental results indicated that human α-thrombin was successfully detected by the corresponding aptamer modified nanofluidic crystal with the limit of detection of 5 nM (0.18 μg/ml) and the read-out signal was enhanced up to 3 folds by using another thrombin aptamer. Being easy to graft probe, facile and low-cost to prepare the nano-device, and having an electrical read-out, the present nanofluidic crystal scheme is a promising and universal strategy for protein sensing. PMID:24404017

  11. Heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on fluorinated layered silicate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Ino

    Full Text Available Here, we describe an improved system for protein crystallization based on heterogeneous nucleation using fluorinated layered silicate. In addition, we also investigated the mechanism of nucleation on the silicate surface. Crystallization of lysozyme using silicates with different chemical compositions indicated that fluorosilicates promoted nucleation whereas the silicates without fluorine did not. The use of synthesized saponites for lysozyme crystallization confirmed that the substitution of hydroxyl groups contained in the lamellae structure for fluorine atoms is responsible for the nucleation-inducing property of the nucleant. Crystallization of twelve proteins with a wide range of pI values revealed that the nucleation promoting effect of the saponites tended to increase with increased substitution rate. Furthermore, the saponite with the highest fluorine content promoted nucleation in all the test proteins regardless of their overall net charge. Adsorption experiments of proteins on the saponites confirmed that the density of adsorbed molecules increased according to the substitution rate, thereby explaining the heterogeneous nucleation on the silicate surface.

  12. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, M.

    2007-03-01

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  13. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-01-01

    The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6122 or P6522, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress. PMID:18391421

  14. The Growth of Protein Crystals Using McDUCK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Felicia; Wilson, Lori; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Most of the current microgravity crystal growth hardware is optimized to produce crystals within the limited time available on orbit. This often results in the actual nucleation and growth process being rushed or the system not coming to equilibrium within the limited time available. Longer duration hardware exists, but one cannot readily pick out crystals grown early versus those which nucleated and grew more slowly. We have devised a long duration apparatus, the Multi-chamber Dialysis Unit for Crystallization Kinetics, or McDUCK. This apparatus-is a series of protein chambers, stacked upon a precipitant reservoir chamber. All chambers are separated by a dialysis membrane, which serves to pass small molecules while retaining the protein. The volume of the Precipitant chamber is equal to the sum of the volumes of the protein chamber. In operation, the appropriate chambers are filled with precipitant solution or protein solution, and the McDUCK is placed standing upright, with the precipitant chamber on the bottom. The precipitant diffuses upwards over time, with the time to reach equilibration a function of the diffusivity of the precipitant and the overall length of the diffusion pathway. Typical equilibration times are approximately 2-4 months, and one can readily separate rapid from slow nucleation and growth crystals. An advantage on Earth is that the vertical precipitant concentration gradient dominates that of the solute, thus dampening out solute density gradient driven convective flows. However, large Earth-grown crystals have so far tended to be more two dimensional. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of lysozyme crystals grown in McDUCK have indicated that the best, and largest, come from the middle chambers, suggesting that there is an optimal growth rate. Further, the improvements in diffraction resolution have been better signal to noise ratios in the low resolution data, not an increase in resolution overall. Due to the persistently large crystals

  15. Science Issues Associated with the Use of a Microfluidic Chip Designed Specifically for Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Anna M.; Monaco, Lisa; Barnes, Cindy; Spearing, Scott; Jenkins, Andy; Johnson, Todd; Mayer, Derek; Cole, Helen

    2003-01-01

    The Iterative Biological Crystallization team in partnership with Caliper Technologies has produced a prototype microfluidic chip for batch crystallization that has been designed and tested. The chip is designed for the mixing and dispensing of up to five solutions with possible variation of the recipe being delivered to two growth wells. Developments that have led to the successful on-chip crystallization of a few model proteins have required investigative insight into many different areas, including fluid mixing dynamics, surface treatments, quantification and fidelity of reagent delivery. This presentation will encompass the ongoing studies and data accumulated toward these efforts.

  16. Four crystal forms of a Bence-Jones protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Debora L.; Henschen-Edman, Agnes H.; McPherson, Alexander, E-mail: amcphers@uci.edu [Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, 560 Steinhaus Hall, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Four crystal forms have been grown and characterized by X-ray diffraction of a Bence-Jones protein collected from the urine of a multiple myeloma patient more than 40 y ago. The trigonal crystal form may shed some light on the formation of fibrils common to certain storage diseases. Four crystal forms have been grown and characterized by X-ray diffraction of a Bence-Jones protein collected from the urine of a multiple myeloma patient more than 40 years ago. Closely related tetragonal and orthorhombic forms belonging to space groups P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.7, c = 182.1 and a = 67.7, b = 69.4, c = 87.3 Å, diffract to 1.5 and 1.9 Å, respectively. Two closely related trigonal forms, both belonging to space group P3{sub 1}21 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 154.3 Å but differing by a doubling of the c axis, one 46.9 Å and the other 94.0 Å, diffract to 2.9 and 2.6 Å resolution, respectively. The trigonal crystal of short c-axis length shows a positive indication of twinning. The trigonal crystal of longer c axis, which appeared only after eight months of incubation at room temperature, is likely to be composed of proteolytically degraded molecules and unlike the other crystal forms contains two entire Bence-Jones dimers in the asymmetric unit. This latter crystal form may shed some light on the formation of fibrils common to certain storage diseases.

  17. Four crystal forms of a Bence-Jones protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Debora L.; Henschen-Edman, Agnes H.; McPherson, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Four crystal forms have been grown and characterized by X-ray diffraction of a Bence-Jones protein collected from the urine of a multiple myeloma patient more than 40 y ago. The trigonal crystal form may shed some light on the formation of fibrils common to certain storage diseases. Four crystal forms have been grown and characterized by X-ray diffraction of a Bence-Jones protein collected from the urine of a multiple myeloma patient more than 40 years ago. Closely related tetragonal and orthorhombic forms belonging to space groups P4 3 2 1 2 and P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.7, c = 182.1 and a = 67.7, b = 69.4, c = 87.3 Å, diffract to 1.5 and 1.9 Å, respectively. Two closely related trigonal forms, both belonging to space group P3 1 21 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 154.3 Å but differing by a doubling of the c axis, one 46.9 Å and the other 94.0 Å, diffract to 2.9 and 2.6 Å resolution, respectively. The trigonal crystal of short c-axis length shows a positive indication of twinning. The trigonal crystal of longer c axis, which appeared only after eight months of incubation at room temperature, is likely to be composed of proteolytically degraded molecules and unlike the other crystal forms contains two entire Bence-Jones dimers in the asymmetric unit. This latter crystal form may shed some light on the formation of fibrils common to certain storage diseases

  18. Models of protein-ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Marc C; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein-ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein-ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein-ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein-ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein-ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein-ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein-ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved.

  19. Comparison of NMR and crystal structures highlights conformational isomerism in protein active sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Geralt, Michael; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Horst, Reto; Herrmann, Torsten; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Tools for systematic comparisons of NMR and crystal structures developed by the JCSG were applied to two proteins with known functions: the T. maritima anti-σ factor antagonist TM1081 and the mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase A2LD1 (gi:13879369). In an attempt to exploit the complementarity of crystal and NMR data, the combined use of the two structure-determination techniques was explored for the initial steps in the challenge of searching proteins of unknown functions for putative active sites. The JCSG has recently developed a protocol for systematic comparisons of high-quality crystal and NMR structures of proteins. In this paper, the extent to which this approach can provide function-related information on the two functionally annotated proteins TM1081, a Thermotoga maritima anti-σ factor antagonist, and A2LD1 (gi:13879369), a mouse γ-glutamylamine cyclotransferase, is explored. The NMR structures of the two proteins have been determined in solution at 313 and 298 K, respectively, using the current JCSG protocol based on the software package UNIO for extensive automation. The corresponding crystal structures were solved by the JCSG at 100 K and 1.6 Å resolution and at 100 K and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. The NMR and crystal structures of the two proteins share the same overall molecular architectures. However, the precision of the structure determination along the amino-acid sequence varies over a significantly wider range in the NMR structures than in the crystal structures. Thereby, in each of the two NMR structures about 65% of the residues have displacements below the average and in both proteins the less well ordered residues include large parts of the active sites, in addition to some highly solvent-exposed surface areas. Whereas the latter show increased disorder in the crystal and in solution, the active-site regions display increased displacements only in the NMR structures, where they undergo local conformational exchange on the

  20. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-05-16

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material?

  1. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Alvarez Fernandez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material?

  2. Screening and Crystallization Plates for Manual and High-throughput Protein Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Berejnov, Viatcheslav (Inventor); Kalinin, Yevgeniy (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    In one embodiment, a crystallization and screening plate comprises a plurality of cells open at a top and a bottom, a frame that defines the cells in the plate, and at least two films. The first film seals a top of the plate and the second film seals a bottom of the plate. At least one of the films is patterned to strongly pin the contact lines of drops dispensed onto it, fixing their position and shape. The present invention also includes methods and other devices for manual and high-throughput protein crystal growth.

  3. Crystal structure of human protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalyt...... as a docking partner for various protein kinases. Furthermore it shows an inter-domain mobility in the catalytic subunit known to be functionally important in protein kinases and detected here for the first time directly within one crystal structure.......The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalytic...... subunits, which make no direct contact with one another. Each catalytic subunit interacts with both regulatory chains, predominantly via an extended C-terminal tail of the regulatory subunit. The CK2 structure is consistent with its constitutive activity and with a flexible role of the regulatory subunit...

  4. Precise Manipulation and Patterning of Protein Crystals for Macromolecular Crystallography Using Surface Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Zhou, Weijie; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Yennawar, Neela H; French, Jarrod B; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-06-01

    Advances in modern X-ray sources and detector technology have made it possible for crystallographers to collect usable data on crystals of only a few micrometers or less in size. Despite these developments, sample handling techniques have significantly lagged behind and often prevent the full realization of current beamline capabilities. In order to address this shortcoming, a surface acoustic wave-based method for manipulating and patterning crystals is developed. This method, which does not damage the fragile protein crystals, can precisely manipulate and pattern micrometer and submicrometer-sized crystals for data collection and screening. The technique is robust, inexpensive, and easy to implement. This method not only promises to significantly increase efficiency and throughput of both conventional and serial crystallography experiments, but will also make it possible to collect data on samples that were previously intractable. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A convenient tool for gas derivatization using fine-needle capillary mounting for protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Makino, Masatomo; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A convenient gas-derivatization tool for protein crystals is presented in combination with a fine-needle capillary and a gas-pressure regulator. Gas derivatization of protein crystals is useful not only to analyse gas-binding proteins but also to solve the phase problem of X-ray crystallography by using noble gases. However, the gas pressurization tools for these experiments are often elaborate and need to release the gas before flash-cooling. To simplify this step, a procedure using a fine-needle capillary to mount and flash-cool protein crystals under the pressurization of gases has been developed. After the crystals are picked up with the capillary, the capillary is sealed with an adhesive and then connected directly to a gas regulator. The quality of the diffraction data using this method is comparable with that of data from conventional pressurization procedures. The preparation of xenon-derivatives of hen egg-white lysozyme using this method was a success. In the derivatives, two new xenon binding sites were found and one of their sites vanished by releasing the gas. This observation shows the availability of flash-cooling under gas pressurization. This procedure is simple and useful for preparing gas-derivative crystals

  6. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  7. Anchoring protein crystals to mounting loops with hydrogel using inkjet technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-11-01

    X-ray crystallography is an important technique for structure-based drug discovery, mainly because it is the only technique that can reveal whether a ligand binds to the target protein as well as where and how it binds. However, ligand screening by X-ray crystallography involves a crystal-soaking experiment, which is usually performed manually. Thus, the throughput is not satisfactory for screening large numbers of candidate ligands. In this study, a technique to anchor protein crystals to mounting loops by using gel and inkjet technology has been developed; the method allows soaking of the mounted crystals in ligand-containing solution. This new technique may assist in the design of a fully automated drug-screening pipeline.

  8. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Anna J.; Armour, Wes; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R.; Horrell, Sam; McAuley, Katherine E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-01-01

    A comparison of X-ray diffraction and radiographic techniques for the location and characterization of protein crystals is demonstrated on membrane protein crystals mounted within lipid cubic phase material. The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required

  9. Modeling of protein electrophoresis in silica colloidal crystals having brush layers of polyacrylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsall, Robert E.; Koshel, Brooke M.; Hua, Yimin; Ratnayaka, Saliya N.; Wirth, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    Sieving of proteins in silica colloidal crystals of mm dimensions is characterized for particle diameters of nominally 350 and 500 nm, where the colloidal crystals are chemically modified with a brush layer of polyacrylamide. A model is developed that relates the reduced electrophoretic mobility to the experimentally measurable porosity. The model fits the data with no adjustable parameters for the case of silica colloidal crystals packed in capillaries, for which independent measurements of the pore radii were made from flow data. The model also fits the data for electrophoresis in a highly ordered colloidal crystal formed in a channel, where the unknown pore radius was used as a fitting parameter. Plate heights as small as 0.4 μm point to the potential for miniaturized separations. Band broadening increases as the pore radius approaches the protein radius, indicating that the main contribution to broadening is the spatial heterogeneity of the pore radius. The results quantitatively support the notion that sieving occurs for proteins in silica colloidal crystals, and facilitate design of new separations that would benefit from miniaturization. PMID:23229163

  10. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Anna J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Armour, Wes [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Oxford e-Research Centre, 7 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3QG (United Kingdom); Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Horrell, Sam [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); McAuley, Katherine E.; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    A comparison of X-ray diffraction and radiographic techniques for the location and characterization of protein crystals is demonstrated on membrane protein crystals mounted within lipid cubic phase material. The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required.

  11. Systematic comparison of crystal and NMR protein structures deposited in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikic, Kresimir; Tomic, Sanja; Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-09-03

    Nearly all the macromolecular three-dimensional structures deposited in Protein Data Bank were determined by either crystallographic (X-ray) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. This paper reports a systematic comparison of the crystallographic and NMR results deposited in the files of the Protein Data Bank, in order to find out to which extent these information can be aggregated in bioinformatics. A non-redundant data set containing 109 NMR - X-ray structure pairs of nearly identical proteins was derived from the Protein Data Bank. A series of comparisons were performed by focusing the attention towards both global features and local details. It was observed that: (1) the RMDS values between NMR and crystal structures range from about 1.5 Å to about 2.5 Å; (2) the correlation between conformational deviations and residue type reveals that hydrophobic amino acids are more similar in crystal and NMR structures than hydrophilic amino acids; (3) the correlation between solvent accessibility of the residues and their conformational variability in solid state and in solution is relatively modest (correlation coefficient = 0.462); (4) beta strands on average match better between NMR and crystal structures than helices and loops; (5) conformational differences between loops are independent of crystal packing interactions in the solid state; (6) very seldom, side chains buried in the protein interior are observed to adopt different orientations in the solid state and in solution.

  12. Structure of a second crystal form of Bence-Jones protein Loc: Strikingly different domain associations in two crystal forms of a single protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, M.; Ainsworth, C.; Xu, Z.B.; Carperos, W.; Olsen, K.; Solomon, A.; Stevens, F.J.; Chang, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have determined the structure of the immunoglobulin light-chain dimer Loc in a second crystal form that was grown from distilled water. The crystal structure was determined to 2.8-angstrom resolution; the R factor is 0.22. The two variable domains are related by local 2-fold axes and form an antigen binding pocket. The variable domain-variable domain interaction observed in this crystal form differs from the one exhibited by the protein when crystallized from ammonium sulfate in which the two variable domains formed a protrusion. The structure attained in the distilled water crystals is similar to, but not identical with, the one observed for the Mcg light-chain dimer in crystals grown from ammonium sulfate. Thus, two strikingly different structures were attained by this multisubunit protein in crystals grown under two different, commonly used, crystallization techniques. The quaternary interactions exhibited by the protein in the two crystal forms are sufficiently different to suggest fundamentally different interpretations of the structural basis for the function of this protein. This observation may have general implications regarding the use of single crystallographic determinations for detailed identification of structural and functional relationships. On the other hand, proteins whose structures can be altered by manipulation of crystallization conditions may provide useful systems for study of fundamental structural chemistry

  13. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, P.A.; Pebay-Peyroula, E.

    1994-01-01

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H 2 O/D 2 O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished

  14. Protein-detergent interactions in single crystals of membrane proteins studied by neutron crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmins, P.A. [ILL, Grenoble (France); Pebay-Peyroula, E. [IBS-UJF Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    The detergent micelles surrounding membrane protein molecules in single crystals can be investigated using neutron crystallography combined with H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O contrast variation. If the protein structure is known then the contrast variation method allows phases to be determined at a contrast where the detergent dominates the scattering. The application of various constraints allows the resulting scattering length density map to be realistically modeled. The method has been applied to two different forms of the membrane protein porin. In one case both hydrogenated and partially deuterated protein were used, allowing the head group and tail to be distinguished.

  15. Escherichia coli PII protein: purification, crystallization and oligomeric structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, S G; Gedye, C; Dixon, N E; Cheah, E; Carr, P D; Suffolk, P M; Jeffrey, P D; Ollis, D L

    1994-01-17

    The Escherichia coli signal transduction protein PII, product of the glnB gene, was overproduced and purified. The predicted molecular weight of the protein based on the correct nucleotide sequence is 12,427 and is very close to the value 12,435 obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectrometry. Hexagonal crystals of the unuridylylated form of PII with dimensions 0.2 x 0.2 x 0.3 mm were grown and analysed by X-ray diffraction. The crystals belong to space group P6(3) with a = b = 61.6 A, c = 56.3 A and Vm of 2.5 for one subunit in the asymmetric unit. A low-resolution electron density map showed electron density concentrated around a three-fold axis, suggesting the molecule to be a trimer. A sedimentation equilibrium experiment of the meniscus depletion type was used to estimate a molecular weight of 35,000 +/- 1,000 for PII in solution. This result is consistent with the native protein being a homotrimer.

  16. Determination of protein and solvent volumes in protein crystals from contrast variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, J. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    By varying the relative values of protein and solvent scattering densities in a crystal, it is possible to obtain information on the shape and dimensions of protein molecular envelopes. Neutron diffraction methods are ideally suited to these contrast variation experiments because H/D exchange leads to large differential changes in the protein and solvent scattering densities and is structurally non-perturbing. Low resolution structure factors have been measured from cubic insulin crystals with differing H/D contents. Structure factors calculated from a simple binary density model, in which uniform scattering densities represent the protein and solvent volumes in the crystals, were compared with these data. The contrast variation differences in the sets of measured structure factors were found to be accurately fitted by this simple model. Trial applications to two problems in crystal structure determination illustrate how this fact may be exploited. (1) A translation function that employs contrast variation data gave a sharp minimum within 1-9{Angstrom} of the correctly positioned insulin molecule and is relatively insensitive to errors in the atomic model. (2) An ab initio phasing method for the contrast variation data, based on analyzing histograms of the density distributions in trial maps, was found to recover the correct molecular envelope.

  17. Crystallization and evaluation of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals for protein pH titration in the crystalline state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Wakari; Yagi, Daichi; Ishikawa, Takuya; Ohnishi, Yuki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2008-05-01

    To observe the ionized status of the amino acid residues in proteins at different pH (protein pH titration in the crystalline state) by neutron diffraction, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5-8.0). Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined. At pH diagram, and at pH > 4.5 the border shifted to the right (higher precipitant concentration). The qualities of these crystals were characterized using the Wilson plot method. The qualities of all crystals at different pH were more or less equivalent (B-factor values within 25-40). It is expected that neutron diffraction analysis of these crystals of different pH provides equivalent data in quality for discussions of protein pH titration in the crystalline state of hen egg-white lysozyme.

  18. A Proposed Model for Protein Crystal Nucleation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    How does one take a molecule, strongly asymmetric in both shape and charge distribution, and assemble it into a crystal? We propose a model for the nucleation and crystal growth process for tetragonal lysozyme, based upon fluorescence, light, neutron, and X-ray scattering data, size exclusion chromatography experiments, dialysis kinetics, AFM, and modeling of growth rate data, from this and other laboratories. The first species formed is postulated to be a 'head to side' dimer. Through repeating associations involving the same intermolecular interactions this grows to a 4(sub 3) helix structure, that in turn serves as the basic unit for nucleation and subsequent crystal growth. High salt attenuates surface charges while promoting hydrophobic interactions. Symmetry facilitates subsequent helix-helix self-association. Assembly stability is enhanced when a four helix structure is obtained, with each bound to two neighbors. Only two unique interactions are required. The first are those for helix formation, where the dominant interaction is the intermolecular bridging anion. The second is the anti-parallel side-by-side helix-helix interaction, guided by alternating pairs of symmetry related salt bridges along each side. At this stage all eight unique positions of the P4(sub3)2(sub 1),2(sub 1) unit cell are filled. The process is one of a) attenuating the most strongly interacting groups, such that b) the molecules begin to self-associate in defined patterns, so that c) symmetry is obtained, which d) propagates as a growing crystal. Simple and conceptually obvious in hindsight, this tells much about what we are empirically doing when we crystallize macromolecules. By adjusting the growth parameters we are empirically balancing the intermolecular interactions, preferentially attenuating the dominant strong (for lysozyme the charged groups) while strengthening the lesser strong (hydrophobic) interactions. In the general case for proteins the lack of a singularly defined

  19. Equilibrium Kinetics Studies and Crystallization Aboard the International Space Station (ISS) Using the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achari, Aniruddha; Roeber, Dana F.; Barnes, Cindy L.; Kundrot, Craig E.; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM) trays have been used in Shuttle missions to crystallize proteins in a microgravity environment. The crystallization experiments are 'sitting drops' similar to that in Cryschem trays, but the reservoir solution is soaked in a wick. From early 2001, crystallization experiments are conducted on the International Space Station using mission durations of months rather than two weeks on previous shuttle missions. Experiments were set up in April 2001 on Flight 6A to characterize the time crystallization experiments will take to reach equilibrium in a microgravity environment using salts, polyethylene glycols and an organic solvent as precipitants. The experiments were set up to gather data for a series of days of activation with different droplet volumes and precipitants. The experimental set up on ISS and results of this study will be presented. These results will help future users of PCAM to choose precipitants to optimize crystallization conditions for their target macromolecules for a particular mission with known mission duration. Changes in crystal morphology and size between the ground and space grown crystals of a protein and a protein -DNA complex flown on the same mission will also be presented.

  20. Crystal structure of the Japanese encephalitis virus envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Vincent C; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A; Fremont, Daved H

    2012-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  1. Development of the protein crystallography by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Since crystal structure determination of the first protein by Kendrew in 1959, protein crystallography developed into the leading role of the protein structure study by various technology developments. Especially the utilization of synchrotron radiation from the 1990s brought innovative progress of protein crystallography on the data quality and the phasing method and had expanded the samples targets including membrane proteins and suprarmolecular complexes. Here I give the outline of the history and the future prospects of the protein crystallography from the role of synchrotron radiation. (author)

  2. Protein crystal growth on board Shenzhou 3: a concerted effort improves crystal diffraction quality and facilitates structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Y.; Cang, H.-X.; Zhou, J.-X.; Wang, Y.-P.; Bi, R.-C.; Colelesage, J.; Delbaere, L.T.J.; Nahoum, V.; Shi, R.; Zhou, M.; Zhu, D.-W.; Lin, S.-X.

    2004-01-01

    The crystallization of 16 proteins was carried out using 60 wells on board Shenzhou 3 in 2002. Although the mission was only 7 days, careful and concerted planning at all stages made it possible to obtain crystals of improved quality compared to their ground controls for some of the proteins. Significantly improved resolutions were obtained from diffracted crystals of 4 proteins. A complete data set from a space crystal of the PEP carboxykinase yielded significantly higher resolution (1.46 A vs. 1.87 A), I/sigma (22.4 vs. 15.5), and a lower average temperature factor (29.2 A 2 vs. 42.9 A 2 ) than the best ground-based control crystal. The 3-D structure of the enzyme is well improved with significant ligand density. It has been postulated that the reduced convection and absence of macromolecule sedimentation under microgravity have advantages/benefits for protein crystal growth. Improvements in experimental design for protein crystal growth in microgravity are ongoing

  3. Microphase Separation Controlled beta-Sheet Crystallization Kinetics in Fibrous Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, X.; Lu, Q.; Kaplan, D.; Cebe, P.

    2009-01-01

    Silk is a naturally occurring fibrous protein with a multiblock chain architecture. As such, it has many similarities with synthetic block copolymers, including the possibility for e-sheet crystallization restricted within the crystallizable blocks. The mechanism of isothermal crystallization kinetics of e-sheet crystals in silk multiblock fibrous proteins is reported in this study. Kinetics theories, such as Avrami analysis which was established for studies of synthetic polymer crystal growth, are for the first time extended to investigate protein self-assembly in e-sheet rich Bombyx mori silk fibroin samples, using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and synchrotron real-time wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The Avrami exponent, n, was close to 2 for all methods and crystallization temperatures, indicating formation of e-sheet crystals in silk proteins is different from the 3-D spherulitic crystal growth found in synthetic polymers. Observations by scanning electron microscopy support the view that the protein structures vary during the different stages of crystal growth, and show a microphase separation pattern after chymotrypsin enzyme biodegradation. We present a model to explain the crystallization of the multiblock silk fibroin protein, by analogy to block copolymers: crystallization of e-sheets occurs under conditions of geometrical restriction caused by phase separation of the crystallizable and uncrystallizable blocks. This crystallization model could be widely applicable in other proteins with multiblock (i.e., crystallizable and noncrystallizable) domains.

  4. The Feasibility of Bulk Crystallization as an Industrial Purification and Production Technique for Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Johns, Michael R.; Pusey, Marc L.; White, Edward T.

    1998-01-01

    Bulk crystallization in stirred vessels is used industrially for the recovery and purification of many inorganic and organic materials. Although much has been written on the crystallization of proteins for X-ray diffraction analysis, very little has been reported on the application of bulk crystallization in stirred vessels. In this study, a 1-liter, seeded, stirred, batch crystallizer was used with ovalbumin as a model protein to test the feasibility of this crystallization method as a recovery and purification process for proteins. Results were obtained for ovalbumin solubility, nucleation thresholds, crystal breakage and crystal growth kinetics in bulk solution under a range of operating conditions of pH and ammonium sulphate concentration (Judge et al., 1996). Experiments were also performed to determine the degree of purification that can be achieved by the crystallization of ovalbumin from a mixture of proteins. The effect of the presence of these proteins upon the ovalbumin crystal growth kinetics was also investigated (Judge et al., 1995). All of these aspects are essential for the design of bulk crystallization processes which have not previously been reported for proteins. Results from a second study that investigated the effect of structurally different proteins on the solubility, crystal growth rates and crystal purity of chicken egg white lysozyme are also presented (Judge et al., 1997). In this case face growth rates were measured using lysozyme purified by liquid chromatography and the effect of the addition of specific protein impurities were observed on the (110) and (101) crystal faces. In these two studies the results are presented to show the feasibility and purifying ability of crystallization as a production process for proteins.

  5. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Kim, Rosalind [Moraga, CA; Jancarik, Jamila [Walnut Creek, CA

    2012-01-31

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  6. Crystallization and evaluation of hen egg-white lysozyme crystals for protein pH titration in the crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Wakari; Yagi, Daichi; Ishikawa, Takuya; Ohnishi, Yuki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    Hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5–8.0) and the quality of the crystals was characterized. Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined To observe the ionized status of the amino acid residues in proteins at different pH (protein pH titration in the crystalline state) by neutron diffraction, hen egg-white lysozyme was crystallized over a wide pH range (2.5–8.0). Crystallization phase diagrams at pH 2.5, 6.0 and 7.5 were determined. At pH < 4.5 the border between the metastable region and the nucleation region shifted to the left (lower precipitant concentration) in the phase diagram, and at pH > 4.5 the border shifted to the right (higher precipitant concentration). The qualities of these crystals were characterized using the Wilson plot method. The qualities of all crystals at different pH were more or less equivalent (B-factor values within 25–40). It is expected that neutron diffraction analysis of these crystals of different pH provides equivalent data in quality for discussions of protein pH titration in the crystalline state of hen egg-white lysozyme

  7. TargetCrys: protein crystallization prediction by fusing multi-view features with two-layered SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Han, Ke; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The accurate prediction of whether a protein will crystallize plays a crucial role in improving the success rate of protein crystallization projects. A common critical problem in the development of machine-learning-based protein crystallization predictors is how to effectively utilize protein features extracted from different views. In this study, we aimed to improve the efficiency of fusing multi-view protein features by proposing a new two-layered SVM (2L-SVM) which switches the feature-level fusion problem to a decision-level fusion problem: the SVMs in the 1st layer of the 2L-SVM are trained on each of the multi-view feature sets; then, the outputs of the 1st layer SVMs, which are the "intermediate" decisions made based on the respective feature sets, are further ensembled by a 2nd layer SVM. Based on the proposed 2L-SVM, we implemented a sequence-based protein crystallization predictor called TargetCrys. Experimental results on several benchmark datasets demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed 2L-SVM for fusing multi-view features. We also compared TargetCrys with existing sequence-based protein crystallization predictors and demonstrated that the proposed TargetCrys outperformed most of the existing predictors and is competitive with the state-of-the-art predictors. The TargetCrys webserver and datasets used in this study are freely available for academic use at: http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetCrys .

  8. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttitta, Christina M.; Ericson, Daniel L.; Scalia, Alexander; Roessler, Christian G.; Teplitsky, Ella; Joshi, Karan; Campos, Olven; Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s −1 ) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening

  9. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup −1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  10. Image processing of small protein-crystals in electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, D.A.

    1978-11-01

    This electron microscope study was undertaken to determine whether high resolution reconstructed images could be obtained from statistically noisy micrographs by the super-position of several small areas of images of well-ordered crystals of biological macromolecules. Methods of rotational and translational alignment which use Fourier space data were demonstrated to be superior to methods which use Real space image data. After alignment, the addition of the diffraction patterns of four small areas did not produce higher resolution because of unexpected image distortion effects. A method was developed to determine the location of the distortion origin and the coefficients of spiral distortion and pincushion/barrel distortion in order to make future correction of distortions in electron microscope images of large area crystals

  11. Water polygons in high-resolution protein crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonas; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2009-07-01

    We have analyzed the interstitial water (ISW) structures in 1500 protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank that have greater than 1.5 A resolution with less than 90% sequence similarity with each other. We observed varieties of polygonal water structures composed of three to eight water molecules. These polygons may represent the time- and space-averaged structures of "stable" water oligomers present in liquid water, and their presence as well as relative population may be relevant in understanding physical properties of liquid water at a given temperature. On an average, 13% of ISWs are localized enough to be visible by X-ray diffraction. Of those, averages of 78% are water molecules in the first water layer on the protein surface. Of the localized ISWs beyond the first layer, almost half of them form water polygons such as trigons, tetragons, as well as expected pentagons, hexagons, higher polygons, partial dodecahedrons, and disordered networks. Most of the octagons and nanogons are formed by fusion of smaller polygons. The trigons are most commonly observed. We suggest that our observation provides an experimental basis for including these water polygon structures in correlating and predicting various water properties in liquid state.

  12. Towards protein-crystal centering using second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissick, David J.; Dettmar, Christopher M.; Becker, Michael; Mulichak, Anne M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Ginell, Stephan L.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Fischetti, Robert F.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals has been explored. The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals was explored. These studies included (i) comparison of microcrystal positions in cryoloops as determined by SHG imaging and by X-ray diffraction rastering and (ii) X-ray structure determinations of selected proteins to investigate the potential for laser-induced damage from SHG imaging. In studies using β 2 adrenergic receptor membrane-protein crystals prepared in lipidic mesophase, the crystal locations identified by SHG images obtained in transmission mode were found to correlate well with the crystal locations identified by raster scanning using an X-ray minibeam. SHG imaging was found to provide about 2 µm spatial resolution and shorter image-acquisition times. The general insensitivity of SHG images to optical scatter enabled the reliable identification of microcrystals within opaque cryocooled lipidic mesophases that were not identified by conventional bright-field imaging. The potential impact of extended exposure of protein crystals to five times a typical imaging dose from an ultrafast laser source was also assessed. Measurements of myoglobin and thaumatin crystals resulted in no statistically significant differences between structures obtained from diffraction data acquired from exposed and unexposed regions of single crystals. Practical constraints for integrating SHG imaging into an active beamline for routine automated crystal centering are discussed

  13. Three-Dimentional Structures of Autophosphorylation Complexes in Crystals of Protein Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Dumbrack, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase autophosphorylation is a common regulatory mechanism in cell signaling pathways. Several autophosphorylation complexes have been identified in crystals of protein kinases, with a known serine, threonine, or tyrosine

  14. [Genes of insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity in Bacillus thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymar, S Iu; Isakova, I A; Kuznietsova, L M; Kordium, V A

    2006-01-01

    The insecticidal crystal proteins of 15 B. thuringiensis strains, isolated in the Crimea territory that are toxical for some Lepidoptera and Colorado potato beetle larvae were identified by PAGE electrophoresis. Ten strains produced the crystal proteins with high molecular weight (> 120 kD). PCR with use of broad specificity primers and DNA of these B. thuringiensis strains as template demonstrated the specific PCR products (1000 bp). Amplified DNA fragments were cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the genomes of ten strains of B. thuringiensis carried Cry1B genes, which are responsible for production of the insecticidal crystal proteins with dual specificity. The influence of the solubilization conditions on the structure and toxicity of Cry1B protein for Colorado potato beetle larvae was shown. The dual toxicity of studied B. thuringiensis strains is explained by the Cry1B genes presence in their genomes. These strains may be used to develop the broad specificity bioinsecticides.

  15. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane protein OmpW from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Reinhard; Zeth, Kornelius; Söding, Johannes; Lupas, Andrei; Linke, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The outer membrane protein OmpW from E. coli was overexpressed in inclusion bodies and refolded with the help of detergent. The protein has been crystallized and the crystals diffract to 3.5 Å resolution. OmpW is an eight-stranded 21 kDa molecular-weight β-barrel protein from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. It is a major antigen in bacterial infections and has implications in antibiotic resistance and in the oxidative degradation of organic compounds. OmpW from Escherichia coli was cloned and the protein was expressed in inclusion bodies. A method for refolding and purification was developed which yields properly folded protein according to circular-dichroism measurements. The protein has been crystallized and crystals were obtained that diffracted to a resolution limit of 3.5 Å. The crystals belong to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 122.5, c = 105.7 Å. A homology model of OmpW is presented based on known structures of eight-stranded β-barrels, intended for use in molecular-replacement trials

  16. Graphene as a protein crystal mounting material to reduce background scatter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierman, Jennifer L; Alden, Jonathan S; Kim, Chae Un; McEuen, Paul L; Gruner, Sol M

    2013-10-01

    The overall signal-to-noise ratio per unit dose for X-ray diffraction data from protein crystals can be improved by reducing the mass and density of all material surrounding the crystals. This article demonstrates a path towards the practical ultimate in background reduction by use of atomically thin graphene sheets as a crystal mounting platform for protein crystals. The results show the potential for graphene in protein crystallography and other cases where X-ray scatter from the mounting material must be reduced and specimen dehydration prevented, such as in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of microscopic objects.

  17. Expression, purification and crystallization of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, B; Niefind, K; Pinna, L A

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic (alpha) subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) was originally cloned and overexpressed in the Escherichia coli strain pT7-7/BL21(DE3). The protein has been purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group C2, they have unit-cell parameter...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of merohedrally twinned crystals of MJ0729, a CBS-domain protein from Methanococcus jannaschii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Kortazar, Danel; Lucas, María; Martínez-Chantar, María Luz; Astigarraga, Egoitz; Fernández, José Andrés; Sabas, Olatz; Albert, Armando; Mato, Jose M.; Martínez-Cruz, Luis Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Trigonal crystals of MJ0729 showing different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning were obtained upon slight variation of the pH. CBS domains are small protein motifs, usually associated in tandem, that are implicated in binding to adenosyl groups. Several genetic diseases in humans have been associated with mutations in CBS sequences, which has made them very promising targets for rational drug design. Trigonal crystals of the CBS-domain protein MJ0729 from Methanococcus jannaschii were grown by the vapour-diffusion method at acidic pH. Preliminary analysis of nine X-ray diffraction data sets using Yeates statistics and Britton plots showed that slight variation in the pH as well as in the buffer used in the crystallization experiments led to crystals with different degrees of merohedral twinning that may vary from perfect hemihedral twinning to perfect tetartohedral twinning

  19. An Overview of Hardware for Protein Crystallization in a Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er-Kai Yan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein crystallization under a magnetic field is an interesting research topic because a magnetic field may provide a special environment to acquire improved quality protein crystals. Because high-quality protein crystals are very useful in high-resolution structure determination using diffraction techniques (X-ray, neutron, and electron diffraction, research using magnetic fields in protein crystallization has attracted substantial interest; some studies have been performed in the past two decades. In this research field, the hardware is especially essential for successful studies because the environment is special and the design and utilization of the research apparatus in such an environment requires special considerations related to the magnetic field. This paper reviews the hardware for protein crystallization (including the magnet systems and the apparatus designed for use in a magnetic field and progress in this area. Future prospects in this field will also be discussed.

  20. Salvage and storage of infectious disease protein targets in the SSGCID high-throughput crystallization pathway using microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Jeff; Gerdts, Cory J.; Clifton, Mathew C.; Stewart, Lance

    2011-01-01

    SSGCID protein crystals were salvaged and stored using the MPCS Plug Maker and CrystalCards when high-throughput traditional sitting-drop vapor diffusion initially failed. The MPCS Plug Maker is a microcapillary-based protein-crystallization system for generating diffraction-ready crystals from nanovolumes of protein. Crystallization screening using the Plug Maker was used as a salvage pathway for proteins that failed to crystallize during the initial observation period using the traditional sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method. Furthermore, the CrystalCards used to store the crystallization experiments set up by the Plug Maker are shown be a viable container for long-term storage of protein crystals without a discernable loss of diffraction quality with time. Use of the Plug Maker with SSGCID proteins is demonstrated to be an effective crystal-salvage and storage method

  1. Green Fluorescent Protein as a Model for Protein Crystal Growth Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, Sabine; Smith, Lori; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish Aequorea Victoria has become a popular marker for e.g. mutagenesis work. Its fluorescent property, which originates from a chromophore located in the center of the molecule, makes it widely applicable as a research too]. GFP clones have been produced with a variety of spectral properties, such as blue and yellow emitting species. The protein is a single chain of molecular weight 27 kDa and its structure has been determined at 1.9 Angstrom resolution. The combination of GFP's fluorescent property, the knowledge of its several crystallization conditions, and its increasing use in biophysical and biochemical studies, all led us to consider it as a model material for macromolecular crystal growth studies. Initial preparations of GFP were from E.coli with yields of approximately 5 mg/L of culture media. Current yields are now in the 50 - 120 mg/L range, and we hope to further increase this by expression of the GFP gene in the Pichia system. The results of these efforts and of preliminary crystal growth studies will be presented.

  2. Research and Development of Crystal Purification for Product of Uranium Crystallization Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Uranium crystallization has been developed as a part of advanced aqueous reprocessing for FBR spent fuel. Although the purity of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) crystal from the crystallization process is supposed to meet a specification of FBR blanket fuel, an improvement of its purity is able to reduce the cost of fuel fabrication and storage (in case interim storage of recovered uranium is required). In this work, UNH crystal purification was developed as additional process after crystallization. Contamination of the crystal is caused by mother solution and solid state impurities. They are inseparable by washing and filtration. Mother solution on the surface of UNH crystals is removable by washing, but it is difficult to remove that in an obstructed part of crystalline aggregate by washing. Major elements of solid state impurities are cesium and barium. Cesium precipitates with tetravalent plutonium as a double nitrate, Cs{sub 2}Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}. Barium crystallizes as Ba(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} because of its low solubility in nitric acid solution. It is difficult to separate their particle from UNH crystal by solid-liquid separation such as simple filtration. As a kind of crystal purification, there are some methods using sweating. Sweating is a phenomenon that a crystal melts partly below its melting point and it is caused by depression of freezing point due to impurity. It is considerably applicable for removal of mother solution. Concerning the solid state impurities, which has higher melting point than that of UNH crystal, it is supposed that they are separable by melting UNH crystal and filtration. The behaviors of impurities and applicability of sweating and melting-filtration operations to the purification for UNH crystal were investigated experimentally on a beaker and an engineering scale. With regard to behaviors of impurities, the conditions of cesium and barium precipitation were surveyed and it was clarified that there were most impurities on the

  3. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emamzadah, Soheila; Petty, Tom J.; De Almeida, Victor; Nishimura, Taisuke; Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Halazonetis, Thanos D.

    2009-01-01

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts

  4. Cleaved thioredoxin fusion protein enables the crystallization of poorly soluble ERα in complex with synthetic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cura, Vincent; Gangloff, Monique; Eiler, Sylvia; Moras, Dino; Ruff, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A new crystallization strategy: the presence of cleaved thioredoxin fusion is critical for crystallization of the estrogen nuclear receptor ligand binding domain in complex with synthetic ligands. This novel technique should be regarded as an interesting alternative for crystallization of difficult proteins. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human oestrogen receptor α was produced in Escherichia coli as a cleavable thioredoxin (Trx) fusion in order to improve solubility. Crystallization trials with either cleaved and purified LBD or with the purified fusion protein both failed to produce crystals. In another attempt, Trx was not removed from the LBD after endoproteolytic cleavage and its presence promoted nucleation and subsequent crystal growth, which allowed the structure determination of two different LBD–ligand–coactivator peptide complexes at 2.3 Å resolution. This technique is likely to be applicable to other low-solubility proteins

  5. In vitro uptake of 140 kDa Bacillus thuringiensis nematicidal crystal proteins by the second stage juvenile of Meloidogyne hapla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs are piercing/sucking pests, which cause severe damage to crops worldwide, and are difficult to control. The cyst and root-knot nematodes (RKN are sedentary endoparasites that develop specialized multinucleate feeding structures from the plant cells called syncytia or giant cells respectively. Within these structures the nematodes produce feeding tubes, which act as molecular sieves with exclusion limits. For example, Heterodera schachtii is reportedly unable to ingest proteins larger than 28 kDa. However, it is unknown yet what is the molecular exclusion limit of the Meloidogyne hapla. Several types of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins showed toxicity to M. hapla. To monitor the entry pathway of crystal proteins into M. hapla, second-stage juveniles (J2 were treated with NHS-rhodamine labeled nematicidal crystal proteins (Cry55Aa, Cry6Aa, and Cry5Ba. Confocal microscopic observation showed that these crystal proteins were initially detected in the stylet and esophageal lumen, and subsequently in the gut. Western blot analysis revealed that these crystal proteins were modified to different molecular sizes after being ingested. The uptake efficiency of the crystal proteins by the M. hapla J2 decreased with increasing of protein molecular mass, based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis. Our discovery revealed 140 kDa nematicidal crystal proteins entered M. hapla J2 via the stylet, and it has important implications in designing a transgenic resistance approach to control RKN.

  6. Biophysical characterization and crystal structure of the Feline Immunodeficiency Virus p15 matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrière, Jennifer; Robert, Xavier; Perez, Magali; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2013-06-24

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a viral pathogen that infects domestic cats and wild felids. During the viral replication cycle, the FIV p15 matrix protein oligomerizes to form a closed matrix that underlies the lipidic envelope of the virion. Because of its crucial role in the early and late stages of viral morphogenesis, especially in viral assembly, FIV p15 is an interesting target in the development of potential new therapeutic strategies. Our biochemical study of FIV p15 revealed that it forms a stable dimer in solution under acidic conditions and at high concentration, unlike other retroviral matrix proteins. We determined the crystal structure of full-length FIV p15 to 2 Å resolution and observed a helical organization of the protein, typical for retroviral matrix proteins. A hydrophobic pocket that could accommodate a myristoyl group was identified, and the C-terminal end of FIV p15, which is mainly unstructured, was visible in electron density maps. As FIV p15 crystallizes in acidic conditions but with one monomer in the asymmetric unit, we searched for the presence of a biological dimer in the crystal. No biological assembly was detected by the PISA server, but the three most buried crystallographic interfaces have interesting features: the first one displays a highly conserved tryptophan acting as a binding platform, the second one is located along a 2-fold symmetry axis and the third one resembles the dimeric interface of EIAV p15. Because the C-terminal end of p15 is involved in two of these three interfaces, we investigated the structure and assembly of a C-terminal-truncated form of p15 lacking 14 residues. The truncated FIV p15 dimerizes in solution at a lower concentration and crystallizes with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The EIAV-like dimeric interface is the only one to be retained in the new crystal form. The dimeric form of FIV p15 in solution and its extended C-terminal end are characteristic among lentiviral matrix proteins

  7. Comparative analysis of amino acids and amino-acid derivatives in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Len; Shiraki, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    New types of aggregation suppressors, such as amino acids and their derivatives, were focused on as fourth-component additives. Data were obtained that indicated that the additives promote protein crystallization. Optimal conditions for protein crystallization are difficult to determine because proteins tend to aggregate in saturated solutions. This study comprehensively evaluates amino acids and amino-acid derivatives as additives for crystallization. This fourth component of the solution increases the probability of crystallization of hen egg-white lysozyme in various precipitants owing to a decrease in aggregation. These results suggest that the addition of certain types of amino acids and amino-acid derivatives, such as Arg, Lys and esterified and amidated amino acids, is a simple method of improving the success rate of protein crystallization

  8. Modification of calcite crystal growth by abalone shell proteins: an atomic force microscope study.

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, D A; Smith, B L; Belcher, A M; Paloczi, G T; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    1997-01-01

    A family of soluble proteins from the shell of Haliotis rufescens was introduced over a growing calcite crystal being scanned in situ by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Atomic step edges on the crystal surface were altered in shape and speed of growth by the proteins. Proteins attached nonuniformly to the surface, indicating different interactions with crystallographically different step edges. The observed changes were consistent with the habit modification induced by this family of protei...

