WorldWideScience

Sample records for protection agency general

  1. GEOGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Environmental Protection Agency helps state and local governments protect the environment by encouraging good environmental management and by regulating human activities to ensure clean air and water. At the Corvallis research laboratory for the EPA, we improve the ways t...

  2. 40 CFR 763.84 - General local education agency responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exterminators) who may come in contact with asbestos in a school are provided information regarding the... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General local education agency responsibilities. 763.84 Section 763.84 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...

  3. Employment protection and temporary work agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Baumann, Florian; Mechtel, Mario; Stähler, Nikolai

    2008-01-01

    Employers who use temporary agency staff in contrast to regular staff are not affected by employment protection regulations when terminating a job. Therefore, services provided by temporary work agencies may be seen as a substitute for regular employment. In this paper, we analyze the effects of employment protection on the size of the temporary work agency sector in a model of equilibrium unemployment. We find that higher firing costs may even reduce temporary work agency employment if agenc...

  4. 10 CFR 501.14 - Notice to Environmental Protection Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice to Environmental Protection Agency. 501.14 Section 501.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS General Provisions § 501.14 Notice to Environmental Protection Agency. A copy of any proposed rule or order that imposes a prohibition, order that...

  5. Environmental Protection Agency, Protecting Children's Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Research Centers Contact Us Share Protecting Children's Environmental Health Children are often more vulnerable to pollutants ... during development. Learn more about children's health, the environment, and what you can do. Basic Information Children ...

  6. Environmental Protection Agency - EPA Pub Central

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — PubMed Central (PMC) is a full-text, online archive of journal literature operated by the National Library of Medicine. The EPA is using PMC to permanently preserve...

  7. Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State... Steve Fruh, Environmental Protection Agency, Air and Radiation, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20460 Phone: 919 541-2837 Fax: 919 541-4991 Email: fruh.steve@epamail.epa.gov RIN: 2060-AP69...

  8. Independence and the Irish Environmental Protection Agency: A Comparative Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Shipan, Charles

    2006-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency is one of the most prominent regulatory agencies in Ireland. Created in 1992, one of the hallmarks of this agency is its independence from other parts of government. Yet little is known about the actual extent of its independence. Independence and the Irish Environmental Protection Agency: A Comparative Assessment addresses several key questions about the agency's independence. Why was independence such a primary justification for the creation of this a...

  9. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Enterprise Data Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Complete Enterprise Dataset Inventory (EDI) listing all agency data assets for compliance with federal Project Open Data mandate (https://project-open-data.cio.gov/).

  10. Notification: Review of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Purchase Card and Convenience Check Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY13-0116, December 20, 2012. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Inspector General, plans to begin preliminary research for an audit of the agency’s purchase card and convenience check programs.

  11. Notification: Assessment of the Qualifications of Environmental Protection Agency Personnel With Significant Security Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OMS-FY12-0006, February 15, 2012. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Inspector General plans to begin preliminary research for the subject project, which will be performed by a contractor.

  12. Agencies revise standards for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article deals with a guideline, compiled by the IAEA, for radiation protection. The guidelines aim at the control of individual risk through specified limits, optimisation of protection and the justification of all practices involving exposure to radiation. The guideline is a revision of the 1967 publication of the IAEA, Basic safety standards for radiation protection. According to the document the main resposibility for radiation protection lies with the employer. The workers should be responsible for observing protection procedures and regulations for their own as well as others' safety

  13. Comparing Child Protective Investigation Performance between Law Enforcement Agencies and Child Welfare Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Neil; Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Gustafson, Mara; Armstrong, Mary; McNeish, Roxann; Vargo, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the comparative effectiveness of using law enforcement agencies for child protective investigation (CPI), in contrast with the traditional approach of CPI conducted by the public child welfare agency. The analysis uses 2006-2007 data from a natural experiment conducted in Florida to show modest differences in performance and…

  14. History of radiation protection agencies and standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritenour, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    The history of radiation protection and standards has shown a decrease of recommended exposure limits over the years. There are two reasons for this decrease. First there has been an increased awareness of the biological effects of radiation. Second, advances in technology have made it possible to use radiation more efficiently while decreasing unnecessary dose to workers and the public. Thus it is now possible to maintain much smaller dose limits than in the early years. Current radiation protection philosophy is based on the assumption that there is no completely ''safe'' amount of radiation. In practical terms, however, there is certainly a level below which the measurement of biologic effects becomes meaningless. The important operational concept as put forth by the ICRP in 1977 is that exposure of an individual should be kept As Low as Reasonably Achievable (the ALARA principle) below recommended limits. In other words, recognizing that there are many situations in which it is impossible to reduce exposure to zero, one must weigh the cost of designing equipment and structures that reduce exposure below the recommended limits against the perceived benefits of doing so

  15. General organisation of radiation protection in Senegal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, P.; Ndiaye, M.; Sow, M.L.; Ndao, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    Organization of radiation protection in Senegal is governed by three main texts that define the general principles and implement legal means for their actions. Efficient control of nuclear activities to ensure protection of workers, the environment and patients against ionizing radiation is subject to criminal penalties in case of breach of this legislation. (authors)

  16. New general radiation protection training course

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    Some members of CERN personnel, users included, may have to work in supervised or controlled radiation areas, or may be concerned with activities involving the use of radioactive sources. According to CERN Safety rules all persons whose work may encounter ionising radiation risk must be adequately trained. This training must ensure that workers are informed about the potential health risks which could result from radiation exposure, about the basic principles of radiation protection and of the relevant radiation protection regulations as well as about safe working methods and techniques in radiation zones. Therefore the Organization organises mandatory general and work-specific radiation protection (RP) courses addressed to its personnel. These courses are also open to contractors’ personnel, in addition to the RP training they must receive from their employers. Based on the results of a pilot project, an improved general radiation protection course has been prepared. This...

  17. New general radiation protection training course

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Some members of CERN personnel, including users, may have to work in supervised or controlled radiation areas, or may be involved in activities involving the use of radioactive sources. According to CERN Safety Rules all persons whose work may be associated with ionising radiation risk must be adequately trained. This training must ensure that workers are informed about the potential health risks which could result from radiation exposure, the basic principles of radiation protection and the relevant radiation protection regulations as well as safe working methods and techniques in radiation zones. Therefore the Organization organises mandatory general and work-specific radiation protection (RP) courses for its personnel. These courses are also open to contractors’ personnel, in addition to the RP training they must receive from their employers. Based on the results of a pilot project, an improved general radiation protection course has been prepared. This new ½ day cours...

