WorldWideScience

Sample records for protein 3d animation

  1. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  2. Lightning fast animation in Element 3D

    CERN Document Server

    Audronis, Ty

    2014-01-01

    An easy-to-follow and all-inclusive guide, in which the underlying principles of 3D animation as well as their importance are explained in detail. The lessons are designed to teach you how to think of 3D animation in such a way that you can troubleshoot any problem, or animate any scene that comes your way.If you are a Digital Artist, Animation Artist, or a Game Programmer and you want to become an expert in Element 3D, this is the book for you. Although there are a lot of basics for beginners in this book, it includes some advanced techniques for both animating in Element 3D, and overcoming i

  3. Computer Animation for Articulated 3D Characters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.

    2002-01-01

    We present a review of the computer animation literature, mainly concentrating on articulated characters and at least some degree of interactivity or real time simulation. Advances in dierent techniques such as key-frame, motion capture (also known as mocap), dynamics, inverse kinematics (IK),

  4. Bringing macromolecular machinery to life using 3D animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Janet H

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a rapid rise in the use of three-dimensional (3D) animation to depict molecular and cellular processes. Much of the growth in molecular animation has been in the educational arena, but increasingly, 3D animation software is finding its way into research laboratories. In this review, I will discuss a number of ways in which 3d animation software can play a valuable role in visualizing and communicating macromolecular structures and dynamics. I will also consider the challenges of using animation tools within the research sphere. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. 3D Animations for Exploring Nucleon Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Waverly; Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Over the last few years many intuitive pictures have been developed for the interpretation of electron hadron scattering experiments, such as a mechanism for transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering experiments. While Dr. Burkardt's pictures have been helpful for many researchers in the field, they are still difficult to visualize for broader audiences since they rely mostly on 2-dimensional static images. In order to make more accessible for a broader audience what can be learned from Jefferson Lab experiments, we have started to work on developing 3-dimensional animations for these processes. The goal is to enable the viewer to repeatedly look at the same microscopic mechanism for a specific reaction, with the viewpoint of the observer changing. This should help an audience that is not so familiar with these reactions to better understand what can be learned from various experiments at Jefferson Lab aimed at exploring the nucleon structure. Jefferson Lab Minority/Female Undergraduate Research Assistantship.

  6. Animation of 3D Model of Human Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Michalcin

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the new algorithm of animation of 3D model of the human head in combination with its global motion. The designed algorithm is very fast and with low calculation requirements, because it does not need the synthesis of the input videosequence for estimation of the animation parameters as well as the parameters of global motion. The used 3D model Candide generates different expressions using its animation units which are controlled by the animation parameters. These ones are estimated on the basis of optical flow without the need of extracting of the feature points in the frames of the input videosequence because they are given by the selected vertices of the animation units of the calibrated 3D model Candide. The established multiple iterations inside the designed animation algorithm of 3D model of the human head between two successive frames significantly improved its accuracy above all for the large motion.

  7. A New Method of 3D Facial Expression Animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animating expressive facial animation is a very challenging topic within the graphics community. In this paper, we introduce a novel ERI (expression ratio image driving framework based on SVR and MPEG-4 for automatic 3D facial expression animation. Through using the method of support vector regression (SVR, the framework can learn and forecast the regression relationship between the facial animation parameters (FAPs and the parameters of expression ratio image. Firstly, we build a 3D face animation system driven by FAP. Secondly, through using the method of principle component analysis (PCA, we generate the parameter sets of eigen-ERI space, which will rebuild reasonable expression ratio image. Then we learn a model with the support vector regression mapping, and facial animation parameters can be synthesized quickly with the parameters of eigen-ERI. Finally, we implement our 3D face animation system driving by the result of FAP and it works effectively.

  8. Automated Finger Spelling by Highly Realistic 3D Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo-Villani, Nicoletta; Beni, Gerardo

    2004-01-01

    We present the design of a new 3D animation tool for self-teaching (signing and reading) finger spelling the first basic component in learning any sign language. We have designed a highly realistic hand with natural animation of the finger motions. Smoothness of motion (in real time) is achieved via programmable blending of animation segments. The…

  9. Hybrid animation integrating 2D and 3D assets

    CERN Document Server

    O'Hailey, Tina

    2010-01-01

    Artist imaginations continue to grow and stretch the boundaries of traditional animation. Successful animators adept and highly skilled in traditional animation mediums are branching out beyond traditional animation workflows and will often use multiple forms of animation in a single project. With the knowledge of 3D and 2D assets and the integration of multiple animation mediums into a single project, animators have a wealth of creative resources available for a project that is not limited to a specific animation medium, software package or workflow processs. Enhance a poignant scene by choos

  10. Enhancing Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Leaning through 3D Animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Bhatti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive theory of Multimedia learning has been a widely used principle in education. However, with current technological advancements and usage, the teaching and learning trend of children’s have also changed with more dependability towards technology. This research work explores and implement the use of 3D Animation as tool for multimedia learning based on cognitive theory. This new dimension in cognitive learning, will foster the latest multimedia tools and application driven through 3D Animation, Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality. The three principles, that facilitate cognitive theory of multimedia learning using animation, addressed in this research are temporal contiguity principle (screening matching narration with animation simultaneously rather than successively, personalization principle (screening text or dialogs in casual form rather than formal style and finally the multimedia principle (screen animation and audio narration together instead of just narration. The result of this new model would yield a new technique of educating the young children through 3D animation and virtual reality. The adaptation of  cognitive theory through 3D animation as a source of multimedia learning with various key principles produces a reliable paradigm for educational enhancement.

  11. 3D bioprinting of structural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk-Biegun, Małgorzata K; Del Campo, Aránzazu

    2017-07-01

    3D bioprinting is a booming method to obtain scaffolds of different materials with predesigned and customized morphologies and geometries. In this review we focus on the experimental strategies and recent achievements in the bioprinting of major structural proteins (collagen, silk, fibrin), as a particularly interesting technology to reconstruct the biochemical and biophysical composition and hierarchical morphology of natural scaffolds. The flexibility in molecular design offered by structural proteins, combined with the flexibility in mixing, deposition, and mechanical processing inherent to bioprinting technologies, enables the fabrication of highly functional scaffolds and tissue mimics with a degree of complexity and organization which has only just started to be explored. Here we describe the printing parameters and physical (mechanical) properties of bioinks based on structural proteins, including the biological function of the printed scaffolds. We describe applied printing techniques and cross-linking methods, highlighting the modifications implemented to improve scaffold properties. The used cell types, cell viability, and possible construct applications are also reported. We envision that the application of printing technologies to structural proteins will enable unprecedented control over their supramolecular organization, conferring printed scaffolds biological properties and functions close to natural systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Virtual reality and 3D animation in forensic visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Minhua; Zheng, Huiru; Lallie, Harjinder

    2010-09-01

    Computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) animation is an ideal media to accurately visualize crime or accident scenes to the viewers and in the courtrooms. Based upon factual data, forensic animations can reproduce the scene and demonstrate the activity at various points in time. The use of computer animation techniques to reconstruct crime scenes is beginning to replace the traditional illustrations, photographs, and verbal descriptions, and is becoming popular in today's forensics. This article integrates work in the areas of 3D graphics, computer vision, motion tracking, natural language processing, and forensic computing, to investigate the state-of-the-art in forensic visualization. It identifies and reviews areas where new applications of 3D digital technologies and artificial intelligence could be used to enhance particular phases of forensic visualization to create 3D models and animations automatically and quickly. Having discussed the relationships between major crime types and level-of-detail in corresponding forensic animations, we recognized that high level-of-detail animation involving human characters, which is appropriate for many major crime types but has had limited use in courtrooms, could be useful for crime investigation. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. VPython: Python plus Animations in Stereo 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Bruce

    2004-03-01

    Python is a modern object-oriented programming language. VPython (http://vpython.org) is a combination of Python (http://python.org), the Numeric module from LLNL (http://www.pfdubois.com/numpy), and the Visual module created by David Scherer, all of which have been under continuous development as open source projects. VPython makes it easy to write programs that generate real-time, navigable 3D animations. The Visual module includes a set of 3D objects (sphere, cylinder, arrow, etc.), tools for creating other shapes, and support for vector algebra. The 3D renderer runs in a parallel thread, and animations are produced as a side effect of computations, freeing the programmer to concentrate on the physics. Applications include educational and research visualization. In the Fall of 2003 Hugh Fisher at the Australian National University, John Zelle at Wartburg College, and I contributed to a new stereo capability of VPython. By adding a single statement to an existing VPython program, animations can be viewed in true stereo 3D. One can choose several modes: active shutter glasses, passive polarized glasses, or colored glasses (e.g. red-cyan). The talk will demonstrate the new stereo capability and discuss the pros and cons of various schemes for display of stereo 3D for a large audience. Supported in part by NSF grant DUE-0237132.

  14. 3dRPC: a web server for 3D RNA-protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangyu; Li, Haotian; Xiao, Yi

    2018-04-01

    RNA-protein interactions occur in many biological processes. To understand the mechanism of these interactions one needs to know three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA-protein complexes. 3dRPC is an algorithm for prediction of 3D RNA-protein complex structures and consists of a docking algorithm RPDOCK and a scoring function 3dRPC-Score. RPDOCK is used to sample possible complex conformations of an RNA and a protein by calculating the geometric and electrostatic complementarities and stacking interactions at the RNA-protein interface according to the features of atom packing of the interface. 3dRPC-Score is a knowledge-based potential that uses the conformations of nucleotide-amino-acid pairs as statistical variables and that is used to choose the near-native complex-conformations obtained from the docking method above. Recently, we built a web server for 3dRPC. The users can easily use 3dRPC without installing it locally. RNA and protein structures in PDB (Protein Data Bank) format are the only needed input files. It can also incorporate the information of interface residues or residue-pairs obtained from experiments or theoretical predictions to improve the prediction. The address of 3dRPC web server is http://biophy.hust.edu.cn/3dRPC. yxiao@hust.edu.cn.

  15. 3D computer visualization and animation of CANDU reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, T.; Echlin, M.; Tonner, P.; Sur, B.

    1999-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer visualization and animation models of typical CANDU reactor cores (Darlington, Point Lepreau) have been developed using world-wide-web (WWW) browser based tools: JavaScript, hyper-text-markup language (HTML) and virtual reality modeling language (VRML). The 3D models provide three-dimensional views of internal control and monitoring structures in the reactor core, such as fuel channels, flux detectors, liquid zone controllers, zone boundaries, shutoff rods, poison injection tubes, ion chambers. Animations have been developed based on real in-core flux detector responses and rod position data from reactor shutdown. The animations show flux changing inside the reactor core with the drop of shutoff rods and/or the injection of liquid poison. The 3D models also provide hypertext links to documents giving specifications and historical data for particular components. Data in HTML format (or other format such as PDF, etc.) can be shown in text, tables, plots, drawings, etc., and further links to other sources of data can also be embedded. This paper summarizes the use of these WWW browser based tools, and describes the resulting 3D reactor core static and dynamic models. Potential applications of the models are discussed. (author)

  16. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  17. Markerless 3D motion capture for animal locomotion studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Irvin Sellers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining quantitative data describing the movements of animals is an essential step in understanding their locomotor biology. Outside the laboratory, measuring animal locomotion often relies on video-based approaches and analysis is hampered because of difficulties in calibration and often the limited availability of possible camera positions. It is also usually restricted to two dimensions, which is often an undesirable over-simplification given the essentially three-dimensional nature of many locomotor performances. In this paper we demonstrate a fully three-dimensional approach based on 3D photogrammetric reconstruction using multiple, synchronised video cameras. This approach allows full calibration based on the separation of the individual cameras and will work fully automatically with completely unmarked and undisturbed animals. As such it has the potential to revolutionise work carried out on free-ranging animals in sanctuaries and zoological gardens where ad hoc approaches are essential and access within enclosures often severely restricted. The paper demonstrates the effectiveness of video-based 3D photogrammetry with examples from primates and birds, as well as discussing the current limitations of this technique and illustrating the accuracies that can be obtained. All the software required is open source so this can be a very cost effective approach and provides a methodology of obtaining data in situations where other approaches would be completely ineffective.

  18. Character animation fundamentals developing skills for 2D and 3D character animation

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Expand your animation toolkit and remain competitive in the industry with this leading resource for 2D and 3D character animation techniques. Apply the industry's best practices to your own workflows and develop 2D, 3D and hybrid characters with ease. With side by side comparisons of 2D and 3D character design, improve your character animation and master traditional principles and processes including weight and balance, timing and walks. Develop characters inspired by humans, birds, fish, snakes and four legged animals. Breathe life into your character and develop a characters personality w

  19. MSX-3D: a tool to validate 3D protein models using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Michaël; Paramelle, David; Subra, Gilles; Forest, Eric; Martinez, Jean; Geourjon, Christophe; Deléage, Gilbert

    2008-12-01

    The technique of chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry has proven to bring valuable information about the protein structure and interactions between proteic subunits. It is an effective and efficient way to experimentally investigate some aspects of a protein structure when NMR and X-ray crystallography data are lacking. We introduce MSX-3D, a tool specifically geared to validate protein models using mass spectrometry. In addition to classical peptides identifications, it allows an interactive 3D visualization of the distance constraints derived from a cross-linking experiment. Freely available at http://proteomics-pbil.ibcp.fr

  20. The virtual craniofacial patient: 3D jaw modeling and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, Reyes; Memon, Ahmed; Fidaleo, Douglas A; Neumann, Ulrich; Mah, James

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present new developments in the area of 3D human jaw modeling and animation. CT (Computed Tomography) scans have traditionally been used to evaluate patients with dental implants, assess tumors, cysts, fractures and surgical procedures. More recently this data has been utilized to generate models. Researchers have reported semi-automatic techniques to segment and model the human jaw from CT images and manually segment the jaw from MRI images. Recently opto-electronic and ultrasonic-based systems (JMA from Zebris) have been developed to record mandibular position and movement. In this research project we introduce: (1) automatic patient-specific three-dimensional jaw modeling from CT data and (2) three-dimensional jaw motion simulation using jaw tracking data from the JMA system (Zebris).

  1. 3D Protein Dynamics in the Cell Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand P; Galland, Rémi; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Grenci, Gianluca; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Studer, Vincent; Viasnoff, Virgile; Saunders, Timothy E

    2017-01-10

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus plays an important role in protein dynamics and in regulating gene expression. However, protein dynamics within the 3D nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a novel combination of 1) single-objective based light-sheet microscopy, 2) photoconvertible proteins, and 3) fluorescence correlation microscopy, to quantitatively measure 3D protein dynamics in the nucleus. We are able to acquire >3400 autocorrelation functions at multiple spatial positions within a nucleus, without significant photobleaching, allowing us to make reliable estimates of diffusion dynamics. Using this tool, we demonstrate spatial heterogeneity in Polymerase II dynamics in live U2OS cells. Further, we provide detailed measurements of human-Yes-associated protein diffusion dynamics in a human gastric cancer epithelial cell line. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 3D-SURFER: software for high-throughput protein surface comparison and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, David; Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Li, Bin; Sael, Lee; Ueng, Stephen; Ahrendt, Steven; Kihara, Daisuke

    2009-11-01

    We present 3D-SURFER, a web-based tool designed to facilitate high-throughput comparison and characterization of proteins based on their surface shape. As each protein is effectively represented by a vector of 3D Zernike descriptors, comparison times for a query protein against the entire PDB take, on an average, only a couple of seconds. The web interface has been designed to be as interactive as possible with displays showing animated protein rotations, CATH codes and structural alignments using the CE program. In addition, geometrically interesting local features of the protein surface, such as pockets that often correspond to ligand binding sites as well as protrusions and flat regions can also be identified and visualized. 3D-SURFER is a web application that can be freely accessed from: http://dragon.bio.purdue.edu/3d-surfer dkihara@purdue.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. iClone 431 3D Animation Beginner's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    McCallum, MD

    2011-01-01

    This book is a part of the Beginner's guide series, wherein you will quickly start doing tasks with precise instructions. Then the tasks will be followed by explanation and then a challenging task or a multiple choice question about the topic just covered. Do you have a story to tell or an idea to illustrate? This book is aimed at film makers, video producers/compositors, vxf artists or 3D artists/designers like you who have no previous experience with iClone. If you have that drive inside you to entertain people via the internet on sites like YouTube or Vimeo, create a superb presentation vid

  4. Markerless 3D motion capture for animal locomotion studies

    OpenAIRE

    William Irvin Sellers; Eishi Hirasaki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obtaining quantitative data describing the movements of animals is an essential step in understanding their locomotor biology. Outside the laboratory, measuring animal locomotion often relies on video-based approaches and analysis is hampered because of difficulties in calibration and often the limited availability of possible camera positions. It is also usually restricted to two dimensions, which is often an undesirable over-simplification given the essentially three-dimensional na...

  5. Application of Synthetic Polymeric Scaffolds in Breast Cancer 3D Tissue Cultures and Animal Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girdhari Rijal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of three-dimensional (3D porous scaffolds from synthetic polymers is a challenge to most laboratories conducting biomedical research. Here, we present a handy and cost-effective method to fabricate polymeric hydrogel and porous scaffolds using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA or polycaprolactone (PCL. Breast cancer cells grown on 3D polymeric scaffolds exhibited distinct survival, morphology, and proliferation compared to those on 2D polymeric surfaces. Mammary epithelial cells cultured on PLGA- or PCL-coated slides expressed extracellular matrix (ECM proteins and their receptors. Estrogen receptor- (ER- positive T47D breast cancer cells are less sensitive to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-HT treatment when cultured on the 3D porous scaffolds than in 2D cultures. Finally, cancer cell-laden polymeric scaffolds support consistent tumor formation in animals and biomarker expression as seen in human native tumors. Our data suggest that the porous synthetic polymer scaffolds satisfy the basic requirements for 3D tissue cultures both in vitro and in vivo. The scaffolding technology has appealing potentials to be applied in anticancer drug screening for a better control of the progression of human cancers.

  6. Role of 3D animation in periodontal patient education: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeren, Gertjan; Quirynen, Marc; Ozcelik, Onur; Teughels, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled parallel trial investigates the effect of 3D animation on the increase and recall of knowledge on periodontitis by patients with periodontitis. The effects of a 3D animation (3D animation group) were compared with narration and drawing (control group) for periodontal patient education. A total of 68 periodontitis patients were stratified according to educational level and then randomly allocated to control or 3D animation groups. All patients received: (1) a pre-test (baseline knowledge), (2) a patient education video (3D animation or control video), (3) a post-test (knowledge immediately after looking at the video), and (4) a follow-up test (knowledge recall after 2 weeks). Each test contained 10 multiple-choice questions. There was no significant difference in baseline knowledge. Patients receiving the 3D animations had significantly higher scores for both the post-test and the follow-up test, when compared with patients receiving sketch animations. 3D animations are more effective than real-time drawings for periodontal patient education in terms of knowledge recall. 3D animations may be a powerful tool for assisting in the information process. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cancer3D: understanding cancer mutations through protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Hrabe, Thomas; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The new era of cancer genomics is providing us with extensive knowledge of mutations and other alterations in cancer. The Cancer3D database at http://www.cancer3d.org gives an open and user-friendly way to analyze cancer missense mutations in the context of structures of proteins in which they are found. The database also helps users analyze the distribution patterns of the mutations as well as their relationship to changes in drug activity through two algorithms: e-Driver and e-Drug. These algorithms use knowledge of modular structure of genes and proteins to separately study each region. This approach allows users to find novel candidate driver regions or drug biomarkers that cannot be found when similar analyses are done on the whole-gene level. The Cancer3D database provides access to the results of such analyses based on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). In addition, it displays mutations from over 14,700 proteins mapped to more than 24,300 structures from PDB. This helps users visualize the distribution of mutations and identify novel three-dimensional patterns in their distribution. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Using Videos and 3D Animations for Conceptual Learning in Basic Computer Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakiroglu, Unal; Yilmaz, Huseyin

    2017-01-01

    This article draws on a one-semester study to investigate the effect of videos and 3D animations on students' conceptual understandings about basic computer units. A quasi-experimental design was carried out in two classrooms; videos and 3D animations were used in classroom activities in one group and those were used for homework in the other…

  9. Protein 3D structure computed from evolutionary sequence variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora S Marks

    Full Text Available The evolutionary trajectory of a protein through sequence space is constrained by its function. Collections of sequence homologs record the outcomes of millions of evolutionary experiments in which the protein evolves according to these constraints. Deciphering the evolutionary record held in these sequences and exploiting it for predictive and engineering purposes presents a formidable challenge. The potential benefit of solving this challenge is amplified by the advent of inexpensive high-throughput genomic sequencing.In this paper we ask whether we can infer evolutionary constraints from a set of sequence homologs of a protein. The challenge is to distinguish true co-evolution couplings from the noisy set of observed correlations. We address this challenge using a maximum entropy model of the protein sequence, constrained by the statistics of the multiple sequence alignment, to infer residue pair couplings. Surprisingly, we find that the strength of these inferred couplings is an excellent predictor of residue-residue proximity in folded structures. Indeed, the top-scoring residue couplings are sufficiently accurate and well-distributed to define the 3D protein fold with remarkable accuracy.We quantify this observation by computing, from sequence alone, all-atom 3D structures of fifteen test proteins from different fold classes, ranging in size from 50 to 260 residues, including a G-protein coupled receptor. These blinded inferences are de novo, i.e., they do not use homology modeling or sequence-similar fragments from known structures. The co-evolution signals provide sufficient information to determine accurate 3D protein structure to 2.7-4.8 Å C(α-RMSD error relative to the observed structure, over at least two-thirds of the protein (method called EVfold, details at http://EVfold.org. This discovery provides insight into essential interactions constraining protein evolution and will facilitate a comprehensive survey of the universe of

  10. 3D complex: a structural classification of protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel D Levy

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Most of the proteins in a cell assemble into complexes to carry out their function. It is therefore crucial to understand the physicochemical properties as well as the evolution of interactions between proteins. The Protein Data Bank represents an important source of information for such studies, because more than half of the structures are homo- or heteromeric protein complexes. Here we propose the first hierarchical classification of whole protein complexes of known 3-D structure, based on representing their fundamental structural features as a graph. This classification provides the first overview of all the complexes in the Protein Data Bank and allows nonredundant sets to be derived at different levels of detail. This reveals that between one-half and two-thirds of known structures are multimeric, depending on the level of redundancy accepted. We also analyse the structures in terms of the topological arrangement of their subunits and find that they form a small number of arrangements compared with all theoretically possible ones. This is because most complexes contain four subunits or less, and the large majority are homomeric. In addition, there is a strong tendency for symmetry in complexes, even for heteromeric complexes. Finally, through comparison of Biological Units in the Protein Data Bank with the Protein Quaternary Structure database, we identified many possible errors in quaternary structure assignments. Our classification, available as a database and Web server at http://www.3Dcomplex.org, will be a starting point for future work aimed at understanding the structure and evolution of protein complexes.

  11. Use of Colour and Interactive Animation in Learning 3D Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Wejdan; Curtis, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two computer-implemented techniques (colour and interactive animation) on learning 3D vectors. The participants were 43 female Saudi Arabian high school students. They were pre-tested on 3D vectors using a paper questionnaire that consisted of calculation and visualization types of questions. The students…

  12. Improved hybrid optimization algorithm for 3D protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changjun; Hou, Caixia; Wei, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    A new improved hybrid optimization algorithm - PGATS algorithm, which is based on toy off-lattice model, is presented for dealing with three-dimensional protein structure prediction problems. The algorithm combines the particle swarm optimization (PSO), genetic algorithm (GA), and tabu search (TS) algorithms. Otherwise, we also take some different improved strategies. The factor of stochastic disturbance is joined in the particle swarm optimization to improve the search ability; the operations of crossover and mutation that are in the genetic algorithm are changed to a kind of random liner method; at last tabu search algorithm is improved by appending a mutation operator. Through the combination of a variety of strategies and algorithms, the protein structure prediction (PSP) in a 3D off-lattice model is achieved. The PSP problem is an NP-hard problem, but the problem can be attributed to a global optimization problem of multi-extremum and multi-parameters. This is the theoretical principle of the hybrid optimization algorithm that is proposed in this paper. The algorithm combines local search and global search, which overcomes the shortcoming of a single algorithm, giving full play to the advantage of each algorithm. In the current universal standard sequences, Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences are certified. Experiments show that the proposed new method outperforms single algorithms on the accuracy of calculating the protein sequence energy value, which is proved to be an effective way to predict the structure of proteins.

  13. Verification of photon attenuation characteristics for 3D printer based small animal lung model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Se Ho; Lee, Seung Wook; Han, Su Chul; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Since it is difficult to measure absorbed dose to mice in vivo, replica mice are mostly used as alternative. In this study, realistic mouse phantom was fabricated by using 3D printer (object500 connex3, Stratasys, USA). Elemental inks as material of 3D printer were selected corresponding to mouse tissue. To represent lung, selected material was partially used with air layer. In order to verify material equivalent, super-flex bolus was simply compared to verify photon attenuation characteristics. In the case of lung, Hounsfield unit (HU) of the phantom were compared with a live mouse. In this study, we fabricated mouse phantom by using 3D printer, and practically verified photon attenuation characteristics. The fabricated phantom shows tissue equivalence as well as similar geometry with live mouse. As more and more growing of 3D printer technique, 3D printer based small preclinical animal phantom would increase reliability of verification of absorbed dose in small animal for preclinical study

  14. Verification of photon attenuation characteristics for 3D printer based small animal lung model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se Ho; Lee, Seung Wook [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Su Chul; Park, Seung Woo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Since it is difficult to measure absorbed dose to mice in vivo, replica mice are mostly used as alternative. In this study, realistic mouse phantom was fabricated by using 3D printer (object500 connex3, Stratasys, USA). Elemental inks as material of 3D printer were selected corresponding to mouse tissue. To represent lung, selected material was partially used with air layer. In order to verify material equivalent, super-flex bolus was simply compared to verify photon attenuation characteristics. In the case of lung, Hounsfield unit (HU) of the phantom were compared with a live mouse. In this study, we fabricated mouse phantom by using 3D printer, and practically verified photon attenuation characteristics. The fabricated phantom shows tissue equivalence as well as similar geometry with live mouse. As more and more growing of 3D printer technique, 3D printer based small preclinical animal phantom would increase reliability of verification of absorbed dose in small animal for preclinical study.

  15. Application of computer virtual simulation technology in 3D animation production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Can

    2017-11-01

    In the continuous development of computer technology, the application system of virtual simulation technology has been further optimized and improved. It also has been widely used in various fields of social development, such as city construction, interior design, industrial simulation and tourism teaching etc. This paper mainly introduces the virtual simulation technology used in 3D animation. Based on analyzing the characteristics of virtual simulation technology, the application ways and means of this technology in 3D animation are researched. The purpose is to provide certain reference for the 3D effect promotion days after.

  16. Characteristics of visual fatigue under the effect of 3D animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Shuo; Hsueh, Ya-Hsin; Tung, Kwong-Chung; Jhou, Fong-Yi; Lin, David Pei-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Visual fatigue is commonly encountered in modern life. Clinical visual fatigue characteristics caused by 2-D and 3-D animations may be different, but have not been characterized in detail. This study tried to distinguish the differential effects on visual fatigue caused by 2-D and 3-D animations. A total of 23 volunteers were subjected to accommodation and vergence assessments, followed by a 40-min video game program designed to aggravate their asthenopic symptoms. The volunteers were then assessed for accommodation and vergence parameters again and directed to watch a 5-min 3-D video program, and then assessed again for the parameters. The results support that the 3-D animations caused similar characteristics in vision fatigue parameters in some specific aspects as compared to that caused by 2-D animations. Furthermore, 3-D animations may lead to more exhaustion in both ciliary and extra-ocular muscles, and such differential effects were more evident in the high demand of near vision work. The current results indicated that an arbitrary set of indexes may be promoted in the design of 3-D display or equipments.

  17. Qualitative Assessment of a 3D Simulation Program: Faculty, Students, and Bio-Organic Reaction Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günersel, Adalet B.; Fleming, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that computer-based simulations and animations are especially helpful in fields such as chemistry where concepts are abstract and cannot be directly observed. Bio-Organic Reaction Animations (BioORA) is a freely available 3D visualization software program developed to help students understand the chemistry of biomolecular events.…

  18. Advances in animal ecology from 3D ecosystem mapping with LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A.; Asner, G. P.

    2015-12-01

    The advent and recent advances of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) have enabled accurate measurement of 3D ecosystem structure. Although the use of LiDAR data is widespread in vegetation science, it has only recently (3D ecosystem structure for animals. We reviewed the studies to date that have used LiDAR in animal ecology, synthesising the insights gained. Structural heterogeneity is most conducive to increased animal richness and abundance, and increased complexity of vertical vegetation structure is more positively influential than traditionally measured canopy cover, which produces mixed results. However, different taxonomic groups interact with a variety of 3D canopy traits and some groups with 3D topography. LiDAR technology can be applied to animal ecology studies in a wide variety of environments to answer an impressive array of questions. Drawing on case studies from vastly different groups, termites and lions, we further demonstrate the applicability of LiDAR and highlight new understanding, ranging from habitat preference to predator-prey interactions, that would not have been possible from studies restricted to field based methods. We conclude with discussion of how future studies will benefit by using LiDAR to consider 3D habitat effects in a wider variety of ecosystems and with more taxa to develop a better understanding of animal dynamics.

  19. Surface Simplification of 3D Animation Models Using Robust Homogeneous Coordinate Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juin-Ling Tseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of 3D surface simplification is to reduce the storage cost of 3D models. A 3D animation model typically consists of several 3D models. Therefore, to ensure that animation models are realistic, numerous triangles are often required. However, animation models that have a high storage cost have a substantial computational cost. Hence, surface simplification methods are adopted to reduce the number of triangles and computational cost of 3D models. Quadric error metrics (QEM has recently been identified as one of the most effective methods for simplifying static models. To simplify animation models by using QEM, Mohr and Gleicher summed the QEM of all frames. However, homogeneous coordinate problems cannot be considered completely by using QEM. To resolve this problem, this paper proposes a robust homogeneous coordinate transformation that improves the animation simplification method proposed by Mohr and Gleicher. In this study, the root mean square errors of the proposed method were compared with those of the method proposed by Mohr and Gleicher, and the experimental results indicated that the proposed approach can preserve more contour features than Mohr’s method can at the same simplification ratio.

  20. I-TASSER server for protein 3D structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of 3-dimensional protein structures from amino acid sequences represents one of the most important problems in computational structural biology. The community-wide Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP experiments have been designed to obtain an objective assessment of the state-of-the-art of the field, where I-TASSER was ranked as the best method in the server section of the recent 7th CASP experiment. Our laboratory has since then received numerous requests about the public availability of the I-TASSER algorithm and the usage of the I-TASSER predictions. Results An on-line version of I-TASSER is developed at the KU Center for Bioinformatics which has generated protein structure predictions for thousands of modeling requests from more than 35 countries. A scoring function (C-score based on the relative clustering structural density and the consensus significance score of multiple threading templates is introduced to estimate the accuracy of the I-TASSER predictions. A large-scale benchmark test demonstrates a strong correlation between the C-score and the TM-score (a structural similarity measurement with values in [0, 1] of the first models with a correlation coefficient of 0.91. Using a C-score cutoff > -1.5 for the models of correct topology, both false positive and false negative rates are below 0.1. Combining C-score and protein length, the accuracy of the I-TASSER models can be predicted with an average error of 0.08 for TM-score and 2 Å for RMSD. Conclusion The I-TASSER server has been developed to generate automated full-length 3D protein structural predictions where the benchmarked scoring system helps users to obtain quantitative assessments of the I-TASSER models. The output of the I-TASSER server for each query includes up to five full-length models, the confidence score, the estimated TM-score and RMSD, and the standard deviation of the estimations. The I-TASSER server is freely available

  1. 3D geospatial visualizations: Animation and motion effects on spatial objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Theofilos; Papatheodorou, Konstantinos; Mastorokostas, Paris; Hilas, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), in combination with high quality raster graphics provide realistic three-dimensional (3D) representations of the globe (virtual globe) and amazing navigation experience over the terrain through earth browsers. In addition, the adoption of interoperable geospatial mark-up languages (e.g. KML) and open programming libraries (Javascript) makes it also possible to create 3D spatial objects and convey on them the sensation of any type of texture by utilizing open 3D representation models (e.g. Collada). One step beyond, by employing WebGL frameworks (e.g. Cesium.js, three.js) animation and motion effects are attributed on 3D models. However, major GIS-based functionalities in combination with all the above mentioned visualization capabilities such as for example animation effects on selected areas of the terrain texture (e.g. sea waves) as well as motion effects on 3D objects moving in dynamically defined georeferenced terrain paths (e.g. the motion of an animal over a hill, or of a big fish in an ocean etc.) are not widely supported at least by open geospatial applications or development frameworks. Towards this we developed and made available to the research community, an open geospatial software application prototype that provides high level capabilities for dynamically creating user defined virtual geospatial worlds populated by selected animated and moving 3D models on user specified locations, paths and areas. At the same time, the generated code may enhance existing open visualization frameworks and programming libraries dealing with 3D simulations, with the geospatial aspect of a virtual world.

  2. The effectiveness of 3D animations to enhance understanding of cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Dylan N; Broadhurst, Henry; Clarke, Stephen P; Farrell, Michael; Bennett, David; Mosley, John R; Mellanby, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is one of the most important orthopedic diseases taught to veterinary undergraduates. The complexity of the anatomy of the canine stifle joint combined with the plethora of different surgical interventions available for the treatment of the disease means that undergraduate veterinary students often have a poor understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of CCL rupture. We designed, developed, and tested a three dimensional (3D) animation to illustrate the pertinent clinical anatomy of the stifle joint, the effects of CCL rupture, and the mechanisms by which different surgical techniques can stabilize the joint with CCL rupture. When compared with a non-animated 3D presentation, students' short-term retention of functional anatomy improved although they could not impart a better explanation of how different surgical techniques worked. More students found the animation useful than those who viewed a comparable non-animated 3D presentation. Multiple peer-review testing is required to maximize the usefulness of 3D animations during development. Free and open access to such tools should improve student learning and client understanding through wide-spread uptake and use.

  3. Evaluation of 3D reconstruction algorithms for a small animal PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.A.; Gandler, W.R.; Seidel, J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of paired, opposing position-sensitive phototube scintillation cameras (SCs) operating in coincidence for small animal imaging with positron emitters is currently under study. Because of the low sensitivity of the system even in 3D mode and the need to produce images with high resolution, it was postulated that a 3D expectation maximization (EM) reconstruction algorithm might be well suited for this application. We investigated four reconstruction algorithms for the 3D SC PET camera: 2D filtered back-projection (FBP), 2D ordered subset EM (OSEM), 3D reprojection (3DRP), and 3D OSEM. Noise was assessed for all slices by the coefficient of variation in a simulated uniform cylinder. Resolution was assessed from a simulation of 15 point sources in the warm background of the uniform cylinder. At comparable noise levels, the resolution achieved with OSEM (0.9-mm to 1.2-mm) is significantly better than that obtained with FBP or 3DRP (1.5-mm to 2.0-mm.) Images of a rat skull labeled with 18 F-fluoride suggest that 3D OSEM can improve image quality of a small animal PET camera

  4. InterMap3D: predicting and visualizing co-evolving protein residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Rodrigo Gouveia; Roque, francisco jose sousa simôes almeida; Wernersson, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    InterMap3D predicts co-evolving protein residues and plots them on the 3D protein structure. Starting with a single protein sequence, InterMap3D automatically finds a set of homologous sequences, generates an alignment and fetches the most similar 3D structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB......). It can also accept a user-generated alignment. Based on the alignment, co-evolving residues are then predicted using three different methods: Row and Column Weighing of Mutual Information, Mutual Information/Entropy and Dependency. Finally, InterMap3D generates high-quality images of the protein...

  5. Generation of 3D templates of active sites of proteins with rigid prosthetic groups

    OpenAIRE

    Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2006-01-01

    MOTIVATION: With the increasing availability of protein structures, the generation of biologically meaningful 3D patterns from the simultaneous alignment of several protein structures is an exciting prospect: active sites could be better understood, protein functions and protein 3D structures could be predicted more accurately. Although patterns can already be generated at the fold and topological levels, no system produces high-resolution 3D patterns including atom and cavity positions. To a...

  6. Generation of 3D templates of active sites of proteins with rigid prosthetic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2006-05-15

    With the increasing availability of protein structures, the generation of biologically meaningful 3D patterns from the simultaneous alignment of several protein structures is an exciting prospect: active sites could be better understood, protein functions and protein 3D structures could be predicted more accurately. Although patterns can already be generated at the fold and topological levels, no system produces high-resolution 3D patterns including atom and cavity positions. To address this challenge, our research focuses on generating patterns from proteins with rigid prosthetic groups. Since these groups are key elements of protein active sites, the generated 3D patterns are expected to be biologically meaningful. In this paper, we present a new approach which allows the generation of 3D patterns from proteins with rigid prosthetic groups. Using 237 protein chains representing proteins containing porphyrin rings, our method was validated by comparing 3D templates generated from homologues with the 3D structure of the proteins they model. Atom positions were predicted reliably: 93% of them had an accuracy of 1.00 A or less. Moreover, similar results were obtained regarding chemical group and cavity positions. Results also suggested our system could contribute to the validation of 3D protein models. Finally, a 3D template was generated for the active site of human cytochrome P450 CYP17, the 3D structure of which is unknown. Its analysis showed that it is biologically meaningful: our method detected the main patterns of the cytochrome P450 superfamily and the motifs linked to catalytic reactions. The 3D template also suggested the position of a residue, which could be involved in a hydrogen bond with CYP17 substrates and the shape and location of a cavity. Comparisons with independently generated 3D models comforted these hypotheses. Alignment software (Nestor3D) is available at http://www.kingston.ac.uk/~ku33185/Nestor3D.html

  7. Femtosecond Laser Direct Write Integration of Multi-Protein Patterns and 3D Microstructures into 3D Glass Microfluidic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Serien

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Microfluidic devices and biochips offer miniaturized laboratories for the separation, reaction, and analysis of biochemical materials with high sensitivity and low reagent consumption. The integration of functional or biomimetic elements further functionalizes microfluidic devices for more complex biological studies. The recently proposed ship-in-a-bottle integration based on laser direct writing allows the construction of microcomponents made of photosensitive polymer inside closed microfluidic structures. Here, we expand this technology to integrate proteinaceous two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D microstructures with the aid of photo-induced cross-linking into glass microchannels. The concept is demonstrated with bovine serum albumin and enhanced green fluorescent protein, each mixed with photoinitiator (Sodium 4-[2-(4-Morpholino benzoyl-2-dimethylamino] butylbenzenesulfonate. Unlike the polymer integration, fabrication over the entire channel cross-section is challenging. Two proteins are integrated into the same channel to demonstrate multi-protein patterning. Using 50% w/w glycerol solvent instead of 100% water achieves almost the same fabrication resolution for in-channel fabrication as on-surface fabrication due to the improved refractive index matching, enabling the fabrication of 3D microstructures. A glycerol-water solvent also reduces the risk of drying samples. We believe this technology can integrate diverse proteins to contribute to the versatility of microfluidics.

  8. MO-DE-BRA-06: 3D Image Acquisition and Reconstruction Explained with Online Animations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the principles of 3D imaging and image reconstruction is fundamental to the field of medical imaging. Clinicians, technologists, physicists, patients, students, and inquisitive minds all stand to benefit from greater comprehension of the supporting technologies. To help explain the basic principles of 3D imaging, we developed multi-frame animations that convey the concepts of tomographic imaging. The series of free (gif) animations are accessible online, and provide a multimedia introduction to the main concepts of image reconstruction. Methods: Text and animations were created to convey the principles of analytic tomography in CT, PET, and SPECT. Specific topics covered included: principles of sinograms/image data storage, forward projection, principles of PET acquisitions, and filtered backprojection. A total of 8 animations were created and presented for CT, PET, and digital phantom formats. In addition, a free executable is also provided to allow users to create their own tomographic animations – providing an opportunity for interaction and personalization to help foster user interest. Results: Tutorial text and animations have been posted online, freely available to view or download. The animations are in first position in a google search of “image reconstruction animations”. The website currently receives approximately 200 hits/month, from all over the world, and the usage is growing. Positive feedback has been collected from users. Conclusion: We identified a need for improved teaching tools to help visualize the (temporally variant) concepts of image reconstruction, and have shown that animations can be a useful tool for this aspect of education. Furthermore, posting animations freely on the web has shown to be a good way to maximize their impact in the community. In future endeavors, we hope to expand this animated content, to cover principles of iterative reconstruction, as well as other phenomena relating to imaging.

  9. MO-DE-BRA-06: 3D Image Acquisition and Reconstruction Explained with Online Animations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesner, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the principles of 3D imaging and image reconstruction is fundamental to the field of medical imaging. Clinicians, technologists, physicists, patients, students, and inquisitive minds all stand to benefit from greater comprehension of the supporting technologies. To help explain the basic principles of 3D imaging, we developed multi-frame animations that convey the concepts of tomographic imaging. The series of free (gif) animations are accessible online, and provide a multimedia introduction to the main concepts of image reconstruction. Methods: Text and animations were created to convey the principles of analytic tomography in CT, PET, and SPECT. Specific topics covered included: principles of sinograms/image data storage, forward projection, principles of PET acquisitions, and filtered backprojection. A total of 8 animations were created and presented for CT, PET, and digital phantom formats. In addition, a free executable is also provided to allow users to create their own tomographic animations – providing an opportunity for interaction and personalization to help foster user interest. Results: Tutorial text and animations have been posted online, freely available to view or download. The animations are in first position in a google search of “image reconstruction animations”. The website currently receives approximately 200 hits/month, from all over the world, and the usage is growing. Positive feedback has been collected from users. Conclusion: We identified a need for improved teaching tools to help visualize the (temporally variant) concepts of image reconstruction, and have shown that animations can be a useful tool for this aspect of education. Furthermore, posting animations freely on the web has shown to be a good way to maximize their impact in the community. In future endeavors, we hope to expand this animated content, to cover principles of iterative reconstruction, as well as other phenomena relating to imaging.

  10. Becoming Bombs: 3D Animated Satellite Imagery and the Weaponization of the Civic Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Stahl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This essay traces the recent history of 3D satellite animation from its military origins to its visibility in the civic sphere. Specifically, technologies unveiled in 2004 as Google Earth first received widespread public visibility in the television coverage of the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq. The essay first maps the political economy of the “military-media-geotech” complex, focusing mainly on the coverage of the Iraq War as an nexus of interests. Second, the essay analyzes the aesthetic uses of 3D satellite animation on the news during this period, including how these imaging practices meshed with existing discourses such as the clean war, the weaponization of the civic gaze, and others. The essay concludes with thoughts regarding what these practices mean for the efficacy of the deliberative citizen, public life, and the meaning of war.

  11. V-Man Generation for 3-D Real Time Animation. Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Sibiryakov, Alexander; Ju, Xiangyang

    2007-01-01

    The V-Man project has developed an intuitive authoring and intelligent system to create, animate, control and interact in real-time with a new generation of 3D virtual characters: The V-Men. It combines several innovative algorithms coming from Virtual Reality, Physical Simulation, Computer Vision, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence. Given a high-level task like "walk to that spot" or "get that object", a V-Man generates the complete animation required to accomplish the task. V-Men synthesise motion at runtime according to their environment, their task and their physical parameters, drawing upon its unique set of skills manufactured during the character creation. The key to the system is the automated creation of realistic V-Men, not requiring the expertise of an animator. It is based on real human data captured by 3D static and dynamic body scanners, which is then processed to generate firstly animatable body meshes, secondly 3D garments and finally skinned body meshes.

  12. Beginning Blender Open Source 3D Modeling, Animations, and Game Design

    CERN Document Server

    Flavell, L

    2010-01-01

    A new world of creative possibilities is opened by Blender, the most popular and powerful open source 3D and animation tool. Blender is not just free software; it is also an important professional tool used in animated shorts, television commercials, and shows, as well as in production for films like Spiderman 2. Lance Flavell's Beginning Blender will give you the skills to start shaping new worlds and virtual characters, and perhaps lead you down a new professional path. Beginning Blender covers the Blender 2.5 release in-depth. The book starts with the creation of simple figures using basic

  13. Generating 3D and 3D-like animations of strongly uneven surface microareas of bloodstains from small series of partially out-of-focus digital SEM micrographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortolà, Policarp

    2010-01-01

    When dealing with microscopic still images of some kinds of samples, the out-of-focus problem represents a particularly serious limiting factor for the subsequent generation of fully sharp 3D animations. In order to produce fully-focused 3D animations of strongly uneven surface microareas, a vertical stack of six digital secondary-electron SEM micrographs of a human bloodstain microarea was acquired. Afterwards, single combined images were generated using a macrophotography and light microscope image post-processing software. Subsequently, 3D animations of texture and topography were obtained in different formats using a combination of software tools. Finally, a 3D-like animation of a texture-topography composite was obtained in different formats using another combination of software tools. By one hand, results indicate that the use of image post-processing software not concerned primarily with electron micrographs allows to obtain, in an easy way, fully-focused images of strongly uneven surface microareas of bloodstains from small series of partially out-of-focus digital SEM micrographs. On the other hand, results also indicate that such small series of electron micrographs can be utilized for generating 3D and 3D-like animations that can subsequently be converted into different formats, by using certain user-friendly software facilities not originally designed for use in SEM, that are easily available from Internet. Although the focus of this study was on bloodstains, the methods used in it well probably are also of relevance for studying the surface microstructures of other organic or inorganic materials whose sharp displaying is difficult of obtaining from a single SEM micrograph.

  14. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanis Barnard

    Full Text Available Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is

  15. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Shanis; Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  16. Virtual embryology: a 3D library reconstructed from human embryo sections and animation of development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, M; Miura, T; Shiota, K; Minato, K; Takahashi, T

    1995-01-01

    The volumetric shape of a human embryo and its development is hard to comprehend as they have been viewed as a 2D schemes in a textbook or microscopic sectional image. In this paper, a CAI and research support system for human embryology using multimedia presentation techniques is described. In this system, 3D data is acquired from a series of sliced specimens. Its 3D structure can be viewed interactively by rotating, extracting, and truncating its whole body or organ. Moreover, the development process of embryos can be animated using a morphing technique applied to the specimen in several stages. The system is intended to be used interactively, like a virtual reality system. Hence, the system is called Virtual Embryology.

  17. Protein-protein docking using region-based 3D Zernike descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Yang, Yifeng D; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2009-12-09

    Protein-protein interactions are a pivotal component of many biological processes and mediate a variety of functions. Knowing the tertiary structure of a protein complex is therefore essential for understanding the interaction mechanism. However, experimental techniques to solve the structure of the complex are often found to be difficult. To this end, computational protein-protein docking approaches can provide a useful alternative to address this issue. Prediction of docking conformations relies on methods that effectively capture shape features of the participating proteins while giving due consideration to conformational changes that may occur. We present a novel protein docking algorithm based on the use of 3D Zernike descriptors as regional features of molecular shape. The key motivation of using these descriptors is their invariance to transformation, in addition to a compact representation of local surface shape characteristics. Docking decoys are generated using geometric hashing, which are then ranked by a scoring function that incorporates a buried surface area and a novel geometric complementarity term based on normals associated with the 3D Zernike shape description. Our docking algorithm was tested on both bound and unbound cases in the ZDOCK benchmark 2.0 dataset. In 74% of the bound docking predictions, our method was able to find a near-native solution (interface C-alphaRMSD 3D Zernike descriptors are adept in capturing shape complementarity at the protein-protein interface and useful for protein docking prediction. Rigorous benchmark studies show that our docking approach has a superior performance compared to existing methods.

  18. 3D reconstruction of internal structure of animal body using near-infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trung Nghia; Yamamoto, Kohei; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    To realize three-dimensional (3D) optical imaging of the internal structure of animal body, we have developed a new technique to reconstruct CT images from two-dimensional (2D) transillumination images. In transillumination imaging, the image is blurred due to the strong scattering in the tissue. We had developed a scattering suppression technique using the point spread function (PSF) for a fluorescent light source in the body. In this study, we have newly proposed a technique to apply this PSF for a light source to the image of unknown light-absorbing structure. The effectiveness of the proposed technique was examined in the experiments with a model phantom and a mouse. In the phantom experiment, the absorbers were placed in the tissue-equivalent medium to simulate the light-absorbing organs in mouse body. Near-infrared light was illuminated from one side of the phantom and the image was recorded with CMOS camera from another side. Using the proposed techniques, the scattering effect was efficiently suppressed and the absorbing structure can be visualized in the 2D transillumination image. Using the 2D images obtained in many different orientations, we could reconstruct the 3D image. In the mouse experiment, an anesthetized mouse was held in an acrylic cylindrical holder. We can visualize the internal organs such as kidneys through mouse's abdomen using the proposed technique. The 3D image of the kidneys and a part of the liver were reconstructed. Through these experimental studies, the feasibility of practical 3D imaging of the internal light-absorbing structure of a small animal was verified.

  19. 3D animation model with augmented reality for natural science learning in elementary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendajani, F.; Hakim, A.; Lusita, M. D.; Saputra, G. E.; Ramadhana, A. P.

    2018-05-01

    Many opinions from primary school students' on Natural Science are a difficult lesson. Many subjects are not easily understood by students, especially on materials that teach some theories about natural processes. Such as rain process, condensation and many other processes. The difficulty that students experience in understanding it is that students cannot imagine the things that have been taught in the material. Although there is material to practice some theories but is actually quite limited. There is also a video or simulation material in the form of 2D animated images. Understanding concepts in natural science lessons are also poorly understood by students. Natural Science learning media uses 3-dimensional animation models (3D) with augmented reality technology, which offers some visualization of science lessons. This application was created to visualize a process in Natural Science subject matter. The hope of making this application is to improve student's concept. This app is made to run on a personal computer that comes with a webcam with augmented reality. The app will display a 3D animation if the camera can recognize the marker.

  20. A 3D HIDAC-PET camera with sub-millimeter resolution for imaging small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeavons, A.P.; Chandler, R.A.; Dettmar, C.A.R.