  9. Developments of integrated laser crystals by a direct bonding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Akira; Fukuyama, Hiroyasu; Katsumata, Masaki; Tanaka, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Yukikatu

    2003-01-01

    Laser crystal integration using a neodymium-doped yttrium vanadate (or orthovanadate) laser crystal, and non-doped yttrium vanadate crystals that function as cold fingers has been demonstrated. A newly developed dry etching process was adopted in the preparation for contact of mechanically polished surfaces. In the heat treatment process, temperature optimization was essential to get rid of precipitation of vanadic acid caused by the thermo-chemical reaction in a vacuum furnace. The bonded crystal was studied via optical characteristics, magnified inspections, laser output performances pumped by a CW laser diode. From these experiments, it was clear that the integrated Nd:YVO 4 laser crystal, securing the well-improved thermal conductivity, can increase laser output power nearly twice that of the conventional single crystal which was cracked in high power laser pumping of 10 W due to its intrinsic poor thermal conductivity. (author)

  10. Expression, purification and crystallization of the Cmi immunity protein from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Römer, Christin; Patzer, Silke I.; Albrecht, Reinhard; Zeth, Kornelius; Braun, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    The colicin M immunity protein Cmi protects E. coli cells against killing by colicin M. The Cmi protein was produced for structure determination and crystals were obtained which diffracted to high resolution. Many bacteria kill related bacteria by secretion of bacteriocins. In Escherichia coli, the colicin M protein kills E. coli after uptake into the periplasm. Self-protection from destruction is provided by the co-expressed immunity protein. The colicin M immunity protein (Cmi) was cloned, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The correct fold of purified Cmi was analyzed by activity tests and circular-dichroism spectroscopy. Crystallization trials yielded crystals, one of which diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å in the orthorhombic space group C222 1 . The crystal packing, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.02, b = 83.47, c = 38.30 Å, indicated the presence of one monomer in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 53%

  11. Protein nanocrystallography: growth mechanism and atomic structure of crystals induced by nanotemplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechkova, E; Vasile, F; Spera, R; Fiordoro, S; Nicolini, C

    2005-11-01

    Protein nanocrystallography, a new technology for crystal growth based on protein nanotemplates, has recently been shown to produce diffracting, stable and radiation-resistant lysozyme crystals. This article, by computing these lysozyme crystals' atomic structures, obtained by the diffraction patterns of microfocused synchrotron radiation, provides a possible mechanism for this increased stability, namely a significant decrease in water content accompanied by a minor but significant alpha-helix increase. These data are shown to be compatible with the circular dichroism and two-dimensional Fourier transform spectra of high-resolution H NMR of proteins dissolved from the same nanotemplate-based crystal versus those from a classical crystal. Finally, evidence for protein direct transfer from the nanotemplate to the drop and the participation of the template proteins in crystal nucleation and growth is provided by high-resolution NMR spectrometry and mass spectrometry. Furthermore, the lysozyme nanotemplate appears stable up to 523 K, as confirmed by a thermal denaturation study using spectropolarimetry. The overall data suggest that heat-proof lysozyme presence in the crystal provides a possible explanation of the crystal's resistance to synchrotron radiation.

  12. Enhancement of nucleation during hanging drop protein crystallization using HF treatment of cover glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Lu, Qin-Qin; Wang, Xi-Kai; Liu, Jun [Key Laboratory for Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072, Shaanxi (China)

    2010-02-15

    We examined a simple approach, i.e., etching cover glasses using hydrofluoric acid (HF), to determine whether cover glass treatment enhances nucleation in hanging drop protein crystallization. Hen egg white lysozyme and proteinase K were used as the model proteins. We found that the treatment increased the success rate of crystallization. The results indicated that the simple treatment, which is easy to adopt without changing much in the hanging drop method, can be utilized as an alternative method to enhance protein crystallization screens (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetko, Jan [Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States); Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E., E-mail: ret6@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Free-radical scavengers that are known to be effective protectors of proteins in solution are found to increase global radiation damage to protein crystals. Protective mechanisms may become deleterious in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystallization or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions.

  14. Can radiation damage to protein crystals be reduced using small-molecule compounds?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kmetko, Jan; Warkentin, Matthew; Englich, Ulrich; Thorne, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Free-radical scavengers that are known to be effective protectors of proteins in solution are found to increase global radiation damage to protein crystals. Protective mechanisms may become deleterious in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. Recent studies have defined a data-collection protocol and a metric that provide a robust measure of global radiation damage to protein crystals. Using this protocol and metric, 19 small-molecule compounds (introduced either by cocrystallization or soaking) were evaluated for their ability to protect lysozyme crystals from radiation damage. The compounds were selected based upon their ability to interact with radiolytic products (e.g. hydrated electrons, hydrogen, hydroxyl and perhydroxyl radicals) and/or their efficacy in protecting biological molecules from radiation damage in dilute aqueous solutions. At room temperature, 12 compounds had no effect and six had a sensitizing effect on global damage. Only one compound, sodium nitrate, appeared to extend crystal lifetimes, but not in all proteins and only by a factor of two or less. No compound provided protection at T = 100 K. Scavengers are ineffective in protecting protein crystals from global damage because a large fraction of primary X-ray-induced excitations are generated in and/or directly attack the protein and because the ratio of scavenger molecules to protein molecules is too small to provide appreciable competitive protection. The same reactivity that makes some scavengers effective radioprotectors in protein solutions may explain their sensitizing effect in the protein-dense environment of a crystal. A more productive focus for future efforts may be to identify and eliminate sensitizing compounds from crystallization solutions

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the RAD protein from Antirrhinum majus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Burton, Nicolas; Costa, Manuela; Nath, Utpal; Dixon, Ray A.; Coen, Enrico S.; Lawson, David M.

    2005-01-01

    An 8 kDa proteolytic fragment of the A. majus RADIALIS protein was crystallized and X-ray data were collected to 2 Å resolution. Crystals of the RADIALIS protein from Antirrhinum majus were grown by vapour diffusion after limited proteolysis. Mass spectrometry indicated that an 8 kDa fragment had been crystallized corresponding to the predicted MYB DNA-binding domain. X-ray data collected at room temperature were consistent with tetragonal symmetry, whereas data collected at 100 K using crystals cryoprotected by supplementing the mother liquor with ethylene glycol conformed to orthorhombic symmetry. It was subsequently shown that crystals soaked in cryoprotectants that were ‘osmolality-matched’ to the mother liquor retained tetragonal symmetry. Using these crystals, X-ray data were collected in-house to a maximum resolution of 2 Å

  16. Enhancement of crystal homogeneity of protein crystals under application of an external alternating current electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.; Uda, S.; Fujiwara, K.; Nozawa, J. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Tachibana, M. [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, 236-0027 (Japan); Kojima, K. [Department of Education, Yokohama Soei University, 1 Miho-tyou, Midori-ku, Yokohama, 226-0015 (Japan)

    2014-10-06

    X-ray diffraction rocking-curve measurements were performed on tetragonal hen egg white (HEW) lysozyme crystals grown with and without the application of an external alternating current (AC) electric field. The crystal quality was assessed by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for each rocking curve. For two-dimensional maps of the FWHMs measured on the 440 and the 12 12 0 reflection, the crystal homogeneity was improved under application of an external electric field at 1 MHz, compared with that without. In particular, the significant improvement of the crystal homogeneity was observed for the 12 12 0 reflection.

  17. Roles of electrostatics and conformation in protein-crystal interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul V Azzopardi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In vitro studies have shown that the phosphoprotein osteopontin (OPN inhibits the nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite (HA and other biominerals. In vivo, OPN is believed to prevent the calcification of soft tissues. However, the nature of the interaction between OPN and HA is not understood. In the computational part of the present study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to predict the adsorption of 19 peptides, each 16 amino acids long and collectively covering the entire sequence of OPN, to the {100} face of HA. This analysis showed that there is an inverse relationship between predicted strength of adsorption and peptide isoelectric point (P<0.0001. Analysis of the OPN sequence by PONDR (Predictor of Naturally Disordered Regions indicated that OPN sequences predicted to adsorb well to HA are highly disordered. In the experimental part of the study, we synthesized phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides corresponding to OPN sequences 65-80 (pSHDHMDDDDDDDDDGD and 220-235 (pSHEpSTEQSDAIDpSAEK. In agreement with the PONDR analysis, these were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to be largely disordered. A constant-composition/seeded growth assay was used to assess the HA-inhibiting potencies of the synthetic peptides. The phosphorylated versions of OPN65-80 (IC(50 = 1.93 microg/ml and OPN220-235 (IC(50 = 1.48 microg/ml are potent inhibitors of HA growth, as is the nonphosphorylated version of OPN65-80 (IC(50 = 2.97 microg/ml; the nonphosphorylated version of OPN220-235 has no measurable inhibitory activity. These findings suggest that the adsorption of acidic proteins to Ca2+-rich crystal faces of biominerals is governed by electrostatics and is facilitated by conformational flexibility of the polypeptide chain.

  18. Towards protein-crystal centering using second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissick, David J.; Dettmar, Christopher M. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Becker, Michael [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mulichak, Anne M. [Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cherezov, Vadim [The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Ginell, Stephan L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Battaile, Kevin P.; Keefe, Lisa J. [Hauptman–Woodward Medical Research Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fischetti, Robert F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Simpson, Garth J., E-mail: gsimpson@purdue.edu [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals has been explored. The potential of second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy for automated crystal centering to guide synchrotron X-ray diffraction of protein crystals was explored. These studies included (i) comparison of microcrystal positions in cryoloops as determined by SHG imaging and by X-ray diffraction rastering and (ii) X-ray structure determinations of selected proteins to investigate the potential for laser-induced damage from SHG imaging. In studies using β{sub 2} adrenergic receptor membrane-protein crystals prepared in lipidic mesophase, the crystal locations identified by SHG images obtained in transmission mode were found to correlate well with the crystal locations identified by raster scanning using an X-ray minibeam. SHG imaging was found to provide about 2 µm spatial resolution and shorter image-acquisition times. The general insensitivity of SHG images to optical scatter enabled the reliable identification of microcrystals within opaque cryocooled lipidic mesophases that were not identified by conventional bright-field imaging. The potential impact of extended exposure of protein crystals to five times a typical imaging dose from an ultrafast laser source was also assessed. Measurements of myoglobin and thaumatin crystals resulted in no statistically significant differences between structures obtained from diffraction data acquired from exposed and unexposed regions of single crystals. Practical constraints for integrating SHG imaging into an active beamline for routine automated crystal centering are discussed.

  19. Microseed matrix screening for optimization in protein crystallization: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Allan; Bergfors, Terese; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Marsh, May

    2014-09-01

    Protein crystals obtained in initial screens typically require optimization before they are of X-ray diffraction quality. Seeding is one such optimization method. In classical seeding experiments, the seed crystals are put into new, albeit similar, conditions. The past decade has seen the emergence of an alternative seeding strategy: microseed matrix screening (MMS). In this strategy, the seed crystals are transferred into conditions unrelated to the seed source. Examples of MMS applications from in-house projects and the literature include the generation of multiple crystal forms and different space groups, better diffracting crystals and crystallization of previously uncrystallizable targets. MMS can be implemented robotically, making it a viable option for drug-discovery programs. In conclusion, MMS is a simple, time- and cost-efficient optimization method that is applicable to many recalcitrant crystallization problems.

  20. Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Wallace

    Full Text Available The crystallization of membrane proteins in amphiphile-rich materials such as lipidic cubic phases is an established methodology in many structural biology laboratories. The standard procedure employed with this methodology requires the generation of a highly viscous lipidic material by mixing lipid, for instance monoolein, with a solution of the detergent solubilized membrane protein. This preparation is often carried out with specialized mixing tools that allow handling of the highly viscous materials while minimizing dead volume to save precious membrane protein sample. The processes that occur during the initial mixing of the lipid with the membrane protein are not well understood. Here we show that the formation of the lipidic phases and the incorporation of the membrane protein into such materials can be separated experimentally. Specifically, we have investigated the effect of different initial monoolein-based lipid phase states on the crystallization behavior of the colored photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We find that the detergent solubilized photosynthetic reaction center spontaneously inserts into and concentrates in the lipid matrix without any mixing, and that the initial lipid material phase state is irrelevant for productive crystallization. A substantial in-situ enrichment of the membrane protein to concentration levels that are otherwise unobtainable occurs in a thin layer on the surface of the lipidic material. These results have important practical applications and hence we suggest a simplified protocol for membrane protein crystallization within amphiphile rich materials, eliminating any specialized mixing tools to prepare crystallization experiments within lipidic cubic phases. Furthermore, by virtue of sampling a membrane protein concentration gradient within a single crystallization experiment, this crystallization technique is more robust and increases the efficiency of identifying productive

  1. High-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein using the high-pressure cryocooling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashiura, Akifumi; Ohta, Kazunori; Masaki, Mika; Sato, Masaru; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. This is the first ultra-high-resolution structure obtained from a high-pressure cryocooled crystal. Recently, many technical improvements in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have increased the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and improved the resolution limit of protein structures. Almost all high-resolution structures have been determined using a synchrotron radiation source in conjunction with cryocooling techniques, which are required in order to minimize radiation damage. However, optimization of cryoprotectant conditions is a time-consuming and difficult step. To overcome this problem, the high-pressure cryocooling method was developed (Kim et al., 2005 ▶) and successfully applied to many protein-structure analyses. In this report, using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. Structural comparisons between high- and ambient-pressure cryocooled crystals at ultra-high resolution illustrate the versatility of this technique. This is the first ultra-high-resolution X-ray structure obtained using the high-pressure cryocooling method

  2. Crystallization of the A-Domain of the Mannitol Transport Protein Enzyme IImtl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Leidy A.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Weeghel, Rob P. van; Pas, Hendri H.; Robillard, George T.

    1992-01-01

    The A-domain of the mannitol transport protein enzyme IImtl from Escherichia coli (relative molecular mass 16,300) was crystallized, both at room temperature and 4°C, from 40% polyethylene glycol 6000 (pH 8.5 to 9.0) using the hanging-drop method of vapour diffusion. The crystals have the monoclinic

  3. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4 1 2 1 2 or P4 3 2 1 2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å

  4. Crystallization Process of Protein Rv0731c from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis for a Successful Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure at 1.2 Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang Cong

    2009-06-08

    Proteins are bio-macromolecules consisting of basic 20 amino acids and have distinct three-dimensional folds. They are essential parts of organisms and participate in every process within cells. Proteins are crucial for human life, and each protein within the body has a specific function, such as antibodies, contractile proteins, enzymes, hormonal proteins, structural proteins, storage proteins and transport proteins. Determining three-dimensional structure of a protein can help researchers discover the remarkable protein folding, binding site, conformation and etc, in order to understand well of protein interaction and aid for possible drug design. The research on protein structure by X-ray protein crystallography carried by Li-Wei Hung's research group in the Physical Bioscience Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is focusing on protein crystallography. The research in this lab is in the process of from crystallizing the proteins to determining the three dimensional crystal structures of proteins. Most protein targets are selected from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. TB (Tuberculosis) is a possible fatal infectious disease. By studying TB target protein can help discover antituberculer drugs, and find treatment for TB. The high-throughput mode of crystallization, crystal harvesting, crystal screening and data collection are applied to the research pipeline (Figure 1). The X-ray diffraction data by protein crystals can be processed and analyzed to result in a three dimensional representation of electron density, producing a detailed model of protein structure. Rv0731c is a conserved hypothetical protein with unknown function from Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. This paper is going to report the crystallization process and brief structure information of Rv0731c.

  5. Fast high-pressure freezing of protein crystals in their mother liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, Anja; Warmer, Martin; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Wagner, Armin; Zouni, Athina; Glöckner, Carina; Reimer, Rudolph; Hohenberg, Heinrich; Meents, Alke

    2012-01-01

    Protein crystals were vitrified using high-pressure freezing in their mother liquor at 210 MPa and 77 K without cryoprotectants or oil coating. The method was successfully applied to photosystem II, which is representative of a membrane protein with a large unit cell and weak crystal contacts. High-pressure freezing (HPF) is a method which allows sample vitrification without cryoprotectants. In the present work, protein crystals were cooled to cryogenic temperatures at a pressure of 210 MPa. In contrast to other HPF methods published to date in the field of cryocrystallography, this protocol involves rapid sample cooling using a standard HPF device. The fast cooling rates allow HPF of protein crystals directly in their mother liquor without the need for cryoprotectants or external reagents. HPF was first attempted with hen egg-white lysozyme and cubic insulin crystals, yielding good to excellent diffraction quality. Non-cryoprotected crystals of the membrane protein photosystem II have been successfully cryocooled for the first time. This indicates that the presented HPF method is well suited to the vitrification of challenging systems with large unit cells and weak crystal contacts

  6. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walchli John

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. Results In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38α, viral polymerase (HCV NS5B, and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. Conclusion The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  7. High-throughput protein crystallization on the World Community Grid and the GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotseruba, Yulia; Cumbaa, Christian A; Jurisica, Igor

    2012-01-01

    We have developed CPU and GPU versions of an automated image analysis and classification system for protein crystallization trial images from the Hauptman Woodward Institute's High-Throughput Screening lab. The analysis step computes 12,375 numerical features per image. Using these features, we have trained a classifier that distinguishes 11 different crystallization outcomes, recognizing 80% of all crystals, 94% of clear drops, 94% of precipitates. The computing requirements for this analysis system are large. The complete HWI archive of 120 million images is being processed by the donated CPU cycles on World Community Grid, with a GPU phase launching in early 2012. The main computational burden of the analysis is the measure of textural (GLCM) features within the image at multiple neighbourhoods, distances, and at multiple greyscale intensity resolutions. CPU runtime averages 4,092 seconds (single threaded) on an Intel Xeon, but only 65 seconds on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050. We report on the process of adapting the C++ code to OpenCL, optimized for multiple platforms.

  8. Visualization of membrane protein crystals in lipid cubic phase using X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Anna J; Armour, Wes; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Hall, David R; Horrell, Sam; McAuley, Katherine E; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-07-01

    The focus in macromolecular crystallography is moving towards even more challenging target proteins that often crystallize on much smaller scales and are frequently mounted in opaque or highly refractive materials. It is therefore essential that X-ray beamline technology develops in parallel to accommodate such difficult samples. In this paper, the use of X-ray microradiography and microtomography is reported as a tool for crystal visualization, location and characterization on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Diamond Light Source. The technique is particularly useful for microcrystals and for crystals mounted in opaque materials such as lipid cubic phase. X-ray diffraction raster scanning can be used in combination with radiography to allow informed decision-making at the beamline prior to diffraction data collection. It is demonstrated that the X-ray dose required for a full tomography measurement is similar to that for a diffraction grid-scan, but for sample location and shape estimation alone just a few radiographic projections may be required.

  9. Crystal structure of secretory protein Hcp3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The Type VI secretion pathway transports proteins across the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterial pathogen infecting humans, uses the type VI secretion pathway to export specific effector proteins crucial for its pathogenesis. The HSI-I virulence locus encodes for several proteins that has been proposed to participate in protein transport including the Hcp1 protein, which forms hexameric rings that assemble into nanotubes in...

  10. Improved success of sparse matrix protein crystallization screening with heterogeneous nucleating agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil S Thakur

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization is a major bottleneck in the process of macromolecular structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Successful crystallization requires the formation of nuclei and their subsequent growth to crystals of suitable size. Crystal growth generally occurs spontaneously in a supersaturated solution as a result of homogenous nucleation. However, in a typical sparse matrix screening experiment, precipitant and protein concentration are not sampled extensively, and supersaturation conditions suitable for nucleation are often missed.We tested the effect of nine potential heterogenous nucleating agents on crystallization of ten test proteins in a sparse matrix screen. Several nucleating agents induced crystal formation under conditions where no crystallization occurred in the absence of the nucleating agent. Four nucleating agents: dried seaweed; horse hair; cellulose and hydroxyapatite, had a considerable overall positive effect on crystallization success. This effect was further enhanced when these nucleating agents were used in combination with each other.Our results suggest that the addition of heterogeneous nucleating agents increases the chances of crystal formation when using sparse matrix screens.

  11. In Vitro Calcite Crystal Morphology Is Modulated by Otoconial Proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, K. Trent; Hong, Mina; Lu, Wenfu; Rowley, Christopher W.; Ornitz, David M.; De Yoreo, James J.; Thalmann, Ruediger

    2014-01-01

    Otoconia are formed embryonically and are instrumental in detecting linear acceleration and gravity. Degeneration and fragmentation of otoconia in elderly patients leads to imbalance resulting in higher frequency of falls that are positively correlated with the incidence of bone fractures and death. In this work we investigate the roles otoconial proteins Otolin-1 and Otoconin 90 (OC90) perform in the formation of otoconia. We demonstrate by rotary shadowing and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments that Otolin-1 forms homomeric protein complexes and self-assembled networks supporting the hypothesis that Otolin-1 serves as a scaffold protein of otoconia. Our calcium carbonate crystal growth data demonstrate that Otolin-1 and OC90 modulate in vitro calcite crystal morphology but neither protein is sufficient to produce the shape of otoconia. Coadministration of these proteins produces synergistic effects on crystal morphology that contribute to morphology resembling otoconia. PMID:24748133

  12. Treatment of alcaline metals halides for developing crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurney, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    A process is described whereby crystals of an alkaline metal halide may be dried and placed in a crucible for development by the Bridgeman-Stockbarger method. Purified alkaline halides from a suspension are dried and formed into dense cakes of transverse section slightly smaller than that of the crucible, where they are packed, melted and grown into crystals according to the Bridgeman-Stockbarger technique. This method applies to the preparation of alkaline halide crystals, particularly sodium iodide for optical elements or scintillation counters [fr

  13. Interaction of Tenebrio Molitor Antifreeze Protein with Ice Crystal: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, L; Ramakrishnan, Vigneshwar

    2016-07-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) observed in cold-adapting organisms bind to ice crystals and prevent further ice growth. However, the molecular mechanism of AFP-ice binding and AFP-inhibited ice growth remains unclear. Here we report the interaction of the insect antifreeze protein (Tenebrio molitor, TmAFP) with ice crystal by molecular dynamics simulation studies. Two sets of simulations were carried out at 263 K by placing the protein near the primary prism plane (PP) and basal plane (BL) of the ice crystal. To delineate the effect of temperatures, both the PP and BL simulations were carried out at 253 K as well. The analyses revealed that the protein interacts strongly with the ice crystal in BL simulation than in PP simulation both at 263 K and 253 K. Further, it was observed that the interactions are primarily mediated through the interface waters. We also observed that as the temperature decreases, the interaction between the protein and the ice increases which can be attributed to the decreased flexibility and the increased structuring of the protein at low temperature. In essence, our study has shed light on the interaction mechanism between the TmAFP antifreeze protein and the ice crystal. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of recombinant immunoglobulin G-binding protein from Streptococcus suis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Abdul Hamid; Chu, Fuliang; Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Qinagmin [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Qi, Jianxun [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao, George Fu, E-mail: gaof@im.ac.cn [Center for Molecular Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Crystallization of recombinant IgG-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method is described. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.98, b = 43.94, c = 78.17 Å. Streptococcus suis, an important zoonotic pathogen, expresses immunoglobulin G-binding protein, which is thought to be helpful to the organism in eluding the host defence system. Recombinant IgG-binding protein expressed in Escherichia coli has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.98, b = 43.94, c = 78.17 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to 2.60 Å resolution.

  15. Crystal Macropattern Development in Prunus serotina (Rosaceae, Prunoideae) Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    LERSTEN, NELS R.; HORNER, HARRY T.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Prunus, subgenus Padus, exhibits two completely different calcium oxalate crystal macropatterns in mature leaves. Foliar macropattern development has been described previously in P. virginiana, representing one version. Prunus serotina, in the group exhibiting the second macropattern, is described here. The goal was to describe developmental details for comparison with P. virginiana, and to extend the sparse current knowledge of crystal macropatterns.

  16. Crystal Structure of a Plant Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Family Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Iwaki, Shigehiro; Tsukazaki, Tomoya

    2017-09-05

    The multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family of proteins consists of transporters responsible for multidrug resistance in prokaryotes. In plants, a number of MATE proteins were identified by recent genomic and functional studies, which imply that the proteins have substrate-specific transport functions instead of multidrug extrusion. The three-dimensional structure of eukaryotic MATE proteins, including those of plants, has not been reported, preventing a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of these proteins. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a MATE protein from the plant Camelina sativa at 2.9 Å resolution. Two sets of six transmembrane α helices, assembled pseudo-symmetrically, possess a negatively charged internal pocket with an outward-facing shape. The crystal structure provides insight into the diversity of plant MATE proteins and their substrate recognition and transport through the membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  18. Vacuum evaporator-crystallizer process development for Hanford defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.H.

    1978-04-01

    One of the major programs in the Department of Energy (DOE) waste management operations at Hanford is the volume reduction and solidification of Hanford Defense Residual Liquor (HDRL) wastes. These wastes are neutralized radioactive wastes that have been concentrated and stored in single-shell underground tanks. Two production vacuum evaporator-crystallizers were built and are operating to reduce the liquid volume and solidify these wastes. The process involves evaporating water under vacuum and thus concentrating and crystallizing the salt waste. The high caustic residual liquor is composed primarily of nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate salts. Past evaporator-crystallizer operation was limited to crystallizing nitrate, nitrite, and carbonate salts. These salts formed a drainable salt cake that was acceptable for storage in the original single-shell tanks. The need for additional volume reduction and further concentration necessitated this process development work. Further concentration forms aluminate salts which pose unique processing problems. The aluminate salts are very fine crystals, non-drainable, and suitable only for storage in new double-shell tanks where the fluid waste can be continuously monitored. A pilot scale vacuum evaporator-crystallizer system was built and operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations to support flowsheet development for the production evaporator-crystallizers. The process developed was the concentration of residual liquor to form aluminate salts. The pilot plant tests demonstrated that residual liquors with high aluminum concentrations could be concentrated and handled in a vacuum evaporator-crystallizer system. The dense slurry with high solids content and concentrated liquor was successfully pumped in the insulated heated piping system. The most frequent problem encountered in the pilot plant was the failure of mechanical pump seals due to the abrasive slurry

  19. Membrane's Eleven: heavy-atom derivatives of membrane-protein crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morth, Jens Preben; Sørensen, Thomas Lykke-Møller; Nissen, Poul

    2006-01-01

    A database has been assembled of heavy-atom derivatives used in the structure determination of membrane proteins. The database can serve as a guide to the design of experiments in the search for heavy-atom derivatives of new membrane-protein crystals. The database pinpoints organomercurials...

  20. Blocking rapid ice crystal growth through nonbasal plane adsorption of antifreeze proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olijve, L.L.C.; Meister, K.; DeVries, A.L.; Duman, J.G.; Guo, S.; Bakker, H.J.; Voets, I.K.

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a unique class of proteins that bind to growing ice crystal surfaces and arrest further ice growth. AFPs have gained a large interest for their use in antifreeze formulations for water-based materials, such as foods, waterborne paints, and organ transplants. Instead of

  1. In vacuo X-ray data collection from graphene-wrapped protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, Anna J.; Crawshaw, Adam D.; Trincao, Jose; Aller, Pierre; Alcock, Simon; Nistea, Ioana; Salgado, Paula S.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2015-01-01

    A method is reported for collecting room-temperature data from protein crystals under vacuum by protecting them with a thin graphene layer. The measurement of diffraction data from macromolecular crystal samples held in vacuo holds the promise of a very low X-ray background and zero absorption of incident and scattered beams, leading to better data and the potential for accessing very long X-ray wavelengths (>3 Å) for native sulfur phasing. Maintaining the hydration of protein crystals under vacuum is achieved by the use of liquid jets, as with serial data collection at free-electron lasers, or is side-stepped by cryocooling the samples, as implemented at new synchrotron beamlines. Graphene has been shown to protect crystals from dehydration by creating an extremely thin layer that is impermeable to any exchanges with the environment. Furthermore, owing to its hydrophobicity, most of the aqueous solution surrounding the crystal is excluded during sample preparation, thus eliminating most of the background caused by liquid. Here, it is shown that high-quality data can be recorded at room temperature from graphene-wrapped protein crystals in a rough vacuum. Furthermore, it was observed that graphene protects crystals exposed to different relative humidities and a chemically harsh environment

  2. In vacuo X-ray data collection from graphene-wrapped protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Anna J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Crawshaw, Adam D. [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Trincao, Jose; Aller, Pierre; Alcock, Simon; Nistea, Ioana [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Salgado, Paula S. [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-26

    A method is reported for collecting room-temperature data from protein crystals under vacuum by protecting them with a thin graphene layer. The measurement of diffraction data from macromolecular crystal samples held in vacuo holds the promise of a very low X-ray background and zero absorption of incident and scattered beams, leading to better data and the potential for accessing very long X-ray wavelengths (>3 Å) for native sulfur phasing. Maintaining the hydration of protein crystals under vacuum is achieved by the use of liquid jets, as with serial data collection at free-electron lasers, or is side-stepped by cryocooling the samples, as implemented at new synchrotron beamlines. Graphene has been shown to protect crystals from dehydration by creating an extremely thin layer that is impermeable to any exchanges with the environment. Furthermore, owing to its hydrophobicity, most of the aqueous solution surrounding the crystal is excluded during sample preparation, thus eliminating most of the background caused by liquid. Here, it is shown that high-quality data can be recorded at room temperature from graphene-wrapped protein crystals in a rough vacuum. Furthermore, it was observed that graphene protects crystals exposed to different relative humidities and a chemically harsh environment.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C from Thermus thermophilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad; Ranjani, Chellamuthu Vasuki; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Baba, Seiki; Chen, Lirong; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Nishida, Masami; Ebihara, Akio; Shinkai, Akeo; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Sekar, Kanagaraj; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2006-01-01

    The molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C from T. thermophilus has been crystallized in two different space groups, P2 1 and R32; the crystals diffracted to 1.9 and 1.75 Å resolution, respectively. The Gram-negative aerobic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is an extremely important thermophilic microorganism that was originally isolated from a thermal vent environment in Japan. The molybdenum cofactor in this organism is considered to be an essential component required by enzymes that catalyze diverse key reactions in the global metabolism of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur. The molybdenum-cofactor biosynthesis protein C derived from T. thermophilus was crystallized in two different space groups. Crystals obtained using the first crystallization condition belong to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 64.81, b = 109.84, c = 115.19 Å, β = 104.9°; the crystal diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å. The other crystal form belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.57, c = 59.25 Å, and diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution. Preliminary calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains 12 monomers and one monomer for the crystals belonging to space group P2 1 and R32, respectively

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of SMU.1108c protein from Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Ming-Jing; Fu, Tian-Min; Liu, Xiang; Li, Lan-Fen

    2010-01-01

    SMU.1108c, a putative uncharacterized protein from S. mutans, was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Streptococcus mutans SMU.1108c (KEGG database) encodes a functionally uncharacterized protein consisting of 270 amino-acid residues. This protein is predicted to have a haloacid dehalogenase hydrolase-like domain and is a homologue of haloacid dehalogenase phosphatases that catalyze phosphoryl-transfer reactions. In this work, SMU.1108c was cloned into the pET28a vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). The protein was purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystal diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 77.1, b = 80.2, c = 47.9 Å, β = 99.5°

  5. Apocrustacyanin C(1) crystals grown in space and on earth using vapour-diffusion geometry: protein structure refinements and electron-density map comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habash, Jarjis; Boggon, Titus J; Raftery, James; Chayen, Naomi E; Zagalsky, Peter F; Helliwell, John R

    2003-07-01

    Models of apocrustacyanin C(1) were refined against X-ray data recorded on Bending Magnet 14 at the ESRF to resolutions of 1.85 and 2 A from a space-grown and an earth-grown crystal, respectively, both using vapour-diffusion crystal-growth geometry. The space crystals were grown in the APCF on the NASA Space Shuttle. The microgravity crystal growth showed a cyclic nature attributed to Marangoni convection, thus reducing the benefits of the microgravity environment, as reported previously [Chayen et al. (1996), Q. Rev. Biophys. 29, 227-278]. A subsequent mosaicity evaluation, also reported previously, showed only a partial improvement in the space-grown crystals over the earth-grown crystals [Snell et al. (1997), Acta Cryst. D53, 231-239], contrary to the case for lysozyme crystals grown in space with liquid-liquid diffusion, i.e. without any major motion during growth [Snell et al. (1995), Acta Cryst. D52, 1099-1102]. In this paper, apocrustacyanin C(1) electron-density maps from the two refined models are now compared. It is concluded that the electron-density maps of the protein and the bound waters are found to be better overall for the structures of apocrustacyanin C(1) studied from the space-grown crystal compared with those from the earth-grown crystal, even though both crystals were grown using vapour-diffusion crystal-growth geometry. The improved residues are on the surface of the protein, with two involved in or nearby crystal lattice-forming interactions, thus linking an improved crystal-growth mechanism to the molecular level. The structural comparison procedures developed should themselves be valuable for evaluating crystal-growth procedures in the future.

  6. Protein crystallization with microseed matrix screening: application to human germline antibody Fabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obmolova, Galina; Malia, Thomas J.; Teplyakov, Alexey; Sweet, Raymond W.; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    The power of microseed matrix screening is demonstrated in the crystallization of a panel of antibody Fab fragments. The crystallization of 16 human antibody Fab fragments constructed from all pairs of four different heavy chains and four different light chains was enabled by employing microseed matrix screening (MMS). In initial screening, diffraction-quality crystals were obtained for only three Fabs, while many Fabs produced hits that required optimization. Application of MMS, using the initial screens and/or refinement screens, resulted in diffraction-quality crystals of these Fabs. Five Fabs that failed to give hits in the initial screen were crystallized by cross-seeding MMS followed by MMS optimization. The crystallization protocols and strategies that resulted in structure determination of all 16 Fabs are presented. These results illustrate the power of MMS and provide a basis for developing future strategies for macromolecular crystallization

  7. Crystallization and initial X-ray analysis of polyhydroxyalkanoate granule-associated protein from Aeromonas hydrophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Minglian; Li, Zhenguo; Zheng, Wei; Lou, Zhiyong [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Guo-Qiang, E-mail: chengq@stu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Multidisciplinary Research Center, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)

    2006-08-01

    The phasin PhaP{sub Ah} from A. hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granule-associated proteins (phasins) were discovered in PHA-accumulating bacteria. They play a crucial role as a structural protein during initial PHA-granule formation and granule growth and also serve as interfaces for granule stabilization in vivo. The phasin PhaP{sub Ah} from Aeromonas hydrophila strain 4AK4 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single crystals were cryocooled for X-ray diffraction analysis. The phasin crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.8, b = 108.9, c = 134.4 Å.

  8. Identifying three-dimensional structures of autophosphorylation complexes in crystals of protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qifang; Malecka, Kimberly L.; Fink, Lauren; Jordan, E. Joseph; Duffy, Erin; Kolander, Samuel; Peterson, Jeffrey; Dunbrack, Roland L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase autophosphorylation is a common regulatory mechanism in cell signaling pathways. Crystal structures of several homomeric protein kinase complexes have a serine, threonine, or tyrosine autophosphorylation site of one kinase monomer located in the active site of another monomer, a structural complex that we call an “autophosphorylation complex.” We developed and applied a structural bioinformatics method to identify all such autophosphorylation kinase complexes in X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We identified 15 autophosphorylation complexes in the PDB, of which 5 complexes had not previously been described in the publications describing the crystal structures. These 5 consist of tyrosine residues in the N-terminal juxtamembrane regions of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R, Tyr561) and EPH receptor A2 (EPHA2, Tyr594), tyrosine residues in the activation loops of the SRC kinase family member LCK (Tyr394) and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R, Tyr1166), and a serine in a nuclear localization signal region of CDC-like kinase 2 (CLK2, Ser142). Mutations in the complex interface may alter autophosphorylation activity and contribute to disease; therefore we mutated residues in the autophosphorylation complex interface of LCK and found that two mutations impaired autophosphorylation (T445V and N446A) and mutation of Pro447 to Ala, Gly, or Leu increased autophosphorylation. The identified autophosphorylation sites are conserved in many kinases, suggesting that, by homology, these complexes may provide insight into autophosphorylation complex interfaces of kinases that are relevant drug targets. PMID:26628682

  9. Matrix Gla Protein is Involved in Crystal Formation in Kidney of Hyperoxaluric Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Lu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Matrix Gla protein (MGP is a molecular determinant regulating vascular calcification of the extracellular matrix. However, it is still unclear how MGP may be invovled in crystal formation in the kidney of hyperoxaluric rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the hyperoxaluric group and control group. Hyperoxaluric rats were administrated by 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG for up to 8 weeks. Renal MGP expression was detected by the standard avidin-biotin complex (ABC method. Renal crystal deposition was observed by a polarizing microscope. Total RNA and protein from the rat kidney tissue were extracted. The levels of MGP mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western blot. Results: Hyperoxaluria was induced successfully in rats. The MGP was polarly distributed, on the apical membrane of renal tubular epithelial cells, and was found in the ascending thick limbs of Henle's loop (cTAL and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT in hyperoxaluric rats, its expression however, was present in the medullary collecting duct (MCD in stone-forming rats. Crystals with multilaminated structure formed in the injurious renal tubules with lack of MGP expression.MGP mRNA expression was significantly upregulated by the crystals' stimulations. Conclusion: Our results suggested that the MGP was involved in crystals formation by the continuous expression, distributing it polarly in the renal tubular cells and binding directly to the crystals.

  10. Crystal structure of secretory protein Hcp3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, Jerzy; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2011-03-01

    The Type VI secretion pathway transports proteins across the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic Gram-negative bacterial pathogen infecting humans, uses the type VI secretion pathway to export specific effector proteins crucial for its pathogenesis. The HSI-I virulence locus encodes for several proteins that has been proposed to participate in protein transport including the Hcp1 protein, which forms hexameric rings that assemble into nanotubes in vitro. Two Hcp1 paralogues have been identified in the P. aeruginosa genome, Hsp2 and Hcp3. Here, we present the structure of the Hcp3 protein from P. aeruginosa. The overall structure of the monomer resembles Hcp1 despite the lack of amino-acid sequence similarity between the two proteins. The monomers assemble into hexamers similar to Hcp1. However, instead of forming nanotubes in head-to-tail mode like Hcp1, Hcp3 stacks its rings in head-to-head mode forming double-ring structures.

  11. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendini, Nicole R.; Polyak, Steve W.; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2008-01-01

    The biotin protein ligase from S. aureus has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified, crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and analysed using X-ray diffraction. Biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus catalyses the biotinylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. Recombinant biotin protein ligase from S. aureus has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitant at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution from crystals using synchrotron X-ray radiation at 100 K. The diffraction was consistent with the tetragonal space group P4 2 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 93.665, c = 131.95

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, Eric; Tardie, Mark; Carty, Maynard; Brown Phillips, Tracy; Wang, Ing-Kae; Soeller, Walt; Qiu, Xiayang; Karam, George

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) with a bound palmitate is reported at 1.5 Å resolution. Human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) belongs to a family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins involved in the transport and storage of lipids. Here, the crystal structure of human aP2 with a bound palmitate is described at 1.5 Å resolution. Unlike the known crystal structure of murine aP2 in complex with palmitate, this structure shows that the fatty acid is in a folded conformation and that the loop containing Phe57 acts as a lid to regulate ligand binding by excluding solvent exposure to the central binding cavity

  13. Biochemical, immunological and toxicological characteristics of the crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Orduz

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the insecticidal and hemolytic activity of solubilized crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt subsp. medellin (Btmed was performed and compared to solubilized crystal proteins of isolates 1884 of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti and isolate PG-14 of B. thuringiensis subsp. morrisoni (Btm. In general, at acid pH values solubilization of the Bt crystalline parasporal inclusions (CPI was lower than at alkaline pH. The larvicidal activity demonstrated by the CPI of Btmed indicated that optimal solubilization of CPI takes place at a pH value of 11.3, in Bti at pH values from 5.03 to 11.3 and in Btm at pH values from 9.05 to 11.3. Hemolytic activity against sheep red blood cells was mainly found following extraction at pH 11.3 in all Bt strains tested. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions revealed that optimal solubilization of the CPI in all Bt strains takes place at the alkaline pH values from 9.05 to 11.3. An enriched preparation of Btmed crystals was obtained, solubilized and crystal proteins were separated on a size exclusion column (Sephacryl S-200. Three main protein peaks were observed on the chromatogram. The first peak had two main proteins that migrate between 90 to 100 kDa. These proteins are apparently not common to other Bt strains isolated to date. The second and third peaks obtained from the size exclusion column yielded polypeptides of 68 and 28-30 kDa, respectively. Each peak independently, showed toxicity against 1st instar Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Interestingly, combinations of the fractions corresponding to the 68 and 30 kDa protein showed an increased toxicity. These results suggest that the 94 kDa protein is an important component of the Btmed toxins with the highest potency to kill mosquito larvae. When crystal proteins of Bti were probed with antisera raised independently against the three main protein fractions of Btmed, the only crystal protein that showed

  14. A New Generation Fiber Optic Probe: Characterization of Biological Fluids, Protein Crystals and Ophthalmic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.

    1996-01-01

    A new fiber optic probe developed for determining transport properties of sub-micron particles in fluids experiments in a microgravity environment has been applied to characterize particulate dispersions/suspensions in various challenging environments which have been hitherto impossible. The probe positioned in front of a sample delivers a low power light (few nW - 3mW) from a laser and guides the light which is back scattered by the suspended particles through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector and to a digital correlator. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions. It has been applied to characterize various biological fluids, protein crystals, and ophthalmic diseases.

  15. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  16. PredPPCrys: accurate prediction of sequence cloning, protein production, purification and crystallization propensity from protein sequences using multi-step heterogeneous feature fusion and selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilin Wang

    Full Text Available X-ray crystallography is the primary approach to solve the three-dimensional structure of a protein. However, a major bottleneck of this method is the failure of multi-step experimental procedures to yield diffraction-quality crystals, including sequence cloning, protein material production, purification, crystallization and ultimately, structural determination. Accordingly, prediction of the propensity of a protein to successfully undergo these experimental procedures based on the protein sequence may help narrow down laborious experimental efforts and facilitate target selection. A number of bioinformatics methods based on protein sequence information have been developed for this purpose. However, our knowledge on the important determinants of propensity for a protein sequence to produce high diffraction-quality crystals remains largely incomplete. In practice, most of the existing methods display poorer performance when evaluated on larger and updated datasets. To address this problem, we constructed an up-to-date dataset as the benchmark, and subsequently developed a new approach termed 'PredPPCrys' using the support vector machine (SVM. Using a comprehensive set of multifaceted sequence-derived features in combination with a novel multi-step feature selection strategy, we identified and characterized the relative importance and contribution of each feature type to the prediction performance of five individual experimental steps required for successful crystallization. The resulting optimal candidate features were used as inputs to build the first-level SVM predictor (PredPPCrys I. Next, prediction outputs of PredPPCrys I were used as the input to build second-level SVM classifiers (PredPPCrys II, which led to significantly enhanced prediction performance. Benchmarking experiments indicated that our PredPPCrys method outperforms most existing procedures on both up-to-date and previous datasets. In addition, the predicted crystallization

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendini, Nicole R; Polyak, Steve W; Booker, Grant W; Wallace, John C; Wilce, Matthew C J

    2008-06-01

    Biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus catalyses the biotinylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. Recombinant biotin protein ligase from S. aureus has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitant at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 A resolution from crystals using synchrotron X-ray radiation at 100 K. The diffraction was consistent with the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 93.665, c = 131.95.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of stationary phase survival protein E (SurE) from Xylella fastidiosa in two crystal forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Marcelo Augusto dos; Saraiva, Antonio Marcos; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Souza, Anete Pereira de; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization and preliminary analysis of two crystal forms of survival protein E from X. fastidiosa are reported. The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a phytopathogenic organism that causes citrus variegated chlorosis, a disease which attacks economically important crops, mainly oranges. In this communication, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of XfSurE, a survival protein E from X. fastidiosa, are reported. Data were collected for two crystal forms, I and II, to 1.93 and 2.9 Å resolution, respectively. Crystal form I belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 172.36, b = 84.18, c = 87.24 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 96.59°, whereas crystal form II belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.05, b = 81.26, c = 72.84 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 94.76°

  19. Time-resolved Laue diffraction from protein crystals: Instrumental considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, D.H.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY; Moffat, K.; Szebenyi, D.M.E.

    1984-01-01

    A serious limitation of macromolecular crystallography has been its inability to determine changes in structure on a biochemical time scale of milliseconds or less. Recently, we have shown that X-ray exposures on single crystals of macromolecules may be obtained in the millisecond time range through the use of intense, polychromatic radiation with Δlambda/lambda approx.= 0.2 derived from the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, CHESS. Such radiation falling on a stationary crystal yields a Laue diffraction pattern, in which almost all Laue reflections arise from a unique set of Miller indices and where their intensities are automatically integrated over wavelength. This Laue technique requires wide band pass optics, which may be obtained by a combination of reflection and transmission mirrors, filters or layered synthetic microstructures. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography may be achieved by several data collection schemes: 'one-shot' recording coupled to a simple streak camera, repetitive sample perturbation coupled to a detector with temporal resolution and repetitive perturbation which uses the synchrotron pulses for stroboscopic triggering and detection. These schemes are appropriate for different time scales, roughly the milli-, micro- and nanosecond regimes. It appears that time-resolved crystallography is entirely feasible, with an ultimate time resolution limited only by the length of a synchrotron light pulse, some 150 ps at CHESS. (orig.)