  18. Comparing child protective investigation performance between law enforcement agencies and child welfare agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Neil; Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Gustafson, Mara; Armstrong, Mary; McNeish, Roxann; Vargo, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the comparative effectiveness of using law enforcement agencies for child protective investigation (CPI), in contrast with the traditional approach of CPI conducted by the public child welfare agency. The analysis uses 2006-2007 data from a natural experiment conducted in Florida to show modest differences in performance and cost-efficiency between the two approaches to CPI. These findings may have implications for other states considering outsourcing CPI to law enforcement.

  19. Protecting genomic sequence anonymity with generalization lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, B A

    2005-01-01

    Current genomic privacy technologies assume the identity of genomic sequence data is protected if personal information, such as demographics, are obscured, removed, or encrypted. While demographic features can directly compromise an individual's identity, recent research demonstrates such protections are insufficient because sequence data itself is susceptible to re-identification. To counteract this problem, we introduce an algorithm for anonymizing a collection of person-specific DNA sequences. The technique is termed DNA lattice anonymization (DNALA), and is based upon the formal privacy protection schema of k -anonymity. Under this model, it is impossible to observe or learn features that distinguish one genetic sequence from k-1 other entries in a collection. To maximize information retained in protected sequences, we incorporate a concept generalization lattice to learn the distance between two residues in a single nucleotide region. The lattice provides the most similar generalized concept for two residues (e.g. adenine and guanine are both purines). The method is tested and evaluated with several publicly available human population datasets ranging in size from 30 to 400 sequences. Our findings imply the anonymization schema is feasible for the protection of sequences privacy. The DNALA method is the first computational disclosure control technique for general DNA sequences. Given the computational nature of the method, guarantees of anonymity can be formally proven. There is room for improvement and validation, though this research provides the groundwork from which future researchers can construct genomics anonymization schemas tailored to specific datasharing scenarios.

  20. The Australian radiation protection and Nuclear Safety Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macnab, D.; Burn, P.; Rubendra, R.

    1998-01-01

    The author talks about the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), the new regulatory authority which will combine the existing resources of the Australian Radiation Laboratory and the Nuclear Safety Bureau. Most uses of radiation in Australia are regulated by State or Territory authorities, but there is presently no regulatory authority for Commonwealth uses of radiation. To provide for regulation of the radiation practices of the Commonwealth, the Australian Government has decided to establish the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and a Bill has passed through the House of Representatives and will go to the Spring sitting of the Senate. The new agency will subsume the resources and functions of the Nuclear Safety Bureau and the Australian Radiation Laboratory, with additional functions including the regulation of radiation protection and nuclear safety of Commonwealth practices. Another function of ARPANSA will be the promotion of uniform regulatory requirements for radiation protection across Australia. This will be done by developing, in consultation with the States and Territories, radiation health policies and practices for adoption by the Commonwealth, States and Territories. ARPANSA will also provide research and services for radiation health, and in support of the regulatory and uniformity functions. The establishment of ARPANSA will ensure that the proposed replacement research reactor, the future low level radioactive waste repository and other Commonwealth nuclear facilities and radiation practices are subject to a regulatory regime which reflects the accumulated experience of the States and Territories and best international practice, and meets public expectations

  1. Protecting sensitive systems and data in an open agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Douglas B.; Tompkins, Frederick G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper focuses on the policy and definitional issues associated with providing adequate and reasonable levels of protection for sensitive systems and data in an agency whose basic charter mandates the open sharing of information and transfer of technology into the market economy. An information model based on current Federal regulatory issuances is presented. A scheme for determining sensitivity levels, based on a categorization taxonomy,is provided.

  2. 78 FR 5148 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Flight Envelope Protection: General...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... failure states occur in the electronic flight control system, flight envelope protection features can... Envelope Protection: General Limiting Requirements AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT...), specifically new control architecture and a full digital flight control system which provides flight envelope...

  3. 76 FR 5186 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities; Office of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0084] National Protection and Programs... Protection Stakeholder Input Project--Generic Clearance AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD...

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency thirty-third general conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    A brief account is given of the 33rd session of IAEA General Conference held in Vienna from 25 to 29 September 1989. The Minister for Primary Industry and Energy, Mr John Kerin, led the Australian delegation. His statement to the General Conference highlighted Australia's role as a major uranium exporter, its committment to the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapon Treaty and support for the role which the Agency plays in it. The major Australian policy initiatives in environmental areas were also outlined. Australia continues to make a substantial extra-budgetary contribution to the Regional Cooperation Agreement for Asia and Pacific (RCA), and it has recently expanded its committment by agreeing to support a series of new RCA projects. In this context, the role played by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization for the provision of technical assistance and cooperation in many areas of the Agency's activities is discussed. ills

  5. 75 FR 68370 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Office of Infrastructure Protection; Chemical Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY National Protection and Programs Directorate [Docket No. DHS-2010-0071] Agency Information Collection Activities: Office of Infrastructure Protection; Chemical Security...: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD), Office...

  6. What the new EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) rules mean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, A.E.; Friedland, D.M.

    1990-02-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has issued its first proposed New Source Performance Standards for municipal incinerators in 18 years. EPA's 1971 NSPS set only particulate limits. The new NSPS also sets combustion standards, acid gas and dioxin emission limits, and a materials separation requirement. The latest NSPS, plus proposed emission guidelines for existing facilities, both regulate municipal waste combustors (MWCs) under the Clean Air Act. They both contain new emission limitations for the various pollutants emitted by MWCs, and materials separation requirements. The emission limitations, and the control technologies on which they are based, are different for different size facilities. The proposed regulations also contain operating requirements, testing and record-keeping provisions, and requirements for operator certification and training. The New Source Performance Standards are summarized. The emission guidelines for existing facilities are then described. These include: best demonstrated technology, combustion controls, and materials separation.