    1999-01-01

    A HIDAC-PET camera consisting essentially of 5 million 0.5 mm gas avalanching detectors has been constructed for small-animal imaging. The particular HIDAC advantage--a high 3D spatial resolution--has been improved to 0.95 mm fwhm and to 0.7 mm fwhm when reconstructing with 3D-OSEM methods incorporating resolution recovery. A depth-of-interaction resolution of 2.5 mm is implicit, due to the laminar construction. Scatter-corrected sensitivity, at 8.9 cps/kBq (i.e. 0.9%) from a central point source, or 7.2 cps/kBq (543 cps/kBq/cm 3 ) from a distributed (40 mm diameter, 60 mm long) source is now much higher than previous, and other, work. A field-of-view of 100 mm (adjustable to 200 mm) diameter by 210 mm axially permits whole-body imaging of small animals, containing typically 4MBqs of activity, at 40 kcps of which 16% are random coincidences, with a typical scatter fraction of 44%. Throughout the field-of-view there are no positional distortions and relative quantitation is uniform to ± 3.5%, but some variation of spatial resolution is found. The performance demonstrates that HIDAC technology is quite appropriate for small-animal PET cameras

  1. Progression of 3D Protein Structure and Dynamics Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Yuji C.

    2018-06-01

    New measurement methodologies have begun to be proposed with the recent progress in the life sciences. Here, we introduce two new methodologies, X-ray fluorescence holography for protein structural analysis and diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT), to observe the dynamic behaviors of individual single molecules.

  2. A 3D high-resolution gamma camera for radiopharmaceutical studies with small animals

    CERN Document Server

    Loudos, G K; Giokaris, N D; Styliaris, E; Archimandritis, S C; Varvarigou, A D; Papanicolas, C N; Majewski, S; Weisenberger, D; Pani, R; Scopinaro, F; Uzunoglu, N K; Maintas, D; Stefanis, K

    2003-01-01

    The results of studies conducted with a small field of view tomographic gamma camera based on a Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube are reported. The system has been used for the evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals in small animals. Phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2 mm in planar and 2-3 mm in tomographic imaging. Imaging studies in mice have been carried out both in 2D and 3D. Conventional radiopharmaceuticals have been used and the results have been compared with images from a clinically used system.

  3. A 3D- and 4D-ESR imaging system for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, K.; Ogata, T.; Togashi, H.; Yokoyama, H.; Ohya-Nishiguchi, H.; Kamada, H.

    1996-01-01

    A new version of in vivo ESR-CT system composed of custom-made 0.7 GHz ESR spectrometer, air-core magnet with a field-scanning coil, three field-gradient coils, and two computers enables up-and down-field, and rapid magnetic-field scanning linearly controlled by computer. 3D-pictures of distribution of nitroxide radicals injected in brains and livers of rats and mice were obtained in 1.5 min with resolution of 1 mm. We have also succeeded in obtaining spatial-time imagings of the animals. (author)

  4. Special effects used in creating 3D animated scenes-part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramescu, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    In present, with the help of computer, we can create special effects that look so real that we almost don't perceive them as being different. These special effects are somehow hard to differentiate from the real elements like those on the screen. With the increasingly accesible 3D field that has more and more areas of application, the 3D technology goes easily from architecture to product designing. Real like 3D animations are used as means of learning, for multimedia presentations of big global corporations, for special effects and even for virtual actors in movies. Technology, as part of the movie art, is considered a prerequisite but the cinematography is the first art that had to wait for the correct intersection of technological development, innovation and human vision in order to attain full achievement. Increasingly more often, the majority of industries is using 3D sequences (three dimensional). 3D represented graphics, commercials and special effects from movies are all designed in 3D. The key for attaining real visual effects is to successfully combine various distinct elements: characters, objects, images and video scenes; like all these elements represent a whole that works in perfect harmony. This article aims to exhibit a game design from these days. Considering the advanced technology and futuristic vision of designers, nowadays we have different and multifarious game models. Special effects are decisively contributing in the creation of a realistic three-dimensional scene. These effects are essential for transmitting the emotional state of the scene. Creating the special effects is a work of finesse in order to achieve high quality scenes. Special effects can be used to get the attention of the onlooker on an object from a scene. Out of the conducted study, the best-selling game of the year 2010 was Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. This way, the article aims for the presented scene to be similar with many locations from this type of games, more

  5. Real-time physics-based 3D biped character animation using an inverted pendulum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yao-Yang; Lin, Wen-Chieh; Cheng, Kuangyou B; Lee, Jehee; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2010-01-01

    We present a physics-based approach to generate 3D biped character animation that can react to dynamical environments in real time. Our approach utilizes an inverted pendulum model to online adjust the desired motion trajectory from the input motion capture data. This online adjustment produces a physically plausible motion trajectory adapted to dynamic environments, which is then used as the desired motion for the motion controllers to track in dynamics simulation. Rather than using Proportional-Derivative controllers whose parameters usually cannot be easily set, our motion tracking adopts a velocity-driven method which computes joint torques based on the desired joint angular velocities. Physically correct full-body motion of the 3D character is computed in dynamics simulation using the computed torques and dynamical model of the character. Our experiments demonstrate that tracking motion capture data with real-time response animation can be achieved easily. In addition, physically plausible motion style editing, automatic motion transition, and motion adaptation to different limb sizes can also be generated without difficulty.

  6. The effects of 3D interactive animated graphics on student learning and attitudes in computer-based instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hye Sun

    Visuals are most extensively used as instructional tools in education to present spatially-based information. Recent computer technology allows the generation of 3D animated visuals to extend the presentation in computer-based instruction. Animated visuals in 3D representation not only possess motivational value that promotes positive attitudes toward instruction but also facilitate learning when the subject matter requires dynamic motion and 3D visual cue. In this study, three questions are explored: (1) how 3D graphics affects student learning and attitude, in comparison with 2D graphics; (2) how animated graphics affects student learning and attitude, in comparison with static graphics; and (3) whether the use of 3D graphics, when they are supported by interactive animation, is the most effective visual cues to improve learning and to develop positive attitudes. A total of 145 eighth-grade students participated in a 2 x 2 factorial design study. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of four computer-based instructions: 2D static; 2D animated; 3D static; and 3D animated. The results indicated that: (1) Students in the 3D graphic condition exhibited more positive attitudes toward instruction than those in the 2D graphic condition. No group differences were found between the posttest score of 3D graphic condition and that of 2D graphic condition. However, students in the 3D graphic condition took less time for information retrieval on posttest than those in the 2D graphic condition. (2) Students in the animated graphic condition exhibited slightly more positive attitudes toward instruction than those in the static graphic condition. No group differences were found between the posttest score of animated graphic condition and that of static graphic condition. However, students in the animated graphic condition took less time for information retrieval on posttest than those in the static graphic condition. (3) Students in the 3D animated graphic condition

  7. Exploring the potential of 3D Zernike descriptors and SVM for protein-protein interface prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daberdaku, Sebastian; Ferrari, Carlo

    2018-02-06

    The correct determination of protein-protein interaction interfaces is important for understanding disease mechanisms and for rational drug design. To date, several computational methods for the prediction of protein interfaces have been developed, but the interface prediction problem is still not fully understood. Experimental evidence suggests that the location of binding sites is imprinted in the protein structure, but there are major differences among the interfaces of the various protein types: the characterising properties can vary a lot depending on the interaction type and function. The selection of an optimal set of features characterising the protein interface and the development of an effective method to represent and capture the complex protein recognition patterns are of paramount importance for this task. In this work we investigate the potential of a novel local surface descriptor based on 3D Zernike moments for the interface prediction task. Descriptors invariant to roto-translations are extracted from circular patches of the protein surface enriched with physico-chemical properties from the HQI8 amino acid index set, and are used as samples for a binary classification problem. Support Vector Machines are used as a classifier to distinguish interface local surface patches from non-interface ones. The proposed method was validated on 16 classes of proteins extracted from the Protein-Protein Docking Benchmark 5.0 and compared to other state-of-the-art protein interface predictors (SPPIDER, PrISE and NPS-HomPPI). The 3D Zernike descriptors are able to capture the similarity among patterns of physico-chemical and biochemical properties mapped on the protein surface arising from the various spatial arrangements of the underlying residues, and their usage can be easily extended to other sets of amino acid properties. The results suggest that the choice of a proper set of features characterising the protein interface is crucial for the interface prediction

  8. SketchBio: a scientist's 3D interface for molecular modeling and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldon, Shawn M; Thompson, Peter M; Hahn, Patrick J; Taylor, Russell M

    2014-10-30

    Because of the difficulties involved in learning and using 3D modeling and rendering software, many scientists hire programmers or animators to create models and animations. This both slows the discovery process and provides opportunities for miscommunication. Working with multiple collaborators, a tool was developed (based on a set of design goals) to enable them to directly construct models and animations. SketchBio is presented, a tool that incorporates state-of-the-art bimanual interaction and drop shadows to enable rapid construction of molecular structures and animations. It includes three novel features: crystal-by-example, pose-mode physics, and spring-based layout that accelerate operations common in the formation of molecular models. Design decisions and their consequences are presented, including cases where iterative design was required to produce effective approaches. The design decisions, novel features, and inclusion of state-of-the-art techniques enabled SketchBio to meet all of its design goals. These features and decisions can be incorporated into existing and new tools to improve their effectiveness.

  9. A 3D character animation engine for multimodal interaction on mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandali, Enrico; Lavagetto, Fabio; Pisano, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Talking virtual characters are graphical simulations of real or imaginary persons that enable natural and pleasant multimodal interaction with the user, by means of voice, eye gaze, facial expression and gestures. This paper presents an implementation of a 3D virtual character animation and rendering engine, compliant with the MPEG-4 standard, running on Symbian-based SmartPhones. Real-time animation of virtual characters on mobile devices represents a challenging task, since many limitations must be taken into account with respect to processing power, graphics capabilities, disk space and execution memory size. The proposed optimization techniques allow to overcome these issues, guaranteeing a smooth and synchronous animation of facial expressions and lip movements on mobile phones such as Sony-Ericsson's P800 and Nokia's 6600. The animation engine is specifically targeted to the development of new "Over The Air" services, based on embodied conversational agents, with applications in entertainment (interactive story tellers), navigation aid (virtual guides to web sites and mobile services), news casting (virtual newscasters) and education (interactive virtual teachers).

  10. The ModFOLD4 server for the quality assessment of 3D protein models

    OpenAIRE

    McGuffin, Liam J.; Buenavista, Maria T.; Roche, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Once you have generated a 3D model of a protein,\\ud how do you know whether it bears any resemblance\\ud to the actual structure? To determine the usefulness\\ud of 3D models of proteins, they must be assessed in\\ud terms of their quality by methods that predict their\\ud similarity to the native structure. The ModFOLD4\\ud server is the latest version of our leading independent\\ud server for the estimation of both the global and\\ud local (per-residue) quality of 3D protein models. The\\ud server ...

  11. Protein-protein docking using region-based 3D Zernike descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sael Lee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are a pivotal component of many biological processes and mediate a variety of functions. Knowing the tertiary structure of a protein complex is therefore essential for understanding the interaction mechanism. However, experimental techniques to solve the structure of the complex are often found to be difficult. To this end, computational protein-protein docking approaches can provide a useful alternative to address this issue. Prediction of docking conformations relies on methods that effectively capture shape features of the participating proteins while giving due consideration to conformational changes that may occur. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm based on the use of 3D Zernike descriptors as regional features of molecular shape. The key motivation of using these descriptors is their invariance to transformation, in addition to a compact representation of local surface shape characteristics. Docking decoys are generated using geometric hashing, which are then ranked by a scoring function that incorporates a buried surface area and a novel geometric complementarity term based on normals associated with the 3D Zernike shape description. Our docking algorithm was tested on both bound and unbound cases in the ZDOCK benchmark 2.0 dataset. In 74% of the bound docking predictions, our method was able to find a near-native solution (interface C-αRMSD ≤ 2.5 Å within the top 1000 ranks. For unbound docking, among the 60 complexes for which our algorithm returned at least one hit, 60% of the cases were ranked within the top 2000. Comparison with existing shape-based docking algorithms shows that our method has a better performance than the others in unbound docking while remaining competitive for bound docking cases. Conclusion We show for the first time that the 3D Zernike descriptors are adept in capturing shape complementarity at the protein-protein interface and useful for

  12. A small animal image guided irradiation system study using 3D dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xin; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Admovics, John

    2015-01-01

    In a high resolution image-guided small animal irradiation platform, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is integrated with an irradiation unit for precise targeting. Precise quality assurance is essential for both imaging and irradiation components. The conventional commissioning techniques with films face major challenges due to alignment uncertainty and labour intensive film preparation and scanning. In addition, due to the novel design of this platform the mouse stage rotation for CBCT imaging is perpendicular to the gantry rotation for irradiation. Because these two rotations are associated with different mechanical systems, discrepancy between rotation isocenters exists. In order to deliver x-ray precisely, it is essential to verify coincidence of the imaging and the irradiation isocenters. A 3D PRESAGE dosimeter can provide an excellent tool for checking dosimetry and verifying coincidence of irradiation and imaging coordinates in one system. Dosimetric measurements were performed to obtain beam profiles and percent depth dose (PDD). Isocentricity and coincidence of the mouse stage and gantry rotations were evaluated with starshots acquired using PRESAGE dosimeters. A single PRESAGE dosimeter can provide 3 -D information in both geometric and dosimetric uncertainty, which is crucial for translational studies

  13. Software Development: 3D Animations and Creating User Interfaces for Realistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Orlando Enrique

    2015-01-01

    My fall 2015 semester was spent at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center working in the Integrated Graphics, Operations, and Analysis Laboratory (IGOAL). My first project was to create a video animation that could tell the story of OMICS. OMICS is a term being used in the field of biomedical science to describe the collective technologies that study biological systems, such as what makes up a cell and how it functions with other systems. In the IGOAL I used a large 23 inch Wacom monitor to draw storyboards, graphics, and line art animations. I used Blender as the 3D environment to sculpt, shape, cut or modify the several scenes and models for the video. A challenge creating this video was to take a term used in biomedical science and describe it in such a way that an 8th grade student can understand. I used a line art style because it would visually set the tone for what we thought was an educational style. In order to get a handle on the perspective and overall feel for the animation without overloading my workspace, I split up the 2 minute animation into several scenes. I used Blender's python scripting capabilities which allowed for the addition of plugins to add or modify tools. The scripts can also directly interact with the objects to create naturalistic patterns or movements. After collecting the rendered scenes, I used Blender's built-in video editing workspace to output the animation. My second project was to write software that emulates a physical system's interface. The interface was to simulate a boat, ROV, and winch system. Simulations are a time and cost effective way to test complicated data and provide training for operators without having to use expensive hardware. We created the virtual controls with 3-D Blender models and 2-D graphics, and then add functionality in C# using the Unity game engine. The Unity engine provides several essential behaviors of a simulator, such as the start and update functions. A framework for Unity, which was developed in

  14. Three-Dimensional Reconstructions Come to Life – Interactive 3D PDF Animations in Functional Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kamp, Thomas; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Vagovič, Patrik; Baumbach, Tilo; Riedel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Digital surface mesh models based on segmented datasets have become an integral part of studies on animal anatomy and functional morphology; usually, they are published as static images, movies or as interactive PDF files. We demonstrate the use of animated 3D models embedded in PDF documents, which combine the advantages of both movie and interactivity, based on the example of preserved Trigonopterus weevils. The method is particularly suitable to simulate joints with largely deterministic movements due to precise form closure. We illustrate the function of an individual screw-and-nut type hip joint and proceed to the complex movements of the entire insect attaining a defence position. This posture is achieved by a specific cascade of movements: Head and legs interlock mutually and with specific features of thorax and the first abdominal ventrite, presumably to increase the mechanical stability of the beetle and to maintain the defence position with minimal muscle activity. The deterministic interaction of accurately fitting body parts follows a defined sequence, which resembles a piece of engineering. PMID:25029366

  15. 3DSwap: Curated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping

    KAUST Repository

    Shameer, Khader

    2011-09-29

    Three-dimensional domain swapping is a unique protein structural phenomenon where two or more protein chains in a protein oligomer share a common structural segment between individual chains. This phenomenon is observed in an array of protein structures in oligomeric conformation. Protein structures in swapped conformations perform diverse functional roles and are also associated with deposition diseases in humans. We have performed in-depth literature curation and structural bioinformatics analyses to develop an integrated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping. The hallmark of 3D domain swapping is the presence of distinct structural segments such as the hinge and swapped regions. We have curated the literature to delineate the boundaries of these regions. In addition, we have defined several new concepts like \\'secondary major interface\\' to represent the interface properties arising as a result of 3D domain swapping, and a new quantitative measure for the \\'extent of swapping\\' in structures. The catalog of proteins reported in 3DSwap knowledgebase has been generated using an integrated structural bioinformatics workflow of database searches, literature curation, by structure visualization and sequence-structure-function analyses. The current version of the 3DSwap knowledgebase reports 293 protein structures, the analysis of such a compendium of protein structures will further the understanding molecular factors driving 3D domain swapping. The Author(s) 2011.

  16. Proteopedia: A Collaborative, Virtual 3D Web-Resource for Protein and Biomolecule Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, Eran; Prilusky, Jaime, Sussman, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    Protein structures are hard to represent on paper. They are large, complex, and three-dimensional (3D)--four-dimensional if conformational changes count! Unlike most of their substrates, which can easily be drawn out in full chemical formula, drawing every atom in a protein would usually be a mess. Simplifications like showing only the surface of…

  17. Protein 3D Structure and Electron Microscopy Map Retrieval Using 3D-SURFER2.0 and EM-SURFER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xusi; Wei, Qing; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-12-08

    With the rapid growth in the number of solved protein structures stored in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB), it is essential to develop tools to perform real-time structure similarity searches against the entire structure database. Since conventional structure alignment methods need to sample different orientations of proteins in the three-dimensional space, they are time consuming and unsuitable for rapid, real-time database searches. To this end, we have developed 3D-SURFER and EM-SURFER, which utilize 3D Zernike descriptors (3DZD) to conduct high-throughput protein structure comparison, visualization, and analysis. Taking an atomic structure or an electron microscopy map of a protein or a protein complex as input, the 3DZD of a query protein is computed and compared with the 3DZD of all other proteins in PDB or EMDB. In addition, local geometrical characteristics of a query protein can be analyzed using VisGrid and LIGSITE CSC in 3D-SURFER. This article describes how to use 3D-SURFER and EM-SURFER to carry out protein surface shape similarity searches, local geometric feature analysis, and interpretation of the search results. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Function of pretribosphenic and tribosphenic mammalian molars inferred from 3D animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Julia A; Martin, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Appearance of the tribosphenic molar in the Late Jurassic (160 Ma) is a crucial innovation for food processing in mammalian evolution. This molar type is characterized by a protocone, a talonid basin and a two-phased chewing cycle, all of which are apomorphic. In this functional study on the teeth of Late Jurassic Dryolestes leiriensis and the living marsupial Monodelphis domestica, we demonstrate that pretribosphenic and tribosphenic molars show fundamental differences of food reduction strategies, representing a shift in dental function during the transition of tribosphenic mammals. By using the Occlusal Fingerprint Analyser (OFA), we simulated the chewing motions of the pretribosphenic Dryolestes that represents an evolutionary precursor condition to such tribosphenic mammals as Monodelphis. Animation of chewing path and detection of collisional contacts between virtual models of teeth suggests that Dryolestes differs from the classical two-phased chewing movement of tribosphenidans, due to the narrowing of the interdental space in cervical (crown-root transition) direction, the inclination angle of the hypoflexid groove, and the unicuspid talonid. The pretribosphenic chewing cycle is equivalent to phase I of the tribosphenic chewing cycle, but the former lacks phase II of the tribosphenic chewing. The new approach can analyze the chewing cycle of the jaw by using polygonal 3D models of tooth surfaces, in a way that is complementary to the electromyography and strain gauge studies of muscle function of living animals. The technique allows alignment and scaling of isolated fossil teeth and utilizes the wear facet orientation and striation of the teeth to reconstruct the chewing path of extinct mammals.

  19. Function of pretribosphenic and tribosphenic mammalian molars inferred from 3D animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Julia A.; Martin, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Appearance of the tribosphenic molar in the Late Jurassic (160 Ma) is a crucial innovation for food processing in mammalian evolution. This molar type is characterized by a protocone, a talonid basin and a two-phased chewing cycle, all of which are apomorphic. In this functional study on the teeth of Late Jurassic Dryolestes leiriensis and the living marsupial Monodelphis domestica, we demonstrate that pretribosphenic and tribosphenic molars show fundamental differences of food reduction strategies, representing a shift in dental function during the transition of tribosphenic mammals. By using the Occlusal Fingerprint Analyser (OFA), we simulated the chewing motions of the pretribosphenic Dryolestes that represents an evolutionary precursor condition to such tribosphenic mammals as Monodelphis. Animation of chewing path and detection of collisional contacts between virtual models of teeth suggests that Dryolestes differs from the classical two-phased chewing movement of tribosphenidans, due to the narrowing of the interdental space in cervical (crown-root transition) direction, the inclination angle of the hypoflexid groove, and the unicuspid talonid. The pretribosphenic chewing cycle is equivalent to phase I of the tribosphenic chewing cycle, but the former lacks phase II of the tribosphenic chewing. The new approach can analyze the chewing cycle of the jaw by using polygonal 3D models of tooth surfaces, in a way that is complementary to the electromyography and strain gauge studies of muscle function of living animals. The technique allows alignment and scaling of isolated fossil teeth and utilizes the wear facet orientation and striation of the teeth to reconstruct the chewing path of extinct mammals.

  20. Scaling Quelccaya: Using 3-D Animation and Satellite Data To Visualize Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, A.; Leich, M.

    2017-12-01

    The near-global glacier retreat of recent decades is among the most convincing evidence for contemporary climate change. The epicenter of this action, however, is often far from population-dense centers. How can a glacier's scale, both physical and temporal, be communicated to those faraway? This project, an artists-scientist collaboration, proposes an alternate system for presenting climate change data, designed to evoke a more visceral response through a visual, geospatial, poetic approach. Focusing on the Quelccaya Ice Cap, the world's largest tropical glaciated area located in the Peruvian Andes, we integrate 30 years of satellite imagery and elevation models with 3D animation and gaming software, to bring it into a virtual juxtaposition with a model of the city of Chicago. Using Chicago as a cosmopolitan North American "measuring stick," we apply glaciological models to determine, for instance, the amount of ice that has melted on Quelccaya over the last 30 years and what the height of an equivalent amount of snow would fall on the city of Chicago (circa 600 feet, higher than the Willis Tower). Placing the two sites in a framework of intimate scale, we present a more imaginative and psychologically-astute manner of portraying the sober facts of climate change, by inviting viewers to learn and consider without inducing fear.

  1. A 3D-Printed Sensor for Monitoring Biosignals in Small Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-Joon; Byun, Donghak; Nam, Tai-Seung; Choi, Seok-Yong; Lee, Byung-Geun; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Sohee

    2017-01-01

    Although additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing, were first introduced in the 1980s, they have recently gained remarkable popularity owing to decreased costs. 3D printing has already emerged as a viable technology in many industries; in particular, it is a good replacement for microfabrication technology. Microfabrication technology usually requires expensive clean room equipment and skilled engineers; however, 3D printing can reduce both cost and time dramatically. Al...

  2. Animation and radiobiological analysis of 3D motion in conformal radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, R I; Graham, P A; Moore, C J; Logue, J P; Sharrock, P J

    1999-07-01

    To allow treatment plans to be evaluated against the range of expected organ motion and set up error anticipated during treatment. Planning tools have been developed to allow concurrent animation and radiobiological analysis of three dimensional (3D) target and organ motion in conformal radiotherapy. Surfaces fitted to structures outlined on CT studies are projected onto pre-treatment images or onto megavoltage images collected during the patient treatment. Visual simulation of tumour and normal tissue movement is then performed by the application of three dimensional affine transformations, to the selected surface. Concurrent registration of the surface motion with the 3D dose distribution allows calculation of the change in dose to the volume. Realistic patterns of motion can be applied to the structure to simulate inter-fraction motion and set-up error. The biologically effective dose for the structure is calculated for each fraction as the surface moves over the course of the treatment and is used to calculate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) or tumour control probability (TCP) for the moving structure. The tool has been used to evaluate conformal therapy plans against set up measurements recorded during patient treatments. NTCP and TCP were calculated for a patient whose set up had been corrected after systematic deviations from plan geometry were measured during treatment, the effect of not making the correction were also assessed. TCP for the moving tumour was reduced if inadequate margins were set for the treatment. Modelling suggests that smaller margins could have been set for the set up corrected during the course of the treatment. The NTCP for the rectum was also higher for the uncorrected set up due to a more rectal tissue falling in the high dose region. This approach provides a simple way for clinical users to utilise information incrementally collected throughout the whole of a patient's treatment. In particular it is possible to

  3. Virtual animation of victim-specific 3D models obtained from CT scans for forensic reconstructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, C; Olsen, K B; Hansen, S H

    2017-01-01

    Post-mortem CT scanning (PMCT) has been introduced at several forensic medical institutions many years ago and has proved to be a useful tool. 3D models of bones, skin, internal organs and bullet paths can rapidly be generated using post-processing software. These 3D models reflect the individual...

  4. Local-global alignment for finding 3D similarities in protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemla, Adam T [Brentwood, CA

    2011-09-20

    A method of finding 3D similarities in protein structures of a first molecule and a second molecule. The method comprises providing preselected information regarding the first molecule and the second molecule. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Longest Continuous Segments (LCS) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Global Distance Test (GDT) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Local Global Alignment Scoring function (LGA_S) analysis. Verifying constructed alignment and repeating the steps to find the regions of 3D similarities in protein structures.

  5. 3D pressure field in lipid membranes and membrane-protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, O H Samuli; Risselada, H Jelger; Louhivuori, Martti

    2009-01-01

    We calculate full 3D pressure fields for inhomogeneous nanoscale systems using molecular dynamics simulation data. The fields represent systems with increasing level of complexity, ranging from semivesicles and vesicles to membranes characterized by coexistence of two phases, including also...... a protein-membrane complex. We show that the 3D pressure field is distinctly different for curved and planar bilayers, the pressure field depends strongly on the phase of the membrane, and that an integral protein modulates the tension and elastic properties of the membrane....

  6. Effect of 3D animation videos over 2D video projections in periodontal health education among dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhulipalla, Ravindranath; Marella, Yamuna; Katuri, Kishore Kumar; Nagamani, Penupothu; Talada, Kishore; Kakarlapudi, Anusha

    2015-01-01

    There is limited evidence about the distinguished effect of 3D oral health education videos over conventional 2 dimensional projections in improving oral health knowledge. This randomized controlled trial was done to test the effect of 3 dimensional oral health educational videos among first year dental students. 80 first year dental students were enrolled and divided into two groups (test and control). In the test group, 3D animation and in the control group, regular 2D video projections pertaining to periodontal anatomy, etiology, presenting conditions, preventive measures and treatment of periodontal problems were shown. Effect of 3D animation was evaluated by using a questionnaire consisting of 10 multiple choice questions given to all participants at baseline, immediately after and 1month after the intervention. Clinical parameters like Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI), and Oral Hygiene Index Simplified (OHI-S) were measured at baseline and 1 month follow up. A significant difference in the post intervention knowledge scores was found between the groups as assessed by unpaired t-test (p3D animation videos are more effective over 2D videos in periodontal disease education and knowledge recall. The application of 3D animation results also demonstrate a better visual comprehension for students and greater health care outcomes.

  7. The RCSB protein data bank: integrative view of protein, gene and 3D structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Peter W; Prlić, Andreas; Altunkaya, Ali; Bi, Chunxiao; Bradley, Anthony R; Christie, Cole H; Costanzo, Luigi Di; Duarte, Jose M; Dutta, Shuchismita; Feng, Zukang; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S; Hudson, Brian; Kalro, Tara; Lowe, Robert; Peisach, Ezra; Randle, Christopher; Rose, Alexander S; Shao, Chenghua; Tao, Yi-Ping; Valasatava, Yana; Voigt, Maria; Westbrook, John D; Woo, Jesse; Yang, Huangwang; Young, Jasmine Y; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M; Burley, Stephen K

    2017-01-04

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://rcsb.org), the US data center for the global PDB archive, makes PDB data freely available to all users, from structural biologists to computational biologists and beyond. New tools and resources have been added to the RCSB PDB web portal in support of a 'Structural View of Biology.' Recent developments have improved the User experience, including the high-speed NGL Viewer that provides 3D molecular visualization in any web browser, improved support for data file download and enhanced organization of website pages for query, reporting and individual structure exploration. Structure validation information is now visible for all archival entries. PDB data have been integrated with external biological resources, including chromosomal position within the human genome; protein modifications; and metabolic pathways. PDB-101 educational materials have been reorganized into a searchable website and expanded to include new features such as the Geis Digital Archive. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. A 3D-Printed Sensor for Monitoring Biosignals in Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Joon Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although additive manufacturing technologies, also known as 3D printing, were first introduced in the 1980s, they have recently gained remarkable popularity owing to decreased costs. 3D printing has already emerged as a viable technology in many industries; in particular, it is a good replacement for microfabrication technology. Microfabrication technology usually requires expensive clean room equipment and skilled engineers; however, 3D printing can reduce both cost and time dramatically. Although 3D printing technology has started to emerge into microfabrication manufacturing and medical applications, it is typically limited to creating mechanical structures such as hip prosthesis or dental implants. There have been increased interests in wearable devices and the critical part of such wearable devices is the sensing part to detect biosignals noninvasively. In this paper, we have built a 3D-printed sensor that can measure electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram from zebrafish. Despite measuring biosignals noninvasively from zebrafish has been known to be difficult due to that it is an underwater creature, we were able to successfully obtain electrophysiological information using the 3D-printed sensor. This 3D printing technique can accelerate the development of simple noninvasive sensors using affordable equipment and provide an economical solution to physiologists who are unfamiliar with complicated microfabrication techniques.

  9. FeatureMap3D - a tool to map protein features and sequence conservation onto homologous structures in the PDB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wernersson, Rasmus; Rapacki, Krzysztof; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    FeatureMap3D is a web-based tool that maps protein features onto 3D structures. The user provides sequences annotated with any feature of interest, such as post-translational modifications, protease cleavage sites or exonic structure and FeatureMap3D will then search the Protein Data Bank (PDB) f...

  10. 3D Printing of Protein Models in an Undergraduate Laboratory: Leucine Zippers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    An upper-division undergraduate laboratory experiment is described that explores the structure/function relationship of protein domains, namely leucine zippers, through a molecular graphics computer program and physical models fabricated by 3D printing. By generating solvent accessible surfaces and color-coding hydrophobic, basic, and acidic amino…

  11. Implication of the cause of differences in 3D structures of proteins with high sequence identity based on analyses of amino acid sequences and 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Masanari; Sugita, Masatake; Kikuchi, Takeshi

    2014-09-18

    Proteins that share a high sequence homology while exhibiting drastically different 3D structures are investigated in this study. Recently, artificial proteins related to the sequences of the GA and IgG binding GB domains of human serum albumin have been designed. These artificial proteins, referred to as GA and GB, share 98% amino acid sequence identity but exhibit different 3D structures, namely, a 3α bundle versus a 4β + α structure. Discriminating between their 3D structures based on their amino acid sequences is a very difficult problem. In the present work, in addition to using bioinformatics techniques, an analysis based on inter-residue average distance statistics is used to address this problem. It was hard to distinguish which structure a given sequence would take only with the results of ordinary analyses like BLAST and conservation analyses. However, in addition to these analyses, with the analysis based on the inter-residue average distance statistics and our sequence tendency analysis, we could infer which part would play an important role in its structural formation. The results suggest possible determinants of the different 3D structures for sequences with high sequence identity. The possibility of discriminating between the 3D structures based on the given sequences is also discussed.

  12. The AUDANA algorithm for automated protein 3D structure determination from NMR NOE data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Petit, Chad M.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Stark, Jaime L.; Markley, John L.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce AUDANA (Automated Database-Assisted NOE Assignment), an algorithm for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins from NMR data that automates the assignment of 3D-NOE spectra, generates distance constraints, and conducts iterative high temperature molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. The protein sequence, chemical shift assignments, and NOE spectra are the only required inputs. Distance constraints generated automatically from ambiguously assigned NOE peaks are validated during the structure calculation against information from an enlarged version of the freely available PACSY database that incorporates information on protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This approach yields robust sets of distance constraints and 3D structures. We evaluated the performance of AUDANA with input data for 14 proteins ranging in size from 6 to 25 kDa that had 27–98 % sequence identity to proteins in the database. In all cases, the automatically calculated 3D structures passed stringent validation tests. Structures were determined with and without database support. In 9/14 cases, database support improved the agreement with manually determined structures in the PDB and in 11/14 cases, database support lowered the r.m.s.d. of the family of 20 structural models.

  13. The AUDANA algorithm for automated protein 3D structure determination from NMR NOE data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woonghee, E-mail: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison and Biochemistry Department (United States); Petit, Chad M. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics (United States); Cornilescu, Gabriel; Stark, Jaime L.; Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison and Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2016-06-15

    We introduce AUDANA (Automated Database-Assisted NOE Assignment), an algorithm for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins from NMR data that automates the assignment of 3D-NOE spectra, generates distance constraints, and conducts iterative high temperature molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. The protein sequence, chemical shift assignments, and NOE spectra are the only required inputs. Distance constraints generated automatically from ambiguously assigned NOE peaks are validated during the structure calculation against information from an enlarged version of the freely available PACSY database that incorporates information on protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This approach yields robust sets of distance constraints and 3D structures. We evaluated the performance of AUDANA with input data for 14 proteins ranging in size from 6 to 25 kDa that had 27–98 % sequence identity to proteins in the database. In all cases, the automatically calculated 3D structures passed stringent validation tests. Structures were determined with and without database support. In 9/14 cases, database support improved the agreement with manually determined structures in the PDB and in 11/14 cases, database support lowered the r.m.s.d. of the family of 20 structural models.

  14. Effectiveness of Applying 2D Static Depictions and 3D Animations to Orthographic Views Learning in Graphical Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Fu; Chiang, Ming-Chin

    2013-01-01

    This study provides experiment results as an educational reference for instructors to help student obtain a better way to learn orthographic views in graphical course. A visual experiment was held to explore the comprehensive differences between 2D static and 3D animation object features; the goal was to reduce the possible misunderstanding…

  15. Virtual animation of victim-specific 3D models obtained from CT scans for forensic reconstructions: Living and dead subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, C; Olsen, K B; Hansen, S H

    2017-09-01

    Post-mortem CT scanning (PMCT) has been introduced at several forensic medical institutions many years ago and has proved to be a useful tool. 3D models of bones, skin, internal organs and bullet paths can rapidly be generated using post-processing software. These 3D models reflect the individual physiognomics and can be used to create whole-body 3D virtual animations. In such way, virtual reconstructions of the probable ante-mortem postures of victims can be constructed and contribute to understand the sequence of events. This procedure is demonstrated in two victims of gunshot injuries. Case #1 was a man showing three perforating gunshot wounds, who died due to the injuries of the incident. Whole-body PMCT was performed and 3D reconstructions of bones, relevant internal organs and bullet paths were generated. Using 3ds Max software and a human anatomy 3D model, a virtual animated body was built and probable ante-mortem postures visualized. Case #2 was a man presenting three perforating gunshot wounds, who survived the incident: one in the left arm and two in the thorax. Only CT scans of the thorax, abdomen and the injured arm were provided by the hospital. Therefore, a whole-body 3D model reflecting the anatomical proportions of the patient was made combining the actual bones of the victim with those obtained from the human anatomy 3D model. The resulted 3D model was used for the animation process. Several probable postures were also visualized in this case. It has be shown that in Case #1 the lesions and the bullet path were not consistent with an upright standing position; instead, the victim was slightly bent forward, i.e. he was sitting or running when he was shot. In Case #2, one of the bullets could have passed through the arm and continued into the thorax. In conclusion, specialized 3D modelling and animation techniques allow for the reconstruction of ante-mortem postures based on both PMCT and clinical CT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  16. Computational methods for constructing protein structure models from 3D electron microscopy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2013-10-01

    Protein structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (EM) has made significant progress in the past decades. Resolutions of EM maps have been improving as evidenced by recently reported structures that are solved at high resolutions close to 3Å. Computational methods play a key role in interpreting EM data. Among many computational procedures applied to an EM map to obtain protein structure information, in this article we focus on reviewing computational methods that model protein three-dimensional (3D) structures from a 3D EM density map that is constructed from two-dimensional (2D) maps. The computational methods we discuss range from de novo methods, which identify structural elements in an EM map, to structure fitting methods, where known high resolution structures are fit into a low-resolution EM map. A list of available computational tools is also provided. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. G2S: A web-service for annotating genomic variants on 3D protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juexin; Sheridan, Robert; Sumer, S Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Xu, Dong; Gao, Jianjiong

    2018-01-27

    Accurately mapping and annotating genomic locations on 3D protein structures is a key step in structure-based analysis of genomic variants detected by recent large-scale sequencing efforts. There are several mapping resources currently available, but none of them provides a web API (Application Programming Interface) that support programmatic access. We present G2S, a real-time web API that provides automated mapping of genomic variants on 3D protein structures. G2S can align genomic locations of variants, protein locations, or protein sequences to protein structures and retrieve the mapped residues from structures. G2S API uses REST-inspired design conception and it can be used by various clients such as web browsers, command terminals, programming languages and other bioinformatics tools for bringing 3D structures into genomic variant analysis. The webserver and source codes are freely available at https://g2s.genomenexus.org. g2s@genomenexus.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Visualization of the variability of 3D statistical shape models by animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamecker, Hans; Seebass, Martin; Lange, Thomas; Hege, Hans-Christian; Deuflhard, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Models of the 3D shape of anatomical objects and the knowledge about their statistical variability are of great benefit in many computer assisted medical applications like images analysis, therapy or surgery planning. Statistical model of shapes have successfully been applied to automate the task of image segmentation. The generation of 3D statistical shape models requires the identification of corresponding points on two shapes. This remains a difficult problem, especially for shapes of complicated topology. In order to interpret and validate variations encoded in a statistical shape model, visual inspection is of great importance. This work describes the generation and interpretation of statistical shape models of the liver and the pelvic bone.

  19. Functionalization of 3D scaffolds with protein-releasing biomaterials for intracellular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Steurer, Christoph; Roldán, Mònica; Vendrell, Meritxell; Vidaurre-Agut, Carla; Tarruella, Anna; Saldaña, Laura; Vilaboa, Nuria; Parera, Marc; Elizondo, Elisa; Ratera, Imma; Ventosa, Nora; Veciana, Jaume; Campillo-Fernández, Alberto J; García-Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2013-10-10

    Appropriate combinations of mechanical and biological stimuli are required to promote proper colonization of substrate materials in regenerative medicine. In this context, 3D scaffolds formed by compatible and biodegradable materials are under continuous development in an attempt to mimic the extracellular environment of mammalian cells. We have here explored how novel 3D porous scaffolds constructed by polylactic acid, polycaprolactone or chitosan can be decorated with bacterial inclusion bodies, submicron protein particles formed by releasable functional proteins. A simple dipping-based decoration method tested here specifically favors the penetration of the functional particles deeper than 300μm from the materials' surface. The functionalized surfaces support the intracellular delivery of biologically active proteins to up to more than 80% of the colonizing cells, a process that is slightly influenced by the chemical nature of the scaffold. The combination of 3D soft scaffolds and protein-based sustained release systems (Bioscaffolds) offers promise in the fabrication of bio-inspired hybrid matrices for multifactorial control of cell proliferation in tissue engineering under complex architectonic setting-ups. © 2013.

  20. Identifying secondary structures in proteins using NMR chemical shift 3D correlation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Dorai, Kavita

    2013-06-01

    NMR chemical shifts are accurate indicators of molecular environment and have been extensively used as aids in protein structure determination. This work focuses on creating empirical 3D correlation maps of backbone chemical shift nuclei for use as identifiers of secondary structure elements in proteins. A correlated database of backbone nuclei chemical shifts was constructed from experimental structural data gathered from entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) as well as isotropic chemical shift values from the RefDB database. Rigorous statistical analysis of the maps led to the conclusion that specific correlations between triplets of backbone chemical shifts are best able to differentiate between different secondary structures such as α-helices, β-strands and turns. The method is compared with similar techniques that use NMR chemical shift information as aids in biomolecular structure determination and performs well in tests done on experimental data determined for different types of proteins, including large multi-domain proteins and membrane proteins.

  1. Deposit3D: a tool for automating structure depositions to the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, J.; Hendle, J.; Burley, S. K.; Kissinger, C. R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a Python script that may be used to gather all required structure-annotation information into an mmCIF file for upload through the RCSB PDB ADIT structure-deposition interface. Almost all successful protein structure-determination projects in the public sector culminate in a structure deposition to the Protein Data Bank (PDB). In order to expedite the deposition proces, Deposit3D has been developed. This command-line script calculates or gathers all the required structure-deposition information and outputs this data into a mmCIF file for subsequent upload through the RCSB PDB ADIT interface. Deposit3D might be particularly useful for structural genomics pipeline projects because it allows workers involved with various stages of a structure-determination project to pool their different categories of annotation information before starting a deposition session

  2. Deposit3D: a tool for automating structure depositions to the Protein Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, J., E-mail: jbadger@active-sight.com; Hendle, J.; Burley, S. K.; Kissinger, C. R. [SGX Inc., 10505 Roselle Street, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a Python script that may be used to gather all required structure-annotation information into an mmCIF file for upload through the RCSB PDB ADIT structure-deposition interface. Almost all successful protein structure-determination projects in the public sector culminate in a structure deposition to the Protein Data Bank (PDB). In order to expedite the deposition proces, Deposit3D has been developed. This command-line script calculates or gathers all the required structure-deposition information and outputs this data into a mmCIF file for subsequent upload through the RCSB PDB ADIT interface. Deposit3D might be particularly useful for structural genomics pipeline projects because it allows workers involved with various stages of a structure-determination project to pool their different categories of annotation information before starting a deposition session.

  3. Comparison of Enzymes / Non-Enzymes Proteins Classification Models Based on 3D, Composition, Sequences and Topological Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu, Cristian Robert

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of Enzymes / Non-Enzymes Proteins Classification Models Based on 3D, Composition, Sequences and Topological Indices, German Conference on Bioinformatics (GCB), Potsdam, Germany (September, 2007)

  4. ANIMATION STRATEGIES FOR SMOOTH TRANSFORMATIONS BETWEEN DISCRETE LODS OF 3D BUILDING MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The cartographic 3D visualization of urban areas has experienced tremendous progress over the last years. An increasing number of applications operate interactively in real-time and thus require advanced techniques to improve the quality and time response of dynamic scenes. The main focus of this article concentrates on the discussion of strategies for smooth transformation between two discrete levels of detail (LOD of 3D building models that are represented as restricted triangle meshes. Because the operation order determines the geometrical and topological properties of the transformation process as well as its visual perception by a human viewer, three different strategies are proposed and subsequently analyzed. The simplest one orders transformation operations by the length of the edges to be collapsed, while the other two strategies introduce a general transformation direction in the form of a moving plane. This plane either pushes the nodes that need to be removed, e.g. during the transformation of a detailed LOD model to a coarser one, towards the main building body, or triggers the edge collapse operations used as transformation paths for the cartographic generalization.

  5. Animation Strategies for Smooth Transformations Between Discrete Lods of 3d Building Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, Martin; Wichmann, Andreas; Filippovska, Yevgeniya; Hermes, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    The cartographic 3D visualization of urban areas has experienced tremendous progress over the last years. An increasing number of applications operate interactively in real-time and thus require advanced techniques to improve the quality and time response of dynamic scenes. The main focus of this article concentrates on the discussion of strategies for smooth transformation between two discrete levels of detail (LOD) of 3D building models that are represented as restricted triangle meshes. Because the operation order determines the geometrical and topological properties of the transformation process as well as its visual perception by a human viewer, three different strategies are proposed and subsequently analyzed. The simplest one orders transformation operations by the length of the edges to be collapsed, while the other two strategies introduce a general transformation direction in the form of a moving plane. This plane either pushes the nodes that need to be removed, e.g. during the transformation of a detailed LOD model to a coarser one, towards the main building body, or triggers the edge collapse operations used as transformation paths for the cartographic generalization.

  6. Finding and tracing human MSC in 3D microenvironments with the photoconvertible protein Dendra2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, Hugo R.; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Oliveira, Carla M.; Gomes, David; Mateus, Denisa D.; Oliveira, Carla; Barrias, Cristina C.; Barbosa, Mário A.; Almeida, Catarina R.

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSC) are a promising cell type for cell-based therapies - from tissue regeneration to treatment of autoimmune diseases - due to their capacity to migrate to damaged tissues, to differentiate in different lineages and to their immunomodulatory and paracrine properties. Here, a simple and reliable imaging technique was developed to study MSC dynamical behavior in natural and bioengineered 3D matrices. Human MSC were transfected to express a fluorescent photoswitchable protein, Dendra2, which was used to highlight and follow the same group of cells for more than seven days, even if removed from the microscope to the incubator. This strategy provided reliable tracking in 3D microenvironments with different properties, including the hydrogels Matrigel and alginate as well as chitosan porous scaffolds. Comparison of cells mobility within matrices with tuned physicochemical properties revealed that MSC embedded in Matrigel migrated 64% more with 5.2 mg protein/mL than with 9.6 mg/mL and that MSC embedded in RGD-alginate migrated 51% faster with 1% polymer concentration than in 2% RGD-alginate. This platform thus provides a straightforward approach to characterize MSC dynamics in 3D and has applications in the field of stem cell biology and for the development of biomaterials for tissue regeneration.

  7. Integrating genomic information with protein sequence and 3D atomic level structure at the RCSB protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prlic, Andreas; Kalro, Tara; Bhattacharya, Roshni; Christie, Cole; Burley, Stephen K; Rose, Peter W

    2016-12-15

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) now contains more than 120,000 three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological macromolecules. To allow an interpretation of how PDB data relates to other publicly available annotations, we developed a novel data integration platform that maps 3D structural information across various datasets. This integration bridges from the human genome across protein sequence to 3D structure space. We developed novel software solutions for data management and visualization, while incorporating new libraries for web-based visualization using SVG graphics. The new views are available from http://www.rcsb.org and software is available from https://github.com/rcsb/. andreas.prlic@rcsb.orgSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Teaching 3D computer animation to illustrators: the instructor as translator and technical director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Wobbe F

    2012-01-01

    An art instructor discusses the difficulties he's encountered teaching computer graphics skills to undergraduate art students. To help the students, he introduced an automated-rigging script for character animation.

  9. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús; Máynez, Leticia O.; Vergara Villegas, Osslan O.; Mederos, Boris; Mejía, José M.; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey G.

    2015-01-01

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image

  10. Denoising of high resolution small animal 3D PET data using the non-subsampled Haar wavelet transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa Domínguez, Humberto de Jesús, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Máynez, Leticia O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Vergara Villegas, Osslan O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Industrial, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico); Mederos, Boris; Mejía, José M.; Cruz Sánchez, Vianey G. [Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y computación, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chih. (Mexico)

    2015-06-01

    PET allows functional imaging of the living tissue. However, one of the most serious technical problems affecting the reconstructed data is the noise, particularly in images of small animals. In this paper, a method for high-resolution small animal 3D PET data is proposed with the aim to reduce the noise and preserve details. The method is based on the estimation of the non-subsampled Haar wavelet coefficients by using a linear estimator. The procedure is applied to the volumetric images, reconstructed without correction factors (plane reconstruction). Results show that the method preserves the structures and drastically reduces the noise that contaminates the image.

  11. PONDEROSA, an automated 3D-NOESY peak picking program, enables automated protein structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Kim, Jin Hae; Westler, William M; Markley, John L

    2011-06-15

    PONDEROSA (Peak-picking Of Noe Data Enabled by Restriction of Shift Assignments) accepts input information consisting of a protein sequence, backbone and sidechain NMR resonance assignments, and 3D-NOESY ((13)C-edited and/or (15)N-edited) spectra, and returns assignments of NOESY crosspeaks, distance and angle constraints, and a reliable NMR structure represented by a family of conformers. PONDEROSA incorporates and integrates external software packages (TALOS+, STRIDE and CYANA) to carry out different steps in the structure determination. PONDEROSA implements internal functions that identify and validate NOESY peak assignments and assess the quality of the calculated three-dimensional structure of the protein. The robustness of the analysis results from PONDEROSA's hierarchical processing steps that involve iterative interaction among the internal and external modules. PONDEROSA supports a variety of input formats: SPARKY assignment table (.shifts) and spectrum file formats (.ucsf), XEASY proton file format (.prot), and NMR-STAR format (.star). To demonstrate the utility of PONDEROSA, we used the package to determine 3D structures of two proteins: human ubiquitin and Escherichia coli iron-sulfur scaffold protein variant IscU(D39A). The automatically generated structural constraints and ensembles of conformers were as good as or better than those determined previously by much less automated means. The program, in the form of binary code along with tutorials and reference manuals, is available at http://ponderosa.nmrfam.wisc.edu/.