  20. Crystal structure analysis, overexpression and refolding behaviour of a DING protein with single mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Zuoqi; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Hirano, Nagisa; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Crystals of a member of the DING protein family (HPBP) were obtained accidentally, and the structure was determined at 1.35 Å resolution. For further analysis, a system for preparation of HPBP was constructed and the structure of a prepared sample was confirmed by X-ray crystal structure analysis at 1.03 Å resolution. After crystallization of a certain protein–RNA complex, well diffracting crystals were obtained. However, the asymmetric unit of the crystal was too small to locate any components. Mass spectrometry and X-ray crystal structure analysis showed that it was a member of the DING protein family (HPBP). Surprisingly, the structure of HPBP reported previously was also determined accidentally as a contaminant, suggesting that HPBP has a strong tendency to crystallize. Furthermore, DING proteins were reported to relate in disease. These observations suggest that DING has potential for application in a wide range of research fields. To enable further analyses, a system for preparation of HPBP was constructed. As HPBP was expressed in insoluble form in Escherichia coli, it was unfolded chemically and refolded. Finally, a very high yield preparation method was constructed, in which 43 mg of HPBP was obtained from 1 L of culture. Furthermore, to evaluate the validity of refolding, its crystal structure was determined at 1.03 Å resolution. The determined structure was identical to the native structure, in which two disulfide bonds were recovered correctly and a phosphate ion was captured. Based on these results, it was concluded that the refolded HPBP recovers its structure correctly

  1. Crystal structure analysis, overexpression and refolding behaviour of a DING protein with single mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, Zuoqi; Nakamura, Akiyoshi [Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshikazu, E-mail: tanaka@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Hirano, Nagisa [Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min [Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Crystals of a member of the DING protein family (HPBP) were obtained accidentally, and the structure was determined at 1.35 Å resolution. For further analysis, a system for preparation of HPBP was constructed and the structure of a prepared sample was confirmed by X-ray crystal structure analysis at 1.03 Å resolution. After crystallization of a certain protein–RNA complex, well diffracting crystals were obtained. However, the asymmetric unit of the crystal was too small to locate any components. Mass spectrometry and X-ray crystal structure analysis showed that it was a member of the DING protein family (HPBP). Surprisingly, the structure of HPBP reported previously was also determined accidentally as a contaminant, suggesting that HPBP has a strong tendency to crystallize. Furthermore, DING proteins were reported to relate in disease. These observations suggest that DING has potential for application in a wide range of research fields. To enable further analyses, a system for preparation of HPBP was constructed. As HPBP was expressed in insoluble form in Escherichia coli, it was unfolded chemically and refolded. Finally, a very high yield preparation method was constructed, in which 43 mg of HPBP was obtained from 1 L of culture. Furthermore, to evaluate the validity of refolding, its crystal structure was determined at 1.03 Å resolution. The determined structure was identical to the native structure, in which two disulfide bonds were recovered correctly and a phosphate ion was captured. Based on these results, it was concluded that the refolded HPBP recovers its structure correctly.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of fluorescence recovery protein from Synechocystis PCC 6803

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ting; Shuai, Yingli; Zhou, Honggang

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery protein from Synechocystis PCC 6803 plays a key role in the orange carotenoid protein-related photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria. The full-length form and a truncated form were overexpressed, purified and crystallized, and diffraction was observed to 2.75 Å resolution. Fluorescence recovery protein (FRP), which is encoded by the slr1964 gene in Synechocystis PCC 6803, plays a key role in the orange carotenoid protein-related photoprotective mechanism in cyanobacteria. As the crystal structure of FRP may provide information about the biological functions and mechanism of action of the protein, recombinant full-length FRP and a truncated form were overexpressed, purified and crystallized at 291 K using ethylene imine polymer as the precipitant. An FRP data set was collected to a resolution of 2.75 Å at low temperature (100 K). The crystal belonged to space group P4 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.9, c = 160.7 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Assuming that the asymmetric unit contains three molecules, the Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 2.1 Å 3 Da −1

  3. Crystallization, diffraction data collection and preliminary crystallographic analysis of DING protein from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moniot, Sebastien; Elias, Mikael; Kim, Donghyo; Scott, Ken; Chabriere, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Crystallization of DING protein from P. fluorescens is reported. A complete data set was collected to 1.43 Å resolution. PfluDING is a phosphate-binding protein expressed in Pseudomonas fluorescens. This protein is clearly distinct from the bacterial ABC transporter soluble phosphate-binding protein PstS and is more homologous to eukaryotic DING proteins. Interestingly, bacterial DING proteins have only been detected in certain Pseudomonas species. Although DING proteins seem to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes, they are systematically absent from eukaryotic genomic databases and thus are still quite mysterious and poorly characterized. PfluDING displays mitogenic activity towards human cells and binds various ligands such as inorganic phosphate, pyrophosphate, nucleotide triphosphates and cotinine. Here, the crystallization of PfluDING is reported in a monoclinic space group (P2 1 ), with typical unit-cell parameters a = 36.7, b = 123.7, c = 40.8 Å, α = 90, β = 116.7, γ = 90°. Preliminary crystallographic analysis reveals good diffraction quality for these crystals and a 1.43 Å resolution data set has been collected

  4. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, XiaoJun; Liang, Yu-He

    2007-01-01

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni 2+ -chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°

  5. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, XiaoJun, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2007-10-01

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°.

  6. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A 1.9-kb DNA fragment, PCR-amplified from HD549 using cryII-gene-specific primers, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein produced 92% mortality in first-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura and 86% inhibition of adult emergence in Phthorimaea operculella, but showed very low toxicity against ...

  7. Understanding water equilibration fundamentals as a step for rational protein crystallization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M Martins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vapor diffusion is the most widely used technique for protein crystallization and the rate of water evaporation plays a key role on the quality of the crystals. Attempts have been made in the past to solve the mass transfer problem governing the evaporation process, either analytically or by employing numerical methods. Despite these efforts, the methods used for protein crystallization remain based on trial and error techniques rather than on fundamental principles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a new theoretical model which describes the hanging drop method as a function of the different variables that are known to influence the evaporation process. The model is extensively tested against experimental data published by other authors and considering different crystallizing conditions. Aspects responsible for the discrepancies between the existing theories and the measured evaporation kinetics are especially discussed; they include the characterization of vapor-liquid equilibrium, the role of mass transfer within the evaporating droplet, and the influence of the droplet-reservoir distance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The validation tests show that the proposed model can be used to predict the water evaporation rates under a wide range of experimental conditions used in the hanging drop vapor-diffusion method, with no parameter fitting or computational requirements. This model combined with protein solubility data is expected to become a useful tool for a priori screening of crystallization conditions.

  8. Role of Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin in calcium oxalate crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carvalho M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the defenses against nephrolithiasis is provided by macromolecules that modulate the nucleation, growth, aggregation and retention of crystals in the kidneys. The aim of the present study was to determine the behavior of two of these proteins, Tamm-Horsfall and uromodulin, in calcium oxalate crystallization in vitro. We studied a group of 10 male stone formers who had formed at least one kidney stone composed of calcium oxalate. They were classified as having idiopathic nephrolithiasis and had no well-known metabolic risk factors involved in kidney stone pathogenesis. Ten normal men were used as controls, as was a group consisting of five normal women and another consisting of five pregnant women. Crystallization was induced by a fixed supersaturation of calcium oxalate and measured with a Coulter Counter. All findings were confirmed by light and scanning electron microscopy. The number of particulate material deposited from patients with Tamm-Horsfall protein was higher than that of the controls (P<0.001. However, Tamm-Horsfall protein decreased the particle diameter of the stone formers when analyzed by the mode of the volume distribution curve (P<0.002 (5.64 ± 0.55 µm compared to 11.41 ± 0.48 µm of uromodulin; 15.94 ± 3.93 µm and 12.45 ± 0.97 µm of normal men Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively; 8.17 ± 1.57 µm and 9.82 ± 0.95 µm of normal women Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively; 12.17 ± 1.41 µm and 12.99 ± 0.51 µm of pregnant Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin, respectively. Uromodulin produced fewer particles than Tamm-Horsfall protein in all groups. Nonetheless, the total volume of the crystals produced by uromodulin was higher than that produced by Tamm-Horsfall protein. Our results indicate a different effect of Tamm-Horsfall protein and uromodulin. This dual behavior suggests different functions. Tamm-Horsfall protein may act on nucleation and inhibit crystal aggregation, while

  9. Cloning, Expression, Purification, Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Mycoplasma Genitalium Protein MG289

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippel, K.; Boehlein, S; Sakai, Y; Quirit, J; Agbandje-McKenna, M; Rosser, C; McKenna, R

    2009-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a human pathogen that is associated with nongonococcal urethritis in men and cervicitis in women. The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of the protein MG289 from M. genitalium strain G37 are reported here. Crystals of MG289 diffracted X-rays to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.7, b = 90.9, c = 176.1 {angstrom}. The diffraction data after processing had an overall R{sub merge} of 8.7%. The crystal structure of Cypl, the ortholog of MG289 from M. hyorhinis, has recently been determined, providing a reasonable phasing model; molecular replacement is currently under way.

  10. The Stanford Automated Mounter: Enabling High-Throughput Protein Crystal Screening at SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.A.; Cohen, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography experiment lends itself perfectly to high-throughput technologies. The initial steps including the expression, purification, and crystallization of protein crystals, along with some of the later steps involving data processing and structure determination have all been automated to the point where some of the last remaining bottlenecks in the process have been crystal mounting, crystal screening, and data collection. At the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a National User Facility that provides extremely brilliant X-ray photon beams for use in materials science, environmental science, and structural biology research, the incorporation of advanced robotics has enabled crystals to be screened in a true high-throughput fashion, thus dramatically accelerating the final steps. Up to 288 frozen crystals can be mounted by the beamline robot (the Stanford Auto-Mounting System) and screened for diffraction quality in a matter of hours without intervention. The best quality crystals can then be remounted for the collection of complete X-ray diffraction data sets. Furthermore, the entire screening and data collection experiment can be controlled from the experimenter's home laboratory by means of advanced software tools that enable network-based control of the highly automated beamlines.

  11. High-resolution diffraction from crystals of a membrane-protein complex: bacterial outer membrane protein OmpC complexed with the antibacterial eukaryotic protein lactoferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundara Baalaji, N.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Singh, T. P.; Krishnaswamy, S.

    2005-01-01

    Crystals of the complex formed between the bacterial membrane protein OmpC and the antibacterial protein lactoferrin suitable for high-resolution structure determination have been obtained. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å. Crystals of the complex formed between the outer membrane protein OmpC from Escherichia coli and the eukaryotic antibacterial protein lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius (camel) have been obtained using a detergent environment. Initial data processing suggests that the crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. This indicated a Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 3.3 Å 3 Da −1 , corresponding to a possible molecular complex involving four molecules of lactoferrin and two porin trimers in the unit cell (4832 amino acids; 533.8 kDa) with 63% solvent content. A complete set of diffraction data was collected to 3 Å resolution at 100 K. Structure determination by molecular replacement is in progress. Structural study of this first surface-exposed membrane-protein complex with an antibacterial protein will provide insights into the mechanism of action of OmpC as well as lactoferrin

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of laminin-binding protein (Lmb) from Streptococcus agalactiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragunathan, Preethi; Spellerberg, Barbara; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2009-01-01

    Laminin-binding protein from S. agalactiae was expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Laminin-binding protein (Lmb), a surface-exposed lipoprotein from Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus), mediates attachment to human laminin and plays a crucial role in the adhesion/invasion of eukaryotic host cells. However, the structural basis of laminin binding still remains unclear. In the context of detailed structural analysis, the lmb gene has been cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 56.63, b = 70.60, c = 75.37 Å, β = 96.77°

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, Christian; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N.

    2008-01-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, Christian, E-mail: clin180@ec.auckland.ac.nz [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Caradoc-Davies, Tom T. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Proft, Thomas [School of Medical Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Baker, Edward N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2008-02-01

    The S. pyogenes laminin-binding protein Lbp, which is essential for adhesion to human laminin, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The laminin-binding protein Lbp (Spy2007) from Streptococcus pyogenes (a group A streptococcus) mediates adhesion to the human basal lamina glycoprotein laminin. Accordingly, Lbp is essential in in vitro models of cell adhesion and invasion. However, the molecular and structural basis of laminin binding by bacteria remains unknown. Therefore, the lbp gene has been cloned for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli. Lbp has been purified and crystallized from 30%(w/v) PEG 1500 by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.62, b = 92.16, c = 70.61 Å, β = 106.27°, and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  15. Expression, purification and crystallization of two major envelope proteins from white spot syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xuhua; Hew, Choy Leong

    2007-01-01

    The crystallization of the N-terminal transmembrane region-truncated VP26 and VP28 of white spot syndrome virus is described. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 Å resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 Å. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 Å, and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution

  16. Expression, purification and crystallization of two major envelope proteins from white spot syndrome virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xuhua; Hew, Choy Leong, E-mail: dbshewcl@nus.edu.sg [Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of the N-terminal transmembrane region-truncated VP26 and VP28 of white spot syndrome virus is described. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 Å resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 Å. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 Å, and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution.

  17. Imaging transport phenomena during lysozyme protein crystal growth by the hanging drop technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethia Gupta, Anamika; Gupta, Rajive; Panigrahi, P. K.; Muralidhar, K.

    2013-06-01

    The present study reports the transport process that occurs during the growth of lysozyme protein crystals by the hanging drop technique. A rainbow schlieren technique has been employed for imaging changes in salt concentration. A one dimensional color filter is used to record the deflection of the light beam. An optical microscope and an X-ray crystallography unit are used to characterize the size, tetragonal shape and Bravais lattice constants of the grown crystals. A parametric study on the effect of drop composition, drop size, reservoir height and number of drops on the crystal size and quality is reported. Changes in refractive index are not large enough to create a meaningful schlieren image in the air gap between the drop and the reservoir. However, condensation of fresh water over the reservoir solution creates large changes in the concentration of NaCl, giving rise to clear color patterns in the schlieren images. These have been analyzed to obtain salt concentration profiles near the free surface of the reservoir solution as a function of time. The diffusion of fresh water into the reservoir solution at the early stages of crystal growth followed by the mass flux of salt from the bulk solution towards the free surface has been recorded. The overall crystal growth process can be classified into two regimes, as demarcated by the changes in slope of salt concentration within the reservoir. The salt concentration in the reservoir equilibrates at long times when the crystallization process is complete. Thus, transport processes in the reservoir emerge as the route to monitor protein crystal growth in the hanging drop configuration. Results show that crystal growth rate is faster for a higher lysozyme concentration, smaller drops, and larger reservoir heights.

  18. EDM-DEDM and protein crystal structure solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliandro, Rocco; Carrozzini, Benedetta; Cascarano, Giovanni Luca; Giacovazzo, Carmelo; Mazzone, Anna Maria; Siliqi, Dritan

    2009-05-01

    Electron-density modification (EDM) procedures are the classical tool for driving model phases closer to those of the target structure. They are often combined with automated model-building programs to provide a correct protein model. The task is not always performed, mostly because of the large initial phase error. A recently proposed procedure combined EDM with DEDM (difference electron-density modification); the method was applied to the refinement of phases obtained by molecular replacement, ab initio or SAD phasing [Caliandro, Carrozzini, Cascarano, Giacovazzo, Mazzone & Siliqi (2009), Acta Cryst. D65, 249-256] and was more effective in improving phases than EDM alone. In this paper, a novel fully automated protocol for protein structure refinement based on the iterative application of automated model-building programs combined with the additional power derived from the EDM-DEDM algorithm is presented. The cyclic procedure was successfully tested on challenging cases for which all other approaches had failed.

  19. Crystal macropattern development in Prunus serotina (Rosaceae, Prunoideae) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lersten, Nels R; Horner, Harry T

    2006-05-01

    Prunus, subgenus Padus, exhibits two completely different calcium oxalate crystal macropatterns in mature leaves. Foliar macropattern development has been described previously in P. virginiana, representing one version. Prunus serotina, in the group exhibiting the second macropattern, is described here. The goal was to describe developmental details for comparison with P. virginiana, and to extend the sparse current knowledge of crystal macropatterns. Leaves at various developmental stages were removed from local trees and from herbarium specimens. Early leaf stages and freehand leaf and stem sections were mounted directly in aqueous glycerine; larger leaves were processed whole or in representative pieces in household bleach, dehydrated in alcohol/xylol, and mounted in Permount. Crystals were detected microscopically between crossed polarizers. Bud scales have a dense druse population. Druses appear first at the stipule tip and proliferate basipetally but soon stop forming; growing stipules therefore have a declining density of druses. Druses appear at the tip of leaves virginiana, and shows that two closely related species can develop radically different modes of crystallization. The few detailed macropattern studies to date reveal striking variations that indicate a new level of organization that must be integrated with the anatomical, physiological and molecular approaches that have been dominant so far.

  20. The Nucleation of Protein Aggregates - From Crystals to Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Alexander K

    2017-01-01

    The condensation and aggregation of individual protein molecules into dense insoluble phases is of relevance in such diverse fields as materials science, medicine, structural biology and pharmacology. A common feature of these condensation phenomena is that they usually are nucleated processes, i.e. the first piece of the condensed phase is energetically costly to create and hence forms slowly compared to its subsequent growth. Here we give a compact overview of the differences and similarities of various protein nucleation phenomena, their theoretical description in the framework of colloid and polymer science and their experimental study. Particular emphasis is put on the nucleation of a specific type of filamentous protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils. The current experimentally derived knowledge on amyloid fibril nucleation is critically assessed, and we argue that it is less advanced than is generally believed. This is due to (I) the lack of emphasis that has been put on the distinction between homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation in experimental studies (II) the use of oversimplifying and/or inappropriate theoretical frameworks for the analysis of kinetic data of amyloid fibril nucleation. A strategy is outlined and advocated of how our understanding of this important class of processes can be improved in the future. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Resistance: a threat to the insecticidal crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer

    1995-01-01

    Insecticidal crystal proteins (also known as d-endotoxins) synthesized by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) are the active ingredient of various environmentally friendly insecticides that are 1) highly compatible with natural enemies and other nontarget organisms due to narrow host specificity, 2) harmless to vertebrates, 3) biodegradable in the...

  2. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of a choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, Neil G.; Riboldi-Tunicliffe, Alan; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Isaacs, Neil W.

    2006-01-01

    The choline-binding protein CbpI from S. pneumoniae has been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 3.5 Å resolution. The choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 23.4 kDa protein with no known function. The protein has been successfully purified initially using Ni–NTA chromatography and to homogeneity using Q-Sepharose ion-exchange resin as an affinity column. CbpI was crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.31, c = 80.29 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55.7% (V M = 2.77 Å 3 Da −1 ) and shows a diffraction limit of 3.5 Å

  3. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong

    2011-01-01

    -occupied receptor. The β(2) adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β(2)AR and nucleotide-free Gs...

  4. Fluid-crystal coexistence for proteins and inorganic nanocolloids : Dependence on ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Odijk, T.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the fluid-crystal coexistence of solutions of globular charged nanoparticles such as proteins and inorganic colloids. The thermodynamic properties of the fluid phase are computed via the optimized Baxter model P. Prinsen and T. Odijk [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6525 (2004)].

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalinski, Eva; Bange, Gert; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard, E-mail: irmi.sinning@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF 328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    Preliminary X-ray analysis of the proliferation-associated protein Ebp1 from Homo sapiens is provided. ErbB-3-binding protein 1 (Ebp1) is a member of the family of proliferation-associated 2G4 proteins (PA2G4s) and plays a role in cellular growth and differentiation. Ligand-induced activation of the transmembrane receptor ErbB3 leads to dissociation of Ebp1 from the receptor in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The non-associated protein is involved in transcriptional and translational regulation in the cell. Here, the overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Ebp1 from Homo sapiens are reported. Initially observed crystals were improved by serial seeding to single crystals suitable for data collection. The optimized crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 and diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 Å.

  6. The 2DX robot: a membrane protein 2D crystallization Swiss Army knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovache, Ioan; Biasini, Marco; Kowal, Julia; Kukulski, Wanda; Chami, Mohamed; van der Goot, F Gisou; Engel, Andreas; Rémigy, Hervé-W

    2010-03-01

    Among the state-of-the-art techniques that provide experimental information at atomic scale for membrane proteins, electron crystallography, atomic force microscopy and solid state NMR make use of two-dimensional crystals. We present a cyclodextrin-driven method for detergent removal implemented in a fully automated robot. The kinetics of the reconstitution processes is precisely controlled, because the detergent complexation by cyclodextrin is of stoichiometric nature. The method requires smaller volumes and lower protein concentrations than established 2D crystallization methods, making it possible to explore more conditions with the same amount of protein. The method yielded highly ordered 2D crystals diffracting to high resolution from the pore-forming toxin Aeromonas hydrophila aerolysin (2.9A), the plant aquaporin SoPIP2;1 (3.1A) and the human aquaporin-8 (hAQP8; 3.3A). This new method outperforms traditional 2D crystallization approaches in terms of accuracy, flexibility, throughput, and allows the usage of detergents having low critical micelle concentration (CMC), which stabilize the structure of membrane proteins in solution. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Computer simulations of radiation damage in protein crystals; Simulationsrechnungen zu Strahlenschaeden an Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zehnder, M

    2007-03-15

    The achievable resolution and the quality of the dataset of an intensity data collection for structure analysis of protein crystals with X-rays is limited among other factors by radiation damage. The aim of this work is to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the radiation damage process in proteins. Since radiation damage is unavoidable it was intended to look for the optimum ratio between elastically scattered intensity and radiation damage. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm physical processes after an inelastic photon interaction are studied. The main radiation damage consists of ionizations of the atoms through the electron cascade following any inelastic photon interaction. Results of the method introduced in this investigation and results of an earlier theoretical studies of the influence of Auger-electron transport in diamond are in a good agreement. The dependence of the radiation damage as a function of the energy of the incident photon was studied by computer-aided simulations. The optimum energy range for diffraction experiments on the protein myoglobin is 10-40 keV. Studies of radiation damage as a function of crystal volume and shape revealed that very small plate or rod shaped crystals suffer less damage than crystals formed like a cube with the same volume. Furthermore the influence of a few heavy atoms in the protein molecule on radiation damage was examined. Already two iron atoms in the unit cell of myoglobin increase radiation damage significantly. (orig.)

  8. Three-Dimentional Structures of Autophosphorylation Complexes in Crystals of Protein Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Dumbrack, Roland

    2016-01-26

    Protein kinase autophosphorylation is a common regulatory mechanism in cell signaling pathways. Several autophosphorylation complexes have been identified in crystals of protein kinases, with a known serine, threonine, or tyrosine autophosphorylation site of one kinase monomer sitting in the active site of another monomer of the same protein in the crystal. We utilized a structural bioinformatics method to identify all such autophosphorylation complexes in X-ray crystallographic structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by generating all unique kinase/kinase interfaces within and between asymmetric units of each crystal and measuring the distance between the hydroxyl oxygen of potential autophosphorylation sites and the oxygen atoms of the active site aspartic acid residue side chain. We have identified 15 unique autophosphorylation complexes in the PDB, of which 5 complexes have not previously been described in the relevant publications on the crystal structures (N-terminal juxtamembrane regions of CSF1R and EPHA2, activation loop tyrosines of LCK and IGF1R, and a serine in a nuclear localization signal region of CLK2. Mutation of residues in the autophosphorylation complex interface of LCK either severely impaired autophosphorylation or increased it. Taking the autophosphorylation complexes as a whole and comparing them with peptide-substrate/kinase complexes, we observe a number of important features among them. The novel and previously observed autophosphorylation sites are conserved in many kinases, indicating that by homology we can extend the relevance of these complexes to many other clinically relevant drug targets.

  9. Characterization of Baculovirus Insecticides Expressing Tailored Bacillus thuringiensis CryIA(b) Crystal Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, John W M; Knoester, Marga; Weijts, Franci; Groffen, Sander J A; Hu, Zhihong; Bosch, Dirk; Vlak, Just M.

    1995-01-01

    Full-length, truncated, and mature forms of the CryIA(b) insecticidal crystal protein gene of Bacillus thuringiensis were engineered into the p10 locus of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV). A signal sequence of Heliothis virescens juvenile hormone esterase was introduced at

  10. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of a choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Neil G., E-mail: neison@chem.gla.ac.uk; Riboldi-Tunicliffe, Alan [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Timothy J. [Division of Infection and Immunity (IBLS), Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom); Isaacs, Neil W. [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre (GBRC), University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA,Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The choline-binding protein CbpI from S. pneumoniae has been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected to 3.5 Å resolution. The choline-binding protein CbpI from Streptococcus pneumoniae is a 23.4 kDa protein with no known function. The protein has been successfully purified initially using Ni–NTA chromatography and to homogeneity using Q-Sepharose ion-exchange resin as an affinity column. CbpI was crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and X-ray crystallographic analysis showed that the crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 83.31, c = 80.29 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 55.7% (V{sub M} = 2.77 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and shows a diffraction limit of 3.5 Å.

  11. Purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of human dynamin-related protein 1 GTPase-GED fusion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinglmayr, Eva; Wenger, Julia; Mayr, Sandra; Bossy-Wetzel, Ella; Puehringer, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization and initial diffraction analysis of human Drp1 GTPase-GED fusion protein are reported. The mechano-enzyme dynamin-related protein 1 plays an important role in mitochondrial fission and is implicated in cell physiology. Dysregulation of Drp1 is associated with abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and neuronal damage. Drp1 shares structural and functional similarities with dynamin 1 with respect to domain organization, ability to self-assemble into spiral-like oligomers and GTP-cycle-dependent membrane scission. Structural studies of human dynamin-1 have greatly improved the understanding of this prototypical member of the dynamin superfamily. However, high-resolution structural information for full-length human Drp1 covering the GTPase domain, the middle domain and the GTPase effector domain (GED) is still lacking. In order to obtain mechanistic insights into the catalytic activity, a nucleotide-free GTPase-GED fusion protein of human Drp1 was expressed, purified and crystallized. Initial X-ray diffraction experiments yielded data to 2.67 Å resolution. The hexagonal-shaped crystals belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.59, b = 151.65, c = 43.53 Å, one molecule per asymmetric unit and a solvent content of 42%. Expression of selenomethionine-labelled protein is currently in progress. Here, the expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the Drp1 GTPase-GED fusion protein are presented, which form a basis for more detailed structural and biophysical analysis

  12. Crystallization and preliminary electron diffraction study to 3. 7 A of DNA helix-destabilizing protein gp32*I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, W; Hosoda, J

    1978-01-01

    A two-dimensionally large and thin crystal has been obtained from gp32*I, a proteolytically digested product of a DNA helix-destabilizing protein coded by gene 32 in bacteriophage T4. High-resolution electron diffraction patterns (approx. 3.7 A) are recorded from both unstained and stained protein crystals embedded in glucose. The crystal is of orthorhombic space group with a = 62.9 A and b = 47.3 A.

  13. The Kinetics of Crystallization of Colloids and Proteins: A Light Scattering Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClymer, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Hard-sphere colloidal systems serve as model systems for aggregation, nucleation, crystallization and gelation as well as interesting systems in their own right.There is strong current interest in using colloidal systems to form photonic crystals. A major scientific thrust of NASA's microgravity research is the crystallization of proteins for structural determination. The crystallization of proteins is a complicated process that requires a great deal of trial and error experimentation. In spite of a great deal of work, "better" protein crystals cannot always be grown in microgravity and conditions for crystallization are not well understood. Crystallization of colloidal systems interacting as hard spheres and with an attractive potential induced by entropic forces have been studied in a series of static light scattering experiments. Additionally, aggregation of a protein as a function of pH has been studied using dynamic light scattering. For our experiments we used PMMA (polymethylacrylate) spherical particles interacting as hard spheres, with no attractive potential. These particles have a radius of 304 nanometers, a density of 1.22 gm/ml and an index of refraction of 1.52. A PMMA colloidal sample at a volume fraction of approximately 54% was index matched in a solution of cycloheptyl bromide (CHB) and cis-decalin. The sample is in a glass cylindrical vial that is placed in an ALV static and dynamic light scattering goniometer system. The vial is immersed in a toluene bath for index matching to minimize flair. Vigorous shaking melts any colloidal crystals initially present. The sample is illuminated with diverging laser light (632.8 nanometers) from a 4x microscope objective placed so that the beam is approximately 1 cm in diameter at the sample location. The sample is rotated about its long axis at approximately 3.5 revolutions per minute (highest speed) as the colloidal crystal system is non-ergodic. The scattered light is detected at various angles using the

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric Form of Lassa Virus Matrix Protein Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; Zandonatti, Michelle; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-05-01

    The arenavirus matrix protein Z is highly multifunctional and occurs in both monomeric and oligomeric forms. The crystal structure of a dodecamer of Z from Lassa virus, presented here, illustrates a ring-like structure with a highly basic center. Mutagenesis demonstrates that the dimeric interface within the dodecamer and a Lys-Trp-Lys triad at the center of the ring are important for oligomerization. This structure provides an additional template to explore the many functions of Z. The arenavirus Lassa virus causes hundreds of thousands of infections each year, many of which develop into fatal hemorrhagic fever. The arenavirus matrix protein Z is multifunctional, with at least four distinct roles. Z exists in both monomeric and oligomeric forms, each of which likely serves a specific function in the viral life cycle. Here we present the dodecameric form of Lassa virus Z and demonstrate that Z forms a "wreath" with a highly basic center. This structure and that of monomeric Z now provide a pair of critical templates by which the multiple roles of Z in the viral life cycle may be interpreted. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Room-temperature serial crystallography using a kinetically optimized microfluidic device for protein crystallization and on-chip X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Heymann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An emulsion-based serial crystallographic technology has been developed, in which nanolitre-sized droplets of protein solution are encapsulated in oil and stabilized by surfactant. Once the first crystal in a drop is nucleated, the small volume generates a negative feedback mechanism that lowers the supersaturation. This mechanism is exploited to produce one crystal per drop. Diffraction data are measured, one crystal at a time, from a series of room-temperature crystals stored on an X-ray semi-transparent microfluidic chip, and a 93% complete data set is obtained by merging single diffraction frames taken from different unoriented crystals. As proof of concept, the structure of glucose isomerase was solved to 2.1 Å, demonstrating the feasibility of high-throughput serial X-ray crystallography using synchrotron radiation.

  17. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound to t...

  18. Effects of insecticidal crystal proteins (Cry proteins) produced by genetically modified maize (Bt maize) on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höss, Sebastian; Menzel, Ralph; Gessler, Frank; Nguyen, Hang T.; Jehle, Johannes A.; Traunspurger, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The genetically modified maize MON89034 × MON88017 expresses different crystal (Cry) proteins with pesticidal activity against the European corn borer (Cry1.105; Cry2Ab2) and the Western corn root worm (Cry3Bb1). Non-target organisms, such as soil nematodes, might be exposed to the Cry proteins that enter the soil in course of crop growing. Therefore, the risk of those proteins for nematodes was assessed by testing their toxic effects on Caenorhabditis elegans. All three insecticidal Cry proteins showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on C. elegans reproduction (EC50: 0.12–0.38 μmol L −1 ), however, at concentrations that were far above the expected soil concentrations. Moreover, a reduced toxicity was observed when Cry proteins were added jointly. A C. elegans mutant strain deficient for receptors for the nematicidal Cry5B was also resistant against Cry1.105 and Cry2Ab2, suggesting that these Cry proteins bound to the same or similar receptors as nematicidal Cry proteins and thereby affect the reproduction of C. elegans. -- Highlights: •Insecticidal Cry proteins dose-dependently inhibited the reproduction of C. elegans. •Mixture toxicity was lower than expected from concentration-additive single effects. •Genes for MAPK-defense-pathway were up-regulated in presence of Cry protein mixture. •Knock-out strains deficient for Cry5B-receptors showed lower susceptibility to insecticidal Cry proteins. •Toxicity of insecticidal Cry-proteins on C. elegans occurred at concentrations far above expected field concentrations. -- Insecticidal Cry proteins expressed by genetically modified maize act on nematodes via a similar mode of action as nematicidal Cry proteins, however, at concentrations far above expected soil levels

  19. crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Huang, Yisheng; Zhang, Lizhen; Lin, Zhoubin; Sun, Shijia; Wang, Guofu

    2014-07-01

    A Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal with dimensions of ϕ 17 × 30 mm3 was grown by the Czochralski method. The thermal expansion coefficients of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal are 1.32 × 10-5 K-1 along c-axis and 1.23 × 10-5 K-1 along a-axis, respectively. The spectroscopic characteristics of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal were investigated. The Judd-Ofelt theory was applied to calculate the spectral parameters. The absorption cross sections at 805 nm are 2.17 × 10-20 cm2 with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15 nm for π-polarization, and 2.29 × 10-20 cm2 with a FWHM of 14 nm for σ-polarization. The emission cross sections are 3.19 × 10-20 cm2 for σ-polarization and 2.67 × 10-20 cm2 for π-polarization at 1,064 nm. The fluorescence quantum efficiency is 67 %. The quasi-cw laser of Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal was performed. The maximum output power is 80 mW. The slope efficiency is 7.12 %. The results suggest Nd3+:Na2La4(WO4)7 crystal as a promising laser crystal fit for laser diode pumping.

  20. Crystal structure of an orthomyxovirus matrix protein reveals mechanisms for self-polymerization and membrane association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenting; Zheng, Wenjie; Toh, Yukimatsu; Betancourt-Solis, Miguel A; Tu, Jiagang; Fan, Yanlin; Vakharia, Vikram N; Liu, Jun; McNew, James A; Jin, Meilin; Tao, Yizhi J

    2017-08-08

    Many enveloped viruses encode a matrix protein. In the influenza A virus, the matrix protein M1 polymerizes into a rigid protein layer underneath the viral envelope to help enforce the shape and structural integrity of intact viruses. The influenza virus M1 is also known to mediate virus budding as well as the nuclear export of the viral nucleocapsids and their subsequent packaging into nascent viral particles. Despite extensive studies on the influenza A virus M1 (FLUA-M1), only crystal structures of its N-terminal domain are available. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length M1 from another orthomyxovirus that infects fish, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). The structure of ISAV-M1 assumes the shape of an elbow, with its N domain closely resembling that of the FLUA-M1. The C domain, which is connected to the N domain through a flexible linker, is made of four α-helices packed as a tight bundle. In the crystal, ISAV-M1 monomers form infinite 2D arrays with a network of interactions involving both the N and C domains. Results from liposome flotation assays indicated that ISAV-M1 binds membrane via electrostatic interactions that are primarily mediated by a positively charged surface loop from the N domain. Cryoelectron tomography reconstruction of intact ISA virions identified a matrix protein layer adjacent to the inner leaflet of the viral membrane. The physical dimensions of the virion-associated matrix layer are consistent with the 2D ISAV-M1 crystal lattice, suggesting that the crystal lattice is a valid model for studying M1-M1, M1-membrane, and M1-RNP interactions in the virion.

  1. High-resolution X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein using the high-pressure cryocooling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiura, Akifumi; Ohta, Kazunori; Masaki, Mika; Sato, Masaru; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Recently, many technical improvements in macromolecular X-ray crystallography have increased the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank and improved the resolution limit of protein structures. Almost all high-resolution structures have been determined using a synchrotron radiation source in conjunction with cryocooling techniques, which are required in order to minimize radiation damage. However, optimization of cryoprotectant conditions is a time-consuming and difficult step. To overcome this problem, the high-pressure cryocooling method was developed (Kim et al., 2005) and successfully applied to many protein-structure analyses. In this report, using the high-pressure cryocooling method, the X-ray crystal structure of bovine H-protein was determined at 0.86 Å resolution. Structural comparisons between high- and ambient-pressure cryocooled crystals at ultra-high resolution illustrate the versatility of this technique. This is the first ultra-high-resolution X-ray structure obtained using the high-pressure cryocooling method.

  2. The charm of protein crystals--Structural biology at a glance in the International Year of Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xiaodong; Cao Qin

    2014-01-01

    Crystallography is a typical intellectual endeavor that has spanned human history for centuries. Through the persistent efforts of generations of scientists, crystallography has been transformed from a mathematical hypothesis to actual physical reality, mainly thanks to X-ray diffraction technology. 2014 is celebrated as the International Year of Crystallography (IYCr-2014), to commemorate that about 100 years ago, when Max von Laue in Germany and the father-and-son Braggs (William Henry Bragg and William Lawrence Bragg) in England pioneered the use of X-rays to determine the atomic structure of crystals; for this pioneering work they were awarded Nobel prizes for physics in the years of 1914 and 1915. This article is dedicated to the IYCr to describe the use of protein crystals, an application that has developed into protein crystallography and subsequently structural biology. In our overview of the history and future prospects of this field, we discuss in detail one example of caspase-6, to demonstrate how protein crystallography can help us understand the structure-function relationship of important proteins. (authors)

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Iuliano, Rodolfo [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Facoltà di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università di Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy); Fusco, Alfredo [Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, c/o Instituto di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Sperimentale del CNR, Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia, Università degli Studi di Napoli ‘Federico II’, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples (Italy); NOGEC (Naples Oncogenomocs Center)-CEINGE, Biotecnologie Avanzate, Via Comunale Margherita 482, 80145 Naples (Italy); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Departamento de Física e Informática, Universidade de São Paulo, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense 400, CEP 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-09-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozo, Huita C.; Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Santos, Maria A. M.; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the catalytic domain of rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The rat protein tyrosine phosphatase η (rPTPη) is a cysteine-dependent phosphatase which hydrolyzes phosphoester bonds in proteins and other molecules. rPTPη and its human homologue DEP-1 are involved in neoplastic transformations. Thus, expression of the protein is reduced in all oncogene-transformed thyroid cell lines and is absent in highly malignant thyroid cells. Moreover, consistent with the suggested tumour suppression role of PTPη, inhibition of the tumorigenic process occurs after its exogenous reconstitution, suggesting that PTPη might be important for gene therapy of cancers. In this study, the catalytic domain of rPTPη was produced in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified to homogeneity. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected to 1.87 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 46.46, b = 63.07, c = 111.64 Å, and contains one molecule per asymmetric unit

  5. Maltose-neopentyl glycol (MNG) amphiphiles for solubilization, stabilization and crystallization of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Rana, Rohini R; Gotfryd, Kamil; Chandra, Richa; Goren, Michael A; Kruse, Andrew C; Nurva, Shailika; Loland, Claus J; Pierre, Yves; Drew, David; Popot, Jean-Luc; Picot, Daniel; Fox, Brian G; Guan, Lan; Gether, Ulrik; Byrne, Bernadette; Kobilka, Brian; Gellman, Samuel H

    2010-12-01

    The understanding of integral membrane protein (IMP) structure and function is hampered by the difficulty of handling these proteins. Aqueous solubilization, necessary for many types of biophysical analysis, generally requires a detergent to shield the large lipophilic surfaces of native IMPs. Many proteins remain difficult to study owing to a lack of suitable detergents. We introduce a class of amphiphiles, each built around a central quaternary carbon atom derived from neopentyl glycol, with hydrophilic groups derived from maltose. Representatives of this maltose-neopentyl glycol (MNG) amphiphile family show favorable behavior relative to conventional detergents, as manifested in multiple membrane protein systems, leading to enhanced structural stability and successful crystallization. MNG amphiphiles are promising tools for membrane protein science because of the ease with which they may be prepared and the facility with which their structures may be varied.

  6. X-CHIP: an integrated platform for high-throughput protein crystallization and on-the-chip X-ray diffraction data collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisselman, Gera; Qiu, Wei; Romanov, Vladimir; Thompson, Christine M.; Lam, Robert; Battaile, Kevin P.; Pai, Emil F.; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.

    2011-01-01

    The X-CHIP (X-ray Crystallography High-throughput Integrated Platform) is a novel microchip that has been developed to combine multiple steps of the crystallographic pipeline from crystallization to diffraction data collection on a single device to streamline the entire process. The X-CHIP (X-ray Crystallization High-throughput Integrated Platform) is a novel microchip that has been developed to combine multiple steps of the crystallographic pipeline from crystallization to diffraction data collection on a single device to streamline the entire process. The system has been designed for crystallization condition screening, visual crystal inspection, initial X-ray screening and data collection in a high-throughput fashion. X-ray diffraction data acquisition can be performed directly on-the-chip at room temperature using an in situ approach. The capabilities of the chip eliminate the necessity for manual crystal handling and cryoprotection of crystal samples, while allowing data collection from multiple crystals in the same drop. This technology would be especially beneficial for projects with large volumes of data, such as protein-complex studies and fragment-based screening. The platform employs hydrophilic and hydrophobic concentric ring surfaces on a miniature plate transparent to visible light and X-rays to create a well defined and stable microbatch crystallization environment. The results of crystallization and data-collection experiments demonstrate that high-quality well diffracting crystals can be grown and high-resolution diffraction data sets can be collected using this technology. Furthermore, the quality of a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion data set collected with the X-CHIP at room temperature was sufficient to generate interpretable electron-density maps. This technology is highly resource-efficient owing to the use of nanolitre-scale drop volumes. It does not require any modification for most in-house and synchrotron beamline systems and offers

  7. X-CHIP: an integrated platform for high-throughput protein crystallization and on-the-chip X-ray diffraction data collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisselman, Gera; Qiu, Wei; Romanov, Vladimir; Thompson, Christine M.; Lam, Robert [Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); Battaile, Kevin P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Pai, Emil F.; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y., E-mail: nchirgad@uhnresearch.ca [Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8 (Canada)

    2011-06-01

    The X-CHIP (X-ray Crystallography High-throughput Integrated Platform) is a novel microchip that has been developed to combine multiple steps of the crystallographic pipeline from crystallization to diffraction data collection on a single device to streamline the entire process. The X-CHIP (X-ray Crystallization High-throughput Integrated Platform) is a novel microchip that has been developed to combine multiple steps of the crystallographic pipeline from crystallization to diffraction data collection on a single device to streamline the entire process. The system has been designed for crystallization condition screening, visual crystal inspection, initial X-ray screening and data collection in a high-throughput fashion. X-ray diffraction data acquisition can be performed directly on-the-chip at room temperature using an in situ approach. The capabilities of the chip eliminate the necessity for manual crystal handling and cryoprotection of crystal samples, while allowing data collection from multiple crystals in the same drop. This technology would be especially beneficial for projects with large volumes of data, such as protein-complex studies and fragment-based screening. The platform employs hydrophilic and hydrophobic concentric ring surfaces on a miniature plate transparent to visible light and X-rays to create a well defined and stable microbatch crystallization environment. The results of crystallization and data-collection experiments demonstrate that high-quality well diffracting crystals can be grown and high-resolution diffraction data sets can be collected using this technology. Furthermore, the quality of a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion data set collected with the X-CHIP at room temperature was sufficient to generate interpretable electron-density maps. This technology is highly resource-efficient owing to the use of nanolitre-scale drop volumes. It does not require any modification for most in-house and synchrotron beamline systems and offers

  8. Comparison of NMR and crystal structures for the proteins TM1112 and TM1367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Serrano, Pedro; Pedrini, Bill; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Geralt, Michael; Horst, Reto; Herrmann, Torsten; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    NMR structures of the proteins TM1112 and TM1367 solved by the JCSG in solution at 298 K could be superimposed with the corresponding crystal structures at 100 K with r.m.s.d. values of <1.0 Å for the backbone heavy atoms. For both proteins the structural differences between multiple molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystals correlated with structural variations within the bundles of conformers used to represent the NMR solution structures. A recently introduced JCSG NMR structure-determination protocol, which makes use of the software package UNIO for extensive automation, was further evaluated by comparison of the TM1112 structure obtained using these automated methods with another NMR structure that was independently solved in another PSI center, where a largely interactive approach was applied. The NMR structures of the TM1112 and TM1367 proteins from Thermotoga maritima in solution at 298 K were determined following a new protocol which uses the software package UNIO for extensive automation. The results obtained with this novel procedure were evaluated by comparison with the crystal structures solved by the JCSG at 100 K to 1.83 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively. In addition, the TM1112 solution structure was compared with an NMR structure solved by the NESG using a conventional largely interactive methodology. For both proteins, the newly determined NMR structure could be superimposed with the crystal structure with r.m.s.d. values of <1.0 Å for the backbone heavy atoms, which provided a starting platform to investigate local structure variations, which may arise from either the methods used or from the different chemical environments in solution and in the crystal. Thereby, these comparative studies were further explored with the use of reference NMR and crystal structures, which were computed using the NMR software with input of upper-limit distance constraints derived from the molecular models that represent the results of structure

  9. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Cockayne syndrome protein A in complex with DNA damage-binding protein 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; Pannu, Navraj S.