  7. 75 FR 80287 - Environmental Protection Agency Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... of omnibus drug legislation on November 18, 1988. Federal agencies issued an interim final common...; FRL- 9242-2] Environmental Protection Agency Implementation of OMB Guidance on Drug-Free Workplace... Protection Agency is removing its regulation implementing the Governmentwide common rule on drug-free...

  8. Senior expert group for the review of the Agency`s programme of activities. Opening remarks by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElBaradei, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1998-03-23

    The document reproduces the opening remarks made by the Director General of the IAEA on 23 March 1998 at the first meeting of the Senior Expert Group for the review of the Agency`s programme and activities. The Director General explains his considerations in establishing the group, and the major challenges facing the safe use of nuclear energy and technologies

  9. Can regulatory agencies protect consumers. Stigler-Cohen debate revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feingold, A.

    1983-01-01

    Stigler-Cohen debate, organized by the American Enterprise Institute, took place twelve years ago. Since then, the movement now known as consumerism has rapidly grown and its impact on public opinion and on political decision makers is of greatest importance to business - it cannot be simply wished away, it must be dealt with rationally and effectively. The paper recognizes the changed reality of the marketplace resulting in growing consumer impotence and a very real need for protection going beyond the general rules governing commercial transactions. At the same time, the author points out that regulation is not costless, that the cure is often worse than the disease. Public policy must be assessed in the light of its overall effects, it must not be based simply on a response to a single-minded call for redress however loudly articulated. There is a great inconsistency in piecemeal attempts at protecting the consumer from himself, while government-supplied goods and services, and government-controlled monopoly pricing afford little consumer protection. Finally, the paper reminds us that freedom itself is our most valuable possession and must not be thoughtlessly traded for perceived temporary advantages.

  10. 75 FR 67989 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Office of Infrastructure Protection; Infrastructure...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0084] Agency Information Collection Activities: Office of Infrastructure Protection; Infrastructure Protection Stakeholder Input Project--Generic... comments; New Information Collection Request: 1670-NEW. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security...

  11. Radiation protection - Performance criteria for radiobioassay. Part 1: General principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    International Standard ISO 12790-1 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear energy, Subcommittee SC 2, Radiation protection. ISO 12790 consists of the following parts, under the general title Radiation protection - Performance criteria for radiobioassay: Part 1: General principles; and Part 2: Rationale and specific applications This part of ISO 12790 provides criteria for quality assurance and control, evaluation of performance and the accreditation of radiobioassay service laboratories. Criteria and guidance for direct radiobioassay ( in vivo) and indirect radiobioassay ( in vitro) are given in separate clauses of this part of ISO 12790. This part of ISO 12790 addresses: a) the accuracy of direct ( in vivo) measurements of activity and quantities of selected important radionuclides in test phantoms and indirect ( in vitro) measurements of activity and quantities of selected important radionuclides in test samples; b) methods for determining the minimum detectable amount; c) minimum testing levels and testing ranges; d) requirements for reporting radiobioassay results by service laboratories; e) quality assurance in service laboratories; f) quality control in service laboratories; g) protocol for reporting test evaluations by service laboratories to the testing laboratory; h) default procedures when the service laboratory customer does not specify the performance criteria. The scope of this part of ISO 12790 does not include: a) detailed radiochemical methods for separating radionuclides from biological samples; b) detailed procedures for in vivo and in vitro radioactivity measurements; c) metabolic data and mathematical models for converting radiobioassay results into absorbed dose and dose equivalent; d) procedures for the preparation and distribution of test samples and phantoms by the testing laboratories. Analytical methods for radiobioassay are not currently standardized, but are available in the literature. Guidance for converting

  12. Hazardous waste management system--Environmental Protection Agency. Notice of regulatory reform actions; request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-13

    In response to Executive Order 12291 and the President's Task Force on Regulatory Relief, the Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing and reassessing the hazardous waste regulations developed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A variety of activities are underway that will simplify procedures and reduce paperwork, modify existing regulations to make them more workable and cost effective, and control new wastes and new processes. The purpose of this notice is to inform the public of these activities and invite comments on the general approaches being taken.

  13. IAEA Director General addresses efforts to protect against nuclear terrorism before UN General Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei, said October 22 in New York that the September 11 attacks on the United States had been a 'wake-up call' to everyone that more can and must be done to bolster security as an integral part of the management of national nuclear programmes. In support of that effort, he had already initiated a thorough review of all IAEA activities and programmes relevant to preventing acts of terrorism involving nuclear and other radioactive materials. 'The Agency is engaged in a variety of activities relevant to combating nuclear terrorism -- including programmes to ensure physical security, to help prevent and respond to illicit trafficking of nuclear material and other radioactive sources, to promote the safety of nuclear facilities, to safeguard nuclear material against non-peaceful uses, and to respond to emergencies', he said. Each of these programmes was being reviewed in-depth to identify additional measures that need to be taken in the light of recent events. In particular, expanding the scope and reach of many of the Agency's security and safety services was being considered. Also, existing conventions and guidelines, including the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, would be examined to ensure that they were comprehensive and effective, and efforts would be redoubled to ensure their universal application. The full text of the Director General's speech is available on the IAEA Web site www.iaea.org/worldatom/Press/Statements

  14. Court-agency interaction in environmental policymaking: the cases of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the increasingly active participation of courts in the administrative process as well as agency responses to court-imposed policy shifts. More specifically, it is an investigation of the interaction between the federal courts, primarily the Supreme Court and the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, and two federal regulatory agencies, the Nuclar Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency. There are five objectives to the study. The first is to examine the natura of court-agency interaction and to determine the extent to which patterns of judicial review of administrative actions can be discerned. The second is to examine the effect of court orders on agency programs and policies. The third is to assess the anticipatory dimension of court-agency relations. The fourth is to inquire into the recurring dimension of court-agency interaction and to determine its effect on subsequent court decisions. The last is to assess the institutional capacity of courts to deal with scientific and technological issues. This study indicates that judicial review has a substantial effect on the NRC's and the EPA's decision-making activities. Few, if any, recent major policy decisions of the two agencies have not been scrutinized closely by federal appellate courts. During the past decade, the courts have blocked policy initiative on numerous occasions and have been the primary source of change in others. In addition, the mere anticipation of judicial review was found to be a factor motivating the two agencies to make reasoned decisions

  15. Implementation of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajuria, Samant; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2017-01-01

    It is impossible to keep the data secure and private when one can’t keep track of what they have, where it is and what its value is. After twenty years, Data protection Directive 95/46/EC (DPD) is finally phased out and replaced by General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This is a step towards...