  12. 3D modelling of the pathogenic Leptospira protein LipL32: A bioinformatics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Sharmilah Kumari; Bakar, Mohd Faizal Abu; Mohd-Padil, Hirzahida; Mat-Sharani, Shuhaila; Sakinah, S; Poorani, K; Alsaeedy, Hiba; Peli, Amira; Wei, Teh Seoh; Ling, Mok Pooi; Hamat, Rukman Awang; Neela, Vasantha Kumari; Higuchi, Akon; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Rajan, Mariappan; Benelli, Giovanni; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Kumar, S Suresh

    2017-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonotic disease caused by pathogenic Leptospira species (Leptospiraceae). LipL32 is an abundant lipoprotein from the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) group, highly conserved among pathogenic and intermediate Leptospira species. Several studies used LipL32 as a specific gene to identify the presence of leptospires. This research was aimed to study the characteristics of LipL32 protein gene code, to fill the knowledge gap concerning the most appropriate gene that can be used as antigen to detect the Leptospira. Here, we investigated the features of LipL32 in fourteen Leptospira pathogenic strains based on comparative analyses of their primary, secondary structures and 3D modeling using a bioinformatics approach. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of LipL32 in different strains were studied, shedding light on the identity of signal peptides, as well as on the secondary and tertiary structure of the LipL32 protein, supported by 3D modelling assays. The results showed that the LipL32 gene was present in all the fourteen pathogenic Leptospira strains used in this study, with limited diversity in terms of sequence conservation, hydrophobic group, hydrophilic group and number of turns (random coil). Overall, these results add basic knowledge to the characteristics of LipL32 protein, contributing to the identification of potential antigen candidates in future research, in order to ensure prompt and reliable detection of pathogenic Leptospira species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The effectiveness of computer-generated 3D animations in inquiry chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theall, Rachel Morgan

    It has been shown that students need a molecular-level understanding of substances in order to comprehend chemistry. For solid structures, atomic-level understanding requires students to learn additional and different concepts than for other states of matter. To aid understanding, animations were created to model unit cell structures and depict the properties of unit cells. In order to determine if these animations are helpful to students, they were tested during a laboratory exercise in which students had previously been using model kits and images from textbooks to learn about solid structures. Students evaluated in this study were from two lecture sections of general chemistry, one that routinely used animations during lecture and one that used a more traditional lecture format that did not include animations or models. Twelve laboratory sections of these lectures, taught by six different instructors each teaching two sections, were chosen for participation. One section for each instructor was given the animations as an optional tool for completing the laboratory assignment, which consisted of questions about unit cells and crystal structures. The results of the study indicate that students who looked at the animations performed significantly better on the assignment. For the control group, students who routinely viewed multiple representations of chemistry in lecture performed significantly better on the lab assignment than students in the lecture section where chemistry concepts were only presented on the chalkboard and overhead projector. Students in the traditional lecture section also had significantly less appreciation for the model kits used in the laboratory than students in the other lecture section. Observations of students in the lab combined with statistical results led to the revision of the solid structures investigation. Additional animations were created and inserted into the module that covered areas where students indicated more help was needed

  14. Automated Computational Processing of 3-D MR Images of Mouse Brain for Phenotyping of Living Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Christopher S; Manifold-Wheeler, Brett; Gonzales, Aaron; Bearer, Elaine L

    2017-07-05

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides a method to obtain anatomical information from the brain in vivo that is not typically available by optical imaging because of this organ's opacity. MR is nondestructive and obtains deep tissue contrast with 100-µm 3 voxel resolution or better. Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) may be used to observe axonal transport and localized neural activity in the living rodent and avian brain. Such enhancement enables researchers to investigate differences in functional circuitry or neuronal activity in images of brains of different animals. Moreover, once MR images of a number of animals are aligned into a single matrix, statistical analysis can be done comparing MR intensities between different multi-animal cohorts comprising individuals from different mouse strains or different transgenic animals, or at different time points after an experimental manipulation. Although preprocessing steps for such comparisons (including skull stripping and alignment) are automated for human imaging, no such automated processing has previously been readily available for mouse or other widely used experimental animals, and most investigators use in-house custom processing. This protocol describes a stepwise method to perform such preprocessing for mouse. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Creating photo-realistic works in a 3D scene using layers styles to create an animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramescu, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Creating realist objects in a 3D scene is not an easy work. We have to be very careful to make the creation very detailed. If we don't know how to make these photo-realistic works, by using the techniques and a good reference photo we can create an amazing amount of detail and realism. For example, in this article there are some of these detailed methods from which we can learn the techniques necessary to make beautiful and realistic objects in a scene. More precisely, in this paper, we present how to create a 3D animated scene, mainly using the Pen Tool and Blending Options. Indeed, this work is based on teaching some simple ways of using the Layer Styles to create some great shadows, lights, textures and a realistic sense of 3 Dimension. The present work involves also showing how some interesting ways of using the illuminating and rendering options can create a realistic effect in a scene. Moreover, this article shows how to create photo realistic 3D models from a digital image. The present work proposes to present how to use Illustrator paths, texturing, basic lighting and rendering, how to apply textures and how to parent the building and objects components. We also propose to use this proposition to recreate smaller details or 3D objects from a 2D image. After a critic art stage, we are able now to present in this paper the architecture of a design method that proposes to create an animation. The aim is to create a conceptual and methodological tutorial to address this issue both scientifically and in practice. This objective also includes proposing, on strong scientific basis, a model that gives the possibility of a better understanding of the techniques necessary to create a realistic animation.

  16. BioJava-ModFinder: identification of protein modifications in 3D structures from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianjiong; Prlic, Andreas; Bi, Chunxiao; Bluhm, Wolfgang F; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Xu, Dong; Bourne, Philip E; Rose, Peter W

    2017-07-01

    We developed a new software tool, BioJava-ModFinder, for identifying protein modifications observed in 3D structures archived in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Information on more than 400 types of protein modifications were collected and curated from annotations in PDB, RESID, and PSI-MOD. We divided these modifications into three categories: modified residues, attachment modifications, and cross-links. We have developed a systematic method to identify these modifications in 3D protein structures. We have integrated this package with the RCSB PDB web application and added protein modification annotations to the sequence diagram and structure display. By scanning all 3D structures in the PDB using BioJava-ModFinder, we identified more than 30 000 structures with protein modifications, which can be searched, browsed, and visualized on the RCSB PDB website. BioJava-ModFinder is available as open source (LGPL license) at ( https://github.com/biojava/biojava/tree/master/biojava-modfinder ). The RCSB PDB can be accessed at http://www.rcsb.org . pwrose@ucsd.edu. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Sign Language for K-8 Mathematics by 3D Interactive Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo-Villani, Nicoletta; Doublestein, John; Martin, Zachary

    2005-01-01

    We present a new highly interactive computer animation tool to increase the mathematical skills of deaf children. We aim at increasing the effectiveness of (hearing) parents in teaching arithmetic to their deaf children, and the opportunity of deaf children to learn arithmetic via interactive media. Using state-of-the-art computer animation…

  18. Automated 3D-Printed Unibody Immunoarray for Chemiluminescence Detection of Cancer Biomarker Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. K.; Vaze, A.; Rusling, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    A low cost three-dimensional (3D) printed clear plastic microfluidic device was fabricated for fast, low cost automated protein detection. The unibody device features three reagent reservoirs, an efficient 3D network for passive mixing, and an optically transparent detection chamber housing a glass capture antibody array for measuring chemiluminescence output with a CCD camera. Sandwich type assays were built onto the glass arrays using a multi-labeled detection antibody-polyHRP (HRP = horseradish peroxidase). Total assay time was ~30 min in a complete automated assay employing a programmable syringe pump so that the protocol required minimal operator intervention. The device was used for multiplexed detection of prostate cancer biomarker proteins prostate specific antigen (PSA) and platelet factor 4 (PF-4). Detection limits of 0.5 pg mL−1 were achieved for these proteins in diluted serum with log dynamic ranges of four orders of magnitude. Good accuracy vs ELISA was validated by analyzing human serum samples. This prototype device holds good promise for further development as a point-of-care cancer diagnostics tool. PMID:28067370

  19. Non-invasive 3D-microscopy with 10-μm spatial resolution inside alive small laboratory animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasov, A.; Dewaele, D.; De Clerck, N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Small laboratory animals (mice and rats) are widely used in development of drugs and treatments. Micro-CT or microtomography allows non-invasive 3D imaging and measurements of the microstructure inside the body of alive animals. To recognise the internal changes of bones and different organs in the very early stage, high-resolution micro-CT scanner for in-vivo 3D-imaging has been developed. The Micro-CT scanner based on the X-ray geometry with source-detector pair rotation around the object instead of object rotation geometry, typical for other micro-CT systems. Object illuminated by an X-ray source with 5 microns spot size and 20-100keV energies. X-ray images collected by a digital x-ray camera. Projection images with 8000x1000x16bit format collected from several hundreds angular projections. On the base of this information cross sectional images can be reconstructed in 8000x8000x32bit full format or 1024x1024x32bit preview. Maximum object size (scanning volume) is 80mm in diameter by 200mm in length with 10-microns isotropic pixel size for reconstruction at any place of this space. All software for system control, reconstruction and 3D analysis runs on Pentium-4 2GHz or Dual Intel Xeon 1.7GHz computer under Microsoft Windows-2000. The instrument is widely used for scanning of physical phantoms as well as different alive small laboratory animals under anesthesia. Achieved spatial resolution is 20microns for low-contrast objects and 10-microns for high-contrast objects (bone, etc.). Typical scanning time is 20-120min, typical irradiation dose - 0.25-0.7Gy per scan. To avoid movement artefacts from breathing, the instrument can synchronise acquisition cycle with pulses from special breathing sensor. Software package includes dual-processor reconstruction software, 3D-rendering and measurement of all general and bone-specific morphological parameters. New in-vivo Micro-CT scanner allows non-destructive 3D-imaging and measurements of the internal

  20. The benefits of 3D modelling and animation in medical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Tim; Peckham, Daniel

    2002-12-01

    Three-dimensional models created using materials such as wax, bronze and ivory, have been used in the teaching of medicine for many centuries. Today, computer technology allows medical illustrators to create virtual three-dimensional medical models. This paper considers the benefits of using still and animated output from computer-generated models in the teaching of medicine, and examines how three-dimensional models are made.

  1. High-quality and interactive animations of 3D time-varying vector fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeland, Anders; Elboth, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present an interactive texture-based method for visualizing three-dimensional unsteady vector fields. The visualization method uses a sparse and global representation of the flow, such that it does not suffer from the same perceptual issues as is the case for visualizing dense representations. The animation is made by injecting a collection of particles evenly distributed throughout the physical domain. These particles are then tracked along their path lines. At each time step, these particles are used as seed points to generate field lines using any vector field such as the velocity field or vorticity field. In this way, the animation shows the advection of particles while each frame in the animation shows the instantaneous vector field. In order to maintain a coherent particle density and to avoid clustering as time passes, we have developed a novel particle advection strategy which produces approximately evenly-spaced field lines at each time step. To improve rendering performance, we decouple the rendering stage from the preceding stages of the visualization method. This allows interactive exploration of multiple fields simultaneously, which sets the stage for a more complete analysis of the flow field. The final display is rendered using texture-based direct volume rendering.

  2. 3D representations of amino acids—applications to protein sequence comparison and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid sequence of a protein is the key to understanding its structure and ultimately its function in the cell. This paper addresses the fundamental issue of encoding amino acids in ways that the representation of such a protein sequence facilitates the decoding of its information content. We show that a feature-based representation in a three-dimensional (3D space derived from amino acid substitution matrices provides an adequate representation that can be used for direct comparison of protein sequences based on geometry. We measure the performance of such a representation in the context of the protein structural fold prediction problem. We compare the results of classifying different sets of proteins belonging to distinct structural folds against classifications of the same proteins obtained from sequence alone or directly from structural information. We find that sequence alone performs poorly as a structure classifier. We show in contrast that the use of the three dimensional representation of the sequences significantly improves the classification accuracy. We conclude with a discussion of the current limitations of such a representation and with a description of potential improvements.

  3. A new tissue segmentation method to calculate 3D dose in small animal radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblet, C; Delpon, G; Supiot, S; Potiron, V; Paris, F; Chiavassa, S

    2018-02-26

    In pre-clinical animal experiments, radiation delivery is usually delivered with kV photon beams, in contrast to the MV beams used in clinical irradiation, because of the small size of the animals. At this medium energy range, however, the contribution of the photoelectric effect to absorbed dose is significant. Accurate dose calculation therefore requires a more detailed tissue definition because both density (ρ) and elemental composition (Z eff ) affect the dose distribution. Moreover, when applied to cone beam CT (CBCT) acquisitions, the stoichiometric calibration of HU becomes inefficient as it is designed for highly collimated fan beam CT acquisitions. In this study, we propose an automatic tissue segmentation method of CBCT imaging that assigns both density (ρ) and elemental composition (Z eff ) in small animal dose calculation. The method is based on the relationship found between CBCT number and ρ*Z eff product computed from known materials. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate the impact of ρZ eff variation on the absorbed dose in tissues. These results led to the creation of a tissue database composed of artificial tissues interpolated from tissue values published by the ICRU. The ρZ eff method was validated by measuring transmitted doses through tissue substitute cylinders and a mouse with EBT3 film. Measurements were compared to the results of the Monte Carlo calculations. The study of the impact of ρZ eff variation over the range of materials, from ρZ eff  = 2 g.cm - 3 (lung) to 27 g.cm - 3 (cortical bone) led to the creation of 125 artificial tissues. For tissue substitute cylinders, the use of ρZ eff method led to maximal and average relative differences between the Monte Carlo results and the EBT3 measurements of 3.6% and 1.6%. Equivalent comparison for the mouse gave maximal and average relative differences of 4.4% and 1.2%, inside the 80% isodose area. Gamma analysis led to a 94.9% success rate in the 10% isodose

  4. Visualisierung analoger Schaltungen durch 3-D Animation von transienten SPICE-Simulationen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Becker

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Für das Zeichnen analoger Schaltpläne wird oft versucht, die Potentialverteilung in der entsprechenden Schaltung auszunutzen, um eine Platzierung der Bauteile nach abfallendem Potential vorzunehmen. Mit Hilfe von Computerunterstützung gelingt es, eine verallgemeinerte dreidimensionale Platzierungsstrategie anzuwenden, die allein auf Grund der Potentialwerte einer Schaltung die automatische Generierung einer technisch exakten Potentialdarstellung erlaubt. Somit ist es möglich, die Ergebnisse von transienten SPICE-Simulationen in jedem Zeitschritt darzustellen und eine Animation des zeitlichen Verhaltens zu erzeugen. Die Umsetzung dieser Methode zur Einbettung in eine webbasierte Lern – und Arbeitsplattform wird im Folgenden erläutert.

  5. Visualisierung analoger Schaltungen durch 3-D Animation von transienten SPICE-Simulationen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J.; Manoli, Y.

    2007-06-01

    Für das Zeichnen analoger Schaltpläne wird oft versucht, die Potentialverteilung in der entsprechenden Schaltung auszunutzen, um eine Platzierung der Bauteile nach abfallendem Potential vorzunehmen. Mit Hilfe von Computerunterstützung gelingt es, eine verallgemeinerte dreidimensionale Platzierungsstrategie anzuwenden, die allein auf Grund der Potentialwerte einer Schaltung die automatische Generierung einer technisch exakten Potentialdarstellung erlaubt. Somit ist es möglich, die Ergebnisse von transienten SPICE-Simulationen in jedem Zeitschritt darzustellen und eine Animation des zeitlichen Verhaltens zu erzeugen. Die Umsetzung dieser Methode zur Einbettung in eine webbasierte Lern - und Arbeitsplattform wird im Folgenden erläutert.

  6. Molecular surface representation using 3D Zernike descriptors for protein shape comparison and docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Daisuke; Sael, Lee; Chikhi, Rayan; Esquivel-Rodriguez, Juan

    2011-09-01

    The tertiary structures of proteins have been solved in an increasing pace in recent years. To capitalize the enormous efforts paid for accumulating the structure data, efficient and effective computational methods need to be developed for comparing, searching, and investigating interactions of protein structures. We introduce the 3D Zernike descriptor (3DZD), an emerging technique to describe molecular surfaces. The 3DZD is a series expansion of mathematical three-dimensional function, and thus a tertiary structure is represented compactly by a vector of coefficients of terms in the series. A strong advantage of the 3DZD is that it is invariant to rotation of target object to be represented. These two characteristics of the 3DZD allow rapid comparison of surface shapes, which is sufficient for real-time structure database screening. In this article, we review various applications of the 3DZD, which have been recently proposed.

  7. FERM proteins in animal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepass, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    Proteins containing a FERM domain are ubiquitous components of the cytocortex of animal cells where they are engaged in structural, transport, and signaling functions. Recent years have seen a wealth of genetic studies in model organisms that explore FERM protein function in development and tissue organization. In addition, mutations in several FERM protein-encoding genes have been associated with human diseases. This review will provide a brief overview of the FERM domain structure and the FERM protein superfamily and then discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism of function and developmental requirement of several FERM proteins including Moesin, Myosin-VIIA, Myosin-XV, Coracle/Band4.1 as well as Yurt and its vertebrate homologs Mosaic Eyes and EPB41L5/YMO1/Limulus.

  8. DNA vaccines expressing soluble CD4-envelope proteins fused to C3d elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, Joseph F.; Green, Thomas D.; Ross, Ted M.

    2004-01-01

    DNA vaccines expressing the envelope (Env) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been relatively ineffective at generating high-titer, long-lasting, neutralizing antibodies in a variety of animal models. In this study, DNA vaccines were constructed to express a fusion protein of the soluble human CD4 (sCD4) and the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope. To enhance the immunogenicity of the expressed fusion protein, three copies of the murine C3d (mC3d 3 ) were added to the carboxyl terminus of the complex. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize CD4-induced epitopes on gp120 efficiently bound to sCD4-gp120 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 . In addition, both sCD4-gp120 and sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 bound to cells expressing appropriate coreceptors in the absence of cell surface hCD4. Mice (BALB/c) vaccinated with DNA vaccines expressing either gp120-mC3d 3 or sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 elicited antibodies that neutralized homologous virus infection. However, the use of sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 -DNA elicited the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies that persisted after depletion of anti-hCD4 antibodies. Interestingly, only mice vaccinated with DNA expressing sCD4-gp120-mC3d 3 had antibodies that elicited cross-protective neutralizing antibodies. The fusion of sCD4 to the HIV-1 envelope exposes neutralizing epitopes that elicit broad protective immunity when the fusion complex is coupled with the molecular adjuvant, C3d

  9. Fitting multimeric protein complexes into electron microscopy maps using 3D Zernike descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-06-14

    A novel computational method for fitting high-resolution structures of multiple proteins into a cryoelectron microscopy map is presented. The method named EMLZerD generates a pool of candidate multiple protein docking conformations of component proteins, which are later compared with a provided electron microscopy (EM) density map to select the ones that fit well into the EM map. The comparison of docking conformations and the EM map is performed using the 3D Zernike descriptor (3DZD), a mathematical series expansion of three-dimensional functions. The 3DZD provides a unified representation of the surface shape of multimeric protein complex models and EM maps, which allows a convenient, fast quantitative comparison of the three-dimensional structural data. Out of 19 multimeric complexes tested, near native complex structures with a root-mean-square deviation of less than 2.5 Å were obtained for 14 cases while medium range resolution structures with correct topology were computed for the additional 5 cases.

  10. Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites in sequences and 3D structures by random forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mile Sikić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying interaction sites in proteins provides important clues to the function of a protein and is becoming increasingly relevant in topics such as systems biology and drug discovery. Although there are numerous papers on the prediction of interaction sites using information derived from structure, there are only a few case reports on the prediction of interaction residues based solely on protein sequence. Here, a sliding window approach is combined with the Random Forests method to predict protein interaction sites using (i a combination of sequence- and structure-derived parameters and (ii sequence information alone. For sequence-based prediction we achieved a precision of 84% with a 26% recall and an F-measure of 40%. When combined with structural information, the prediction performance increases to a precision of 76% and a recall of 38% with an F-measure of 51%. We also present an attempt to rationalize the sliding window size and demonstrate that a nine-residue window is the most suitable for predictor construction. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our prediction methods by modeling the Ras-Raf complex using predicted interaction sites as target binding interfaces. Our results suggest that it is possible to predict protein interaction sites with quite a high accuracy using only sequence information.

  11. i3Drefine software for protein 3D structure refinement and its assessment in CASP10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure refinement refers to the process of improving the qualities of protein structures during structure modeling processes to bring them closer to their native states. Structure refinement has been drawing increasing attention in the community-wide Critical Assessment of techniques for Protein Structure prediction (CASP) experiments since its addition in 8(th) CASP experiment. During the 9(th) and recently concluded 10(th) CASP experiments, a consistent growth in number of refinement targets and participating groups has been witnessed. Yet, protein structure refinement still remains a largely unsolved problem with majority of participating groups in CASP refinement category failed to consistently improve the quality of structures issued for refinement. In order to alleviate this need, we developed a completely automated and computationally efficient protein 3D structure refinement method, i3Drefine, based on an iterative and highly convergent energy minimization algorithm with a powerful all-atom composite physics and knowledge-based force fields and hydrogen bonding (HB) network optimization technique. In the recent community-wide blind experiment, CASP10, i3Drefine (as 'MULTICOM-CONSTRUCT') was ranked as the best method in the server section as per the official assessment of CASP10 experiment. Here we provide the community with free access to i3Drefine software and systematically analyse the performance of i3Drefine in strict blind mode on the refinement targets issued in CASP10 refinement category and compare with other state-of-the-art refinement methods participating in CASP10. Our analysis demonstrates that i3Drefine is only fully-automated server participating in CASP10 exhibiting consistent improvement over the initial structures in both global and local structural quality metrics. Executable version of i3Drefine is freely available at http://protein.rnet.missouri.edu/i3drefine/.

  12. i3Drefine Software for Protein 3D Structure Refinement and Its Assessment in CASP10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cheng, Jianlin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure refinement refers to the process of improving the qualities of protein structures during structure modeling processes to bring them closer to their native states. Structure refinement has been drawing increasing attention in the community-wide Critical Assessment of techniques for Protein Structure prediction (CASP) experiments since its addition in 8th CASP experiment. During the 9th and recently concluded 10th CASP experiments, a consistent growth in number of refinement targets and participating groups has been witnessed. Yet, protein structure refinement still remains a largely unsolved problem with majority of participating groups in CASP refinement category failed to consistently improve the quality of structures issued for refinement. In order to alleviate this need, we developed a completely automated and computationally efficient protein 3D structure refinement method, i3Drefine, based on an iterative and highly convergent energy minimization algorithm with a powerful all-atom composite physics and knowledge-based force fields and hydrogen bonding (HB) network optimization technique. In the recent community-wide blind experiment, CASP10, i3Drefine (as ‘MULTICOM-CONSTRUCT’) was ranked as the best method in the server section as per the official assessment of CASP10 experiment. Here we provide the community with free access to i3Drefine software and systematically analyse the performance of i3Drefine in strict blind mode on the refinement targets issued in CASP10 refinement category and compare with other state-of-the-art refinement methods participating in CASP10. Our analysis demonstrates that i3Drefine is only fully-automated server participating in CASP10 exhibiting consistent improvement over the initial structures in both global and local structural quality metrics. Executable version of i3Drefine is freely available at http://protein.rnet.missouri.edu/i3drefine/. PMID:23894517

  13. The virtual lover: variable and easily guided 3D fish animations as an innovative tool in mate-choice experiments with sailfin mollies-II. Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierszewski, Stefanie; Müller, Klaus; Smielik, Ievgen; Hütwohl, Jan-Marco; Kuhnert, Klaus-Dieter; Witte, Klaudia

    2017-02-01

    The use of computer animation in behavioral research is a state-of-the-art method for designing and presenting animated animals to live test animals. The major advantages of computer animations are: (1) the creation of animated animal stimuli with high variability of morphology and even behavior; (2) animated stimuli provide highly standardized, controlled and repeatable testing procedures; and (3) they allow a reduction in the number of live test animals regarding the 3Rs principle. But the use of animated animals should be attended by a thorough validation for each test species to verify that behavior measured with live animals toward virtual animals can also be expected with natural stimuli. Here we present results on the validation of a custom-made simulation for animated 3D sailfin mollies Poecilia latipinna and show that responses of live test females were as strong to an animated fish as to a video or a live male fish. Movement of an animated stimulus was important but female response was stronger toward a swimming 3D fish stimulus than to a "swimming" box. Moreover, male test fish were able to discriminate between animated male and female stimuli; hence, rendering the animated 3D fish a useful tool in mate-choice experiments with sailfin mollies.

  14. A 3D model of the membrane protein complex formed by the white spot syndrome virus structural proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Shiang Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of white spot disease have had a large negative economic impact on cultured shrimp worldwide. However, the pathogenesis of the causative virus, WSSV (whit spot syndrome virus, is not yet well understood. WSSV is a large enveloped virus. The WSSV virion has three structural layers surrounding its core DNA: an outer envelope, a tegument and a nucleocapsid. In this study, we investigated the protein-protein interactions of the major WSSV structural proteins, including several envelope and tegument proteins that are known to be involved in the infection process. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present report, we used coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid assays to elucidate and/or confirm all the interactions that occur among the WSSV structural (envelope and tegument proteins VP51A, VP19, VP24, VP26 and VP28. We found that VP51A interacted directly not only with VP26 but also with VP19 and VP24. VP51A, VP19 and VP24 were also shown to have an affinity for self-interaction. Chemical cross-linking assays showed that these three self-interacting proteins could occur as dimers. CONCLUSIONS: From our present results in conjunction with other previously established interactions we construct a 3D model in which VP24 acts as a core protein that directly associates with VP26, VP28, VP38A, VP51A and WSV010 to form a membrane-associated protein complex. VP19 and VP37 are attached to this complex via association with VP51A and VP28, respectively. Through the VP26-VP51C interaction this envelope complex is anchored to the nucleocapsid, which is made of layers of rings formed by VP664. A 3D model of the nucleocapsid and the surrounding outer membrane is presented.

  15. A constraint logic programming approach to associate 1D and 3D structural components for large protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Palù, Alessandro; Pontelli, Enrico; He, Jing; Lu, Yonggang

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a novel framework, constructed using Constraint Logic Programming (CLP) and parallelism, to determine the association between parts of the primary sequence of a protein and alpha-helices extracted from 3D low-resolution descriptions of large protein complexes. The association is determined by extracting constraints from the 3D information, regarding length, relative position and connectivity of helices, and solving these constraints with the guidance of a secondary structure prediction algorithm. Parallelism is employed to enhance performance on large proteins. The framework provides a fast, inexpensive alternative to determine the exact tertiary structure of unknown proteins.

  16. Cloud4Psi: cloud computing for 3D protein structure similarity searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Dariusz; Małysiak-Mrozek, Bożena; Kłapciński, Artur

    2014-10-01

    Popular methods for 3D protein structure similarity searching, especially those that generate high-quality alignments such as Combinatorial Extension (CE) and Flexible structure Alignment by Chaining Aligned fragment pairs allowing Twists (FATCAT) are still time consuming. As a consequence, performing similarity searching against large repositories of structural data requires increased computational resources that are not always available. Cloud computing provides huge amounts of computational power that can be provisioned on a pay-as-you-go basis. We have developed the cloud-based system that allows scaling of the similarity searching process vertically and horizontally. Cloud4Psi (Cloud for Protein Similarity) was tested in the Microsoft Azure cloud environment and provided good, almost linearly proportional acceleration when scaled out onto many computational units. Cloud4Psi is available as Software as a Service for testing purposes at: http://cloud4psi.cloudapp.net/. For source code and software availability, please visit the Cloud4Psi project home page at http://zti.polsl.pl/dmrozek/science/cloud4psi.htm. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. Pyridones as NNRTIs against HIV-1 mutants: 3D-QSAR and protein informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Utsab; Verma, Saroj; Jain, Surabhi; Katti, Setu B.; Prabhakar, Yenamandra S.

    2013-07-01

    CoMFA and CoMSIA based 3D-QSAR of HIV-1 RT wild and mutant (K103, Y181C, and Y188L) inhibitory activities of 4-benzyl/benzoyl pyridin-2-ones followed by protein informatics of corresponding non-nucleoside inhibitors' binding pockets from pdbs 2BAN, 3MED, 1JKH, and 2YNF were analysed to discover consensus features of the compounds for broad-spectrum activity. The CoMFA/CoMSIA models indicated that compounds with groups which lend steric-cum-electropositive fields in the vicinity of C5, hydrophobic field in the vicinity of C3 of pyridone region and steric field in aryl region produce broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 RT activity. Also, a linker rendering electronegative field between pyridone and aryl moieties is common requirement for the activities. The protein informatics showed considerable alteration in residues 181 and 188 characteristics on mutation. Also, mutants' isoelectric points shifted in acidic direction. The study offered fresh avenues for broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 agents through designing new molecules seeded with groups satisfying common molecular fields and concerns of mutating residues.

  18. Protein Hydrolysates/Peptides in Animal Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalla, Jeff; Waugh, Terry; Lohry, Eric

    The use of protein hydrolysates as an important nutrient for growth and maintenance has been increasing in animal nutrition. Although animal proteins and protein hydrolysates are widely used however, recently vegetable protein hydrolysates are gaining importance. This chapter reviews the use of protein hydrolysates developed by enzyme hydrolysis and by solid state fermentation process in animal nutrition especially for piglets and compares it with the standard products such as plasma and fishmeal.

  19. Architectural protein subclasses shape 3-D organization of genomes during lineage commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E.; Sauria, Michael E. G.; Sanyal, Amartya; Gerasimova, Tatiana I.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Bell, Joshua S. K.; Ong, Chin-Tong; Hookway, Tracy A.; Guo, Changying; Sun, Yuhua; Bland, Michael J.; Wagstaff, William; Dalton, Stephen; McDevitt, Todd C.; Sen, Ranjan; Dekker, Job; Taylor, James; Corces, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Understanding the topological configurations of chromatin may reveal valuable insights into how the genome and epigenome act in concert to control cell fate during development. Here we generate high-resolution architecture maps across seven genomic loci in embryonic stem cells and neural progenitor cells. We observe a hierarchy of 3-D interactions that undergo marked reorganization at the sub-Mb scale during differentiation. Distinct combinations of CTCF, Mediator, and cohesin show widespread enrichment in looping interactions at different length scales. CTCF/cohesin anchor long-range constitutive interactions that form the topological basis for invariant sub-domains. Conversely, Mediator/cohesin together with pioneer factors bridge shortrange enhancer-promoter interactions within and between larger sub-domains. Knockdown of Smc1 or Med12 in ES cells results in disruption of spatial architecture and down-regulation of genes found in cohesin-mediated interactions. We conclude that cell type-specific chromatin organization occurs at the sub-Mb scale and that architectural proteins shape the genome in hierarchical length scales. PMID:23706625

  20. 3D-SURFER 2.0: web platform for real-time search and characterization of protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi; Esquivel-Rodriguez, Juan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of uncharacterized protein structures necessitates the development of computational approaches for function annotation using the protein tertiary structures. Protein structure database search is the basis of any structure-based functional elucidation of proteins. 3D-SURFER is a web platform for real-time protein surface comparison of a given protein structure against the entire PDB using 3D Zernike descriptors. It can smoothly navigate the protein structure space in real-time from one query structure to another. A major new feature of Release 2.0 is the ability to compare the protein surface of a single chain, a single domain, or a single complex against databases of protein chains, domains, complexes, or a combination of all three in the latest PDB. Additionally, two types of protein structures can now be compared: all-atom-surface and backbone-atom-surface. The server can also accept a batch job for a large number of database searches. Pockets in protein surfaces can be identified by VisGrid and LIGSITE (csc) . The server is available at http://kiharalab.org/3d-surfer/.

  1. Can molecular dynamics simulations help in discriminating correct from erroneous protein 3D models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibrat Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent approaches for predicting the three-dimensional (3D structure of proteins such as de novo or fold recognition methods mostly rely on simplified energy potential functions and a reduced representation of the polypeptide chain. These simplifications facilitate the exploration of the protein conformational space but do not permit to capture entirely the subtle relationship that exists between the amino acid sequence and its native structure. It has been proposed that physics-based energy functions together with techniques for sampling the conformational space, e.g., Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics (MD simulations, are better suited to the task of modelling proteins at higher resolutions than those of models obtained with the former type of methods. In this study we monitor different protein structural properties along MD trajectories to discriminate correct from erroneous models. These models are based on the sequence-structure alignments provided by our fold recognition method, FROST. We define correct models as being built from alignments of sequences with structures similar to their native structures and erroneous models from alignments of sequences with structures unrelated to their native structures. Results For three test sequences whose native structures belong to the all-α, all-β and αβ classes we built a set of models intended to cover the whole spectrum: from a perfect model, i.e., the native structure, to a very poor model, i.e., a random alignment of the test sequence with a structure belonging to another structural class, including several intermediate models based on fold recognition alignments. We submitted these models to 11 ns of MD simulations at three different temperatures. We monitored along the corresponding trajectories the mean of the Root-Mean-Square deviations (RMSd with respect to the initial conformation, the RMSd fluctuations, the number of conformation clusters, the evolution of

  2. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, S; Manjunath, S; Senthilkumar, R; Rajendiran, S; Yoshioka, H; Mori, Y; Abraham, S

    2011-01-01

    The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP) is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury. Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain) and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining). The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any adverse reactions and upon confirmation of safety following completion of the

  3. The Plasmodium falciparum exported protein PF3D7_0402000 binds to erythrocyte ankyrin and band 4.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakya, Bikash; Penn, Wesley D.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Lacount, Douglas J.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum extensively modifies the infected red blood cell (RBC), resulting in changes in deformability, shape and surface properties. These alterations suggest that the RBC cytoskeleton is a major target for modification during infection. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are largely unknown. To begin to address this question, we screened for exported P. falciparum proteins that bound to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton proteins ankyrin 1 (ANK1) and band 4.1 (4.1R), which form critical interactions with other cytoskeletal proteins that contribute to the deformability and stability of RBCs. Yeast two-hybrid screens with ANK1 and 4.1R identified eight interactions with P. falciparum exported proteins, including an interaction between 4.1R and PF3D7_0402000 (PFD0090c). This interaction was first identified in a large-scale screen (Vignali et al., Malaria J, 7:211, 2008), which also reported an interaction between PF3D7_0402000 and ANK1. We confirmed the interactions of PF3D7_0402000 with 4.1R and ANK1 in pair-wise yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation assays. In both cases, an intact PHIST domain in PF3D7_0402000 was required for binding. Complex purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis provided additional support for the interaction of PF3D7_0402000 with ANK1 and 4.1R. RBC ghost cells loaded with maltose-binding protein (MBP)-PF3D7_0402000 passed through a metal microsphere column less efficiently than mock- or MBP-loaded controls, consistent with an effect of PF3D7_0402000 on RBC rigidity or membrane stability. This study confirmed the interaction of PF3D7_0402000 with 4.1R in multiple independent assays, provided the first evidence that PF3D7_0402000 also binds to ANK1, and suggested that PF3D7_0402000 affects deformability or membrane stability of uninfected RBC ghosts.

  4. Open 3D Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many professionals and 3D artists consider Blender as being the best open source solution for 3D computer graphics. The main features are related to modeling, rendering, shading, imaging, compositing, animation, physics and particles and realtime 3D/game creation.

  5. Fabrication of 2D protein microstructures and 3D polymer-protein hybrid microstructures by two-photon polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Sascha [Lehrstuhl fuer Lasertechnik, RWTH Aachen, Steinbachstrasse 15, Aachen (Germany); Hoch, Eva; Tovar, Guenter E M [Institut fuer Grenzflaechenverfahrenstechnik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Nobelstrasse 12, Stuttgart (Germany); Borchers, Kirsten [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Grenzflaechen- und Bioverfahrenstechnik, Nobelstrasse 12, Stuttgart (Germany); Meyer, Wolfdietrich; Krueger, Hartmut [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Angewandte Polymerforschung, Geiselbergstrasse 69, Potsdam (Germany); Gillner, Arnold, E-mail: sascha.engelhardt@ilt.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Lasertechnik, Steinbachstrasse 15, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) offers the possibility of creating artificial cell scaffolds composed of micro- and nanostructures with spatial resolutions of less than 1 {mu}m. For use in tissue engineering, the identification of a TPP-processable polymer that provides biocompatibility, biofunctionality and appropriate mechanical properties is a difficult task. ECM proteins such as collagen or fibronectin, which could mimic native tissues best, often lack the mechanical stability. Hence, by generating polymer-protein hybrid structures, the beneficial properties of proteins can be combined with the advantageous characteristics of polymers, such as sufficient mechanical stability. This study describes three steps toward facilitated application of TPP for biomaterial generation. (1) The efficiency of a low-cost ps-laser source is compared to a fs-laser source by testing several materials. A novel photoinitiator for polymerization with a ps-laser source is synthesized and proved to enable increased fabrication throughput. (2) The fabrication of 3D-microstructures with both systems and the fabrication of polymer-protein hybrid structures are demonstrated. (3) The tissue engineering capabilities of TPP are demonstrated by creating cross-linked gelatin microstructures, which clearly forced porcine chondrocytes to adapt their cell morphology.

  6. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury Materials & Methods: Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining.Results: The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Conclusion: Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any

  7. Protein folding optimization based on 3D off-lattice model via an improved artificial bee colony algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bai; Lin, Mu; Liu, Qiao; Li, Ya; Zhou, Changjun

    2015-10-01

    Protein folding is a fundamental topic in molecular biology. Conventional experimental techniques for protein structure identification or protein folding recognition require strict laboratory requirements and heavy operating burdens, which have largely limited their applications. Alternatively, computer-aided techniques have been developed to optimize protein structures or to predict the protein folding process. In this paper, we utilize a 3D off-lattice model to describe the original protein folding scheme as a simplified energy-optimal numerical problem, where all types of amino acid residues are binarized into hydrophobic and hydrophilic ones. We apply a balance-evolution artificial bee colony (BE-ABC) algorithm as the minimization solver, which is featured by the adaptive adjustment of search intensity to cater for the varying needs during the entire optimization process. In this work, we establish a benchmark case set with 13 real protein sequences from the Protein Data Bank database and evaluate the convergence performance of BE-ABC algorithm through strict comparisons with several state-of-the-art ABC variants in short-term numerical experiments. Besides that, our obtained best-so-far protein structures are compared to the ones in comprehensive previous literature. This study also provides preliminary insights into how artificial intelligence techniques can be applied to reveal the dynamics of protein folding. Graphical Abstract Protein folding optimization using 3D off-lattice model and advanced optimization techniques.

  8. 3D protein-structure-oriented discovery of clinical relation across chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mochament, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Polychronidou, Eleftheria

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia with still unclear etiology. Indications of antigenic pressure have been hinted, using sequence and structure-based reasoning. The accuracy of such approaches, and in particular of the ones derived from 3D models obtained from t...

  9. Protein adsorption resistant surface on polymer composite based on 2D- and 3D-controlled grafting of phospholipid moieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Toru; Matsuno, Ryosuke; Sawaguchi, Takashi; Konno, Tomohiro; Takai, Madoka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    To prepare the biocompatible surface, a phosphorylcholine (PC) group was introduced on this hydroxyl group generated by surface hydrolysis on the polymer composite composed of polyethylene (PE) and poly (vinyl acetate) (PVAc) prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide. Two different procedures such as two-dimensional (2D) modification and three-dimensional (3D) modification were applied to obtain the steady biocompatible surface. 2D modification was that PC groups were directly anchored on the surface of the polymer composite. 3D modification was that phospholipid polymer was grafted from the surface of the polymer composite by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC). The surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, dynamic water contact angle measurements, and atomic force microscope. The effects of the poly(MPC) chain length on the protein adsorption resistivity were investigated. The protein adsorption on the polymer composite surface with PC groups modified by 2D or 3D modification was significantly reduced as compared with that on the unmodified PE. Further, the amount of protein adsorbed on the 3D modified surface that is poly(MPC)-grafted surface decreased with an increase in the chain length of the poly(MPC). The surface with an arbitrary structure and the characteristic can be constructed by using 2D and 3D modification. We conclude that the polymer composites of PE/PVAc with PC groups on the surface are useful for fabricating biomedical devices due to their good mechanical and surface properties

  10. An Augmented Pocketome: Detection and Analysis of Small-Molecule Binding Pockets in Proteins of Known 3D Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavat, Raghu; Sankar, Santhosh; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2018-03-06

    Protein-ligand interactions form the basis of most cellular events. Identifying ligand binding pockets in proteins will greatly facilitate rationalizing and predicting protein function. Ligand binding sites are unknown for many proteins of known three-dimensional (3D) structure, creating a gap in our understanding of protein structure-function relationships. To bridge this gap, we detect pockets in proteins of known 3D structures, using computational techniques. This augmented pocketome (PocketDB) consists of 249,096 pockets, which is about seven times larger than what is currently known. We deduce possible ligand associations for about 46% of the newly identified pockets. The augmented pocketome, when subjected to clustering based on similarities among pockets, yielded 2,161 site types, which are associated with 1,037 ligand types, together providing fold-site-type-ligand-type associations. The PocketDB resource facilitates a structure-based function annotation, delineation of the structural basis of ligand recognition, and provides functional clues for domains of unknown functions, allosteric proteins, and druggable pockets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 3D structure prediction of histone acetyltransferase (HAC proteins of the p300/CBP family and their interactome in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Cemanovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Histone acetylation is an important posttranslational modification correlated with gene activation. In Arabidopsis thaliana the histone acetyltransferase (HAC proteins of the CBP family are homologous to animal p300/CREB (cAMP-responsive element-binding proteins, which are important histone acetyltransferases participating in many physiological processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study the 3-D structure of all HAC protein subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana: HAC1, HAC2, HAC4, HAC5 and HAC12 is predicted by homology modeling and confirmed by Ramachandran plot analysis. The amino acid sequences HAC family members are highly similar to the sequences of the homologous human p300/CREB protein. Conservation of p300/CBP domains among the HAC proteins was examined further by sequence alignment and pattern search. The domains of p300/CBP required for the HAC function, such as PHD, TAZ and ZZ domains, are conserved in all HAC proteins. Interactome analysis revealed that HAC1, HAC5 and HAC12 proteins interact with S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase domaincontaining protein that shows methyltransferase activity, suggesting an additional function of the HAC proteins. Additionally, HAC5 has a strong interaction value for the putative c-myb-like transcription factor MYB3R-4, which suggests that it also may have a function in regulation of DNA replication.

  12. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Rausch

    Full Text Available Surfactant proteins (SP are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class.

  13. Potential for protein surface shape analysis using spherical harmonics and 3D Zernike descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    With structure databases expanding at a rapid rate, the task at hand is to provide reliable clues to their molecular function and to be able to do so on a large scale. This, however, requires suitable encodings of the molecular structure which are amenable to fast screening. To this end, moment-based representations provide a compact and nonredundant description of molecular shape and other associated properties. In this article, we present an overview of some commonly used representations with specific focus on two schemes namely spherical harmonics and their extension, the 3D Zernike descriptors. Key features and differences of the two are reviewed and selected applications are highlighted. We further discuss recent advances covering aspects of shape and property-based comparison at both global and local levels and demonstrate their applicability through some of our studies.

  14. Sequence and 3D structure based analysis of TNT degrading proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Amrita; Mandal, Rahul Shubhra; Das, Santasabuj; Kundu, Sudip

    2014-03-01

    TNT, accidentally released at several manufacturing sites, contaminates ground water and soil. It has a toxic effect to algae and invertebrate, and chronic exposure to TNT also causes harmful effects to human. On the other hand, many plants including Arabidopsis thaliana have the ability to metabolize TNT either completely or at least to a reduced less toxic form. In A. thaliana, the enzyme UDP glucosyltransferase (UDPGT) can further conjugate the reduced forms 2-HADNT and 4-HADNT (2-hydroxylamino-4, 6- dinitrotoluene and 4-hydroxylamino-2, 6- dinitrotoluene) of TNT. Based on the experimental analysis, existing literature and phylogenetic analysis, it is evident that among 107 UDPGT proteins only six are involved in the TNT degrading process. A total of 13 UDPGT proteins including five of these TNT degrading proteins fall within the same group of phylogeny. Thus, these 13 UDPGT proteins have been classified into two groups, TNT-degrading and TNT-non-degrading proteins. To understand the differences in TNT-degrading capacities; using homology modeling we first predicted two structures, taking one representative sequence from both the groups. Next, we performed molecular docking of the modeled structure and TNT reduced form 2-hydroxylamino-4, 6- dinitrotoluene (2-HADNT). We observed that while the Trp residue located within the active site region of the TNT- degrading protein showed π-Cation interaction; such type of interaction was absent in TNT-non-degrading protein, as the respective Trp residue lay outside of the pocket in this case. We observed the conservation of this π-Cation interaction during MD simulation of TNT-degrading protein. Thus, the position and the orientation of the active site residue Trp could explain the presence and absence of TNT-degrading capacity of the UDPGT proteins.

  15. From 3D to 2D: a review of the molecular imprinting of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nicholas W; Jeans, Christopher W; Brain, Keith R; Allender, Christopher J; Hlady, Vladimir; Britt, David W

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a generic technology that allows for the introduction of sites of specific molecular affinity into otherwise homogeneous polymeric matrices. Commonly this technique has been shown to be effective when targeting small molecules of molecular weight proteins has proven difficult. A number of key inherent problems in protein imprinting have been identified, including permanent entrapment, poor mass transfer, denaturation, and heterogeneity in binding pocket affinity, which have been addressed using a variety of approaches. This review focuses on protein imprinting in its various forms, ranging from conventional bulk techniques to novel thin film and monolayer surface imprinting approaches.

  16. 3DSwap: Curated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping

    KAUST Repository

    Shameer, Khader; Shingate, Prashant N.; Manjunath, S. C. P.; Karthika, M.; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2011-01-01

    structures in oligomeric conformation. Protein structures in swapped conformations perform diverse functional roles and are also associated with deposition diseases in humans. We have performed in-depth literature curation and structural bioinformatics

  17. Limited cross-reactivity among domains of the Plasmodium falciparum clone 3D7 erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Turner, Louise; Magistrado, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    The var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family is responsible for antigenic variation and sequestration of infected erythrocytes during malaria. We have previously grouped the 60 PfEMP1 variants of P. falciparum clone 3D7 into groups A and B/A (category A......) and groups B, B/C, and C (category non-A). Expression of category A molecules is associated with severe malaria, and that of category non-A molecules is associated with uncomplicated malaria and asymptomatic infection. Here we assessed cross-reactivity among 60 different recombinant PfEMP1 domains derived...... from clone 3D7 by using a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a pool of plasma from 63 malaria-exposed Tanzanian individuals. We conclude that naturally acquired antibodies are largely directed toward epitopes varying between different domains with a few, mainly category A, domains...

  18. New sources of animal proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, Van A.

    2017-01-01

    As the land currently available for livestock is not enough to satisfy the growing demand for meat, insects are proposed as an alternative protein source. Examples of insect consumption are given from the Lao People's Democratic Republic and Nigeria. It is argued that edible insects may qualify as a

  19. Halfway between 2D and Animal Models: Are 3D Cultures the Ideal Tool to Study Cancer-Microenvironment Interactions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hoarau-Véchot

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An area that has come to be of tremendous interest in tumor research in the last decade is the role of the microenvironment in the biology of neoplastic diseases. The tumor microenvironment (TME comprises various cells that are collectively important for normal tissue homeostasis as well as tumor progression or regression. Seminal studies have demonstrated the role of the dialogue between cancer cells (at many sites and the cellular component of the microenvironment in tumor progression, metastasis, and resistance to treatment. Using an appropriate system of microenvironment and tumor culture is the first step towards a better understanding of the complex interaction between cancer cells and their surroundings. Three-dimensional (3D models have been widely described recently. However, while it is claimed that they can bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo, it is sometimes hard to decipher their advantage or limitation compared to classical two-dimensional (2D cultures, especially given the broad number of techniques used. We present here a comprehensive review of the different 3D methods developed recently, and, secondly, we discuss the pros and cons of 3D culture compared to 2D when studying interactions between cancer cells and their microenvironment.

  20. Halfway between 2D and Animal Models: Are 3D Cultures the Ideal Tool to Study Cancer-Microenvironment Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Rafii, Arash; Touboul, Cyril; Pasquier, Jennifer

    2018-01-18

    An area that has come to be of tremendous interest in tumor research in the last decade is the role of the microenvironment in the biology of neoplastic diseases. The tumor microenvironment (TME) comprises various cells that are collectively important for normal tissue homeostasis as well as tumor progression or regression. Seminal studies have demonstrated the role of the dialogue between cancer cells (at many sites) and the cellular component of the microenvironment in tumor progression, metastasis, and resistance to treatment. Using an appropriate system of microenvironment and tumor culture is the first step towards a better understanding of the complex interaction between cancer cells and their surroundings. Three-dimensional (3D) models have been widely described recently. However, while it is claimed that they can bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo, it is sometimes hard to decipher their advantage or limitation compared to classical two-dimensional (2D) cultures, especially given the broad number of techniques used. We present here a comprehensive review of the different 3D methods developed recently, and, secondly, we discuss the pros and cons of 3D culture compared to 2D when studying interactions between cancer cells and their microenvironment.

  1. IAG ring test animal proteins 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Prins, T.W.; Voet, van der H.; Vliege, J.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    A ring test was organized for the detection of animal proteins in animal feed by microscopy in the framework of the annual ring tests of the IAG – International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy. The aim of the ring study was to provide the participants

  2. IAG ring test animal proteins 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Rhee, van de N.E.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Prins, T.W.; Vliege, J.J.M.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The annual ring test for the detection of animal proteins in animal feed of the IAG - International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy was organized by RIKILT - Wageningen UR, The Netherlands. The aim of the ring study was to provide the participants information

  3. IAG ring test animal proteins 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Rhee, van de N.E.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Prins, T.W.; Vliege, J.J.M.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.