    2011-01-01

    Human Cockayne syndrome protein A has been cocrystallized with human DNA damage-binding protein 1 and data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Cockayne syndrome protein A is one of the main components in mammalian transcription coupled repair. Here, the overproduction, purification and crystallization of human Cockayne syndrome protein A in complex with its interacting partner DNA damage binding protein 1 are reported. The complex was coproduced in insect cells, copurified and crystallized using sitting drops with PEG 3350 and sodium citrate as crystallizing agents. The crystals had unit-cell parameters a = b = 142.03, c = 250.19 Å and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution on beamline ID14-1 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

  10. Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

  11. Perdeuteration, purification, crystallization and preliminary neutron diffraction of an ocean pout type III antifreeze protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit-Haertlein, Isabelle; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Howard, Eduardo; Hazemann, Isabelle; Mitschler, Andre; Haertlein, Michael; Podjarny, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Perdeuterated type III antifreeze protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Preliminary neutron data collection showed diffraction to 1.85 Å resolution from a 0.13 mm 3 crystal. The highly homologous type III antifreeze protein (AFP) subfamily share the capability to inhibit ice growth at subzero temperatures. Extensive studies by X-ray crystallography have been conducted, mostly on AFPs from polar fishes. Although interactions between a defined flat ice-binding surface and a particular lattice plane of an ice crystal have now been identified, the fine structural features underlying the antifreeze mechanism still remain unclear owing to the intrinsic difficulty in identifying H atoms using X-ray diffraction data alone. Here, successful perdeuteration (i.e. complete deuteration) for neutron crystallographic studies of the North Atlantic ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus) AFP in Escherichia coli high-density cell cultures is reported. The perdeuterated protein (AFP D) was expressed in inclusion bodies, refolded in deuterated buffer and purified by cation-exchange chromatography. Well shaped perdeuterated AFP D crystals have been grown in D 2 O by the sitting-drop method. Preliminary neutron Laue diffraction at 293 K using LADI-III at ILL showed that with a few exposures of 24 h a very low background and clear small spots up to a resolution of 1.85 Å were obtained using a ‘radically small’ perdeuterated AFP D crystal of dimensions 0.70 × 0.55 × 0.35 mm, corresponding to a volume of 0.13 mm 3

  12. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of Rhagium inquisitor antifreeze protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakim, Aaron; Thakral, Durga; Zhu, Darren F.; Nguyen, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    A novel hyperactive antifreeze protein from R. inquisitor (RiAFP) has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. A complete native X-ray diffraction data set was recorded to 1.3 Å resolution. Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are a specialized evolutionary adaptation of a variety of bacteria, fish, arthropods and other organisms to inhibit ice-crystal growth for survival in harsh subzero environments. The recently reported novel hyperactive AFP from Rhagium inquisitor (RiAFP) is the second distinct type of AFP in beetles and its structure could reveal important molecular insights into the evolution of AFPs. For this purpose, RiAFP was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized at 293 K using a combination of 23% PEG 3350 and 0.2 M ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.3 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3 1 21 (or P3 2 21), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 46.46, c = 193.21 Å

  13. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez Barroso, J. A.; Pereira, H.; Miranda, M.; Pereira, C.; Garratt, R. C.; Aguilar, C. F.

    2010-01-01

    T. cruzi TcNDPK1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally poly-His-tagged fusion protein and crystallized. The flagellated protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the aetiological agent of Chagas disease. Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDPKs) are enzymes that are involved in energy management and nucleoside balance in the cell. T. cruzi TcNDPK1, a canonical isoform, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as an N-terminally poly-His-tagged fusion protein and crystallized. Crystals grew after 72 h in 0.2 M MgCl 2 , 20% PEG 3350. Data were collected to 3.5 Å resolution using synchrotron X-ray radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.84, c = 275.49 Å. Structure determination is under way and will provide relevant information that may lead to the first step in rational drug design for the treatment of Chagas disease

  14. A new crystal lattice structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Osamu; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    A new crystal lattice structure of H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein has been determined. Iron loading causes a series of conformational changes at the ferroxidase centre. A new crystal lattice structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) has been determined in two forms: the native state (Apo) at 2.20 Å resolution and an iron-loaded form (Fe-load) at 2.50 Å resolution. The highly solvated packing of the dodecameric shell is suitable for crystallographic study of the metal ion-uptake pathway. Like other bacterioferritins, HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of channels. Iron loading causes a series of conformational changes of amino-acid residues (Trp26, Asp52 and Glu56) at the ferroxidase centre

  15. Acoustic methods for high-throughput protein crystal mounting at next-generation macromolecular crystallographic beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Christian G; Kuczewski, Anthony; Stearns, Richard; Ellson, Richard; Olechno, Joseph; Orville, Allen M; Allaire, Marc; Soares, Alexei S; Héroux, Annie

    2013-09-01

    To take full advantage of advanced data collection techniques and high beam flux at next-generation macromolecular crystallography beamlines, rapid and reliable methods will be needed to mount and align many samples per second. One approach is to use an acoustic ejector to eject crystal-containing droplets onto a solid X-ray transparent surface, which can then be positioned and rotated for data collection. Proof-of-concept experiments were conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source on thermolysin crystals acoustically ejected onto a polyimide `conveyor belt'. Small wedges of data were collected on each crystal, and a complete dataset was assembled from a well diffracting subset of these crystals. Future developments and implementation will focus on achieving ejection and translation of single droplets at a rate of over one hundred per second.

  16. Crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana provides insights into its product specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Wenhe; Liu, Zihe; Xie, Yongchao; Wang, Hao; Mu, Yajuan; Huang, Yao; Feng, Yue

    2016-09-16

    Specifier proteins are important components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, which mediate plant defense against herbivory and pathogen attacks. Upon tissue disruption, glucosinolates are hydrolyzed to instable aglucones by myrosinases, and then aglucones will rearrange to form defensive isothiocyanates. Specifier proteins can redirect this reaction to form other products, such as simple nitriles, epithionitriles and organic thiocyanates instead of isothiocyanates based on the side chain structure of glucosinolate and the type of the specifier proteins. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying the different product spectrums of various specifier proteins was not fully understood. Here in this study, we solved the crystal structure of the Epithiospecifier Protein, ESP from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtESP) at 2.3 Å resolution. Structural comparisons with the previously solved structure of thiocyanate forming protein, TFP from Thlaspi arvense (TaTFP) reveal that AtESP shows a dimerization pattern different from TaTFP. Moreover, AtESP harbors a slightly larger active site pocket than TaTFP and several residues around the active site are different between the two proteins, which might account for the different product spectrums of the two proteins. Together, our structural study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms of specifier proteins and shed light on the basis of their different product spectrums. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of C-reactive protein from zebrafish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Rong; Qi, Jianxun; Yao, Shugang; Pan, Xiaocheng; Gao, Feng; Xia, Chun

    2011-01-01

    Crystals of native and selenomethionine-substituted C-reactive protein from zebrafish diffracted to 2.3 and 1.7 Å resolution, respectively, and belonged to space group R3 with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The Matthews coefficient was calculated to be 3.28 Å 3 Da −1 . C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein that is found in blood, the concentration of which in plasma rises rapidly in response to inflammation. It functions as a pattern-recognition molecule, recognizing dead cells and various pathogenic agents and eliminating them by utilizing the classical complement pathway and activating macrophages. CRP is phylogenetically highly conserved in invertebrates and mammals. To date, information on the CRP gene has been reported from numerous species of animals, but little is known about the structure of CRP from species other than humans. In order to solve the structure of CRP from bony fish, the CRP gene from zebrafiah (Danio rerio) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The zebrafish CRP (Dare-CRP) was then purified and crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and belonged to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 114.7, c = 61.0 Å. The Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 3.28 Å 3 Da −1 and 62.55%, respectively. Determination of the zebrafish CRP structure should be helpful in investigating the evolution of CRPs in the innate immune system

  18. Crystal Structure of Green Fluorescent Protein Clover and Design of Clover-Based Redox Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Benjamin C; Petsko, Gregory A; Liu, Ce Feng

    2018-02-06

    We have determined the crystal structure of Clover, one of the brightest fluorescent proteins, and found that its T203H/S65G mutations relative to wild-type GFP lock the critical E222 side chain in a fixed configuration that mimics the major conformer of that in EGFP. The resulting equilibrium shift to the predominantly deprotonated chromophore increases the extinction coefficient (EC), opposes photoactivation, and is responsible for the bathochromic shift. Clover's brightness can further be attributed to a π-π stacking interaction between H203 and the chromophore. Consistent with these observations, the Clover G65S mutant reversed the equilibrium shift, dramatically decreased the EC, and made Clover photoactivatable under conditions that activated photoactivatable GFP. Using the Clover structure, we rationally engineered a non-photoactivatable redox sensor, roClover1, and determined its structure as well as that of its parental template, roClover0.1. These high-resolution structures provide deeper insights into structure-function relationships in GFPs and may aid the development of excitation-improved ratiometric biosensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts.

  20. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  1. Triosephosphate isomerase is a common crystallization contaminant of soluble His-tagged proteins produced in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Vinaik, Roohi; Gehring, Kalle

    2013-01-01

    Crystals of E. coli triosephosphate isomerase were obtained as a contaminant and its structure was determined to 1.85 Å resolution. Attempts to crystallize several mammalian proteins overexpressed in Escherichia coli revealed a common contaminant, triosephosphate isomerase, a protein involved in glucose metabolism. Even with triosephosphate isomerase present in very small amounts, similarly shaped crystals appeared in the crystallization drops in a number of polyethylene glycol-containing conditions. All of the target proteins were His-tagged and their purification involved immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC), a step that was likely to lead to triosephosphate isomerase contamination. Analysis of the triosephosphate isomerase crystals led to the structure of E. coli triosephosphate isomerase at 1.85 Å resolution, which is a significant improvement over the previous structure

  2. Preparative Protein Production from Inclusion Bodies and Crystallization: A Seven-Week Biochemistry Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Megan J.; Snyder, W. Kalani; Westerman, Shelley; McFarland, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe how to produce and purify proteins from E. coli inclusion bodies by adapting versatile, preparative-scale techniques to the undergraduate laboratory schedule. This seven-week sequence of experiments fits into an annual cycle of research activity in biochemistry courses. Recombinant proteins are expressed as inclusion bodies, which are collected, washed, then solubilized in urea. Stepwise dialysis to dilute urea over the course of a week produces refolded protein. Column chromatography is used to purify protein into fractions, which are then analyzed with gel electrophoresis and concentration assays. Students culminate the project by designing crystallization trials in sitting-drop trays. Student evaluation of the experience has been positive, listing 5–12 new techniques learned, which are transferrable to graduate research in academia and industry. PMID:21691428

  3. HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2012-04-02

    In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyáš et al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

  4. Surface (glyco-)proteins: primary structure and crystallization under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, H.; Akca, E.; Schultz, N.; Karbach, G.; Schlott, B.; Debaerdemaeker, T.; De Clercq, J.-P.; König, H.

    2001-08-01

    The Archaea comprise microorganisms that live under environmental extremes, like high temperature, low pH value or high salt concentration. Their cells are often covered by a single layer of (glyco)protein subunits (S-layer) in hexagonal arrangement. In order to get further hints about the molecular mechanisms of protein stabilization we compared the primary and secondary structures of archaeal S-layer (glyco)proteins. We found an increase of charged amino acids in the S-layer proteins of the extreme thermophilic species compared to their mesophilic counterparts. Our data and those of other authors suggest that ionic interactions, e.g., salt bridges seem to be played a major role in protein stabilization at high temperatures. Despite the differences in the growth optima and the predominance of some amino acids the primary structures of S-layers revealed also a significant degree of identity between phylogenetically related archaea. These obervations indicate that protein sequences of S-layers have been conserved during the evolution from extremely thermophilic to mesophilic life. To support these findings the three-dimensional structure of the S-layer proteins has to be elucidated. Recently, we described the first successful crystallization of an extreme thermophilic surface(glyco)protein under microgravity conditions.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of protein 14 from Sulfolobus islandicus filamentous virus (SIFV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulet, Adeline; Spinelli, Silvia; Campanacci, Valérie; Porciero, Sophie; Blangy, Stéphanie; Garrett, Roger A.; Tilbeurgh, Herman van; Leulliot, Nicolas; Basta, Tamara; Prangishvili, David; Cambillau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Crystals of S. islandicus filamentous virus (SIFV) protein 14 have been grown at 293 K. Crystals belong to space group P6 2 22 or P6 4 22 and diffract to a resolution of 2.95 Å. A large-scale programme has been embarked upon aiming towards the structural determination of conserved proteins from viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea. Here, the crystallization of protein 14 from the archaeal virus SIFV is reported. This protein, which contains 111 residues (MW 13 465 Da), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His 6 tag and purified to homogeneity. The tag was subsequently cleaved and the protein was crystallized using PEG 1000 or PEG 4000 as a precipitant. Large crystals were obtained of the native and the selenomethionine-labelled protein using sitting drops of 100–300 nl. Crystals belong to space group P6 2 22 or P6 4 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.1, c = 132.4 Å. Diffraction data were collected to a maximum acceptable resolution of 2.95 and 3.20 Å for the SeMet-labelled and native protein, respectively

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic data of the PAS domain of the NifL protein from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hefti, M.H.; Hendle, J.; Enroth, C.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Tucker, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    The Azotobacter vinelandii NifL protein is a redox-sensing flavoprotein which inhibits the activity of the nitrogen-specific transcriptional activator NifA. The N-terminal PAS domain has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal

  7. Crystallization and quaternary structure analysis of an Lrp-like regulatory protein from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedelnikova, S.E.; Smits, S.H.J.; Leonard, P.M.; Brinkman, A.B.; Oost, van der J.; Rafferty, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    The LrpA transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) family, has been crystallized by the hanging-drop method of vapour diffusion using ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belong to the tetragonal system and are in

  8. NMR structure of the protein NP-247299.1: comparison with the crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaudzems, Kristaps; Geralt, Michael; Serrano, Pedro; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Horst, Reto; Pedrini, Bill; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of the NMR and crystal structures of a protein determined using largely automated methods has enabled the interpretation of local differences in the highly similar structures. These differences are found in segments of higher B values in the crystal and correlate with dynamic processes on the NMR chemical shift timescale observed in solution. The NMR structure of the protein NP-247299.1 in solution at 313 K has been determined and is compared with the X-ray crystal structure, which was also solved in the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) at 100 K and at 1.7 Å resolution. Both structures were obtained using the current largely automated crystallographic and solution NMR methods used by the JCSG. This paper assesses the accuracy and precision of the results from these recently established automated approaches, aiming for quantitative statements about the location of structure variations that may arise from either one of the methods used or from the different environments in solution and in the crystal. To evaluate the possible impact of the different software used for the crystallographic and the NMR structure determinations and analysis, the concept is introduced of reference structures, which are computed using the NMR software with input of upper-limit distance constraints derived from the molecular models representing the results of the two structure determinations. The use of this new approach is explored to quantify global differences that arise from the different methods of structure determination and analysis versus those that represent interesting local variations or dynamics. The near-identity of the protein core in the NMR and crystal structures thus provided a basis for the identification of complementary information from the two different methods. It was thus observed that locally increased crystallographic B values correlate with dynamic structural polymorphisms in solution, including that the solution state of the protein involves

  9. Development of aptamers against unpurified proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Shinichi; Tsukakoshi, Kaori; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2017-12-01

    SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) has been widely used for the generation of aptamers against target proteins. However, its requirement for pure target proteins remains a major problem in aptamer selection, as procedures for protein purification from crude bio-samples are not only complicated but also time and labor consuming. This is because native proteins can be found in a large number of diverse forms because of posttranslational modifications and their complicated molecular conformations. Moreover, several proteins are difficult to purify owing to their chemical fragility and/or rarity in native samples. An alternative route is the use of recombinant proteins for aptamer selection, because they are homogenous and easily purified. However, aptamers generated against recombinant proteins produced in prokaryotic cells may not interact with the same proteins expressed in eukaryotic cells because of posttranslational modifications. Moreover, to date recombinant proteins have been constructed for only a fraction of proteins expressed in the human body. Therefore, the demand for advanced SELEX methods not relying on complicated purification processes from native samples or recombinant proteins is growing. This review article describes several such techniques that allow researchers to directly develop an aptamer from various unpurified samples, such as whole cells, tissues, serum, and cell lysates. The key advantages of advanced SELEX are that it does not require a purification process from a crude bio-sample, maintains the functional states of target proteins, and facilitates the development of aptamers against unidentified and uncharacterized proteins in unpurified biological samples. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Development of the mercury iodide semiconductor crystal for application as a radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Joao Francisco Trencher

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the establishment of a technique for HgI growth and preparation of crystals, for use as room temperature radiation semiconductor detectors is described. Three methods of crystal growth were studied while developing this work: physical vapor transport (PVT); saturated solution of HgI 2 , using two different solvents; (a) dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and (b) acetone, and the Bridgman method. In order to evaluate the obtained crystals by the three methods, systematic measurements were carried out for determining the stoichiometry, structure, orientation, surface morphology and impurity of the crystal. The influence of these physical chemical properties on the crystals development was studied, evaluating their performance as radiation detectors. The X-ray diffractograms indicated that the crystals were, preferentially, oriented in the (001) e (101) directions with tetragonal structure for all crystals. Nevertheless, morphology with a smaller deformation level was observed for the crystal obtained by the PVT technique, comparing to other methods. Uniformity on the surface layer of the PVT crystal was detected, while clear incrustations of elements distinct from the crystal could be viewed on the DMSO crystal surface. The best results as to radiation response were found for the crystal grown by physical vapor transport. Significant improvement in the HgI z2 radiation detector performance was achieved for purer crystals, growing the crystal twice by PVT technique. (author)

  11. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of YjcG protein from Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Chan, Chiomui; Liang, Yu-He; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Li, Lanfen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2005-01-01

    B. subtilis YjcG protein was expressed, purified and crystallized. A complete diffraction data set was collected at BSRF beamline 3W1A and processed to 2.3 Å resolution. Bacillus subtilis YjcG is a functionally uncharacterized protein with 171 residues that has no structural homologue in the Protein Data Bank. However, it shows sequence homology to bacterial and archaeal 2′–5′ RNA ligases. In order to identify its exact function via structural studies, the yjcG gene was amplified from B. subtilis genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET21-DEST. The protein was expressed in a soluble form in Escherichia coli and was purified to homogeneity. Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained that diffracted to 2.3 Å and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 99.66, b = 73.93, c = 61.77 Å, β = 113.56°

  12. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K [Brussels; (Trinity); (Michigan); (Stanford-MED); (Michigan-Med); (UW)

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  13. Limitations of polyethylene glycol-induced precipitation as predictive tool for protein solubility during formulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Melanie; Winzer, Matthias; Weber, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2018-05-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced protein precipitation is often used to extrapolate apparent protein solubility at specific formulation compositions. The procedure was used for several fields of application such as protein crystal growth but also protein formulation development. Nevertheless, most studies focused on applicability in protein crystal growth. In contrast, this study focuses on applicability of PEG-induced precipitation during high-concentration protein formulation development. In this study, solubility of three different model proteins was investigated over a broad range of pH. Solubility values predicted by PEG-induced precipitation were compared to real solubility behaviour determined by either turbidity or content measurements. Predicted solubility by PEG-induced precipitation was confirmed for an Fc fusion protein and a monoclonal antibody. In contrast, PEG-induced precipitation failed to predict solubility of a single-domain antibody construct. Applicability of PEG-induced precipitation as indicator of protein solubility during formulation development was found to be not valid for one of three model molecules. Under certain conditions, PEG-induced protein precipitation is not valid for prediction of real protein solubility behaviour. The procedure should be used carefully as tool for formulation development, and the results obtained should be validated by additional investigations. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of central structure domains from mumps virus F protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yueyong; Xu, Yanhui; Zhu, Jieqing; Qiu, Bingsheng; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F.; Tien, Po

    2005-01-01

    Single crystals of the central structure domains from mumps virus F protein have been obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A diffraction data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. Fusion of members of the Paramyxoviridae family involves two glycoproteins: the attachment protein and the fusion protein. Changes in the fusion-protein conformation were caused by binding of the attachment protein to the cellular receptor. In the membrane-fusion process, two highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) regions, HR1 and HR2, are believed to form a stable six-helix coiled-coil bundle. However, no crystal structure has yet been determined for this state in the mumps virus (MuV, a member of the Paramyxoviridae family). In this study, a single-chain protein consisting of two HR regions connected by a flexible amino-acid linker (named 2-Helix) was expressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A complete X-ray data set was obtained in-house to 2.2 Å resolution from a single crystal. The crystal belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 161.2, b = 60.8, c = 40.1 Å, β = 98.4°. The crystal structure will help in understanding the molecular mechanism of Paramyxoviridae family membrane fusion

  15. ContaMiner and ContaBase: a webserver and database for early identification of unwantedly crystallized protein contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungler, Arnaud; Momin, Afaque; Diederichs, Kay; Arold, Stefan, T.

    2016-01-01

    Solving the phase problem in protein X-ray crystallography relies heavily on the identity of the crystallized protein, especially when molecular replacement (MR) methods are used. Yet, it is not uncommon that a contaminant crystallizes instead of the protein of interest. Such contaminants may be proteins from the expression host organism, protein fusion tags or proteins added during the purification steps. Many contaminants co-purify easily, crystallize and give good diffraction data. Identification of contaminant crystals may take time, since the presence of the contaminant is unexpected and its identity unknown. A webserver (ContaMiner) and a contaminant database (ContaBase) have been established, to allow fast MR-based screening of crystallographic data against currently 62 known contaminants. The web-based ContaMiner (available at http://strube.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/contaminer/) currently produces results in 5 min to 4 h. The program is also available in a github repository and can be installed locally. ContaMiner enables screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for ‘crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis’ publications. Thus, in addition to potentially saving X-ray crystallographers much time and effort, ContaMiner might considerably lower the risk of publishing erroneous data. PMID:27980519

  16. Monoclonal Antibody Analysis and Insecticidal Spectrum of Three Types of Lepidopteran-Specific Insecticidal Crystal Proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfte, Herman; Van Rie, Jeroen; Jansens, Stefan; Van Houtven, Annemie; Vanderbruggen, Hilde; Vaeck, Mark

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated the protein composition and the insecticidal spectrum of crystals of 29 Bacillus thuringiensis strains active against lepidopteran larvae. All crystals contained proteins of 130 to 140 kilodaltons (kDa) which could be grouped into three types by the molecular weight of the protoxin and the trypsin-activated core fragment. Proteins of the three types showed a characteristic insecticidal spectrum when tested against five lepidopteran species. Type A crystal proteins were protoxins of 130 or 133 kDa, which were processed into 60-kDa toxins by trypsin. Several genes encoding crystal proteins of this type have been cloned and sequenced earlier. They are highly conserved in the N-terminal half of the toxic fragment and were previously classified in three subtypes (the 4.5-, 5.3-, and 6.6-kilobase subtypes) based on the restriction map of their genes. The present study shows that different proteins of these three subtypes were equally toxic against Manduca sexta and Pieris brassicae and had no detectable activity against Spodoptera littoralis. However, the 4.5-, 5.3-, and 6.6-kilobase subtypes differed in their toxicity against Heliothis virescens and Mamestra brassicae. Type B crystal proteins consisted of 140-kDa protoxins with a 55-kDa tryptic core fragment. These were only active against one of the five insect species tested (P. brassicae). The protoxin and the trypsin-activated toxin of type C were 135- and 63-kDa proteins, respectively. Proteins of this type were associated with high toxicity against S. littoralis and M. brassicae. A panel of 35 monoclonal antibodies was used to compare the structural characteristics of crystal proteins of the three different types and subtypes. Each type of protein could be associated with a typical epitope structure, indicating an unambiguous correlation between antigenic structure and insect specificity. Images PMID:16347711

  17. Crystal structure of an eIF4G-like protein from Danio rerio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; McCoy, Jason G.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-04-18

    The gene LOC 91917 Danio rerio (zebrafish) encodes a protein annotated in the UniProt knowledgebase as the middle domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G domain containing protein b (MIF4Gdb). Its molecular weight is 25.8 kDa, and it comprises 222 amino acid residues. BLAST searches revealed homologues of D. rerio MIF4Gdb in many eukaryotes including humans. The homologue sand MIF4Gdb were identified as members of the Pfam family, MIF4G (PF2854), which is named after the middle domain of eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G). eIF4G is a component of eukaryotic translational initiation complex, and contains binding sites for other initiation factors, suggesting its critical role in translational initiation. The MIF4G domain also occurs in several other proteins involved in RNA metabolism, including the Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay 2 protein (NMD2/UPF2), and the nuclear cap-binding protein 80-kDa subunit (CBP80). Sequence and structure analysis of the MIF4G domains in many proteins indicate that the domain assumes an all helical fold and has tandem repeated motifs. The zebrafish protein described here has homology to domains of other proteins variously referred to as NIC-containing proteins (NMD2, eIF4G, CBP80). The biological function of D. rerio MIF4Gdb has not yet been experimentally characterized, and the annotation is based on amino acid sequence comparison. D. rerio MIF4Gdb did not share more than 25% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known and was selected as a target for structure determination by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG). Here, they report the crystal structure of D. rerio MIF4Gdb (UniGene code Dr.79360, UniProt code Q5EAQ1, CESG target number GO.79294).

  18. On the behavior of water at subfreezing temperatures in a protein crystal: evidence of higher mobility than in bulk water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongqi; Böckmann, Anja; Dolenc, Jožica; Meier, Beat H; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-10-03

    NMR experiments have shown that water molecules in the crystal of the protein Crh are still mobile at temperatures well below 273 K. In order to investigate this water anomaly, a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of crystalline Crh was carried out to determine the mobility of water in this crystal. The simulations were carried out at three temperatures, 150, 200, and 291 K. Simulations of bulk water at these temperatures were also done to obtain the properties of the simple point charge (SPC) water model used at these temperatures and to allow a comparison of the properties of water in the Crh crystal with those of bulk water at the same temperatures. According to the simulations, water is immobilized at 150 K both in crystal and in bulk water. As expected, at 291 K it diffuses and rotates more slowly in the protein crystal than in bulk water. However, at 200 K, the translational and rotational mobility of the water molecules is larger in the crystal than in bulk water. The enhancement of water mobility in the crystal at 200 K was further investigated by MD simulations in which the backbone or all protein atoms were positionally restrained, and in which additionally the electrostatic protein-water interactions were removed. Of these changes in the environment of the water molecules, rigidifying the protein backbones slightly enhanced water diffusion, while it slowed down rotation. In contrast, removal of electrostatic protein-water interactions did not change water diffusion but enhanced rotational motion significantly. Further investigations are required to delineate particular features of the protein crystal that induce the anomalous behavior of water at 200 K.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain mutant proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, Daisy W.; Borek, Dominika; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Wang, Tianjiao; Prins, Kathleen C.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.

    2010-01-01

    Three mutant forms of Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain were crystallized in three different space groups. VP35 is one of seven structural proteins encoded by the Ebola viral genome and mediates viral replication, nucleocapsid formation and host immune suppression. The C-terminal interferon inhibitory domain (IID) of VP35 is critical for dsRNA binding and interferon inhibition. The wild-type VP35 IID structure revealed several conserved residues that are important for dsRNA binding and interferon antagonism. Here, the expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant Zaire Ebola VP35 IID mutants R312A, K319A/R322A and K339A in space groups P6 1 22, P2 1 2 1 2 1 and P2 1 , respectively, are described. Diffraction data were collected using synchrotron sources at the Advanced Light Source and the Advanced Photon Source

  20. A new crystal structure fragment-based pharmacophore method for G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidom, Kimberley; Isberg, Vignir; Hauser, Alexander Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    and receptor residue pairs, from crystal structure complexes. We describe the procedure to collect a library with more than 250 fragments covering 29 residue positions within the generic transmembrane binding pocket. We describe how the library fragments are recombined and inferred to build pharmacophores...... for new targets. A validating retrospective virtual screening of histamine H1 and H3 receptor pharmacophores yielded area-under-the-curves of 0.88 and 0.82, respectively. The fragment-based method has the unique advantage that it can be applied to targets for which no (homologous) crystal structures...... or ligands are known. 47% of the class A G protein-coupled receptors can be targeted with at least four-element pharmacophores. The fragment libraries can also be used to grow known ligands or for rotamer refinement of homology models. Researchers can download the complete fragment library or a subset...

  1. Isolation, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of amaryllin, a plant pathogenesis-related protein from Amaryllis belladonna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjit; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, A.; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, T. P.

    2009-01-01

    A novel 15 kDa antifungal protein amaryllin has been crystallized using 30% PEG 8000 as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to orthorhombic space group I or I2 1 2 1 2 1 with cell dimensions, a = 48.6, b = 61.9 and c = 79.6–Å. A novel antifungal protein, amaryllin, has been isolated from the underground bulbs of Amaryllis belladonna, purified to homogeneity and crystallized. The protein was extracted using ammonium sulfate fractionation. The purified protein samples indicated a molecular weight of 15 kDa on SDS–PAGE. The protein showed antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium oxysporum. The N-terminal sequence of the first 15 amino-acid residues was determined using Edman degradation and did not show significant sequence identity to any known protein. The protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with 30% PEG 8000 as precipitating agent. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group I222 or I2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 48.6, b = 61.9, c = 79.6 Å. The complete sequence and structure determination of amaryllin are in progress

  2. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of human ribosomal protein L10 core domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Kawazoe, Masahito; Shirouzu, Mikako; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    A truncated variant of human ribosomal protien L10 was prepared and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Eukaryotic ribosomal protein L10 is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, which organizes the architecture of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site. The human L10 protein is also called the QM protein and consists of 214 amino-acid residues. For crystallization, the L10 core domain (L10CD, Phe34–Glu182) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. A hexagonal crystal of L10CD was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The L10CD crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belongs to space group P3 1 21 or P3 2 21

  4. Protein phosphorylation during coconut zygotic embryo development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islas-Flores, I.; Oropeza, C.; Hernandez-Sotomayor, S.M.T.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence was obtained on the occurrence of protein threonine, serine, and tyrosine (Tyr) kinases in developing coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) zygotic embryos, based on in vitro phosphorylation of proteins in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, alkaline treatment, and thin-layer chromatography analysis, which showed the presence of [32P]phosphoserine, [32P]phosphothreonine, and [32P]phosphotyrosine in [32P]-labeled protein hydrolyzates. Tyr kinase activity was further confirmed in extracts of embryos at different stages of development using antiphosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies and the synthetic peptide derived from the amino acid sequence surrounding the phosphorylation site in pp60src (RR-SRC), which is specific for Tyr kinases. Anti-phosphotyrosine western blotting revealed a changing profile of Tyr-phosphorylated proteins during embryo development. Tyr kinase activity, as assayed using RR-SRC, also changed during embryo development, showing two peaks of activity, one during early and another during late embryo development. In addition, the use of genistein, a Tyr kinase inhibitor, diminished the ability of extracts to phosphorylate RR-SRC. Results presented here show the occurrence of threonine, serine, and Tyr kinases in developing coconut zygotic embryos, and suggest that protein phosphorylation, and the possible inference of Tyr phosphorylation in particular, may play a role in the coordination of the development of embryos in this species

  5. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, Danny; Foadi, James; Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani; Iwata, So; Beis, Konstantinos; Evans, Gwyndaf; Alguel, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines

  6. Structure determination of an integral membrane protein at room temperature from crystals in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hu, Nien-Jen; Choudhury, Hassanul Ghani [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Iwata, So [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Beis, Konstantinos [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Alguel, Yilmaz, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-14

    The X-ray structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron diffraction data measured in situ at room temperature is demonstrated. The structure determination of an integral membrane protein using synchrotron X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature directly in vapour-diffusion crystallization plates (in situ) is demonstrated. Exposing the crystals in situ eliminates manual sample handling and, since it is performed at room temperature, removes the complication of cryoprotection and potential structural anomalies induced by sample cryocooling. Essential to the method is the ability to limit radiation damage by recording a small amount of data per sample from many samples and subsequently assembling the resulting data sets using specialized software. The validity of this procedure is established by the structure determination of Haemophilus influenza TehA at 2.3 Å resolution. The method presented offers an effective protocol for the fast and efficient determination of membrane-protein structures at room temperature using third-generation synchrotron beamlines.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohoutová, J.; Kutá Smatanová, I.; Brynda, J.; Lapkouski, M.; Revuelta, J. L.; Arellano, J. B.; Ettrich, R.

    2009-01-01

    Degradation-free crystalization of thrombin-digested recombinant His-tagged PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea resulting in crystals diffracting to 2.06 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was performed using N-terminally His-tagged recombinant PsbP protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant PsbP protein (thrombin-digested recombinant His-tagged PsbP) stored in bis-Tris buffer pH 6.00 was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 550 MME as a precipitant and zinc sulfate as an additive. SDS–PAGE analysis of a dissolved crystal showed that the crystals did not contain the degradation products of recombinant PsbP protein. PsbP crystals diffracted to 2.06 Å resolution in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 38.68, b = 46.73, c = 88.9 Å

  8. Crystal Structure of VC0702 at 2.0 Angstrom: Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Vibrio Cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, S.; Forouhar, F.; Bussiere, D.; Robinson, H.; Kennedy, M.

    2006-01-01

    VC0702, a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function from Vibrio cholerae, resides in a three-gene operon containing the MbaA gene that encodes for a GGDEF and EAL domain-containing protein which is involved in regulating formation of the extracellular matrix of biofilms in Vibrio cholerae. The VC0702 crystal structure has been determined at 2.0 Angstroms and refined to R work = 22.8% and R free = 26.3%. VC0702 crystallized in an orthorhombic crystal lattice in the C2221 space group with dimensions of a = 66.61 Angstroms, b = 88.118 Angstroms, and c = 118.35 Angstroms with a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. VC0702, which forms a mixed α + β three-layered αβα sandwich, belongs to the Pfam DUF84 and COG1986 families of proteins. Sequence conservation within the DUF84 and COG1986 families was used to identify a conserved patch of surface residues that define a cleft and potential substrate-binding site in VC0702. The three-dimensional structure of VC0702 is similar to that of Mj0226 from Methanococcus janeschii, which has been identified as a novel NTPase that binds NTP in a deep cleft similarly located to the conserved patch of surface residues that define an analogous cleft in VC0702. Collectively, the data suggest that VC0702 may have a biochemical function that involves NTP binding and phosphatase activity of some kind, and is likely involved in regulation of the signaling pathway that controls biofilm formation and maintenance in Vibrio cholerae

  9. ContaMiner and ContaBase: a webserver and database for early identification of unwantedly crystallized protein contaminants

    KAUST Repository

    Hungler, Arnaud; Momin, Afaque Ahmad Imtiyaz; Diederichs, Kay; Arold, Stefan T.

    2016-01-01

    Solving the phase problem in protein X-ray crystallography relies heavily on the identity of the crystallized protein, especially when molecular replacement (MR) methods are used. Yet, it is not uncommon that a contaminant crystallizes instead of the protein of interest. Such contaminants may be proteins from the expression host organism, protein fusion tags or proteins added during the purification steps. Many contaminants co-purify easily, crystallize and give good diffraction data. Identification of contaminant crystals may take time, since the presence of the contaminant is unexpected and its identity unknown. A webserver (ContaMiner) and a contaminant database (ContaBase) have been established, to allow fast MR-based screening of crystallographic data against currently 62 known contaminants. The web-based ContaMiner (available at http://strube.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/contaminer/) currently produces results in 5 min to 4 h. The program is also available in a github repository and can be installed locally. ContaMiner enables screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for 'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis' publications. Thus, in addition to potentially saving X-ray crystallographers much time and effort, ContaMiner might considerably lower the risk of publishing erroneous data. A web server, titled ContaMiner, has been established, which allows fast molecular-replacement-based screening of crystallographic data against a database (ContaBase) of currently 62 potential contaminants. ContaMiner enables systematic screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for 'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis' publications. © Arnaud Hungler et al. 2016.

  10. ContaMiner and ContaBase: a webserver and database for early identification of unwantedly crystallized protein contaminants

    KAUST Repository

    Hungler, Arnaud

    2016-11-02

    Solving the phase problem in protein X-ray crystallography relies heavily on the identity of the crystallized protein, especially when molecular replacement (MR) methods are used. Yet, it is not uncommon that a contaminant crystallizes instead of the protein of interest. Such contaminants may be proteins from the expression host organism, protein fusion tags or proteins added during the purification steps. Many contaminants co-purify easily, crystallize and give good diffraction data. Identification of contaminant crystals may take time, since the presence of the contaminant is unexpected and its identity unknown. A webserver (ContaMiner) and a contaminant database (ContaBase) have been established, to allow fast MR-based screening of crystallographic data against currently 62 known contaminants. The web-based ContaMiner (available at http://strube.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/contaminer/) currently produces results in 5 min to 4 h. The program is also available in a github repository and can be installed locally. ContaMiner enables screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for \\'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis\\' publications. Thus, in addition to potentially saving X-ray crystallographers much time and effort, ContaMiner might considerably lower the risk of publishing erroneous data. A web server, titled ContaMiner, has been established, which allows fast molecular-replacement-based screening of crystallographic data against a database (ContaBase) of currently 62 potential contaminants. ContaMiner enables systematic screening of novel crystals at synchrotron beamlines, and it would be valuable as a routine safety check for \\'crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis\\' publications. © Arnaud Hungler et al. 2016.

  11. Crystal structure of AFV3-109, a highly conserved protein from crenarchaeal viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quevillon-Cheruel Sophie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The extraordinary morphologies of viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea clearly distinguish them from bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. Moreover, their genomes code for proteins that to a large extend have no related sequences in the extent databases. However, a small pool of genes is shared by overlapping subsets of these viruses, and the most conserved gene, exemplified by the ORF109 of the Acidianus Filamentous Virus 3, AFV3, is present on genomes of members of three viral familes, the Lipothrixviridae, Rudiviridae, and "Bicaudaviridae", as well as of the unclassified Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus, STIV. We present here the crystal structure of the protein (Mr = 13.1 kD, 109 residues encoded by the AFV3 ORF 109 in two different crystal forms at 1.5 and 1.3 Å resolution. The structure of AFV3-109 is a five stranded β-sheet with loops on one side and three helices on the other. It forms a dimer adopting the shape of a cradle that encompasses the best conserved regions of the sequence. No protein with a related fold could be identified except for the ortholog from STIV1, whose structure was deposited at the Protein Data Bank. We could clearly identify a well bound glycerol inside the cradle, contacting exclusively totally conserved residues. This interaction was confirmed in solution by fluorescence titration. Although the function of AFV3-109 cannot be deduced directly from its structure, structural homology with the STIV1 protein, and the size and charge distribution of the cavity suggested it could interact with nucleic acids. Fluorescence quenching titrations also showed that AFV3-109 interacts with dsDNA. Genomic sequence analysis revealed bacterial homologs of AFV3-109 as a part of a putative previously unidentified prophage sequences in some Firmicutes.

  12. Solution structure of detergent micelles at conditions relevant to membrane protein crystallization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littrell, K.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Tiede, D.; Urban, V.

    1999-07-02

    In this study small angle neutron scattering was used to characterize the formation of micelles in aqueous solutions of the detergents DMG and SPC as a function of detergent concentration and ionic strength of the solvent. The effects on the micelle structure of the additives glycerol and PEG, alone as well as in combination typical for actual membrane protein crystallization, were also explored. This research suggests that the micelles are cigar-like in form at the concentrations studied. The size of the micelles was observed to increase with increasing ionic strength but decrease with the addition of glycerol or PEG.

  13. Model for determining vapor equilibrium rates in the hanging drop method for protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented. Results are applied to 18 drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory. The chemical nature of the salt, drop size and shape, drop concentration, well size, well concentration, and temperature are taken into account. The rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation in this model possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu Hao,; Sun, L.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Fu, S.; Akerboom, A.P.; Li, X.; Oost, van der J.

    2007-01-01

    A predicted GTP-binding protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus, termed SsGBP, has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in the presence of 0.05 M cadmium sulfate and 0.8

  15. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of an oomycete-derived Nep1-like protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luberacki, B.; Weyand, M.; Seitz, H.U.; Koch, W.; Oecking, C.; Ottmann, C.

    2008-01-01

    The elicitor protein Nep1-like protein from the plant pathogen Pythium aphanidermatum was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A native data set was collected to 1.35 angstrom resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Since selenomethionine-labelled

  16. Detection of Collapse and Crystallization of Saccharide, Protein and Mannitol Formulations by Optical Fibers in Lyophilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Jacqueline; Friess, Wolfgang

    2018-01-01

    The collapse temperature (Tc) and the glass transition temperature of freeze-concentrated solutions (Tg’) as well as the crystallization behavior of excipients are important physicochemical characteristics which guide the cycle development in freeze-drying. The most frequently used methods to determine these values are differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and freeze-drying microscopy (FDM). The objective of this study was to evaluate the optical fiber system (OFS) unit as alternative tool for the analysis of Tc, Tg’ and crystallization events. The OFS unit was also tested as a potential online monitoring tool during freeze-drying. Freeze/thawing and freeze-drying experiments of sucrose, trehalose, stachyose, mannitol and highly concentrated IgG1 and lysozyme solutions were carried out and monitored by the OFS. Comparative analyses were performed by DSC and FDM. OFS and FDM results correlated well. The crystallization behavior of mannitol could be monitored by the OFS during freeze/thawing as it can be done by DSC. Online monitoring of freeze-drying runs detected collapse of amorphous saccharide matrices. The OFS unit enabled the analysis of both Tc and crystallization processes, which is usually carried out by FDM and DSC. The OFS can hence be used as novel measuring device. Additionally, detection of these events during lyophilization facilitate online-monitoring. Thus the OFS is a new beneficial tool for the development and monitoring of freeze-drying processes.

  17. Detection of Collapse and Crystallization of Saccharide, Protein, and Mannitol Formulations by Optical Fibers in Lyophilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Horn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The collapse temperature (Tc and the glass transition temperature of freeze-concentrated solutions (Tg' as well as the crystallization behavior of excipients are important physicochemical characteristics which guide the cycle development in freeze-drying. The most frequently used methods to determine these values are differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and freeze-drying microscopy (FDM. The objective of this study was to evaluate the optical fiber system (OFS unit as alternative tool for the analysis of Tc, Tg' and crystallization events. The OFS unit was also tested as a potential online monitoring tool during freeze-drying. Freeze/thawing and freeze-drying experiments of sucrose, trehalose, stachyose, mannitol, and highly concentrated IgG1 and lysozyme solutions were carried out and monitored by the OFS. Comparative analyses were performed by DSC and FDM. OFS and FDM results correlated well. The crystallization behavior of mannitol could be monitored by the OFS during freeze/thawing as it can be done by DSC. Online monitoring of freeze-drying runs detected collapse of amorphous saccharide matrices. The OFS unit enabled the analysis of both Tc and crystallization processes, which is usually carried out by FDM and DSC. The OFS can hence be used as novel measuring device. Additionally, detection of these events during lyophilization facilitates online-monitoring. Thus the OFS is a new beneficial tool for the development and monitoring of freeze-drying processes.

  18. Co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins define the surface structure of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Yamagishi, Ayana; Fukuyo, Ayumi; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize magnetosomes comprised of membrane-enveloped single crystalline magnetite (Fe3 O4 ). The size and morphology of the nano-sized magnetite crystals (Mms (Mms5, Mms6, Mms7, and Mms13), was previously isolated from the surface of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. Analysis of an mms6 gene deletion mutant suggested that the Mms6 protein plays a major role in the regulation of magnetite crystal size and morphology. In this study, we constructed various mms gene deletion mutants and characterized the magnetite crystals formed by the mutant strains. Comparative analysis showed that all mms genes were involved in the promotion of crystal growth in different manners. The phenotypic characterization of magnetites also suggested that these proteins are involved in controlling the geometries of the crystal surface structures. Thus, the co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins regulate the morphology of the cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the chemokine-binding protein from orf virus (Poxviridae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couñago, Rafael Miguez; Fleming, Stephen B.; Mercer, Andrew A.; Krause, Kurt L.

    2010-01-01

    The chemokine-binding protein from orf virus was purified and crystallized. The morphology and diffraction behaviour of these crystals was significantly improved through the use of additives known as Silver Bullets. The parapoxvirus orf virus (ORFV) encodes a chemokine-binding protein (CBP) that functions to downregulate the host’s immune response at the site of infection by blocking the chemokine-induced recruitment of immune cells. In order to shed light on the structural determinants of CBP–chemokine binding, ORFV CBP was crystallized as part of an ongoing structure–function study on this protein. ORFV CBP crystals were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique using ammonium citrate as a precipitant. The crystal quality was greatly improved through the addition of small-molecule additives to the crystallization mother liquor. ORFV CBP crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.50 Å resolution and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6 1 22 or its enantiomorph P6 5 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 75.62, c = 282.49 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°

  20. Crystal Structure Analysis and the Identification of Distinctive Functional Regions of the Protein Elicitor Mohrip2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengjie; Duan, Liangwei; Wang, Meifang; Zeng, Hongmei; Liu, Xinqi; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor MoHrip2, which was extracted from Magnaporthe oryzae as an exocrine protein, triggers the tobacco immune system and enhances blast resistance in rice. However, the detailed mechanisms by which MoHrip2 acts as an elicitor remain unclear. Here, we investigated the structure of MoHrip2 to elucidate its functions based on molecular structure. The three-dimensional structure of MoHrip2 was obtained. Overall, the crystal structure formed a β-barrel structure and showed high similarity to the pathogenesis-related (PR) thaumatin superfamily protein thaumatin-like xylanase inhibitor (TL-XI). To investigate the functional regions responsible for MoHrip2 elicitor activities, the full length and eight truncated proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were evaluated for elicitor activity in tobacco. Biological function analysis showed that MoHrip2 triggered the defense system against Botrytis cinerea in tobacco. Moreover, only MoHrip2M14 and other fragments containing the 14 amino acids residues in the middle region of the protein showed the elicitor activity of inducing a hypersensitive response and resistance related pathways, which were similar to that of full-length MoHrip2. These results revealed that the central 14 amino acid residues were essential for anti-pathogenic activity.

  1. Crystal Structure Analysis and the Identification of Distinctive Functional Regions of the Protein Elicitor Mohrip2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjie Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The protein elicitor MoHrip2, which was extracted from Magnaporthe oryzae as an exocrine protein, triggers the tobacco immune system and enhances blast resistance in rice. However, the detailed mechanisms by which MoHrip2 acts as an elicitor remain unclear. Here, we investigated the structure of MoHrip2 to elucidate its functions based on molecular structure. The 3-dimensional structure of MoHrip2 was obtained. Overall, the crystal structure formed a β-barrel structure and showed high similarity to the pathogenesis-related (PR thaumatin superfamily protein thaumatin-like xylanase inhibitor (TL-XI. To investigate the functional regions responsible for MoHrip2 elicitor activities, the full length and 8 truncated proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were evaluated for elicitor activity in tobacco. Biological function analysis showed that MoHrip2 triggered the defense system against Botrytis cinerea in tobacco. Moreover, only MoHrip2M14 and other fragments containing the 14 amino acids residues in the middle region of the protein showed the elicitor activity of inducing a hypersensitive response and resistance related pathways, which were similar to that of full-length MoHrip2. These results revealed that the central 14 amino acid residues were essential for anti-pathogenic activity.