  16. 78 FR 31838 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Flight Envelope Protection: General...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    .... When failure states occur in the electronic flight control system, flight envelope protection features... any change in envelope limiting or maneuverability is produced by single or multiple failures of the...; Flight Envelope Protection: General Limiting Requirements AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...

  17. 41 CFR 102-192.130 - What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities as an agency mail manager? 102-192.130 Section 102-192.130 Public Contracts and Property... ADMINISTRATIVE PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Agency Mail Manager Requirements § 102-192.130 What are your general responsibilities as an agency mail manager? In addition to carrying out the responsibilities in Subparts B, C, D...

  18. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 6 National Priorities List (NPL) Sites - 05/12/2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point locations for sites in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 6 which are documented as being part of the National Priorities List as of May 12, 2014....

  19. Manual on radiation protection in hospital and general practice. Volume 4. Radiation protection in dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koren, K; Wuehrmann, A H

    1977-01-01

    The nine chapters of this manual on radiation protection in dentistry discuss the following topics: the need for radiation protection; delegation of responsibility; radiographic equipment; radiographic film; radiographic techniques; film processing and handling; patient doses; general radiation protection and monitoring; and educational standards. (HLW)

  20. Managing Uncertainty in Runoff Estimation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Stormwater Calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Stormwater Calculator (NSWC) simplifies the task of estimating runoff through a straightforward simulation process based on the EPA Stormwater Management Model. The NSWC accesses localized climate and soil hydrology data, and opti...

  1. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: ARSENIC MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This technology ...

  2. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: ARSENIC TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techn...

  3. Interpretation and evaluation of the US Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment guidelines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Murray, K

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to facilitate a common understanding, on-going debate and increasing application of ecological risk assessment (ERA) in South Africa, the ERA process of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been summarised and evaluated...

  4. Current radiation protection activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program of the Radiation Safety Section is described in this paper. The Section has two main components: (1) the development of consensus safety documentation and (2) the use of that documentation as the basis for assisting countries to deal safely with their applications of radiation and radioactivity. Main activities of the section are listed for each of these components. Activities include documentation, coordinated research programs, and assistance to developing countries. 14 tabs

  5. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Emerging Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the past decade, the scientific community and general public have become increasingly aware of the potential for the presence of unregulated, and generally unmonitored contaminants, found at low concentrations (sub-ug/L) in surface, ground and drinking water. The most common...

  6. Lightning protection technology for small general aviation composite material aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumer, J. A.; Setzer, T. E.; Siddiqi, S.

    1993-01-01

    An on going NASA (Small Business Innovative Research) SBIR Phase II design and development program will produce the first lightning protected, fiberglass, General Aviation aircraft that is available as a kit. The results obtained so far in development testing of typical components of the aircraft kit, such as the wing and fuselage panels indicate that the lightning protection design methodology and materials chosen are capable of protecting such small composite airframes from lightning puncture and structural damage associated with severe threat lightning strikes. The primary objective of the program has been to develop a lightening protection design for full scale test airframe and verify its adequacy with full scale laboratory testing, thus enabling production and sale of owner-built, lightning-protected, Stoddard-Hamilton Aircraft, Inc. Glasair II airplanes. A second objective has been to provide lightning protection design guidelines for the General Aviation industry, and to enable these airplanes to meet lightening protection requirements for certification of small airplanes. This paper describes the protection design approaches and development testing results obtained thus far in the program, together with design methodology which can achieve the design goals listed above. The presentation of this paper will also include results of some of the full scale verification tests, which will have been completed by the time of this conference.

  7. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S COMPUTATIONAL TOXCIOLOGY PROGRAM - METABOLISM AND METABONOMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mission of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to safeguard public health and the environment from adverse effects that may be caused by exposure to pollutants in the air, water, soil and food. Protecting human health and the environment carries with it the ch...

  8. Performance assessment of select covers and disposal cell compliance with EPA [Environmental Protection Agency] groundwater standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This document describes the technical approach to the assessment of the performance of a full component topslope cover, three sideslope covers, and hence the way in which a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) groundwater protection standards. 4 refs

  9. Science to Support Informed Decision-Making: Examples from the US Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mission of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is to protect human health and the environment. We work to achieve our mission through a combination of applied research and technical guidance for localities, states, tribes, and regions to best manage the...

  10. Statement of the Director General to the forty-third regular session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Statement on the forty-third regular session of the General Conference of the IAEA, the Director General of the Agency presented the past, present and future programme of the Agency in terms of the three 'pillars' that constitute its mandate: Nuclear technology (with emphasis on nuclear power and nuclear applications); Nuclear, radiation and waste safety (with emphasis on international conventions prescribing the basic legal norms for the safe use of nuclear energy, internationally accepted safety standards, and measures to assist Member States in the implementation of these conventions and standards, including technological solutions for improving safety); Nuclear verification and the security of material (with emphasis on IAEA safeguards, and physical protection of nuclear material), including possible new verification activities and specific verification issues (Iraq, DPRK, Middle East region). The Director General also touched in his Statement on two supporting elements that undergird these 'pillars': effective interaction with partners and the public, and achieving excellence in management

  11. Radiation protection office at the general direction of health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechowski, J.

    1996-01-01

    The radiation protection office at the general direction of health has the following functions: organisation and relations with decentralized services, legal aspects, relations with the direction of nuclear installation safety, nuclear medicine with licensing, radioactive wastes in relation with ANDRA, environment, trusteeship of OPRI in matter of measurements, dosimetry and epidemiology in relation with the Minister of work and training in radiation protection. (N.C.)

  12. Radiation protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morkunas, G.; Ziliukas, J.

    2001-01-01

    The situation in control of exposure due to general diagnostic radiological examinations in Lithuania is described. Experience in creation of legal basis for radiation protection, results of measurements of patients' doses and quality control tests of x-ray units are given. The main problems encountered in implementation of international recommendations and requirements of European Medical Exposure Directive are discussed. (author)

  13. 46 CFR 169.683 - Overcurrent protection, general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overcurrent protection, general. 169.683 Section 169.683 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS... reaches a value that causes an excessive or dangerous temperature in the conductor or conductor insulation...