    2015-01-01

    A ring test was organized for the detection of animal proteins in animal feed by microscopy in the framework of the annual ring tests of the IAG - International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy. The organizer of the ring test was RIKILT - Wageningen UR, The

  4. IAG ring test animal proteins 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Prins, T.W.; Vliege, J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    A ring test was organized for the detection of animal proteins in animal feed by microscopy in the framework of the annual ring tests of the IAG - International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy. The organizer of the the ring study was to provide the

  5. Cell and protein compatible 3D bioprinting of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawkins, M J; Mistry, P; Shakesheff, K M; Yang, J; Brown, B N; Bonassar, L J

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping of bone tissue engineering constructs often utilizes elevated temperatures, organic solvents and/or UV light for materials processing. These harsh conditions may prevent the incorporation of cells and therapeutic proteins in the fabrication processes. Here we developed a method for using bioprinting to produce constructs from a thermoresponsive microparticulate material based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) at ambient conditions. These constructs could be engineered with yield stresses of up to 1.22 MPa and Young’s moduli of up to 57.3 MPa which are within the range of properties of human cancellous bone. Further study showed that protein-releasing microspheres could be incorporated into the bioprinted constructs. The release of the model protein lysozyme from bioprinted constructs was sustainted for a period of 15 days and a high degree of protein activity could be measured up to day 9. This work suggests that bioprinting is a viable route to the production of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair under mild conditions which allow the inclusion of viable cells and active proteins. (paper)

  6. Modeling of DNA and Protein Organization Levels with Cn3D Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasinakis, Panagiotis K.; Nicolaou, Despoina

    2017-01-01

    The molecular structure of living organisms and the complex interactions amongst its components are the basis for the diversity observed at the macroscopic level. Proteins and nucleic acids are some of the major molecular components, and play a key role in several biological functions, such as those of development and evolution. This article…

  7. A genetically modified protein-based hydrogel for 3D culture of AD293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Du

    Full Text Available Hydrogels have strong application prospects for drug delivery, tissue engineering and cell therapy because of their excellent biocompatibility and abundant availability as scaffolds for drugs and cells. In this study, we created hybrid hydrogels based on a genetically modified tax interactive protein-1 (TIP1 by introducing two or four cysteine residues in the primary structure of TIP1. The introduced cysteine residues were crosslinked with a four-armed poly (ethylene glycol having their arm ends capped with maleimide residues (4-armed-PEG-Mal to form hydrogels. In one form of the genetically modification, we incorporated a peptide sequence 'GRGDSP' to introduce bioactivity to the protein, and the resultant hydrogel could provide an excellent environment for a three dimensional cell culture of AD293 cells. The AD293 cells continued to divide and displayed a polyhedron or spindle-shape during the 3-day culture period. Besides, AD293 cells could be easily separated from the cell-gel constructs for future large-scale culture after being cultured for 3 days and treating hydrogel with trypsinase. This work significantly expands the toolbox of recombinant proteins for hydrogel formation, and we believe that our hydrogel will be of considerable interest to those working in cell therapy and controlled drug delivery.

  8. Beyond Textbook Illustrations: Hand-Held Models of Ordered DNA and Protein Structures as 3D Supplements to Enhance Student Learning of Helical Biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2010-01-01

    Textbook illustrations of 3D biopolymers on printed paper, regardless of how detailed and colorful, suffer from its two-dimensionality. For beginners, computer screen display of skeletal models of biopolymers and their animation usually does not provide the at-a-glance 3D perception and details, which can be done by good hand-held models. Here, we…

  9. Building foundations for transcatheter intervascular anastomoses: 3D anatomy of the great vessels in large experimental animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sizarov, Aleksander; de Bakker, Bernadette S.; Klein, Karina; Ohlerth, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    To provide comprehensive illustrations of anatomy of the relevant vessels in large experimental animals in an interactive format as preparation for developing an effective and safe transcatheter technique of aortopulmonary and bidirectional cavopulmonary intervascular anastomoses. Computed

  10. FuncPatch: a web server for the fast Bayesian inference of conserved functional patches in protein 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Fei; Golding, G Brian

    2015-02-15

    A number of statistical phylogenetic methods have been developed to infer conserved functional sites or regions in proteins. Many methods, e.g. Rate4Site, apply the standard phylogenetic models to infer site-specific substitution rates and totally ignore the spatial correlation of substitution rates in protein tertiary structures, which may reduce their power to identify conserved functional patches in protein tertiary structures when the sequences used in the analysis are highly similar. The 3D sliding window method has been proposed to infer conserved functional patches in protein tertiary structures, but the window size, which reflects the strength of the spatial correlation, must be predefined and is not inferred from data. We recently developed GP4Rate to solve these problems under the Bayesian framework. Unfortunately, GP4Rate is computationally slow. Here, we present an intuitive web server, FuncPatch, to perform a fast approximate Bayesian inference of conserved functional patches in protein tertiary structures. Both simulations and four case studies based on empirical data suggest that FuncPatch is a good approximation to GP4Rate. However, FuncPatch is orders of magnitudes faster than GP4Rate. In addition, simulations suggest that FuncPatch is potentially a useful tool complementary to Rate4Site, but the 3D sliding window method is less powerful than FuncPatch and Rate4Site. The functional patches predicted by FuncPatch in the four case studies are supported by experimental evidence, which corroborates the usefulness of FuncPatch. The software FuncPatch is freely available at the web site, http://info.mcmaster.ca/yifei/FuncPatch golding@mcmaster.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. DeepSite: protein-binding site predictor using 3D-convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, J; Doerr, S; Martínez-Rosell, G; Rose, A S; De Fabritiis, G

    2017-10-01

    An important step in structure-based drug design consists in the prediction of druggable binding sites. Several algorithms for detecting binding cavities, those likely to bind to a small drug compound, have been developed over the years by clever exploitation of geometric, chemical and evolutionary features of the protein. Here we present a novel knowledge-based approach that uses state-of-the-art convolutional neural networks, where the algorithm is learned by examples. In total, 7622 proteins from the scPDB database of binding sites have been evaluated using both a distance and a volumetric overlap approach. Our machine-learning based method demonstrates superior performance to two other competitive algorithmic strategies. DeepSite is freely available at www.playmolecule.org. Users can submit either a PDB ID or PDB file for pocket detection to our NVIDIA GPU-equipped servers through a WebGL graphical interface. gianni.defabritiis@upf.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Strategies for the structural analysis of multi-protein complexes: lessons from the 3D-Repertoire project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinet, B; Friberg, A; Brooks, M A; van den Elzen, T; Henriot, V; Dziembowski, A; Graille, M; Durand, D; Leulliot, N; Saint André, C; Lazar, N; Sattler, M; Séraphin, B; van Tilbeurgh, H

    2011-08-01

    Structural studies of multi-protein complexes, whether by X-ray diffraction, scattering, NMR spectroscopy or electron microscopy, require stringent quality control of the component samples. The inability to produce 'keystone' subunits in a soluble and correctly folded form is a serious impediment to the reconstitution of the complexes. Co-expression of the components offers a valuable alternative to the expression of single proteins as a route to obtain sufficient amounts of the sample of interest. Even in cases where milligram-scale quantities of purified complex of interest become available, there is still no guarantee that good quality crystals can be obtained. At this step, protein engineering of one or more components of the complex is frequently required to improve solubility, yield or the ability to crystallize the sample. Subsequent characterization of these constructs may be performed by solution techniques such as Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to identify 'well behaved' complexes. Herein, we recount our experiences gained at protein production and complex assembly during the European 3D Repertoire project (3DR). The goal of this consortium was to obtain structural information on multi-protein complexes from yeast by combining crystallography, electron microscopy, NMR and in silico modeling methods. We present here representative set case studies of complexes that were produced and analyzed within the 3DR project. Our experience provides useful insight into strategies that are more generally applicable for structural analysis of protein complexes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genome-Wide Prediction and Analysis of 3D-Domain Swapped Proteins in the Human Genome from Sequence Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Atul Kumar; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    3D-domain swapping is one of the mechanisms of protein oligomerization and the proteins exhibiting this phenomenon have many biological functions. These proteins, which undergo domain swapping, have acquired much attention owing to their involvement in human diseases, such as conformational diseases, amyloidosis, serpinopathies, proteionopathies etc. Early realisation of proteins in the whole human genome that retain tendency to domain swap will enable many aspects of disease control management. Predictive models were developed by using machine learning approaches with an average accuracy of 78% (85.6% of sensitivity, 87.5% of specificity and an MCC value of 0.72) to predict putative domain swapping in protein sequences. These models were applied to many complete genomes with special emphasis on the human genome. Nearly 44% of the protein sequences in the human genome were predicted positive for domain swapping. Enrichment analysis was performed on the positively predicted sequences from human genome for their domain distribution, disease association and functional importance based on Gene Ontology (GO). Enrichment analysis was also performed to infer a better understanding of the functional importance of these sequences. Finally, we developed hinge region prediction, in the given putative domain swapped sequence, by using important physicochemical properties of amino acids.

  14. Construction and tests of demonstrator modules for a 3-D axial PET system for brain or small animal imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N; Pauss, P; Meddi, F; Beltrame, P; Kagan, H; Braem, A; Casella, C; Djambazov, G; Smith, S; Johnson, I; Lustermann, W; Weilhammer, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Dissertori, G; Renker, D; Schneider, T; Schinzel, D; Honscheid, K; De Leo, R; Bolle, E; Fanti, V; Rafecas, M; Cochran, E; Rudge, A; Stapnes, S; Huh, S; Seguinot, J; Solevi, P; Joram, C; Oliver, J F

    2011-01-01

    The design and construction of a PET camera module with high sensitivity, full 3-D spatial reconstruction and very good energy resolution is presented. The basic principle consists of an axial arrangement of long scintillation crystals around the Field Of View (FOV), providing a measurement of the transverse coordinates of the interacting 511 keV gamma ray. On top of each layer of crystals, an array of Wave-Length Shifter (WLS) strips, which collect the light leaving the crystals sideways, is positioned orthogonal to the crystal direction. The signals in the WLS strips allow a precise measurement of the z (axial) co-ordinate of the 511 keV gamma-ray gamma impact. The construction of two modules used for demonstration of the concept is described. First preliminary results on spatial and energy resolution from one full module will be shown. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An iterative approach to dynamic simulation of 3D rigid body motions for real-time interactive computer animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overveld, van C.W.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for approximating the motions of linked 3-dimensional rigid body systems that may be applied in the context of interactive motion specification for computer animation. The method is based on decoupling the ballistic (free) component of the motion of the points that constitute

  16. Toward the identification of a reliable 3D-QSAR model for the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhou, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is an intracellular non-receptor phosphatase that is implicated in signal transduction of insulin and leptin pathways, thus PTP1B is considered as potential target for treating type II diabetes and obesity. The present article is an attempt to formulate the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) modeling of a series of compounds possessing PTP1B inhibitory activities using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) techniques. The optimum template ligand-based models are statistically significant with great CoMFA (R2cv = 0.600, R2pred = 0.6760) and CoMSIA (R2cv = 0.624, R2pred = 0.8068) values. Molecular docking was employed to elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms of this series of compounds against PTP1B. In addition, the CoMFA and CoMSIA field contour maps agree well with the structural characteristics of the binding pocket of PTP1B active site. The knowledge of structure-activity relationship and ligand-receptor interactions from 3D-QSAR model and molecular docking will be useful for better understanding the mechanism of ligand-receptor interaction and facilitating development of novel compounds as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  17. 3D Plasma Nanotextured® Polymeric Surfaces for Protein or Antibody Arrays, and Biomolecule and Cell Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsougeni, Katerina; Ellinas, Kosmas; Koukouvinos, George; Petrou, Panagiota S; Tserepi, Angeliki; Kakabakos, Sotirios E; Gogolides, Evangelos

    2018-01-01

    Plasma micro-nanotexturing is a generic technology for topographical and chemical modification of surfaces and their implementation in microfluidics and microarrays. Nanotextured surfaces with desirable chemical functionality (and wetting behavior) have shown excellent biomolecule immobilization and cell adhesion. Specifically, nanotextured hydrophilic areas show (a) strong binding of biomolecules and (b) strong adhesion of cells, while nanotextured superhydrophobic areas show null adsorption of (a) proteins and (b) cells. Here we describe the protocols for (a) biomolecule adsorption control on nanotextured surfaces for microarray fabrication and (b) cell adhesion on such surfaces. 3D plasma nanotextured® substrates are commercialized through Nanoplasmas private company, a spin-off of the National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos.

  18. Towards a molecular interpretation of astringency: synthesis, 3D structure, colloidal state, and human saliva protein recognition of procyanidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cala, Olivier; Fabre, Sandy; Pinaud, Noël; Dufourc, Erick J; Fouquet, Eric; Laguerre, Michel; Pianet, Isabelle

    2011-07-01

    Astringency is a sensation in the mouth used in judging the quality of red wine. The rough, dry, and puckering sensation called astringency is the result of an interaction between tannins and saliva proteins, mainly proline-rich proteins (PRP), which leads to the formation and precipitation of a complex. A dry and rough sensation is then perceived in the mouth. To get an insight into astringency at the molecular level we investigated: (i) An efficient and iterative method for 4-8 procyanidin synthesis, which gives rise to all possible 4-8 procyanidins up to the tetramer with total control of degree of oligomerization and stereochemistry. (ii) The 3D-structural preferences, which take into account their internal movements, using 2D NMR and molecular modeling. (iii) The self-association process in water or hydroalcoholic solutions using diffusion NMR spectroscopy that gives the active proportion of tannins able to fix proteins. (iv) A comprehensive description of the PRP-procyanidin complex formation to get information about stoichiometry, binding site localization, and affinity constants for different procyanidins. The data collected suggest that the interactions are controlled by both procyanidin conformational and colloidal state preferences. All these results provide new insights into the molecular interpretation of tannin astringency. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. The 3D protein of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 binds to a viral genomic 3' UTR and shows RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Cao, Qianda; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Shun; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Xinxin; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-12-01

    To explore the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) function of the 3D protein of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1), the gene was cloned into the pET-32a(+) vector for prokaryotic expression. The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of DHAV-1 together with a T7 promoter was cloned into the pMD19-T vector for in vitro transcription of 3' UTR RNA, which was further used as a template in RNA-dependent RNA polymerization. In this study, three methods were applied to analyze the RdRP function of the 3D protein: (1) ammonium molybdate spectrophotometry to detect pyrophosphate produced during polymerization; (2) quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) to investigate the changes in RNA quantity during polymerization; and (3) electrophoresis mobility shift assay to examine the interaction between the 3D protein and 3' UTR. The results showed the 3D protein was successfully expressed in bacteria culture supernatant in a soluble form, which could be purified by affinity chromatography. In 3D enzymatic activity assays, pyrophosphate and RNA were produced, the amounts of which increased based on approximative kinetics, and binding of the 3D protein to the 3' UTR was observed. These results indicate that prokaryotically expressed soluble DHAV-13D protein can bind to a viral genomic 3' UTR and exhibit RdRP activity.

  20. Comparison of 3D Maximum A Posteriori and Filtered Backprojection algorithms for high resolution animal imaging in microPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatziioannou, A.; Qi, J.; Moore, A.; Annala, A.; Nguyen, K.; Leahy, R.M.; Cherry, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    We have evaluated the performance of two three dimensional reconstruction algorithms with data acquired from microPET, a high resolution tomograph dedicated to small animal imaging. The first was a linear filtered-backprojection algorithm (FBP) with reprojection of the missing data and the second was a statistical maximum-aposteriori probability algorithm (MAP). The two algorithms were evaluated in terms of their resolution performance, both in phantoms and in vivo. Sixty independent realizations of a phantom simulating the brain of a baby monkey were acquired, each containing 3 million counts. Each of these realizations was reconstructed independently with both algorithms. The ensemble of the sixty reconstructed realizations was used to estimate the standard deviation as a measure of the noise for each reconstruction algorithm. More detail was recovered in the MAP reconstruction without an increase in noise relative to FBP. Studies in a simple cylindrical compartment phantom demonstrated improved recovery of known activity ratios with MAP. Finally in vivo studies also demonstrated a clear improvement in spatial resolution using the MAP algorithm. The quantitative accuracy of the MAP reconstruction was also evaluated by comparison with autoradiography and direct well counting of tissue samples and was shown to be superior

  1. The virtual lover: variable and easily guided 3D fish animations as an innovative tool in mate-choice experiments with sailfin mollies-I. Design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Klaus; Smielik, Ievgen; Hütwohl, Jan-Marco; Gierszewski, Stefanie; Witte, Klaudia; Kuhnert, Klaus-Dieter

    2017-02-01

    Animal behavior researchers often face problems regarding standardization and reproducibility of their experiments. This has led to the partial substitution of live animals with artificial virtual stimuli. In addition to standardization and reproducibility, virtual stimuli open new options for researchers since they are easily changeable in morphology and appearance, and their behavior can be defined. In this article, a novel toolchain to conduct behavior experiments with fish is presented by a case study in sailfin mollies Poecilia latipinna . As the toolchain holds many different and novel features, it offers new possibilities for studies in behavioral animal research and promotes the standardization of experiments. The presented method includes options to design, animate, and present virtual stimuli to live fish. The designing tool offers an easy and user-friendly way to define size, coloration, and morphology of stimuli and moreover it is able to configure virtual stimuli randomly without any user influence. Furthermore, the toolchain brings a novel method to animate stimuli in a semiautomatic way with the help of a game controller. These created swimming paths can be applied to different stimuli in real time. A presentation tool combines models and swimming paths regarding formerly defined playlists, and presents the stimuli onto 2 screens. Experiments with live sailfin mollies validated the usage of the created virtual 3D fish models in mate-choice experiments.

  2. PONDEROSA-C/S: client-server based software package for automated protein 3D structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Stark, Jaime L; Markley, John L

    2014-11-01

    Peak-picking Of Noe Data Enabled by Restriction Of Shift Assignments-Client Server (PONDEROSA-C/S) builds on the original PONDEROSA software (Lee et al. in Bioinformatics 27:1727-1728. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btr200, 2011) and includes improved features for structure calculation and refinement. PONDEROSA-C/S consists of three programs: Ponderosa Server, Ponderosa Client, and Ponderosa Analyzer. PONDEROSA-C/S takes as input the protein sequence, a list of assigned chemical shifts, and nuclear Overhauser data sets ((13)C- and/or (15)N-NOESY). The output is a set of assigned NOEs and 3D structural models for the protein. Ponderosa Analyzer supports the visualization, validation, and refinement of the results from Ponderosa Server. These tools enable semi-automated NMR-based structure determination of proteins in a rapid and robust fashion. We present examples showing the use of PONDEROSA-C/S in solving structures of four proteins: two that enable comparison with the original PONDEROSA package, and two from the Critical Assessment of automated Structure Determination by NMR (Rosato et al. in Nat Methods 6:625-626. doi: 10.1038/nmeth0909-625 , 2009) competition. The software package can be downloaded freely in binary format from http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/download_packages.html. Registered users of the National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison can submit jobs to the PONDEROSA-C/S server at http://ponderosa.nmrfam.wisc.edu, where instructions, tutorials, and instructions can be found. Structures are normally returned within 1-2 days.

  3. Enhance the performance of current scoring functions with the aid of 3D protein-ligand interaction fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Su, Minyi; Liu, Zhihai; Li, Jie; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxiao

    2017-07-18

    In structure-based drug design, binding affinity prediction remains as a challenging goal for current scoring functions. Development of target-biased scoring functions provides a new possibility for tackling this problem, but this approach is also associated with certain technical difficulties. We previously reported the Knowledge-Guided Scoring (KGS) method as an alternative approach (BMC Bioinformatics, 2010, 11, 193-208). The key idea is to compute the binding affinity of a given protein-ligand complex based on the known binding data of an appropriate reference complex, so the error in binding affinity prediction can be reduced effectively. In this study, we have developed an upgraded version, i.e. KGS2, by employing 3D protein-ligand interaction fingerprints in reference selection. KGS2 was evaluated in combination with four scoring functions (X-Score, ChemPLP, ASP, and GoldScore) on five drug targets (HIV-1 protease, carbonic anhydrase 2, beta-secretase 1, beta-trypsin, and checkpoint kinase 1). In the in situ scoring test, considerable improvements were observed in most cases after application of KGS2. Besides, the performance of KGS2 was always better than KGS in all cases. In the more challenging molecular docking test, application of KGS2 also led to improved structure-activity relationship in some cases. KGS2 can be applied as a convenient "add-on" to current scoring functions without the need to re-engineer them, and its application is not limited to certain target proteins as customized scoring functions. As an interpolation method, its accuracy in principle can be improved further with the increasing knowledge of protein-ligand complex structures and binding affinity data. We expect that KGS2 will become a practical tool for enhancing the performance of current scoring functions in binding affinity prediction. The KGS2 software is available upon contacting the authors.

  4. SU-E-T-296: Dosimetric Analysis of Small Animal Image-Guided Irradiator Using High Resolution Optical CT Imaging of 3D Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Y; Qian, X; Wuu, C; Adamovics, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator using a high-resolution of optical CT imaging of 3D dosimeters. Methods: PRESAEGE 3D dosimeters were used to determine dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator and compared with EBT2 films. Cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters with 7cm height and 6cm diameter were placed along the central axis of the beam. The films were positioned between 6×6cm 2 cubed plastic water phantoms perpendicular to the beam direction with multiple depths. PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films were then irradiated with the irradiator beams at 220kVp and 13mA. Each of irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters named PA1, PA2, PB1, and PB2, was independently scanned using a high-resolution single laser beam optical CT scanner. The transverse images were reconstructed with a 0.1mm high-resolution pixel. A commercial Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was used for readout of irradiated EBT2 films at a 0.4mm pixel resolution. PDD curves and beam profiles were measured for the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters and EBT2 films. Results: The PDD agreements between the irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2 and the EB2 films were 1.7, 2.3, 1.9, and 1.9% for the multiple depths at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 50mm, respectively. The FWHM measurements for each PRESAEGE dosimeter and film agreed with 0.5, 1.1, 0.4, and 1.7%, respectively, at 30mm depth. Both PDD and FWHM measurements for the PRESAGE dosimeters and the films agreed overall within 2%. The 20%–80% penumbral widths of each PRESAGE dosimeter and the film at a given depth were respectively found to be 0.97, 0.91, 0.79, 0.88, and 0.37mm. Conclusion: Dosimetric characteristics of a small animal image-guided irradiator have been demonstrated with the measurements of PRESAGE dosimeter and EB2 film. With the high resolution and accuracy obtained from this 3D dosimetry system, precise targeting small animal irradiation can be achieved

  5. Correlation between spatial (3D) structure of pea and bean thylakoid membranes and arrangement of chlorophyll-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumak, Izabela; Mazur, Radosław; Gieczewska, Katarzyna; Kozioł-Lipińska, Joanna; Kierdaszuk, Borys; Michalski, Wojtek P; Shiell, Brian J; Venema, Jan Henk; Vredenberg, Wim J; Mostowska, Agnieszka; Garstka, Maciej

    2012-05-25

    The thylakoid system in plant chloroplasts is organized into two distinct domains: grana arranged in stacks of appressed membranes and non-appressed membranes consisting of stroma thylakoids and margins of granal stacks. It is argued that the reason for the development of appressed membranes in plants is that their photosynthetic apparatus need to cope with and survive ever-changing environmental conditions. It is not known however, why different plant species have different arrangements of grana within their chloroplasts. It is important to elucidate whether a different arrangement and distribution of appressed and non-appressed thylakoids in chloroplasts are linked with different qualitative and/or quantitative organization of chlorophyll-protein (CP) complexes in the thylakoid membranes and whether this arrangement influences the photosynthetic efficiency. Our results from TEM and in situ CLSM strongly indicate the existence of different arrangements of pea and bean thylakoid membranes. In pea, larger appressed thylakoids are regularly arranged within chloroplasts as uniformly distributed red fluorescent bodies, while irregular appressed thylakoid membranes within bean chloroplasts correspond to smaller and less distinguished fluorescent areas in CLSM images. 3D models of pea chloroplasts show a distinct spatial separation of stacked thylakoids from stromal spaces whereas spatial division of stroma and thylakoid areas in bean chloroplasts are more complex. Structural differences influenced the PSII photochemistry, however without significant changes in photosynthetic efficiency. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of chlorophyll-protein complexes as well as spectroscopic investigations indicated a similar proportion between PSI and PSII core complexes in pea and bean thylakoids, but higher abundance of LHCII antenna in pea ones. Furthermore, distinct differences in size and arrangements of LHCII-PSII and LHCI-PSI supercomplexes between species are suggested

  6. 21 CFR 573.200 - Condensed animal protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Condensed animal protein hydrolysate. 573.200... ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.200 Condensed animal protein hydrolysate. (a) Identity. The condensed animal protein hydrolysate is produced from the meat byproducts scraped from cured (salted) hides taken...

  7. 3D ARCHITECTURAL VIDEOMAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Catanese

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D architectural mapping is a video projection technique that can be done with a survey of a chosen building in order to realize a perfect correspondence between its shapes and the images in projection. As a performative kind of audiovisual artifact, the real event of the 3D mapping is a combination of a registered video animation file with a real architecture. This new kind of visual art is becoming very popular and its big audience success testifies new expressive chances in the field of urban design. My case study has been experienced in Pisa for the Luminara feast in 2012.

  8. Protein folding pathology in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruys, Erik

    2004-10-01

    Fibrillar proteins form structural elements of cells and the extracellular matrix. Pathological lesions of fibrillar microanatomical structures, or secondary fibrillar changes in globular proteins are well known. A special group concerns histologically amorphous deposits, amyloid. The major characteristics of amyloid are: apple green birefringence after Congo red staining of histological sections, and non-branching 7-10 nm thick fibrils on electron microscopy revealing a high content of cross beta pleated sheets. About 25 different types of amyloid have been characterised. In animals, AA-amyloid is the most frequent type. Other types of amyloid in animals represent: AIAPP (in cats), AApoAI, AApoAII, localised AL-amyloid, amyloid in odontogenic or mammary tumors and amyloid in the brain. In old dogs Abeta and in sheep APrPsc-amyloid can be encountered. AA-amyloidosis is a systemic disorder with a precursor in blood, acute phase serum amyloid A (SAA). In chronic inflammatory processes AA-amyloid can be deposited. A rapid crystallization of SAA to amyloid fibrils on small beta-sheeted fragments, the 'amyloid enhancing factor' (AEF), is known and the AEF has been shown to penetrate the enteric barrier. Amyloid fibrils can aggregate from various precursor proteins in vitro in particular at acidic pH and when proteolytic fragments are formed. Molecular chaperones influence this process. Tissue data point to amyloid fibrillogenesis in lysosomes and near cell surfaces. A comparison can be made of the fibrillogenesis in prion diseases and in enhanced AA-amyloidosis. In the reactive form, acute phase SAA is the supply of the precursor protein, whereas in the prion diseases, cell membrane proteins form a structural source. Abeta-amyloid in brain tissue of aged dogs showing signs of dementia forms a canine counterpart of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (ccSDAT) in man. Misfolded proteins remain potential food hazards. Developments concerning prevention of amyloidogenesis

  9. Worldwide Protein Data Bank biocuration supporting open access to high-quality 3D structural biology data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, John D; Feng, Zukang; Persikova, Irina; Sala, Raul; Sen, Sanchayita; Berrisford, John M; Swaminathan, G Jawahar; Oldfield, Thomas J; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Igarashi, Reiko; Armstrong, David R; Baskaran, Kumaran; Chen, Li; Chen, Minyu; Clark, Alice R; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Gao, Guanghua; Ghosh, Sutapa; Gore, Swanand; Guranovic, Vladimir; Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Hudson, Brian P; Ikegawa, Yasuyo; Kengaku, Yumiko; Lawson, Catherine L; Liang, Yuhe; Mak, Lora; Mukhopadhyay, Abhik; Narayanan, Buvaneswari; Nishiyama, Kayoko; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sahni, Gaurav; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Sato, Junko; Sekharan, Monica R; Shao, Chenghua; Smart, Oliver S; Tan, Lihua; van Ginkel, Glen; Yang, Huanwang; Zhuravleva, Marina A; Markley, John L; Nakamura, Haruki; Kurisu, Genji; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Velankar, Sameer; Berman, Helen M; Burley, Stephen K

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the single global repository for experimentally determined 3D structures of biological macromolecules and their complexes with ligands. The worldwide PDB (wwPDB) is the international collaboration that manages the PDB archive according to the FAIR principles: Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability. The wwPDB recently developed OneDep, a unified tool for deposition, validation and biocuration of structures of biological macromolecules. All data deposited to the PDB undergo critical review by wwPDB Biocurators. This article outlines the importance of biocuration for structural biology data deposited to the PDB and describes wwPDB biocuration processes and the role of expert Biocurators in sustaining a high-quality archive. Structural data submitted to the PDB are examined for self-consistency, standardized using controlled vocabularies, cross-referenced with other biological data resources and validated for scientific/technical accuracy. We illustrate how biocuration is integral to PDB data archiving, as it facilitates accurate, consistent and comprehensive representation of biological structure data, allowing efficient and effective usage by research scientists, educators, students and the curious public worldwide. Database URL: https://www.wwpdb.org/ PMID:29688351

  10. A Smart Cage With Uniform Wireless Power Distribution in 3D for Enabling Long-Term Experiments With Freely Moving Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Bahrami, Hadi; Sawan, Mohamad; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel experimental chamber with uniform wireless power distribution in 3D for enabling long-term biomedical experiments with small freely moving animal subjects. The implemented power transmission chamber prototype is based on arrays of parallel resonators and multicoil inductive links, to form a novel and highly efficient wireless power transmission system. The power transmitter unit includes several identical resonators enclosed in a scalable array of overlapping square coils which are connected in parallel to provide uniform power distribution along x and y. Moreover, the proposed chamber uses two arrays of primary resonators, facing each other, and connected in parallel to achieve uniform power distribution along the z axis. Each surface includes 9 overlapped coils connected in parallel and implemented into two layers of FR4 printed circuit board. The chamber features a natural power localization mechanism, which simplifies its implementation and ease its operation by avoiding the need for active detection and control mechanisms. A single power surface based on the proposed approach can provide a power transfer efficiency (PTE) of 69% and a power delivered to the load (PDL) of 120 mW, for a separation distance of 4 cm, whereas the complete chamber prototype provides a uniform PTE of 59% and a PDL of 100 mW in 3D, everywhere inside the chamber with a size of 27×27×16 cm(3).

  11. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Animal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Fanny; Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells secrete a range of proteins in a constitutive or regulated manner through the conventional or canonical exocytic/secretory pathway characterized by vesicular traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum, through the Golgi apparatus, and towards the plasma membrane. However, a number of proteins are secreted in an unconventional manner, which are insensitive to inhibitors of conventional exocytosis and use a route that bypasses the Golgi apparatus. These include cytosolic proteins such as fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and membrane proteins that are known to also traverse to the plasma membrane by a conventional process of exocytosis, such as α integrin and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor (CFTR). Mechanisms underlying unconventional protein secretion (UPS) are actively being analyzed and deciphered, and these range from an unusual form of plasma membrane translocation to vesicular processes involving the generation of exosomes and other extracellular microvesicles. In this chapter, we provide an overview on what is currently known about UPS in animal cells.

  12. A framework for inverse planning of beam-on times for 3D small animal radiotherapy using interactive multi-objective optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balvert, Marleen; Den Hertog, Dick; Van Hoof, Stefan J; Granton, Patrick V; Trani, Daniela; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Verhaegen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Advances in precision small animal radiotherapy hardware enable the delivery of increasingly complicated dose distributions on the millimeter scale. Manual creation and evaluation of treatment plans becomes difficult or even infeasible with an increasing number of degrees of freedom for dose delivery and available image data. The goal of this work is to develop an optimisation model that determines beam-on times for a given beam configuration, and to assess the feasibility and benefits of an automated treatment planning system for small animal radiotherapy.The developed model determines a Pareto optimal solution using operator-defined weights for a multiple-objective treatment planning problem. An interactive approach allows the planner to navigate towards, and to select the Pareto optimal treatment plan that yields the most preferred trade-off of the conflicting objectives. This model was evaluated using four small animal cases based on cone-beam computed tomography images. Resulting treatment plan quality was compared to the quality of manually optimised treatment plans using dose-volume histograms and metrics.Results show that the developed framework is well capable of optimising beam-on times for 3D dose distributions and offers several advantages over manual treatment plan optimisation. For all cases but the simple flank tumour case, a similar amount of time was needed for manual and automated beam-on time optimisation. In this time frame, manual optimisation generates a single treatment plan, while the inverse planning system yields a set of Pareto optimal solutions which provides quantitative insight on the sensitivity of conflicting objectives. Treatment planning automation decreases the dependence on operator experience and allows for the use of class solutions for similar treatment scenarios. This can shorten the time required for treatment planning and therefore increase animal throughput. In addition, this can improve treatment standardisation and

  13. The research methods and model of protein turnover in animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xilin; Yang Feng

    2002-01-01

    The author discussed the concept and research methods of protein turnover in animal body. The existing problems and the research results of animal protein turnover in recent years were presented. Meanwhile, the measures to improve the models of animal protein turnover were analyzed

  14. Other Sources of Animal Protein in Ogun State, Nigeria | Taiwo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inadequate animal protein intake is widely orchestrated among Nigerians especially Ogun State indigenes. This led to investigating other sources of animal protein in the rural and suburban areas of the state that could bridge inadequate supply from the conventional sources of animal protein. Structured questionnaires ...

  15. The New 3D Printed Left Atrial Appendage Closure with a Novel Holdfast Device: A Pre-Clinical Feasibility Animal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Brzeziński

    pericarditis or macroscopic signs of inflammation at the site of the device were found. All pigs were in good condition with normal weight gain and no other clinical symptoms.This novel 3D printed left atrial appendage closure technique with a novel holdfast device was proven to be safe and feasible in all pigs. A benign healing process without inflammation and damage to the surrounding structures or evidence of new thrombi formation was observed. Moreover, the uncomplicated survival and full LAA exclusion in all animals demonstrate the efficacy of this novel and relatively cheap device. Further clinical evaluation and implementation studies should be performed to introduce this new technology into clinical practice.

  16. Species identification of processed animal proteins (PAPs) in animal feed containing feed materials from animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmann, Sonja; Adler, Andreas; Brandstettner, Agnes Josephine; Spadinger, Gabriela; Weiss, Roland; Strnad, Irmengard

    2015-01-01

    Since June 2013 the total feed ban of processed animal proteins (PAPs) was partially lifted. Now it is possible to mix fish feed with PAPs from non-ruminants (pig and poultry). To guarantee that fish feed, which contains non-ruminant PAPs, is free of ruminant PAPs, it has to be analysed with a ruminant PCR assay to comply with the total ban of feeding PAPs from ruminants. However, PCR analysis cannot distinguish between ruminant DNA, which originates from proteins such as muscle and bones, and ruminant DNA, which comes from feed materials of animal origin such as milk products or fat. Thus, there is the risk of obtaining positive ruminant PCR signals based on these materials. The paper describes the development of the combination of two analysis methods, micro-dissection and PCR, to eliminate the problem of 'false-positive' PCR signals. With micro-dissection, single particles can be isolated and subsequently analysed with PCR.

  17. (¹⁵N ± ¹³C') edited (4, 3)D-H(CC)CONH TOCSY and (4, 3)D-NOESY HNCO experiments for unambiguous side chain and NOE assignments of proteins with high shift degeneracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Arora, Ashish

    2011-11-01

    Well-resolved and unambiguous through-bond correlations and NOE data are crucial for high-quality protein structure determination by NMR. In this context, we present here (4, 3)D reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments: H(CC)CONH TOCSY and NOESY HNCO--which instead of (15)N shifts exploit the linear combination of (15)N(i) and (13)C'(i-1) shifts (where i is a residue number) to resolve the through-bond (1)H-(1)H correlations and through-space (1)H-(1)H NOEs. The strategy makes use of the fact that (15)N and (13)C' chemical shifts when combined linearly provide a dispersion which is better compared to those of the individual chemical shifts. The extended dispersion thus available in these experiments will help to obtain the unambiguous side chain and accurate NOE assignments especially for medium-sized alpha-helical or partially unstructured proteins [molecular weight (MW) between 12-15 kDa] as well as higher MW (between 15-25 kDa) folded proteins where spectral overlap renders inaccurate and ambiguous NOEs. Further, these reduced dimensionality experiments in combination with routinely used (15)N and (13)C' edited TOCSY and NOESY experiments will provide an alternative way for high-quality NMR structure determination of large unstable proteins (with very high shift degeneracy), which are not at all amenable to 4D NMR. The utility of these experiments has been demonstrated here using (13)C/(15)N labeled ubiquitin (76 aa) protein. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. 3D for Graphic Designers

    CERN Document Server

    Connell, Ellery

    2011-01-01

    Helping graphic designers expand their 2D skills into the 3D space The trend in graphic design is towards 3D, with the demand for motion graphics, animation, photorealism, and interactivity rapidly increasing. And with the meteoric rise of iPads, smartphones, and other interactive devices, the design landscape is changing faster than ever.2D digital artists who need a quick and efficient way to join this brave new world will want 3D for Graphic Designers. Readers get hands-on basic training in working in the 3D space, including product design, industrial design and visualization, modeling, ani

  19. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, K; Fuchs, J; Fröber, A; Kirmse, R; Glass, B; Anders-Össwein, M; Walther, P; Kräusslich, H-G; Dietrich, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV-pulsed mature human dendritic cells. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics (United States); Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biophysics (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living {sup 15}N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through {sup 15}N–{sup 15}N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish {sup 15}N–{sup 15}N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR-mixing experiments.

  1. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T; Mote, Kaustubh R; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living (15)N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through (15)N-(15)N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish (15)N-(15)N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI-HETCOR-mixing experiments.

  2. Simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D solid-state NMR experiments for sequential assignment of oriented membrane protein samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, T.; Mote, Kaustubh R.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method called DAISY (Dual Acquisition orIented ssNMR spectroScopY) for the simultaneous acquisition of 2D and 3D oriented solid-state NMR experiments for membrane proteins reconstituted in mechanically or magnetically aligned lipid bilayers. DAISY utilizes dual acquisition of sine and cosine dipolar or chemical shift coherences and long living 15 N longitudinal polarization to obtain two multi-dimensional spectra, simultaneously. In these new experiments, the first acquisition gives the polarization inversion spin exchange at the magic angle (PISEMA) or heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra, the second acquisition gives PISEMA-mixing or HETCOR-mixing spectra, where the mixing element enables inter-residue correlations through 15 N– 15 N homonuclear polarization transfer. The analysis of the two 2D spectra (first and second acquisitions) enables one to distinguish 15 N– 15 N inter-residue correlations for sequential assignment of membrane proteins. DAISY can be implemented in 3D experiments that include the polarization inversion spin exchange at magic angle via I spin coherence (PISEMAI) sequence, as we show for the simultaneous acquisition of 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR and 3D PISEMAI–HETCOR-mixing experiments

  3. Animal proteins in feed : IAG ring rest 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.; Vliege, J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    A ring test was organized for the detection of animal proteins in animal feed by microscopy in the framework of the annual ring tests of the Inernational Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy.

  4. Mosaic amino acid conservation in 3D-structures of surface protein and polymerase of hepatitis B virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, Formijn J.; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Berkhout, Ben; Lukashov, Vladimir V.

    2008-01-01

    Surface protein and polymerase of hepatitis B virus provide a striking example of gene overlap. Inclusion of more coding constraints in the phylogenetic analysis forces the tree toward accepted topology. Three-dimensional protein modeling demonstrates that participation in local protein function

  5. 3D co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes and cytoprotective effects on keratinocytes against reactive oxygen species by insect virus-derived protein microcrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimabukuro, Junji; Yamaoka, Ayako; Murata, Ken-ichi; Kotani, Eiji; Hirano, Tomoko; Nakajima, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Goichi; Mori, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Stable protein microcrystals called polyhedra are produced by certain insect viruses. Cytokines, such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), can be immobilized within polyhedra. Here, we investigated three-dimensional (3D) co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes on collagen gel containing FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra. Melanocytes were observed to reside at the base of the 3D cell culture and melanin was also typically observed in the lower layer. The 3D cell culture model with FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra was a useful in vitro model of the epidermis due to effective melanogenesis, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. FGF-7 polyhedra showed a potent cytoprotective effect when keratinocytes were treated with menadione, which is a generator of reactive oxygen species. The cytoprotective effect was activated by the inositol triphosphate kinase–Akt pathway leading to upregulation of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 6. - Highlights: • 3D cultures using FGF-2 and FGF-7 microcrystals as a human skin model • Cytoprotection of keratinocytes against ROS by FGF-7 microcrystals • Overexpression of SOD and Prdx6 in keratinocytes by FGF-7 microcrystals

  6. 3D co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes and cytoprotective effects on keratinocytes against reactive oxygen species by insect virus-derived protein microcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimabukuro, Junji; Yamaoka, Ayako; Murata, Ken-ichi [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kotani, Eiji [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Hirano, Tomoko [Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Nakajima, Yumiko [Functional Genomics Group, COMB, Tropical Biosphere Research Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Matsumoto, Goichi [Division of Oral Surgery, Yokohama Clinical Education Center of Kanagawa Dental University, Yokohama (Japan); Mori, Hajime, E-mail: hmori@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    Stable protein microcrystals called polyhedra are produced by certain insect viruses. Cytokines, such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), can be immobilized within polyhedra. Here, we investigated three-dimensional (3D) co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes on collagen gel containing FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra. Melanocytes were observed to reside at the base of the 3D cell culture and melanin was also typically observed in the lower layer. The 3D cell culture model with FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra was a useful in vitro model of the epidermis due to effective melanogenesis, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. FGF-7 polyhedra showed a potent cytoprotective effect when keratinocytes were treated with menadione, which is a generator of reactive oxygen species. The cytoprotective effect was activated by the inositol triphosphate kinase–Akt pathway leading to upregulation of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 6. - Highlights: • 3D cultures using FGF-2 and FGF-7 microcrystals as a human skin model • Cytoprotection of keratinocytes against ROS by FGF-7 microcrystals • Overexpression of SOD and Prdx6 in keratinocytes by FGF-7 microcrystals.

  7. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  8. Animal proteins in feed : IAG ring rest 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.; Vliege, J.J.M.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, section Feeding stuff Microscopy, organises annually a ring test for animal proteins for all their members. In this report the ring test for animal proteins is presented, which was organised by RIKILT in 2011 on behalf of the IAG section

  9. eEcoLiDAR, eScience infrastructure for ecological applications of LiDAR point clouds : reconstructing the 3D ecosystem structure for animals at regional to continental scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kissling, W.D.; Seijmonsbergen, A.C.; Foppen, R.P.B.; Bouten, W.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of high-resolution measurements of 3D ecosystem structure across broad spatial extents impedes major advancements in animal ecology and biodiversity science. We aim to fill this gap by using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology to characterize the vertical and horizontal

  10. Tissue protein metabolism in parasitized animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Symons, L.E.A.; Steel, J.W.; Jones, W.O.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of gastrointestinal nematode infection of mammals, particularly of the small intestine of the sheep, on protein metabolism of skeletal muscle, liver, the gastrointestinal tract and wool are described. These changes have been integrated to explain poor growth and production in the sheep heavily infected with Trichostrongylus colubriformis. The rates of both synthesis and catabolism of muscle protein are depressed, but nitrogen is lost from this tissue because the depression of synthesis exceeds that of catabolism. Anorexia is the major cause of these changes. Although the effect on liver protein synthesis is unclear, it is probable that the leakage of plasma proteins into the gastrointestinal tract stimulates an early increase in the rate of synthesis of these proteins, but this eventually declines and is insufficient to correct developing hypoalbuminaemia. Changes in the intestinal tract are complex. Exogenous nitrogen is reduced by anorexia, but the flow of nitrogen through the tract from abomasum to faeces is above normal because of the increase of endogenous protein from leakage of plasma protein and, presumably, from exfoliated epithelial cells. There is evidence that protein metabolism of intestinal tissue, particularly in the uninfected distal two-thirds, is increased. Synthesis of wool protein is decreased. As the result of anorexia, intestinal loss of endogenous protein and an increased rate of intestinal protein metabolism there is a net movement of amino nitrogen from muscle, liver and possibly skin to the intestine of the heavily infected sheep. Thus, the availability of amino nitrogen for growth and wool production is reduced. (author)

  11. Bipolar resistive switching in different plant and animal proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bag, A.; Hota, Mrinal Kanti; Mallik, Sandipan B.; Maì ti, Chinmay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We report bipolar resistive switching phenomena observed in different types of plant and animal proteins. Using protein as the switching medium, resistive switching devices have been fabricated with conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) and Al as bottom and top electrodes, respectively. A clockwise bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in all proteins. It is shown that the resistive switching phenomena originate from the local redox process in the protein and the ion exchange from the top electrode/protein interface.

  12. Bipolar resistive switching in different plant and animal proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bag, A.

    2014-06-01

    We report bipolar resistive switching phenomena observed in different types of plant and animal proteins. Using protein as the switching medium, resistive switching devices have been fabricated with conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) and Al as bottom and top electrodes, respectively. A clockwise bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in all proteins. It is shown that the resistive switching phenomena originate from the local redox process in the protein and the ion exchange from the top electrode/protein interface.

  13. Detection and characterization of 3D-signature phosphorylation site motifs and their contribution towards improved phosphorylation site prediction in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selbig Joachim

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation of proteins plays a crucial role in the regulation and activation of metabolic and signaling pathways and constitutes an important target for pharmaceutical intervention. Central to the phosphorylation process is the recognition of specific target sites by protein kinases followed by the covalent attachment of phosphate groups to the amino acids serine, threonine, or tyrosine. The experimental identification as well as computational prediction of phosphorylation sites (P-sites has proved to be a challenging problem. Computational methods have focused primarily on extracting predictive features from the local, one-dimensional sequence information surrounding phosphorylation sites. Results We characterized the spatial context of phosphorylation sites and assessed its usability for improved phosphorylation site predictions. We identified 750 non-redundant, experimentally verified sites with three-dimensional (3D structural information available in the protein data bank (PDB and grouped them according to their respective kinase family. We studied the spatial distribution of amino acids around phosphorserines, phosphothreonines, and phosphotyrosines to extract signature 3D-profiles. Characteristic spatial distributions of amino acid residue types around phosphorylation sites were indeed discernable, especially when kinase-family-specific target sites were analyzed. To test the added value of using spatial information for the computational prediction of phosphorylation sites, Support Vector Machines were applied using both sequence as well as structural information. When compared to sequence-only based prediction methods, a small but consistent performance improvement was obtained when the prediction was informed by 3D-context information. Conclusion While local one-dimensional amino acid sequence information was observed to harbor most of the discriminatory power, spatial context information was identified as

  14. VIRTOPSY--scientific documentation, reconstruction and animation in forensic: individual and real 3D data based geo-metric approach including optical body/object surface and radiological CT/MRI scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thali, Michael J; Braun, Marcel; Buck, Ursula; Aghayev, Emin; Jackowski, Christian; Vock, Peter; Sonnenschein, Martin; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2005-03-01

    Until today, most of the documentation of forensic relevant medical findings is limited to traditional 2D photography, 2D conventional radiographs, sketches and verbal description. There are still some limitations of the classic documentation in forensic science especially if a 3D documentation is necessary. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate new 3D real data based geo-metric technology approaches. This paper present approaches to a 3D geo-metric documentation of injuries on the body surface and internal injuries in the living and deceased cases. Using modern imaging methods such as photogrammetry, optical surface and radiological CT/MRI scanning in combination it could be demonstrated that a real, full 3D data based individual documentation of the body surface and internal structures is possible in a non-invasive and non-destructive manner. Using the data merging/fusing and animation possibilities, it is possible to answer reconstructive questions of the dynamic development of patterned injuries (morphologic imprints) and to evaluate the possibility, that they are matchable or linkable to suspected injury-causing instruments. For the first time, to our knowledge, the method of optical and radiological 3D scanning was used to document the forensic relevant injuries of human body in combination with vehicle damages. By this complementary documentation approach, individual forensic real data based analysis and animation were possible linking body injuries to vehicle deformations or damages. These data allow conclusions to be drawn for automobile accident research, optimization of vehicle safety (pedestrian and passenger) and for further development of crash dummies. Real 3D data based documentation opens a new horizon for scientific reconstruction and animation by bringing added value and a real quality improvement in forensic science.

  15. Application of 3D documentation and geometric reconstruction methods in traffic accident analysis: with high resolution surface scanning, radiological MSCT/MRI scanning and real data based animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Ursula; Naether, Silvio; Braun, Marcel; Bolliger, Stephan; Friederich, Hans; Jackowski, Christian; Aghayev, Emin; Christe, Andreas; Vock, Peter; Dirnhofer, Richard; Thali, Michael J

    2007-07-20

    The examination of traffic accidents is daily routine in forensic medicine. An important question in the analysis of the victims of traffic accidents, for example in collisions between motor vehicles and pedestrians or cyclists, is the situation of the impact. Apart from forensic medical examinations (external examination and autopsy), three-dimensional technologies and methods are gaining importance in forensic investigations. Besides the post-mortem multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the documentation and analysis of internal findings, highly precise 3D surface scanning is employed for the documentation of the external body findings and of injury-inflicting instruments. The correlation of injuries of the body to the injury-inflicting object and the accident mechanism are of great importance. The applied methods include documentation of the external and internal body and the involved vehicles and inflicting tools as well as the analysis of the acquired data. The body surface and the accident vehicles with their damages were digitized by 3D surface scanning. For the internal findings of the body, post-mortem MSCT and MRI were used. The analysis included the processing of the obtained data to 3D models, determination of the driving direction of the vehicle, correlation of injuries to the vehicle damages, geometric determination of the impact situation and evaluation of further findings of the accident. In the following article, the benefits of the 3D documentation and computer-assisted, drawn-to-scale 3D comparisons of the relevant injuries with the damages to the vehicle in the analysis of the course of accidents, especially with regard to the impact situation, are shown on two examined cases.

  16. Developing and Evaluating of Non-Realistic Three-Dimensional (3d-Nr) and Two-Dimensional (2d) Talking-Head Animation Courseware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Mohd Najib; Ali, Ahmad Zamzuri Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    The talking-head animation is an instructional animation capable of improving the communication skills through enhancing the pronunciation skills; whereby a word is pronounced correctly and accurately. This had been proven by several researches, which indicate that learning with interactive animation is much more advantageous than conventional…

  17. ProtDCal: A program to compute general-purpose-numerical descriptors for sequences and 3D-structures of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Blanco, Yasser B; Paz, Waldo; Green, James; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani

    2015-05-16

    The exponential growth of protein structural and sequence databases is enabling multifaceted approaches to understanding the long sought sequence-structure-function relationship. Advances in computation now make it possible to apply well-established data mining and pattern recognition techniques to these data to learn models that effectively relate structure and function. However, extracting meaningful numerical descriptors of protein sequence and structure is a key issue that requires an efficient and widely available solution. We here introduce ProtDCal, a new computational software suite capable of generating tens of thousands of features considering both sequence-based and 3D-structural descriptors. We demonstrate, by means of principle component analysis and Shannon entropy tests, how ProtDCal's sequence-based descriptors provide new and more relevant information not encoded by currently available servers for sequence-based protein feature generation. The wide diversity of the 3D-structure-based features generated by ProtDCal is shown to provide additional complementary information and effectively completes its general protein encoding capability. As demonstration of the utility of ProtDCal's features, prediction models of N-linked glycosylation sites are trained and evaluated. Classification performance compares favourably with that of contemporary predictors of N-linked glycosylation sites, in spite of not using domain-specific features as input information. ProtDCal provides a friendly and cross-platform graphical user interface, developed in the Java programming language and is freely available at: http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/ProtDCal/ . ProtDCal introduces local and group-based encoding which enhances the diversity of the information captured by the computed features. Furthermore, we have shown that adding structure-based descriptors contributes non-redundant additional information to the features-based characterization of polypeptide systems. This

  18. The chemical component dictionary: complete descriptions of constituent molecules in experimentally determined 3D macromolecules in the Protein Data Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Westbrook, John D.; Shao, Chenghua; Feng, Zukang; Zhuravleva, Marina; Velankar, Sameer; Young, Jasmine

    2014-01-01

    Summary: The Chemical Component Dictionary (CCD) is a chemical reference data resource that describes all residue and small molecule components found in Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries. The CCD contains detailed chemical descriptions for standard and modified amino acids/nucleotides, small molecule ligands and solvent molecules. Each chemical definition includes descriptions of chemical properties such as stereochemical assignments, chemical descriptors, systematic chemical names and idealize...