  2. Laser scattering in a hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus for protein crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casay, G. A.; Wilson, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    One type of hardware used to grow protein crystals in the microgravity environment aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle is a hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus (HDVDA). In order to optimize crystal growth conditions, dynamic control of the HDVDA is desirable. A critical component in the dynamically controlled system is a detector for protein nucleation. We have constructed a laser scattering detector for the HDVDA capable of detecting the nucleation stage. The detector was successfully tested for several scatterers differing in size using dynamic light scattering techniques. In addition, the ability to detect protein nucleation using the HDVDA was demonstrated for lysozyme.

  3. Crystallization of a 79 kDa fragment of the hook protein FlgE from Campylobacter jejuni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Yasuji; Yoon, Young-Ho; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2011-01-01

    A 79 kDa fragment of FlgE from C. jejuni has been crystallized. A 79 kDa fragment of the bacterial flagellar hook protein FlgE from Campylobacter jejuni was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Two different crystal forms were obtained. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data showed that the first crystal form, which diffracted to 4.9 Å resolution, belonged to the tetragonal crystal system, with space group I4 1 22 and unit-cell parameters a = b = 186.2, c = 386.6 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The second crystal form diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic crystal system, with space group P2 1 and unit-cell parameters a = 75.7, b = 173.8, c = 150.8 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 106.5°. SeMet protein was also overexpressed, purified and crystallized, and a 2.6 Å resolution MAD data set was collected

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of human PACSIN 1 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xiaoyun; Meng, Geng; Li, Guoming; Luo, Ming; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2009-01-01

    A C-terminal truncation construct of human PACSIN 1 (1–344) has been purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 3.0 Å resolution. PACSIN 1, which is mainly detected in brain tissue, is one of the PACSIN-family proteins involved in endocytosis and recruitment of synaptic vesicles. It binds to dynamin, synaptojanin 1 and N-WASP, and functions in vesicle formation and transport. However, the mechanisms of action of PACSIN 1 in these processes are largely unknown. Here, full-length and five C-terminal truncation constructs of human PACSIN 1 have been successfully expressed and purified in Escherichia coli. PACSIN 1 (1–344) was crystallized and diffracted to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 158.65, b = 87.38, c = 91.76 Å, α = 90.00, β = 113.61, γ = 90.00°. There were two molecules in the asymmetric unit and the solvent content was estimated to be about 70.47%

  5. Crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human myelin protein zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Sohi, Jasloveleen; Kamholz, John; Kovari, Ladislau C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

    2012-03-27

    different mutations in the MPZ gene leading to peripheral neuropathy in patients have been reported worldwide (http://www.molgen. ua.ac.be/CMTMutations). All identified mutations resulting in a change or deletion of amino acid residues in MPZ give rise to neuropathy with the exception of R215L, which instead causes a benign polymorphism. Furthermore, more detailed analysis has classified the MPZ mutations into two major groups. In the first group, the mutations disrupt the intracellular processing of MPZ and are primarily associated with early onset neuropathy. It has been proposed that the mutated MPZ is trapped inside the cell rather than being transported to the plasma membrane. However, other evidence suggests that the mutated MPZ protein is expressed on the plasma membrane, but dominant-negatively disrupts the structure of myelin. In the second group, the MPZ mutations are associated with late onset neuropathy as these mutations cause only mild demyelination. The underlying mechanism is elusive with the hypothesis being that the second group of mutations cause minor abnormalities in the myelin sheath that over time may lead to aberrant Schwann cell-axon interactions and subsequently to axonal degeneration. The crystal structure of the extracellular domain of human MPZ (hP0ex) fused with maltose binding protein (MBP) is reported at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. While the crystal structure of rat MPZ extracellular domain (rP0ex) is available, the crystal structure of the human counterpart is useful for the analysis of the two homologs as well as a comparison between the two species. The hP0ex molecule reveals subtle structural variations between two homologs allowing comparison of the human myelin protein zero to that of the rat protein. The alignment of these homologs is shown in Figure 1(a).

  6. A Versatile System for High-Throughput In Situ X-ray Screening and Data Collection of Soluble and Membrane-Protein Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broecker, Jana; Klingel, Viviane; Ou, Wei-Lin; Balo, Aidin R.; Kissick, David J.; Ogata, Craig M.; Kuo, Anling; Ernst, Oliver P.

    2016-10-12

    In recent years, in situ data collection has been a major focus of progress in protein crystallography. Here, we introduce the Mylar in situ method using Mylar-based sandwich plates that are inexpensive, easy to make and handle, and show significantly less background scattering than other setups. A variety of cognate holders for patches of Mylar in situ sandwich films corresponding to one or more wells makes the method robust and versatile, allows for storage and shipping of entire wells, and enables automated crystal imaging, screening, and goniometerbased X-ray diffraction data-collection at room temperature and under cryogenic conditions for soluble and membrane-protein crystals grown in or transferred to these plates. We validated the Mylar in situ method using crystals of the water-soluble proteins hen egg-white lysozyme and sperm whale myoglobin as well as the 7-transmembrane protein bacteriorhodopsin from Haloquadratum walsbyi. In conjunction with current developments at synchrotrons, this approach promises high-resolution structural studies of membrane proteins to become faster and more routine.

  7. Crystal structure and conformational flexibility of the unligated FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Mustafi, Sourajit M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); LeMaster, David M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Li, Zhong [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Héroux, Annie [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda, E-mail: griselda@wadsworth.org [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Two crystal forms of unligated FKBP12.6 exhibit multiple conformations in the active site and in the 80s loop, the primary site for known protein-recognition interactions. The previously unreported NMR backbone assignment of FKBP12.6 revealed extensive doubling of amide resonances, which reflects a slow conformational transition centered in the 80s loop. The primary known physiological function of FKBP12.6 involves its role in regulating the RyR2 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} channels in cardiac muscle, pancreatic β islets and the central nervous system. With only a single previously reported X-ray structure of FKBP12.6, bound to the immunosuppressant rapamycin, structural inferences for this protein have been drawn from the more extensive studies of the homologous FKBP12. X-ray structures at 1.70 and 1.90 Å resolution from P2{sub 1} and P3{sub 1}21 crystal forms are reported for an unligated cysteine-free variant of FKBP12.6 which exhibit a notable diversity of conformations. In one monomer from the P3{sub 1}21 crystal form, the aromatic ring of Phe59 at the base of the active site is rotated perpendicular to its typical orientation, generating a steric conflict for the immunosuppressant-binding mode. The peptide unit linking Gly89 and Val90 at the tip of the protein-recognition ‘80s loop’ is flipped in the P2{sub 1} crystal form. Unlike the >30 reported FKBP12 structures, the backbone conformation of this loop closely follows that of the first FKBP domain of FKBP51. The NMR resonances for 21 backbone amides of FKBP12.6 are doubled, corresponding to a slow conformational transition centered near the tip of the 80s loop, as recently reported for 31 amides of FKBP12. The comparative absence of doubling for residues along the opposite face of the active-site pocket in FKBP12.6 may in part reflect attenuated structural coupling owing to increased conformational plasticity around the Phe59 ring.

  8. Carotenoid crystal formation in Arabidopsis and carrot roots caused by increased phytoene synthase protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Maass

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As the first pathway-specific enzyme in carotenoid biosynthesis, phytoene synthase (PSY is a prime regulatory target. This includes a number of biotechnological approaches that have successfully increased the carotenoid content in agronomically relevant non-green plant tissues through tissue-specific PSY overexpression. We investigated the differential effects of constitutive AtPSY overexpression in green and non-green cells of transgenic Arabidopsis lines. This revealed striking similarities to the situation found in orange carrot roots with respect to carotenoid amounts and sequestration mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Arabidopsis seedlings, carotenoid content remained unaffected by increased AtPSY levels although the protein was almost quantitatively imported into plastids, as shown by western blot analyses. In contrast, non-photosynthetic calli and roots overexpressing AtPSY accumulated carotenoids 10 and 100-fold above the corresponding wild-type tissues and contained 1800 and 500 microg carotenoids per g dry weight, respectively. This increase coincided with a change of the pattern of accumulated carotenoids, as xanthophylls decreased relative to beta-carotene and carotene intermediates accumulated. As shown by polarization microscopy, carotenoids were found deposited in crystals, similar to crystalline-type chromoplasts of non-green tissues present in several other taxa. In fact, orange-colored carrots showed a similar situation with increased PSY protein as well as carotenoid levels and accumulation patterns whereas wild white-rooted carrots were similar to Arabidopsis wild type roots in this respect. Initiation of carotenoid crystal formation by increased PSY protein amounts was further confirmed by overexpressing crtB, a bacterial PSY gene, in white carrots, resulting in increased carotenoid amounts deposited in crystals. CONCLUSIONS: The sequestration of carotenoids into crystals can be driven by the

  9. Ectodomain of plasmodesmata-localized protein 5 in Arabidopsis: expression, purification, crystallization and crystallographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaocui; Zhu, Peiyan; Qu, Shanshan; Zhao, Jie; Singh, Prashant K; Wang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodesmata-localized protein 5 (PDLP5) is a cysteine-rich receptor-like protein which is localized on the plasmodesmata of Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of PDLP5 can reduce the permeability of the plasmodesmata and further affect the cell-to-cell movement of viruses and macromolecules in plants. The ectodomain of PDLP5 contains two DUF26 domains; however, the function of these domains is still unknown. Here, the ectodomain of PDLP5 from Arabidopsis was cloned and overexpressed using an insect expression system and was then purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.9, b = 48.1, c = 62.2 Å, α = 97.3, β = 103.1, γ = 99.7°. Analysis of the crystal content indicated that there are two molecules in the asymmetric unit, with a Matthews coefficient of 2.51 Å 3  Da -1 and a solvent content of 50.97%.

  10. Routine phasing of coiled-coil protein crystal structures with AMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens M. H. Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coiled-coil protein folds are among the most abundant in nature. These folds consist of long wound α-helices and are architecturally simple, but paradoxically their crystallographic structures are notoriously difficult to solve with molecular-replacement techniques. The program AMPLE can solve crystal structures by molecular replacement using ab initio search models in the absence of an existent homologous protein structure. AMPLE has been benchmarked on a large and diverse test set of coiled-coil crystal structures and has been found to solve 80% of all cases. Successes included structures with chain lengths of up to 253 residues and resolutions down to 2.9 Å, considerably extending the limits on size and resolution that are typically tractable by ab initio methodologies. The structures of two macromolecular complexes, one including DNA, were also successfully solved using their coiled-coil components. It is demonstrated that both the ab initio modelling and the use of ensemble search models contribute to the success of AMPLE by comparison with phasing attempts using single structures or ideal polyalanine helices. These successes suggest that molecular replacement with AMPLE should be the method of choice for the crystallographic elucidation of a coiled-coil structure. Furthermore, AMPLE may be able to exploit the presence of a coiled coil in a complex to provide a convenient route for phasing.

  11. Evaluation of Semi-supervised Learning for Classification of Protein Crystallization Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, Madhav; Dinç, İmren; Dinç, Semih; Sigdel, Madhu S; Pusey, Marc L; Aygün, Ramazan S

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of two wrapper methods for semi-supervised learning algorithms for classification of protein crystallization images with limited labeled images. Firstly, we evaluate the performance of semi-supervised approach using self-training with naïve Bayesian (NB) and sequential minimum optimization (SMO) as the base classifiers. The confidence values returned by these classifiers are used to select high confident predictions to be used for self-training. Secondly, we analyze the performance of Yet Another Two Stage Idea (YATSI) semi-supervised learning using NB, SMO, multilayer perceptron (MLP), J48 and random forest (RF) classifiers. These results are compared with the basic supervised learning using the same training sets. We perform our experiments on a dataset consisting of 2250 protein crystallization images for different proportions of training and test data. Our results indicate that NB and SMO using both self-training and YATSI semi-supervised approaches improve accuracies with respect to supervised learning. On the other hand, MLP, J48 and RF perform better using basic supervised learning. Overall, random forest classifier yields the best accuracy with supervised learning for our dataset.

  12. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a novel haem-binding protein of Streptomyces reticuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Peijian; Groves, Matthew R.; Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra D.; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío

    2008-01-01

    The haem-binding protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å. Streptomyces reticuli is a soil-growing Gram-positive bacteria that has been shown to secrete a novel haem-binding protein known as HbpS. Sequence analysis reveals that homologues of HbpS are found in a wide variety of bacteria, including different Actinobacteria and the Gram-negative Vibrio cholera and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vivo production of HbpS is greatly increased when S. reticuli is cultured in the presence of the natural antibiotic haemin (Fe 3+ oxidized form of haem). Mutational analysis demonstrated that HbpS significantly increases the resistance of S. reticuli to toxic concentrations of haemin. Previous data show that the presence of the newly identified two-component sensor system SenS–SenR also considerably enhances the resistance of S. reticuli to haemin and the redox-cycling compound plumbagin, suggesting a role in the sensing of redox changes. Specific interaction between HbpS and SenS–SenR, which regulates the expression of the catalase–peroxidase CpeB, as well as HbpS, has been demonstrated in vitro. HbpS has been recombinantly overexpressed, purified and crystallized in space group P2 1 3, with a cell edge of 152.5 Å. Diffraction data were recorded to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å and phases were obtained using the SAD method from crystals briefly soaked in high concentrations of sodium bromide

  13. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of a novel haem-binding protein of Streptomyces reticuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Peijian [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Groves, Matthew R. [EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra D.; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío, E-mail: ortiz@biologie.uni-osnabrueck.de [Universität Osnabrück, FB Biologie/Chemie, Angewandte Genetik der Mikroorganismen, Barbarastrasse 13, 49069 Osnabrück (Germany); EMBL Outstation Hamburg, c/o DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-05-01

    The haem-binding protein HbpS from Streptomyces reticuli was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å. Streptomyces reticuli is a soil-growing Gram-positive bacteria that has been shown to secrete a novel haem-binding protein known as HbpS. Sequence analysis reveals that homologues of HbpS are found in a wide variety of bacteria, including different Actinobacteria and the Gram-negative Vibrio cholera and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The in vivo production of HbpS is greatly increased when S. reticuli is cultured in the presence of the natural antibiotic haemin (Fe{sup 3+} oxidized form of haem). Mutational analysis demonstrated that HbpS significantly increases the resistance of S. reticuli to toxic concentrations of haemin. Previous data show that the presence of the newly identified two-component sensor system SenS–SenR also considerably enhances the resistance of S. reticuli to haemin and the redox-cycling compound plumbagin, suggesting a role in the sensing of redox changes. Specific interaction between HbpS and SenS–SenR, which regulates the expression of the catalase–peroxidase CpeB, as well as HbpS, has been demonstrated in vitro. HbpS has been recombinantly overexpressed, purified and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}3, with a cell edge of 152.5 Å. Diffraction data were recorded to a maximal resolution of 2.25 Å and phases were obtained using the SAD method from crystals briefly soaked in high concentrations of sodium bromide.

  14. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) nucleocapsid protein C-terminal domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Xiaohang; Ma, Yanlin; Li, Xuemei

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of mouse hepatitis virus nucleocapsid protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal belonged to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, c = 50.8 Å, and diffracted to 2.20 Å resolution. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) belongs to the group II coronaviruses. The virus produces nine genes encoding 11 proteins that could be recognized as structural proteins and nonstructural proteins and are crucial for viral RNA synthesis. The nucleocapsid (N) protein, one of the structural proteins, interacts with the 30.4 kb virus genomic RNA to form the helical nucleocapsid and associates with the membrane glycoprotein via its C-terminus to stabilize virion assembly. Here, the expression and crystallization of the MHV nucleocapsid protein C-terminal domain are reported. The crystals diffracted to 2.20 Å resolution and belonged to space group P422, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, c = 50.8 Å. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 43.0% (V M = 2.16 Å 3 Da −1 )

  15. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWDBP, a member of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herde, Petra; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2006-01-01

    The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWD-binding protein (MAWDBP) are described. MAWDBP is the only representative of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family in the human genome. Its expression is elevated in several disease processes, including insulin resistance, folate deficiency and hypotension, and it may also be involved in carcinogenesis. The exact molecular function of MAWDBP is unknown. Native and seleno-l-methionine-labelled MAWDBP were expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at room temperature from precipitants containing 10 mM KF, 14%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.1 M sodium citrate pH 5.4. Crystals belong to space group H32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 187, c = 241 Å, indicative of three to five monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystals were cryoprotected with 15%(v/v) glycerol and data have been collected to 2.7 Å resolution

  16. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWDBP, a member of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herde, Petra; Blankenfeldt, Wulf, E-mail: wulf.blankenfeldt@mpi-dortmund.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Physiology, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 11, 44227 Dortmund (Germany)

    2006-06-01

    The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of human MAWD-binding protein (MAWDBP) are described. MAWDBP is the only representative of the phenazine biosynthesis-like protein family in the human genome. Its expression is elevated in several disease processes, including insulin resistance, folate deficiency and hypotension, and it may also be involved in carcinogenesis. The exact molecular function of MAWDBP is unknown. Native and seleno-l-methionine-labelled MAWDBP were expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized at room temperature from precipitants containing 10 mM KF, 14%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.1 M sodium citrate pH 5.4. Crystals belong to space group H32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 187, c = 241 Å, indicative of three to five monomers per asymmetric unit. Crystals were cryoprotected with 15%(v/v) glycerol and data have been collected to 2.7 Å resolution.

  17. Large-scale purification and crystallization of the endoribonuclease XendoU: troubleshooting with His-tagged proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renzi, Fabiana; Panetta, Gianna; Vallone, Beatrice; Brunori, Maurizio; Arceci, Massimo; Bozzoni, Irene; Laneve, Pietro; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant His-tagged XendoU, a eukaryotic endoribonuclease, appeared to aggregate in the presence of divalent cations. Monodisperse protein which yielded crystals diffracting to 2.2 Å was obtained by addition of EDTA. XendoU is the first endoribonuclease described in higher eukaryotes as being involved in the endonucleolytic processing of intron-encoded small nucleolar RNAs. It is conserved among eukaryotes and its viral homologue is essential in SARS replication and transcription. The large-scale purification and crystallization of recombinant XendoU are reported. The tendency of the recombinant enzyme to aggregate could be reversed upon the addition of chelating agents (EDTA, imidazole): aggregation is a potential drawback when purifying and crystallizing His-tagged proteins, which are widely used, especially in high-throughput structural studies. Purified monodisperse XendoU crystallized in two different space groups: trigonal P3 1 21, diffracting to low resolution, and monoclinic C2, diffracting to higher resolution

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarendra K. Rai

    2006-12-04

    Turbine blades in coal derived syngas systems are subject to oxidation and corrosion due to high steam temperature and pressure. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are developed to address these problems. The emphasis is on prime-reliant design and a better coating architecture, having high temperature and corrosion resistance properties for turbine blades. In Phase I, UES Inc. proposed to develop, characterize and optimize a prime reliant TBC system, having smooth and defect-free NiCoCrAlY bond layer and a defect free oxide sublayer, using a filtered arc technology. Phase I work demonstrated the deposition of highly dense, smooth and defect free NiCoCrAlY bond coat on a single crystal CMSX-4 substrate and the deposition of alpha-alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sublayer on top of the bond coat. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation test and pre- and post-characterization of these layers, in Phase I work, (with and without top TBC layer of commercial EB PVD YSZ) revealed significant performance enhancement.

  19. Protein Adsorption to Titanium and Zirconia Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Kusakawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein adsorption onto titanium (Ti or zirconia (ZrO2 was evaluated using a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM. As proteins, fibronectin (Fn, a cell adhesive protein, and albumin (Alb, a cell adhesion-inhibiting protein, were evaluated. The Ti and ZrO2 sensors for QCM were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron probe microanalysis observation, measurement of contact angle against water, and surface roughness. The amounts of Fn and Alb adsorbed onto the Ti and ZrO2 sensors and apparent reaction rate were obtained using QCM measurements. Ti sensor showed greater adsorption of Fn and Alb than the ZrO2 sensor. In addition, amount of Fn adsorbed onto the Ti or ZrO2 sensors was higher than that of Alb. The surface roughness and hydrophilicity of Ti or ZrO2 may influence the adsorption of Fn or Alb. With regard to the adsorption rate, Alb adsorbed more rapidly than Fn onto Ti. Comparing Ti and ZrO2, Alb adsorption rate to Ti was faster than that to ZrO2. Fn adsorption will be effective for cell activities, but Alb adsorption will not. QCM method could simulate in vivo Fn and Alb adsorption to Ti or ZrO2.

  20. Protein NMR Structures Refined with Rosetta Have Higher Accuracy Relative to Corresponding X-ray Crystal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We have found that refinement of protein NMR structures using Rosetta with experimental NMR restraints yields more accurate protein NMR structures than those that have been deposited in the PDB using standard refinement protocols. Using 40 pairs of NMR and X-ray crystal structures determined by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, for proteins ranging in size from 5–22 kDa, restrained Rosetta refined structures fit better to the raw experimental data, are in better agreement with their X-ray counterparts, and have better phasing power compared to conventionally determined NMR structures. For 37 proteins for which NMR ensembles were available and which had similar structures in solution and in the crystal, all of the restrained Rosetta refined NMR structures were sufficiently accurate to be used for solving the corresponding X-ray crystal structures by molecular replacement. The protocol for restrained refinement of protein NMR structures was also compared with restrained CS-Rosetta calculations. For proteins smaller than 10 kDa, restrained CS-Rosetta, starting from extended conformations, provides slightly more accurate structures, while for proteins in the size range of 10–25 kDa the less CPU intensive restrained Rosetta refinement protocols provided equally or more accurate structures. The restrained Rosetta protocols described here can improve the accuracy of protein NMR structures and should find broad and general for studies of protein structure and function. PMID:24392845

  1. Glucose-Neopentyl Glycol (GNG) Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Solubilization, Stabilization and Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Rohini R.; Gotfryd, Kamil; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Cho, Kyung Ho; Capaldi, Stefano; Carlsson, Emil; Kobilka, Brian; Loland, Claus J.; Gether, Ulrik; Banerjee, Surajit

    2012-01-01

    The development of a new class of surfactants for membrane protein manipulation, “GNG amphiphiles”, is reported. These amphiphiles display promising behavior for membrane proteins, as demonstrated recently by the high resolution structure of a sodium-pumping pyrophosphatase reported by Kellosalo et al. PMID:23165475

  2. Glucose-Neopentyl Glycol (GNG) Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Solubilization, Stabilization and Crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rana, Rohini R.; Gotfryd, Kamil; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Cho, Kyung Ho; Capaldi, Stefano; Carlsson, Emil; Kobilka, Brian; Loland, Claus J.; Gether, Ulrik; Banerjee, Surajit; Byrne, Bernadette; Lee, John K.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a new class of surfactants for membrane protein manipulation, “GNG amphiphiles”, is reported. These amphiphiles display promising behavior for membrane proteins, as demonstrated recently by the high resolution structure of a sodium-pumping pyrophosphatase reported by Kellosalo et al.

  3. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  4. Development of polarization magneto-optics of paramagnetic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapasskij, V.S.; Feofilov, P.P.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of the polarization magnetooptics of crystals containing paramagnetic ion impurities is reviewed. The paper discusses methods of measurement of circular magnetic anisotropy and results obtained in recent years in the field of conventional magnetooptical studies, e.g., magnetooptical activity in absorption spectra for intrinsic and impurity defects in crystals, luminescence magnetic circular polarization, anisotropy of magnetooptical activity in cubic crystals. The main emphasis is placed on new trends in polarization magnetooptics: studies of interactions of a spin system with a lattice, in particular, spin-lattice relaxation and spin memory effect, experiments in the double radiooptical resonance, studies of optical spin relaxation, nonlinear magnetooptical effects, etc

  5. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a cyclophilin A-like protein from Piriformospora indica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Harshesh; Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Pal, Ravi Kant; Johri, Atul Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2012-01-01

    Cyclophin A like protein from Piriformospora indica involved in salt-stress tolerance was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals obtained diffracted X-rays to 2 Å resolution and belonged to space group C222 1 . Cyclophilins are widely distributed both in eukaryotes and prokaryotes and have a primary role as peptidyl-prolyl cis–trans isomerases (PPIases). This study focuses on the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of a salinity-stress-induced cyclophilin A (CypA) homologue from the symbiotic fungus Piriformospora indica. Crystallization experiments in the presence of 56 mM sodium phosphate monobasic monohydrate, 1.34 M potassium phosphate dibasic pH 8.2 yielded crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 121.15, b = 144.12, c = 110.63 Å. The crystals diffracted to a resolution limit of 2.0 Å. Analysis of the diffraction data indicated the presence of three molecules of the protein per asymmetric unit (V M = 4.48 Å 3 Da −1 , 72.6% solvent content)

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein 2B from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Baba, Nobuyoshi; Miyara, Takako; Saito, Jun; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    2008-01-01

    The selenomethionyl-substituted transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2B from S. pneumoniae was isolated from a limited proteolysis digest of the soluble form of recombinant PBP 2B and then crystallized. MAD data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2B from Streptococcus pneumoniae catalyzes the cross-linking of peptidoglycan precursors that occurs during bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. A selenomethionyl (SeMet) substituted PBP 2B transpeptidase domain was isolated from a limited proteolysis digest of a soluble form of recombinant PBP 2B and then crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group P4 3 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 86.39, c = 143.27 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution using the BL32B2 beamline at SPring-8. The asymmetric unit contains one protein molecule and 63.7% solvent

  7. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Burkholderia pseudomallei L1 ribosomal protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz, Abd Ghani; Ruzheinikov, Sergey N.; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Mohamed, Rahmah; Nathan, Sheila; Baker, Patrick J.; Rice, David W.

    2012-01-01

    The L1 ribosomal protein from B. pseudomallei has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in a form suitable for X-ray analysis. The gene encoding the L1 ribosomal protein from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain D286 has been cloned into the pETBLUE-1 vector system, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals of the native protein were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 3350 as a precipitant and diffracted to beyond 1.65 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.6, b = 127.1, c = 31.8 Å and with a single molecule in the asymmetric unit

  8. Development and melt growth of novel scintillating halide crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Yokota, Yuui; Shoji, Yasuhiro; Kral, Robert; Kamada, Kei; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Ohashi, Yuji; Arakawa, Mototaka; Chani, Valery I.; Kochurikhin, Vladimir V.; Yamaji, Akihiro; Andrey, Medvedev; Nikl, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Melt growth of scintillating halide crystals is reviewed. The vertical Bridgman growth technique is still considered as very popular method that enables production of relatively large and commercially attractive crystals. On the other hand, the micro-pulling-down method is preferable when fabrication of small samples, sufficient for preliminary characterization of their optical and/or scintillation performance, is required. Moreover, bulk crystal growth is also available using the micro-pulling-down furnace. The examples of growths of various halide crystals by industrially friendly melt growth techniques including Czochralski and edge-defined film-fed growth methods are also discussed. Finally, traveling molten zone growth that in some degree corresponds to horizontal zone melting is briefly overviewed.

  9. New developments in flexible cholesteric liquid crystal displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Tod; Davis, Donald J.; Franklin, Sean; Venkataraman, Nithya; McDaniel, Diaz; Nicholson, Forrest; Montbach, Erica; Khan, Asad; Doane, J. William

    2007-02-01

    Flexible Cholesteric liquid crystal displays have been rapidly maturing into a strong contender in the flexible display market. Encapsulation of the Cholesteric liquid crystal permits the use of flexible plastic substrates and roll-to-roll production. Recent advances include ultra-thin displays, laser-cut segmented displays of variable geometry, and smart card applications. Exciting technologies such as simultaneous laser-edge sealing and singulation enable high volume production, excellent quality control and non-traditional display geometries and formats.

  10. Purification and crystallization of the ABC-type transport substrate-binding protein OppA from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jinlan; Li, Xiaolu [State Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100005, People' s Republic of China (China); Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People' s Republic of China (China); Feng, Yue; Zhang, Bo [Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People' s Republic of China (China); Miao, Shiying [State Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100005, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Linfang, E-mail: lfwangz@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Biology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100005, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Na, E-mail: nawang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua-Peking Joint Center for Life Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We truncated the signal peptide of OppA{sub TTE0054} to make it express in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystals of OppA{sub TTE0054} were grown by sitting-drop vapor diffusion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal of OppA{sub TTE0054} diffracted to 2.25 A. -- Abstract: Di- and oligopeptide- binding protein OppAs play important roles in solute and nutrient uptake, sporulation, biofilm formation, cell wall muropeptides recycling, peptide-dependent quorum-sensing responses, adherence to host cells, and a variety of other biological processes. Soluble OppA from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis was expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was found to be >95% pure with SDS-PAGE after a series of purification steps and the purity was further verified by mass spectrometry. The protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as the precipitant. Crystal diffraction extended to 2.25 A. The crystal belonged to space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters of a = 69.395, b = 199.572, c = 131.673 A, and {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90 Degree-Sign .

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a calcineurin B-like protein 1 (CBL1) mutant from Ammopiptanthus mongolicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Guijun; Cang, Huaixing; Liu, Zhijie; Gao, Wei; Bi, Ruchang

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant calcineurin B-like protein 1 from Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (AmCBL1) was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Calcineurin B-like protein 1 (CBL1) is a calcium sensor in plants. It transmits the calcium signal through the downstream protein CBL-interacting protein kinase (CIPK). CBL1 and CIPK play crucial roles in the response to environmental stresses such as low K + , osmotic shock, high salt, cold and drought. Recombinant CBL1 from Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (AmCBL1) was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. However, the crystal did not diffract well. A mutant prepared using the surface-entropy method and crystallized using the hanging-drop method at 298 K with PEG 2000 MME as a precipitant diffracted to 2.90 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 99.87, b = 114.42, c = 63.80 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00° and three molecules per asymmetric unit

  12. SOCS proteins in development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trengove, Monique C; Ward, Alister C

    2013-01-01

    Cytokine and growth factor signaling mediates essential roles in the differentiation, proliferation, survival and function of a number of cell lineages. This is achieved via specific receptors located on the surface of target cells, with ligand binding activating key intracellular signal transduction cascades to mediate the requisite cellular outcome. Effective resolution of receptor signaling is also essential, with excessive signaling having the potential for pathological consequences. The Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins represent one important mechanism to extinguish cytokine and growth factor receptor signaling. There are 8 SOCS proteins in mammals; SOCS1-7 and the alternatively named Cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH). SOCS1-3 and CISH are predominantly associated with the regulation of cytokine receptor signaling, while SOCS4-7 are more commonly involved in the control of Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Individual SOCS proteins are typically induced by specific cytokines and growth factors, thereby generating a negative feedback loop. As a consequence of their regulatory properties, SOCS proteins have important functions in development and homeostasis, with increasing recognition of their role in disease, particularly their tumor suppressor and anti-inflammatory functions. This review provides a synthesis of our current understanding of the SOCS family, with an emphasis on their immune and hematopoietic roles. PMID:23885323

  13. Crystallization of the novel flavodoxine-like protein, WrbA, - on the way to three-dimensional structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Wolfová, J.; Grandori, R.; Chatterjee, N.; Carey, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2004 (2004), s. 35 ISSN 1210-8529. [European Crystallographic Meeting /22./. Budapešť, 26.08.2004-31.08.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 640; GA MŠk LN00A141 Grant - others:GA ÚV1 INT-03-09049 Keywords : flavodoxine-like protein, tryprophan-repressor binding protein, WrbA apoprotein, WrbA holoprotein, FMN, standard crystallization techniques, advanced crystallization techniques Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. Characterization of the Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus for Microgravity Aboard the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Roeber, D.; Achari, A.; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have conducted experiments to determine the equilibration rates of some major precipitants used in protein crystallography aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The solutions were placed in the Protein Crystallization Apparatus for Microgravity (PCAM) which mimic Cryschem sitting drop trays. The trays were placed in cylinders. These cylinders were placed inside a Single locker Thermal Enclosure System (STES), and were activated for different durations during the flight. Bumpers pressed against elastomers seal drops in a deactivated state during pre-flight and prior to transfer to the ISS. Activation occurs while in flight on the ISS by releasing the bumpers allowing the drops to be exposed to the reservoir. PCAM was flown to the ISS on STS 100, Flight 6A, on April 19, 2001. Six series of equilibration experiments were tested for each precipitant with a small amount of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Cylinder 10 was never activated, 7 was activated for 40 days, 8 was activated for 20 days, 9 was activated for 10 days, 11 was activated for 4 days and 12 was activated for 2 days. Upon the return to Earth by STS 104 on July 24,2001 the samples were transferred to Marshall Space Flight Center. The samples were then brought to the lab and the volumes of each sample were measured.

  15. Crystallization of FcpA from Leptospira, a novel flagellar protein that is essential for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martin, Fabiana; Mechaly, Ariel E; Larrieux, Nicole; Wunder, Elsio A; Ko, Albert I; Picardeau, Mathieu; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    The protein FcpA is a unique component of the flagellar filament of spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Leptospira. Although it plays an essential role in translational motility and pathogenicity, no structures of FcpA homologues are currently available in the PDB. Its three-dimensional structure will unveil the novel motility mechanisms that render pathogenic Leptospira particularly efficient at invading and disseminating within their hosts, causing leptospirosis in humans and animals. FcpA from L. interrogans was purified and crystallized, but despite laborious attempts no useful X ray diffraction data could be obtained. This challenge was solved by expressing a close orthologue from the related saprophytic species L. biflexa. Three different crystal forms were obtained: a primitive and a centred monoclinic form, as well as a hexagonal variant. All forms diffracted X-rays to suitable resolutions for crystallographic analyses, with the hexagonal type typically reaching the highest limits of 2.0 Å and better. A variation of the quick-soaking procedure resulted in an iodide derivative that was instrumental for single-wavelength anomalous diffraction methods.

  16. Competition between crystallization and glassification for particles with short-ranged attraction. Possible applications to protein crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccarelli, E.; Sciortino, F.; Tartaglia, P.; Foffi, G.; McCullagh, G. D.; Lawlor, A.; Dawson, K. A.

    2002-11-01

    We discuss the phase behaviour of spherical hard-core particles, with an attractive potential, as described by a hard-core Yukawa model. The ratio of the range of the attraction to the diameter of the particles is an important control parameter of the problem. Upon decreasing the range of the attraction, the phase diagram changes quite significantly, with the liquid-gas transition becoming metastable, and the crystal being in equilibrium with the fluid, with no intervening liquid. We also study the glass transition lines and, crucially, find that the situation, being very simple for pure repulsive potentials, becomes much richer in competition between glass and crystal phases for short-range attractions. Also a transition between attractive and repulsive glass appears somewhat in analogy with the isostructural equilibrium transition between two crystals.

  17. A Medipix quantum area detector allows rotation electron diffraction data collection from submicrometre three-dimensional protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nederlof, Igor; Genderen, Eric van; Li, Yao-Wang; Abrahams, Jan Pieter, E-mail: abrahams@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    An ultrasensitive Medipix2 detector allowed the collection of rotation electron-diffraction data from single three-dimensional protein nanocrystals for the first time. The data could be analysed using the standard X-ray crystallography programs MOSFLM and SCALA. When protein crystals are submicrometre-sized, X-ray radiation damage precludes conventional diffraction data collection. For crystals that are of the order of 100 nm in size, at best only single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected and rotation data collection has not been possible, irrespective of the diffraction technique used. Here, it is shown that at a very low electron dose (at most 0.1 e{sup −} Å{sup −2}), a Medipix2 quantum area detector is sufficiently sensitive to allow the collection of a 30-frame rotation series of 200 keV electron-diffraction data from a single ∼100 nm thick protein crystal. A highly parallel 200 keV electron beam (λ = 0.025 Å) allowed observation of the curvature of the Ewald sphere at low resolution, indicating a combined mosaic spread/beam divergence of at most 0.4°. This result shows that volumes of crystal with low mosaicity can be pinpointed in electron diffraction. It is also shown that strategies and data-analysis software (MOSFLM and SCALA) from X-ray protein crystallography can be used in principle for analysing electron-diffraction data from three-dimensional nanocrystals of proteins.

  18. A Medipix quantum area detector allows rotation electron diffraction data collection from submicrometre three-dimensional protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederlof, Igor; Genderen, Eric van; Li, Yao-Wang; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasensitive Medipix2 detector allowed the collection of rotation electron-diffraction data from single three-dimensional protein nanocrystals for the first time. The data could be analysed using the standard X-ray crystallography programs MOSFLM and SCALA. When protein crystals are submicrometre-sized, X-ray radiation damage precludes conventional diffraction data collection. For crystals that are of the order of 100 nm in size, at best only single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected and rotation data collection has not been possible, irrespective of the diffraction technique used. Here, it is shown that at a very low electron dose (at most 0.1 e − Å −2 ), a Medipix2 quantum area detector is sufficiently sensitive to allow the collection of a 30-frame rotation series of 200 keV electron-diffraction data from a single ∼100 nm thick protein crystal. A highly parallel 200 keV electron beam (λ = 0.025 Å) allowed observation of the curvature of the Ewald sphere at low resolution, indicating a combined mosaic spread/beam divergence of at most 0.4°. This result shows that volumes of crystal with low mosaicity can be pinpointed in electron diffraction. It is also shown that strategies and data-analysis software (MOSFLM and SCALA) from X-ray protein crystallography can be used in principle for analysing electron-diffraction data from three-dimensional nanocrystals of proteins

  19. Evaporation kinetics in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.; Frieden, Richard W.; Meehan, E. J., Jr.; Twigg, Pamela J.; Howard, Sandra B.; Fowlis, William A.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering analysis of the rate of evaporation of solvent in the hanging drop method of protein crystal growth is presented; these results are applied to 18 different drop and well arrangements commonly encountered in the laboratory, taking into account the chemical nature of the salt, the drop size and shape, the drop concentration, the well size, the well concentration, and the temperature. It is found that the rate of evaporation increases with temperature, drop size, and with the salt concentration difference between the drop and the well. The evaporation possesses no unique half-life. Once the salt in the drop achieves about 80 percent of its final concentration, further evaporation suffers from the law of diminishing returns.

  20. Characterization of polyacrylamide-stabilized Pf1 phage liquid crystals for protein NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trempe, Jean-Francois; Morin, Frederick G.; Xia Zhicheng; Marchessault, Robert H.; Gehring, Kalle [McGill University, Department of Biochemistry and Department of Chemistry (Canada)], E-mail: kalle@bri.nrc.ca

    2002-01-15

    A new polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystal has been characterized for the measurement of biomolecular residual dipolar couplings. Filamentous Pf1 phage were embedded in a polyacrylamide matrix that fixes the orientation of the particles. The alignment was characterized by the quadrupolar splitting of the {sup 2}H NMR water signal and by the measurement of {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N residual dipolar couplings (RDC) in the archeal translation elongation factor 1{beta}. Protein dissolved in the polymer-stabilized medium orients quantitatively as in media without polyacrylamide. We show that the quadrupolar splitting and RDCs are zero in media in which the Pf1 phage particles are aligned at the magic angle. This allows measurement of J and dipolar couplings in a single sample.

  1. Characterization of polyacrylamide-stabilized Pf1 phage liquid crystals for protein NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trempe, Jean-Francois; Morin, Frederick G.; Xia Zhicheng; Marchessault, Robert H.; Gehring, Kalle

    2002-01-01

    A new polymer-stabilized nematic liquid crystal has been characterized for the measurement of biomolecular residual dipolar couplings. Filamentous Pf1 phage were embedded in a polyacrylamide matrix that fixes the orientation of the particles. The alignment was characterized by the quadrupolar splitting of the 2 H NMR water signal and by the measurement of 1 H- 15 N residual dipolar couplings (RDC) in the archeal translation elongation factor 1β. Protein dissolved in the polymer-stabilized medium orients quantitatively as in media without polyacrylamide. We show that the quadrupolar splitting and RDCs are zero in media in which the Pf1 phage particles are aligned at the magic angle. This allows measurement of J and dipolar couplings in a single sample

  2. The influence of magnetic fields on protein crystal growth and quality; Zum Einfluss magnetischer Felder auf das Wachstum und die Qualitaet von Proteinkristallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meents, Alke

    2005-08-01

    Magnetic fields can affect protein crystal growth in several ways. In homogeneous magnetic fields molecules and crystallites line up themselves along the magnetic field direction due to their magnetic anisotropy. Inhomogeneous magnetic fields exert a force on diamagnetic and paramagnetic compounds towards regions of lower or higher field strength. This effect can be used to create a microgravity-like environment for diamagnetic proteins and an environment comparable to hypergravity for paramagnetic proteins. Crystallization in homogeneous magnetic fields and a microgravity-like environment are reported to have a positive effect on crystal quality. The aim of this work was to systematically investigate the effect of protein crystallization in magnetic fields on the crystal quality by comparing a large number of crystals grown under identical conditions with- and without magnetic fields. Crystal quality was determined by means of high resolution rocking-curve measurements. Furthermore in certain cases complete diffraction datasets were collected. Any possible influence of magnetic fields on the mosaicity and the quality of the diffraction data was evaluated statistically by applying Wilcoxon-Ranksum tests. To investigate the effect of protein crystallization in homogeneous magnetic fields the diamagnetic proteins Thaumatin, Trypsin, and Lysozyme and paramagnetic Myoglobin were crystallized in magnetic fields of 5 T, 8.8 T, and 15.8 T. The analysis of crystal mosaicity and quality of the diffraction data of the diamagnetic proteins did not reveal a significant influence on the crystal quality. In contrast the crystals of paramagnetic Myoglobin grew up to 14 times larger than the ones in the control experiment. In addition they had a significant lower mosaicity, and diffracted to a higher resolution than ever reported before. Special pole pieces for an existing magnet were designed and build to grow protein crystals in an inhomogeneous magnetic field The experimental

  3. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a specific VHH domain against mouse prion protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abskharon, Romany N. N.; Soror, Sameh H.; Pardon, Els; El Hassan, Hassan; Legname, Giuseppe; Steyaert, Jan; Wohlkonig, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    The crystallization of a specific nanobody against mouse PrP C and preliminary diffraction analysis of a crystal that diffracted to 1.23 Å resolution are presented. Prion disorders are infectious diseases that are characterized by the conversion of the cellular prion protein PrP C into the pathogenic isoform PrP Sc . Specific antibodies that interact with the cellular prion protein have been shown to inhibit this transition. Recombinant VHHs (variable domain of dromedary heavy-chain antibodies) or nanobodies are single-domain antibodies, making them the smallest antigen-binding fragments. A specific nanobody (Nb-PrP-01) was raised against mouse PrP C . A crystallization condition for this recombinant nanobody was identified using high-throughput screening. The crystals were optimized using streak-seeding and the hanging-drop method. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 30.04, b = 37.15, c = 83.00 Å, and diffracted to 1.23 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure of this specific nanobody against PrP C together with the known PrP C structure may help in understanding the PrP C /PrP Sc transition mechanism

  5. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of SDF2-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Ravaud, Stephanie; Schott, Andrea; Strahl, Sabine; Sinning, Irmgard

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of the stromal-cell-derived factor 2-like protein of Arabidopsis thaliana are reported. The crystals belonged to the space group P6 1 and diffracted to 1.95 Å resolution. The stromal-cell-derived factor 2-like protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSDL) has been shown to be highly up-regulated in response to unfolded protein response (UPR) inducing reagents, suggesting that it plays a crucial role in the plant UPR pathway. AtSDL has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. Two crystal forms have been obtained under very similar conditions. The needle-shaped crystals did not diffract X-rays, while the other form diffracted to 1.95 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.1, c = 69.3 Å

  6. Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the periplasmic stress sensory protein RseB from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmann, Petra; Zeth, Kornelius

    2006-01-01

    The periplasmic stress protein RseB from E. coli was cloned, expressed and crystallized. Crystallographic data are presented and structure solution using the multiple isomorphous replacement approach (MIR) is in progress. Sensing external stress in the bacterial periplasm and signal transduction to the cytoplasm are important functions of the CpxAR, Bae and σ E signalling pathways. In Escherichia coli, the σ E pathway can be activated through degradation of the antisigma factor RseA by DegS and YaeL. The periplasmic protein RseB plays an important role in this pathway by exerting a direct or indirect negative effect on YaeL cleavage efficiency. RseB from E. coli, missing the periplasmic signal sequence (RseB ΔN ), was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained in two different forms belonging to space group P42 1 2 (form I) and C222 1 (form II) and diffracted to 2.8 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. In crystal form I two copies of the protein were located in the asymmetric unit according to heavy-atom analysis, while crystal form II contained three copies

  7. Crystallization, data collection and phasing of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santacruz, C. P.; Balan, A.; Ferreira, L. C. S.; Barbosa, J. A. R. G.

    2006-01-01

    The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) from X. axonopodis pv. citri was crystallized with sodium molybdate in the presence of PEG or sulfate. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222 1, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ModA protein is the ABC periplasmic binding component responsible for the capture of molybdate. The protein was crystallized with sodium molybdate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG or sulfate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress

  8. Crystallization, data collection and phasing of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacruz, C. P.; Balan, A.; Ferreira, L. C. S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas II, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barbosa, J. A. R. G., E-mail: joao@lnls.br [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Estrutural (CeBiMe), Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS), CP 6192, Campinas, SP 13084-971 (Brazil); Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas II, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2006-03-01

    The molybdate-binding protein (ModA) from X. axonopodis pv. citri was crystallized with sodium molybdate in the presence of PEG or sulfate. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å and belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1,} with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ModA protein is the ABC periplasmic binding component responsible for the capture of molybdate. The protein was crystallized with sodium molybdate using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG or sulfate. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 1.7 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group C222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.15, b = 172.14, c = 112.04 Å. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress.

  9. Purification, isolation, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of the BTB domain of the centrosomal protein 190 from Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, K. M.; Nikolaeva, A. Yu.; Kachalova, G. S.; Bonchuk, A. N.; Popov, V. O.