  14. General fire protection guidelines for egyptian nuclear facilities. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhad, S; Hussien, A Z; Hammad, F H [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the regulatory requirements of that will provide and ensure fire protection of egyptian nuclear facilities. Those facilities that use, handle and store low and/or medium radioactive substances are included. Two or more classes of occupancy are considered to occur in the same building or structure. Fir protection measures and systems were reviewed for three of the egyptian Nuclear facilities. These are egypt first nuclear reactor (ETRR-1) building and systems, hot laboratories buildings and facilities, and the building including the AECL type Is-6500 industrial cobalt-60 gamma irradiator {sup E}gypt`s mega gamma I{sup .} The study includes the outlines of the various aspects of fire protection with a view to define the relevant highlights and scope of egyptian guideline for nuclear installations. The study considers fire protection aspects including the following items: 1- Site selection. 2- General facility design. 3- Fire alarm, detection and suppression systems. (4- Protection for specific areas/control room, cable spreading room, computer room) 5- Fire emergency response planning. 6- Fire water supply. 7- Emergency lighting and communication. 8- Rescue and escape routes. 9- Explosion protection. 10-Manual fire fighting. 11- Security consideration in the interest of fire protection. 12- quality assurance programme. Therefore, first of all the design stage, then during the construction stage, and later during the operation stage, measures must be taken to forestall the risks associated with the outbreak of fire and to ensure that consequences of fire accidents remain limited.

  15. General fire protection guidelines for egyptian nuclear facilities. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhad, S.; Hussien, A.Z.; Hammad, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish the regulatory requirements of that will provide and ensure fire protection of egyptian nuclear facilities. Those facilities that use, handle and store low and/or medium radioactive substances are included. Two or more classes of occupancy are considered to occur in the same building or structure. Fir protection measures and systems were reviewed for three of the egyptian Nuclear facilities. These are egypt first nuclear reactor (ETRR-1) building and systems, hot laboratories buildings and facilities, and the building including the AECL type Is-6500 industrial cobalt-60 gamma irradiator E gypt's mega gamma I . The study includes the outlines of the various aspects of fire protection with a view to define the relevant highlights and scope of egyptian guideline for nuclear installations. The study considers fire protection aspects including the following items: 1- Site selection. 2- General facility design. 3- Fire alarm, detection and suppression systems. 4- Protection for specific areas/control room, cable spreading room, computer room) 5- Fire emergency response planning. 6- Fire water supply. 7- Emergency lighting and communication. 8- Rescue and escape routes. 9- Explosion protection. 10-Manual fire fighting. 11- Security consideration in the interest of fire protection. 12- quality assurance programme. Therefore, first of all the design stage, then during the construction stage, and later during the operation stage, measures must be taken to forestall the risks associated with the outbreak of fire and to ensure that consequences of fire accidents remain limited

  16. 78 FR 48660 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ...; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management AGENCY: Federal Student... of Collection: Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management OMB Control Number... administration of 34 CFR 668 Subpart K Cash Management of the Student Assistance General Provisions. The...

  17. General Conformity Training Module 2.5: Proactive Role for Federal Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Module 2.5 explains how taking a proactive role will allow a federal agency to more effectively participate in newly promulgated programs under the General Conformity Regulations, such as the emission reduction credits and the emission budgets programs.

  18. International recommendations[General radiation protection background to protective measures against foodstuffs contaminated with radioactive substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, Bo [Swedish National Institute of Radiation Protection (Sweden)

    1986-07-01

    Full text: This short presentation will indicate the general radiation protection background to protective measures against foodstuffs contaminated with radioactive substances. A number of international organizations are involved in various aspects of radiation protection, for example, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the World Health Organization (WHO). Two international organizations, however, provide the basic background. These are the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). UNSCEAR provides the scientific information on radiation levels and effects. It consists of 21 member countries, with truly international coverage. It issues reports to the UN General Assembly, including comprehensive scientific annexes. Its latest comprehensive report was issued in 1982, the next is expected to be published in 1988. That report will include an assessment of the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The ICRP is a non-governmental organization. It has issued recommendations on radiation protection since 1928. The postulated biological basis for radiation protection recommendations involves two types of biological effects. The so-called non-stochastic effects, mainly due to cell death, appear only when the radiation doses exceed a certain threshold value. These effects, therefore, can only appear after high accidental exposures. After the Chernobyl accident, they only affected about 200 individuals involved in fire extinction and rescue work at the damaged nuclear power plant. Stochastic effects, with some simplification, may be seen as the result of initial changes in the genetic code of some surviving cells. If these cells are germ cells, this may lead to hereditary harm. If they are somatic cells, the result could be cancer

  19. International funding agencies: potential leaders of impact evaluation in protected areas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigie, Ian D; Barnes, Megan D; Geldmann, Jonas; Woodley, Stephen

    2015-11-05

    Globally, protected areas are the most commonly used tools to halt biodiversity loss. Yet, some are failing to adequately conserve the biodiversity they contain. There is an urgent need for knowledge on how to make them function more effectively. Impact evaluation methods provide a set of tools that could yield this knowledge. However, rigorous outcome-focused impact evaluation is not yet used as extensively as it could be in protected area management. We examine the role of international protected area funding agencies in facilitating the use of impact evaluation. These agencies are influential stakeholders as they allocate hundreds of millions of dollars annually to support protected areas, creating a unique opportunity to shape how the conservation funds are spent globally. We identify key barriers to the use of impact evaluation, detail how large funders are uniquely placed to overcome many of these, and highlight the potential benefits if impact evaluation is used more extensively. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Manual on radiation protection in hospitals and general practice. Radiation protection in dentistry. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koren, K [Statens Institutt for Straalehygiene, Oslo (Norway); Wuehrmann, A H [Alabama Univ., Birmingham (USA)

    1977-01-01

    The booklet deals with all aspects of the use of X rays in dentistry. The recommendations made are designed to reduce unnecessary exposure of the patient, will result in the production of superior radiographs and assist in eliminating unnecessary exposure of the operator himself. Separate chapters deal with the following topics: the need for radiation protection, delegation of responsibility, radiographic equipment, radiographic film, radiographic techniques, film processing and handling, patient doses (adults and children), general radiation protection and monitoring, educational standards.