  19. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  20. Insights into Protein Sequence and Structure-Derived Features Mediating 3D Domain Swapping Mechanism using Support Vector Machine Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khader Shameer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available 3-dimensional domain swapping is a mechanism where two or more protein molecules form higher order oligomers by exchanging identical or similar subunits. Recently, this phenomenon has received much attention in the context of prions and neuro-degenerative diseases, due to its role in the functional regulation, formation of higher oligomers, protein misfolding, aggregation etc. While 3-dimensional domain swap mechanism can be detected from three-dimensional structures, it remains a formidable challenge to derive common sequence or structural patterns from proteins involved in swapping. We have developed a SVM-based classifier to predict domain swapping events using a set of features derived from sequence and structural data. The SVM classifier was trained on features derived from 150 proteins reported to be involved in 3D domain swapping and 150 proteins not known to be involved in swapped conformation or related to proteins involved in swapping phenomenon. The testing was performed using 63 proteins from the positive dataset and 63 proteins from the negative dataset. We obtained 76.33% accuracy from training and 73.81% accuracy from testing. Due to high diversity in the sequence, structure and functions of proteins involved in domain swapping, availability of such an algorithm to predict swapping events from sequence and structure-derived features will be an initial step towards identification of more putative proteins that may be involved in swapping or proteins involved in deposition disease. Further, the top features emerging in our feature selection method may be analysed further to understand their roles in the mechanism of domain swapping.

  1. PONDEROSA-C/S: client–server based software package for automated protein 3D structure determination

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woonghee; Stark, Jaime L.; Markley, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Peak-picking Of Noe Data Enabled by Restriction Of Shift Assignments-Client Server (PONDEROSA-C/S) builds on the original PONDEROSA software (Lee et al. in Bioinformatics 27:1727–1728. doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btr200, 2011) and includes improved features for structure calculation and refinement. PONDEROSA-C/S consists of three programs: Ponderosa Server, Ponderosa Client, and Ponderosa Analyzer. PONDEROSA-C/S takes as input the protein sequence, a list of assigned chemical shifts, and nucle...

  2. Protein metabolism in marine animals: the underlying mechanism of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Keiron P P; Rogers, Alex D

    2007-01-01

    Growth is a fundamental process within all marine organisms. In soft tissues, growth is primarily achieved by the synthesis and retention of proteins as protein growth. The protein pool (all the protein within the organism) is highly dynamic, with proteins constantly entering the pool via protein synthesis or being removed from the pool via protein degradation. Any net change in the size of the protein pool, positive or negative, is termed protein growth. The three inter-related processes of protein synthesis, degradation and growth are together termed protein metabolism. Measurement of protein metabolism is vital in helping us understand how biotic and abiotic factors affect growth and growth efficiency in marine animals. Recently, the developing fields of transcriptomics and proteomics have started to offer us a means of greatly increasing our knowledge of the underlying molecular control of protein metabolism. Transcriptomics may also allow us to detect subtle changes in gene expression associated with protein synthesis and degradation, which cannot be detected using classical methods. A large literature exists on protein metabolism in animals; however, this chapter concentrates on what we know of marine ectotherms; data from non-marine ectotherms and endotherms are only discussed when the data are of particular relevance. We first consider the techniques available to measure protein metabolism, their problems and what validation is required. Protein metabolism in marine organisms is highly sensitive to a wide variety of factors, including temperature, pollution, seasonality, nutrition, developmental stage, genetics, sexual maturation and moulting. We examine how these abiotic and biotic factors affect protein metabolism at the level of whole-animal (adult and larval), tissue and cellular protein metabolism. Available gene expression data, which help us understand the underlying control of protein metabolism, are also discussed. As protein metabolism appears to

  3. ModFOLD6: an accurate web server for the global and local quality estimation of 3D protein models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Ali H A; McGuffin, Liam J

    2017-07-03

    Methods that reliably estimate the likely similarity between the predicted and native structures of proteins have become essential for driving the acceptance and adoption of three-dimensional protein models by life scientists. ModFOLD6 is the latest version of our leading resource for Estimates of Model Accuracy (EMA), which uses a pioneering hybrid quasi-single model approach. The ModFOLD6 server integrates scores from three pure-single model methods and three quasi-single model methods using a neural network to estimate local quality scores. Additionally, the server provides three options for producing global score estimates, depending on the requirements of the user: (i) ModFOLD6_rank, which is optimized for ranking/selection, (ii) ModFOLD6_cor, which is optimized for correlations of predicted and observed scores and (iii) ModFOLD6 global for balanced performance. The ModFOLD6 methods rank among the top few for EMA, according to independent blind testing by the CASP12 assessors. The ModFOLD6 server is also continuously automatically evaluated as part of the CAMEO project, where significant performance gains have been observed compared to our previous server and other publicly available servers. The ModFOLD6 server is freely available at: http://www.reading.ac.uk/bioinf/ModFOLD/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Hyaluronan (HA) interacting proteins RHAMM and hyaluronidase impact prostate cancer cell behavior and invadopodia formation in 3D HA-based hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurski, Lisa A; Xu, Xian; Labrada, Lyana N; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Xiao, Longxi; van Golen, Kenneth L; Jia, Xinqiao; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2012-01-01

    To study the individual functions of hyaluronan interacting proteins in prostate cancer (PCa) motility through connective tissues, we developed a novel three-dimensional (3D) hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel assay that provides a flexible, quantifiable, and physiologically relevant alternative to current methods. Invasion in this system reflects the prevalence of HA in connective tissues and its role in the promotion of cancer cell motility and tissue invasion, making the system ideal to study invasion through bone marrow or other HA-rich connective tissues. The bio-compatible cross-linking process we used allows for direct encapsulation of cancer cells within the gel where they adopt a distinct, cluster-like morphology. Metastatic PCa cells in these hydrogels develop fingerlike structures, "invadopodia", consistent with their invasive properties. The number of invadopodia, as well as cluster size, shape, and convergence, can provide a quantifiable measure of invasive potential. Among candidate hyaluronan interacting proteins that could be responsible for the behavior we observed, we found that culture in the HA hydrogel triggers invasive PCa cells to differentially express and localize receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility (RHAMM)/CD168 which, in the absence of CD44, appears to contribute to PCa motility and invasion by interacting with the HA hydrogel components. PCa cell invasion through the HA hydrogel also was found to depend on the activity of hyaluronidases. Studies shown here reveal that while hyaluronidase activity is necessary for invadopodia and inter-connecting cluster formation, activity alone is not sufficient for acquisition of invasiveness to occur. We therefore suggest that development of invasive behavior in 3D HA-based systems requires development of additional cellular features, such as activation of motility associated pathways that regulate formation of invadopodia. Thus, we report development of a 3D system amenable to dissection of

  5. Identification of proteins in hyperglycemia and stroke animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jin-Hee; Shah, Fawad-Ali; Gim, Sang-Ah; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of disability and death in adults. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that strongly increases the risk of severe vascular diseases. This study compared changes in proteins of the cerebral cortex during ischemic brain injury between nondiabetic and diabetic animals. Adult male rats were injected with streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) via the intraperitoneal route to induce diabetes and underwent surgical middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) 4 wk after streptozotocin treatment. Cerebral cortex tissues were collected 24 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Several proteins were identified as differentially expressed between nondiabetic and diabetic animals. Among the identified proteins, we focused on the following metabolism-related enzymes: isocitrate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, adenosylhomocysteinase, pyruvate kinase, and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (neuroleukin). Expression of these proteins was decreased in animals that underwent MCAO. Moreover, protein expression was reduced to a greater extent in diabetic animals than in nondiabetic animals. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that the diabetic condition exacerbates the decrease in expression of metabolism-related proteins after MCAO. These results suggest that the diabetic condition may exacerbate brain damage during focal cerebral ischemia through the downregulation of metabolism-related proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jin-Ju; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Keun-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Seok; Bae, Eun-Bin; Choi, Jae-Won; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM) scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent an...

  7. 3D absorbed dose calculation with GATE Monte Carlo simulation for the image-guided radiation therapy dedicated to the small animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noblet, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Innovating irradiators dedicated to small animal allow to mimic clinical treatments in image-guided radiation therapy. Clinical practice is scaled down to the small animal by reducing beam dimensions (from cm to mm) and energy (from MeV to keV). Millimeter medium energy beams ( [fr

  8. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  9. The chemical component dictionary: complete descriptions of constituent molecules in experimentally determined 3D macromolecules in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, John D; Shao, Chenghua; Feng, Zukang; Zhuravleva, Marina; Velankar, Sameer; Young, Jasmine

    2015-04-15

    The Chemical Component Dictionary (CCD) is a chemical reference data resource that describes all residue and small molecule components found in Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries. The CCD contains detailed chemical descriptions for standard and modified amino acids/nucleotides, small molecule ligands and solvent molecules. Each chemical definition includes descriptions of chemical properties such as stereochemical assignments, chemical descriptors, systematic chemical names and idealized coordinates. The content, preparation, validation and distribution of this CCD chemical reference dataset are described. The CCD is updated regularly in conjunction with the scheduled weekly release of new PDB structure data. The CCD and amino acid variant reference datasets are hosted in the public PDB ftp repository at ftp://ftp.wwpdb.org/pub/pdb/data/monomers/components.cif.gz, ftp://ftp.wwpdb.org/pub/pdb/data/monomers/aa-variants-v1.cif.gz, and its mirror sites, and can be accessed from http://wwpdb.org. jwest@rcsb.rutgers.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Determination of processed animal proteins, including meat and bone meal, in animal feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gizzi, G.; Holst, von C.; Baeten, V.; Berben, G.; Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of processed animal proteins (PAP), including meat and bone meal (MBM) from various species, in animal feed was investigated. It was demonstrated that microscopy is the most reliable method for enforcing the current total MBM ban in the European Uion (EU). It was shown that near

  11. Beyond bread and beer: whole cell protein extracts from baker's yeast as a bulk source for 3D cell culture matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenberger, Nicholas; Kubiczek, Dennis; Paul, Patrick; Preising, Nico; Weber, Lukas; Bosch, Ramona; Hausmann, Rudolf; Gottschalk, Kay-Eberhard; Rosenau, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Here, we present a novel approach to form hydrogels from yeast whole cell protein. Countless hydrogels are available for sophisticated research, but their fabrication is often difficult to reproduce, with the gels being complicated to handle or simply too expensive. The yeast hydrogels presented here are polymerized using a four-armed, amine reactive crosslinker and show a high chemical and thermal resistance. The free water content was determined by measuring swelling ratios for different protein concentrations, and in a freeze-drying approach, pore sizes of up to 100 μm in the gel could be created without destabilizing the 3D network. Elasticity was proofed to be adjustable with the help of atomic force microscopy by merely changing the amount of used protein. Furthermore, the material was tested for possible cell culture applications; diffusion rates in the network are high enough for sufficient supply of human breast cancer cells and adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cells with nutrition, and cells showed high viabilities when tested for compatibility with the material. Furthermore, hydrogels could be functionalized with RGD peptide and the optimal concentration for sufficient cell adhesion was determined to be 150 μM. Given that yeast protein is one of the cheapest and easiest available protein sources and that hydrogels are extremely easy to handle, the developed material has highly promising potential for both sophisticated cell culture techniques as well as for larger scale industrial applications.

  12. Are animal models predictive for human postmortem muscle protein degradation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfellner, Bianca; Zissler, Angela; Steinbacher, Peter; Monticelli, Fabio C; Pittner, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    A most precise determination of the postmortem interval (PMI) is a crucial aspect in forensic casework. Although there are diverse approaches available to date, the high heterogeneity of cases together with the respective postmortal changes often limit the validity and sufficiency of many methods. Recently, a novel approach for time since death estimation by the analysis of postmortal changes of muscle proteins was proposed. It is however necessary to improve the reliability and accuracy, especially by analysis of possible influencing factors on protein degradation. This is ideally investigated on standardized animal models that, however, require legitimization by a comparison of human and animal tissue, and in this specific case of protein degradation profiles. Only if protein degradation events occur in comparable fashion within different species, respective findings can sufficiently be transferred from the animal model to application in humans. Therefor samples from two frequently used animal models (mouse and pig), as well as forensic cases with representative protein profiles of highly differing PMIs were analyzed. Despite physical and physiological differences between species, western blot analysis revealed similar patterns in most of the investigated proteins. Even most degradation events occurred in comparable fashion. In some other aspects, however, human and animal profiles depicted distinct differences. The results of this experimental series clearly indicate the huge importance of comparative studies, whenever animal models are considered. Although animal models could be shown to reflect the basic principles of protein degradation processes in humans, we also gained insight in the difficulties and limitations of the applicability of the developed methodology in different mammalian species regarding protein specificity and methodic functionality.

  13. Effect of high plant protein cowpeas ( Vigna unguculata ) and animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent trends in weight loss diets have been formulated that led to a substantial increase in protein intake. It has however been established that high protein intake impacts negatively on already compromised kidney, while its effect on a healthy kidney remains unclear. Our aim therefore was to study the effect of animal ...

  14. Symposium 20 - PABMB: Teaching biochemistry in a connected world: KEEPING 3D RESOURCES IN THE WEB TO LEARN ON PROTEIN STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Herrera

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Symposium 20 - PABMB: Teaching biochemistry in a connected world Chair: Miguel Castanho, Universidade de Lisboa, PortugalAbstract:The new paradigm of higher education requires new teaching strategies to meet the learning objectives of biochemistry courses. Teaching biochemistry in the current state of science and society requires a special motivation for learning, especially for students of degrees other than Biochemistry. The traditional way of teaching, based on the teacher-student relationship, mostly unidirectional, does not fulfil the needs imposed in this era. Considering the current situation universities students require new abilities in their training and the use of computers can constitute a place for discovery and research, enabling the experience of new and diverse situations. The design of teaching material for undergraduate students who take biochemistry courses as complementary subject on their careers should be seen as an opportunity to complement theoretical aspects on the current courses. Three different approaches could be used: (I a description of the basic concepts, like in a book but using dynamics figures. (II Modelling proteins highlighting key motifs at the three-dimensional structure and residues where inhibitors can be attached. And (III elaborating active quizzes where students can be driven on their learning. Building knowledge based on practical experience can improve student competences on basic science and the learning process can be complemented in the use of dynamics models. On the other hand, exploring protein structures from the web could give students a better comprehension of residues interaction and non-covalent forces involved in protein-protein or protein-ligand interaction. The use of dynamic models improves the comprehension of protein structure and their special link to amino acids residues or ligands. This work was supported by Anillo ACT1110 project. Key Words: protein structure, 3D source, learning

  15. Markerless 3D Face Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walder, Christian; Breidt, Martin; Bulthoff, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the markerless tracking of deforming surfaces such as faces. We acquire a sequence of 3D scans along with color images at 40Hz. The data is then represented by implicit surface and color functions, using a novel partition-of-unity type method of efficiently...... the scanned surface, using the variation of both shape and color as features in a dynamic energy minimization problem. Our prototype system yields high-quality animated 3D models in correspondence, at a rate of approximately twenty seconds per timestep. Tracking results for faces and other objects...

  16. Immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins: the use of animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinks, Vera; Jiskoot, Wim; Schellekens, Huub

    2011-10-01

    Immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins lowers patient well-being and drastically increases therapeutic costs. Preventing immunogenicity is an important issue to consider when developing novel therapeutic proteins and applying them in the clinic. Animal models are increasingly used to study immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins. They are employed as predictive tools to assess different aspects of immunogenicity during drug development and have become vital in studying the mechanisms underlying immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins. However, the use of animal models needs critical evaluation. Because of species differences, predictive value of such models is limited, and mechanistic studies can be restricted. This review addresses the suitability of animal models for immunogenicity prediction and summarizes the insights in immunogenicity that they have given so far.

  17. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; Loon, Mark van [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building,Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-28

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N=2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N=2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-’t Hooft loops in the 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory. In the presence of a mass parameter for the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  18. Animal study assessing safety of an acoustic coupling fluid that holds the potential to avoid surgically induced artifacts in 3D ultrasound guided operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakola, Asgeir S; Jørgensen, Arve; Selbekk, Tormod; Michler, Ralf-Peter; Solheim, Ole; Torp, Sverre H; Sagberg, Lisa M; Aadahl, Petter; Unsgård, Geirmund

    2014-01-01

    Use of ultrasound in brain tumor surgery is common. The difference in attenuation between brain and isotonic saline may cause artifacts that degrade the ultrasound images, potentially affecting resection grades and safety. Our research group has developed an acoustic coupling fluid that attenuates ultrasound energy like the normal brain. We aimed to test in animals if the newly developed acoustic coupling fluid may have harmful effects. Eight rats were included for intraparenchymal injection into the brain, and if no adverse reactions were detected, 6 pigs were to be included with injection of the coupling fluid into the subarachnoid space. Animal behavior, EEG registrations, histopathology and immunohistochemistry were used in assessment. In total, 14 animals were included, 8 rats and 6 pigs. We did not detect any clinical adverse effects, seizure activity on EEG or histopathological signs of tissue damage. The novel acoustic coupling fluid intended for brain tumor surgery appears safe in rats and pigs under the tested circumstances

  19. Molecular characterization of amino acid deletion in VP1 (1D) protein and novel amino acid substitutions in 3D polymerase protein of foot and mouth disease virus subtype A/Iran87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaelizad, Majid; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Saber; Hashemnejad, Khadije; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Lotfi, Mohsen

    2011-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the VP1 (1D) and partial 3D polymerase (3D(pol)) coding regions of the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine strain A/Iran87, a highly passaged isolate (~150 passages), was determined and aligned with previously published FMDV serotype A sequences. Overall analysis of the amino acid substitutions revealed that the partial 3D(pol) coding region contained four amino acid alterations. Amino acid sequence comparison of the VP1 coding region of the field isolates revealed deletions in the highly passaged Iranian isolate (A/Iran87). The prominent G-H loop of the FMDV VP1 protein contains the conserved arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide, which is a well-known ligand for a specific cell surface integrin. Despite losing the RGD sequence of the VP1 protein and an Asp(26)→Glu substitution in a beta sheet located within a small groove of the 3D(pol) protein, the virus grew in BHK 21 suspension cell cultures. Since this strain has been used as a vaccine strain, it may be inferred that the RGD deletion has no critical role in virus attachment to the cell during the initiation of infection. It is probable that this FMDV subtype can utilize other pathways for cell attachment.

  20. A 3d-3d appetizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T[L(p,1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p,1). In particular, for p=1, we show how the familiar S{sup 3} partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p,1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p,1)] on the squashed three-sphere S{sub b}{sup 3}. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G{sub ℂ} complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  1. Non-biased enrichment does not improve quantitative proteomic delineation of reovirus T3D-infected HeLa cell protein alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyuan eJiang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometry-based methods have allowed elucidation of alterations in complex proteomes, such as eukaryotic cells. Such studies have identified and measured relative abundances of thousands of host proteins after cells are infected with a virus. One of the potential limitations in such studies is that generally only the most abundant proteins are identified, leaving the deep richness of the cellular proteome largely unexplored. We differentially labeled HeLa cells with light and heavy stable isotopic forms of lysine and arginine (SILAC and infected cells with reovirus strain T3D. Cells were harvested at 24 hours post-infection. Heavy-labeled infected and light-labeled mock-infected cells were mixed together 1:1. Cells were then divided into cytosol and nuclear fractions and each fraction analyzed, both by standard 2D-HPLC/MS, and also after each fraction had been reacted with a random hexapeptide library (Proteominer® beads to attempt to enrich for low-abundance cellular proteins. A total of 2736 proteins were identified by 2 or more peptides at >99% confidence, of which 66 were significantly up-regulated and 67 were significantly down-regulated. Up-regulated proteins included those involved in antimicrobial and antiviral responses, GTPase activity, nucleotide binding, interferon signaling, and enzymes associated with energy generation. Down-regulated proteins included those involved in cell and biological adhesion, regulation of cell proliferation, structural molecule activity, and numerous molecular binding activities. Comparisons of the r2 correlations, degree of dataset overlap, and numbers of peptides detected suggest that non-biased enrichment approaches may not provide additional data to allow deeper quantitative and comparative mining of complex proteomes.

  2. Optimization of high grade glioma cell culture from surgical specimens for use in clinically relevant animal models and 3D immunochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, Laura A; Irtenkauf, Susan M; Lemke, Nancy W; Nelson, Kevin K; Berezovsky, Artem D; Carlton, Enoch T; Transou, Andrea D; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C

    2014-01-07

    Glioblastomas, the most common and aggressive form of astrocytoma, are refractory to therapy, and molecularly heterogeneous. The ability to establish cell cultures that preserve the genomic profile of the parental tumors, for use in patient specific in vitro and in vivo models, has the potential to revolutionize the preclinical development of new treatments for glioblastoma tailored to the molecular characteristics of each tumor. Starting with fresh high grade astrocytoma tumors dissociated into single cells, we use the neurosphere assay as an enrichment method for cells presenting cancer stem cell phenotype, including expression of neural stem cell markers, long term self-renewal in vitro, and the ability to form orthotopic xenograft tumors. This method has been previously proposed, and is now in use by several investigators. Based on our experience of dissociating and culturing 125 glioblastoma specimens, we arrived at the detailed protocol we present here, suitable for routine neurosphere culturing of high grade astrocytomas and large scale expansion of tumorigenic cells for preclinical studies. We report on the efficiency of successful long term cultures using this protocol and suggest affordable alternatives for culturing dissociated glioblastoma cells that fail to grow as neurospheres. We also describe in detail a protocol for preserving the neurospheres 3D architecture for immunohistochemistry. Cell cultures enriched in CSCs, capable of generating orthotopic xenograft models that preserve the molecular signatures and heterogeneity of GBMs, are becoming increasingly popular for the study of the biology of GBMs and for the improved design of preclinical testing of potential therapies.

  3. 3D virtuel udstilling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tournay, Bruno; Rüdiger, Bjarne

    2006-01-01

    3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s.......3d digital model af Arkitektskolens gård med virtuel udstilling af afgangsprojekter fra afgangen sommer 2006. 10 s....

  4. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  5. Animal Proteins as Important Contributors to a Healthy Human Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Meyer, Alexa L

    2017-02-08

    Adequate protein intake is critical for health and development. Generally, protein of animal origin is of higher quality for humans owing to its amino acid pattern and good digestibility. When administered in mixtures it can enhance the quality of plant proteins, but its availability is often low in low-income communities, especially in young children, the elderly, and pregnant and lactating women, who have increased requirements and in whom high-quality protein also stimulates (bone) growth and maintenance. Although high protein intake was associated with increased type 2 diabetes mellitus risk, milk and seafood are good sources of branched chain amino acids and taurine, which act beneficially on glucose metabolism and blood pressure. However, high consumption of protein-rich animal food is also associated with adverse health effects and higher risk for noncommunicable diseases, partly related to other components of these foods, like saturated fatty acids and potential carcinogens in processed meat but also the atherogenic methionine metabolite homocysteine. In moderation, however, animal proteins are especially important for health maintenance in vulnerable persons.

  6. Molecular evolution of cyclin proteins in animals and fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonnikov Dmitry A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The passage through the cell cycle is controlled by complexes of cyclins, the regulatory units, with cyclin-dependent kinases, the catalytic units. It is also known that cyclins form several families, which differ considerably in primary structure from one eukaryotic organism to another. Despite these lines of evidence, the relationship between the evolution of cyclins and their function is an open issue. Here we present the results of our study on the molecular evolution of A-, B-, D-, E-type cyclin proteins in animals and fungi. Results We constructed phylogenetic trees for these proteins, their ancestral sequences and analyzed patterns of amino acid replacements. The analysis of infrequently fixed atypical amino acid replacements in cyclins evidenced that accelerated evolution proceeded predominantly during paralog duplication or after it in animals and fungi and that it was related to aromorphic changes in animals. It was shown also that evolutionary flexibility of cyclin function may be provided by consequential reorganization of regions on protein surface remote from CDK binding sites in animal and fungal cyclins and by functional differentiation of paralogous cyclins formed in animal evolution. Conclusions The results suggested that changes in the number and/or nature of cyclin-binding proteins may underlie the evolutionary role of the alterations in the molecular structure of cyclins and their involvement in diverse molecular-genetic events.

  7. Accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of acute pulmonary embolism - development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens. Development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ries, B.G.; Kauczor, H.U.; Thelen, M.; Konerding, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model for simulation the CT morphologic situation of acute pulmonary embolism, to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of artificial emboli and to investigate the influence of the orientation of emboli depending on z-axis orientation. Materials and Methods: Standardized artificial emboli made of wax and of defined size and shape were positioned into the pulmonary arteries of porcine lungs. Castings of the embolized pulmonary arterial trees were made by injection of a special opaque resin. After performance of spiral CT the data sets of the emboli and the pulmonary arteries were post-processed. The 3D segmentations were compared with the anatomic preparation to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT/3D reconstruction-technique. Technical specimens simulating CT-morphology of acute embolized vessels underwent spiral CT in six different positions with respect to the z-axis. The CT data were reconstructed using a standardized and a contrastadapted method with interactive correction. The 3D emboli were analysed under qualitative aspects, and measurements of their extent were done. Results: In nearly 91%, there was complete agreement between CT and the corresponding findings at the anatomical preparation. Measurements of the 3D reconstructed technical specimens showed discrepancies of shape and size in dependence of the size of the original preparation, orientation and reconstruction technique. Overestimation up to 4 mm and underestimation to 2,2 mm were observed. Measurements of preparations with heights from 14 to 26 mm showed variances of ±1,5 mm (∝6-11%). Conclusion: The presented models are suitable to simulate CT morphology of acute pulmonary embolism under ex-vivo conditions. Accuracy in the detection of artificial emboli using spiral CT/3D reconstruction is affected by localization, size and orientation of the emboli and the reconstruction technique. (orig.) [de

  8. Underwater 3D filming

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” ) and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Unde...

  9. Blender 3D cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Valenza, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book is aimed at the professionals that already have good 3D CGI experience with commercial packages and have now decided to try the open source Blender and want to experiment with something more complex than the average tutorials on the web. However, it's also aimed at the intermediate Blender users who simply want to go some steps further.It's taken for granted that you already know how to move inside the Blender interface, that you already have 3D modeling knowledge, and also that of basic 3D modeling and rendering concepts, for example, edge-loops, n-gons, or samples. In any case, it'

  10. Wavelet-based regularization and edge preservation for submillimetre 3D list-mode reconstruction data from a high resolution small animal PET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus Ochoa Dominguez, Humberto de, E-mail: hochoa@uacj.mx [Departamento de Ingenieria Eectrica y Computacion, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte, C.P. 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico); Ortega Maynez, Leticia; Osiris Vergara Villegas, Osslan; Gordillo Castillo, Nelly; Guadalupe Cruz Sanchez, Vianey; Gutierrez Casas, Efren David [Departamento de Ingenieria Eectrica y Computacion, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte, C.P. 32310 Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    2011-10-01

    The data obtained from a PET system tend to be noisy because of the limitations of the current instrumentation and the detector efficiency. This problem is particularly severe in images of small animals as the noise contaminates areas of interest within small organs. Therefore, denoising becomes a challenging task. In this paper, a novel wavelet-based regularization and edge preservation method is proposed to reduce such noise. To demonstrate this method, image reconstruction using a small mouse {sup 18}F NEMA phantom and a {sup 18}F mouse was performed. Investigation on the effects of the image quality was addressed for each reconstruction case. Results show that the proposed method drastically reduces the noise and preserves the image details.

  11. [Production of human proteins in the blood of transgenic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massoud, M.; Bischoff, Rainer; Dalemans, W.; Pointu, H.; Attal, J.; Schultz, H.; Clesse, D.; Stinnakre, M.G.; Pavirani, A.; Houdebine, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene has been microinjected into rabbit embryos. A line of transgenic rabbits has thus been established. Human alpha 1-antitrypsin was found in the blood of transgenic animals at the concentration of 1 mg/ml plasma. The human protein was active and separable from its

  12. Animal Agriculture as Panacea for Increased Protein Intake in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The world's population is expected to increase from 6 billion to more than 7.5 billion by 2020. This burgeoning population may require a doubling of animal protein and a corresponding doubling of feed grains demand. Nigeria is currently the most populous black nation in the world with the threat of nutritional deficiency ...

  13. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    This is the first book written on using Blender (an open source visualization suite widely used in the entertainment and gaming industries) for scientific visualization. It is a practical and interesting introduction to Blender for understanding key parts of 3D rendering and animation that pertain to the sciences via step-by-step guided tutorials. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender takes you through an understanding of 3D graphics and modelling for different visualization scenarios in the physical sciences.

  14. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    This is the first book written on using Blender for scientific visualization. It is a practical and interesting introduction to Blender for understanding key parts of 3D rendering and animation that pertain to the sciences via step-by-step guided tutorials. 3D Scientific Visualization with Blender takes you through an understanding of 3D graphics and modelling for different visualization scenarios in the physical sciences.

  15. DELTA 3D PRINTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ȘOVĂILĂ Florin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing is a very used process in industry, the generic name being “rapid prototyping”. The essential advantage of a 3D printer is that it allows the designers to produce a prototype in a very short time, which is tested and quickly remodeled, considerably reducing the required time to get from the prototype phase to the final product. At the same time, through this technique we can achieve components with very precise forms, complex pieces that, through classical methods, could have been accomplished only in a large amount of time. In this paper, there are presented the stages of a 3D model execution, also the physical achievement after of a Delta 3D printer after the model.

  16. Professional Papervision3D

    CERN Document Server

    Lively, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Professional Papervision3D describes how Papervision3D works and how real world applications are built, with a clear look at essential topics such as building websites and games, creating virtual tours, and Adobe's Flash 10. Readers learn important techniques through hands-on applications, and build on those skills as the book progresses. The companion website contains all code examples, video step-by-step explanations, and a collada repository.

  17. Dietary ratio of animal:plant protein is associated with 24-h urinary iodine excretion in healthy school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Bethancourt, Gabriela; Johner, Simone A; Stehle, Peter; Remer, Thomas

    2015-07-14

    Adequate dietary iodine intake in children is essential for optimal physical and neurological development. Whether lower dietary animal food and salt intake may adversely affect iodine status is under discussion. We examined the association between dietary animal:plant protein ratio with 24-h urinary iodine excretion (24-h UI, μg/d), and whether this is modified by salt intake. A 24-h UI was measured in 1959 24-h urine samples from 516 6- to 12-year-old participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed Study. Parallel 3 d weighed food records were used to estimate dietary intakes. Protein sources were classified as dairy, animal and plant. A repeated-measures regression model (PROC MIXED) was used to analyse the effect of animal:plant protein ratios on 24-h UI. plant protein ratios ranged from 0.5 (95 % CI 0.4, 0.6) to 1.6 (95 % CI 1.4, 1.9) (lowest and highest quartile). After adjustment for total energy intake, main dietary iodine sources (dairy and salt intake), and further covariates, the inter-individual variation in animal:plant protein ratio was significantly associated with variation in 24-h UI. One unit higher animal:plant protein ratio predicted 6 μg/d higher 24-h UI (P= 0.002) in boys and 5 μg/d (P= 0.03) in girls. This relationship was partially mediated by a higher salt intake at higher animal:plant protein ratios. These results suggest that lower consumption of animal protein is associated with a small decline in iodine excretion, partially mediated by decreased salt intake. Because limited salt and increased intake of plant-based foods are part of a preferable healthy food pattern, effective nutrition political strategies will be required in the future to ensure appropriate iodine nutrition in adherent populations.

  18. Accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of acute pulmonary embolism - development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens. Development of an animal model using porcine lungs and technical specimens; Diagnostik der akuten Lungenembolie mittels Spiral-CT und 3D-Rekonstruktion. Entwicklung eines Tiermodells und technischer Probekoerper im Ex-vivo-Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ries, B.G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Kauczor, H.U.; Thelen, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Konerding, M.A. [Anatomisches Inst., Mainz Univ (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Purpose: To develop a model for simulation the CT morphologic situation of acute pulmonary embolism, to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT and 3D reconstruction in the detection of artificial emboli and to investigate the influence of the orientation of emboli depending on z-axis orientation. Materials and Methods: Standardized artificial emboli made of wax and of defined size and shape were positioned into the pulmonary arteries of porcine lungs. Castings of the embolized pulmonary arterial trees were made by injection of a special opaque resin. After performance of spiral CT the data sets of the emboli and the pulmonary arteries were post-processed. The 3D segmentations were compared with the anatomic preparation to evaluate the accuracy of spiral CT/3D reconstruction-technique. Technical specimens simulating CT-morphology of acute embolized vessels underwent spiral CT in six different positions with respect to the z-axis. The CT data were reconstructed using a standardized and a contrastadapted method with interactive correction. The 3D emboli were analysed under qualitative aspects, and measurements of their extent were done. Results: In nearly 91%, there was complete agreement between CT and the corresponding findings at the anatomical preparation. Measurements of the 3D reconstructed technical specimens showed discrepancies of shape and size in dependence of the size of the original preparation, orientation and reconstruction technique. Overestimation up to 4 mm and underestimation to 2,2 mm were observed. Measurements of preparations with heights from 14 to 26 mm showed variances of {+-}1,5 mm ({proportional_to}6-11%). Conclusion: The presented models are suitable to simulate CT morphology of acute pulmonary embolism under ex-vivo conditions. Accuracy in the detection of artificial emboli using spiral CT/3D reconstruction is affected by localization, size and orientation of the emboli and the reconstruction technique. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Entwicklung

  19. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  20. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  1. The IntFOLD server: an integrated web resource for protein fold recognition, 3D model quality assessment, intrinsic disorder prediction, domain prediction and ligand binding site prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Daniel B; Buenavista, Maria T; Tetchner, Stuart J; McGuffin, Liam J

    2011-07-01

    The IntFOLD server is a novel independent server that integrates several cutting edge methods for the prediction of structure and function from sequence. Our guiding principles behind the server development were as follows: (i) to provide a simple unified resource that makes our prediction software accessible to all and (ii) to produce integrated output for predictions that can be easily interpreted. The output for predictions is presented as a simple table that summarizes all results graphically via plots and annotated 3D models. The raw machine readable data files for each set of predictions are also provided for developers, which comply with the Critical Assessment of Methods for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) data standards. The server comprises an integrated suite of five novel methods: nFOLD4, for tertiary structure prediction; ModFOLD 3.0, for model quality assessment; DISOclust 2.0, for disorder prediction; DomFOLD 2.0 for domain prediction; and FunFOLD 1.0, for ligand binding site prediction. Predictions from the IntFOLD server were found to be competitive in several categories in the recent CASP9 experiment. The IntFOLD server is available at the following web site: http://www.reading.ac.uk/bioinf/IntFOLD/.

  2. Trends in recombinant protein use in animal production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifre, Laia; Arís, Anna; Bach, Àlex; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena

    2017-03-04

    Recombinant technologies have made possible the production of a broad catalogue of proteins of interest, including those used for animal production. The most widely studied proteins for the animal sector are those with an important role in reproduction, feed efficiency, and health. Nowadays, mammalian cells and fungi are the preferred choice for recombinant production of hormones for reproductive purposes and fibrolytic enzymes to enhance animal performance, respectively. However, the development of low-cost products is a priority, particularly in livestock. The study of cell factories such as yeast and bacteria has notably increased in the last decades to make the new developed reproductive hormones and fibrolytic enzymes a real alternative to the marketed ones. Important efforts have also been invested to developing new recombinant strategies for prevention and therapy, including passive immunization and modulation of the immune system. This offers the possibility to reduce the use of antibiotics by controlling physiological processes and improve the efficacy of preventing infections. Thus, nowadays different recombinant fibrolytic enzymes, hormones, and therapeutic molecules with optimized properties have been successfully produced through cost-effective processes using microbial cell factories. However, despite the important achievements for reducing protein production expenses, alternative strategies to further reduce these costs are still required. In this context, it is necessary to make a giant leap towards the use of novel strategies, such as nanotechnology, that combined with recombinant technology would make recombinant molecules affordable for animal industry.

  3. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Cheol Bae

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent and bone graft material that promotes new bone growth. Teeth were extracted from the mandible of the beagle model and scanned by computed tomography (CT to fabricate a customized scaffold that would fit the bone defect. After positioning the implant guide scaffold, the implant was placed and rhBMP-2 was injected into the scaffold of the experimental group. The two beagles were sacrificed after three months. The specimen block was obtained and scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis showed that the control and experimental groups had similar new bone volume (NBV, % but the experimental group with BMP exhibited a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %. Within the limitations of this preliminary study, a 3D-printed scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 can be used simultaneously as an implant surgical guide and a bone graft in a large bone defect site. Further large-scale studies will be needed to confirm these results.

  4. Development and Assessment of a 3D-Printed Scaffold with rhBMP-2 for an Implant Surgical Guide Stent and Bone Graft Material: A Pilot Animal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Cheol; Lee, Jin-Ju; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Park, Keun-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Seok; Bae, Eun-Bin; Choi, Jae-Won; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a new concept of a 3D-printed scaffold was introduced for the accurate placement of an implant and the application of a recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2)-loaded bone graft. This preliminary study was conducted using two adult beagles to evaluate the 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL)/β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP)/bone decellularized extracellular matrix (bdECM) scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 for the simultaneous use as an implant surgical guide stent and bone graft material that promotes new bone growth. Teeth were extracted from the mandible of the beagle model and scanned by computed tomography (CT) to fabricate a customized scaffold that would fit the bone defect. After positioning the implant guide scaffold, the implant was placed and rhBMP-2 was injected into the scaffold of the experimental group. The two beagles were sacrificed after three months. The specimen block was obtained and scanned by micro-CT. Histological analysis showed that the control and experimental groups had similar new bone volume (NBV, %) but the experimental group with BMP exhibited a significantly higher bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC, %). Within the limitations of this preliminary study, a 3D-printed scaffold conjugated with rhBMP-2 can be used simultaneously as an implant surgical guide and a bone graft in a large bone defect site. Further large-scale studies will be needed to confirm these results. PMID:29258172

  5. Quantifying the mechanisms of domain gain in animal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljan, Marija; Frankish, Adam; Bateman, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Protein domains are protein regions that are shared among different proteins and are frequently functionally and structurally independent from the rest of the protein. Novel domain combinations have a major role in evolutionary innovation. However, the relative contributions of the different molecular mechanisms that underlie domain gains in animals are still unknown. By using animal gene phylogenies we were able to identify a set of high confidence domain gain events and by looking at their coding DNA investigate the causative mechanisms. Here we show that the major mechanism for gains of new domains in metazoan proteins is likely to be gene fusion through joining of exons from adjacent genes, possibly mediated by non-allelic homologous recombination. Retroposition and insertion of exons into ancestral introns through intronic recombination are, in contrast to previous expectations, only minor contributors to domain gains and have accounted for less than 1% and 10% of high confidence domain gain events, respectively. Additionally, exonization of previously non-coding regions appears to be an important mechanism for addition of disordered segments to proteins. We observe that gene duplication has preceded domain gain in at least 80% of the gain events. The interplay of gene duplication and domain gain demonstrates an important mechanism for fast neofunctionalization of genes.

  6. Plant protein and animal proteins: do they differentially affect cardiovascular disease risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Champagne, Catherine M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2015-11-01

    Proteins from plant-based compared with animal-based food sources may have different effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Numerous epidemiologic and intervention studies have evaluated their respective health benefits; however, it is difficult to isolate the role of plant or animal protein on CVD risk. This review evaluates the current evidence from observational and intervention studies, focusing on the specific protein-providing foods and populations studied. Dietary protein is derived from many food sources, and each provides a different composite of nonprotein compounds that can also affect CVD risk factors. Increasing the consumption of protein-rich foods also typically results in lower intakes of other nutrients, which may simultaneously influence outcomes. Given these complexities, blanket statements about plant or animal protein may be too general, and greater consideration of the specific protein food sources and the background diet is required. The potential mechanisms responsible for any specific effects of plant and animal protein are similarly multifaceted and include the amino acid content of particular foods, contributions from other nonprotein compounds provided concomitantly by the whole food, and interactions with the gut microbiome. Evidence to date is inconclusive, and additional studies are needed to further advance our understanding of the complexity of plant protein vs. animal protein comparisons. Nonetheless, current evidence supports the idea that CVD risk can be reduced by a dietary pattern that provides more plant sources of protein compared with the typical American diet and also includes animal-based protein foods that are unprocessed and low in saturated fat. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. Getting started in 3D with Maya

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Deliver professional-level 3D content in no time with this comprehensive guide to 3D animation with Maya. With over 12 years of training experience, plus several award winning students under his belt, author Adam Watkins is the ideal mentor to get you up to speed with 3D in Maya. Using a structured and pragmatic approach Getting Started in 3D with Maya begins with basic theory of fundamental techniques, then builds on this knowledge using practical examples and projects to put your new skills to the test. Prepared so that you can learn in an organic fashion, each chapter builds on the know

  8. Wearable 3D measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yoshitsugu; Imura, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Masanobu; Yasumuro, Yoshihiro; Chihara, Kunihiro

    2003-01-01

    Wearable 3D measurement realizes to acquire 3D information of an objects or an environment using a wearable computer. Recently, we can send voice and sound as well as pictures by mobile phone in Japan. Moreover it will become easy to capture and send data of short movie by it. On the other hand, the computers become compact and high performance. And it can easy connect to Internet by wireless LAN. Near future, we can use the wearable computer always and everywhere. So we will be able to send the three-dimensional data that is measured by wearable computer as a next new data. This paper proposes the measurement method and system of three-dimensional data of an object with the using of wearable computer. This method uses slit light projection for 3D measurement and user"s motion instead of scanning system.

  9. 3D Digital Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundebøl, Jesper

    wave of new building information modelling tools demands further investigation, not least because of industry representatives' somewhat coarse parlance: Now the word is spreading -3D digital modelling is nothing less than a revolution, a shift of paradigm, a new alphabet... Research qeustions. Based...... on empirical probes (interviews, observations, written inscriptions) within the Danish construction industry this paper explores the organizational and managerial dynamics of 3D Digital Modelling. The paper intends to - Illustrate how the network of (non-)human actors engaged in the promotion (and arrest) of 3...... important to appreciate the analysis. Before turning to the presentation of preliminary findings and a discussion of 3D digital modelling, it begins, however, with an outline of industry specific ICT strategic issues. Paper type. Multi-site field study...

  10. Interaktiv 3D design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villaume, René Domine; Ørstrup, Finn Rude

    2002-01-01

    Projektet undersøger potentialet for interaktiv 3D design via Internettet. Arkitekt Jørn Utzons projekt til Espansiva blev udviklet som et byggesystem med det mål, at kunne skabe mangfoldige planmuligheder og mangfoldige facade- og rumudformninger. Systemets bygningskomponenter er digitaliseret som...... 3D elementer og gjort tilgængelige. Via Internettet er det nu muligt at sammenstille og afprøve en uendelig  række bygningstyper som  systemet blev tænkt og udviklet til....

  11. 3D Projection Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halskov, Kim; Johansen, Stine Liv; Bach Mikkelsen, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional projection installations are particular kinds of augmented spaces in which a digital 3-D model is projected onto a physical three-dimensional object, thereby fusing the digital content and the physical object. Based on interaction design research and media studies, this article ...... Fingerplan to Loop City, is a 3-D projection installation presenting the history and future of city planning for the Copenhagen area in Denmark. The installation was presented as part of the 12th Architecture Biennale in Venice in 2010....

  12. Herramientas SIG 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Feito Higueruela

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Geographical Information Systems on several Archeology fields have been increasing during the last years. Recent avances in these technologies make possible to work with more realistic 3D models. In this paper we introduce a new paradigm for this system, the GIS Thetrahedron, in which we define the fundamental elements of GIS, in order to provide a better understanding of their capabilities. At the same time the basic 3D characteristics of some comercial and open source software are described, as well as the application to some samples on archeological researchs

  13. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iliesiu, Luca [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kos, Filip; Poland, David [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Pufu, Silviu S. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Simmons-Duffin, David [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Yacoby, Ran [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions 〈ψψψψ〉 in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ×ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C{sub T}. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the Gross-Neveu models at large N. We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  14. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  15. eEcoLiDAR, eScience infrastructure for ecological applications of LiDAR point clouds: reconstructing the 3D ecosystem structure for animals at regional to continental scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Daniel Kissling

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The lack of high-resolution measurements of 3D ecosystem structure across broad spatial extents impedes major advancements in animal ecology and biodiversity science. We aim to fill this gap by using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR technology to characterize the vertical and horizontal complexity of vegetation and landscapes at high resolution across regional to continental scales. The newly LiDAR-derived 3D ecosystem structures will be applied in species distribution models for breeding birds in forests and marshlands, for insect pollinators in agricultural landscapes, and songbirds at stopover sites during migration. This will allow novel insights into the hierarchical structure of animal-habitat associations, into why animal populations decline, and how they respond to habitat fragmentation and ongoing land use change. The processing of these massive amounts of LiDAR point cloud data will be achieved by developing a generic interactive eScience environment with multi-scale object-based image analysis (OBIA and interpretation of LiDAR point clouds, including data storage, scalable computing, tools for machine learning and visualisation (feature selection, annotation/segmentation, object classification, and evaluation, and a PostGIS spatial database. The classified objects will include trees, forests, vegetation strata, edges, bushes, hedges, reedbeds etc. with their related metrics, attributes and summary statistics (e.g. vegetation openness, height, density, vertical biomass distribution etc.. The newly developed eScience tools and data will be available to other disciplines and applications in ecology and the Earth sciences, thereby achieving high impact. The project will foster new multi-disciplinary collaborations between ecologists and eScientists and contribute to training a new generation of geo-ecologists.

  16. MORC Proteins: Novel Players in Plant and Animal Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Aline; Kang, Hong-Gu; Steinbrenner, Jens; Dempsey, D'Maris A; Klessig, Daniel F; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Microrchidia (MORC) proteins comprise a family of proteins that have been identified in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are defined by two hallmark domains: a GHKL-type ATPase and an S5 fold. MORC proteins in plants were first discovered via a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants compromised for resistance to a viral pathogen. Subsequent studies expanded their role in plant immunity and revealed their involvement in gene silencing and transposable element repression. Emerging data suggest that MORC proteins also participate in pathogen-induced chromatin remodeling and epigenetic gene regulation. In addition, biochemical analyses recently demonstrated that plant MORCs have topoisomerase II (topo II)-like DNA modifying activities that may be important for their function. Interestingly, animal MORC proteins exhibit many parallels with their plant counterparts, as they have been implicated in disease development and gene silencing. In addition, human MORCs, like plant MORCs, bind salicylic acid and this inhibits some of their topo II-like activities. In this review, we will focus primarily on plant MORCs, although relevant comparisons with animal MORCs will be provided.

  17. MORC Proteins: Novel Players in Plant and Animal Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Koch

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microrchidia (MORC proteins comprise a family of proteins that have been identified in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are defined by two hallmark domains: a GHKL-type ATPase and an S5 fold. MORC proteins in plants were first discovered via a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants compromised for resistance to a viral pathogen. Subsequent studies expanded their role in plant immunity and revealed their involvement in gene silencing and transposable element repression. Emerging data suggest that MORC proteins also participate in pathogen-induced chromatin remodeling and epigenetic gene regulation. In addition, biochemical analyses recently demonstrated that plant MORCs have topoisomerase II (topo II-like DNA modifying activities that may be important for their function. Interestingly, animal MORC proteins exhibit many parallels with their plant counterparts, as they have been implicated in disease development and gene silencing. In addition, human MORCs, like plant MORCs, bind salicylic acid and this inhibits some of their topo II-like activities. In this review, we will focus primarily on plant MORCs, although relevant comparisons with animal MORCs will be provided.

  18. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Sánchez, Obed; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Delaye, Luis; Tiessen, Axel

    2016-12-01

    Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa), average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt)]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230nt). Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400nt). Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520aa), whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240aa). Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Plant Proteins Are Smaller Because They Are Encoded by Fewer Exons than Animal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed Ramírez-Sánchez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein size is an important biochemical feature since longer proteins can harbor more domains and therefore can display more biological functionalities than shorter proteins. We found remarkable differences in protein length, exon structure, and domain count among different phylogenetic lineages. While eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 amino acid residues (aa, average protein sizes in plant genomes are smaller than those of animals and fungi. Proteins unique to plants are ∼81 aa shorter than plant proteins conserved among other eukaryotic lineages. The smaller average size of plant proteins could neither be explained by endosymbiosis nor subcellular compartmentation nor exon size, but rather due to exon number. Metazoan proteins are encoded on average by ∼10 exons of small size [∼176 nucleotides (nt]. Streptophyta have on average only ∼5.7 exons of medium size (∼230 nt. Multicellular species code for large proteins by increasing the exon number, while most unicellular organisms employ rather larger exons (>400 nt. Among subcellular compartments, membrane proteins are the largest (∼520 aa, whereas the smallest proteins correspond to the gene ontology group of ribosome (∼240 aa. Plant genes are encoded by half the number of exons and also contain fewer domains than animal proteins on average. Interestingly, endosymbiotic proteins that migrated to the plant nucleus became larger than their cyanobacterial orthologs. We thus conclude that plants have proteins larger than bacteria but smaller than animals or fungi. Compared to the average of eukaryotic species, plants have ∼34% more but ∼20% smaller proteins. This suggests that photosynthetic organisms are unique and deserve therefore special attention with regard to the evolutionary forces acting on their genomes and proteomes.