    2017-11-01

    The spatial organization of the genome is controlled by a special class of architectural proteins, including proteins containing BTB domains that are able to dimerize or multimerize. The centrosomal protein 190 is one of such architectural proteins. The purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of the BTB domain of the centrosomal protein 190 are reported. The crystallization conditions were found by the vapor-diffusion technique. The crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to sp. gr. P3221. The structure was solved by the molecular replacement method. The structure refinement is currently underway.

  10. A crystal structure of the Dengue virus NS5 protein reveals a novel inter-domain interface essential for protein flexibility and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqian Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3 at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5.

  11. Purification, crystal structure determination and functional characterization of type III antifreeze proteins from the European eelpout Zoarces viviparus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Ramløv, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are essential components of many organisms adaptation to cold temperatures. Fish type III AFPs are divided into two groups, SP isoforms being much less active than QAE1 isoforms. Two type III AFPs from Zoarces viviparus, a QAE1 (ZvAFP13) and an SP (ZvAFP6) isoform......, are here characterized and their crystal structures determined. We conclude that the higher activity of the QAE1 isoforms cannot be attributed to single residues, but rather a combination of structural effects. Furthermore both ZvAFP6 and ZvAFP13 crystal structures have water molecules around T18...... equivalent to the tetrahedral-like waters previously identified in a neutron crystal structure. Interestingly, ZvAFP6 forms dimers in the crystal, with a significant dimer interface. The presence of ZvAFP6 dimers was confirmed in solution by native electrophoresis and gel filtration. To our knowledge...

  12. Development and directions of powder diffraction on proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Dreele, R B; Besnard, C; Basso, S; Camus, F; Pattison, P; Schiltz, M; Wright, J P; Margiolaki, R; Fitch, A N; Fox, G C; Prugoveeki, S; Beckers, D; Helliwell, J R; Helliwell, M; Jones, R H; Roberts, M A; Miura, K; Kahn, R; Giacovazzo, C; Altomare, A; Caliandro, R; Camalli, M; Cuocci, C; Moliterni, A G.G.; Rizzi, R; Hinrichsen, B; Kern, A; Coelho, A A; Degen, T; Kokkinidis, M; Fadouloglou, V; Gazi, A; Panopoulos, N; Pinotsis, N; Wilmanns, M; Norrman, M; Schluckebier, G; Prugoveeki, B; Dilovic, J; Matkovic-Calogovic, D; Bill, David; Markvardsen, A; Grosse-Kunstleve, R; Rius, J; Glykos Nicholas, M; Murshudov, G N

    2007-07-01

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most important method for obtaining information about the structure of proteins and thereby for gaining insight into fundamental biological and biochemical mechanisms. This seminar was dedicated to X-ray powder diffraction and was organized around 6 sessions: 1) what can powder diffraction do for proteins?, 2) adapting experimentally to proteins, 3) interpreting powder data, 4) the world of protein crystallography, 5) advancing methods for powder data analysis, and 6) transferable methods from single crystals. This document gathers the abstracts of the 23 papers presented. (A.C.)

  13. Development and directions of powder diffraction on proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Dreele, R.B.; Besnard, C.; Basso, S.; Camus, F.; Pattison, P.; Schiltz, M.; Wright, J.P.; Margiolaki, R.; Fitch, A.N.; Fox, G.C.; Prugoveeki, S.; Beckers, D.; Helliwell, J.R.; Helliwell, M.; Jones, R.H.; Roberts, M.A.; Miura, K.; Kahn, R.; Giacovazzo, C.; Altomare, A.; Caliandro, R.; Camalli, M.; Cuocci, C.; Moliterni, A.G.G.; Rizzi, R.; Hinrichsen, B.; Kern, A.; Coelho, A.A.; Degen, T.; Kokkinidis, M.; Fadouloglou, V.; Gazi, A.; Panopoulos, N.; Pinotsis, N.; Wilmanns, M.; Norrman, M.; Schluckebier, G.; Prugoveeki, B.; Dilovic, J.; Matkovic-Calogovic, D.; Bill, David; Markvardsen, A.; Grosse-Kunstleve, R.; Rius, J.; Glykos Nicholas, M.; Murshudov, G.N.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most important method for obtaining information about the structure of proteins and thereby for gaining insight into fundamental biological and biochemical mechanisms. This seminar was dedicated to X-ray powder diffraction and was organized around 6 sessions: 1) what can powder diffraction do for proteins?, 2) adapting experimentally to proteins, 3) interpreting powder data, 4) the world of protein crystallography, 5) advancing methods for powder data analysis, and 6) transferable methods from single crystals. This document gathers the abstracts of the 23 papers presented. (A.C.)

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a PaaX-like protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Yi; Lou, Zhiyong; Sun, Yuna; Xue, Fei; Feng, Changzeng; Gong, Xiaocui; Yang, Dongmei; Bartlam, Mark; Meng, Zhaohui; Zhang, Keqin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the PaaX-like protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was successfully crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. PaaX is a global regulator of the phenylacetyl-coenzyme A catabolon that adjusts the expression of different operons to that of the paa-encoded central pathway. In this study, the PaaX-like protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 was successfully crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Diffraction data were obtained to a resolution of 3.0 Å using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. The crystal belonged to space group P321, with unit-cell parameters a = 86.4, b = 86.4, c = 105.5 Å

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the genetically encoded fluorescent calcium indicator protein GCaMP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez Guilbe, María M.; Alfaro Malavé, Elisa C.; Akerboom, Jasper; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2008-01-01

    The genetically encoded fluorescent calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution and the structure was solved by molecular replacement. Fluorescent proteins and their engineered variants have played an important role in the study of biology. The genetically encoded calcium-indicator protein GCaMP2 comprises a circularly permuted fluorescent protein coupled to the calcium-binding protein calmodulin and a calmodulin target peptide, M13, derived from the intracellular calmodulin target myosin light-chain kinase and has been used to image calcium transients in vivo. To aid rational efforts to engineer improved variants of GCaMP2, this protein was crystallized in the calcium-saturated form. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 126.1, b = 47.1, c = 68.8 Å, β = 100.5° and one GCaMP2 molecule in the asymmetric unit. The structure was phased by molecular replacement and refinement is currently under way

  16. Development of Chalcopyrite Crystals for Nonlinear Optical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    write the expansion ol the homopolar and the heteropolar part of the mean energy gap in the following way. £.(«) - £. + (a«», + (a.)’*, + (Ha) C...a nearly linear relation over a wide 7 —12-um spectral range. We therefore used a 1 stepping motor and synchronously rotated the AgGaSe, crystal

  17. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miggiano, R.; Perugino, G.; Ciaramella, M.; Serpe, M.; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, S.; Lahiri, S.; Rizzi, M.; Rossi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 473, č. 2 (2016), s. 123-133 ISSN 0264-6021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 241587 - SYSTEMTB Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA repair * DNA-binding protein * Mycobacterium tuberculosis * O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase * co-operativity * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.797, year: 2016

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the N-terminal domain of human thioredoxin-interacting protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polekhina, Galina; Ascher, David Benjamin; Kok, Shie Foong; Waltham, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of thioredoxin-interacting protein has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to a monoclinic space group and diffracted to 3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is a negative regulator of thioredoxin and its roles in the pathologies of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases have marked it out as a potential drug target. Expression of TXNIP is robustly induced under various stress conditions such as high glucose, heat shock, UV, H 2 O 2 and mechanical stress amongst others. Elevated levels of TXNIP result in the sequestration and inactivation of thioredoxin, leading to cellular oxidative stress. For some time, this was the only known function of TXNIP; however, more recently the protein has been shown to play a role in regulation of glucose uptake and activation of the inflammasome. Based on the primary sequence, TXNIP is remotely related to β-arrestins, which include the visual arrestins. TXNIP has thus been classified as a member of the α-arrestin family, which to date includes five other members. None of the other α-arrestins are known to interact with thioredoxin, although curiously one has been implicated in glucose uptake. In order to gain insight into the structure–function relationships of the α-arrestin protein family, and particularly that of TXNIP, the N-terminal domain of TXNIP has been crystallized. The crystals belonged to a monoclinic space group and diffracted to 3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation

  19. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Bacteriophasge T4 UvsY Recombination Mediator Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H.; Beernink, H.; Rould, M.; Morrical, S.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophage T4 UvsY protein is considered to be the prototype of recombination mediator proteins, a class of proteins which assist in the loading of recombinases onto DNA. Wild-type and Se-substituted UvsY protein have been expressed and purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion. The crystals diffract to 2.4 (angstrom) using in-house facilities and to 2.2 (angstrom) at NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The crystals belong to space group P422, P4 2 22, P42 1 2 or P4 2 2 1 2, the ambiguity arising from pseudo-centering, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 76.93, c = 269.8 (angstrom). Previous biophysical characterization of UvsY indicates that it exists primarily as a hexamer in solution. Along with the absence of a crystallographic threefold, this suggests that the asymmetric unit of these crystals is likely to contain either three monomers, giving a solvent content of 71%, or six monomers, giving a solvent content of 41%

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the extrinsic PsbP protein of photosystem II from Spinacia oleracea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Brynda, Jiří; Lapkouski, Mikalai; Revuelta, J. L.; Arellano, J.B.; Ettrich, Rüdiger

    F65, č. 2 (2009), s. 111-115 ISSN 1744-3091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : photosystem protein * crystallization * X-ray analysis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.551, year: 2009

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of choline-binding protein F from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Rafael [Grupo de Cristalografía Macromolecular y Biología Estructural, Instituto Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); González, Ana; Moscoso, Miriam; García, Pedro [Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Stelter, Meike; Kahn, Richard [Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel CEA CNRS UJF, Laboratoire de Cristallographie Macromoléculaire, 41 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 1 (France); Hermoso, Juan A., E-mail: xjuan@iqfr.csic.es [Grupo de Cristalografía Macromolecular y Biología Estructural, Instituto Química Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-09-01

    The modular choline-binding protein F (CbpF) from S. pneumoniae has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A SAD data set from a gadolinium-complex derivative has been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Choline-binding protein F (CbpF) is a modular protein that is bound to the pneumococcal cell wall through noncovalent interactions with choline moieties of the bacterial teichoic and lipoteichoic acids. Despite being one of the more abundant proteins on the surface, along with the murein hydrolases LytA, LytB, LytC and Pce, its function is still unknown. CbpF has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Diffraction-quality orthorhombic crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.13, b = 114.94, c = 75.69 Å. A SAD data set from a Gd-HPDO3A-derivatized CbpF crystal was collected to 2.1 Å resolution at the gadolinium L{sub III} absorption edge using synchrotron radiation.

  2. Crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays at 2.1 A resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Pinna, L A

    1998-01-01

    CK2alpha is the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2, an acidophilic and constitutively active eukaryotic Ser/Thr kinase involved in cell proliferation. A crystal structure, at 2.1 A resolution, of recombinant maize CK2alpha (rmCK2alpha) in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, shows the enzyme in an ...

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of choline-binding protein F from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Rafael; González, Ana; Moscoso, Miriam; García, Pedro; Stelter, Meike; Kahn, Richard; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2007-01-01

    The modular choline-binding protein F (CbpF) from S. pneumoniae has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A SAD data set from a gadolinium-complex derivative has been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Choline-binding protein F (CbpF) is a modular protein that is bound to the pneumococcal cell wall through noncovalent interactions with choline moieties of the bacterial teichoic and lipoteichoic acids. Despite being one of the more abundant proteins on the surface, along with the murein hydrolases LytA, LytB, LytC and Pce, its function is still unknown. CbpF has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Diffraction-quality orthorhombic crystals belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.13, b = 114.94, c = 75.69 Å. A SAD data set from a Gd-HPDO3A-derivatized CbpF crystal was collected to 2.1 Å resolution at the gadolinium L III absorption edge using synchrotron radiation

  4. Protein engineering for biofuel production: Recent development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The unstable and unsure handiness of crude oil sources moreover the rising price of fuels have shifted international efforts to utilize renewable resources for the assembly of greener energy and a replacement which might additionally meet the high energy demand of the globe. Biofuels represent a sustainable, renewable, and also the solely predictable energy supply to fossil fuels. During the green production of Biofuels, several in vivo processes place confidence in the conversion of biomass to sugars by engineered enzymes, and the subsequent conversion of sugars to chemicals via designed proteins in microbial production hosts. Enzymes are indispensable within the effort to provide fuels in an ecologically friendly manner. They have the potential to catalyze reactions with high specificity and potency while not using dangerous chemicals. Nature provides an in depth assortment of enzymes, however usually these should be altered to perform desired functions in needed conditions. Presently available enzymes like cellulose are subject to tight induction and regulation systems and additionally suffer inhibition from numerous end products. Therefore, more impregnable and economical catalyst preparations ought to be developed for the enzymatic method to be more economical. Approaches like protein engineering, reconstitution of protein mixtures and bio prospecting for superior enzymes are gaining importance. Advances in enzyme engineering allow the planning and/or directed evolution of enzymes specifically tailored for such industrial applications. Recent years have seen the production of improved enzymes to help with the conversion of biomass into fuels. The assembly of the many of those fuels is feasible due to advances in protein engineering. This review discusses the distinctive challenges that protein engineering faces in the method of changing lignocellulose to biofuels and the way they're addressed by recent advances in this field.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of L30e, a ribosomal protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MJ1044)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangarajan, Sarani; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Mridula, Palappetty; Sakamoto, Keiko; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Agari, Yoshihiro; Shinkai, Akeo; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sekar, Kanagaraj

    2008-01-01

    The ribosomal protein (L30e) from M. jannaschii was cloned from the gene MJ1044, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belongs to the primitive tetragonal space group P4 3 and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. In view of the biological significance of understanding the ribosomal machinery of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, the L30e ribosomal protein from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the microbatch-under-oil method with the crystallization conditions 40% PEG 400, 0.1 M MES pH 6.0 and 5% PEG 3000 at 291 K. A diffraction-quality crystal (0.20 × 0.20 × 0.35 mm) was obtained that belonged to the primitive tetragonal space group P4 3 , with unit-cell parameters a = 46.1, b = 46.1, c = 98.5 Å, and diffracted to a resolution of 1.9 Å. Preliminary calculations reveal that the asymmetric unit contains two monomers with a Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 2.16 Å 3 Da −1

  6. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  7. A comprehensive review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive and up-to-date review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes is reported. Recent applications of the method for in situ serial crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons are described. The lipid cubic phase or in meso method is a robust approach for crystallizing membrane proteins for structure determination. The uptake of the method is such that it is experiencing what can only be described as explosive growth. This timely, comprehensive and up-to-date review introduces the reader to the practice of in meso crystallogenesis, to the associated challenges and to their solutions. A model of how crystallization comes about mechanistically is presented for a more rational approach to crystallization. The possible involvement of the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases in crystallogenesis and the application of the method to water-soluble, monotopic and lipid-anchored proteins are addressed. How to set up trials manually and automatically with a robot is introduced with reference to open-access online videos that provide a practical guide to all aspects of the method. These range from protein reconstitution to crystal harvesting from the hosting mesophase, which is noted for its viscosity and stickiness. The sponge phase, as an alternative medium in which to perform crystallization, is described. The compatibility of the method with additive lipids, detergents, precipitant-screen components and materials carried along with the protein such as denaturants and reducing agents is considered. The powerful host and additive lipid-screening strategies are described along with how samples that have low protein concentration and cell-free expressed protein can be used. Assaying the protein reconstituted in the bilayer of the cubic phase for function is an important element of quality control and is detailed. Host lipid design for crystallization at low temperatures and for

  8. A comprehensive review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, Martin, E-mail: martin.caffrey@tcd.ie [Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive and up-to-date review of the lipid cubic phase or in meso method for crystallizing membrane and soluble proteins and complexes is reported. Recent applications of the method for in situ serial crystallography at X-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons are described. The lipid cubic phase or in meso method is a robust approach for crystallizing membrane proteins for structure determination. The uptake of the method is such that it is experiencing what can only be described as explosive growth. This timely, comprehensive and up-to-date review introduces the reader to the practice of in meso crystallogenesis, to the associated challenges and to their solutions. A model of how crystallization comes about mechanistically is presented for a more rational approach to crystallization. The possible involvement of the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases in crystallogenesis and the application of the method to water-soluble, monotopic and lipid-anchored proteins are addressed. How to set up trials manually and automatically with a robot is introduced with reference to open-access online videos that provide a practical guide to all aspects of the method. These range from protein reconstitution to crystal harvesting from the hosting mesophase, which is noted for its viscosity and stickiness. The sponge phase, as an alternative medium in which to perform crystallization, is described. The compatibility of the method with additive lipids, detergents, precipitant-screen components and materials carried along with the protein such as denaturants and reducing agents is considered. The powerful host and additive lipid-screening strategies are described along with how samples that have low protein concentration and cell-free expressed protein can be used. Assaying the protein reconstituted in the bilayer of the cubic phase for function is an important element of quality control and is detailed. Host lipid design for crystallization at low temperatures and for

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.412c protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Zhao-Yang; Hou, Qiao-Ming; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Crystallization of SMU.412c protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans can easily appear in the condition 2.8 M sodium acetate pH 7.0 and its crystal belongs to space group P4 1 2 1 2. The smu.412c gene encodes a putative histidine triad-like protein (SMU.412c) with 139 residues that is involved in cell-cycle regulation in Streptococcus mutans. The gene was cloned into the expression vector pET28a and subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) to give a substantially soluble form of SMU.412c with a His 6 tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure involving Ni 2+ -chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution on beamline BL6A at Photon Factory, Tsukuba, Japan. The crystal belonged to space group P4 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 53.5, c = 141.1 Å

  10. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a penicillin-binding protein homologue from Pyrococcus abyssi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Sougakoff, Wladimir; Mayer, Claudine

    2005-01-01

    The crystallization of a hypothetical penicillin-binding protein from the archaeon P. abyssi in space group C2 by hanging-drop vapour diffusion is reported. The genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains a gene (pab0087) encoding a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) homologue. This sequence consists of 447 residues and shows significant sequence similarity to low-molecular-weight PBPs and class C β-lactamases. The Pab0087 protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data from two different crystal forms were collected to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution. Both crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 160.59, b = 135.74, c = 113.02 Å, β = 117.36° and a = 166.97, b = 131.25, c = 189.39 Å, β = 113.81°, respectively. The asymmetric unit contains four and eight molecules, respectively, with fourfold non-crystallographic symmetry

  11. Tet protein function during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available The TET (Ten-eleven translocation 1, 2 and 3 proteins have been shown to function as DNA hydroxymethylases in vertebrates and their requirements have been documented extensively. Recently, the Tet proteins have been shown to also hydroxylate 5-methylcytosine in RNA. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmrC is enriched in messenger RNA but the function of this modification has yet to be elucidated. Because Cytosine methylation in DNA is barely detectable in Drosophila, it serves as an ideal model to study the biological function of 5hmrC. Here, we characterized the temporal and spatial expression and requirement of Tet throughout Drosophila development. We show that Tet is essential for viability as Tet complete loss-of-function animals die at the late pupal stage. Tet is highly expressed in neuronal tissues and at more moderate levels in somatic muscle precursors in embryos and larvae. Depletion of Tet in muscle precursors at early embryonic stages leads to defects in larval locomotion and late pupal lethality. Although Tet knock-down in neuronal tissue does not cause lethality, it is essential for neuronal function during development through its affects upon locomotion in larvae and the circadian rhythm of adult flies. Further, we report the function of Tet in ovarian morphogenesis. Together, our findings provide basic insights into the biological function of Tet in Drosophila, and may illuminate observed neuronal and muscle phenotypes observed in vertebrates.

  12. Crystal structure of an activated variant of small heat shock protein Hsp16.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHaourab, Hassane S; Lin, Yi-Lun; Spiller, Benjamin W

    2012-06-26

    How does the sequence of a single small heat shock protein (sHSP) assemble into oligomers of different sizes? To gain insight into the underlying structural mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of an engineered variant of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii Hsp16.5 wherein a 14 amino acid peptide from human heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) was inserted at the junction of the N-terminal region and the α-crystallin domain. In response to this insertion, the oligomer shell expands from 24 to 48 subunits while maintaining octahedral symmetry. Oligomer rearrangement does not alter the fold of the conserved α-crystallin domain nor does it disturb the interface holding the dimeric building block together. Rather, the flexible C-terminal tail of Hsp16.5 changes its orientation relative to the α-crystallin domain which enables alternative packing of dimers. This change in orientation preserves a peptide-in-groove interaction of the C-terminal tail with an adjacent β-sandwich, thereby holding the assembly together. The interior of the expanded oligomer, where substrates presumably bind, retains its predominantly nonpolar character relative to the outside surface. New large windows in the outer shell provide increased access to these substrate-binding regions, thus accounting for the higher affinity of this variant to substrates. Oligomer polydispersity regulates sHSPs chaperone activity in vitro and has been implicated in their physiological roles. The structural mechanism of Hsp16.5 oligomer flexibility revealed here, which is likely to be highly conserved across the sHSP superfamily, explains the relationship between oligomer expansion observed in disease-linked mutants and changes in chaperone activity.

  13. Crystal structure of reovirus attachment protein σ1 in complex with sialylated oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Dirk M; Frierson, Johnna M; Halvorson, Elizabeth E; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Dermody, Terence S; Stehle, Thilo

    2011-08-01

    Many viruses attach to target cells by binding to cell-surface glycans. To gain a better understanding of strategies used by viruses to engage carbohydrate receptors, we determined the crystal structures of reovirus attachment protein σ1 in complex with α-2,3-sialyllactose, α-2,6-sialyllactose, and α-2,8-di-siallylactose. All three oligosaccharides terminate in sialic acid, which serves as a receptor for the reovirus serotype studied here. The overall structure of σ1 resembles an elongated, filamentous trimer. It contains a globular head featuring a compact β-barrel, and a fibrous extension formed by seven repeating units of a triple β-spiral that is interrupted near its midpoint by a short α-helical coiled coil. The carbohydrate-binding site is located between β-spiral repeats two and three, distal from the head. In all three complexes, the terminal sialic acid forms almost all of the contacts with σ1 in an identical manner, while the remaining components of the oligosaccharides make little or no contacts. We used this structural information to guide mutagenesis studies to identify residues in σ1 that functionally engage sialic acid by assessing hemagglutination capacity and growth in murine erythroleukemia cells, which require sialic acid binding for productive infection. Our studies using σ1 mutant viruses reveal that residues 198, 202, 203, 204, and 205 are required for functional binding to sialic acid by reovirus. These findings provide insight into mechanisms of reovirus attachment to cell-surface glycans and contribute to an understanding of carbohydrate binding by viruses. They also establish a filamentous, trimeric carbohydrate-binding module that could potentially be used to endow other trimeric proteins with carbohydrate-binding properties.

  14. Crystal structure of reovirus attachment protein σ1 in complex with sialylated oligosaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk M Reiter

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses attach to target cells by binding to cell-surface glycans. To gain a better understanding of strategies used by viruses to engage carbohydrate receptors, we determined the crystal structures of reovirus attachment protein σ1 in complex with α-2,3-sialyllactose, α-2,6-sialyllactose, and α-2,8-di-siallylactose. All three oligosaccharides terminate in sialic acid, which serves as a receptor for the reovirus serotype studied here. The overall structure of σ1 resembles an elongated, filamentous trimer. It contains a globular head featuring a compact β-barrel, and a fibrous extension formed by seven repeating units of a triple β-spiral that is interrupted near its midpoint by a short α-helical coiled coil. The carbohydrate-binding site is located between β-spiral repeats two and three, distal from the head. In all three complexes, the terminal sialic acid forms almost all of the contacts with σ1 in an identical manner, while the remaining components of the oligosaccharides make little or no contacts. We used this structural information to guide mutagenesis studies to identify residues in σ1 that functionally engage sialic acid by assessing hemagglutination capacity and growth in murine erythroleukemia cells, which require sialic acid binding for productive infection. Our studies using σ1 mutant viruses reveal that residues 198, 202, 203, 204, and 205 are required for functional binding to sialic acid by reovirus. These findings provide insight into mechanisms of reovirus attachment to cell-surface glycans and contribute to an understanding of carbohydrate binding by viruses. They also establish a filamentous, trimeric carbohydrate-binding module that could potentially be used to endow other trimeric proteins with carbohydrate-binding properties.

  15. Development of n- and p-type Doped Perovskite Single Crystals Using Solid-State Single Crystal Growth (SSCG) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    for AGG should be minimal. For this purpose, the seeds for AGG may also be provided externally. This process is called the solid-state single...bonding process . Figure 31 shows (a) the growth of one large single crystal from one small single crystal seed as well as (b) the growth of one...one bi-crystal seed : One large bi-crystal can be grown from one small bi-crystal by SSCG process . Fig. 32. Diffusion bonding process for

  16. Calorimetric determination of inhibition of ice crystal growth by antifreeze protein in hydroxyethyl starch solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, T N; Carpenter, J F

    1993-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry and cryomicroscopy were used to investigate the effects of type I antifreeze protein (AFP) from winter flounder on 58% solutions of hydroxyethyl starch. The glass, devitrification, and melt transitions noted during rewarming were unaffected by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Isothermal annealing experiments were undertaken to detect the effects of AFP-induced inhibition of ice crystal growth using calorimetry. A premelt endothermic peak was detected during warming after the annealing procedure. Increasing the duration or the temperature of the annealing for the temperature range from -28 and -18 degrees C resulted in a gradual increase in the enthalpy of the premelt endotherm. This transition was unaffected by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Annealing between -18 and -10 degrees C resulted in a gradual decrease in the premelt peak enthalpy. This process was inhibited by 100 micrograms/ml AFP. Cryomicroscopic examination of the samples revealed that AFP inhibited ice recrystallization during isothermal annealing at -10 degrees C. Annealing at lower temperatures resulted in minimal ice recrystallization and no visible effect of AFP. Thus, the 100 micrograms/ml AFP to have a detectable influence on thermal events in the calorimeter, conditions must be used that result in significant ice growth without AFP and visible inhibition of this process by AFP. Images FIGURE 8 PMID:7690257

  17. Improvement of an automated protein crystal exchange system PAM for high-throughput data collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Masahiko; Yamada, Yusuke; Chavas, Leonard M. G.; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Matsugaki, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    A special liquid-nitrogen Dewar with double capacity for the sample-exchange robot has been created at AR-NE3A at the Photon Factory, allowing continuous fully automated data collection. In this work, this new system is described and the stability of its calibration is discussed. Photon Factory Automated Mounting system (PAM) protein crystal exchange systems are available at the following Photon Factory macromolecular beamlines: BL-1A, BL-5A, BL-17A, AR-NW12A and AR-NE3A. The beamline AR-NE3A has been constructed for high-throughput macromolecular crystallography and is dedicated to structure-based drug design. The PAM liquid-nitrogen Dewar can store a maximum of three SSRL cassettes. Therefore, users have to interrupt their experiments and replace the cassettes when using four or more of them during their beam time. As a result of investigation, four or more cassettes were used in AR-NE3A alone. For continuous automated data collection, the size of the liquid-nitrogen Dewar for the AR-NE3A PAM was increased, doubling the capacity. In order to check the calibration with the new Dewar and the cassette stand, calibration experiments were repeatedly performed. Compared with the current system, the parameters of the novel system are shown to be stable

  18. Improvement of an automated protein crystal exchange system PAM for high-throughput data collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Masahiko, E-mail: masahiko.hiraki@kek.jp; Yamada, Yusuke; Chavas, Leonard M. G. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Wakatsuki, Soichi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 69, Menlo Park, CA 94025-7015 (United States); Stanford University, Beckman Center B105, Stanford, CA 94305-5126 (United States); Matsugaki, Naohiro [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    A special liquid-nitrogen Dewar with double capacity for the sample-exchange robot has been created at AR-NE3A at the Photon Factory, allowing continuous fully automated data collection. In this work, this new system is described and the stability of its calibration is discussed. Photon Factory Automated Mounting system (PAM) protein crystal exchange systems are available at the following Photon Factory macromolecular beamlines: BL-1A, BL-5A, BL-17A, AR-NW12A and AR-NE3A. The beamline AR-NE3A has been constructed for high-throughput macromolecular crystallography and is dedicated to structure-based drug design. The PAM liquid-nitrogen Dewar can store a maximum of three SSRL cassettes. Therefore, users have to interrupt their experiments and replace the cassettes when using four or more of them during their beam time. As a result of investigation, four or more cassettes were used in AR-NE3A alone. For continuous automated data collection, the size of the liquid-nitrogen Dewar for the AR-NE3A PAM was increased, doubling the capacity. In order to check the calibration with the new Dewar and the cassette stand, calibration experiments were repeatedly performed. Compared with the current system, the parameters of the novel system are shown to be stable.

  19. Electrophoresis in ice surface grooves for probing protein affinity to a specific plane of ice crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagawa, Arinori; Okada, Yusuke; Okada, Tetsuo

    2018-06-01

    Channel-like grooves are formed on the surface of frozen aqueous sucrose. They are filled with a freeze concentrated solution (FCS) and act as an efficient size-tunable separation field for micro and nanoparticles. The width of the channel can be easily varied by changing the temperature. Because the channel width decreases with decreasing temperature, particles become immobilized due to physical interference from the ice wall when the temperature reaches a threshold point specific to the particle size. Surface modification of particles can add a factor of chemical interaction between the particles and ice walls. In this study, anti-freeze proteins (AFPs) are anchored on 1µm-polystyrene (PS) particles, and their behavior in the surface grooves on the ice is studied. The threshold temperature is an effective criterion for evaluating chemical interactions between particles and ice walls. The AFP binding on 1µm PS particles lowers the threshold temperature by 2.5°C, indicating interactions between AFPs on the PS particles and the ice wall. Because the AFPs studied here show selectivity towards the prism plane, it is critical that the prism plane of the ice crystal is in contact with the FCS in the surface grooves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of iron regulatory protein 1 in complex with ferritin IRE RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selezneva, Anna I.; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Walden, William E.; Volz, Karl

    2006-01-01

    The iron regulatory protein IRP1 has been crystallized in a complex with ferritin IRE RNA and a complete data set has been collected to 2.8 Å resolution. Iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) is a bifunctional protein with activity as an RNA-binding protein or as a cytoplasmic aconitase. Interconversion of IRP1 between these mutually exclusive states is central to cellular iron regulation and is accomplished through iron-responsive assembly and disassembly of a [4Fe–4S] cluster. When in its apo form, IRP1 binds to iron responsive elements (IREs) found in mRNAs encoding proteins of iron storage and transport and either prevents translation or degradation of the bound mRNA. Excess cellular iron stimulates the assembly of a [4Fe–4S] cluster in IRP1, inhibiting its IRE-binding ability and converting it to an aconitase. The three-dimensional structure of IRP1 in its different active forms will provide details of the interconversion process and clarify the selective recognition of mRNA, Fe–S sites and catalytic activity. To this end, the apo form of IRP1 bound to a ferritin IRE was crystallized. Crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 109.6, b = 80.9, c = 142.9 Å, β = 92.0°. Native data sets have been collected from several crystals with resolution extending to 2.8 Å and the structure has been solved by molecular replacement

  1. Particle Characterization for a Protein Drug Product Stored in Pre-Filled Syringes Using Micro-Flow Imaging, Archimedes, and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Songyan; Puri, Aastha; Li, Jinjiang; Jaiswal, Archana; Adams, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Micro-flow imaging (MFI) has been used for formulation development for analyzing sub-visible particles. Archimedes, a novel technique for analyzing sub-micron particles, has been considered as an orthogonal method to currently existing techniques. This study utilized these two techniques to investigate the effectiveness of polysorbate (PS-80) in mitigating the particle formation of a therapeutic protein formulation stored in silicone oil-coated pre-filled syringes. The results indicated that PS-80 prevented the formation of both protein and silicone oil particles. In the case of protein particles, PS-80 might involve in the interactions with the hydrophobic patches of protein, air bubbles, and the stressed surfaces of silicone oil-coated pre-filled syringes. Such interactions played a role in mitigating the formation of protein particles. Subsequently, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was utilized to characterize the interactions associated with silicone oil, protein, and PS-80 in the solutions. Based on QCM-D results, we proposed that PS-80 likely formed a layer on the interior surfaces of syringes. As a result, the adsorbed PS-80 might block the leakage of silicone oil from the surfaces to solution so that the silicone oil particles were mitigated at the presence of PS-80. Overall, this study demonstrated the necessary of utilizing these three techniques cooperatively in order to better understand the interfacial role of PS-80 in mitigating the formation of protein and silicone oil particles.

  2. Development of radioimmunoassay for prolactin binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raikar, R.S.; Sheth, A.R. (Institute for Research in Reproduction, Bombay (India))

    1982-01-01

    Using a homogenous prolactin binding protein (PBP) preparations from rat seminal vesicle secretion, a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for PBP has been developed. The assay was highly specific and showed no cross-reaction with other protein hormones from various species. The antiserum had an affinity constant (Ka) of 2.66 x 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/. The assay sensitivity was in the range of 0.5-1.0 ng of pure PBP per assay tube and the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variations were 6-8% and 12-14.5% respectively. The overall recovery of PBP to the rat seminal vesicle secretion was 96.8%. Using this RIA, PBP levels in various biological fluids and reproductive tissues were measured. Azoospermic human semen contained significantly higher levels of PBP than normospermic semen. The seminal vesicle of rat exhibited the highest concentration of PBP. Administration of antiserum to PBP to mature male rats resulted in a significant reduction in the weight of ventral prostrate and serum prolactin levels were significantly elevated in these animals suggesting that the antibody raised against the PBP was capable of blocking prolactin receptors.

  3. Following DNA chain extension and protein conformational changes in crystals of a Y-family DNA polymerase via Raman crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Herrera, Shirly J; Gaur, Vineet; Suo, Zucai; Carey, Paul R

    2013-07-23

    Y-Family DNA polymerases are known to bypass DNA lesions in vitro and in vivo. Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA polymerase (Dpo4) was chosen as a model Y-family enzyme for investigating the mechanism of DNA synthesis in single crystals. Crystals of Dpo4 in complexes with DNA (the binary complex) in the presence or absence of an incoming nucleotide were analyzed by Raman microscopy. (13)C- and (15)N-labeled d*CTP, or unlabeled dCTP, were soaked into the binary crystals with G as the templating base. In the presence of the catalytic metal ions, Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), nucleotide incorporation was detected by the disappearance of the triphosphate band of dCTP and the retention of *C modes in the crystal following soaking out of noncovalently bound C(or *C)TP. The addition of the second coded base, thymine, was observed by adding cognate dTTP to the crystal following a single d*CTP addition. Adding these two bases caused visible damage to the crystal that was possibly caused by protein and/or DNA conformational change within the crystal. When d*CTP is soaked into the Dpo4 crystal in the absence of Mn(2+) or Mg(2+), the primer extension reaction did not occur; instead, a ternary protein·template·d*CTP complex was formed. In the Raman difference spectra of both binary and ternary complexes, in addition to the modes of d(*C)CTP, features caused by ring modes from the template/primer bases being perturbed and from the DNA backbone appear, as well as features from perturbed peptide and amino acid side chain modes. These effects are more pronounced in the ternary complex than in the binary complex. Using standardized Raman intensities followed as a function of time, the C(*C)TP population in the crystal was maximal at ∼20 min. These remained unchanged in the ternary complex but declined in the binary complexes as chain incorporation occurred.

  4. Crystal Structure of PAV1-137: A Protein from the Virus PAV1 That Infects Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Leulliot

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1 was the first virus particle infecting a hyperthermophilic Euryarchaeota (Pyrococcus abyssi strain GE23 that has been isolated and characterized. It is lemon shaped and is decorated with a short fibered tail. PAV1 morphologically resembles the fusiform members of the family Fuselloviridae or the genus Salterprovirus. The 18 kb dsDNA genome of PAV1 contains 25 predicted genes, most of them of unknown function. To help assigning functions to these proteins, we have initiated structural studies of the PAV1 proteome. We determined the crystal structure of a putative protein of 137 residues (PAV1-137 at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The protein forms dimers both in solution and in the crystal. The fold of PAV1-137 is a four-α-helical bundle analogous to those found in some eukaryotic adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase, suggesting that PAV1-137 is involved in protein-protein interactions.

  5. Increasing the X-ray Diffraction Power of Protein Crystals by Dehydration: The Case of Bovine Serum Albumin and a Survey of Literature Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Russo Krauss

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum albumin is one of the most widely studied proteins. It is the most abundant protein in plasma with a typical concentration of 5 g/100 mL and the principal transporter of fatty acids in plasma. While the crystal structures of human serum albumin (HSA free and in complex with fatty acids, hemin, and local anesthetics have been characterized, no crystallographic models are available on bovine serum albumin (BSA, presumably because of the poor diffraction power of existing hexagonal BSA crystals. Here, the crystallization and diffraction data of a new BSA crystal form, obtained by the hanging drop method using MPEG 5K as precipitating agent, are presented. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 216.45 Å, b = 44.72 Å, c = 140.18 Å, β = 114.5°. Dehydration was found to increase the diffraction limit of BSA crystals from ~8 Å to 3.2 Å, probably by improving the packing of protein molecules in the crystal lattice. These results, together with a survey of more than 60 successful cases of protein crystal dehydration, confirm that it can be a useful procedure to be used in initial screening as a method of improving the diffraction limits of existing crystals.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the haem-binding protein HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Sabine; Paoli, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    The haem binding protein HemS from Y. enterocolitica has been crystallized in complex with its ligand. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.6 Å in-house. Bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire iron from their environment. Pathogenic microbes rely on specialized proteins to ‘steal’ haem from their host and use it as an iron source. HemS is the ultimate recipient of a molecular-relay system for haem uptake in Gram-negative species, functioning as the cytosolic carrier of haem. Soluble expression and high-quality diffraction crystals were obtained for HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.86, b = 77.45, c = 114.09 Å, and diffract X-rays to 2.6 Å spacing in-house. Determination of the structure of the haem–HemS complex will reveal the molecular basis of haem binding

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the haem-binding protein HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sabine; Paoli, Massimo, E-mail: max.paoli@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Pharmacy and Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    The haem binding protein HemS from Y. enterocolitica has been crystallized in complex with its ligand. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.6 Å in-house. Bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire iron from their environment. Pathogenic microbes rely on specialized proteins to ‘steal’ haem from their host and use it as an iron source. HemS is the ultimate recipient of a molecular-relay system for haem uptake in Gram-negative species, functioning as the cytosolic carrier of haem. Soluble expression and high-quality diffraction crystals were obtained for HemS from Yersinia enterocolitica. Crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.86, b = 77.45, c = 114.09 Å, and diffract X-rays to 2.6 Å spacing in-house. Determination of the structure of the haem–HemS complex will reveal the molecular basis of haem binding.

  8. A Genetic Analysis of Crystal Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Stanley; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Johnson, E.

    2000-01-01

    The regulation of crystal morphology by proteins is often observed in biology. It is a central feature in the formation of hard tissues such as bones, teeth and mollusc shells. We have developed a genetic system in the bacterium Escherichia coli to study the protein-mediated control of crystal...

  9. 5,5'-Dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification of cysteine improves the crystal quality of human chloride intracellular channel protein 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi Wei; Li Lanfen; Su Xiaodong

    2008-01-01

    Structural studies of human chloride intracellular channel protein 2 (CLIC2) had been hampered by the problem of generating suitable crystals primarily due to the protein containing exposed cysteines. Several chemical reagents were used to react with the cysteines on CLIC2 in order to modify the redox state of the protein. We have obtained high quality crystals that diffracted to better than 2.5 A at a home X-ray source by treating the protein with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). After solving the crystal structure of CLIC2, we found that the DTNB had reacted with the Cys 114 , and made CLIC2 in a homogenous oxidized state. This study demonstrated that the DTNB modification drastically improved the crystallization of CLIC2, and it implied that this method may be useful for other proteins containing exposed cysteines in general

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the metalloregulatory protein DtxR from Thermoplasma acidophilum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Hyun Ku; Kang, Jina; Park, Young Woo; Sung, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jae Young

    2012-01-01

    Orthorhombic crystals of DtxR from T. acidophilum have been obtained. X-ray data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is a metal-ion-dependent transcriptional regulator which regulates genes encoding proteins involved in metal-ion uptake to maintain metal-ion homeostasis. DtxR from Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Crystals of N-terminally His-tagged DtxR were obtained by hanging-drop vapour diffusion and diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. DtxR was crystallized at 296 K using polyethylene glycol 4000 as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.14, b = 84.61, c = 46.91 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit contained approximately one monomer of DtxR, giving a crystal volume per mass (V M ) of 2.22 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 44.6%

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of Drosophila melanogaster Gαo-subunit of heterotrimeric G protein in complex with the RGS domain of CG5036

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishchenko, Svetlana; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Tin, Uliana; Kostareva, Olga; Lin, Chen; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2012-01-01

    D. melanogaster Gαo-subunit and the RGS domain of its interacting partner CG5036 have been overproduced and purified; the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complex of the two proteins are reported. Regulator of G-protein signalling (RGS) proteins negatively regulate heterotrimeric G-protein signalling through their conserved RGS domains. RGS domains act as GTPase-activating proteins, accelerating the GTP hydrolysis rate of the activated form of Gα-subunits. Although omnipresent in eukaryotes, RGS proteins have not been adequately analysed in non-mammalian organisms. The Drosophila melanogaster Gαo-subunit and the RGS domain of its interacting partner CG5036 have been overproduced and purified; the crystallization of the complex of the two proteins using PEG 4000 as a crystallizing agent and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis are reported. Diffraction data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source

  12. The crystal structure of the Split End protein SHARP adds a new layer of complexity to proteins containing RNA recognition motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieti, Fabiana; Gabus, Caroline; Tambalo, Margherita; Huet, Tiphaine; Round, Adam; Thore, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    The Split Ends (SPEN) protein was originally discovered in Drosophila in the late 1990s. Since then, homologous proteins have been identified in eukaryotic species ranging from plants to humans. Every family member contains three predicted RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) in the N-terminal region of the protein. We have determined the crystal structure of the region of the human SPEN homolog that contains these RRMs-the SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), at 2.0 Å resolution. SHARP is a co-regulator of the nuclear receptors. We demonstrate that two of the three RRMs, namely RRM3 and RRM4, interact via a highly conserved interface. Furthermore, we show that the RRM3-RRM4 block is the main platform mediating the stable association with the H12-H13 substructure found in the steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), a long, non-coding RNA previously shown to play a crucial role in nuclear receptor transcriptional regulation. We determine that SHARP association with SRA relies on both single- and double-stranded RNA sequences. The crystal structure of the SHARP-RRM fragment, together with the associated RNA-binding studies, extend the repertoire of nucleic acid binding properties of RRM domains suggesting a new hypothesis for a better understanding of SPEN protein functions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Crystallization of the novel flavodoxine-like protein, WrbA, - on the way to three-dimensional structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Wolfová, J.; Grandori, R.; Chatterjee, N.; Carey, J.

    A 60, - (2004), s. 159 ISSN 0108-7673. [European Crystallographic Meeting /22./. Budapešť, 26.08.2004-31.08.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 640; GA MŠk LN00A141 Grant - others:GA ÚV1 INT-03-09049 Keywords : Flavodoxine-like protein * WebA apoprotein * Standard and advanced crystallization techniques Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.829, year: 2004

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokane, Michio; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-01-01

    PH1010, a DUF54-family protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. horikoshii OT3, was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution. PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins, was expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The space group of the crystal was determined to be P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 49.5, c = 132.7 Å. The crystal contained two PH1010 molecules in the asymmetric unit (V M = 2.4 Å 3 Da −1 ) and had a solvent content of 48%

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirokane, Michio; Sawano, Yoriko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru, E-mail: amtanok@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2007-06-01

    PH1010, a DUF54-family protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon P. horikoshii OT3, was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution. PH1010 from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, a member of the archaeal DUF54 family of proteins, was expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystallization was performed by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 1.90 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The space group of the crystal was determined to be P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 49.5, c = 132.7 Å. The crystal contained two PH1010 molecules in the asymmetric unit (V{sub M} = 2.4 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}) and had a solvent content of 48%.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein 2B from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Mototsugu, E-mail: mototsugu-yamada@meiji.co.jp; Watanabe, Takashi; Baba, Nobuyoshi; Miyara, Takako; Saito, Jun; Takeuchi, Yasuo [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Meiji Seika Kaisha Ltd, 760 Morooka-cho, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 222-8567 (Japan)

    2008-04-01

    The selenomethionyl-substituted transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2B from S. pneumoniae was isolated from a limited proteolysis digest of the soluble form of recombinant PBP 2B and then crystallized. MAD data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2B from Streptococcus pneumoniae catalyzes the cross-linking of peptidoglycan precursors that occurs during bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. A selenomethionyl (SeMet) substituted PBP 2B transpeptidase domain was isolated from a limited proteolysis digest of a soluble form of recombinant PBP 2B and then crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 86.39, c = 143.27 Å. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution using the BL32B2 beamline at SPring-8. The asymmetric unit contains one protein molecule and 63.7% solvent.