  1. Environmental futures research at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Olson

    2012-01-01

    Relatively little research on environmental futures has been carried out in the United States. An exception is the long-running futures research that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been conducting since the 1970s. This paper reviews past and current efforts toward developing a capacity for environmental foresight within the EPA, and discusses some...

  2. Predictors of trust in the general science and climate science research of US federal agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Teresa A; Kotcher, John; Stenhouse, Neil; Anderson, Ashley A; Maibach, Edward; Beall, Lindsey; Leiserowitz, Anthony

    2017-10-01

    In this article, we focus on a key strategic objective of scientific organizations: maintaining the trust of the public. Using data from a nationally representative survey of American adults ( n = 1510), we assess the extent to which demographic factors and political ideology are associated with citizens' trust in general science and climate science research conducted by US federal agencies. Finally, we test whether priming individuals to first consider agencies' general science research influences trust in their climate science research, and vice versa. We found that federal agencies' general science research is more trusted than their climate science research-although a large minority of respondents did not have an opinion-and that political ideology has a strong influence on public trust in federal scientific research. We also found that priming participants to consider general scientific research does not increase trust in climate scientific research. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  3. Statement to the 33rd session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 25 September 1989. Statement to the 44th session of the United Nations General Assembly 25 October 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1989-11-01

    The report briefly describes the environmental problem and the energy needs which form an essential background against which the nuclear power option must be considered. It also reviews the Agency's recent work in the fields of operational safety, waste disposal and the problem of radiation protection and the generally poor public understanding of this problem

  4. Radiation protection training for diverse general employee populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation protection training for the general employee at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has undergone a great deal of restructuring in the last two years. The number of personnel totally dedicated to nuclear facilities is less than a fifth of our employees and the percentage of contracted employees who are dedicated radiation workers is much smaller. However, the aging of our facilities and increasing emphasis on environmental control means that everyone needs to understand the basics of radiation protection. In accordance with changing DOE guidelines and internal ORNL policies, greater emphasis has been placed on keeping training focused on current issues, training the total workforce, and requiring some type of testing or feedback mechanism. This report describes efforts to instill respect, but not fear, of radiation in the work environment. Flexible tools are being developed to meet this objective for several diverse general employee populations. Continuing efforts include consideration of computer-based training for retraining, developing additional modules for specialized groups and jobs, and testing/documentation appropriate to each population segment. 6 refs

  5. Mobile laboratory-based environmental radioactivity analysis capability of the US Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, G.; Poppell, S.

    1999-01-01

    This poster presentation will highlight the capability of the US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air to process and analyze environmental and emergency response samples in mobile radiological laboratories. Philosophy of use, construction, analytical equipment, and procedures will be discussed in the poster presentation. Accompanying the poster presentation, EPA will also have a static display of its mobile laboratories at the meeting site. (author)

  6. 40 CFR 7.125 - Coordination with other agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination with other agencies. 7.125 Section 7.125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Agency...

  7. Agency, Managed Care and Financial-Risk Sharing in General Medical Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Vermaas

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWhich techniques can and do third-party agents apply within their relationships with general practitioners in order to reduce the agency problems within the patient-physician relationship? We gave an overview of techniques that are used by third parties rather commonly – that is to

  8. 78 FR 45517 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ...; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management AGENCY: Federal Student...--Subpart K--Cash Management. OMB Control Number: 1845-0106. Type of Review: An extension of an existing... Records Management Services, Office of Management. [FR Doc. 2013-18034 Filed 7-26-13; 8:45 am] BILLING...

  9. 78 FR 52519 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ...; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management AGENCY: Federal Student... Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management. OMB Control Number: 1845-0049. Type of Review: Revision of an... Collection Clearance Division, Privacy, Information and Records Management Services, Office of Management...

  10. Manual on radiation protection in hospitals and general practice. Basic protection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braestrup, C.B.; Vikterloef, K.J.

    1974-01-01

    The manual as a whole deals with the radiation protection of patients, occupationally exposed persons, and the public. Volume 1, on basic protection requirements, is a general review common to all medical applications of ionizing radiation and radionuclides. Radiation protection is required for patients and staff, and with regard to medical research and chemical trials of new methods; radiation equipment and operating procedures are discussed in connection with diagnostic x-ray installations, x-ray beam therapy, gamma-ray installations for teletherapy, brachytherapy, unsealed sources for therapeutic use, and the diagnostic use of unsealed sources in nuclear medicine. In planning of radiation facilities, attention is paid to levels at which medical care is given, the centralization and decentralization of radiation facilities, diagnostic x-ray facilities and therapy facilities, and nuclear medicine and therapy with unsealed sources. Shielding design is discussed applicable to diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and the therapeutic use of radionuclides. Assignment of responsibilities, legal responsibilities, safety checks, refresher courses and symposia are discussed in the context of organizing radiation protection. Radiation surveys are necessary, and such surveys are described for x-ray and gamma-ray beams, sealed radioactive sources and nuclear medicine. A whole section is devoted to personnel monitoring and health surveillance. An annex gives a list of commonly used radionuclides, another deals with the design of protective shielding

  11. Application of the general principles of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, R.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristic feature of radiation protection is that of a unitary approach vis-a-vis a coherent set of concepts and general principles and the ensuing systems of standards. This situation creates favourable conditions for guaranteeing quality control. However, the benefit of radiation protection would be limited if the doctrine, principles and standards were merely a theoretical administrative and technocratic system: it is essential that these doctrines, principles and standards should lead to concrete action at all stages of development, from design right up to daily operational procedures. This requires on the part of all those involved, and at all levels, a spirit of discipline and openness where there must be both common sense and respect for the rules. It also requires the constraint of the regulation which is comprehensive, precise, clear and which cannot be evaded. In short, it must be enforceable. Even if the situation in the nuclear industry vis-a-vis radiological safety cannot be called ideal, it is totally satisfactory, both for members of the public and for workers. This is the main topic developed in the report

  12. LEGAL PROTECTION FOR CONSUMER OF UNLICENCED VAPOR FROM DRUG AND FOOD SUPERVISORY AGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedhi Bima Samudra