  20. Shaping 3-D boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenholt, Rasmus; Madsen, Claus B.

    2011-01-01

    Enabling users to shape 3-D boxes in immersive virtual environments is a non-trivial problem. In this paper, a new family of techniques for creating rectangular boxes of arbitrary position, orientation, and size is presented and evaluated. These new techniques are based solely on position data...

  1. 3D Wire 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordi, Moréton; F, Escribano; J. L., Farias

    This document is a general report on the implementation of gamification in 3D Wire 2015 event. As the second gamification experience in this event, we have delved deeply in the previous objectives (attracting public areas less frequented exhibition in previous years and enhance networking) and have...

  2. 3D Harmonic Echocardiography:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Voormolen (Marco)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThree dimensional (3D) echocardiography has recently developed from an experimental technique in the ’90 towards an imaging modality for the daily clinical practice. This dissertation describes the considerations, implementation, validation and clinical application of a unique

  3. A new method for finding the minimum free energy pathway of ions and small molecule transportation through protein based on 3D-RISM theory and the string method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Norio

    2018-05-01

    A new method for finding the minimum free energy pathway (MFEP) of ions and small molecule transportation through a protein based on the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory combined with the string method has been proposed. The 3D-RISM theory produces the distribution function, or the potential of mean force (PMF), for transporting substances around the given protein structures. By applying the string method to the PMF surface, one can readily determine the MFEP on the PMF surface. The method has been applied to consider the Na+ conduction pathway of channelrhodopsin as an example.

  4. SU-C-213-07: Fabrication and Testing of a 3D-Printed Small Animal Rectal Cooling Device to Evaluate Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector During Prostate SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycushko, B; Chopra, R; Futch, C; Bing, C; Wodzak, M; Stojadinovic, S; Jiang, S; Medin, P [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The protective effects of induced or even accidental hypothermia on the human body are widespread with several medical uses currently under active research. In vitro experiments using human cell lines have shown hypothermia provides a radioprotective effect that becomes more pronounced at large, single-fraction doses common to SBRT treatments. Relevant to prostate SBRT, this work details the fabrication and testing of a 3D-printed cooling device to facilitate the investigation of the radioprotective effect of local hypothermia on the rat rectum. Methods: A 3cm long, two-channel rectal cooling device was designed in SOLIDWORKS CAD for 3D printing. The water intake nozzle is connected to a 1mm diameter brass pipe from which water flows and circulates back around to the exit nozzle. Both nozzles are connected by plastic tubing to a water chiller pump. Following leak-proof testing, fiber optic temperature probes were used to evaluate the temperature over time when placed adjacent to the cooling device within a rat rectum. MRI thermometry characterized the relative temperature distribution in concentric ROIs surrounding the probe. CBCT images from a small-animal irradiator were evaluated for imaging artifacts which could affect Monte Carlo dose calculations during treatment planning. Results: The rectal temperature adjacent to the cooling device decreased from body temperature (37°C) to 15°C in 10–20 minutes from device insertion. Rectal temperature was maintained at 15±3°C during active cooling. MRI thermometry tests revealed a steep temperature gradient with increasing distance from the cooling device, with the desired temperature range maintained within the surrounding few millimeters. Conclusion: A 3D printed rectal cooling device was fabricated for the purpose of inducing local hypothermia in rat rectums. Rectal cooling capabilities were characterized in-vivo to facilitate an investigation of the radioprotective effect of hypothermia for late rectal

  5. SU-C-213-07: Fabrication and Testing of a 3D-Printed Small Animal Rectal Cooling Device to Evaluate Local Hypothermia as a Radioprotector During Prostate SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrycushko, B; Chopra, R; Futch, C; Bing, C; Wodzak, M; Stojadinovic, S; Jiang, S; Medin, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The protective effects of induced or even accidental hypothermia on the human body are widespread with several medical uses currently under active research. In vitro experiments using human cell lines have shown hypothermia provides a radioprotective effect that becomes more pronounced at large, single-fraction doses common to SBRT treatments. Relevant to prostate SBRT, this work details the fabrication and testing of a 3D-printed cooling device to facilitate the investigation of the radioprotective effect of local hypothermia on the rat rectum. Methods: A 3cm long, two-channel rectal cooling device was designed in SOLIDWORKS CAD for 3D printing. The water intake nozzle is connected to a 1mm diameter brass pipe from which water flows and circulates back around to the exit nozzle. Both nozzles are connected by plastic tubing to a water chiller pump. Following leak-proof testing, fiber optic temperature probes were used to evaluate the temperature over time when placed adjacent to the cooling device within a rat rectum. MRI thermometry characterized the relative temperature distribution in concentric ROIs surrounding the probe. CBCT images from a small-animal irradiator were evaluated for imaging artifacts which could affect Monte Carlo dose calculations during treatment planning. Results: The rectal temperature adjacent to the cooling device decreased from body temperature (37°C) to 15°C in 10–20 minutes from device insertion. Rectal temperature was maintained at 15±3°C during active cooling. MRI thermometry tests revealed a steep temperature gradient with increasing distance from the cooling device, with the desired temperature range maintained within the surrounding few millimeters. Conclusion: A 3D printed rectal cooling device was fabricated for the purpose of inducing local hypothermia in rat rectums. Rectal cooling capabilities were characterized in-vivo to facilitate an investigation of the radioprotective effect of hypothermia for late rectal

  6. 21 CFR 589.2000 - Animal proteins prohibited in ruminant feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Animal proteins prohibited in ruminant feed. 589... Animal proteins prohibited in ruminant feed. (a) Definitions—(1) Protein derived from mammalian tissues means any protein-containing portion of mammalian animals, excluding: Blood and blood products; gelatin...

  7. Studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear PET, modifying some of the parameters of the reconstruction algorithm IMF-OSEM 3D on the data acquisition simulated with GAMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadas, M.; Mendoza, J.; Embid, M.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear- PET. Certain figures of merit (FOM) were used to assess a quantitative value of the contrast and delectability of lesions. The optimization was carried out modifying some of the parameters in the reconstruction software of the scanner, imaging a mini-Derenzo phantom and a cylinder phantom with background activity and two hot spheres. Specifically, it was evaluated the incidence of the inter-update Metz filter (IMF) inside the iterative reconstruction algorithm 3D OSEM. The data acquisition was simulated using the GAMOS framework (Monte Carlo simulation). Integrating GAMOS output with the reconstruction software of the scanner was an additional novelty of this work, to achieve this, data sets were written with the list-mode format (LMF) of ClearPET. In order to verify the optimum values obtained, we foresee to make real acquisitions in the ClearPET of CIEMAT. (Author) 17 refs

  8. 3D Surgical Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive ...

  9. Differentiation of infection from vaccination in foot-and-mouth disease by the detection of antibodies to the non-structural proteins 3D, 3AB and 3ABC in ELISA using antigens expressed in baculovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; Madsen, K.G.; Madsen, E.S.

    1998-01-01

    The baculovirus expression system was found to be efficient at expressing the 3D, the 3AB and the 3ABC non-structural proteins (NSP) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) as antigens recognised by immune sera in ELISA. ELISA's using 3D, 3AB and 3ABC detected antibodies from day 8 and 10 after...... experimental infection of susceptible cattle and sheep and cattle remained seropositive for more than 395 days. The ELISA's detected antibodies against any of the seven serotypes of FMDV. The 3D ELISA was specific and precise and as sensitive as established ELISA's which measure antibody to structural proteins....... The assay may be used as a resource saving alternative to established ELISA's for the detection of antibodies against any of the seven serotypes. The 3AB and the 3ABC ELISA were also specific and precise. FMDV infected cattle could be differentiated from those that had been merely vaccinated as they gave...

  10. The TALE face of Hox proteins in animal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Galliot, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are major regulators of embryonic development. One of their most conserved functions is to coordinate the formation of specific body structures along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis in Bilateria. This architectural role was at the basis of several morphological innovations across bilaterian evolution. In this review, we traced the origin of the Hox patterning system by considering the partnership with PBC and Meis proteins. PBC and Meis belong to the TALE-class of homeodomain-containing transcription factors and act as generic cofactors of Hox proteins for AP axis patterning in Bilateria. Recent data indicate that Hox proteins acquired the ability to interact with their TALE partners in the last common ancestor of Bilateria and Cnidaria. These interactions relied initially on a short peptide motif called hexapeptide (HX), which is present in Hox and non-Hox protein families. Remarkably, Hox proteins can also recruit the TALE cofactors by using specific PBC Interaction Motifs (SPIMs). We describe how a functional Hox/TALE patterning system emerged in eumetazoans through the acquisition of SPIMs. We anticipate that interaction flexibility could be found in other patterning systems, being at the heart of the astonishing morphological diversity observed in the animal kingdom.

  11. The toxicogenomic multiverse: convergent recruitment of proteins into animal venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Bryan G; Roelants, Kim; Champagne, Donald E; Scheib, Holger; Tyndall, Joel D A; King, Glenn F; Nevalainen, Timo J; Norman, Janette A; Lewis, Richard J; Norton, Raymond S; Renjifo, Camila; de la Vega, Ricardo C Rodríguez

    2009-01-01

    Throughout evolution, numerous proteins have been convergently recruited into the venoms of various animals, including centipedes, cephalopods, cone snails, fish, insects (several independent venom systems), platypus, scorpions, shrews, spiders, toxicoferan reptiles (lizards and snakes), and sea anemones. The protein scaffolds utilized convergently have included AVIT/colipase/prokineticin, CAP, chitinase, cystatin, defensins, hyaluronidase, Kunitz, lectin, lipocalin, natriuretic peptide, peptidase S1, phospholipase A(2), sphingomyelinase D, and SPRY. Many of these same venom protein types have also been convergently recruited for use in the hematophagous gland secretions of invertebrates (e.g., fleas, leeches, kissing bugs, mosquitoes, and ticks) and vertebrates (e.g., vampire bats). Here, we discuss a number of overarching structural, functional, and evolutionary generalities of the protein families from which these toxins have been frequently recruited and propose a revised and expanded working definition for venom. Given the large number of striking similarities between the protein compositions of conventional venoms and hematophagous secretions, we argue that the latter should also fall under the same definition.

  12. Protein Hydrolysates as Hypoallergenic, Flavors and Palatants for Companion Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagodawithana, Tilak W.; Nelles, Lynn; Trivedi, Nayan B.

    Early civilizations have relied upon their good sense and experience to develop and improve their food quality. The discovery of soy sauce centuries ago can now be considered one of the earliest protein hydrolysates made by man to improve palatability of foods. Now, it is well known that such savory systems are not just sources for enjoyment but complex semiotic systems that direct the humans to satisfy the body's protein need for their sustenance. Recent developments have resulted in a wide range of cost effective savory flavorings, the best known of which are autolyzed yeast extracts and hydrolyzed vegetable proteins. New technologies have helped researchers to improve the savory characteristics of yeast extracts through the application of Maillard reaction and by generating specific flavor enhancers through the use of enzymes. An interesting parallel exists in the pet food industry, where a similar approach is taken in using animal protein hydrolysates to create palatability enhancers via Maillard reaction scheme. Protein hydrolysates are also utilized extensively as a source of nutrition to the elderly, young children and immuno-compromised patient population. These hydrolysates have an added advantage in having peptides small enough to avoid any chance of an allergenic reaction which sometimes occur with the consumption of larger sized peptides or proteins. Accordingly, protein hydrolysates are required to have an average molecular weight distribution in the range 800-1,500 Da to make them non-allergenic. The technical challenge for scientists involved in food and feed manufacture is to use an appropriate combination of enzymes within the existing economic constraints and other physical factors/limitations, such as heat, pH, and time, to create highly palatable, yet still nutritious and hypoallergenic food formulations.

  13. Production of animal and vegetable proteins: an integrated thermal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesari, J P; Bonvehi, F; De Saint-Salvy, A; Miquel, J F

    1984-01-01

    For the optimization of our integrated farm, theoretical models using a microcomputer and experimental tests to verify these models were carried out on two research units. A test cell integrated with a greenhouse and a rock bed and a standard rock bed coupled with solar air collectors. A complete wooden house has been constructed and experimented in a remote village 200 km north of Toulouse as part of a demonstration unit. The geese and the Lemna minor (duckweed) have been selected as an animal and as a vegetable for the protein production. Some of the experimental results are reported.

  14. Tangible 3D Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejlesen, Aske K.; Ovesen, Nis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental approach to teaching 3D modelling techniques in an Industrial Design programme. The approach includes the use of tangible free form models as tools for improving the overall learning. The paper is based on lecturer and student experiences obtained through...... facilitated discussions during the course as well as through a survey distributed to the participating students. The analysis of the experiences shows a mixed picture consisting of both benefits and limits to the experimental technique. A discussion about the applicability of the technique and about...

  15. Analyzing the 3D Structure of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II and Its Mutants Using Deep View and the Protein Data Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ship, Noam J.; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2005-01-01

    The self directed study of a 3D image of a biomolecule stresses the complex nature of the intra- and intermolecular interactions that come together to define its structure. This is made up of a series of in vitro experiments with a wild-type and mutants forms of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) that examine the structure function relationship…

  16. 3D Surgical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  17. Lessons from Animal Models of Cytoplasmic Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Magin, Thomas M

    Cytoplasmic intermediate filaments (IFs) represent a major cytoskeletal network contributing to cell shape, adhesion and migration as well as to tissue resilience and renewal in numerous bilaterians, including mammals. The observation that IFs are dispensable in cultured mammalian cells, but cause tissue-specific, life-threatening disorders, has pushed the need to investigate their function in vivo. In keeping with human disease, the deletion or mutation of murine IF genes resulted in highly specific pathologies. Epidermal keratins, together with desmin, are essential to protect corresponding tissues against mechanical force but also participate in stabilizing cell adhesion and in inflammatory signalling. Surprisingly, other IF proteins contribute to tissue integrity to a much lesser extent than anticipated, pointing towards their role in stress situations. In support, the overexpression of small chaperones or the interference with inflammatory signalling in several settings has been shown to rescue severe tissue pathologies that resulted from the expression of mutant IF proteins. It stills remains an open issue whether the wide range of IF disorders share similar pathomechanisms. Moreover, we lack an understanding how IF proteins participate in signalling processes. Now, with a large number of mouse models in hand, the next challenge will be to develop organotypic cell culture models to dissect pathomechanisms at the molecular level, to employ Crispr/Cas-mediated genome engineering to optimize models and, finally, to combine available animal models with medicinal chemistry for the development of molecular therapies.

  18. Animal Protein intake and the Effect of age on the level of Protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of the items such as eggs, milk and poultry meat were not consumed in reasonable quantities due to poor economic situation of the family. The results suggested that except for the fathers, other groups such as mothers and children were consuming animal protein below the quantity required by them. JARD Vol.

  19. Mobile 3D tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illerhaus, Bernhard; Goebbels, Juergen; Onel, Yener; Sauerwein, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Mobile tomographs often have the problem that high spatial resolution is impossible owing to the position or setup of the tomograph. While the tree tomograph developed by Messrs. Isotopenforschung Dr. Sauerwein GmbH worked well in practice, it is no longer used as the spatial resolution and measuring time are insufficient for many modern applications. The paper shows that the mechanical base of the method is sufficient for 3D CT measurements with modern detectors and X-ray tubes. CT measurements with very good statistics take less than 10 min. This means that mobile systems can be used, e.g. in examinations of non-transportable cultural objects or monuments. Enhancement of the spatial resolution of mobile tomographs capable of measuring in any position is made difficult by the fact that the tomograph has moving parts and will therefore have weight shifts. With the aid of tomographies whose spatial resolution is far higher than the mechanical accuracy, a correction method is presented for direct integration of the Feldkamp algorithm [de

  20. Manipulating heat shock protein expression in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, J Keith; Roberts, Stephen M

    2005-02-01

    Upregulation of heat shock proteins (Hsps) has been observed to impart resistance to a wide variety of physical and chemical insults. Elucidation of the role of Hsps in cellular defense processes depends, in part, on the ability to manipulate Hsp expression in laboratory animals. Simple methods of inducing whole body hyperthermia, such as warm water immersion or heating pad application, are effective in producing generalized expression of Hsps. Hsps can be upregulated locally with focused direct or indirect heating, such as with ultrasound or with laser or microwave radiation. Increased Hsp expression in response to toxic doses of xenobiotics has been commonly observed. Some pharmacologic agents are capable of altering Hsps more specifically by affecting processes involved in Hsp regulation. Gene manipulation offers the ability to selectively increase or decrease individual Hsps. Knockout mouse strains and Hsp-overexpressing transgenics have been used successfully to examine the role of specific Hsps in protection against hyperthermia, chemical insults, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Gene therapy approaches also offer the possibility of selective alteration of Hsp expression. Some methods of increasing Hsp expression have application in specialized areas of research, such cold response, myocardial protection from exercise, and responses to stressful or traumatic stimuli. Each method of manipulating Hsp expression in laboratory animals has advantages and disadvantages, and selection of the best method depends upon the experimental objectives (e.g., the alteration in Hsp expression needed, its timing, and its location) and resources available.

  1. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  2. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  3. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  4. Replacement of animal protein with vegetable protein in the diets of Astyanax altiparanae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Rosa Sussel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of replacing animal protein with vegetable protein sources on the productive performance of Astyanax altiparanae (lambari-do-rabo-amarelo. Five experimental diets were formulated with increasing replacement levels of animal protein by vegetable protein. A total of 9000 individuals (initial mean weight 1.18 ± 0.12 g, initial mean length 2.1 ± 0.3 cm were distributed in 20 net cages (1 m3 with a density of 450 ind. m-3. Cages were randomly placed in a pond (180 m2, 1.5 m deep, 10% water renewal per day. After 63 days of cultivation, total count and individual biometrics from 20% of each experimental unit were taken. Mean weight, total length, survival, feed conversion, biomass weight gain and proximate body composition were evaluated. The experimental design was completely randomized with five treatments and four replications. The reduction in the formulation cost achieved by increasing levels of vegetable protein compensated the slight decrease in biomass gain. Besides that, inclusion of vegetable protein resulted in greater fat deposition, suggesting future exploration of A. altiparanae as a functional food.

  5. {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C- SOFAST-HMQC editing enhances 3D-NOESY sensitivity in highly deuterated, selectively [{sup 1}H,{sup 13}C]-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: rossip@umn.edu; Xia, Youlin; Khanra, Nandish; Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu; Kalodimos, Charalampos G., E-mail: ckalodim@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The ongoing NMR method development effort strives for high quality multidimensional data with reduced collection time. Here, we apply ‘SOFAST-HMQC’ to frequency editing in 3D NOESY experiments and demonstrate the sensitivity benefits using highly deuterated and {sup 15}N, methyl labeled samples in H{sub 2}O. The experiments benefit from a combination of selective T{sub 1} relaxation (or L-optimized effect), from Ernst angle optimization and, in certain types of experiments, from using the mixing time for both NOE buildup and magnetization recovery. This effect enhances sensitivity by up to 2.4× at fast pulsing versus reference HMQC sequences of same overall length and water suppression characteristics. Representative experiments designed to address interesting protein NMR challenges are detailed. Editing capabilities are exploited with heteronuclear {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-edited, or with diagonal-free {sup 13}C aromatic/methyl-resolved 3D-SOFAST-HMQC–NOESY–HMQC. The latter experiment is used here to elucidate the methyl-aromatic NOE network in the hydrophobic core of the 19 kDa FliT-FliJ flagellar protein complex. Incorporation of fast pulsing to reference experiments such as 3D-NOESY–HMQC boosts digital resolution, simplifies the process of NOE assignment and helps to automate protein structure determination.

  6. 3D Volume Rendering and 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, Rujuta A; Taft, Robert M; Grant, Gerald T

    2018-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered images allow 3D insight into the anatomy, facilitating surgical treatment planning and teaching. 3D printing, additive manufacturing, and rapid prototyping techniques are being used with satisfactory accuracy, mostly for diagnosis and surgical planning, followed by direct manufacture of implantable devices. The major limitation is the time and money spent generating 3D objects. Printer type, material, and build thickness are known to influence the accuracy of printed models. In implant dentistry, the use of 3D-printed surgical guides is strongly recommended to facilitate planning and reduce risk of operative complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 3D game environments create professional 3D game worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Ahearn, Luke

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate resource to help you create triple-A quality art for a variety of game worlds; 3D Game Environments offers detailed tutorials on creating 3D models, applying 2D art to 3D models, and clear concise advice on issues of efficiency and optimization for a 3D game engine. Using Photoshop and 3ds Max as his primary tools, Luke Ahearn explains how to create realistic textures from photo source and uses a variety of techniques to portray dynamic and believable game worlds.From a modern city to a steamy jungle, learn about the planning and technological considerations for 3D modelin

  8. Implementation of a 3D Virtual Drummer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnenat-ThalmannThalmann, M.; Kragtwijk, M.; Nijholt, Antinus; Thalmann, D.; Zwiers, Jakob

    2001-01-01

    We describe a system for the automatic generation of a 3D animation of a drummer playing along with a given piece of music. The input, consisting of a sound wave, is analysed to determine which drums are struck at what moments. The Standard MIDI File format is used to store the recognised notes.

  9. The Future Is 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Luke

    2015-01-01

    3D printers are a way of producing a 3D model of an item from a digital file. The model builds up in successive layers of material placed by the printer controlled by the information in the computer file. In this article the author argues that 3D printers are one of the greatest technological advances of recent times. He discusses practical uses…

  10. The 3D additivist cookbook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allahyari, Morehshin; Rourke, Daniel; Rasch, Miriam

    The 3D Additivist Cookbook, devised and edited by Morehshin Allahyari & Daniel Rourke, is a free compendium of imaginative, provocative works from over 100 world-leading artists, activists and theorists. The 3D Additivist Cookbook contains .obj and .stl files for the 3D printer, as well as critical

  11. Leveraging 3D chemical similarity, target and phenotypic data in the identification of drug-protein and drug-adverse effect associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Santiago; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    Drug-target identification is crucial to discover novel applications for existing drugs and provide more insights about mechanisms of biological actions, such as adverse drug effects (ADEs). Computational methods along with the integration of current big data sources provide a useful framework for drug-target and drug-adverse effect discovery. In this article, we propose a method based on the integration of 3D chemical similarity, target and adverse effect data to generate a drug-target-adverse effect predictor along with a simple leveraging system to improve identification of drug-targets and drug-adverse effects. In the first step, we generated a system for multiple drug-target identification based on the application of 3D drug similarity into a large target dataset extracted from the ChEMBL. Next, we developed a target-adverse effect predictor combining targets from ChEMBL with phenotypic information provided by SIDER data source. Both modules were linked to generate a final predictor that establishes hypothesis about new drug-target-adverse effect candidates. Additionally, we showed that leveraging drug-target candidates with phenotypic data is very useful to improve the identification of drug-targets. The integration of phenotypic data into drug-target candidates yielded up to twofold precision improvement. In the opposite direction, leveraging drug-phenotype candidates with target data also yielded a significant enhancement in the performance. The modeling described in the current study is simple and efficient and has applications at large scale in drug repurposing and drug safety through the identification of mechanism of action of biological effects.

  12. Effect of four processed animal proteins in the diet on behavior in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krimpen, van M.M.; Veldkamp, T.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Veer, de R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was performed to investigate the effect of animal versus vegetable protein sources in the diet on the development of behavior in laying hens. A diet containing protein sources of only vegetable origin was compared with four diets, each containing one of four processed animal proteins

  13. Effect of four processed animal proteins in the diet on digestibility and performance in laying hens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krimpen, van M.M.; Veldkamp, T.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Veer, de R.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment was performed to investigate the effect of animal vs. vegetable protein sources in the diet of laying hens on the development of hen performance. A diet containing protein sources of only vegetable origin was compared with 4 diets, each containing 1 of 4 processed animal proteins

  14. Biological role of copper and copper-containing proteins in human and animal organism

    OpenAIRE

    ANTONYAK H.L.; VAZHNENKO A.V.; PANAS N.E.

    2011-01-01

    Current scientific data related to copper metabolism and functional activity of Cu-containing proteins in human and animal cells are reviewed in the article. Important functional role of this essential element in human and animal organism is analyzed.

  15. Stereolithographic hydrogel printing of 3D culture chips with biofunctionalized complex 3D perfusion networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Rujing; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2017-01-01

    the required freedom in design, detail and chemistry for fabricating truly 3D constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a stereolithographic high-resolution 3D printing technique utilizing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA, MW 700) to manufacture diffusion-open and mechanically stable hydrogel...... and material flexibility by embedding a highly compliant cell-laden gelatin hydrogel within the confines of a 3D printed resilient PEGDA hydrogel chip of intermediate compliance. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an automated, cost-effective and high resolution technique to manufacture complex 3D......Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models capturing both the structural and dynamic complexity of the in vivo situation are in great demand as an alternative to animal models. Despite tremendous progress in engineering complex tissue/organ models in the past decade, approaches that support...

  16. iLoc-Animal: a multi-label learning classifier for predicting subcellular localization of animal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Zhong; Fang, Jian-An; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-04-05

    Predicting protein subcellular localization is a challenging problem, particularly when query proteins have multi-label features meaning that they may simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Most of the existing methods can only be used to deal with the single-label proteins. Actually, multi-label proteins should not be ignored because they usually bear some special function worthy of in-depth studies. By introducing the "multi-label learning" approach, a new predictor, called iLoc-Animal, has been developed that can be used to deal with the systems containing both single- and multi-label animal (metazoan except human) proteins. Meanwhile, to measure the prediction quality of a multi-label system in a rigorous way, five indices were introduced; they are "Absolute-True", "Absolute-False" (or Hamming-Loss"), "Accuracy", "Precision", and "Recall". As a demonstration, the jackknife cross-validation was performed with iLoc-Animal on a benchmark dataset of animal proteins classified into the following 20 location sites: (1) acrosome, (2) cell membrane, (3) centriole, (4) centrosome, (5) cell cortex, (6) cytoplasm, (7) cytoskeleton, (8) endoplasmic reticulum, (9) endosome, (10) extracellular, (11) Golgi apparatus, (12) lysosome, (13) mitochondrion, (14) melanosome, (15) microsome, (16) nucleus, (17) peroxisome, (18) plasma membrane, (19) spindle, and (20) synapse, where many proteins belong to two or more locations. For such a complicated system, the outcomes achieved by iLoc-Animal for all the aforementioned five indices were quite encouraging, indicating that the predictor may become a useful tool in this area. It has not escaped our notice that the multi-label approach and the rigorous measurement metrics can also be used to investigate many other multi-label problems in molecular biology. As a user-friendly web-server, iLoc-Animal is freely accessible to the public at the web-site .

  17. (1) The Relationship of Protein Expression and Cell Division, (2) 3D Imaging of Cells Using Digital Holography, and (3) General Chemistry Enrollment at University of Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 1: The role of cell division in protein expression is important to understand in order to guide the development of better nonviral gene delivery materials that can transport DNA to the nucleus with high efficiency for a variety of cell types, particularly when nondividing cells are targets of gene therapy. We evaluated the relationship…

  18. Three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction and function analysis of the chitin-binding domain 3 protein HD73_3189 from Bacillus thuringiensis HD73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yiling; Guo, Shuyuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is capable of producing a chitin-binding protein believed to be functionally important to bacteria during the stationary phase of its growth cycle. In this paper, the chitin-binding domain 3 protein HD73_3189 from B. thuringiensis has been analyzed by computer technology. Primary and secondary structural analyses demonstrated that HD73_3189 is negatively charged and contains several α-helices, aperiodical coils and β-strands. Domain and motif analyses revealed that HD73_3189 contains a signal peptide, an N-terminal chitin binding 3 domains, two copies of a fibronectin-like domain 3 and a C-terminal carbohydrate binding domain classified as CBM_5_12. Moreover, analysis predicted the protein's associated localization site to be the cell wall. Ligand site prediction determined that amino acid residues GLU-312, TRP-334, ILE-341 and VAL-382 exposed on the surface of the target protein exhibit polar interactions with the substrate.

  19. A monoclonal antibody distinguishes between two IgM heavy chain isotypes in Atlantic salmon and brown trout: protein characterization, 3D modeling and epitope mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil, Atif; Falk, Knut; Sharma, Animesh; Raae, Arnt; Berven, Frode; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Hordvik, Ivar

    2011-09-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) possess two distinct subpopulations of IgM which can be separated by anion exchange chromatography. Accordingly, there are two isotypic μ genes in these species, related to ancestral tetraploidy. In the present work it was verified by mass spectrometry that IgM of peak 1 (subpopulation 1) have heavy chains previously designated as μB type whereas IgM of peak 2 (subpopulation 2) have heavy chains of μA type. Two adjacent cysteine residues are present near the C-terminal part of μB, in contrast to one cysteine residue in μA. Salmon IgM of both peak 1 and peak 2 contain light chains of the two most common isotypes: IgL1 and IgL3. In contrast to salmon and brown trout, IgM of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is eluted in a single peak when subjected to anion exchange chromatography. Surprisingly, a monoclonal antibody MAb4C10 against rainbow trout IgM, reacted with μA in salmon, whereas in brown trout it reacted with μB. It is plausible to assume that DNA has been exchanged between the paralogous A and B loci during evolution while maintaining the two sub-variants, with and without the extra cysteine. MAb4C10 was conjugated to magnetic beads and used to separate cells, demonstrating that μ transcripts residing from captured cells were primarily of A type in salmon and B type in brown trout. An analysis of amino acid substitutions in μA and μB of salmon and brown trout indicated that the third constant domain is essential for MAb4C10 binding. This was supported by 3D modeling and was finally verified by studies of MAb4C10 reactivity with a series of recombinant μ3 constructs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  1. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  2. 3D IBFV : Hardware-Accelerated 3D Flow Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D flow visualization problem in a

  3. 3D IBFV : hardware-accelerated 3D flow visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, A.C.; Wijk, van J.J.

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique presented by van Wijk (2001) for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D

  4. Using 3D in Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Jo; Kirschenbauer, Sabine; Döllner, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    to display 3D imagery. The extra cartographic degree of freedom offered by using 3D is explored and offered as a motivation for employing 3D in visualization. The use of VR and the construction of virtual environments exploit navigational and behavioral realism, but become most usefil when combined...... with abstracted representations embedded in a 3D space. The interactions between development of geovisualization, the technology used to implement it and the theory surrounding cartographic representation are explored. The dominance of computing technologies, driven particularly by the gaming industry...

  5. Qademah Fault 3D Survey

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Collect 3D seismic data at Qademah Fault location to 1. 3D traveltime tomography 2. 3D surface wave migration 3. 3D phase velocity 4. Possible reflection processing Acquisition Date: 26 – 28 September 2014 Acquisition Team: Sherif, Kai, Mrinal, Bowen, Ahmed Acquisition Layout: We used 288 receiver arranged in 12 parallel lines, each line has 24 receiver. Inline offset is 5 m and crossline offset is 10 m. One shot is fired at each receiver location. We use the 40 kgm weight drop as seismic source, with 8 to 15 stacks at each shot location.

  6. 3D Bayesian contextual classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2000-01-01

    We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours.......We extend a series of multivariate Bayesian 2-D contextual classifiers to 3-D by specifying a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for the feature vectors as well as a prior distribution of the class variables of a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours....

  7. 3-D printers for libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Griffey, Jason

    2014-01-01

    As the maker movement continues to grow and 3-D printers become more affordable, an expanding group of hobbyists is keen to explore this new technology. In the time-honored tradition of introducing new technologies, many libraries are considering purchasing a 3-D printer. Jason Griffey, an early enthusiast of 3-D printing, has researched the marketplace and seen several systems first hand at the Consumer Electronics Show. In this report he introduces readers to the 3-D printing marketplace, covering such topics asHow fused deposition modeling (FDM) printing workBasic terminology such as build

  8. The Essential Guide to 3D in Flash

    CERN Document Server

    Olsson, Ronald A

    2010-01-01

    If you are an ActionScript developer or designer and you would like to work with 3D in Flash, this book is for you. You will learn the core Flash 3D concepts, using the open source Away3D engine as a primary tool. Once you have mastered these skills, you will be able to realize the possibilities that the available Flash 3D engines, languages, and technologies have to offer you with Flash and 3D.* Describes 3D concepts in theory and their implementation using Away3D* Dives right in to show readers how to quickly create an interactive, animated 3D scene, and builds on that experience throughout

  9. Easy and unambiguous sequential assignments of intrinsically disordered proteins by correlating the backbone 15N or 13C′ chemical shifts of multiple contiguous residues in highly resolved 3D spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Yuichi; Kulminskaya, Natalia V.; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Sequential resonance assignment strategies are typically based on matching one or two chemical shifts of adjacent residues. However, resonance overlap often leads to ambiguity in resonance assignments in particular for intrinsically disordered proteins. We investigated the potential of establishing connectivity through the three-bond couplings between sequentially adjoining backbone carbonyl carbon nuclei, combined with semi-constant time chemical shift evolution, for resonance assignments of small folded and larger unfolded proteins. Extended sequential connectivity strongly lifts chemical shift degeneracy of the backbone nuclei in disordered proteins. We show here that 3D (H)N(COCO)NH and (HN)CO(CO)NH experiments with relaxation-optimized multiple pulse mixing correlate up to seven adjacent backbone amide nitrogen or carbonyl carbon nuclei, respectively, and connections across proline residues are also obtained straightforwardly. Multiple, recurrent long-range correlations with ultra-high resolution allow backbone 1 H N , 15 N H , and 13 C′ resonance assignments to be completed from a single pair of 3D experiments

  10. Integrating Model-Based Learning and Animations for Enhancing Students' Understanding of Proteins Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri; Hussein-Farraj, Rania

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a study conducted in the context of chemistry education reforms in Israel. The study examined a new biochemistry learning unit that was developed to promote in-depth understanding of 3D structures and functions of proteins and nucleic acids. Our goal was to examine whether, and to what extent teaching and learning via…

  11. The Skeletal Muscle Anabolic Response to Plant- versus Animal-Based Protein Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Stephan; Burd, Nicholas A; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-09-01

    Clinical and consumer market interest is increasingly directed toward the use of plant-based proteins as dietary components aimed at preserving or increasing skeletal muscle mass. However, recent evidence suggests that the ingestion of the plant-based proteins in soy and wheat results in a lower muscle protein synthetic response when compared with several animal-based proteins. The possible lower anabolic properties of plant-based protein sources may be attributed to the lower digestibility of plant-based sources, in addition to greater splanchnic extraction and subsequent urea synthesis of plant protein-derived amino acids compared with animal-based proteins. The latter may be related to the relative lack of specific essential amino acids in plant- as opposed to animal-based proteins. Furthermore, most plant proteins have a relatively low leucine content, which may further reduce their anabolic properties when compared with animal proteins. However, few studies have actually assessed the postprandial muscle protein synthetic response to the ingestion of plant proteins, with soy and wheat protein being the primary sources studied. Despite the proposed lower anabolic properties of plant vs. animal proteins, various strategies may be applied to augment the anabolic properties of plant proteins. These may include the following: 1) fortification of plant-based protein sources with the amino acids methionine, lysine, and/or leucine; 2) selective breeding of plant sources to improve amino acid profiles; 3) consumption of greater amounts of plant-based protein sources; or 4) ingesting multiple protein sources to provide a more balanced amino acid profile. However, the efficacy of such dietary strategies on postprandial muscle protein synthesis remains to be studied. Future research comparing the anabolic properties of a variety of plant-based proteins should define the preferred protein sources to be used in nutritional interventions to support skeletal muscle mass gain

  12. Nitrogen retention and water balance in animals fed medium protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    amount of nitrogen, in contrast to control animals that lost 2.4% nitrogen via the faeces. Inadequate drinking caused decreased excretion of urea. The improved nitrogen retention coupled with high rates of urea recycling enhances nutrients digestion and consequently the animals' absorptive capabilities. . (Afr. J. Biomed.

  13. Abusir 3D survey 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinori Kawae

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2015, in collaboration with the Czech Institute of Egyptology, we, a Japanese consortium, initiated the Abusir 3D Survey (A-3DS for the 3D documentation of the site’s pyramids, which have not been updated since the time of the architectural investigations of Vito Maragioglio and Celeste Rinaldi in the 1960s to the 1970s. The first season of our project focused on the exterior of Neferirkare’s pyramid, the largest pyramid at Abusir. By developing a strategic mathematical 3D survey plan, step-by-step 3D documentation to suit specific archaeological needs, and producing a new display method for the 3D data, we successfully measured the dimensions of the pyramid in a cost-effective way.

  14. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has...... been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...... a channel limited 2-D transducer array and the conventional 3-D beamforming technique, Parallel Beamforming. The first part of the scientific contributions demonstrate that 3-D synthetic aperture imaging achieves a better image quality than the Parallel Beamforming technique. Data were obtained using both...

  15. 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... are (vx, vy, vz) = (-0.03, 95, 1.0) ± (9, 6, 1) cm/s compared with the expected (0, 96, 0) cm/s. Afterwards, 3D vector flow images from a cross-sectional plane of the vessel are presented. The out of plane velocities exhibit the expected 2D circular-symmetric parabolic shape. The experimental results...... verify that the 3D TO method estimates the complete 3D velocity vectors, and that the method is suitable for 3D vector flow imaging....

  16. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  17. E3D, 3-D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, S.; Harris, D.; Schultz, C.; Maddix, D.; Bakowsky, T.; Bent, L.

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output. 2 - Methods: The software simulates wave propagation by solving the elasto-dynamic formulation of the full wave equation on a staggered grid. The solution scheme is 4-order accurate in space, 2-order accurate in time

  18. 3D local structure around copper site of rabbit prion-related protein: Quantitative determination by XANES spectroscopy combined with multiple-scattering calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, P. X.; Lian, F. L.; Wang, Y.; Wen, Yi; Chu, W. S.; Zhao, H. F.; Zhang, S.; Li, J.; Lin, D. H.; Wu, Z. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Prion-related protein (PrP), a cell-surface copper-binding glycoprotein, is considered to be responsible for a number of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The structural conversion of PrP from the normal cellular isoform (PrPC) to the post-translationally modified form (PrPSc) is thought to be relevant to Cu2+ binding to histidine residues. Rabbits are one of the few mammalian species that appear to be resistant to TSEs, because of the structural characteristics of the rabbit prion protein (RaPrPC) itself. Here we determined the three-dimensional local structure around the C-terminal high-affinity copper-binding sites using X-ray absorption near-edge structure combined with ab initio calculations in the framework of the multiple-scattering (MS) theory. Result shows that two amino acid resides, Gln97 and Met108, and two histidine residues, His95 and His110, are involved in binding this copper(II) ion. It might help us understand the roles of copper in prion conformation conversions, and the molecular mechanisms of prion-involved diseases.

  19. 3D local structure around copper site of rabbit prion-related protein: Quantitative determination by XANES spectroscopy combined with multiple-scattering calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, P.X.; Lian, F.L.; Wang, Y.; Wen, Yi; Chu, W.S.; Zhao, H.F.; Zhang, S.; Li, J.; Lin, D.H.; Wu, Z.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Prion-related protein (PrP), a cell-surface copper-binding glycoprotein, is considered to be responsible for a number of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The structural conversion of PrP from the normal cellular isoform (PrP C ) to the post-translationally modified form (PrP Sc ) is thought to be relevant to Cu 2+ binding to histidine residues. Rabbits are one of the few mammalian species that appear to be resistant to TSEs, because of the structural characteristics of the rabbit prion protein (RaPrP C ) itself. Here we determined the three-dimensional local structure around the C-terminal high-affinity copper-binding sites using X-ray absorption near-edge structure combined with ab initio calculations in the framework of the multiple-scattering (MS) theory. Result shows that two amino acid resides, Gln97 and Met108, and two histidine residues, His95 and His110, are involved in binding this copper(II) ion. It might help us understand the roles of copper in prion conformation conversions, and the molecular mechanisms of prion-involved diseases. - Highlights: ► The first structure of the metal ion binding site in RaPrP fifth copper-binding site. ► Quantitative determination by XANES spectroscopy combined with ab initio calculations. ► Provide a proof of the roles of copper in prion conformation conversions. ► Provide a proof of the molecular mechanisms of prion-involved diseases

  20. Design of 3D printed insert for hanging culture of Caco-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Chong; Meng, Qin; Zhang, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    A Caco-2 cell culture on Transwell, an alternative testing to animal or human testing used in evaluating drug intestinal permeability, incorrectly estimated the absorption of actively transported drugs due to the low expression of membrane transporters. Similarly, three-dimensional (3D) cultures of Caco-2 cells, which have been recommended to be more physiological relevant, were not superior to the Transwell culture in either accuracy or convenience in drug permeability testing. Using rapid 3D printing prototyping techniques, this study proposed a hanging culture of Caco-2 cells that performed with high accuracy in predicting drug permeability in humans. As found, hanging cultured Caco-2 cells formed a confluent monolayer and maintained high cell viability on the 3D printed insert. Compared with the normal culture on Transwell, the Caco-2 cells on the 3D printed insert presented ∼30–100% higher brush border enzyme activity and ∼2–7 folds higher activity of P-glycoprotein/multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 during 21 days of incubation. For the eight membrane transporter substrates, the predictive curve of the 3D printing culture exhibited better linearity (R 2  = 0.92) to the human oral adsorption than that of the Transwell culture (R 2  = 0.84), indicating better prediction by the 3D printing culture. In this regard, the 3D printed insert for hanging culture could be potentially developed as a convenient and low-cost tool for testing drug oral absorption. (paper)

  1. Bioinformatic analysis of microRNA biogenesis and function related proteins in eleven animal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuying; Luo, GuanZheng; Bai, Xiujuan; Wang, Xiu-Jie

    2009-10-01

    MicroRNAs are approximately 22 nt long small non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles in eukaryotes. The biogenesis and functional processes of microRNAs require the participation of many proteins, of which, the well studied ones are Dicer, Drosha, Argonaute and Exportin 5. To systematically study these four protein families, we screened 11 animal genomes to search for genes encoding above mentioned proteins, and identified some new members for each family. Domain analysis results revealed that most proteins within the same family share identical or similar domains. Alternative spliced transcript variants were found for some proteins. We also examined the expression patterns of these proteins in different human tissues and identified other proteins that could potentially interact with these proteins. These findings provided systematic information on the four key proteins involved in microRNA biogenesis and functional pathways in animals, and will shed light on further functional studies of these proteins.

  2. The role of 3D structure and protein conformation on the innate and adaptive immune responses to silk-based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Trella, Emanuele; Miot, Sylvie; Das, Sanskrita; Loparic, Marko; Ray, Alok R; Martin, Ivan; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated monocyte and T cell responsiveness to silk based biomaterials of different physico-chemical characteristics. Here we report that untransformed CD14+ human monocytes respond to overnight exposure to silk fibroin-based biomaterials in tridimensional form by IL-1β and IL-6, but not IL-10 gene expression and protein production. In contrast, fibroin based materials in bidimensional form are unable to stimulate monocyte responsiveness. The elicitation of these effects critically requires contact between biomaterials and responding cells, is not sustained and becomes undetectable in longer term cultures. We also observed that NF-κβ and p38 MAP kinase play key roles in monocyte activation by silk-based biomaterials. On the other hand, fibroin based materials, irrespective of their physico-chemical characteristics appeared to be unable to induce the activation of peripheral blood T cells from healthy donors, as evaluated by the expression of activation markers and IFN-γ gene. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. pLoc-mAnimal: predict subcellular localization of animal proteins with both single and multiple sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang; Zhao, Shu-Guang; Lin, Wei-Zhong; Xiao, Xuan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2017-11-15

    Cells are deemed the basic unit of life. However, many important functions of cells as well as their growth and reproduction are performed via the protein molecules located at their different organelles or locations. Facing explosive growth of protein sequences, we are challenged to develop fast and effective method to annotate their subcellular localization. However, this is by no means an easy task. Particularly, mounting evidences have indicated proteins have multi-label feature meaning that they may simultaneously exist at, or move between, two or more different subcellular location sites. Unfortunately, most of the existing computational methods can only be used to deal with the single-label proteins. Although the 'iLoc-Animal' predictor developed recently is quite powerful that can be used to deal with the animal proteins with multiple locations as well, its prediction quality needs to be improved, particularly in enhancing the absolute true rate and reducing the absolute false rate. Here we propose a new predictor called 'pLoc-mAnimal', which is superior to iLoc-Animal as shown by the compelling facts. When tested by the most rigorous cross-validation on the same high-quality benchmark dataset, the absolute true success rate achieved by the new predictor is 37% higher and the absolute false rate is four times lower in comparison with the state-of-the-art predictor. To maximize the convenience of most experimental scientists, a user-friendly web-server for the new predictor has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/pLoc-mAnimal/, by which users can easily get their desired results without the need to go through the complicated mathematics involved. xxiao@gordonlifescience.org or kcchou@gordonlifescience.org. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. 3-D neutron transport benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.; Ikeda, H.

    1991-03-01

    A set of 3-D neutron transport benchmark problems proposed by the Osaka University to NEACRP in 1988 has been calculated by many participants and the corresponding results are summarized in this report. The results of K eff , control rod worth and region-averaged fluxes for the four proposed core models, calculated by using various 3-D transport codes are compared and discussed. The calculational methods used were: Monte Carlo, Discrete Ordinates (Sn), Spherical Harmonics (Pn), Nodal Transport and others. The solutions of the four core models are quite useful as benchmarks for checking the validity of 3-D neutron transport codes

  5. Handbook of 3D integration

    CERN Document Server

    Garrou , Philip; Ramm , Peter

    2014-01-01

    Edited by key figures in 3D integration and written by top authors from high-tech companies and renowned research institutions, this book covers the intricate details of 3D process technology.As such, the main focus is on silicon via formation, bonding and debonding, thinning, via reveal and backside processing, both from a technological and a materials science perspective. The last part of the book is concerned with assessing and enhancing the reliability of the 3D integrated devices, which is a prerequisite for the large-scale implementation of this emerging technology. Invaluable reading fo

  6. Studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear PET, modifying some of the parameters of the reconstruction algorithm IMF-OSEM 3D on the data acquisition simulated with GAMOS; Estudios para la optimizaciOn de la calidad de imagen en el escaner ClearPET, modifi cando parametros del algoritmo IMF-OSEM 3D sobre adquisiciones simuladas con GAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadas, M.; Mendoza, J.; Embid, M.

    2007-09-27

    This report presents studies oriented to optimize the image quality of the small animal PET: Clear- PET. Certain figures of merit (FOM) were used to assess a quantitative value of the contrast and delectability of lesions. The optimization was carried out modifying some of the parameters in the reconstruction software of the scanner, imaging a mini-Derenzo phantom and a cylinder phantom with background activity and two hot spheres. Specifically, it was evaluated the incidence of the inter-update Metz filter (IMF) inside the iterative reconstruction algorithm 3D OSEM. The data acquisition was simulated using the GAMOS framework (Monte Carlo simulation). Integrating GAMOS output with the reconstruction software of the scanner was an additional novelty of this work, to achieve this, data sets were written with the list-mode format (LMF) of ClearPET. In order to verify the optimum values obtained, we foresee to make real acquisitions in the ClearPET of CIEMAT. (Author) 17 refs.

  7. 3D Modeling Techniques for Print and Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Megan Ashley

    In developing my thesis, I looked to gain skills using ZBrush to create 3D models, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. The models created compared the hearts of several vertebrates and were intended for students attending Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. I used several resources to create a model of the human heart and was able to work from life while creating heart models from other vertebrates. I successfully learned ZBrush and 3D scanning, and successfully printed 3D heart models. ZBrush allowed me to create several intricate models for use in both animation and print media. The 3D scanning technique did not fit my needs for the project, but may be of use for later projects. I was able to 3D print using two different techniques as well.

  8. 3D Models of Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collaborative grant is developing 3D models of both mouse and human biology to investigate aspects of therapeutic vaccination in order to answer key questions relevant to human cancer immunotherapy.

  9. AI 3D Cybug Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this short paper I briefly discuss 3D war Game based on artificial intelligence concepts called AI WAR. Going in to the details, I present the importance of CAICL language and how this language is used in AI WAR. Moreover I also present a designed and implemented 3D War Cybug for AI WAR using CAICL and discus the implemented strategy to defeat its enemies during the game life.

  10. 3D Face Apperance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations......We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations...

  11. 3D accelerator magnet calculations using MAGNUS-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissanetzky, S.; Miao, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The steady trend towards increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of accelerator magnets has caused a need for reliable 3D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic system in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D family of programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors. MAGNUS-3D uses the finite element method and the two-scalar-potentials formulation of Maxwell's equations to obtain the solution, which can then be used interactively to obtain tables of field components at specific points or lines, plots of field lines, function graphs representing a field component plotted against a coordinate along any line in space (such as the beam line), and views of the conductors, the mesh and the magnetic bodies. The magnetic quantities that can be calculated include the force or torque on conductors or magnetic parts, the energy, the flux through a specified surface, line integrals of any field component along any line in space, and the average field or potential harmonic coefficients. We describe the programs with emphasis placed on their use for accelerator magnet design, and present an advanced example of actual calculations. (orig.)

  12. A 3D Geometry Model Search Engine to Support Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gary K. L.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of 3D graphics in animation and games, usage of 3D geometry deformable models increases dramatically. Despite their growing importance, these models are difficult and time consuming to build. A distance learning system for the construction of these models could greatly facilitate students to learn and practice at different…

  13. Spacecraft 3D Augmented Reality Mobile App

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Kevin J.; Doronila, Paul R.; Kumanchik, Brian E.; Chan, Evan G.; Ellison, Douglas J.; Boeck, Andrea; Moore, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spacecraft 3D application allows users to learn about and interact with iconic NASA missions in a new and immersive way using common mobile devices. Using Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to project 3D renditions of the mission spacecraft into real-world surroundings, users can interact with and learn about Curiosity, GRAIL, Cassini, and Voyager. Additional updates on future missions, animations, and information will be ongoing. Using a printed AR Target and camera on a mobile device, users can get up close with these robotic explorers, see how some move, and learn about these engineering feats, which are used to expand knowledge and understanding about space. The software receives input from the mobile device's camera to recognize the presence of an AR marker in the camera's field of view. It then displays a 3D rendition of the selected spacecraft in the user's physical surroundings, on the mobile device's screen, while it tracks the device's movement in relation to the physical position of the spacecraft's 3D image on the AR marker.