  17. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of a conserved hypothetical protein XC1692 from Xanthomonas campestris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Ko-Hsin; Huang, Zhao-Wei; Wei, Kun-Chou; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Shr, Hui-Lin; Gao, Fei Philip; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2005-01-01

    A conserved hypothetical protein XC1692 from X. campestris pv. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli. The purified recombinant protein crystallized in a variety of forms and diffracted to a resolution of at least 1.45 Å. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris strain 17 is a Gram-negative yellow-pigmented pathogenic bacterium that causes black rot, one of the major worldwide diseases of cruciferous crops. Its genome contains approximately 4500 genes, one third of which have no known structure and/or function yet are highly conserved among several different bacterial genuses. One of these gene products is XC1692 protein, containing 141 amino acids. It was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in a variety of forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffract to at least 1.45 Å resolution. They are hexagonal and belong to space group P6 3 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9, c = 71.0 Å. They contain one molecule per asymmetric unit

  18. Chirality Switching by Martensitic Transformation in Protein Cylindrical Crystals: Application to Bacterial Flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komai, Ricardo Kiyohiro

    Martensitic transformations provide unique engineering properties that, when designed properly, become important parts of new technology. Martensitic transformations have been studied for many years in traditional alloys (iron, steel, titanium, etc.), however there is still much to be learned in regards to these transformations in biological materials. Olson and Hartman showed in 1982 that these transformations are also observed in bacterial flagella and T4 bacteriophage viral sheaths, allowing for propulsion of bacteria in a fluid environment and, for the virus, is responsible for the infection mechanism. This work demonstrates, using the bacterial flagella as an example, that these transformations can be modelled using thermodynamic methods that are also used to model the transformations in alloys. This thesis work attempts to explain the transformations that occur in bacterial flagella, which are capable of small strain, highly reversible martensitic transformations. The first stress/temperature phase diagrams of these flagella were created by adding the mechanical energy of the transformation of the flagella to limited chemical thermodynamics information of the transformation. Mechanical energy is critical to the transformation process because the bacterial body applies a torque to the radius of the flagella. Finally, work has begun and will be completed in regards to understanding the kinetics of the transformation of the flagella. The motion of the transformation interface can be predicted by using a Landau-Ginzburg model. The crystallography of the transformation in bacterial flagella is also being computed to determine the invariant lines of transformation that occur within this cylindrical crystal. This work has shown that it is possible to treat proteins in a similar manner that alloys are treated when using thermodynamic modelling. Much can be learned from translating what is known regarding phase transformations in hard material systems to soft, organic

  19. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin protein ligase complex from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Matsuura, Yoshinori; Bagautdinova, Svetlana; Kunishima, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    A truncated form of biotin carboxyl carrier protein containing the C-terminal half fragment (BCCPΔN76) and the biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the mutation R48A (BPL*) or the double mutation R48A K111A (BPL**) were successfully cocrystallized in the presence of ATP and biotin. The BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals belong to space group P2 1 and diffract X-rays to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. Biotin protein ligase (BPL) catalyses the biotinylation of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. To elucidate the exact details of the protein–protein interactions in the biotinylation function, the C-terminal half fragment of BCCP (BCCPΔN76), the R48A mutant of BPL (BPL*) and the R48A K111A double mutant of BPL (BPL**), all of which are from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, have been expressed, purified and successfully cocrystallized. Cocrystals of the BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 complexes as well as crystals of BPL*, BPL** and BCCPΔN76 were obtained by the oil-microbatch method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant at 295 K. Complete X-ray diffraction data sets for BPL*–BCCPΔN76 and BPL**–BCCPΔN76 crystals were collected at 100 K to 2.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. They belong to the monoclinic space group P2 1 , with similar unit-cell parameters a = 69.85, b = 63.12, c = 75.64 Å, β = 95.9°. Assuming two subunits of the complex per asymmetric unit gives a V M value of 2.45 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 50%

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Na-ASP-1, a multi-domain pathogenesis-related-1 protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Loukas, Alex; Inan, Mehmet; Barent, Rick; Huang, Jicai; Plantz, Brad; Swanson, Amber; Gouthro, Mark; Meagher, Michael M.; Hotez, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the pathogenesis-related-1 domain, Na-ASP-1, the first multi-domain ASP from the human hookworm parasite N. americanus, has been crystallized. 2.2 Å resolution data have been collected from a crystal belonging to the monoclinic space group P2 1 . Human hookworm infection is a major cause of anemia and malnutrition in the developing world. In an effort to control hookworm infection, the Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative has identified candidate vaccine antigens from the infective larval stage (L3) of the parasite, including a family of pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) proteins known as the ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). The functions of the ASPs are unknown. In addition, it is unclear why some ASPs have one while others have multiple PR-1 domains. There are no known structures of a multi-domain ASP and in an effort to remedy this situation, recombinant Na-ASP-1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Na-ASP-1 is a 406-amino-acid multi-domain ASP from the prevalent human hookworm parasite Necator americanus. Useful X-ray data to 2.2 Å have been collected from a crystal that belongs to the monoclinic space group P2 1 with unit-cell parameters a = 67.7, b = 74.27, c = 84.60 Å, β = 112.12°. An initial molecular-replacement solution has been obtained with one monomer in the asymmetric unit

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Na-ASP-1, a multi-domain pathogenesis-related-1 protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, 987696 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-7696 (United States); Loukas, Alex [Department of Microbiology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University Medical Center, Washington DC 20037 (United States); Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, QLD 4006 (Australia); Inan, Mehmet; Barent, Rick; Huang, Jicai; Plantz, Brad; Swanson, Amber; Gouthro, Mark; Meagher, Michael M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0643 (United States); Hotez, Peter J. [Department of Microbiology and Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University Medical Center, Washington DC 20037 (United States); Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, 987696 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-7696 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    In order to clarify the structural basis of the pathogenesis-related-1 domain, Na-ASP-1, the first multi-domain ASP from the human hookworm parasite N. americanus, has been crystallized. 2.2 Å resolution data have been collected from a crystal belonging to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}. Human hookworm infection is a major cause of anemia and malnutrition in the developing world. In an effort to control hookworm infection, the Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative has identified candidate vaccine antigens from the infective larval stage (L3) of the parasite, including a family of pathogenesis-related-1 (PR-1) proteins known as the ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). The functions of the ASPs are unknown. In addition, it is unclear why some ASPs have one while others have multiple PR-1 domains. There are no known structures of a multi-domain ASP and in an effort to remedy this situation, recombinant Na-ASP-1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Na-ASP-1 is a 406-amino-acid multi-domain ASP from the prevalent human hookworm parasite Necator americanus. Useful X-ray data to 2.2 Å have been collected from a crystal that belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with unit-cell parameters a = 67.7, b = 74.27, c = 84.60 Å, β = 112.12°. An initial molecular-replacement solution has been obtained with one monomer in the asymmetric unit.

  3. Structural and biophysical characterization of an epitope-specific engineered Fab fragment and complexation with membrane proteins: implications for co-crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Entzminger, Kevin C; Hyun, Jeongmin; Kalyoncu, Sibel; Heaner, David P; Morales, Ivan A; Sheppard, Aly; Gumbart, James C; Maynard, Jennifer A; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2015-04-01

    Crystallization chaperones are attracting increasing interest as a route to crystal growth and structure elucidation of difficult targets such as membrane proteins. While strategies to date have typically employed protein-specific chaperones, a peptide-specific chaperone to crystallize multiple cognate peptide epitope-containing client proteins is envisioned. This would eliminate the target-specific chaperone-production step and streamline the co-crystallization process. Previously, protein engineering and directed evolution were used to generate a single-chain variable (scFv) antibody fragment with affinity for the peptide sequence EYMPME (scFv/EE). This report details the conversion of scFv/EE to an anti-EE Fab format (Fab/EE) followed by its biophysical characterization. The addition of constant chains increased the overall stability and had a negligible impact on the antigen affinity. The 2.0 Å resolution crystal structure of Fab/EE reveals contacts with larger surface areas than those of scFv/EE. Surface plasmon resonance, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and size-exclusion chromatography were used to assess Fab/EE binding to EE-tagged soluble and membrane test proteins: namely, the β-barrel outer membrane protein intimin and α-helical A2a G protein-coupled receptor (A2aR). Molecular-dynamics simulation of the intimin constructs with and without Fab/EE provides insight into the energetic complexities of the co-crystallization approach.

  4. Development of a ten inch manipulators-based, flexible, broadband two-crystal spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steel, A. B., E-mail: steel1@llnl.gov; Dunn, J.; Emig, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Shepherd, R.; Marley, E. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hoarty, D. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    We have developed and implemented a broadband X-ray spectrometer with a variable energy range for use at the Atomic Weapons Establishment's Orion Laser. The spectrometer covers an energy bandwidth of ∼1–2 keV using two independently mounted, movable Bragg diffraction crystals. Using combinations of cesium hydrogen pthlate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, and pentaerythritol crystals, spectra covering the 1.4–2.5, 1.85–3.15, or 3.55–5.1 keV energy bands have been measured. Image plate is used for detection owing to its high dynamic range. Background signals caused by high energy X-rays and particles commonly produced in high energy laser experiments are reduced by a series of tantalum baffles and filters installed between the source and crystal and also between the crystals and detector.

  5. Development of a ten inch manipulators-based, flexible, broadband two-crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, A. B.; Dunn, J.; Emig, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Shepherd, R.; Marley, E. V.; Hoarty, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a broadband X-ray spectrometer with a variable energy range for use at the Atomic Weapons Establishment's Orion Laser. The spectrometer covers an energy bandwidth of ∼1–2 keV using two independently mounted, movable Bragg diffraction crystals. Using combinations of cesium hydrogen pthlate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, and pentaerythritol crystals, spectra covering the 1.4–2.5, 1.85–3.15, or 3.55–5.1 keV energy bands have been measured. Image plate is used for detection owing to its high dynamic range. Background signals caused by high energy X-rays and particles commonly produced in high energy laser experiments are reduced by a series of tantalum baffles and filters installed between the source and crystal and also between the crystals and detector

  6. Escherichia coli MltA : MAD phasing and refinement of a tetartohedrally twinned protein crystal structure (vol D61, pg 613, 2005)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, Thomas R.M.; Jong, René M. de; Straaten, Karin E. van; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W.H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    Crystals were grown of a mutant form of the bacterial cell-wall maintenance protein MltA that diffracted to 2.15 Å resolution. When phasing with molecular replacement using the native structure failed, selenium MAD was used to obtain initial phases. However, after MAD phasing the crystals were found

  7. The dissolution phenomenon of lysozyme crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Ulrich, J. [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Thermal Separation Processes, Centre of Engineering Science, Halle/Saale (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Dissolution studies on lysozyme crystals were carried out since the observed dissolution pattern look different from non-protein dissolved crystals. The Tetragonal, High Temperature and Low Temperature Orthorhombic morphologies, crystallized using sodium chloride, were chosen and the influence of different pH, salt and protein concentration on their dissolution was investigated. An increase in pH and/or salt concentration can modify the dissolution behaviour. The pattern of the crystals during the dissolution process will, therefore, develop differently. Frequently a skeleton like crystal pattern followed by a falling apart of the crystals is observed. The multi-component character of the lysozyme crystal (protein, water, buffer, salt) as well as ''solvatomorphism'' gives first insights in the phenomena happening in the dissolution process. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: Application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazemann, I.; Dauvergne, M.T.; Blakeley, M.P.; Meilleur, Flora; Haertlein, M.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Mitschler, A.; Myles, Dean A.A.; Podjarny, A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 (angstrom) resolution from a small (0.15 mm 3 ) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR(D)), subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm 3 are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 (angstrom) resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 (angstrom). This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae proteins: the family II inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, Mika K.; Lehtiö, Lari; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Rubens, Craig E.; Goldman, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Two S. agalactiae proteins, the inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase, were crystallized and diffraction data were collected and processed from these crystals. The data from the two protein crystals extended to 2.80 and 2.65 Å, respectively. Streptococcus agalactiae, which infects human neonates and causes sepsis and meningitis, has recently been shown to possess a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein phosphorylation signalling cascade. Through their target proteins, the S. agalactiae Ser/Thr kinase and Ser/Thr phosphatase together control the growth as well as the morphology and virulence of this organism. One of the targets is the S. agalactiae family II inorganic pyrophosphatase. The inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase have therefore been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected from their crystals. The data were processed using XDS. The inorganic pyrosphosphatase crystals diffracted to 2.80 Å and the Ser/Thr phosphatase crystals to 2.65 Å. Initial structure-solution experiments indicate that structure solution will be successful in both cases. Solving the structure of the proteins involved in this cascade is the first step towards understanding this phenomenon in atomic detail

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of two Streptococcus agalactiae proteins: the family II inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, Mika K.; Lehtiö, Lari [Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Rubens, Craig E. [Division of Infectious Disease, Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington 98105 (United States); Goldman, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.goldman@helsinki.fi [Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 65, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-09-01

    Two S. agalactiae proteins, the inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase, were crystallized and diffraction data were collected and processed from these crystals. The data from the two protein crystals extended to 2.80 and 2.65 Å, respectively. Streptococcus agalactiae, which infects human neonates and causes sepsis and meningitis, has recently been shown to possess a eukaryotic-like serine/threonine protein phosphorylation signalling cascade. Through their target proteins, the S. agalactiae Ser/Thr kinase and Ser/Thr phosphatase together control the growth as well as the morphology and virulence of this organism. One of the targets is the S. agalactiae family II inorganic pyrophosphatase. The inorganic pyrophosphatase and the serine/threonine phosphatase have therefore been purified and crystallized and diffraction data have been collected from their crystals. The data were processed using XDS. The inorganic pyrosphosphatase crystals diffracted to 2.80 Å and the Ser/Thr phosphatase crystals to 2.65 Å. Initial structure-solution experiments indicate that structure solution will be successful in both cases. Solving the structure of the proteins involved in this cascade is the first step towards understanding this phenomenon in atomic detail.

  11. High resolution crystal structure of PedB: a structural basis for the classification of pediocin-like immunity proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha Sun-Shin

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediocin-like bacteriocins, ribosomally-synthesized antimicrobial peptides, are generally coexpressed with cognate immunity proteins in order to protect the bacteriocin-producer from its own bacteriocin. As a step for understanding the mode of action of immunity proteins, we determined the crystal structure of PedB, a pediocin-like immunity protein conferring immunity to pediocin PP-1. Results The 1.6 Å crystal structure of PedB reveals that PedB consists of an antiparallel four-helix bundle with a flexible C-terminal end. PedB shows structural similarity to an immunity protein against enterocin A (EntA-im but some disparity to an immunity protein against carnobacteriocin B2 (ImB2 in both the C-terminal conformation and the local structure constructed by α3, α4, and their connecting loop. Structure-inspired mutational studies reveal that deletion of the last seven residues of the C-terminus of PedB almost abolished its immunity activity. Conclusion The fact that PedB, EntA-im, and ImB2 share a four-helix bundle structure strongly suggests the structural conservation of this motif in the pediocin-like immunity proteins. The significant difference in the core structure and the C-terminal conformation provides a structural basis for the classification of pediocin-like immunity proteins. Our mutational study using C-terminal-shortened PedBs and the investigation of primary sequence of the C-terminal region, propose that several polar or charged residues in the extreme C-terminus of PedB which is crucial for the immunity are involved in the specific recognition of pediocin PP-1.

  12. Get phases from arsenic anomalous scattering: de novo SAD phasing of two protein structures crystallized in cacodylate buffer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of two proteins, a putative pyrazinamidase/nicotinamidase from the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans (SmPncA and the human caspase-6 (Casp6, were solved by de novo arsenic single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (As-SAD phasing method. Arsenic (As, an uncommonly used element in SAD phasing, was covalently introduced into proteins by cacodylic acid, the buffering agent in the crystallization reservoirs. In SmPncA, the only cysteine was bound to dimethylarsinoyl, which is a pentavalent arsenic group (As (V. This arsenic atom and a protein-bound zinc atom both generated anomalous signals. The predominant contribution, however, was from the As anomalous signals, which were sufficient to phase the SmPncA structure alone. In Casp6, four cysteines were found to bind cacodyl, a trivalent arsenic group (As (III, in the presence of the reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT, and arsenic atoms were the only anomalous scatterers for SAD phasing. Analyses and discussion of these two As-SAD phasing examples and comparison of As with other traditional heavy atoms that generate anomalous signals, together with a few arsenic-based de novo phasing cases reported previously strongly suggest that As is an ideal anomalous scatterer for SAD phasing in protein crystallography.

  13. Protein expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of LidA from Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Wenzhuang; Meng, Geng; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Feiyun; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization of recombinant lidA, a translocated substrate of the Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm type IV secretion system, is reported. Crystals were obtained and diffracted to 2.75 Å in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 . LidA, a translocated substrate of the Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm type IV secretion system, is associated with maintenance of bacterial integrity and interferes with the early secretory pathway. However, the precise mechanism of LidA in these processes remains elusive. To further investigate the structure and function of LidA, the full-length protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. LidA was crystallized using sitting-drop vapour diffusion and diffracted to a resolution of 2.75 Å. The crystal belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 57.5, b = 64.5, c = 167.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of two vascular apoptosis-inducing proteins (VAPs) from Crotalus atrox venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Tomoko; Oishi, Yuko; Araki, Satohiko; Mori, Hidezo; Takeda, Soichi

    2006-01-01

    Vascular apoptosis-inducing protein 1 (VAP1) and VAP2 from C. atrox venom were crystallized in variety of different crystal forms. Diffraction data sets were obtained to 2.5 and 2.15 Å resolution for VAP1 and VAP2, respectively. VAPs are haemorrhagic snake-venom toxins belonging to the reprolysin family of zinc metalloproteinases. In vitro, VAPs induce apoptosis specifically in cultured vascular endothelial cells. VAPs have a modular structure that bears structural homology to mammalian ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases). VAP1 is a homodimer with a MW of 110 kDa in which the monomers are connected by a single disulfide bridge. VAP2 is homologous to VAP1 and exists as a monomer with a MW of 55 kDa. In the current study, several crystal forms of VAP1 and VAP2 were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method and diffraction data sets were collected using SPring-8 beamlines. The best crystals of VAP1 and VAP2 generated data sets to 2.5 and 2.15 Å resolution, respectively

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of YisP protein from Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis strain 168

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yumei; Jia, Shiru; Ren, Feifei; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Guo, Rey-Ting; Zheng, Yingying

    2012-01-01

    A bacteria biofilm formation involved enzyme, BsYisP, from Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis strain 168, was crystallized and diffracted to 1.92 Å. YisP is an enzyme involved in the pathway of biofilm formation in bacteria and is predicted to possess squalene synthase activity. A BlastP search using the YisP protein sequence from Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis strain 168 shows that it shares 23% identity with the dehydrosqualene synthase from Staphylococcus aureus. The YisP from B. subtilis 168 was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein was purified and crystallized. The crystals, which belong to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 43.966, b = 77.576, c = 91.378 Å, were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 1.92 Å resolution. Structure determination using MAD and MIR methods is in progress

  16. Cloning, expression, and crystallization of Cpn60 proteins from Thermococcus litoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, J; Sriram, M; Mai, X; Adams, M W; Joachimiak, A

    2000-01-01

    Two genes of the extreme thermophilic archaeon Thermococcus litoralis homologous to those that code for Cpn60 chaperonins were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Each of the Cpn60 subunits as well as the entire Cpn60 complex crystallize in a variety of morphological forms. The best crystals diffract to 3.6 A resolution at room temperature and belong to the space group 1422 with unit cell parameters a = b = 193.5 A, c = 204.2 A.

  17. Energy-dispersive x-Ray Analysis of Phosphorus, Potassium, Magnesium, and Calcium in Globoid Crystals in Protein Bodies from Different Regions of Cucurbita maxima Embryos 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, John N. A.; Greenwood, John S.; Vollmer, Catherine M.; Buttrose, Mark S.

    1978-01-01

    The seeds of Cucurbita maxima contain protein bodies with electrondense globoid crystals. Because of their density globoid crystals are ideal material for energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis studies of elemental composition. Fixation trials were carried out to test globoid crystal extraction during glutaraldehyde fixation, water washing, and ethanol dehydration. Glutaraldehyde fixation without subsequent washing or dehydration alone produced no significant changes in elemental composition of cotyledon globoid crystals. If glutaraldehyde fixation was followed by water washes or ethanol dehydration there was some loss of the major globoid crystal elements but the relative percentages of the elements P, K, Ca, and Mg remained relatively unchanged. In this paper results of a study of the P, K, Mg, and Ca content of globoid crystals in different tissues of squash embryos are presented. The globoid crystals in the radicle were found to be the least dense in the embryo. Globoid crystals from all embryo regions contained P, K, and Mg. In the various embryo regions P and Mg maintained relatively constant proportions of the globoid crystal composition while K and Ca varied. Of particular significance is the distribution of Ca which is generally an immobile element. Calcium was found in highest amounts in the globoid crystals of the radicle and stem regions while globoid crystals in much of the cotyledon contained little, if any, Ca. The Ca storage thus seems to be spatially arranged in a manner that would aid early growth of the root-shoot axis. PMID:16660439

  18. Development of crystals based in cesium iodide for application as radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Maria da Conceicao Costa

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic scintillators with fast luminescence decay time, high density and high light output have been the object of studies for application in nuclear physics, high energy physics, nuclear tomography and other fields of science and engineering. Scintillation crystals based on cesium iodide (CsI) are matters with relatively low higroscopy, high atomic number, easy handling and low cost, characteristics that favor their use as radiation detectors. In this work, the growth of pure CsI crystals, CsI:Br and CsI:Pb, using the Bridgman technique, is described. The concentration of the bromine doping element (Br) was studied in the range of 1,5x10 -1 M to 10 -2 M and the lead (Pb) in the range of 10 -2 M to 5x10 -4 M. To evaluate the scintillators developed, systematic measurements were carried out for luminescence emission and luminescence decay time for gamma radiation, optical transmittance assays, Vickers micro-hardness assays, determination of the doping elements distribution along the grown crystals and analysis of crystals response to the gamma radiation in the energy range of 350 keV to 1330 keV and alpha particles from a 241 Am source, with energy of 5.54 MeV. It was obtained 13 ns to 19 ns for luminescence decay time for CsI:Br and CsI:Pb crystals. These results were very promising. The results obtained for micro-hardness showed a significant increase in function of the doping elements concentration, when compared to the pure CsI crystal, increasing consequently the mechanical resistance of the grown crystals. The validity of using these crystals as radiation sensors may be seen from the results of their response to gamma radiation and alpha particles. (author)

  19. At least 10% shorter C–H bonds in cryogenic protein crystal structures than in current AMBER forcefields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Yuan-Ping, E-mail: pang@mayo.edu

    2015-03-06

    High resolution protein crystal structures resolved with X-ray diffraction data at cryogenic temperature are commonly used as experimental data to refine forcefields and evaluate protein folding simulations. However, it has been unclear hitherto whether the C–H bond lengths in cryogenic protein structures are significantly different from those defined in forcefields to affect protein folding simulations. This article reports the finding that the C–H bonds in high resolution cryogenic protein structures are 10–14% shorter than those defined in current AMBER forcefields, according to 3709 C–H bonds in the cryogenic protein structures with resolutions of 0.62–0.79 Å. Also, 20 all-atom, isothermal–isobaric, 0.5-μs molecular dynamics simulations showed that chignolin folded from a fully-extended backbone formation to the native β-hairpin conformation in the simulations using AMBER forcefield FF12SB at 300 K with an aggregated native state population including standard error of 10 ± 4%. However, the aggregated native state population with standard error reduced to 3 ± 2% in the same simulations except that C–H bonds were shortened by 10–14%. Furthermore, the aggregated native state populations with standard errors increased to 35 ± 3% and 26 ± 3% when using FF12MC, which is based on AMBER forcefield FF99, with and without the shortened C–H bonds, respectively. These results show that the 10–14% bond length differences can significantly affect protein folding simulations and suggest that re-parameterization of C–H bonds according to the cryogenic structures could improve the ability of a forcefield to fold proteins in molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Cryogenic crystal structures are commonly used in computational studies of proteins. • C–H bonds in the cryogenic structures are shorter than those defined in forcefields. • A survey of 3709 C–H bonds shows that the cryogenic bonds are 10–14% shorter. • The

  20. Crystal Growth of High-Quality Protein Crystals under the Presence of an Alternant Electric Field in Pulse-Wave Mode, and a Strong Magnetic Field with Radio Frequency Pulses Characterized by X-ray Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Rodríguez-Romero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this research was devoted to investigating the effect of alternate current (AC using four different types of wave modes (pulse-wave at 2 Hz on the crystal growth of lysozyme in solution. The best results, in terms of size and crystal quality, were obtained when protein crystals were grown under the influence of electric fields in a very specific wave mode (“breathing” wave, giving the highest resolution up to 1.34 Å in X-ray diffraction analysis compared with controls and with those crystals grown in gel. In the second part, we evaluated the effect of a strong magnetic field of 16.5 Tesla combined with radiofrequency pulses of 0.43 μs on the crystal growth in gels of tetragonal hen egg white (HEW lysozyme. The lysozyme crystals grown, both in solution applying breathing-wave and in gel under the influence of this strong magnetic field with pulses of radio frequencies, produced the larger-in-size crystals and the highest resolution structures. Data processing and refinement statistics are very good in terms of the resolution, mosaicity and Wilson B factor obtained for each crystal. Besides, electron density maps show well-defined and distinctly separated atoms at several selected tryptophan residues for the crystal grown using the “breathing wave pulses”.

  1. Development of Control Applications for High-Throughput Protein Crystallography Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponov, Yurii A.; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Honda, Nobuo; Sasajima, Kumiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Hiraki, Masahiko; Yamada, Yusuke; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2007-01-01

    An integrated client-server control system (PCCS) with a unified relational database (PCDB) has been developed for high-throughput protein crystallography experiments on synchrotron beamlines. The major steps in protein crystallographic experiments (purification, crystallization, crystal harvesting, data collection, and data processing) are integrated into the software. All information necessary for performing protein crystallography experiments is stored in the PCDB database (except raw X-ray diffraction data, which is stored in the Network File Server). To allow all members of a protein crystallography group to participate in experiments, the system was developed as a multi-user system with secure network access based on TCP/IP secure UNIX sockets. Secure remote access to the system is possible from any operating system with X-terminal and SSH/X11 (Secure Shell with graphical user interface) support. Currently, the system covers the high-throughput X-ray data collection stages and is being commissioned at BL5A and NW12A (PF, PF-AR, KEK, Tsukuba, Japan)

  2. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus ZEBRA protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morand, Patrice [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, EA 2939, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Budayova-Spano, Monika [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Perrissin, Monique [Laboratoire de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, EA 2939, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Müller, Christoph W., E-mail: mueller@embl-grenoble.fr; Petosa, Carlo [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Grenoble Outstation, BP 181, 38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France)

    2006-03-01

    A C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus lytic switch protein ZEBRA has been crystallized in complex with DNA. A C-terminal fragment of the Epstein–Barr virus immediate-early transcription factor ZEBRA has been expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The fragment behaves as a dimer in solution, consistent with the presence of a basic region leucine-zipper (bZIP) domain. Crystals of the fragment in complex with a DNA duplex were grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 4000 and magnesium acetate as crystallization agents. Crystals diffract to better than 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation (λ = 0.976 Å). Crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 94.2, b = 26.5, c = 98.1 Å, β = 103.9°.

  3. Crystallization and molecular-replacement studies of the monoclonal antibody mAbR310 specific for the (R)-HNE-modified protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Sohei; Tatsuda, Emi; Ishino, Kousuke; Suzuki, Kenichiro; Sakai, Hiroshi; Uchida, Koji

    2006-01-01

    Antigen-free Fab fragment of mAbR310, which recognizes (R)-HNE modified protein, has been crystallized. Initial phases have been obtained by molecular replacement. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major racemic product of lipid peroxidation, reacts with histidine to form a stable HNE–histidine Michael addition-type adduct possessing three chiral centres in the cyclic hemiacetal structure. Monoclonal antibodies against HNE-modified protein have been widely used for assessing oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. Here, the purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a Fab fragment of novel monoclonal antibody R310 (mAbR310), which recognizes (R)-HNE-modified protein, are reported. The Fab fragment of mAbR310 was obtained by digestion with papain, purified and crystallized. Using hanging-drop vapour-diffusion crystallization techniques, crystals of mAbR310 Fab were obtained. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 127.04, b = 65.31, c = 64.29 Å, β = 118.88°) and diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 1.84 Å. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of mAbR310, with a corresponding crystal volume per protein weight of 2.51 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 51.0%

  4. The crystal structure of human protein α1M reveals a chromophore-binding site and two putative protein–protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yangli; Gao, Zengqiang; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Luo, Miao; Hou, Haifeng; Huang, Ailong; Dong, Yuhui; Wang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We determined the first structure of human α1M with heavy electron density of the chromophore. •We proposed a new structural model of the chromophore. •We first revealed that the two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. -- Abstract: Lipocalin α1-microglobulin (α1M) is a conserved glycoprotein present in plasma and in the interstitial fluids of all tissues. α1M is linked to a heterogeneous yellow–brown chromophore of unknown structure, and interacts with several target proteins, including α1-inhibitor-3, fibronectin, prothrombin and albumin. To date, there is little knowledge about the interaction sites between α1M and its partners. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human α1M. Due to the crystallization occurring in a low ionic strength solution, the unidentified chromophore with heavy electron density is observed at a hydrophobic inner tube of α1M. In addition, two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. Further study is needed to unravel the detailed information about the interaction between α1M and its partners

  5. Development of low-cost silicon crystal growth techniques for terrestrial photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Because of the growing need for new sources of electrical energy, photovoltaic solar energy conversion is being developed. Photovoltaic devices are now being produced mainly from silicon wafers obtained from the slicing and polishing of cylindrically shaped single crystal ingots. Inherently high-cost processes now being used must either be eliminated or modified to provide low-cost crystalline silicon. Basic to this pursuit is the development of new or modified methods of crystal growth and, if necessary, crystal cutting. If silicon could be grown in a form requiring no cutting, a significant cost saving would potentially be realized. Therefore, several techniques for growth in the form of ribbons or sheets are being explored. In addition, novel techniques for low-cost ingot growth and cutting are under investigation.

  6. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, Colin; Sutton, Geoff; Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian; Stuart, David Ian

    2016-01-01

    Coherent diffraction observations from polyhedra crystals at cryotemperature are reported. Information is obtained about the lattice strain and the changes with radiation damage. Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage

  7. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nave, Colin, E-mail: colin.nave@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Sutton, Geoff [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Robinson, Ian [University College London, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Stuart, David Ian [Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-01

    Coherent diffraction observations from polyhedra crystals at cryotemperature are reported. Information is obtained about the lattice strain and the changes with radiation damage. Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage.

  8. Development of TiBr semiconductor crystal for applications as radiation detector and photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Icimone Braga de

    2006-01-01

    In this work, Tlbr crystals were grown by the Bridgman method from zone melted materials. The influence of the purification efficiency and the crystalline surface quality on the crystal were studied, evaluating its performance as a radiation detector. Due to significant improvement in the purification and crystals growth, good results have been obtained for the developed detectors. The spectrometric performance of the Tlbr detector was evaluated by 241 Am (59 keV), 133 Ba (80 e 355 keV), 57 Co (122 keV), 22 Na (511 keV) and 137 Cs (662 keV) at room temperature. The best energy resolution results were obtained from purer detectors. Energy resolutions of 10 keV (16%), 12 keV (15%), 12 keV (10%), 28 keV (8%), 31 keV (6%) and 36 keV (5%) to 59, 80, 122, 355, 511 and 662 keV energies, respectively, were obtained. A study on the detection response at -20 deg C was also carried out, as well as the detector stability in function of the time. No significant difference was observed in the energy resolution between measurements at both temperatures. It was observed that the detector instability causes degradation of the spectroscopic characteristics during measurements at room temperature and the instability varies for each detector. This behavior was also verified by other authors. The viability to use the developed Tlbr crystal as a photodetector coupled to scintillators crystals was also studied in this work. Due to its quantum efficiency in the region from 350 to 500 nm, Tlbr shows to be a promising material to be used as a photodetector. As a possible application of this work, the development of a surgical probe has been initiated using the developed Tlbr crystal as the radiation detector of the probe. (author)

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of hepatitis B virus core fusion protein corresponding to octahedral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masaki; Iwabuchi, Shinichiro; Kikkou, Tatsuhiko; Noguchi, Keiichi; Odaka, Masafumi; Yohda, Masafumi; Kawata, Masaaki; Sato, Chikara; Matsumoto, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Novel hepatitis B virus-like particles of recombinant dimeric core–GFP fusion protein were expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.15 Å resolution and belonged to space group F432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 219.7 Å. Recombinant hepatitis B virus core proteins dimerize to form building blocks that are capable of self-assembly into a capsid. A core capsid protein dimer (CPD) linked to a green fluorescent protein variant, EGFP, at the C-terminus has been designed. The recombinant fusion CPD was expressed in Escherichia coli, assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs), purified and crystallized. The single crystal diffracted to 2.15 Å resolution and belonged to the cubic space group F432, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 219.7 Å. The fusion proteins assembled into icosahedral VLPs in aqueous solution, but were rearranged into octahedral symmetry through the crystal-packing process under the crystallization conditions

  10. Expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of RNA-binding protein Hfq (YmaH) from Bacillus subtilis in complex with an RNA aptamer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Seiki; Someya, Tatsuhiko; Kawai, Gota; Nakamura, Kouji; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Hfq from B. subtilis was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in two crystal forms that belonged to space groups I422 and F222; diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution from both forms. The Hfq protein is a hexameric RNA-binding protein which regulates gene expression by binding to RNA under the influence of diverse environmental stresses. Its ring structure binds various types of RNA, including mRNA and sRNA. RNA-bound structures of Hfq from Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus have been revealed to have poly(A) RNA at the distal site and U-rich RNA at the proximal site, respectively. Here, crystals of a complex of the Bacillus subtilis Hfq protein with an A/G-repeat 7-mer RNA (Hfq–RNA) that were prepared using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique are reported. The type 1 Hfq–RNA crystals belonged to space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 123.70, c = 119.13 Å, while the type 2 Hfq–RNA crystals belonged to space group F222, with unit-cell parameters a = 91.92, b = 92.50, c = 114.92 Å. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.20 Å from both crystal forms. The hexameric structure of the Hfq protein was clearly shown by self-rotation analysis

  11. Development of paracetamol-caffeine co-crystals to improve compressional, formulation and in vivo performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Sumera; Abbas, Nasir; Hussain, Amjad; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Bukhari, Nadeem Irfan; Afzal, Hafsa; Riffat, Sualeha; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2018-07-01

    Paracetamol, a frequently used antipyretic and analgesic drug, has poor compression moldability owing to its low plasticity. In this study, new co-crystals of paracetamol (PCM) with caffeine (as a co-former) were prepared and delineated. Co-crystals exhibited improved compaction and mechanical behavior. A screening study was performed by utilizing a number of methods namely dry grinding, liquid assisted grinding (LAG), solvent evaporation (SE), and anti-solvent addition using various weight ratios of starting materials. LAG and SE were found successful in the screening study. Powders at 1:1 and 2:1 weight ratio of PCM/CAF by LAG and SE, respectively, resulted in the formation of co-crystals. Samples were characterized by PXRD, DSC, and ATR-FTIR techniques. Compressional properties of PCM and developed co-crystals were analyzed by in-die heckle model. Mean yield pressure (Py), an inverse measure of plasticity, obtained from the heckle plots decreased significantly (p < .05) for co-crystals than pure drug. Intrinsic dissolution profile of co-crystals showed up to 2.84-fold faster dissolution than PCM and physical mixtures in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 at 37 °C. In addition, co-crystals formulated into tablets by direct compression method showed better mechanical properties like hardness and tensile strength. In vitro dissolution studies on tablets also showed enhanced dissolution profiles (∼90-97%) in comparison to the tablets of PCM prepared by direct compression (∼55%) and wet granulation (∼85%) methods. In a single dose sheep model study, co-crystals showed up to twofold increase in AUC and C max . A significant (p < .05) decrease in clearance as compared to pure drug was also recorded. In conclusion, new co-crystals of PCM were successfully prepared with improved tabletability in vitro and in vivo profile. Enhancement in AUC and C max of PCM by co-crystallization might suggest the dose reduction and avoidance of side effects.

  12. An Hfq-like protein in archaea: crystal structure and functional characterization of the Sm protein from Methanococcus jannaschii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper S; Bøggild, Andreas; Andersen, Christian B F

    2007-01-01

    The Sm and Sm-like proteins are conserved in all three domains of life and have emerged as important players in many different RNA-processing reactions. Their proposed role is to mediate RNA-RNA and/or RNA-protein interactions. In marked contrast to eukaryotes, bacteria appear to contain only one...... diameter of the archaeal Hfq hexamer is significantly smaller than its bacterial counterparts. Functional analysis reveals that Escherichia coli and M. jannaschii Hfqs display very similar biochemical and biological properties. It thus appears that the archaeal and bacterial Hfq proteins are largely...

  13. Development of peptide and protein based radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and proteins have recently gained great interest as theranostics, due to their numerous and considerable advantages over small (organic) molecules. Developmental procedures of these radiolabelled biomolecules start with the radiolabelling process, greatly defined by the amino acid composition of the molecule and the radionuclide used. Depending on the radionuclide selection, radiolabelling starting materials are whether or not essential for efficient radiolabelling, resulting in direct or indirect radioiodination, radiometal-chelate coupling, indirect radiofluorination or (3)H/(14)C-labelling. Before preclinical investigations are performed, quality control analyses of the synthesized radiopharmaceutical are recommended to eliminate false positive or negative functionality results, e.g. changed receptor binding properties due to (radiolabelled) impurities. Therefore, radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity are investigated, next to the general peptide attributes as described in the European and the United States Pharmacopeia. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo stability characteristics of the peptides and proteins also need to be explored, seen their strong sensitivity to proteinases and peptidases, together with radiolysis and trans-chelation phenomena of the radiopharmaceuticals. In vitro biomedical characterization of the radiolabelled peptides and proteins is performed by saturation, kinetic and competition binding assays, analyzing KD, Bmax, kon, koff and internalization properties, taking into account the chemical and metabolic stability and adsorption events inherent to peptides and proteins. In vivo biodistribution can be adapted by linker, chelate or radionuclide modifications, minimizing normal tissue (e.g. kidney and liver) radiation, and resulting in favorable dosimetry analyses. Finally, clinical trials are initiated, eventually leading to the marketing of radiolabelled peptides and proteins for PET/SPECT-imaging and therapy

  14. Crystal Structures and Thermodynamic Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms of CD28 Phosphopeptide Binding to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domains of Three Adaptor Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satomi; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Morii, Hisayuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Full activation of T cells and differentiation into effector T cells are essential for many immune responses and require co-stimulatory signaling via the CD28 receptor. Extracellular ligand binding to CD28 recruits protein-tyrosine kinases to its cytoplasmic tail, which contains a YMNM motif. Following phosphorylation of the tyrosine, the proteins growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc (Gads), and p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase may bind to pYMNM (where pY is phosphotyrosine) via their Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, leading to downstream signaling to distinct immune pathways. These three adaptor proteins bind to the same site on CD28 with variable affinity, and all are important for CD28-mediated co-stimulatory function. However, the mechanism of how these proteins recognize and compete for CD28 is unclear. To visualize their interactions with CD28, we have determined the crystal structures of Gads SH2 and two p85 SH2 domains in complex with a CD28-derived phosphopeptide. The high resolution structures obtained revealed that, whereas the CD28 phosphopeptide bound to Gads SH2 is in a bent conformation similar to that when bound to Grb2 SH2, it adopts a more extended conformation when bound to the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of p85. These differences observed in the peptide-protein interactions correlated well with the affinity and other thermodynamic parameters for each interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The detailed insight into these interactions reported here may inform the development of compounds that specifically inhibit the association of CD28 with these adaptor proteins to suppress excessive T cell responses, such as in allergies and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27927989

  15. Crystal Structures and Thermodynamic Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms of CD28 Phosphopeptide Binding to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domains of Three Adaptor Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satomi; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Morii, Hisayuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-01-20

    Full activation of T cells and differentiation into effector T cells are essential for many immune responses and require co-stimulatory signaling via the CD28 receptor. Extracellular ligand binding to CD28 recruits protein-tyrosine kinases to its cytoplasmic tail, which contains a YMNM motif. Following phosphorylation of the tyrosine, the proteins growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc (Gads), and p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase may bind to pYMNM (where pY is phosphotyrosine) via their Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, leading to downstream signaling to distinct immune pathways. These three adaptor proteins bind to the same site on CD28 with variable affinity, and all are important for CD28-mediated co-stimulatory function. However, the mechanism of how these proteins recognize and compete for CD28 is unclear. To visualize their interactions with CD28, we have determined the crystal structures of Gads SH2 and two p85 SH2 domains in complex with a CD28-derived phosphopeptide. The high resolution structures obtained revealed that, whereas the CD28 phosphopeptide bound to Gads SH2 is in a bent conformation similar to that when bound to Grb2 SH2, it adopts a more extended conformation when bound to the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of p85. These differences observed in the peptide-protein interactions correlated well with the affinity and other thermodynamic parameters for each interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The detailed insight into these interactions reported here may inform the development of compounds that specifically inhibit the association of CD28 with these adaptor proteins to suppress excessive T cell responses, such as in allergies and autoimmune diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Small Scaffolds, Big Potential: Developing Miniature Proteins as Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Justin M

    2017-09-01

    Preclinical Research Miniature proteins are a class of oligopeptide characterized by their short sequence lengths and ability to adopt well-folded, three-dimensional structures. Because of their biomimetic nature and synthetic tractability, miniature proteins have been used to study a range of biochemical processes including fast protein folding, signal transduction, catalysis and molecular transport. Recently, miniature proteins have been gaining traction as potential therapeutic agents because their small size and ability to fold into defined tertiary structures facilitates their development as protein-based drugs. This research overview discusses emerging developments involving the use of miniature proteins as scaffolds to design novel therapeutics for the treatment and study of human disease. Specifically, this review will explore strategies to: (i) stabilize miniature protein tertiary structure; (ii) optimize biomolecular recognition by grafting functional epitopes onto miniature protein scaffolds; and (iii) enhance cytosolic delivery of miniature proteins through the use of cationic motifs that facilitate endosomal escape. These objectives are discussed not only to address challenges in developing effective miniature protein-based drugs, but also to highlight the tremendous potential miniature proteins hold for combating and understanding human disease. Drug Dev Res 78 : 268-282, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Purification, crystallization and X-ray characterization of a Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor protein from the seeds of chickpea (Cicer arietinum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Urvashi; Suresh, C. G.

    2011-01-01

    The purification, characterization and crystallization of a trypsin inhibitor protein isolated from chickpea seeds are reported. A Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor protein (CPTI) purified from chickpea seeds was estimated to have a molecular mass of 18 kDa on SDS–PAGE. The IC 50 value of CPTI was determined to be 2.5 µg against trypsin. The inhibitory activity of CPTI is 114 TIU (trypsin inhibitory units) per milligram of protein, which is high compared with those of other known Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitors from legumes. CPTI crystallized in three different orthorhombic crystal forms: P2 1 2 1 2 form A, P2 1 2 1 2 form B and P2 1 2 1 2 1 . The crystals of P2 1 2 1 2 form A, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 41.2, c = 104.6 Å, diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution at the home source and to 1.4 Å on beamline BM14 at the ESRF. Data were also collected from crystals grown in the presence of iodine. The Matthews coefficient for these crystals was calculated to be 2.37 Å 3 Da −1 , corresponding to a solvent content of 42%. The other two crystal forms (P2 1 2 1 2 form B and P2 1 2 1 2 1 ) diffracted comparatively poorly

  18. Useable diffraction data from a multiple microdomain-containing crystal of Ascaris suum As-p18 fatty-acid-binding protein using a microfocus beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Griffiths, Kate; Roe, Andrew J.; Cooper, Alan; Smith, Brian O.; Córsico, Betina; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2012-01-01

    As-p18, an unusual fatty-acid-binding protein from a parasitic nematode, was expressed in bacteria, purified and crystallized. The use of a microfocus beamline was essential for data collection. As-p18 is a fatty-acid-binding protein from the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. Although it exhibits sequence similarity to mammalian intracellular fatty-acid-binding proteins, it contains features that are unique to nematodes. Crystals were obtained, but initial diffraction data analysis revealed that they were composed of a number of ‘microdomains’. Interpretable data could only be collected using a microfocus beamline with a beam size of 12 × 8 µm

  19. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the C-terminal domain of outer membrane protein A from enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Jiang; Ji, Xiaowei; Qi, Jianxun; Ma, Ying; Mao, Xuhu; Zou, Quanming

    2010-01-01

    In this study, recombinant OmpAC from EHEC was purified and crystallized and a diffraction data set was collected to 2.7 Å resolution. Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) plays multiple roles in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis, such as mediation of bacterial conjunction, maintenance of cell shape, induction of adhesion of EHEC to host cells etc. Better understanding of the functions of OmpA will help in the control of EHEC infections. OmpA is composed of two domains: the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain is a β-barrel structure and embeds in the outer membrane of the bacterium. The structure and function of the C-terminal domain of OmpA (OmpAC) remain elusive. In this study, recombinant OmpAC from EHEC was purified and crystallized and a diffraction data set was collected to 2.7 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to space group I4 1 32, with unit-cell parameter a = 158.99 Å. The Matthews coefficient and solvent content were calculated to be 2.55 Å 3 Da −1 and 51.77%, respectively, for two molecules in the asymmetric unit

  20. CLONING, EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION AND CRYSTALLIZATION OF A NOVEL GLCNAC METABOLIC PROTEIN, GIG2 (DUF1479 FROM PATHOGENIC FUNGUS CANDIDA ALBICANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Rani1

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc, an alternative sugar, is emerging as an important molecule having a multifarious role in Candida albicans including a major role in signaling. GlcNAc Inducible Gene 2, GIG2 is one of the highly upregulated genes in GlcNAc grown cells in C. albicans. Our earlier studies show the involvement of Gig2 in the formation of N-acetylneuraminic (NANA acid from GlcNAc-6-phosphate through an understudied route. The crystal structure of Gig2 would help us in determining the exact reaction that this enzyme catalyzes. Here the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported along with preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis at 2.4Å resolution. The crystal belonged to P21 space group, with unit cell parameters a=59.59, b= 54.43, c= 73.29Å; α = 90°, β = 102.7° and γ = 90°. The structure was solved using PDB ID 2CSG as a template which has only 27% identity. Molecular replacement yielded a solution with LLG score of 87. The structure is currently under further refinement

  1. The crystal structure of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 in the apo form: when protein post-translational modifications make the difference.