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research begins with the number of liquid vapor that is not licensed BPOM spread in Indonesia, and there is no clear law for liquid vapor, so there is no clarity from legal protection against liquid vapor consumers who are not licensed from  BPOM. Therefore, in this research, there is the formulation of the problem as follows: Is there a legal protection against liquid vapor consumers who are not licensed from BPOM?. The purpose of this research to determine whether there is legal protection against liquid vapor consumers who are not licensed BPOM. So this research can be useful for subsequent research that has the same theme and beneficial to researchers, liquid vapor consumers and also for the government. The research method used is the normative method. Normative research methods using statute approach. The result of the research shows that there is legal protection for liquid vapor consumer who is not licensed by BPOM, which is reviewed from the Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 36 Year on concerning the health of Article 113 paragraph (1 and Article 114, Law of the Republic of Indonesia Number 8 Year 1999 on Consumer protection Article 8 paragraph (1 c and paragraph (1 i, Regulation of the Head of the Food and Drug Supervisory Agency of the Republic of Indonesia Number 4 Year 2017 on the Supervision of the Importation of Drugs into the Territory of Indonesia Article 4 paragraph (1. Keywords: Legal Protection, Consumer, Liquid-Vapor

  13. Reducing Uncontrolled Radioactive Sources through Tracking and Training: US Environmental Protection Agency Initiatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopsick, D.A., E-mail: kopsick.deborah@epa.gov [US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The international metal processing industries are very concerned about the importation of scrap metal contaminated with radioactive materials. When radioactive sources fall out of regulatory control, improper handling can cause serious injury and death. There is no one way to address this problem and various US governmental and industry entities have developed radiation source control programmes that function within their authorities. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mission is to protect public health and the environment. To ensure this protection, EPA's approach to orphan sources in scrap metal has focused on regaining control of lost sources and preventing future losses. EPA has accomplished this through a number of avenues including training development, product stewardship, identification of non-radiation source alternatives, physical tagging of sources, field testing of innovative radiation detection instrumentation and development of international best practices. In order to achieve its goal of enhanced control on contaminated scrap metal and orphaned radioactive sources, EPA has forged alliances with the metals industry, other Federal agencies, state governments and the IAEA. (author)

  14. Mandated to fail? Humanitarian agencies and the protection of Palestinian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jason; Forte, Claudia Lo

    2013-10-01

    This paper considers the efforts of United Nations and international agencies to address the threats to Palestinian children arising from Israeli occupation. It contains an account of the reasons why agencies have failed, over many years, to prevent systematic violations by the Israeli authorities and settlers. The discussion is organised around two inter-related domains: institutional and political. The paper argues that, in the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt), limitations to the ways in which child protection has been conceptualised and pursued in practice are abundantly evident. Nevertheless, political pressure by Western donor governments serves to constrain an approach to child protection that is more preventative in nature, that addresses more explicitly Israeli violations of international law, and that reflects the experience and aspirations of Palestinian children themselves. Ultimately, therefore, the failure to protect Palestinian children must be seen not only as a result of humanitarian miscalculation but also as a consequence of political strategy. © 2013 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2013.

  15. Engineered nano materials and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Research at the Western Ecology Division in Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanoparticles represent a unique hazard to human health and the environment because their inherent characteristics differ significantly from commonly used chemicals and bulk forms of materials. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for protecti...

  16. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance New Mapping Tool for Enforcement Cases

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The new mapping tool shows facilities in the United States where the EPA concluded formal environmental enforcement actions between October 1, 2008 and September 30,...

  17. US Environmental Protection Agency National Coastal Assessment for Hawaii 2002: Water Quality, Fish Taxon, Sediment Chemistry Data (NODC Accession 0061250)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2002, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Assessment (NCA), in conjunction with...

  18. Environmental Protection Agency Library System Book Catalog. Holdings from August 1973 to December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Library System Book Catalog of holdings from August 1973 to December 1974 has been published in a single volume. The full catalog lists alphabetically by title the complete entry for each book owned by the individual EPA libraries. The indexes to the Book Catalog are in two parts. Part 1, the Author Index, lists each author in alphabetical order. The Subject Index (Part 2) lists, in alphabetical order, the subject headings assigned to the books in the catalog

  19. Review of the general regulation of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes C, A.

    2008-12-01

    As a result of advances in radiation protection at the international level, the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards has been given the task of revising the General Regulation of Radiation Safety to cover such developments, especially those contained in the safety basic standards No. 115 of the IAEA, published in 1977. In addition, the working group has considered issues that need to be regulated to avoid unnecessary dose received by the public due to exposure to ionizing radiation. Related to the public exposure believes the preliminary deal with situations of chronic exposure in homes, as well as human activities involving natural sources of ionizing radiation exposure to cause the public to levels that exceed the dose limits laid down in the Regulation. It is also envisaged that they will be subject to monitoring by the Commission, the concentration levels due to radon in homes, radon outdoor, radio and radon in drinking water, and external radiation levels due to naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials. Thus, the processes that may be subject to surveillance by the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards include water treatment, some metallurgical processes, some of the mining industry and some industrial processes in which waste increase activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides. With the revision of the General Regulation of Radiation Safety, certain standards must be reviewed and further developed such as the concentration of radon levels in homes room, outdoor radon, radon and radio in drinking water, radiation levels out sourcing due to naturally occurring radionuclides in building materials, and standards governing (and identify) the radioactive material generation in the processes mentioned previously. (Author)

  20. Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools; Final Rule and Notice. Part III: Environmental Protection Agency. 40 CFR Part 763.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Register, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a final rule under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) to require all local education agencies (LEAs) to identify asbestos-containing materials in their school buildings and take appropriate action to control release of asbestos fibers. The LEAs are required to describe their activities in…

  1. The Environmental Protection Agency in the Early Trump Administration: Prelude to Regulatory Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Lindsey; Sellers, Christopher; Underhill, Vivian; Shapiro, Nicholas; Ohayon, Jennifer Liss; Sullivan, Marianne; Brown, Phil; Harrison, Jill; Wylie, Sara

    2018-04-01

    We explore and contextualize changes at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over the first 6 months of the Trump administration, arguing that its pro-business direction is enabling a form of regulatory capture. We draw on news articles, public documents, and a rapid response, multisited interview study of current and retired EPA employees to (1) document changes associated with the new administration, (2) contextualize and compare the current pro-business makeover with previous ones, and (3) publicly convey findings in a timely manner. The lengthy, combined experience of interviewees with previous Republican and Democratic administrations made them valuable analysts for assessing recent shifts at the Scott Pruitt-led EPA and the extent to which these shifts steer the EPA away from its stated mission to "protect human and environmental health." Considering the extent of its pro-business leanings in the absence of mitigating power from the legislative branch, we conclude that its regulatory capture has become likely-more so than at similar moments in the agency's 47-year history. The public and environmental health consequences of regulatory capture of the EPA will probably be severe and far-reaching.