  14. Immersive 3D geovisualisation in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2014-05-01

    Through geovisualisation we explore spatial data, we analyse it towards a specific questions, we synthesise results, and we present and communicate them to a specific audience (MacEachren & Kraak 1997). After centuries of paper maps, the means to represent and visualise our physical environment and its abstract qualities have changed dramatically since the 1990s - and accordingly the methods how to use geovisualisation in teaching. Whereas some people might still consider the traditional classroom as ideal setting for teaching and learning geographic relationships and its mapping, we used a 3D CAVE (computer-animated virtual environment) as environment for a problem-oriented learning project called "GEOSimulator". Focussing on this project, we empirically investigated, if such a technological advance like the CAVE make 3D visualisation, including 3D geovisualisation, not only an important tool for businesses (Abulrub et al. 2012) and for the public (Wissen et al. 2008), but also for educational purposes, for which it had hardly been used yet. The 3D CAVE is a three-sided visualisation platform, that allows for immersive and stereoscopic visualisation of observed and simulated spatial data. We examined the benefits of immersive 3D visualisation for geographic research and education and synthesized three fundamental technology-based visual aspects: First, the conception and comprehension of space and location does not need to be generated, but is instantaneously and intuitively present through stereoscopy. Second, optical immersion into virtual reality strengthens this spatial perception which is in particular important for complex 3D geometries. And third, a significant benefit is interactivity, which is enhanced through immersion and allows for multi-discursive and dynamic data exploration and knowledge transfer. Based on our problem-oriented learning project, which concentrates on a case study on flood risk management at the Wilde Weisseritz in Germany, a river

  15. From 3D view to 3D print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  16. Hyperglycemia decreases expression of 14-3-3 proteins in an animal model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seong-Jun; Sung, Jin-Hee; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2016-07-28

    Diabetes is a severe metabolic disorder and a major risk factor for stroke. Stroke severity is worse in patients with diabetes compared to the non-diabetic population. The 14-3-3 proteins are a family of conserved acidic proteins that are ubiquitously expressed in cells and tissues. These proteins are involved in many cellular processes including metabolic pathways, signal transduction, protein trafficking, protein synthesis, and cell cycle control. This study investigated 14-3-3 proteins expression in the cerebral cortex of animals with diabetes, cerebral ischemic injury and a combination of both diabetes and cerebral ischemic injury. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40mg/kg) in adult male rats. After 4 weeks of treatment, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed for the induction of focal cerebral ischemia and cerebral cortex tissue was collected 24h after MCAO. We confirmed that diabetes increases infarct volume following MCAO compared to non-diabetic animals. In diabetic animals with MCAO injury, reduction of 14-3-3 β/α, 14-3-3 ζ/δ, 14-3-3 γ, and 14-3-3 ε isoforms was detected. The expression of these proteins was significantly decreased in diabetic animals with MCAO injury compared to diabetic-only and MCAO-only animals. Moreover, Western blot analysis ascertained the decreased expression of 14-3-3 family proteins in diabetic animals with MCAO injury, including β/α, ζ/δ, γ, ε, τ, and η isoforms. These results show the changes of 14-3-3 proteins expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals with MCAO injury. Thus, these findings suggest that decreases in 14-3-3 proteins might be involved in the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins under the presence of diabetes following MCAO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 3D imaging, 3D printing and 3D virtual planning in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pratik; Chong, B S

    2018-03-01

    The adoption and adaptation of recent advances in digital technology, such as three-dimensional (3D) printed objects and haptic simulators, in dentistry have influenced teaching and/or management of cases involving implant, craniofacial, maxillofacial, orthognathic and periodontal treatments. 3D printed models and guides may help operators plan and tackle complicated non-surgical and surgical endodontic treatment and may aid skill acquisition. Haptic simulators may assist in the development of competency in endodontic procedures through the acquisition of psycho-motor skills. This review explores and discusses the potential applications of 3D printed models and guides, and haptic simulators in the teaching and management of endodontic procedures. An understanding of the pertinent technology related to the production of 3D printed objects and the operation of haptic simulators are also presented.

  18. Immunogenicity and T cell recognition in swine of foot-and-mouth disease virus polymerase 3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Briones, Maria M.; Blanco, Esther; Chiva, Cristina; Andreu, David; Ley, Victoria; Sobrino, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Immunization of domestic pigs with a vaccinia virus (VV) recombinant expressing foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3D protein conferred partial protection against challenge with infectious virus. The severity reduction of the clinical symptoms developed by the challenged animals occurred in the absence of significant levels of anti-3D circulating antibodies. This observation suggested that the partial protection observed was mediated by the induction of a 3D-specific cellular immune response. To gain information on the T cell recognition of FMDV 3D protein, we conducted in vitro proliferative assays using lymphocytes from outbred pigs experimentally infected with FMDV and 90 overlapping peptides spanning the complete 3D sequence. The use of pools of two to three peptides allowed the identification of T cell epitopes that were efficiently recognized by lymphocytes from at least four of the five animals analyzed. This recognition was heterotypic because anti-peptide responses increased upon reinfection of animals with a FMDV isolate from a different serotype. The results obtained with individual peptides confirmed the antigenicity observed with peptide pools. Detection of cytokine mRNAs by RT-PCR in lymphocytes stimulated in vitro by individual 3D peptides revealed that IFN-γ mRNA was the most consistently induced, suggesting that the activated T cells belong to the Th 1 subset. These results indicate that 3D protein contains epitopes that can be efficiently recognized by porcine T lymphocytes from different infected animals, both upon primary and secondary (heterotypic) FMDV infection. These epitopes can extend the repertoire of viral T cell epitopes to be included in subunit and synthetic FMD vaccines

  19. Cadenas de valor globales y desarrollo de cluster locales: Una mirada a pequeñas empresas colombianas de la industria de animación en tercera dimensión Global Value Chains and Local Cluster Development: A Perspective on Domestic Small Enterprises in the 3D-Animation Industry in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Fuerst

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo utiliza el concepto de “cadena de valor global” para hacer un análisis de cómo se desarrolla en Colombia el cluster de animaciones 3D. Se argumenta que la participación en cadenas de valor globales trae un impacto positivo al crecimiento y la innovación del cluster, e igualmente a sus empresas. El artículo utiliza la representación de diamante presentada por Porter  para mostrar las características que influyen positivamente en el desarrollo de este cluster en específico y para identificar recomendaciones a nivel de políticas necesarias que pueden mejorar la inserción del cluster de animaciones 3D en cadenas de valor globales This article draws on the framework of the “global value chain” to describe local cluster development in the 3D -animation industry in Colombia. It is argued that the participation in global value chains can have a positive impact on cluster growth and innovation, and the individual firm as well. Porter’s diamond is used to illustrate the characteristics that drive dynamic cluster development in this case and to point out the necessary policy recommendations for further enhancing the linkage of the 3D-animation cluster into global value chains.

  20. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  1. Modelling the interactions between animal venom peptides and membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Andrew; Kuyucak, Serdar; Schroeder, Christina I; Kaas, Quentin

    2017-12-01

    The active components of animal venoms are mostly peptide toxins, which typically target ion channels and receptors of both the central and peripheral nervous system, interfering with action potential conduction and/or synaptic transmission. The high degree of sequence conservation of their molecular targets makes a range of these toxins active at human receptors. The high selectivity and potency displayed by some of these toxins have prompted their use as pharmacological tools as well as drugs or drug leads. Molecular modelling has played an essential role in increasing our molecular-level understanding of the activity and specificity of animal toxins, as well as engineering them for biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. This review focuses on the biological insights gained from computational and experimental studies of animal venom toxins interacting with membranes and ion channels. A host of recent X-ray crystallography and electron-microscopy structures of the toxin targets has contributed to a dramatic increase in the accuracy of the molecular models of toxin binding modes greatly advancing this exciting field of study. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Venom-derived Peptides as Pharmacological Tools.' Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P.; Howard, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  3. Materialedreven 3d digital formgivning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med forskningsprojektet er for det første at understøtte keramikeren i at arbejde eksperimenterende med digital formgivning, og for det andet at bidrage til en tværfaglig diskurs om brugen af digital formgivning. Forskningsprojektet fokuserer på 3d formgivning og derved på 3d digital...... formgivning og Rapid Prototyping (RP). RP er en fællesbetegnelse for en række af de teknikker, der muliggør at overføre den digitale form til 3d fysisk form. Forskningsprojektet koncentrerer sig om to overordnede forskningsspørgsmål. Det første handler om, hvordan viden og erfaring indenfor det keramiske...... fagområde kan blive udnyttet i forhold til 3d digital formgivning. Det andet handler om, hvad en sådan tilgang kan bidrage med, og hvordan den kan blive udnyttet i et dynamisk samspil med det keramiske materiale i formgivningen af 3d keramiske artefakter. Materialedreven formgivning er karakteriseret af en...

  4. 3D future internet media

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2014-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The main contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Projects ROMEO, which focus on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the Future Internet (www.ict-romeo.eu). The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of constant video quality to both fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will design and develop hybrid-networking solutions that co...

  5. Novel 3D media technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2015-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Project ROMEO, which focuses on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the future Internet. The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of consistent video quality to fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will present hybrid networking solutions that combine the DVB-T2 and DVB-NGH broadcas...

  6. Peptidomic Approach to Developing ELISAs for the Determination of Bovine and Porcine Processed Animal Proteins in Feed for Farmed Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huet, Anne-Catherine; Charlier, Caroline; Deckers, Elise; Marbaix, Hélène; Raes, Martine; Mauro, Sergio; Delahaut, Philippe; Gillard, Nathalie

    2016-11-30

    The European Commission (EC) wants to reintroduce nonruminant processed animal proteins (PAPs) safely into the feed chain. This would involve replacing the current ban in feed with a species-to-species ban which, in the case of nonruminants, would only prohibit feeding them with proteins from the same species. To enforce such a provision, there is an urgent need for species-specific methods for detecting PAPs from several species in animal feed and in PAPs from other species. Currently, optical microscopy and the polymerase chain reaction are the officially accepted methods, but they have limitations, and alternative methods are needed. We have developed immunoassays using antibodies raised against targets which are not influenced by high temperature and pressure. These targets were identified in a previous study based on an experimental approach. One optimized competitive ELISA detects bovine PAPs at 2% in plant-derived feed. The detection capability demonstrated on blind samples shows a good correlation with mass spectrometry results.

  7. Modification of 3D milling machine to 3D printer

    OpenAIRE

    Taska, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Tato práce se zabývá přestavbou gravírovací frézky na 3D tiskárnu. V první části se práce zabývá možnými technologiemi 3D tisku a možností jejich využití u přestavby. Dále jsou popsány a vybrány vhodné součásti pro přestavbu. V další části je realizováno řízení ohřevu podložky, trysky a řízení posuvu drátu pomocí softwaru TwinCat od společnosti Beckhoff na průmyslovém počítači. Výsledkem práce by měla být oživená 3D tiskárna. This thesis deals with rebuilding of engraving machine to 3D pri...

  8. Aspects of defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study supersymmetric co-dimension 2 and 4 defects in the compactification of the 6d (2,0) theory of type A_N_−_1 on a 3-manifold M. The so-called 3d-3d correspondence is a relation between complexified Chern-Simons theory (with gauge group SL(N,ℂ)) on M and a 3d N=2 theory T_N[M]. We study this correspondence in the presence of supersymmetric defects, which are knots/links inside the 3-manifold. Our study employs a number of different methods: state-integral models for complex Chern-Simons theory, cluster algebra techniques, domain wall theory T[SU(N)], 5d N=2 SYM, and also supergravity analysis through holography. These methods are complementary and we find agreement between them. In some cases the results lead to highly non-trivial predictions on the partition function. Our discussion includes a general expression for the cluster partition function, which can be used to compute in the presence of maximal and certain class of non-maximal punctures when N>2. We also highlight the non-Abelian description of the 3d N=2T_N[M] theory with defect included, when such a description is available. This paper is a companion to our shorter paper http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1751-8113/49/30/30LT02, which summarizes our main results.

  9. Association of Animal and Plant Protein Intake With All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Fung, Teresa T; Hu, Frank B; Willett, Walter C; Longo, Valter D; Chan, Andrew T; Giovannucci, Edward L

    2016-10-01

    Defining what represents a macronutritionally balanced diet remains an open question and a high priority in nutrition research. Although the amount of protein may have specific effects, from a broader dietary perspective, the choice of protein sources will inevitably influence other components of diet and may be a critical determinant for the health outcome. To examine the associations of animal and plant protein intake with the risk for mortality. This prospective cohort study of US health care professionals included 131 342 participants from the Nurses' Health Study (1980 to end of follow-up on June 1, 2012) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986 to end of follow-up on January 31, 2012). Animal and plant protein intake was assessed by regularly updated validated food frequency questionnaires. Data were analyzed from June 20, 2014, to January 18, 2016. Hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Of the 131 342 participants, 85 013 were women (64.7%) and 46 329 were men (35.3%) (mean [SD] age, 49 [9] years). The median protein intake, as assessed by percentage of energy, was 14% for animal protein (5th-95th percentile, 9%-22%) and 4% for plant protein (5th-95th percentile, 2%-6%). After adjusting for major lifestyle and dietary risk factors, animal protein intake was not associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 1.02 per 10% energy increment; 95% CI, 0.98-1.05; P for trend = .33) but was associated with higher cardiovascular mortality (HR, 1.08 per 10% energy increment; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P for trend = .04). Plant protein was associated with lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.90 per 3% energy increment; 95% CI, 0.86-0.95; P for trend animal protein of various origins with plant protein was associated with lower mortality. In particular, the HRs for all-cause mortality were 0.66 (95% CI, 0.59-0.75) when 3% of energy from plant protein was substituted for an equivalent amount of protein from processed red meat, 0.88 (95% CI

  10. [Drosophila melanogaster as a model for studying the function of animal viral proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelianchuk, L V; Iudina, O S

    2011-07-01

    Studies in which Drosophila melanogaster individuals carrying transgenes of animal viruses were used to analyze the action of animal viral proteins on the cell are reviewed. The data presented suggest that host specificity of viruses is determined by their proteins responsible for the penetration of the virus into the cell, while viral proteins responsible for interactions with the host cell are much less host-specific. Due to this, the model of Drosophila with its developed system of searching for genetic interactions can be used to find intracellular targets for the action of viral proteins of the second group.

  11. Illustrating the disassembly of 3D models

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Jianwei

    2013-06-11

    We present a framework for the automatic disassembly of 3D man-made models and the illustration of the disassembly process. Given an assembled 3D model, we first analyze the individual parts using sharp edge loops and extract the contact faces between each pair of neighboring parts. The contact faces are then used to compute the possible moving directions of each part. We then present a simple algorithm for clustering the sets of the individual parts into meaningful sub-assemblies, which can be used for a hierarchical decomposition. We take the stability of sub-assemblies into account during the decomposition process by considering the upright orientation of the input models. Our framework also provides a user-friendly interface to enable the superimposition of the constraints for the decomposition. Finally, we visualize the disassembly process by generating an animated sequence. The experiments demonstrate that our framework works well for a variety of complex models. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Stereoscopic 3D graphics generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Jianping; Zan, Y.

    1997-05-01

    Stereoscopic display technology is one of the key techniques of areas such as simulation, multimedia, entertainment, virtual reality, and so on. Moreover, stereoscopic 3D graphics generation is an important part of stereoscopic 3D display system. In this paper, at first, we describe the principle of stereoscopic display and summarize some methods to generate stereoscopic 3D graphics. Secondly, to overcome the problems which came from the methods of user defined models (such as inconvenience, long modifying period and so on), we put forward the vector graphics files defined method. Thus we can design more directly; modify the model simply and easily; generate more conveniently; furthermore, we can make full use of graphics accelerator card and so on. Finally, we discuss the problem of how to speed up the generation.

  13. 3-D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon

    , if this significant reduction in the element count can still provide precise and robust 3-D vector flow estimates in a plane. The study concludes that the RC array is capable of estimating precise 3-D vector flow both in a plane and in a volume, despite the low channel count. However, some inherent new challenges...... ultrasonic vector flow estimation and bring it a step closer to a clinical application. A method for high frame rate 3-D vector flow estimation in a plane using the transverse oscillation method combined with a 1024 channel 2-D matrix array is presented. The proposed method is validated both through phantom...... hampers the task of real-time processing. In a second study, some of the issue with the 2-D matrix array are solved by introducing a 2-D row-column (RC) addressing array with only 62 + 62 elements. It is investigated both through simulations and via experimental setups in various flow conditions...

  14. Plant G-Proteins Come of Age: Breaking the Bond with Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusov, Yuri; Botella, José R

    2016-01-01

    G-proteins are universal signal transducers mediating many cellular responses. Plant G-protein signaling has been modeled on the well-established animal paradigm but accumulated experimental evidence indicates that G-protein-dependent signaling in plants has taken a very different evolutionary path. Here we review the differences between plant and animal G-proteins reported over past two decades. Most importantly, while in animal systems the G-protein signaling cycle is activated by seven transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptors, the existence of these type of receptors in plants is highly controversial. Instead plant G-proteins have been proven to be functionally associated with atypical receptors such as the Arabidopsis RGS1 and a number of receptor-like kinases. We propose that, instead of the GTP/GDP cycle used in animals, plant G-proteins are activated/de-activated by phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation. We discuss the need of a fresh new look at these signaling molecules and provide a hypothetical model that departs from the accepted animal paradigm.

  15. The New Realm of 3-D Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Dimension Technologies Inc., developed a line of 2-D/3-D Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) screens, including a 15-inch model priced at consumer levels. DTI's family of flat panel LCD displays, called the Virtual Window(TM), provide real-time 3-D images without the use of glasses, head trackers, helmets, or other viewing aids. Most of the company initial 3-D display research was funded through NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The images on DTI's displays appear to leap off the screen and hang in space. The display accepts input from computers or stereo video sources, and can be switched from 3-D to full-resolution 2-D viewing with the push of a button. The Virtual Window displays have applications in data visualization, medicine, architecture, business, real estate, entertainment, and other research, design, military, and consumer applications. Displays are currently used for computer games, protein analysis, and surgical imaging. The technology greatly benefits the medical field, as surgical simulators are helping to increase the skills of surgical residents. Virtual Window(TM) is a trademark of Dimension Technologies Inc.

  16. [Human nutrition with reference to animals as sources of protein (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wijn, J F

    1981-03-01

    In achieving adequate nutrition for all people in the world foods of animal origin are indispensable to supply sufficient protein and essential nutrients. All foods of animal origin have a number of characteristics in common, in view of which they should be regarded as highly valuable human food because of the considerable biological value of the proteins, their ready digestibility and their palatability. A number of nutritional features of animal versus vegetable protein are discussed. Several queries have to be placed against the health aspects of the copious consumption of animal protein as has increasingly become the practice in Europe. The consumption of dishes prepared from food of animal origin high in protein will inevitably be associated with a high fat content. It is not likely that, specifically, the incidence of human cancer will also be increased by the allegedly carcinogenic effects of meat persé, however using nitrite in meats may be hazardous when consumption of meat is considerable because of the carcinogenic effects of nitrosamines. In addition, there are drawbacks to the copious consumption of food of animal origin as part of the daily diet because of the high fat content and low dietary fibre content of this food. A conference of managers in the animal-food industry and experts from the professional medical and dietetic organizations would be a desirable improvement in achieving an optimum situation. Sufficient production and distribution will not fully ensure adequate nutrition of animal origin. Its valuable nutrients must be available from food which is acceptable to the individual consumer. Those factors which decide what is eaten and why, are not known to a sufficient extent. Cultural and environmental factors also play a highly decisive role in the matter. There are religious rules regarding food of animal origin, which obtain for large sections of the population all over the world. Other practices concerning the consumption of food of

  17. Ideal 3D asymmetric concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Botella, Angel [Departamento Fisica Aplicada a los Recursos Naturales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E.T.S.I. de Montes, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez-Balbuena, Antonio Alvarez; Vazquez, Daniel; Bernabeu, Eusebio [Departamento de Optica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Fac. CC. Fisicas, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    Nonimaging optics is a field devoted to the design of optical components for applications such as solar concentration or illumination. In this field, many different techniques have been used for producing reflective and refractive optical devices, including reverse engineering techniques. In this paper we apply photometric field theory and elliptic ray bundles method to study 3D asymmetric - without rotational or translational symmetry - concentrators, which can be useful components for nontracking solar applications. We study the one-sheet hyperbolic concentrator and we demonstrate its behaviour as ideal 3D asymmetric concentrator. (author)

  18. Oxidant/Antioxidant Balance in Animal Nutrition and Health: The Role of Protein Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Celi, Pietro; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress (OS), and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism, and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functi...

  19. Oxidant/antioxidant balance in animal nutrition and health: the role of protein oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Pietro eCeli; Pietro eCeli; Gianfranco eGabai

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress, and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional m...

  20. Research of the complex of functional and technological properties of animal protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Борисівна Дроменко

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the results of analytical and practical research of the complex of functional and technological properties of animal protein Gelexcel A-95 as the basis for creation of complex functional additives is shown. The regularities of their changes are determined depending on technological factors. Rational parameters of animal protein rehydration, gelation conditions, emulsification for further use in the process of production of meat products are identified

  1. NDR proteins: lessons learned from Arabidopsis and animal cells prompt a testable hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Yashwanti; Jones, Alan M

    2010-08-01

    N-myc Down Regulated (NDR) genes were discovered more than fifteen years ago. Indirect evidence support a role in tumor progression and cellular differentiation, but their biochemical function is still unknown. Our detailed analyses on Arabidopsis NDL proteins show their involvement in altering auxin transport, local auxin gradients and expression level of auxin transport proteins. Animal NDL proteins may be involved in membrane recycling of E-cadherin and effector for the small GTPase. In light of these findings, we hypothesize that NDL proteins regulate vesicular trafficking of auxin transport facilitator PIN proteins by biochemically alterating the local lipid environment of PIN proteins.

  2. Animator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  3. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  4. 3D Terahertz Beam Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Strikwerda, Andrew; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    We present a characterization of THz beams generated in both a two-color air plasma and in a LiNbO3 crystal. Using a commercial THz camera, we record intensity images as a function of distance through the beam waist, from which we extract 2D beam profiles and visualize our measurements into 3D beam...

  5. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  6. 3D Pit Stop Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Lael; Shaw, Daniel; Gaidds, Kimberly; Lyman, Gregory; Sorey, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    Although solving an engineering design project problem with limited resources or structural capabilities of materials can be part of the challenge, students making their own parts can support creativity. The authors of this article found an exciting solution: 3D printers are not only one of several tools for making but also facilitate a creative…

  7. 3D structure of muscle dihydropyridine receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Samsó

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excitation contraction coupling, the rapid and massive Ca2+ release under control of an action potential that triggers muscle contraction, takes places at specialized regions of the cell called triad junctions. There, a highly ordered supramolecular complex between the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR and the ryanodine receptor (RyR1 mediates the quasi‐instantaneous conversion from T‐tubule depolarization into Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. The DHPR has several key modules required for EC coupling: the voltage sensors and II‐III loop in the alpha1s subunit, and the beta subunit. To gain insight into their molecular organization, this review examines the most updated 3D structure of the DHPR as obtained by transmission electron microscopy and image reconstruction. Although structure determination of a heteromeric membrane protein such as the DHPR is challenging, novel technical advances in protein expression and 3D labeling facilitated this task. The 3D structure of the DHPR complex consists of a main body with five irregular corners around its perimeter encompassing the transmembrane alpha 1s subunit besides the intracellular beta subunit, an extended extracellular alpha 2 subunit, and a bulky intracellular II‐III loop. The structural definition attained at 19 Å resolution enabled docking of the atomic coordinates of structural homologs of the alpha1s and beta subunits. These structural features, together with their relative location with respect to the RyR1, are discussed in the context of the functional data.

  8. ANTIGENICITY OF COW'S MILK PROTEINS IN TWO ANIMAL MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    T.R. Neyestani; M. Djalali M. I'ezeshki

    2000-01-01

    Antigenicity of proteins found in cow's milk is age dependent. This is primarily due to infants possessing a more permeable intestinal wall than that in adults. Thus infants may acquire cow's milk allergy during their first year of life. While milk antigen specific IgE may cause allergy in susceptible subjects, there is some evidence indicating that milk antigen specific IgG may play some role in chronic disease development. The puropose of this study was to determine the antigenicity of cow'...

  9. 3D histomorphometric quantification from 3D computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F. de; Lopes, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    The histomorphometric analysis is based on stereologic concepts and was originally applied to biologic samples. This technique has been used to evaluate different complex structures such as ceramic filters, net structures and cancellous objects that are objects with inner connected structures. The measured histomorphometric parameters of structure are: sample volume to total reconstructed volume (BV/TV), sample surface to sample volume (BS/BV), connection thickness (Tb Th ), connection number (Tb N ) and connection separation (Tb Sp ). The anisotropy was evaluated as well. These parameters constitute the base of histomorphometric analysis. The quantification is realized over cross-sections recovered by cone beam reconstruction, where a real-time microfocus radiographic system is used as tomographic system. The three-dimensional (3D) histomorphometry, obtained from tomography, corresponds to an evolution of conventional method that is based on 2D analysis. It is more coherent with morphologic and topologic context of the sample. This work shows result from 3D histomorphometric quantification to characterize objects examined by 3D computer tomography. The results, which characterizes the internal structures of ceramic foams with different porous density, are compared to results from conventional methods

  10. DYNA3D2000*, Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: DYNA3D2000 is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, including frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation. 2 - Method of solution: Discretization of a continuous model transforms partial differential equations into algebraic equations. A numerical solution is then obtained by solving these algebraic equations through a direct time marching scheme. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Recent software improvements have eliminated most of the user identified limitations with dynamic memory allocation and a very large format description that has pushed potential problem sizes beyond the reach of most users. The dominant restrictions remain in code execution speed and robustness, which the developers constantly strive to improve

  11. Practical algorithms for 3D computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, R Stuart

    2013-01-01

    ""A valuable book to accompany any course that mixes the theory and practice of 3D graphics. The book's web site has many useful programs and code samples.""-Karen Rafferty, Queen's University, Belfast""The topics covered by this book are backed by the OpenFX modeling and animation software. This is a big plus in that it provides a practical perspective and encourages experimentation. … [This] will offer students a more interesting and hands-on learning experience, especially for those wishing to pursue a career in computer game development.""-Naganand Madhavapeddy, GameDeveloper>

  12. How protein kinases co-ordinate mitosis in animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2011-04-01

    Mitosis is associated with profound changes in cell physiology and a spectacular surge in protein phosphorylation. To accomplish these, a remarkably large portion of the kinome is involved in the process. In the present review, we will focus on classic mitotic kinases, such as cyclin-dependent kinases, Polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases, as well as more recently characterized players such as NIMA (never in mitosis in Aspergillus nidulans)-related kinases, Greatwall and Haspin. Together, these kinases co-ordinate the proper timing and fidelity of processes including centrosomal functions, spindle assembly and microtubule-kinetochore attachment, as well as sister chromatid separation and cytokinesis. A recurrent theme of the mitotic kinase network is the prevalence of elaborated feedback loops that ensure bistable conditions. Sequential phosphorylation and priming phosphorylation on substrates are also frequently employed. Another important concept is the role of scaffolds, such as centrosomes for protein kinases during mitosis. Elucidating the entire repertoire of mitotic kinases, their functions, regulation and interactions is critical for our understanding of normal cell growth and in diseases such as cancers.

  13. 3-D Discrete Analytical Ridgelet Transform

    OpenAIRE

    Helbert , David; Carré , Philippe; Andrès , Éric

    2006-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we propose an implementation of the 3-D Ridgelet transform: the 3-D discrete analytical Ridgelet transform (3-D DART). This transform uses the Fourier strategy for the computation of the associated 3-D discrete Radon transform. The innovative step is the definition of a discrete 3-D transform with the discrete analytical geometry theory by the construction of 3-D discrete analytical lines in the Fourier domain. We propose two types of 3-D discrete lines:...

  14. Nutritional evaluation of irradiated animal protein by-products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hakeim, N.F.; Hilali, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Blood, fish and meat-bone meals were irradiated at dose levels of 0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 kGy. Radiation induced an insignificant effect on the chemical composition of meals. Available lysine in irradiated fish meals was reduced by 8,04%. Losses occurred in some amino acids especially the essential ones of the irradiated protein by-products. Isoleucine, phenylalanine and valine were the limiting amino acids in the irradiated blood, fish and meat-bone meal, respectively. At dose levels of 0, 5, 10, 20 and 50 kGy essential amino acids index (EAAI) was 48,24%, 42,89%, 48,38%, 53% and 55,95% for blood meal 37,91%, 39,71%, 41,18% and 37,90% for fish meal and 37,07%, 36,01%, 27,61%, 38,21% and 38,45% for meat-bone meal, respectively. (orig.) [de

  15. NDR proteins: Lessons learned from Arabidopsis and animal cells prompt a testable hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mudgil, Yashwanti; Jones, Alan M

    2010-01-01

    N-myc downregulated (NDR) genes were discovered more than fifteen years ago. Indirect evidence support a role in tumor progression and cellular differentiation, but their biochemical function is still unknown. Our detailed analyses on Arabidopsis NDR proteins (deisgnated NDR-like, NDL) show their involvement in altering auxin transport, local auxin gradients and expression level of auxin transport proteins. Animal NDL proteins may be involved in membrane recycling of E-cadherin and effector f...

  16. Detection of animal-derived proteins in feedstuffs in Italy: a reproducibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingravalle, Francesco; Abete, Maria Cesarina; Crescio, Maria Ines; Ru, Giuseppe

    2007-04-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy is a prion disease of ruminants that was first recognized in 1986 in the United Kingdom. Early in the epidemic, it became obvious that the presence of meat and bone meal in feed rations was a common factor in all bovine spongiform encephalopathy cases. The first ban of derived animal proteins in feed was enforced in Europe in 1994 and implemented by Regulation 999/2001 that prohibited the feeding of animal-derived protein to farm animals. The only official method currently accepted by the European Union Commission for test for the presence of animal-derived proteins in feedstuffs is feed microscopy. In Italy, monitoring of feedstuff safety is provided by both the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Agriculture. The quality of official control, usually assessed by verifying the reproducibility and the accuracy of the testing method, is of fundamental importance for all laboratories and institutions using these results for comparative purposes. The aims of this study were to assess the reproducibility of the official method over all the Italian surveillance network and to provide a model for evaluating the performance of the monitoring system. The accuracy of the identification of the animal class of derived protein detected (avian, mammalian, or aquatic organism) was assessed. The interlaboratory agreement within the overall network reached 0.97 (95% confidence interval of 0.95 to 0.98) for determining the presence or absence of animal-derived proteins (e.g., for mammalian, avian, or aquatic species), and specificity of the identification of the animal class indicated that fish proteins are more easily recognized than are avian or mammalian proteins.

  17. Piwi and potency: PIWI proteins in animal stem cells and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C

    2014-10-01

    PIWI proteins are well known for their roles in the animal germline. They are essential for germline development and maintenance, and together with their binding partners, the piRNAs, they mediate transposon silencing. More recently, PIWI proteins have also been identified in somatic stem cells in diverse animals. The expression of PIWI proteins in these cells could be related to the ability of such cells to contribute to the germline. However, evaluation of stem cell systems across many different animal phyla suggests that PIWI proteins have an ancestral role in somatic stem cells, irrespective of their contribution to the germ cell lineage. Moreover, the data currently available reveal a possible correlation between the differentiation potential of a cell and its PIWI levels. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. 3D integrated superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, D.; Kim, D.; Das, R.; Yost, D.; Gustavsson, S.; Hover, D.; Krantz, P.; Melville, A.; Racz, L.; Samach, G. O.; Weber, S. J.; Yan, F.; Yoder, J. L.; Kerman, A. J.; Oliver, W. D.

    2017-10-01

    As the field of quantum computing advances from the few-qubit stage to larger-scale processors, qubit addressability and extensibility will necessitate the use of 3D integration and packaging. While 3D integration is well-developed for commercial electronics, relatively little work has been performed to determine its compatibility with high-coherence solid-state qubits. Of particular concern, qubit coherence times can be suppressed by the requisite processing steps and close proximity of another chip. In this work, we use a flip-chip process to bond a chip with superconducting flux qubits to another chip containing structures for qubit readout and control. We demonstrate that high qubit coherence (T1, T2,echo > 20 μs) is maintained in a flip-chip geometry in the presence of galvanic, capacitive, and inductive coupling between the chips.

  19. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  20. Mortars for 3D printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanenko Olga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed at developing scientifically proven compositions of mortars for 3D printing modified by a peat-based admixture with improved operational characteristics. The paper outlines the results of experimental research on hardened cement paste and concrete mixture with the use of modifying admixture MT-600 (thermally modified peat. It is found that strength of hardened cement paste increases at early age when using finely dispersed admixtures, which is the key factor for formation of construction and technical specifications of concrete for 3D printing technologies. The composition of new formations of hardened cement paste modified by MT-600 admixture were obtained, which enabled to suggest the possibility of their physico-chemical interaction while hardening.

  1. Automated 3-D Radiation Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarpinian, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    This work describes an automated radiation detection and imaging system which combines several state-of-the-art technologies to produce a portable but very powerful visualization tool for planning work in radiation environments. The system combines a radiation detection system, a computerized radiation imaging program, and computerized 3-D modeling to automatically locate and measurements are automatically collected and imaging techniques are used to produce colored, 'isodose' images of the measured radiation fields. The isodose lines from the images are then superimposed over the 3-D model of the area. The final display shows the various components in a room and their associated radiation fields. The use of an automated radiation detection system increases the quality of radiation survey obtained measurements. The additional use of a three-dimensional display allows easier visualization of the area and associated radiological conditions than two-dimensional sketches

  2. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LITTLE, CHARLES Q.; PETERS, RALPH R.; RIGDON, J. BRIAN; SMALL, DANIEL E.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene

  3. 3D neutron transport modelization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warin, X.

    1996-12-01

    Some nodal methods to solve the transport equation in 3D are presented. Two nodal methods presented at an OCDE congress are described: a first one is a low degree one called RTN0; a second one is a high degree one called BDM1. The two methods can be made faster with a totally consistent DSA. Some results of parallelization show that: 98% of the time is spent in sweeps; transport sweeps are easily parallelized. (K.A.)

  4. 3D Printing A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zulkifl Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid free fabrication SFF are produced to enhance the printing instrument utilizing distinctive strategies like Piezo spout control multi-spout injet printers or STL arrange utilizing cutting information. The procedure is utilized to diminish the cost and enhance the speed of printing. A few techniques take long at last because of extra process like dry the printing. This study will concentrate on SFFS utilizing UV gum for 3D printing.

  5. 3D neutron transport modelization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warin, X.

    1996-12-01

    Some nodal methods to solve the transport equation in 3D are presented. Two nodal methods presented at an OCDE congress are described: a first one is a low degree one called RTN0; a second one is a high degree one called BDM1. The two methods can be made faster with a totally consistent DSA. Some results of parallelization show that: 98% of the time is spent in sweeps; transport sweeps are easily parallelized. (K.A.). 10 refs.

  6. Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained...... showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared...

  7. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  8. 3D treatment planning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng B; Li, Sicong

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems have evolved and become crucial components of modern radiation therapy. The systems are computer-aided designing or planning softwares that speed up the treatment planning processes to arrive at the best dose plans for the patients undergoing radiation therapy. Furthermore, the systems provide new technology to solve problems that would not have been considered without the use of computers such as conformal radiation therapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The 3D treatment planning systems vary amongst the vendors and also the dose delivery systems they are designed to support. As such these systems have different planning tools to generate the treatment plans and convert the treatment plans into executable instructions that can be implemented by the dose delivery systems. The rapid advancements in computer technology and accelerators have facilitated constant upgrades and the introduction of different and unique dose delivery systems than the traditional C-arm type medical linear accelerators. The focus of this special issue is to gather relevant 3D treatment planning systems for the radiation oncology community to keep abreast of technology advancement by assess the planning tools available as well as those unique "tricks or tips" used to support the different dose delivery systems. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Compact 3D quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Edwar; Deppe, Frank; Renger, Michael; Repp, Daniel; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Pogorzalek, Stefan; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Marx, Achim; Gross, Rudolf

    2018-05-01

    Superconducting 3D microwave cavities offer state-of-the-art coherence times and a well-controlled environment for superconducting qubits. In order to realize at the same time fast readout and long-lived quantum information storage, one can couple the qubit to both a low-quality readout and a high-quality storage cavity. However, such systems are bulky compared to their less coherent 2D counterparts. A more compact and scalable approach is achieved by making use of the multimode structure of a 3D cavity. In our work, we investigate such a device where a transmon qubit is capacitively coupled to two modes of a single 3D cavity. External coupling is engineered so that the memory mode has an about 100 times larger quality factor than the readout mode. Using an all-microwave second-order protocol, we realize a lifetime enhancement of the stored state over the qubit lifetime by a factor of 6 with a fidelity of approximately 80% determined via quantum process tomography. We also find that this enhancement is not limited by fundamental constraints.

  10. 3D Graphics with Spreadsheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Benacka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the formulas for orthographic parallel projection of 3D bodies on computer screen are derived using secondary school vector algebra. The spreadsheet implementation is demonstrated in six applications that project bodies with increasing intricacy – a convex body (cube with non-solved visibility, convex bodies (cube, chapel with solved visibility, a coloured convex body (chapel with solved visibility, and a coloured non-convex body (church with solved visibility. The projections are revolvable in horizontal and vertical plane, and they are changeable in size. The examples show an unusual way of using spreadsheets as a 3D computer graphics tool. The applications can serve as a simple introduction to the general principles of computer graphics, to the graphics with spreadsheets, and as a tool for exercising stereoscopic vision. The presented approach is usable at visualising 3D scenes within some topics of secondary school curricula as solid geometry (angles and distances of lines and planes within simple bodies or analytic geometry in space (angles and distances of lines and planes in E3, and even at university level within calculus at visualising graphs of z = f(x,y functions. Examples are pictured.

  11. New portable FELIX 3D display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhans, Knut; Bezecny, Daniel; Homann, Dennis; Bahr, Detlef; Vogt, Carsten; Blohm, Christian; Scharschmidt, Karl-Heinz

    1998-04-01

    An improved generation of our 'FELIX 3D Display' is presented. This system is compact, light, modular and easy to transport. The created volumetric images consist of many voxels, which are generated in a half-sphere display volume. In that way a spatial object can be displayed occupying a physical space with height, width and depth. The new FELIX generation uses a screen rotating with 20 revolutions per second. This target screen is mounted by an easy to change mechanism making it possible to use appropriate screens for the specific purpose of the display. An acousto-optic deflection unit with an integrated small diode pumped laser draws the images on the spinning screen. Images can consist of up to 10,000 voxels at a refresh rate of 20 Hz. Currently two different hardware systems are investigated. The first one is based on a standard PCMCIA digital/analog converter card as an interface and is controlled by a notebook. The developed software is provided with a graphical user interface enabling several animation features. The second, new prototype is designed to display images created by standard CAD applications. It includes the development of a new high speed hardware interface suitable for state-of-the- art fast and high resolution scanning devices, which require high data rates. A true 3D volume display as described will complement the broad range of 3D visualization tools, such as volume rendering packages, stereoscopic and virtual reality techniques, which have become widely available in recent years. Potential applications for the FELIX 3D display include imaging in the field so fair traffic control, medical imaging, computer aided design, science as well as entertainment.

  12. Comparison of structure, function and regulation of plant cold shock domain proteins to bacterial and animal cold shock domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikam, Vijay; Karlson, Dale T

    2010-01-01

    The cold shock domain (CSD) is among the most ancient and well conserved nucleic acid binding domains from bacteria to higher animals and plants. The CSD facilitates binding to RNA, ssDNA and dsDNA and most functions attributed to cold shock domain proteins are mediated by this nucleic acid binding activity. In prokaryotes, cold shock domain proteins only contain a single CSD and are termed cold shock proteins (Csps). In animal model systems, various auxiliary domains are present in addition to the CSD and are commonly named Y-box proteins. Similar to animal CSPs, plant CSPs contain auxiliary C-terminal domains in addition to their N-terminal CSD. Cold shock domain proteins have been shown to play important roles in development and stress adaptation in wide variety of organisms. In this review, the structure, function and regulation of plant CSPs are compared and contrasted to the characteristics of bacterial and animal CSPs. [BMB reports 2010; 43(1): 1-8].

  13. 3D composite image, 3D MRI, 3D SPECT, hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, T.; Shibata, I.; Sugo, N.; Takano, M.; Takahashi, H.

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D)SPECT imaging technique we have studied and published for the past several years is an analytical tool that permits visual expression of the cerebral circulation profile in various cerebral diseases. The greatest drawback of SPECT is that the limitation on precision of spacial resolution makes intracranial localization impossible. In 3D SPECT imaging, intracranial volume and morphology may vary with the threshold established. To solve this problem, we have produced complimentarily combined SPECT and helical-CT 3D images by means of general-purpose visualization software for intracranial localization. In hydrocephalus, however, the key subject to be studied is the profile of cerebral circulation around the ventricles of the brain. This suggests that, for displaying the cerebral ventricles in three dimensions, CT is a difficult technique whereas MRI is more useful. For this reason, we attempted to establish the profile of cerebral circulation around the cerebral ventricles by the production of combined 3D images of SPECT and MRI. In patients who had shunt surgery for hydrocephalus, a difference between pre- and postoperative cerebral circulation profiles was assessed by a voxel distribution curve, 3D SPECT images, and combined 3D SPECT and MRI images. As the shunt system in this study, an Orbis-Sigma valve of the automatic cerebrospinal fluid volume adjustment type was used in place of the variable pressure type Medos valve currently in use, because this device requires frequent changes in pressure and a change in pressure may be detected after MRI procedure. The SPECT apparatus used was PRISM3000 of the three-detector type, and 123I-IMP was used as the radionuclide in a dose of 222 MBq. MRI data were collected with an MAGNEXa+2 with a magnetic flux density of 0.5 tesla under the following conditions: field echo; TR 50 msec; TE, 10 msec; flip, 30ueK; 1 NEX; FOV, 23 cm; 1-mm slices; and gapless. 3D images are produced on the workstation TITAN

  14. 3D silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzefall, Ulrich; Bates, Richard; Boscardin, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Lozano, Manuel; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pennicard, David; Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina; Szumlak, Tomasz; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10 15 N eq /cm 2 , which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10 15 N eq /cm 2 . The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr 90 β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the results obtained with 3D-STC-modules.

  15. 3D silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Bates, Richard [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Lozano, Manuel [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Pellegrini, Giulio [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Szumlak, Tomasz [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of

  16. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  17. Nuclear protein synthesis in animal and vegetal hemispheres of Xenopus oocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldherr, C.M.; Hodges, P.; Paine, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if nuclear proteins are preferentially synthesized in the vicinity of the nucleus, a factor which could facilitate nucleocytoplasmic exchange. Using Xenopus oocytes, animal and vegetal hemispheres were separated by bisecting the cells in paraffin oil. It was initially established that protein synthesis is not affected by the bisecting procedure. To determine if nuclear protein synthesis is restricted to the animal hemisphere (which contains the nucleus), vegetal halves and enucleated animal halves were injected with [ 3 H]leucine and incubated in oil for 90 min. The labeled cell halves were then fused with unlabeled, nucleated animal hemispheres that had been previously injected with puromycin in amounts sufficient to prevent further protein synthesis. Thus, labeled polypeptides which subsequently entered the nuclei were synthesized before fusion. Three hours after fusion, the nuclei were isolated, run on two-dimensional gels, and fluorographed. Approximately 200 labeled nuclear polypeptides were compared, and only 2 were synthesized in significantly different amounts in the animal and vegetal hemispheres. The results indicate that nuclear protein synthesis is not restricted to the cytoplasm adjacent to the nucleus

  18. Oxidant/Antioxidant Balance in Animal Nutrition and Health: The Role of Protein Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celi, Pietro; Gabai, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the role that oxidative stress (OS), and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism, and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional modifications. Protein oxidation seems to be involved in pathological conditions, such as respiratory diseases and parasitic infection; however, some studies also suggest that protein oxidation plays a crucial role in the regulation of important physiological functions, such as reproduction, nutrition, metabolism, lactation, gut health, and neonatal physiology. As the characterization of the mechanisms by which OS may influence metabolism and health is attracting considerable scientific interest, the aim of this review is to present veterinary scientists and clinicians with various aspects of oxidative damage to proteins.

  19. iCAVE: an open source tool for visualizing biomolecular networks in 3D, stereoscopic 3D and immersive 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liluashvili, Vaja; Kalayci, Selim; Fluder, Eugene; Wilson, Manda; Gabow, Aaron; Gümüs, Zeynep H

    2017-08-01

    Visualizations of biomolecular networks assist in systems-level data exploration in many cellular processes. Data generated from high-throughput experiments increasingly inform these networks, yet current tools do not adequately scale with concomitant increase in their size and complexity. We present an open source software platform, interactome-CAVE (iCAVE), for visualizing large and complex biomolecular interaction networks in 3D. Users can explore networks (i) in 3D using a desktop, (ii) in stereoscopic 3D using 3D-vision glasses and a desktop, or (iii) in immersive 3D within a CAVE environment. iCAVE introduces 3D extensions of known 2D network layout, clustering, and edge-bundling algorithms, as well as new 3D network layout algorithms. Furthermore, users can simultaneously query several built-in databases within iCAVE for network generation or visualize their own networks (e.g., disease, drug, protein, metabolite). iCAVE has modular structure that allows rapid development by addition of algorithms, datasets, or features without affecting other parts of the code. Overall, iCAVE is the first freely available open source tool that enables 3D (optionally stereoscopic or immersive) visualizations of complex, dense, or multi-layered biomolecular networks. While primarily designed for researchers utilizing biomolecular networks, iCAVE can assist researchers in any field. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. Land Use for Edible Protein of Animal Origin—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flachowsky, Gerhard; Meyer, Ulrich; Südekum, Karl-Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary The growing world population has led to a higher demand for more and better quality food. In the future, there will be increasingly strong competition for arable land and other non-renewable resources. Proteins of animal origin are very valuable sources of essential nutrients, but their production consumes resources and causes emissions. The aim of this study was to calculate exemplarily the land use for production of edible animal protein from different animal species and categories in consideration of important influencing factors. Large differences were found with the highest amounts per kilogram of body weight produced by broiler chickens and the lowest yields in edible protein and the highest land need observed for beef cattle. Abstract The present period is characterized by a growing world population and a higher demand for more and better quality food, as well as other products for an improved standard of living. In the future, there will be increasingly strong competition for arable land and non-renewable resources such as fossil carbon-sources, water, and some minerals, as well as between food, feed, fuel, fiber, flowers, and fun (6 F’s). Proteins of animal origin like milk, meat, fish, eggs and, probably, insects are very valuable sources of essential amino acids, minerals and vitamins, but their production consumes some non-renewable resources including arable land and causes considerable emissions. Therefore, this study´s objective was to calculate some examples of the land use (arable land and grassland) for production of edible animal protein taking into consideration important animal species/categories, levels of plant and animal yields, the latter estimated with and without co-products from agriculture, and the food/biofuel industry in animal feeding. There are large differences between animal species/categories and their potential to produce edible protein depending on many influencing variables. The highest amounts per kilogram

  1. 3D-e-Chem-VM: Structural Cheminformatics Research Infrastructure in a Freely Available Virtual Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGuire, R.; Verhoeven, S.; Vass, M.; Vriend, G.; Esch, I.J. de; Lusher, S.J.; Leurs, R.; Ridder, L.; Kooistra, A.J.; Ritschel, T.; Graaf, C. de

    2017-01-01

    3D-e-Chem-VM is an open source, freely available Virtual Machine ( http://3d-e-chem.github.io/3D-e-Chem-VM/ ) that integrates cheminformatics and bioinformatics tools for the analysis of protein-ligand interaction data. 3D-e-Chem-VM consists of software libraries, and database and workflow tools

  2. 3D-e-Chem-VM : Structural Cheminformatics Research Infrastructure in a Freely Available Virtual Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGuire, Ross; Verhoeven, Stefan; Vass, Márton; Vriend, Gerrit; De Esch, Iwan J P; Lusher, Scott J.; Leurs, Rob; Ridder, Lars; Kooistra, Albert J.; Ritschel, Tina; de Graaf, C.