    KAUST Repository

    Fiorillo, Annarita

    2014-03-21

    The 14-3-3s are a family of dimeric evolutionary conserved pSer/pThr binding proteins that play a key role in multiple biological processes by interacting with a plethora of client proteins. Giardia duodenalis is a flagellated protozoan that affects millions of people worldwide causing an acute and chronic diarrheal disease. The single giardial 14-3-3 isoform (g14-3-3), unique in the 14-3-3 family, needs the constitutive phosphorylation of Thr214 and the polyglycylation of its C-terminus to be fully functional in vivo. Alteration of the phosphorylation and polyglycylation status affects the parasite differentiation into the cyst stage. To further investigate the role of these post-translational modifications, the crystal structure of the g14-3-3 was solved in the unmodified apo form. Oligomers of g14-3-3 were observed due to domain swapping events at the protein C-terminus. The formation of filaments was supported by TEM. Mutational analysis, in combination with native PAGE and chemical cross-linking, proved that polyglycylation prevents oligomerization. In silico phosphorylation and molecular dynamics simulations supported a structural role for the phosphorylation of Thr214 in promoting target binding. Our findings highlight unique structural features of g14-3-3 opening novel perspectives on the evolutionary history of this protein family and envisaging the possibility to develop anti-giardial drugs targeting g14-3-3.

  2. The crystal structure of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 in the apo form: when protein post-translational modifications make the difference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita Fiorillo

    Full Text Available The 14-3-3s are a family of dimeric evolutionary conserved pSer/pThr binding proteins that play a key role in multiple biological processes by interacting with a plethora of client proteins. Giardia duodenalis is a flagellated protozoan that affects millions of people worldwide causing an acute and chronic diarrheal disease. The single giardial 14-3-3 isoform (g14-3-3, unique in the 14-3-3 family, needs the constitutive phosphorylation of Thr214 and the polyglycylation of its C-terminus to be fully functional in vivo. Alteration of the phosphorylation and polyglycylation status affects the parasite differentiation into the cyst stage. To further investigate the role of these post-translational modifications, the crystal structure of the g14-3-3 was solved in the unmodified apo form. Oligomers of g14-3-3 were observed due to domain swapping events at the protein C-terminus. The formation of filaments was supported by TEM. Mutational analysis, in combination with native PAGE and chemical cross-linking, proved that polyglycylation prevents oligomerization. In silico phosphorylation and molecular dynamics simulations supported a structural role for the phosphorylation of Thr214 in promoting target binding. Our findings highlight unique structural features of g14-3-3 opening novel perspectives on the evolutionary history of this protein family and envisaging the possibility to develop anti-giardial drugs targeting g14-3-3.

  3. The crystal structure of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 in the apo form: when protein post-translational modifications make the difference.

    KAUST Repository

    Fiorillo, Annarita; di Marino, Daniele; Bertuccini, Lucia; Via, Allegra; Pozio, Edoardo; Camerini, Serena; Ilari, Andrea; Lalle, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The 14-3-3s are a family of dimeric evolutionary conserved pSer/pThr binding proteins that play a key role in multiple biological processes by interacting with a plethora of client proteins. Giardia duodenalis is a flagellated protozoan that affects millions of people worldwide causing an acute and chronic diarrheal disease. The single giardial 14-3-3 isoform (g14-3-3), unique in the 14-3-3 family, needs the constitutive phosphorylation of Thr214 and the polyglycylation of its C-terminus to be fully functional in vivo. Alteration of the phosphorylation and polyglycylation status affects the parasite differentiation into the cyst stage. To further investigate the role of these post-translational modifications, the crystal structure of the g14-3-3 was solved in the unmodified apo form. Oligomers of g14-3-3 were observed due to domain swapping events at the protein C-terminus. The formation of filaments was supported by TEM. Mutational analysis, in combination with native PAGE and chemical cross-linking, proved that polyglycylation prevents oligomerization. In silico phosphorylation and molecular dynamics simulations supported a structural role for the phosphorylation of Thr214 in promoting target binding. Our findings highlight unique structural features of g14-3-3 opening novel perspectives on the evolutionary history of this protein family and envisaging the possibility to develop anti-giardial drugs targeting g14-3-3.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of NP24-I, an isoform of a thaumatin-like protein from ripe tomato fruits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Raka; Chakrabarti, Chandana, E-mail: chandana.chakrabarti@saha.ac.in [Crystallography and Molecular Biology Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2005-08-01

    A thaumatin-like antifungal protein, NP24-I, has been isolated from ripe tomato fruits. It was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method and data were collected to 2.45 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. NP24 is a 24 kDa (207-amino-acid) antifungal thaumatin-like protein (TLP) found in tomato fruits. An isoform of the protein, NP24-I, is reported to play a possible role in ripening of the fruit in addition to its antifungal properties. The protein has been isolated and purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.01, c = 62.90 Å and one molecule per asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data were processed to a resolution of 2.45 Å and the structure was solved by molecular replacement.

  5. Two crystal forms of a helix-rich fatty acid- and retinol-binding protein, Na-FAR-1, from the parasitic nematode Necator americanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Rey-Burusco, M. Florencia; Griffiths, Kate; Roe, Andrew J.; Cooper, Alan; Smith, Brian O.; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Corsico, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Na-FAR-1, a fatty acid- and retinol-binding protein, was expressed in bacteria, purified and crystallized. Crystals grew in two different morphologies under the same conditions. Na-FAR-1 is an unusual α-helix-rich fatty acid- and retinol-binding protein from Necator americanus, a blood-feeding intestinal parasitic nematode of humans. It belongs to the FAR protein family, which is unique to nematodes; no structural information is available to date for FAR proteins from parasites. Crystals were obtained with two different morphologies that corresponded to different space groups. Crystal form 1 exhibited space group P432 (unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 120.80 Å, α = β = γ = 90°) and diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution, whereas crystal form 2 exhibited space group F23 (unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 240.38 Å, α = β = γ = 90°) and diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. Crystal form 2 showed signs of significant twinning

  6. Virtual Crystallizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  7. Human recombinant cementum attachment protein (hrPTPLa/CAP) promotes hydroxyapatite crystal formation in vitro and bone healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Gonzalo; Arenas, Jesús; Romo, Enrique; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Alvarez, Marco; Narayanan, A Sampath; Velázquez, Ulises; Mercado, Gabriela; Arzate, Higinio

    2014-12-01

    Cementum extracellular matrix is similar to other mineralized tissues; however, this unique tissue contains molecules only present in cementum. A cDNA of these molecules, cementum attachment protein (hrPTPLa/CAP) was cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. This molecule is an alternative splicing of protein tyrosine phosphatase-like A (PTPLa). In this study, we wanted to determine the structural and functional characteristics of this protein. Our results indicate that hrPTPLa/CAP contains a 43.2% α-helix, 8.9% β-sheet, 2% β-turn and 45.9% random coil secondary structure. Dynamic light scattering shows that this molecule has a size distribution of 4.8 nm and aggregates as an estimated mass of 137 kDa species. AFM characterization and FE-SEM studies indicate that this protein self-assembles into nanospheres with sizes ranging from 7.0 to 27 nm in diameter. Functional studies demonstrate that hrPTPLa/CAP promotes hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation: EDS analysis revealed that hrPTPLa/CAP-induced crystals had a 1.59 ± 0.06 Ca/P ratio. Further confirmation with MicroRaman spectrometry and TEM confirm the presence of hydroxyapatite. In vivo studies using critical-size defects in rat cranium showed that hrPTPLa/CAP promoted 73% ± 2.19% and 87% ± 1.97% new bone formation at 4 and 8 weeks respectively. Although originally identified in cementum, PTPLa/CAP is very effective at inducing bone repair and healing and therefore this novel molecule has a great potential to be used for mineralized tissue bioengineering and tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative sequence and structural analyses of G-protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and implications for molecular models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Worth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Up until recently the only available experimental (high resolution structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR was that of bovine rhodopsin. In the past few years the determination of GPCR structures has accelerated with three new receptors, as well as squid rhodopsin, being successfully crystallized. All share a common molecular architecture of seven transmembrane helices and can therefore serve as templates for building molecular models of homologous GPCRs. However, despite the common general architecture of these structures key differences do exist between them. The choice of which experimental GPCR structure(s to use for building a comparative model of a particular GPCR is unclear and without detailed structural and sequence analyses, could be arbitrary. The aim of this study is therefore to perform a systematic and detailed analysis of sequence-structure relationships of known GPCR structures. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed in detail conserved and unique sequence motifs and structural features in experimentally-determined GPCR structures. Deeper insight into specific and important structural features of GPCRs as well as valuable information for template selection has been gained. Using key features a workflow has been formulated for identifying the most appropriate template(s for building homology models of GPCRs of unknown structure. This workflow was applied to a set of 14 human family A GPCRs suggesting for each the most appropriate template(s for building a comparative molecular model. CONCLUSIONS: The available crystal structures represent only a subset of all possible structural variation in family A GPCRs. Some GPCRs have structural features that are distributed over different crystal structures or which are not present in the templates suggesting that homology models should be built using multiple templates. This study provides a systematic analysis of GPCR crystal structures and a consistent method for identifying

  9. Comparative sequence and structural analyses of G-protein-coupled receptor crystal structures and implications for molecular models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Catherine L; Kleinau, Gunnar; Krause, Gerd

    2009-09-16

    Up until recently the only available experimental (high resolution) structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) was that of bovine rhodopsin. In the past few years the determination of GPCR structures has accelerated with three new receptors, as well as squid rhodopsin, being successfully crystallized. All share a common molecular architecture of seven transmembrane helices and can therefore serve as templates for building molecular models of homologous GPCRs. However, despite the common general architecture of these structures key differences do exist between them. The choice of which experimental GPCR structure(s) to use for building a comparative model of a particular GPCR is unclear and without detailed structural and sequence analyses, could be arbitrary. The aim of this study is therefore to perform a systematic and detailed analysis of sequence-structure relationships of known GPCR structures. We analyzed in detail conserved and unique sequence motifs and structural features in experimentally-determined GPCR structures. Deeper insight into specific and important structural features of GPCRs as well as valuable information for template selection has been gained. Using key features a workflow has been formulated for identifying the most appropriate template(s) for building homology models of GPCRs of unknown structure. This workflow was applied to a set of 14 human family A GPCRs suggesting for each the most appropriate template(s) for building a comparative molecular model. The available crystal structures represent only a subset of all possible structural variation in family A GPCRs. Some GPCRs have structural features that are distributed over different crystal structures or which are not present in the templates suggesting that homology models should be built using multiple templates. This study provides a systematic analysis of GPCR crystal structures and a consistent method for identifying suitable templates for GPCR homology modelling that will

  10. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein clusters assembled on to damaged DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miggiano, Riccardo; Perugino, Giuseppe; Ciaramella, Maria; Serpe, Mario; Rejman, Dominik; Páv, Ondřej; Pohl, Radek; Garavaglia, Silvia; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rizzi, Menico; Rossi, Franca

    2016-01-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MtOGT) contributes to protect the bacterial GC-rich genome against the pro-mutagenic potential of O(6)-methylated guanine in DNA. Several strains of M. tuberculosis found worldwide encode a point-mutated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (OGT) variant (MtOGT-R37L), which displays an arginine-to-leucine substitution at position 37 of the poorly functionally characterized N-terminal domain of the protein. Although the impact of this mutation on the MtOGT activity has not yet been proved in vivo, we previously demonstrated that a recombinant MtOGT-R37L variant performs a suboptimal alkylated-DNA repair in vitro, suggesting a direct role for the Arg(37)-bearing region in catalysis. The crystal structure of MtOGT complexed with modified DNA solved in the present study reveals details of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions occurring during alkylated-DNA binding, and the protein capability also to host unmodified bases inside the active site, in a fully extrahelical conformation. Our data provide the first experimental picture at the atomic level of a possible mode of assembling three adjacent MtOGT monomers on the same monoalkylated dsDNA molecule, and disclose the conformational flexibility of discrete regions of MtOGT, including the Arg(37)-bearing random coil. This peculiar structural plasticity of MtOGT could be instrumental to proper protein clustering at damaged DNA sites, as well as to protein-DNA complexes disassembling on repair. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  11. Maltose-neopentyl glycol (MNG) amphiphiles for solubilization, stabilization and crystallization of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Rana, Rohini; Gotfryd, Kamil; Chandra, Richa; Goren, Michael A.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Nurva, Shailika; Loland, Claus J.; Pierre, Yves; Drew, David; Popot, Jean-Luc; Picot, Daniel; Fox, Brian G.; Guan, Lan

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of integral membrane protein (IMP) structure and function is hampered by the difficulty of handling these proteins. Aqueous solubilization, necessary for many types of biophysical analysis, generally requires a detergent to shield the large lipophilic surfaces displayed by native IMPs. Many proteins remain difficult to study owing to a lack of suitable detergents. We introduce a class of amphiphiles, each of which is built around a central quaternary carbon atom derived from...

  12. in silico identification of cross affinity towards Cry1Ac pesticidal protein with receptor enzyme in Bos taurus and sequence, structure analysis of crystal proteins for stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, King Solomon; Nachimuthu, Ramesh; Thiagarajan, Prabha; Velu, Rajesh Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Any novel protein introduced into the GM crops need to be evaluated for cross affinity on living organisms. Many researchers are currently focusing on the impact of Bacillus thuringiensis cotton on soil and microbial diversity by field experiments. In spite of this, in silico approach might be helpful to elucidate the impact of cry genes. The crystal a protein which was produced by Bt at the time of sporulation has been used as a biological pesticide to target the insectivorous pests like Cry1Ac for Helicoverpa armigera and Cry2Ab for Spodoptera sp. and Heliothis sp. Here, we present the comprehensive in silico analysis of Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab proteins with available in silico tools, databases and docking servers. Molecular docking of Cry1Ac with procarboxypeptidase from Helicoverpa armigera and Cry1Ac with Leucine aminopeptidase from Bos taurus has showed the 125(th) amino acid position to be the preference site of Cry1Ac protein. The structures were compared with each other and it showed 5% of similarity. The cross affinity of this toxin that have confirmed the earlier reports of ill effects of Bt cotton consumed by cattle.

  13. Common structural features of cholesterol binding sites in crystallized soluble proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alejandro M

    2017-06-01

    Cholesterol-protein interactions are essential for the architectural organization of cell membranes and for lipid metabolism. While cholesterol-sensing motifs in transmembrane proteins have been identified, little is known about cholesterol recognition by soluble proteins. We reviewed the structural characteristics of binding sites for cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate from crystallographic structures available in the Protein Data Bank. This analysis unveiled key features of cholesterol-binding sites that are present in either all or the majority of sites: i ) the cholesterol molecule is generally positioned between protein domains that have an organized secondary structure; ii ) the cholesterol hydroxyl/sulfo group is often partnered by Asn, Gln, and/or Tyr, while the hydrophobic part of cholesterol interacts with Leu, Ile, Val, and/or Phe; iii ) cholesterol hydrogen-bonding partners are often found on α-helices, while amino acids that interact with cholesterol's hydrophobic core have a slight preference for β-strands and secondary structure-lacking protein areas; iv ) the steroid's C21 and C26 constitute the "hot spots" most often seen for steroid-protein hydrophobic interactions; v ) common "cold spots" are C8-C10, C13, and C17, at which contacts with the proteins were not detected. Several common features we identified for soluble protein-steroid interaction appear evolutionarily conserved. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Generation of mariner-based transposon insertion mutant library of Bacillus sphaericus 2297 and investigation of genes involved in sporulation and mosquito-larvicidal crystal protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiming; Hu, Xiaomin; Ge, Yong; Zheng, Dasheng; Yuan, Zhiming

    2012-05-01

    Bacillus sphaericus has been used with great success in mosquito control programs worldwide. Under conditions of nutrient limitation, it undergoes sporulation via a series of well defined morphological stages. However, only a small number of genes involved in sporulation have been identified. To identify genes associated with sporulation, and to understand the relationship between sporulation and crystal protein synthesis, a random mariner-based transposon insertion mutant library of B. sphaericus strain 2297 was constructed and seven sporulation-defective mutants were selected. Sequencing of the DNA flanking of the transposon insertion identified several genes involved in sporulation. The morphologies of mutants were determined by electron microscopy and synthesis of crystal proteins was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Four mutants blocked at early stages of sporulation failed to produce crystal proteins and had lower larvicidal activity. However, the other three mutants were blocked at later stages and were able to form crystal proteins, and the larvicidal activity was similar to wild type. These results indicated that crystal protein synthesis in B. sphaericus is dependent on sporulation initiation. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recent developments in crystal calorimeters (featuring the CMS PbWO4 electromagnetic calorimeter)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascon-Shotkin, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the mass range of 110-150 GeV the favored process for Higgs boson detection via p-p collisions is via its decay into two photons, which demands a very high-resolution electromagnetic calorimeter. This physics goal plus the Large Hadron Calorimeter (LHC)-imposed design constraints of 25ns bunch spacing and a hostile radiation environment have led the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration to the choice of lead tungstate (PbWO 4 ) crystals. These factors plus the presence of a 4T magnetic field and the relatively low room-temperature scintillation photon yield of PbWO 4 make photo detection a real challenge, which CMS has met via the choice of devices providing gain amplification: Avalanche photodiodes (APD) in the central barrel region and vacuum phototriodes (VPT) in the forward and backward endcap regions. In the past year the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter has entered the construction phase. We review progress in the areas of crystals, barrel and endcap photo detection devices, plans for detector calibration as well as the status of assembly and quality control. We also invoke relevant developments in other crystal calorimeters currently in operation or under development. Crystal calorimeters remain the medium of choice for precision energy and position measurements in high energy physics

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the human RuvB-like protein RuvBL1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorynia, Sabine; Matias, Pedro M.; Gonçalves, Susana; Coelho, Ricardo; Lopes, Gonçalo; Thomaz, Mónica; Huber, Martina; Haendler, Bernard; Donner, Peter; Carrondo, Maria Arménia

    2005-01-01

    Human RuvB-like protein RuvBL1 plays important roles in essential signaling pathways like c-Myc and Wnt, in transcription, and in DNA repair and apoptosis. Crystals of both native and a Se-Met derivative were obtained and characterized. SAD data leading to the structure solution at 2.2 Å were measured from the Se-Met crystals. RuvBL1, an evolutionary highly conserved protein related to the AAA + family of ATPases, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 293 K. The crystals are hexagonal and belong to space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 207.1, c = 60.7 Å and three molecules in the asymmetric unit

  17. The crystal structure of a multifunctional protein: Phosphoglucose isomerase/autocrine motility factor/neuroleukin

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Wei-Shone; Wu, Rong-Tsun; Meng, Menghsiao; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) plays a central role in both the glycolysis and the gluconeogenesis pathways. We present here the complete crystal structure of PGI from Bacillus stearothermophilus at 2.3-Å resolution. We show that PGI has cell-motility-stimulating activity on mouse colon cancer cells similar to that of endogenous autocrine motility factor (AMF). PGI can also enhance neurite outgrowth on neuronal progenitor cells similar to that observed for neuroleukin. The results confirm tha...

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of human FAIM protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guoming; Qu, Linglong; Meng, Geng; Bai, Xiaoyun; Dai, Kesheng; Zheng, Xiaofeng

    2010-01-01

    Full-length human Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM) and two truncation constructs have successfully been cloned, expressed and purified in Escherichia coli. FAIM (1–90) was crystallized and diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å. Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule (FAIM), an antagonist of Fas-induced cell death, is highly conserved and is broadly expressed in many tissues. It has been found that FAIM can stimulate neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and primary neurons. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of FAIM are not understood in detail. Here, full-length human FAIM and two truncation constructs have successfully been cloned, expressed and purified in Escherichia coli. FAIM (1–90) was crystallized and diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å; the crystal belonged to space group P3 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 58.02, c = 71.11 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. There were two molecules in the asymmetric unit

  19. Crystal Structure of the Mammalian GIRK2 K+ Channel and Gating Regulation by G-Proteins, PIP2 and Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Matthew R.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2011-01-01

    Summary G-protein-gated K+ channels (Kir3.1–Kir3.4) control electrical excitability in many different cells. Among their functions relevant to human physiology and disease, they regulate the heart rate and govern a wide range of neuronal activities. Here we present the first crystal structures of a G-protein-gated K+ channel. By comparing the wild-type structure to that of a constitutively active mutant, we identify a global conformational change through which G-proteins could open a G-loop gate in the cytoplasmic domain. The structures of both channels in the absence and presence of PIP2 show that G-proteins open only the G-loop gate in the absence of PIP2, but in the presence of PIP2 the G-loop gate and a second inner helix gate become coupled, so that both gates open. We also identify a strategically located Na+ ion-binding site, which would allow intracellular Na+ to modulate GIRK channel activity. These data provide a mechanistic description of multi-ligand regulation of GIRK channel gating. PMID:21962516

  20. The crystal structure of the Dachshund domain of human SnoN reveals flexibility in the putative protein interaction surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Nyman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human SnoN is an oncoprotein that interacts with several transcription-regulatory proteins such as the histone-deacetylase, N-CoR containing co-repressor complex and Smad proteins. This study presents the crystal structure of the Dachshund homology domain of human SnoN. The structure reveals a groove composed of conserved residues with characteristic properties of a protein-interaction surface. A comparison of the 12 monomers in the asymmetric unit reveals the presence of two major conformations: an open conformation with a well accessible groove and a tight conformation with a less accessible groove. The variability in the backbone between the open and the tight conformations matches the differences seen in previously determined structures of individual Dachshund homology domains, suggesting a general plasticity within this fold family. The flexibility observed in the putative protein binding groove may enable SnoN to recognize multiple interaction partners.This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1.

  1. An Overview of the Top Ten Detergents Used for Membrane Protein Crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stetsenko, Artem; Guskov, Albert

    2017-01-01

    To study integral membrane proteins, one has to extract them from the membrane—the step that is typically achieved by the application of detergents. In this mini-review, we summarize the top 10 detergents used for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on the published results. The aim

  2. Protein adsorption on nanoparticles: model development using computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Qing; Hall, Carol K

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticles results in the formation of the protein corona, the composition of which determines how nanoparticles influence their biological surroundings. We seek to better understand corona formation by developing models that describe protein adsorption on nanoparticles using computer simulation results as data. Using a coarse-grained protein model, discontinuous molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the adsorption of two small proteins (Trp-cage and WW domain) on a model nanoparticle of diameter 10.0 nm at protein concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 5 mM. The resulting adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Kiselev models, but not by the Elovich, Fowler–Guggenheim and Hill–de Boer models. We also try to develop a generalized model that can describe protein adsorption equilibrium on nanoparticles of different diameters in terms of dimensionless size parameters. The simulation results for three proteins (Trp-cage, WW domain, and GB3) on four nanoparticles (diameter  =  5.0, 10.0, 15.0, and 20.0 nm) illustrate both the promise and the challenge associated with developing generalized models of protein adsorption on nanoparticles. (paper)

  3. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  4. Development of a CE-QUAL-W2 temperature model for Crystal Springs Lake, Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccola, Norman L.; Stonewall, Adam J.

    2016-05-19

    During summer 2014, lake level, streamflow, and water temperature in and around Crystal Springs Lake in Portland, Oregon, were measured by the U.S. Geological Survey and the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental Services to better understand the effect of the lake on Crystal Springs Creek and Johnson Creek downstream. Johnson Creek is listed as an impaired water body for temperature by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ), as required by section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act. A temperature total maximum daily load applies to all streams in the Johnson Creek watershed, including Crystal Springs Creek. Summer water temperatures downstream of Crystal Springs Lake and the Golf Pond regularly exceed the ODEQ numeric criterion of 64.4 °F (18.0 °C) for salmonid rearing and migration. To better understand temperature contributions of this system, the U.S. Geological Survey developed two-dimensional hydrodynamic water temperature models of Crystal Springs Lake and the Golf Pond. Model grids were developed to closely resemble the bathymetry of the lake and pond using data from a 2014 survey. The calibrated models simulated surface water elevations to within 0.06 foot (0.02 meter) and outflow water temperature to within 1.08 °F (0.60 °C). Streamflow, water temperature, and lake elevation data collected during summer 2014 supplied the boundary and reference conditions for the model. Measured discrepancies between outflow and inflow from the lake, assumed to be mostly from unknown and diffuse springs under the lake, accounted for about 46 percent of the total inflow to the lake.

  5. Chemical conversion of cisplatin and carboplatin with histidine in a model protein crystallized under sodium iodide conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    Crystals of HEWL with cisplatin and HEWL with carboplatin grown in sodium iodide conditions both show a partial chemical transformation of cisplatin or carboplatin to a transiodoplatin (PtI{sub 2}X{sub 2}) form. The binding is only at the N{sup δ} atom of His15. A further Pt species (PtI{sub 3}X) is also seen, in both cases bound in a crevice between symmetry-related protein molecules. Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum anticancer agents that are used to treat a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine in hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) showed a partial chemical conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high sodium chloride concentration used in the crystallization conditions. Also, the co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin in sodium bromide conditions resulted in the partial conversion of carboplatin to the transbromoplatin form, with a portion of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate (CBDC) moiety still present. The results of the co-crystallization of HEWL with cisplatin or carboplatin in sodium iodide conditions are now reported in order to determine whether the cisplatin and carboplatin converted to the iodo form, and whether this took place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin in NaCl conditions or to transbromoplatin in NaBr conditions as seen previously. It is reported here that a partial chemical transformation has taken place to a transplatin form for both ligands. The NaI-grown crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The chemically transformed cisplatin and carboplatin bind to both His15 residues, i.e. in each asymmetric unit. The binding is only at the N{sup δ} atom of His15. A third platinum species is also seen in both conditions bound in a crevice between symmetry-related molecules. Here, the platinum is bound to three I atoms identified based on their anomalous difference electron densities

  6. Crystallization, data collection and data processing of maltose-binding protein (MalE) from the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, C. S.; Ferreira, L. C. S.; Thomas, L.; Barbosa, J. A. R. G.; Balan, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri maltose-binding protein MalE has been crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Maltose-binding protein is the periplasmic component of the ABC transporter responsible for the uptake of maltose/maltodextrins. The Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri maltose-binding protein MalE has been crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belonged to the primitive hexagonal space group P6 1 22, with unit-cell parameters a = 123.59, b = 123.59, c = 304.20 Å, and contained two molecules in the asymetric unit. It diffracted to 2.24 Å resolution

  7. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from Francisella tularensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subburaman, Priadarsini; Austin, Brian P.; Shaw, Gary X.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2010-01-01

    The macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from F. tularensis crystallized in the hexagonal space group P6 1 or P6 5 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125, c = 54 Å. Francisella tularensis, a potential bioweapon, causes a rare infectious disease called tularemia in humans and animals. The macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from F. tularensis associates with RNA polymerase to positively regulate the expression of multiple virulence factors that are required for its survival and replication within macrophages. The MglA protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 7.5 Å resolution at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6 1 or P6 5 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125, c = 54 Å

  8. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of two intestinal fatty-acid binding proteins in the presence of 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguerre, Aisha; Wielens, Jerome; Parker, Michael W.; Porter, Christopher J. H.; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid binding proteins from human and rat have been crystallized in complex with the fluorescent probe 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid. Diffraction data for the crystals were collected to 1.8 Å resolution (human) and 1.6 Å resolution (rat). Fatty-acid binding proteins (FABPs) are abundantly expressed proteins that bind a range of lipophilic molecules. They have been implicated in the import and intracellular distribution of their ligands and have been linked with metabolic and inflammatory responses in the cells in which they are expressed. Despite their high sequence identity, human intestinal FABP (hIFABP) and rat intestinal FABP (rIFABP) bind some ligands with different affinities. In order to address the structural basis of this differential binding, diffraction-quality crystals have been obtained of hIFABP and rIFABP in complex with the fluorescent fatty-acid analogue 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid

  9. Simulation of modulated protein crystal structure and diffraction data in a supercell and in superspace

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lovelace, J.J.; Simone, P.D.; Petříček, Václav; Borgstahl, G.E.O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, Part 6 (2013), 1062-1072 ISSN 0907-4449 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : protein crystallograhy * superspace approach * incommensurately modulated structures Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.232, year: 2013

  10. Protein resources and aquafeed development in the Sultanate of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Goddard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continued growth of intensive aquaculture is dependent on the development of sustainable protein sources to replace conventional fish meals in aquafeeds. Practical alternatives are plant-derived protein, protein from micro-organisms and protein from under-utilized marine resources. The challenges are to find alternative ingredients with high protein, suitable amino acid content, high palatability and absence of anti-nutritional factors. There is considerable biotechnology-based research in this area, including genetic modification of plant-based proteins, use of probiotics to enhance digestibility and the renewed application of fermentation technologies to produce single cell proteins. Research in Oman is focused on the utilization of marine protein resources. Fisheries by-catch and processing waste have been evaluated as liquid hydrolysates and as meals for inclusion in aquafeeds and new research is planned on the utilization of meso-pelagic fish (myctophids, which occur in abundance in the Arabian Sea and the Sea of Oman. Initial studies have been conducted on the biochemical composition of the lantern fish, Benthosema pterotum, which revealed favorable protein, amino acid and long-chain PUFA content. Potential limiting factors were high levels of saturated lipids and the heavy metals arsenic and cadmium. These results will be discussed within a general review of marine resources and aquafeed development in Oman.

  11. Protein based therapeutic delivery agents: Contemporary developments and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liming; Yuvienco, Carlo; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2017-07-01

    As unique biopolymers, proteins can be employed for therapeutic delivery. They bear important features such as bioavailability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability with low toxicity serving as a platform for delivery of various small molecule therapeutics, gene therapies, protein biologics and cells. Depending on size and characteristic of the therapeutic, a variety of natural and engineered proteins or peptides have been developed. This, coupled to recent advances in synthetic and chemical biology, has led to the creation of tailor-made protein materials for delivery. This review highlights strategies employing proteins to facilitate the delivery of therapeutic matter, addressing the challenges for small molecule, gene, protein and cell transport. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Human, FIC-Domain Containing Protein HYPE and Implications for Its Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunney, Tom D.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein, HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized. Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of autoAMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition. PMID:25435325

  13. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  14. Agronomic potentials of quality protein maize hybrids developed in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agronomic potentials of quality protein maize hybrids developed in Ghana. ... Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science ... and Wheat Improvement (CIMMYT) were evaluated on research stations and in farmers\\' fields in Ghana from 1995 to 1996.

  15. Dermal quercetin smartCrystals®: Formulation development, antioxidant activity and cellular safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatahet, T; Morille, M; Hommoss, A; Dorandeu, C; Müller, R H; Bégu, S

    2016-05-01

    Flavonoids are natural plant pigments, which possess high antioxidative and antiradical activities. However, their poor water solubility led to a limited bioavailability. To overcome this major hurdle, quercetin nanocrystals were produced implementing smartCrystals® technology. This process combines bead milling and subsequent high-pressure homogenization at relatively low pressure (300bar). To test the possibility to develop a dermal formulation from quercetin smartCrystals®, quercetin nanosuspensions were admixed to Lutrol® F127 and hydroxythylcellulose nonionic gels. The physicochemical properties (morphology, size and charge), saturation solubility, dissolution velocity and the antioxidant properties (DPPH assay) as well as the cellular interaction of the produced quercetin smartCrystals® were studied and compared to crude quercetin powder. Quercetin smartCrystals® showed a strong increase in the saturation solubility and the dissolution velocity (7.6 fold). SmartCrystals® loaded or not into gels proved to be physically stable over a period of three months at 25°C. Interestingly, in vitro DPPH assay confirmed the preservation of quercetin antioxidative properties after nanonization. In parallel, the nanocrystalline form did not display cellular toxicity, even at high concentration (50μg/ml), as assayed on an epithelial cell line (VERO cells). In addition, the nanocrystalline form confirmed a protective activity for VERO cells against hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in vitro. This new formulation presents a promising approach to deliver quercetin efficiently to skin in well-tolerated formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Intracellular and Extracellular Expression of Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry5B in Lactococcus lactis for Use as an Anthelminthic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Evelyn; Hu, Yan; Aroian, Raffi V.

    2015-01-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis crystal (Cry) protein Cry5B (140 kDa) and a truncated version of the protein, tCry5B (79 kDa), are lethal to nematodes. Genes encoding the two proteins were separately cloned into a high-copy-number vector with a strong constitutive promoter (pTRK593) in Lactococcus lactis for potential oral delivery against parasitic nematode infections. Western blots using a Cry5B-specific antibody revealed that constitutively expressed Cry5B and tCry5B were present in both cells and supernatants. To increase production, cry5B was cloned into the high-copy-number plasmid pMSP3535H3, carrying a nisin-inducible promoter. Immunoblotting revealed that 3 h after nisin induction, intracellular Cry5B was strongly induced at 200 ng/ml nisin, without adversely affecting cell viability or cell membrane integrity. Both Cry5B genes were also cloned into plasmid pTRK1061, carrying a promoter and encoding a transcriptional activator that invoke low-level expression of prophage holin and lysin genes in Lactococcus lysogens, resulting in a leaky phenotype. Cry5B and tCry5B were actively expressed in the lysogenic strain L. lactis KP1 and released into cell supernatants without affecting culture growth. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays indicated that Cry5B, but not LDH, leaked from the bacteria. Lastly, using intracellular lysates from L. lactis cultures expressing both Cry5B and tCry5B, in vivo challenges of Caenorhabditis elegans worms demonstrated that the Cry proteins were biologically active. Taken together, these results indicate that active Cry5B proteins can be expressed intracellularly in and released extracellularly from L. lactis, showing potential for future use as an anthelminthic that could be delivered orally in a food-grade microbe. PMID:26682852

  17. The Development of Protein Microarrays and Their Applications in DNA-Protein and Protein-Protein Interaction Analyses of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; He, Kun; Covington, Mike; Dinesh-Kumar, S. P.; Snyder, Michael; Harmer, Stacey L.; Zhu, Yu-Xian; Deng, Xing Wang

    2009-01-01

    We used our collection of Arabidopsis transcription factor (TF) ORFeome clones to construct protein microarrays containing as many as 802 TF proteins. These protein microarrays were used for both protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction analyses. For protein-DNA interaction studies, we examined AP2/ERF family TFs and their cognate cis-elements. By careful comparison of the DNA-binding specificity of 13 TFs on the protein microarray with previous non-microarray data, we showed that protein microarrays provide an efficient and high throughput tool for genome-wide analysis of TF-DNA interactions. This microarray protein-DNA interaction analysis allowed us to derive a comprehensive view of DNA-binding profiles of AP2/ERF family proteins in Arabidopsis. It also revealed four TFs that bound the EE (evening element) and had the expected phased gene expression under clock-regulation, thus providing a basis for further functional analysis of their roles in clock regulation of gene expression. We also developed procedures for detecting protein interactions using this TF protein microarray and discovered four novel partners that interact with HY5, which can be validated by yeast two-hybrid assays. Thus, plant TF protein microarrays offer an attractive high-throughput alternative to traditional techniques for TF functional characterization on a global scale. PMID:19802365

  18. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Sven O; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E

    2013-02-01

    Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome.

  19. Phosphate-binding protein from Polaromonas JS666: purification, characterization, crystallization and sulfur SAD phasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Hey, Louis; LaMirande, Jacob; Pfeffer, Rachel; Lipsh, Rosalie; Amitay, Moshe; Gonzalez, Daniel; Elias, Mikael (JCT-Israel); (UMM); (CNRS-UMR)

    2017-05-25

    Phosphate-binding proteins (PBPs) are key proteins that belong to the bacterial ABC-type phosphate transporters. PBPs are periplasmic (or membrane-anchored) proteins that capture phosphate anions from the environment and release them to the transmembrane transporter. Recent work has suggested that PBPs have evolved for high affinity as well as high selectivity. In particular, a short, unique hydrogen bond between the phosphate anion and an aspartate residue has been shown to be critical for selectivity, yet is not strictly conserved in PBPs. Here, the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is focused on. Interestingly, this PBP is predicted to harbor different phosphate-binding residues to currently known PBPs. Here, it is shown that the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is capable of binding phosphate, with a maximal binding activity at pH 8. Its structure is expected to reveal its binding-cleft configuration as well as its phosphate-binding mode. Here, the expression, purification, characterization, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data collection to 1.35 Å resolution of the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 are reported.

  20. Crystal Structures of SlyA Protein, a Master Virulence Regulator of Salmonella, in Free and DNA-bound States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Kyle T.; Duguid, Erica M.; He, Chuan (UC)

    2011-11-17

    SlyA is a master virulence regulator that controls the transcription of numerous genes in Salmonella enterica. We present here crystal structures of SlyA by itself and bound to a high-affinity DNA operator sequence in the slyA gene. SlyA interacts with DNA through direct recognition of a guanine base by Arg-65, as well as interactions between conserved Arg-86 and the minor groove and a large network of non-base-specific contacts with the sugar phosphate backbone. Our structures, together with an unpublished structure of SlyA bound to the small molecule effector salicylate (Protein Data Bank code 3DEU), reveal that, unlike many other MarR family proteins, SlyA dissociates from DNA without large conformational changes when bound to this effector. We propose that SlyA and other MarR global regulators rely more on indirect readout of DNA sequence to exert control over many genes, in contrast to proteins (such as OhrR) that recognize a single operator.

  1. Yb3+:Sr5(VO4)3F: Crystal growth, spectroscopic characterization and laser development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante, Andrea Nora Pino

    1999-01-01

    Crystal growth, spectroscopic characterization and laser development of Yb 3+ :SVAP [Sr 5 (VO 4 ) 3 F] was performed to demonstrate for the first time, operation of tunable laser emission centered at 1120 nm. Initially, SVAP crystals were grown with high dopant concentrations, up to 6.0 mol % of Yb 2 O 3 in the melt, in order to investigate the material for potential laser operation at a new laser wavelength. Additional research was performed to alleviate highly doped SVAP crystals of defects previously observed. Basic spectroscopic characterization including absorption and luminescent properties were measured to better understand the behavior of Yb 3+ ions in SVAP. Based upon these studies, discussion of the 1120 nm laser transition is presented as it arises from a ground state vibrational level. Investigations of the charge compensation process and the optical parameters as a function of dopant concentration are also presented. The laser development of Yb 3+ :SVAP included continuous and pulsed modes of operation of the 1044 nm and 1120 nm transitions. Initial laser action of the 1044 nm transition was achieved using a Yi: Saphire laser pump source in order to compare with previously results. Further development of a diode-pumped Yb 3+ :SVAP laser system demonstrated continuously tunable laser operation from 1103 nm for the first time. The laser investigations also proved that this high gain media does provide continuous wave laser action at 1044 nm and 1120 simultaneously without significant gain depletion. (author)

  2. Modular design of synthetic protein mimics. Characterization of the helical conformation of a 13-residue peptide in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karle, I.L.; Flippen-Anderson, J.L.; Uma, K.; Balaram, P.

    1989-01-01

    The incorporation of α-aminoisobutyryl (Aib) residues into peptide sequences facilitates helical folding. Aib-containing sequences have been chosen for the design of rigid helical segments in a modular approach to the construction of a synthetic protein mimic. The helical conformation of the synthetic peptide Boc-Aib-(Val-Ala-Leu-Aib) 3 -OMe in crystals is established by X-ray diffraction. The 13-residue apolar peptide adopts a helical form in the crystal with seven α-type hydrogen bonds in the middle and 3 10 -type hydrogen bonds at either end. The helices stack in columns, zigzag rather than linear, by means of direct NH hor-ellipsis OC head to tail hydrogen bonds. Leucyl side chains are extended on one side of the helix and valyl side chains on the other side. Water molecules form hydrogen bonds with several backbone carbonyl oxygens that also participate in α-helix hydrogen bonds. There is no apparent distortion of the helix caused by hydration

  3. The adsorption features between insecticidal crystal protein and nano-Mg(OH)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaohong; Xu, Zhangyan; Zheng, Yilin; Huang, Tengzhou; Li, Lan; Chen, Zhi; Rao, Wenhua; Chen, Saili; Hong, Xianxian; Guan, Xiong

    2017-12-01

    Nano-Mg(OH) 2 , with low biological toxicity, is an ideal nano-carrier for insecticidal protein to improve the bioactivity. In this work, the adsorption features of insecticidal protein by nano-Mg(OH) 2 have been studied. The adsorption capacity could reach as high as 136 mg g -1 , and the adsorption isotherm had been fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich models. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-first or -second order rate model, and the adsorption was spontaneous and an exothermic process. However, high temperatures are not suitable for adsorption, which implies that the temperature would be a critical factor during the adsorption process. In addition, FT-IR confirmed that the protein was adsorbed on the nano-Mg(OH) 2 , zeta potential analysis suggested that insecticidal protein was loaded onto the nano-Mg(OH) 2 not by electrostatic adsorption but maybe by intermolecular forces, and circular dichroism spectroscopy of Cry11Aa protein before and after loading with nano-Mg(OH) 2 was changed. The study applied the adsorption information between Cry11Aa and nano-Mg(OH) 2 , which would be useful in the practical application of nano-Mg(OH) 2 as a nano-carrier.

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the human keratin 4-binding domain of serine-rich repeat protein 1 from Streptococcus agalactiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaresan, Ramya; Samen, Ulrike; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2011-01-01

    Expression, purification and crystallization of Srr-1-K4BD, a human keratin 4-binding domain of serine-rich repeat protein 1 from S. agalactiae, was carried out. Native crystals of Srr-1-K4BD diffracted to 3.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Serine-rich repeat protein 1 (Srr-1) is a surface protein from Streptococcus agalactiae. A 17 kDa region of this protein has been identified to bind to human keratin 4 (K4) and is termed the Srr-1 K4-binding domain (Srr-1-K4BD). Recombinant Srr-1-K4BD was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Native and selenomethionine-substituted proteins were prepared using Luria–Bertani (LB) and M9 minimal media, respectively. A two-step purification protocol was carried out to obtain a final homogenous sample of Srr-1-K4BD. Crystals of native Srr-1-K4BD were obtained using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. The crystals diffracted to 3.8 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 47.56, b = 59.48, c = 94.71 Å, β = 93.95°

  5. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for beta-lactam acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongzhen; Ding, Yi; Bartlam, Mark; Sun, Fei; Le, Yi; Qin, Xincheng; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Rongguang; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Liu, Jinyuan; Zhao, Nanming; Rao, Zihe

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55A resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic "V" shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  6. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for {beta}-lactam acetylation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, H.; Ding, Y.; Bartlam, M.; Sun, F.; Le, Y.; Qin, X.; Tang, H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Liu, J.; Zhao, N.; Rao, Z.; Biosciences Division; Tsinghua Univ.; Chinese Academy of Science

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55 {angstrom} resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic 'V' shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  7. Localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds in protein crystals using molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahms, Sven O.; Kuester, Miriam; Streb, Carsten; Roth, Christian; Sträter, Norbert; Than, Manuel E.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach is presented that allows the efficient localization and orientation of heavy-atom cluster compounds used in experimental phasing by a molecular replacement procedure. This permits the calculation of meaningful phases up to the highest resolution of the diffraction data. Heavy-atom clusters (HA clusters) containing a large number of specifically arranged electron-dense scatterers are especially useful for experimental phase determination of large complex structures, weakly diffracting crystals or structures with large unit cells. Often, the determination of the exact orientation of the HA cluster and hence of the individual heavy-atom positions proves to be the critical step in successful phasing and subsequent structure solution. Here, it is demonstrated that molecular replacement (MR) with either anomalous or isomorphous differences is a useful strategy for the correct placement of HA cluster compounds. The polyoxometallate cluster hexasodium α-metatungstate (HMT) was applied in phasing the structure of death receptor 6. Even though the HA cluster is bound in alternate partially occupied orientations and is located at a special position, its correct localization and orientation could be determined at resolutions as low as 4.9 Å. The broad applicability of this approach was demonstrated for five different derivative crystals that included the compounds tantalum tetradecabromide and trisodium phosphotungstate in addition to HMT. The correct placement of the HA cluster depends on the length of the intramolecular vectors chosen for MR, such that both a larger cluster size and the optimal choice of the wavelength used for anomalous data collection strongly affect the outcome

  8. The effect of incidence angle on ion bombardment induced surface topography development on single crystal copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, G.; Nobes, M.J.; Lewis, G.W.; Whitton, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The fluence dependence of development of microscopic surface features, particularly etch pits, during 9 keV Ar + ion bombardment of (11,3,1) oriented Cu single crystals has been studied employing quasi-dynamic irradiation and observation techniques in a scanning electron microscope-accelerator system. 9 keV ions are observed not to produce crystallographic pyramids under all irradiation conditions for this surface, a very different result from our earlier studies with higher energy ions. The bombardment does elaborate etch pits however, the habits and growth kinetics of which depend upon both polar and azimuthal angles of ion incidence to the surface. The results are explained in terms of differential erosion of crystal planes modified by the presence of pre-existing and irradiation induces extended defects. (orig.)

  9. Development of phonon and photon detectors for rare events searches using scintillating crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, Felix; Enss, Christian; Fleischmann, Andreas; Gastaldo, Loredana; Hassel, Clemens; Hendricks, Sebastian; Kempf, Sebastian [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Universit at Heidelberg (Germany); Kim, Yong-Hamb [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Loidl, Martin; Navick, Xavier-Francois; Rodrigues, Matias [Commissariat a l' energie atomique, Saclay (France)

    2016-07-01

    The use of scintillating crystals in cryogenic experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay and for direct interaction of dark matter particles allows for an efficient background reduction due to particle discrimination. We develop phonon and photon detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) to perform simultaneous measurements of heat and light generated by the interaction of a particle in a scintillating crystal. As designed we expect for the phonon sensor an energy resolution of ΔE{sub FWHM}<100 eV and a signal rise time τ<200 μs whereas for the photon detector we expect ΔE{sub FWHM}<5 eV and τ<50 μs. We discuss the design and the fabrication of these detectors and present recent results.

  10. Purification, crystallization and X-ray characterization of a Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor protein from the seeds of chickpea (Cicer ar