    2017-01-01

    3D-e-Chem-VM is an open source, freely available Virtual Machine ( http://3d-e-chem.github.io/3D-e-Chem-VM/ ) that integrates cheminformatics and bioinformatics tools for the analysis of protein-ligand interaction data. 3D-e-Chem-VM consists of software libraries, and database and workflow tools

  3. ANIMASI IKLAN 3D SAFETY DRIVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusron Aulia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah membuat sebuah aplikasi video iklan bertemakan tentang keamanan mengemudi sebagai media edukasi kepada masyarakat tentang pentingnya  keamanan  dalam  mengemudi.  Begitu  pentingnya  keamanan  mengemudi, maka  menjadi  pengemudi  aman  menjadi  keharusan  bagi setiap  anggota  masyarakat. Metode pengumpulan data yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah observasi, dokumentasi dan studi pustaka. Untuk pengembangan sistem multimedia dilakukan berdasarkan tiga tahapan yaitu: Pra Produksi, Produksi, dan Pasca Produksi. Hasil dari penelitian   ini   berupa   aplikasi   video   iklan   animasi   3D   bertemakan   keamanan mengemudi. Aplikasi yang dihasilkan berekstensi .mpeg untuk CD/DVD, .mkv untuk diputar di computer, dan .mp4 yang diunggah di internet. Selain fungsi iklan animasi ini sebagai penyampaian pesan dan memotivasi masyarakat untuk lebih disiplin, tertib dan aman dalam mengemudi, dan juga sebagai penginspirasi untuk lebih mengembangkan animasi karya asli Indonesia Kata kunci : animasi, iklan, 3D, safety, driving.The purpose of this research  is to create  an  application  video on driving safety themed advertising  as a medium to educate people about the importance of safety in driving. Once the importance of driving safety, becomes a safe driver is a must for every member of the community. Data collection methods used in this study is the observation, documentation and literature.  For the development of multimedia systems is done based on three stages: Pre-Production,  Production,  and Post Production.  The results of this research  is  the  application  of 3D  animation  video ads  themed  driving  safety. The resulting application extension .Mpeg to CD / DVD .Mkv to be played on the computer, and .Mp4 uploaded on the internet. In addition to the function of these animated ads as delivering  a  message  and  motivate people to be more disciplined

  4. Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FROILAN G. DESTREZA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is for the BSHRM Students of Batangas State University (BatStateU ARASOF for the researchers believe that the Wireless 3D Chocolate Printer would be helpful in their degree program especially on making creative, artistic, personalized and decorative chocolate designs. The researchers used the Prototyping model as procedural method for the successful development and implementation of the hardware and software. This method has five phases which are the following: quick plan, quick design, prototype construction, delivery and feedback and communication. This study was evaluated by the BSHRM Students and the assessment of the respondents regarding the software and hardware application are all excellent in terms of Accuracy, Effecitveness, Efficiency, Maintainability, Reliability and User-friendliness. Also, the overall level of acceptability of the design project as evaluated by the respondents is excellent. With regard to the observation about the best raw material to use in 3D printing, the chocolate is good to use as the printed material is slightly distorted,durable and very easy to prepare; the icing is also good to use as the printed material is not distorted and is very durable but consumes time to prepare; the flour is not good as the printed material is distorted, not durable but it is easy to prepare. The computation of the economic viability level of 3d printer with reference to ROI is 37.14%. The recommendation of the researchers in the design project are as follows: adding a cooling system so that the raw material will be more durable, development of a more simplified version and improving the extrusion process wherein the user do not need to stop the printing process just to replace the empty syringe with a new one.

  5. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  6. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  7. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (pProteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A label-free multi-functionalized electrochemical aptasensor based on a Fe_3O_4@3D-rGO@plasma-polymerized (4-vinyl pyridine) nanocomposite for the sensitive detection of proteins in whole blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Shaoming; Dong, Xiaodong; Liu, Shunli; Penng, Donglai; He, Linghao; Wang, Minghua; Fu, Guodong; Feng, Xiaozhong; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a novel label-free electrochemical aptasensor for detecting proteins in whole blood based on a three-component nanocomposite, in which ferriferrous oxide and three-dimensional graphene nanocomposite were modified with the plasma-polymerized 4-vinyl pyridine (Fe_3O_4@3D-rGO@PP4VP). In this novel sensing strategy, large amounts of amino groups in PP4VP facilitated the immobilization of aptamer strands via the strong electrostatic interaction between positively charged ammonium groups of the nanocomposites and negatively charged phosphate groups of aptamers. In the presence of thrombin, LYS (LYS), and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), the adsorbed aptamer strands on the developed nanocomposite surface caught the targeted proteins at the electrode interface. The aptamer preferred to be a barrier for electrons and inhibited electron transfer, leading to the decreased peak current of cyclic voltammetry measurements and the increased electron transfer resistance of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The determination of the thrombin, PDGF-BB, and LYS concentrations with this novel strategy showed low detection limits of 4.5, 29.4, and 14 pg·mL"−"1, and the analytical ranges extend from 0.01 to 50, 0.1 to 100, and 0.1 to 200 ng·mL"−"1, respectively. The resultant aptasensor exhibited high selectivity, acceptable reproducibility, and stability toward thrombin. The aptasensor could be used to detect thrombin in whole blood samples, thereby suggesting its possible application in clinical settings.

  9. TeCo3D: a 3D telecooperation application based on VRML and Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauve, Martin

    1998-12-01

    In this paper we present a method for sharing collaboration- unaware VRML content, e.g. 3D models which were not specifically developed for use in a distributed environment. This functionality is an essential requirement for the inclusion of arbitrary VRML content, as generated by standard CAD or animation software, into teleconferencing sessions. We have developed a 3D TeleCooperation (TeCo3D) prototype to demonstrate the feasibility of our approach. The basic services provided by the prototype are the distribution of cooperation unaware VRML content, the sharing of user interactions, and the joint viewing of the content. In order to achieve maximum portability, the prototype was developed completely in Java. This paper presents general aspects of sharing VRML content as well as the concepts, the architecture and the services of the TeCo3D prototype. Our approach relies on existing VRML browsers as the VRML presentation and execution engines while reliable multicast is used as the means of communication to provide for scalability.

  10. Analysis of 3-D images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, M. Arif; Batchelor, Bruce G.

    1992-03-01

    Deriving generalized representation of 3-D objects for analysis and recognition is a very difficult task. Three types of representations based on type of an object is used in this paper. Objects which have well-defined geometrical shapes are segmented by using a fast edge region based segmentation technique. The segmented image is represented by plan and elevation of each part of the object if the object parts are symmetrical about their central axis. The plan and elevation concept enables representing and analyzing such objects quickly and efficiently. The second type of representation is used for objects having parts which are not symmetrical about their central axis. The segmented surface patches of such objects are represented by the 3-D boundary and the surface features of each segmented surface. Finally, the third type of representation is used for objects which don't have well-defined geometrical shapes (for example a loaf of bread). These objects are represented and analyzed from its features which are derived using a multiscale contour based technique. Anisotropic Gaussian smoothing technique is introduced to segment the contours at various scales of smoothing. A new merging technique is used which enables getting the current best estimate of break points at each scale. This new technique enables elimination of loss of accuracy of localization effects at coarser scales without using scale space tracking approach.

  11. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  12. 3D DNA Origami Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Hartl, Caroline; Frank, Kilian; Heuer-Jungemann, Amelie; Fischer, Stefan; Nickels, Philipp C; Nickel, Bert; Liedl, Tim

    2018-05-18

    3D crystals assembled entirely from DNA provide a route to design materials on a molecular level and to arrange guest particles in predefined lattices. This requires design schemes that provide high rigidity and sufficiently large open guest space. A DNA-origami-based "tensegrity triangle" structure that assembles into a 3D rhombohedral crystalline lattice with an open structure in which 90% of the volume is empty space is presented here. Site-specific placement of gold nanoparticles within the lattice demonstrates that these crystals are spacious enough to efficiently host 20 nm particles in a cavity size of 1.83 × 10 5 nm 3 , which would also suffice to accommodate ribosome-sized macromolecules. The accurate assembly of the DNA origami lattice itself, as well as the precise incorporation of gold particles, is validated by electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. The results show that it is possible to create DNA building blocks that assemble into lattices with customized geometry. Site-specific hosting of nano objects in the optically transparent DNA lattice sets the stage for metamaterial and structural biology applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. 3D printed bionic ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  14. RELAP5-3D User Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riemke, Richard Allan

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program with 3D capability (RELAP5-3D) is a reactor system analysis code that has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 3D capability in RELAP5-3D includes 3D hydrodynamics and 3D neutron kinetics. Assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability in RELAP5-3D is discussed in the literature. Additional assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability of RELAP5-3D will be presented in other papers in this users seminar. As with any software, user problems occur. User problems usually fall into the categories of input processing failure, code execution failure, restart/renodalization failure, unphysical result, and installation. This presentation will discuss some of the more generic user problems that have been reported on RELAP5-3D as well as their resolution

  15. Phosphorylation-dependent trafficking of plasma membrane proteins in animal and plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offringa, Remko; Huang, Fang

    2013-09-01

    In both unicellular and multicellular organisms, transmembrane (TM) proteins are sorted to and retained at specific membrane domains by endomembrane trafficking mechanisms that recognize sorting signals in the these proteins. The trafficking and distribution of plasma membrane (PM)-localized TM proteins (PM proteins), especially of those PM proteins that show an asymmetric distribution over the PM, has received much attention, as their proper PM localization is crucial for elementary signaling and transport processes, and defects in their localization often lead to severe disease symptoms or developmental defects. The subcellular localization of PM proteins is dynamically regulated by post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These modificaitons mostly occur on sorting signals that are located in the larger cytosolic domains of the cargo proteins. Here we review the effects of phosphorylation of PM proteins on their trafficking, and present the key examples from the animal field that have been subject to studies for already several decades, such as that of aquaporin 2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Our knowledge on cargo trafficking in plants is largely based on studies of the family of PIN FORMED (PIN) carriers that mediate the efflux of the plant hormone auxin. We will review what is known on the subcellular distribution and trafficking of PIN proteins, with a focus on how this is modulated by phosphorylation, and identify and discuss analogies and differences in trafficking with the well-studied animal examples. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-01-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  17. Evolutionary distance from human homologs reflects allergenicity of animal food proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, John A; Breiteneder, Heimo; Mills, E N Clare

    2007-12-01

    In silico analysis of allergens can identify putative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and allergenic properties. Such systematic analysis reveals that most plant food allergens belong to a restricted number of protein superfamilies, with pollen allergens behaving similarly. We have investigated the structural relationships of animal food allergens and their evolutionary relatedness to human homologs to define how closely a protein must resemble a human counterpart to lose its allergenic potential. Profile-based sequence homology methods were used to classify animal food allergens into Pfam families, and in silico analyses of their evolutionary and structural relationships were performed. Animal food allergens could be classified into 3 main families--tropomyosins, EF-hand proteins, and caseins--along with 14 minor families each composed of 1 to 3 allergens. The evolutionary relationships of each of these allergen superfamilies showed that in general, proteins with a sequence identity to a human homolog above approximately 62% were rarely allergenic. Single substitutions in otherwise highly conserved regions containing IgE epitopes in EF-hand parvalbumins may modulate allergenicity. These data support the premise that certain protein structures are more allergenic than others. Contrasting with plant food allergens, animal allergens, such as the highly conserved tropomyosins, challenge the capability of the human immune system to discriminate between foreign and self-proteins. Such immune responses run close to becoming autoimmune responses. Exploiting the closeness between animal allergens and their human homologs in the development of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy will need to consider the potential for developing unanticipated autoimmune responses.

  18. Effect of animal and vegetable protein intake on oxalate excretion in idiopathic calcium stone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangella, M; Bianco, O; Martini, C; Petrarulo, M; Vitale, C; Linari, F

    1989-04-01

    Oxalate excretion was measured in healthy subjects and idiopathic calcium stone-formers on dietary regimens which differed in the type and amount of protein allowed; 24-h urine collections were obtained from 41 practising vegetarians and 40 normal persons on a free, mixed, "mediterranean" diet. Twenty idiopathic calcium stone-formers were also studied while on two low calcium, low oxalate diets which differed in that animal protein was high in one and restricted in the other. Vegetarians had higher urinary oxalate levels than controls and although the calcium levels were markedly lower, urinary saturation with calcium/oxalate was significantly higher. This mild hypercalciuria was interpreted as being secondary to both a higher intake and increased fractional intestinal absorption of oxalate. Changing calcium stone-formers from a high to a low animal protein intake produced a significant decrease in calcium excretion but there was no variation in urinary oxalate. As a result, the decrease in calcium oxalate saturation was only marginal and not significant. It was concluded that dietary animal protein has a minimal effect on oxalate excretion. Mild hyperoxaluria of idiopathic calcium stone disease is likely to be intestinal in origin. Calcium stone-formers should be advised to avoid an excess of animal protein but the risks of a vegetable-rich diet should also be borne in mind.

  19. From Microscale Devices to 3D Printing: Advances in Fabrication of 3D Cardiovascular Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovjagin, Anton V.; Ogle, Brenda; Berry, Joel; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Current strategies for engineering cardiovascular cells and tissues have yielded a variety of sophisticated tools for studying disease mechanisms, for development of drug therapies, and for fabrication of tissue equivalents that may have application in future clinical use. These efforts are motivated by the need to extend traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture systems into 3D to more accurately replicate in vivo cell and tissue function of cardiovascular structures. Developments in microscale devices and bioprinted 3D tissues are beginning to supplant traditional 2D cell cultures and pre-clinical animal studies that have historically been the standard for drug and tissue development. These new approaches lend themselves to patient-specific diagnostics, therapeutics, and tissue regeneration. The emergence of these technologies also carries technical challenges to be met before traditional cell culture and animal testing become obsolete. Successful development and validation of 3D human tissue constructs will provide powerful new paradigms for more cost effective and timely translation of cardiovascular tissue equivalents. PMID:28057791

  20. Preparation of recombinant proteins in milk to improve human and animal health

    OpenAIRE

    Soler , Eric; Thépot , Dominique; Rival-Gervier , Sylvie; JOLIVET , Geneviève; Houdebine , Louis-Marie

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Milk is a very abundant source of proteins for animal and human consumption. Milk composition can be modified using transgenesis, including exogenous gene addition and endogenous gene inactivation. The study of milk protein genes has provided researchers with regulatory regions capable of efficiently and specifically driving the expression of foreign genes in milk. The projects underway are aimed at modifying milk composition, improving its nutritional value, reducing ...

  1. Land Use for Edible Protein of Animal Origin—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Flachowsky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present period is characterized by a growing world population and a higher demand for more and better quality food, as well as other products for an improved standard of living. In the future, there will be increasingly strong competition for arable land and non-renewable resources such as fossil carbon-sources, water, and some minerals, as well as between food, feed, fuel, fiber, flowers, and fun (6 F’s. Proteins of animal origin like milk, meat, fish, eggs and, probably, insects are very valuable sources of essential amino acids, minerals and vitamins, but their production consumes some non-renewable resources including arable land and causes considerable emissions. Therefore, this study´s objective was to calculate some examples of the land use (arable land and grassland for production of edible animal protein taking into consideration important animal species/categories, levels of plant and animal yields, the latter estimated with and without co-products from agriculture, and the food/biofuel industry in animal feeding. There are large differences between animal species/categories and their potential to produce edible protein depending on many influencing variables. The highest amounts per kilogram body weight are produced by growing broiler chicken followed by laying hens and dairy cows; the lowest yields in edible protein and the highest land need were observed for beef cattle. This review clearly indicates that the production of food of animal origin is a very complex process, and selective considerations, i.e., focusing on single factors, do not provide an assessment that reflects the complexity of the subject.

  2. Creating 3D visualizations of MRI data: A brief guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is itself 3D, it is often difficult to adequately present the results papers and slides in 3D. As a result, findings of MRI studies are often presented in 2D instead. A solution is to create figures that include perspective and can convey 3D information; such figures can sometimes be produced by standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis packages and related specialty programs. However, many options cannot provide functionality such as visualizing activation clusters that are both cortical and subcortical (i.e., a 3D glass brain), the production of several statistical maps with an identical perspective in the 3D rendering, or animated renderings. Here I detail an approach for creating 3D visualizations of MRI data that satisfies all of these criteria. Though a 3D ‘glass brain’ rendering can sometimes be difficult to interpret, they are useful in showing a more overall representation of the results, whereas the traditional slices show a more local view. Combined, presenting both 2D and 3D representations of MR images can provide a more comprehensive view of the study’s findings. PMID:26594340

  3. 3D biometrics systems and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, David

    2013-01-01

    Includes discussions on popular 3D imaging technologies, combines them with biometric applications, and then presents real 3D biometric systems Introduces many efficient 3D feature extraction, matching, and fusion algorithms Techniques presented have been supported by experimental results using various 3D biometric classifications

  4. Telerobotics and 3-d TV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Able, E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of telerobotic techniques that can be used in the nuclear industry. The approach has been to apply available equipment, modify available equipment, or design and build anew. The authors have successfully built an input controller which can be used with standard industrial robots, converting them into telerobots. A clean room industrial robot has been re-engineered into an advanced telerobot engineered for the nuclear industry, using a knowledge of radiation tolerance design principles and collaboration with the manufacturer. A powerful hydraulic manipulator has been built to respond to a need for more heavy duty devices for in-cell handling. A variety of easy to use 3-D TV systems has been developed

  5. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Emnéus

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements.

  6. Methodical investigation of the protein metabolism and of the bioenergetics of the protein retention in growing animals. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelker, T.; Krawielitzki, K.; Klein, M.; Keller, J.

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid composition of the proteins in selected body fractions of chickens and the 15 N -excess of amino acids isolated from them resulting from a feeding experiment with long-term 15 NH 4 -acetate labelling were determined. The amino acid spectra of feathers, breast and leg muscles are characterized by differences in the content of individual amino acids specific for the organs, the composition of the proteins, however, is independent of the protein content of the ration and the age of the animals. The sarcoplasmatic and myofibrillar proteins also have typical amino acid patterns, which-with the exception of the histidine content-are neither influenced by the extraction of the proteins from the breast or leg muscles nor by the energy level of the feeding or the age of the animals. There are no significant differences in the metabolization of the main protein fraction of the breast and leg muscles. The oral supply of 15 N-ammonium acetate to broilers predominantly labels the non-essential amino acids so that the derived kinetic data chiefly represent the metabolism of the non-essential amino acids. (author)

  7. Embedding complex objects with 3d printing

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-10-12

    A CMOS technology-compatible fabrication process for flexible CMOS electronics embedded during additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing). A method for such a process may include printing a first portion of a 3D structure; pausing the step of printing the 3D structure to embed the flexible silicon substrate; placing the flexible silicon substrate in a cavity of the first portion of the 3D structure to embed the flexible silicon substrate in the 3D structure; and resuming the step of printing the 3D structure to form the second portion of the 3D structure.

  8. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through. The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave. This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron. High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these structures, but their orientation and

  9. 3D printing of soft robotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, T. J.; Pikul, J.; Shepherd, R. F.

    2018-06-01

    Soft robots are capable of mimicking the complex motion of animals. Soft robotic systems are defined by their compliance, which allows for continuous and often responsive localized deformation. These features make soft robots especially interesting for integration with human tissues, for example, the implementation of biomedical devices, and for robotic performance in harsh or uncertain environments, for example, exploration in confined spaces or locomotion on uneven terrain. Advances in soft materials and additive manufacturing technologies have enabled the design of soft robots with sophisticated capabilities, such as jumping, complex 3D movements, gripping and releasing. In this Review, we examine the essential soft material properties for different elements of soft robots, highlighting the most relevant polymer systems. Advantages and limitations of different additive manufacturing processes, including 3D printing, fused deposition modelling, direct ink writing, selective laser sintering, inkjet printing and stereolithography, are discussed, and the different techniques are investigated for their application in soft robotic fabrication. Finally, we explore integrated robotic systems and give an outlook for the future of the field and remaining challenges.

  10. DPSC colonization of functionalized 3D textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Marine; Rosales-Ibáñez, Raúl; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; De Bien, Charlotte; Toye, Dominique; Flores, Héctor; Grandfils, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Fiber scaffolds are attractive materials for mimicking, within a 3D in vitro system, any living environment in which animal cells can adhere and proliferate. In three dimensions, cells have the ability to communicate and organize into complex architectures similar to those found in their natural environments. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in terms of cell reactivity, a new in vitro cell model: dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in a 3D polymeric textile. Scaffolds were knitted from polyglycolic acid (PGA) or polydioxanone (PDO) fibers differing in surface roughness. To promote cell adhesion, these hydrophobic fabrics were also functionalized with either chitosan or the peptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD). Cell behavior was examined 1, 10, and 21 days post-seeding with a LIVE/DEAD ® Kit. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) highlighted the biocompatibility of these materials (cell survival rate: 94% to 100%). Fiber roughness was found to influence cell adhesion and viability significantly and favorably. A clear benefit of polymeric textile functionalization with chitosan or RGD was demonstrated in terms of cell adhesion and viability. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 785-794, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Natural fibre composites for 3D Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing has been common option for prototyping. Not all the materials are suitable for 3D printing. Various studies have been done and still many are ongoing regarding the suitability of the materials for 3D printing. This thesis work discloses the possibility of 3D printing of certain polymer composite materials. The main objective of this thesis work was to study the possibility for 3D printing the polymer composite material composed of natural fibre composite and various different ...

  12. Convergent evolution of plant and animal embryo defences by hyperstable non-digestible storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquevich, María Yanina; Dreon, Marcos Sebastián; Qiu, Jian-Wen; Mu, Huawei; Heras, Horacio

    2017-11-20

    Plants have evolved sophisticated embryo defences by kinetically-stable non-digestible storage proteins that lower the nutritional value of seeds, a strategy that have not been reported in animals. To further understand antinutritive defences in animals, we analysed PmPV1, massively accumulated in the eggs of the gastropod Pomacea maculata, focusing on how its structure and structural stability features affected its capacity to withstand passage through predator guts. The native protein withstands >50 min boiling and resists the denaturing detergent sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), indicating an unusually high structural stability (i.e., kinetic stability). PmPV1 is highly resistant to in vitro proteinase digestion and displays structural stability between pH 2.0-12.0 and 25-85 °C. Furthermore, PmPV1 withstands in vitro and mice digestion and is recovered unchanged in faeces, supporting an antinutritive defensive function. Subunit sequence similarities suggest a common origin and tolerance to mutations. This is the first known animal genus that, like plant seeds, lowers the nutritional value of eggs by kinetically-stable non-digestible storage proteins that survive the gut of predators unaffected. The selective pressure of the harsh gastrointestinal environment would have favoured their appearance, extending by convergent evolution the presence of plant-like hyperstable antinutritive proteins to unattended reproductive stages in animals.

  13. In situ ruminal crude protein degradability of by-products from cereals, oilseeds and animal origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, G.; Khan, N.A.; Ali, M.; Bezabih, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a database on in situ ruminal crude protein (CP) degradability characteristics of by-products from cereal grains, oilseeds and animal origin commonly fed to ruminants in Pakistan and South Asian Countries. The oilseed by-products were soybean meal, sunflower

  14. Animal products, calcium and protein and prostate cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.G.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Dorant, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Prostate cancer risk in relation to consumption of animal products, and intake of calcium and protein was investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study. At baseline in 1986, 58,279 men aged 55-69 years completed a self-administered 150-item food frequency questionnaire and a questionnaire on other

  15. Animal proteins in feed : annual report 2009-2010 of the Dutch National Reference Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Vliege, J.J.M.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.; Groot, M.J.; Ossenkoppele, J.S.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2011-01-01

    RIKILT serves as the only official control laboratory for animal proteins in feeds in the Netherlands in the framework of Directive 882/2004/EC. As National Reference Laboratory (NRL), RIKILT participated in 2 annual proficiency tests during the reporting period, in 2 additional interlaboratory

  16. Comparison of molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) and molecular mechanics-three-dimensional reference interaction site model (MM-3D-RISM) method to calculate the binding free energy of protein-ligand complexes: Effect of metal ion and advance statistical test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Preeti; Srivastava, Rakesh; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2018-03-01

    The relative performance of MM-PBSA and MM-3D-RISM methods to estimate the binding free energy of protein-ligand complexes is investigated by applying these to three proteins (Dihydrofolate Reductase, Catechol-O-methyltransferase, and Stromelysin-1) differing in the number of metal ions they contain. None of the computational methods could distinguish all the ligands based on their calculated binding free energies (as compared to experimental values). The difference between the two comes from both polar and non-polar part of solvation. For charged ligand case, MM-PBSA and MM-3D-RISM give a qualitatively different result for the polar part of solvation.

  17. An overview of 3D software visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyseyre, Alfredo R; Campo, Marcelo R

    2009-01-01

    Software visualization studies techniques and methods for graphically representing different aspects of software. Its main goal is to enhance, simplify and clarify the mental representation a software engineer has of a computer system. During many years, visualization in 2D space has been actively studied, but in the last decade, researchers have begun to explore new 3D representations for visualizing software. In this article, we present an overview of current research in the area, describing several major aspects like: visual representations, interaction issues, evaluation methods and development tools. We also perform a survey of some representative tools to support different tasks, i.e., software maintenance and comprehension, requirements validation and algorithm animation for educational purposes, among others. Finally, we conclude identifying future research directions.

  18. Different Cells Make Different Proteins: A Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Tissue-Specific Protein Expression in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarguren, Izaskun; Villamarín, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    All the cells of higher organisms have the same DNA but not the same proteins. Each type of specialised cell that forms a tissue has its own pattern of gene expression and, consequently, it contains a particular set of proteins that determine its function. Here, we describe a laboratory exercise addressed to undergraduate students that aims to…

  19. Effect of radiation treatment on protein quality and vitamin content of animal feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggum, B.O.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of autoclaving and irradiation on the protein quality and vitamin content of various nutrients of laboratory animal diets. The protein quality and its amino acid composition was not significantly affected by a radiation dose as high as 7.0 Mrad, whereas the protein quality of autoclaved diet (102 0 C for 5 minutes) was significantly affected. Vitamin B 1 , B 0 and α-tocopherol appeared to be affected by irradiation, whereas autoclaving reduced the levels of vitamins A, B 1 and E. (author)

  20. Combining 3D structure of real video and synthetic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Man-Bae; Song, Mun-Sup; Kim, Do-Kyoon

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents a new approach of combining real video and synthetic objects. The purpose of this work is to use the proposed technology in the fields of advanced animation, virtual reality, games, and so forth. Computer graphics has been used in the fields previously mentioned. Recently, some applications have added real video to graphic scenes for the purpose of augmenting the realism that the computer graphics lacks in. This approach called augmented or mixed reality can produce more realistic environment that the entire use of computer graphics. Our approach differs from the virtual reality and augmented reality in the manner that computer- generated graphic objects are combined to 3D structure extracted from monocular image sequences. The extraction of the 3D structure requires the estimation of 3D depth followed by the construction of a height map. Graphic objects are then combined to the height map. The realization of our proposed approach is carried out in the following steps: (1) We derive 3D structure from test image sequences. The extraction of the 3D structure requires the estimation of depth and the construction of a height map. Due to the contents of the test sequence, the height map represents the 3D structure. (2) The height map is modeled by Delaunay triangulation or Bezier surface and each planar surface is texture-mapped. (3) Finally, graphic objects are combined to the height map. Because 3D structure of the height map is already known, Step (3) is easily manipulated. Following this procedure, we produced an animation video demonstrating the combination of the 3D structure and graphic models. Users can navigate the realistic 3D world whose associated image is rendered on the display monitor.

  1. 3-D discrete analytical ridgelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbert, David; Carré, Philippe; Andres, Eric

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an implementation of the 3-D Ridgelet transform: the 3-D discrete analytical Ridgelet transform (3-D DART). This transform uses the Fourier strategy for the computation of the associated 3-D discrete Radon transform. The innovative step is the definition of a discrete 3-D transform with the discrete analytical geometry theory by the construction of 3-D discrete analytical lines in the Fourier domain. We propose two types of 3-D discrete lines: 3-D discrete radial lines going through the origin defined from their orthogonal projections and 3-D planes covered with 2-D discrete line segments. These discrete analytical lines have a parameter called arithmetical thickness, allowing us to define a 3-D DART adapted to a specific application. Indeed, the 3-D DART representation is not orthogonal, It is associated with a flexible redundancy factor. The 3-D DART has a very simple forward/inverse algorithm that provides an exact reconstruction without any iterative method. In order to illustrate the potentiality of this new discrete transform, we apply the 3-D DART and its extension to the Local-DART (with smooth windowing) to the denoising of 3-D image and color video. These experimental results show that the simple thresholding of the 3-D DART coefficients is efficient.

  2. Digestibility of animal and vegetable protein ingredients by pirarucu juveniles, Arapaima gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe dos Santos Cipriano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to determine the apparent digestibility coefficients of energy, protein, and amino acids in protein ingredients by pirarucu juveniles. A test was conducted with six protein ingredients: meat and bone meal, fish meal, hydrolyzed feather meal, poultry by-product meal, soybean meal, and corn gluten meal. Three repetitions were used for each tested ingredient. A reference feed was used with 430 g kg−1 crude protein and 19.63 kJ g−1 gross energy. The test feeds consisted of the replacement of 30% of the reference feeds with the test ingredients. Chromium oxide was added to the feeds at 1 g kg−1 as an external marker. Eighteen juveniles with an average weight of 235±36 g were used. The best apparent digestibility coefficients of protein were found for fish meal, followed by the poultry by-product meal and meat and bone meal. However, except for gluten, all the tested ingredients presented protein digestibilities above 0.70. The crude energy apparent digestibility coefficient was higher for animal ingredients, above 0.75, than for vegetable ingredients, which presented values below 0.60. Pirarucu efficiently uses the protein from the tested ingredients, regardless of origin. However, it has a preferential ability to use the energy from animal ingredients.

  3. 3D-Printable Bioactivated Nanocellulose-Alginate Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppiniemi, Jenni; Lahtinen, Panu; Paajanen, Antti; Mahlberg, Riitta; Metsä-Kortelainen, Sini; Pinomaa, Tatu; Pajari, Heikki; Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Pursula, Pekka; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2017-07-05

    We describe herein a nanocellulose-alginate hydrogel suitable for 3D printing. The composition of the hydrogel was optimized based on material characterization methods and 3D printing experiments, and its behavior during the printing process was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulations. The hydrogel was biofunctionalized by the covalent coupling of an enhanced avidin protein to the cellulose nanofibrils. Ionic cross-linking of the hydrogel using calcium ions improved the performance of the material. The resulting hydrogel is suitable for 3D printing, its mechanical properties indicate good tissue compatibility, and the hydrogel absorbs water in moist conditions, suggesting potential in applications such as wound dressings. The biofunctionalization potential was shown by attaching a biotinylated fluorescent protein and a biotinylated fluorescent small molecule via avidin and monitoring the material using confocal microscopy. The 3D-printable bioactivated nanocellulose-alginate hydrogel offers a platform for the development of biomedical devices, wearable sensors, and drug-releasing materials.

  4. ORMGEN3D, 3-D Crack Geometry FEM Mesh Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ORMGEN3D is a finite element mesh generator for computational fracture mechanics analysis. The program automatically generates a three-dimensional finite element model for six different crack geometries. These geometries include flat plates with straight or curved surface cracks and cylinders with part-through cracks on the outer or inner surface. Mathematical or user-defined crack shapes may be considered. The curved cracks may be semicircular, semi-elliptical, or user-defined. A cladding option is available that allows for either an embedded or penetrating crack in the clad material. 2 - Method of solution: In general, one eighth or one-quarter of the structure is modelled depending on the configuration or option selected. The program generates a core of special wedge or collapsed prism elements at the crack front to introduce the appropriate stress singularity at the crack tip. The remainder of the structure is modelled with conventional 20-node iso-parametric brick elements. Element group I of the finite element model consists of an inner core of special crack tip elements surrounding the crack front enclosed by a single layer of conventional brick elements. Eight element divisions are used in a plane orthogonal to the crack front, while the number of element divisions along the arc length of the crack front is user-specified. The remaining conventional brick elements of the model constitute element group II. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of 5,500 nodes, 4 layers of clad elements

  5. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik Tappa; Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka

    2018-01-01

    The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and c...

  6. The ER in 3-D: a multifunctional dynamic membrane network

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Jonathan R.; Voeltz, Gia K.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a large, singular, membrane-bound organelle that has an elaborate 3-D structure with a diversity of structural domains. It contains regions that are flat and cisternal, ones that are highly curved and tubular, and others adapted to form contact with nearly every other organelle and with the plasma membrane. ER 3-D structure is determined by both integral ER membrane proteins and by interactions with the cytoskeleton. Here, we describe some of the factors that...

  7. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  8. CROWDSOURCING BASED 3D MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Somogyi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users’ images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  9. Comparative assessment of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging in an animal model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppert, Jennifer K; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Higgins, Christopher D; Steward, Annette; Ahringer, Julie; Kuhn, Jeffrey R; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-11-07

    Fluorescent protein tags are fundamental tools used to visualize gene products and analyze their dynamics in vivo. Recent advances in genome editing have expedited the precise insertion of fluorescent protein tags into the genomes of diverse organisms. These advances expand the potential of in vivo imaging experiments and facilitate experimentation with new, bright, photostable fluorescent proteins. Most quantitative comparisons of the brightness and photostability of different fluorescent proteins have been made in vitro, removed from biological variables that govern their performance in cells or organisms. To address the gap, we quantitatively assessed fluorescent protein properties in vivo in an animal model system. We generated transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing green, yellow, or red fluorescent proteins in embryos and imaged embryos expressing different fluorescent proteins under the same conditions for direct comparison. We found that mNeonGreen was not as bright in vivo as predicted based on in vitro data but is a better tag than GFP for specific kinds of experiments, and we report on optimal red fluorescent proteins. These results identify ideal fluorescent proteins for imaging in vivo in C. elegans embryos and suggest good candidate fluorescent proteins to test in other animal model systems for in vivo imaging experiments. © 2016 Heppert et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing; Yi, Xin; Xiao, Kang; Li, Shunbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  11. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing

    2013-10-10

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  12. Vrste i tehnike 3D modeliranja

    OpenAIRE

    Bernik, Andrija

    2010-01-01

    Proces stvaranja 3D stvarnih ili imaginarnih objekata naziva se 3D modeliranje. Razvoj računalne tehnologije omogućuje korisniku odabir raznih metoda i tehnika kako bi se postigla optimalna učinkovitost. Odabir je vezan za klasično 3D modeliranje ili 3D skeniranje pomoću specijaliziranih programskih i sklopovskih rješenja. 3D tehnikama modeliranja korisnik može izraditi 3D model na nekoliko načina: koristi poligone, krivulje ili hibrid dviju spomenutih tehnika pod nazivom subdivizijsko modeli...

  13. Kuvaus 3D-tulostamisesta hammastekniikassa

    OpenAIRE

    Munne, Mauri; Mustonen, Tuomas; Vähäjylkkä, Jaakko

    2013-01-01

    3D-tulostaminen kehittyy nopeasti ja yleistyy koko ajan. Tulostimien tarkkuuksien kehittyessä 3D-tulostus on ottamassa myös jalansijaa hammastekniikan alalta. Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on kuvata 3D-tulostamisen tilaa hammastekniikassa. 3D-tulostaminen on Suomessa vielä melko harvinaista, joten opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on koota yhteen kaikki mahdollinen tieto liittyen 3D-tulostamiseen hammastekniikassa. Tavoitteena on myös 3D-tulostimen testaaminen käytännössä aina suun skannaami...

  14. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  15. The effects of a high-animal- and a high-vegetable-protein diet on mineral balance and bowel function of young men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokkum, W. van; Wesstra, A.; Luyken, R.; Hermus, R.J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Twelve young men were given for periods of 20 d, each of three mixed diets, namely a low-protein (LP) diet (9% total energy as protein, 67% of animal origin), a high-animal-protein (HA) diet (16% total energy as protein, 67% of animal origin) and a high-vegetable-protein (HV) diet (16% total energy

  16. Magma emplacement in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, W.; Vogt, K.

    2017-12-01

    Magma intrusion is a major material transfer process in Earth's continental crust. Yet, the mechanical behavior of the intruding magma and its host are a matter of debate. In this study, we present a series of numerical thermo-mechanical experiments on mafic magma emplacement in 3D.In our model, we place the magmatic source region (40 km diameter) at the base of the mantle lithosphere and connect it to the crust by a 3 km wide channel, which may have evolved at early stages of magmatism during rapid ascent of hot magmatic fluids/melts. Our results demonstrate continental crustal response due to magma intrusion. We observe change in intrusion geometries between dikes, cone-sheets, sills, plutons, ponds, funnels, finger-shaped and stock-like intrusions as well as injection time. The rheology and temperature of the host-rock are the main controlling factors in the transition between these different modes of intrusion. Viscous deformation in the warm and deep crust favours host rock displacement and magma pools along the crust-mantle boundary forming deep-seated plutons or magma ponds in the lower to middle-crust. Brittle deformation in the cool and shallow crust induces cone-shaped fractures in the host rock and enables emplacement of finger- or stock-like intrusions at shallow or intermediate depth. A combination of viscous and brittle deformation forms funnel-shaped intrusions in the middle-crust. Low-density source magma results in T-shaped intrusions in cross-section with magma sheets at the surface.

  17. Allergenic potential of novel proteins - What can we learn from animal production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmay, Ricardo D; Coon, Craig N; Ladics, Gregory S; Herman, Rod A

    2017-10-01

    Currently, risk assessment of the allergenic potential of novel proteins relies heavily on evaluating protein digestibility under normal conditions based on the theory that allergens are more resistant to gastrointestinal digestion than non-allergens. There is also proposed guidance for expanded in vitro digestibility assay conditions to include vulnerable sub-populations. One of the underlying rationales for the expanded guidance is that current in vitro assays do not accurately replicate the range of physiological conditions. Animal scientists have long sought to predict protein and amino acid digestibility for precision nutrition. Monogastric production animals, especially swine, have gastrointestinal systems similar to humans, and evaluating potential allergen digestibility in this context may be beneficial. Currently, there is no compelling evidence that the mechanisms sometimes postulated to be associated with allergenic sensitization, e.g. antacid modification of stomach pH, are valid among production animals. Furthermore, examples are provided where non-biologically representative assays are better at predicting protein and amino acid digestibility compared with those designed to mimic in vivo conditions. Greater emphasis should be made to align in vitro assessments with in vivo data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Application areas of 3D bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Peng, Weijie; Ozbolat, Veli

    2016-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) bioprinting has been a powerful tool in patterning and precisely placing biologics, including living cells, nucleic acids, drug particles, proteins and growth factors, to recapitulate tissue anatomy, biology and physiology. Since the first time of cytoscribing cells demonstrated in 1986, bioprinting has made a substantial leap forward, particularly in the past 10 years, and it has been widely used in fabrication of living tissues for various application areas. The technology has been recently commercialized by several emerging businesses, and bioprinters and bioprinted tissues have gained significant interest in medicine and pharmaceutics. This Keynote review presents the bioprinting technology and covers a first-time comprehensive overview of its application areas from tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to pharmaceutics and cancer research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 3D7-derived Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 is a frequent target of naturally acquired antibodies recognizing protein domains in a particular pattern independent of malaria transmission intensity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Louise; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Turner, Louise

    2007-01-01

    Protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria is largely mediated by IgG against surface Ags such as the erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family (PfEMP1) responsible for antigenic variation and sequestration of infected erythrocytes. PfEMP1 molecules can be divided into groups A, B/A, B, C, and B......, the sequence by which individuals acquired Abs to particular constructs was largely the same in the three villages. This indicates that the pattern of PfEMP1 expression by parasites transmitted at the different sites was similar, suggesting that PfEMP1 expression is nonrandom and shaped by host......-parasite relationship factors operating at all transmission intensities....

  20. Will 3D printers manufacture your meals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bommel, K.J.C. van

    2013-01-01

    These days, 3D printers are laying down plastics, metals, resins, and other materials in whatever configurations creative people can dream up. But when the next 3D printing revolution comes, you'll be able to eat it.

  1. Eesti 3D jaoks kitsas / Virge Haavasalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Haavasalu, Virge

    2009-01-01

    Produktsioonifirma Digitaalne Sputnik: Kaur ja Kaspar Kallas tegelevad filmide produtseerimise ning 3D digitaalkaamerate tootearendusega (Silicon Imaging LLC). Vendade Kallaste 3D-kaamerast. Kommenteerib Eesti Filmi Sihtasutuse direktor Marge Liiske

  2. Objective and subjective quality assessment of geometry compression of reconstructed 3D humans in a 3D virtual room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekuria, Rufael; Cesar, Pablo; Doumanis, Ioannis; Frisiello, Antonella

    2015-09-01

    Compression of 3D object based video is relevant for 3D Immersive applications. Nevertheless, the perceptual aspects of the degradation introduced by codecs for meshes and point clouds are not well understood. In this paper we evaluate the subjective and objective degradations introduced by such codecs in a state of art 3D immersive virtual room. In the 3D immersive virtual room, users are captured with multiple cameras, and their surfaces are reconstructed as photorealistic colored/textured 3D meshes or point clouds. To test the perceptual effect of compression and transmission, we render degraded versions with different frame rates in different contexts (near/far) in the scene. A quantitative subjective study with 16 users shows that negligible distortion of decoded surfaces compared to the original reconstructions can be achieved in the 3D virtual room. In addition, a qualitative task based analysis in a full prototype field trial shows increased presence, emotion, user and state recognition of the reconstructed 3D Human representation compared to animated computer avatars.

  3. LC-MS/MS Identification of Species-Specific Muscle Peptides in Processed Animal Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchis, Daniela; Altomare, Alessandra; Gili, Marilena; Ostorero, Federica; Khadjavi, Amina; Corona, Cristiano; Ru, Giuseppe; Cappelletti, Benedetta; Gianelli, Silvia; Amadeo, Francesca; Rumio, Cristiano; Carini, Marina; Aldini, Giancarlo; Casalone, Cristina

    2017-12-06

    An innovative analytical strategy has been applied to identify signature peptides able to distinguish among processed animal proteins (PAPs) derived from bovine, pig, fish, and milk products. Proteomics was first used to elucidate the proteome of each source. Starting from the identified proteins and using a funnel based approach, a set of abundant and well characterized peptides with suitable physical-chemical properties (signature peptides) and specific for each source was selected. An on-target LC-ESI-MS/MS method (MRM mode) was set up using standard peptides and was then applied to selectively identify the PAP source and also to distinguish proteins from bovine carcass and milk proteins. We believe that the method described meets the request of the European Commission which has developed a strategy for gradually lifting the "total ban" toward "species to species ban", therefore requiring official methods for species-specific discrimination in feed.

  4. 3D-Printed Millimeter Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    demonstrates the resolution of the printer with a 10 micron nozzle. Figure 2: Measured loss tangent of SEBS and SBS samples. 3D - Printed Millimeter... 3D printing of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) and styrene ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) is used to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D - printed ...Additionally, a dielectric lens is printed which improves the antenna gain of an open-ended WR-28 waveguide from 7 to 8.5 dBi. Keywords: 3D printing

  5. Digital Dentistry — 3D Printing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zaharia Cristian; Gabor Alin-Gabriel; Gavrilovici Andrei; Stan Adrian Tudor; Idorasi Laura; Sinescu Cosmin; Negruțiu Meda-Lavinia

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an additive manufacturing method in which a 3D item is formed by laying down successive layers of material. 3D printers are machines that produce representations of objects either planned with a CAD program or scanned with a 3D scanner. Printing is a method for replicating text and pictures, typically with ink on paper. We can print different dental pieces using different methods such as selective laser sintering (SLS), stereolithography, fused deposition mo...

  6. Detectors in 3D available for assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Re, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    This deliverable reports on 3D devices resulting from the vertical integration of pixel sensors and readout electronics. After 3D integration steps such as etching of through-silicon vias and backside metallization of readout integrated circuits, ASICs and sensors are interconnected to form a 3D pixel detector. Various 3D detectors have been devised in AIDA WP3 and their status and performance is assessed here.

  7. Animal Models of Congenital Cardiomyopathies Associated With Mutations in Z-Line Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac Z-line at the boundary between sarcomeres is a multiprotein complex connecting the contractile apparatus with the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The Z-line is important for efficient force generation and transmission as well as the maintenance of structural stability and integrity. Furthermore, it is a nodal point for intracellular signaling, in particular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. Mutations in various genes encoding Z-line proteins have been associated with different cardiomyopathies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and left ventricular noncompaction, and mutations even within the same gene can cause widely different pathologies. Animal models have contributed to a great advancement in the understanding of the physiological function of Z-line proteins and the pathways leading from mutations in Z-line proteins to cardiomyopathy, although genotype-phenotype prediction remains a great challenge. This review presents an overview of the currently available animal models for Z-line and Z-line associated proteins involved in human cardiomyopathies with special emphasis on knock-in and transgenic mouse models recapitulating the clinical phenotypes of human cardiomyopathy patients carrying mutations in Z-line proteins. Pros and cons of mouse models will be discussed and a future outlook will be given. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 38-52, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Oxidant/antioxidant balance in animal nutrition and health: the role of protein oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eCeli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review examines the role that oxidative stress, and protein oxidation in particular, plays in nutrition, metabolism and health of farm animals. The route by which redox homeostasis is involved in some important physiological functions and the implications of the impairment of oxidative status on animal health and diseases is also examined. Proteins have various and, at the same time, unique biological functions and their oxidation can result in structural changes and various functional modifications. Protein oxidation seems to be involved in pathological conditions such as respiratory diseases and parasitic infection; however some studies also suggest that protein oxidation plays a crucial role in the regulation of important physiological functions such as reproduction, nutrition, metabolism, lactation, gut health and neonatal physiology. As the characterization of the mechanisms by which oxidative stress may influence metabolism and health is attracting considerable scientific interest, the aim of this review is to present veterinary scientists and clinicians with various aspects of oxidative damage to proteins.

  9. 3D modelling for multipurpose cadastre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abduhl Rahman, A.; Van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Hua, T.C.; Sharkawi, K.H.; Duncan, E.E.; Azri, N.; Hassan, M.I.

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling of cadastral objects (such as legal spaces around buildings, around utility networks and other spaces) is one of the important aspects for a multipurpose cadastre (MPC). This paper describes the 3D modelling of the objects for MPC and its usage to the knowledge of 3D

  10. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  11. 3D Characterization of Recrystallization Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yubin; Godfrey, Andrew William; MacDonald, A. Nicole

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) volume containing a recrystallizing grain and a deformed matrix in a partially recrystallized pure aluminum was characterized using the 3D electron backscattering diffraction technique. The 3D shape of a recrystallizing boundary, separating the recrystallizing grain...... on the formation of protrusions/retrusions....

  12. 3D-Printable Antimicrobial Composite Resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, Jun; Zhao, Pei; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y.; van de Lagemaat, Marieke; Grotenhuis, Arjen; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Herrmann, Andreas; Ren, Yijin

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is seen as a game-changing manufacturing process in many domains, including general medicine and dentistry, but the integration of more complex functions into 3D-printed materials remains lacking. Here, it is expanded on the repertoire of 3D-printable materials to include antimicrobial

  13. Possible nature and specificity of a protein factor favoringsolubilization of chromatin from irradiated animal thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldatenkov, V.A.; Trebenok, Z.A.; Filippovich, I.V.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that activation of endonucleolysis of thymocyte nuclear chromatin by protein factor from the cells of irradiated animals is not conditioned by its nuclease activity or ability to activate Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ - dependent lymphocyte endonuclease. DNA degradation character and kinetics of accumulation of the forming products doesn't change in autolysis of thymocyte nucleus. It is assumed that protein factor doesn't participate in starting mechanisms of postirradiation chromatin degradation but can be of significance at delayed stages of the process. The discovered effect is characterized by tissue and specific characteristic

  14. [Expression of angiopoietin-like proteins for animal breeding: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weiwei; Ma, Yun; Chen, Ningbo; Li, He; Bai, Yueyu

    2015-11-01

    Angiopoietin-like proteins are a family of proteins that are closely related to lipid, glucose and energy metabolism, as well as angiogenesis. To date, eight Angptls have been discovered, namely Angptl1 to Angptl8 that play key roles in metabolic regulation and marker assisted selection. In this review, we summarized current progress on the structure, signaling pathways, upstream regulatory genes and metabolic network of Angptl1-8. Finally, in combination with our work, the status and problems of animal breeding as well as the future prospects for Angptls were discussed.

  15. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Tappa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. With continuous research and progress in biomaterials used in 3D printing, there has been a rapid growth in applications of 3D printing in manufacturing customized implants, prostheses, drug delivery devices, and 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The current review focuses on the novel biomaterials used in variety of 3D printing technologies for clinical applications. Most common types of medical 3D printing technologies, including fused deposition modeling, extrusion based bioprinting, inkjet, and polyjet printing techniques, their clinical applications, different types of biomaterials currently used by researchers, and key limitations are discussed in detail.

  16. Novel Biomaterials Used in Medical 3D Printing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappa, Karthik; Jammalamadaka, Udayabhanu

    2018-02-07

    The success of an implant depends on the type of biomaterial used for its fabrication. An ideal implant material should be biocompatible, inert, mechanically durable, and easily moldable. The ability to build patient specific implants incorporated with bioactive drugs, cells, and proteins has made 3D printing technology revolutionary in medical and pharmaceutical fields. A vast variety of biomaterials are currently being used in medical 3D printing, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. With continuous research and progress in biomaterials used in 3D printing, there has been a rapid growth in applications of 3D printing in manufacturing customized implants, prostheses, drug delivery devices, and 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The current review focuses on the novel biomaterials used in variety of 3D printing technologies for clinical applications. Most common types of medical 3D printing technologies, including fused deposition modeling, extrusion based bioprinting, inkjet, and polyjet printing techniques, their clinical applications, different types of biomaterials currently used by researchers, and key limitations are discussed in detail.

  17. 3-D Animation, NL Editing & Special Effects Software Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Visual Effects Team of the Indirect Fire Division is a team of highly skilled people with specialized training and experience in Multimedia Production. Utilizing...

  18. Automatic Grading of 3D Computer Animation Laboratory Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Fabrizio; Sanna, Andrea; Paravati, Gianluca; Carlevaris, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Assessment is a delicate task in the overall teaching process because it may require significant time and may be prone to subjectivity. Subjectivity is especially true for disciplines in which perceptual factors play a key role in the evaluation. In previous decades, computer-based assessment techniques were developed to address the…

  19. Toxin structures as evolutionary tools: Using conserved 3D folds to study the evolution of rapidly evolving peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undheim, Eivind A B; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) structures have been used to explore the evolution of proteins for decades, yet they have rarely been utilized to study the molecular evolution of peptides. Here, we highlight areas in which 3D structures can be particularly useful for studying the molecular evolution of peptide toxins. Although we focus our discussion on animal toxins, including one of the most widespread disulfide-rich peptide folds known, the inhibitor cystine knot, our conclusions should be widely applicable to studies of the evolution of disulfide-constrained peptides. We show that conserved 3D folds can be used to identify evolutionary links and test hypotheses regarding the evolutionary origin of peptides with extremely low sequence identity; construct accurate multiple sequence alignments; and better understand the evolutionary forces that drive the molecular evolution of peptides. Also watch the video abstract. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. View-based 3-D object retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Content-based 3-D object retrieval has attracted extensive attention recently and has applications in a variety of fields, such as, computer-aided design, tele-medicine,mobile multimedia, virtual reality, and entertainment. The development of efficient and effective content-based 3-D object retrieval techniques has enabled the use of fast 3-D reconstruction and model design. Recent technical progress, such as the development of camera technologies, has made it possible to capture the views of 3-D objects. As a result, view-based 3-D object retrieval has become an essential but challenging res