  2. Chronicles of recent disasters. Are Agencies and Civil Protections getting sloppy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miozzo, D.; Altamura, M.; Ferraris, L.; Musso, L.

    2010-09-01

    Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models and forecasts have a paramount role in the real time decision making command chain. It is thanks to them that Civil Protection (CP) across Europe and the World were able to redeploy towards preventing calamities rather than passively awaiting for their happening. However, from the implementation of these new methodological and procedural instruments stems the process of codification of a generalized Ius Commune. This natural drive towards Positive Law grants the fruition and tutelage of new rights but, if not adequately controlled, can initiate vicious circles leading towards the overcriminalization of the system. Trials, intended against CP operators and guardians or guarantors, according to civil law acception, showed how meteorological weather prediction can be faulty and dangerously underestimate an incoming event. The margin of error unfolds on both a temporal and a spatial plan. The discrepancy which emerged from ex post analysis (Molini et al. 2009) tells us that state of the art instruments can possibly induce CP operators to make wrong decisions. In addition to these computational and modelling problems, the complex orography of our territories impedes to deterministically asses and characterize hydrometeorological risk. The best instrument in our hands, a part from radar and satellite data (which both have a yet important delay in the acquisition of data due to its transfer), is still represented by NWP models and by the experience of whom, on a daily basis, issues meteorological bulletins and alert whom are the foremost link between CPs and the population. Envisaging the problem of the overcriminalization phenomenon and its social consequences, unpredicted flash floods are extremely rare to count. Nevertheless they do happen and create the basis for a much more dangerous problem: the lowering of the alert threshold to an excessively precautionary level, thus, eliminating any kind of discretionality in assessing

  3. The Agency's Annual Report to the General Assembly of the United Nations for the Year 1969-70. Explanatory Note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1970-11-13

    By Resolution GC(XIV)/RES/268 the General Conference requested the Board of Governors to arrange for the preparation of a supplement to the Board's annual report to the General Conference for 1969-70 which, together with that report, constitutes the Agency's report to the General Assembly of the United Nations for that year. The present document contains the supplement, which deals briefly with some developments in the Agency's work during the period 1 July to 1 October 1970.

  4. The Agency's Annual Report to the General Assembly of the United Nations for the Year 1968-69. Explanatory Note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    By Resolution GC(XIII)/RES/251 the General Conference requested the Board of Governors to arrange for the preparation of a supplement to the Board's annual report to the General Conference for 1968-69 which, together with that report, shall constitute the Agency's report to the General Assembly of the United Nations for that year. The present document contains the supplement, which deals briefly with some developments in the Agency's work during the period 1 July to 1 October 1969.

  5. The Agency's Annual Report to the General Assembly of the United Nations for the Year 1969-70. Explanatory Note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    By Resolution GC(XIV)/RES/268 the General Conference requested the Board of Governors to arrange for the preparation of a supplement to the Board's annual report to the General Conference for 1969-70 which, together with that report, constitutes the Agency's report to the General Assembly of the United Nations for that year. The present document contains the supplement, which deals briefly with some developments in the Agency's work during the period 1 July to 1 October 1970.

  6. Amoco-US Environmental Protection Agency, pollution prevention project, Yorktown, Virginia: Pollution prevention workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    On March 25-27, 1991, a workshop was held in Williamsburg, VA, to review Multi-media (air, water, land) data on environmental releases from Amoco Oil Company's Yorktown Virginia Refinery. Following the data review and a Refinery tour, breakout sessions were held to brainstorm on various topics including (1) process changes to reduce emissions, (2) groundwater protection, (3) criteria for ranking alternatives, (4) permitting issues, (5) general obstacles and incentives, and (6) maintenance and operating practices

  7. Energy policy of the International Energy Agency (IEA) countries. General review of the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book is a general review on energy policy leaded by Members countries of International Energy Agency (IEA) during the year 1990. This book describes also the trends and the recent events which have affected energy demand, energy conservation, energy efficiency, energy supply and energy source development. This annual review gives the IEA energy forecasting for the next years, till year 2001. A detailed study of energy policy in Federal Republic of Germany, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Ireland and Japan is given. The policy of fifteen another Members countries, which have been analyzed the previous years, is recapitulated and briefly brought up to date

  8. Amoco-US Environmental Protection Agency, pollution prevention project, Yorktown, Virginia: Solid waste data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizior, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989 Amoco and the US Environmental Protection Agency initiated a joint project to review pollution prevention alternatives at Amoco Oil Company's Yorktown, Virginia, Refinery as a case study site. The report summarizes the solid waste emissions inventory, solids source identification, and the solid waste sampling program that was conducted at the Amoco Yorktown Refinery on September 25-27, 1990, in support of the Pollution Prevention Project. Major findings showed that the majority of solid waste generation occurs as end-of-pipe solids resulting from the treatment of wastewaters from the refinery sewer. Based on a regression analysis of the composition data for samples collected during this project, major upstream contributors to these solids appear to be soils. Solids from process units are also significant contributors

  9. Amoco/Environmental Protection Agency Pollution Prevention Project, Yorktown refinery. Refinery release inventory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klee, H.; Kizier, G.J.; Baloo, S.; Hockman, E.L.; Couzens-Roberts, C.

    1992-07-01

    The report volume summarizes physical data obtained during a 2-year pollution prevention study of Amoco Oil Company's Yorktown Virginia Refinery. The study was jointly sponsored as a cooperative effort of Amoco Corporation and the United States Environmental Protection Agency. A multi-media sampling program was used to identify potential pollution sources within the Refinery. Sampling and analysis included air, surface water, groundwater, and solid waste data. Public perceptions about environmental issues of concern in the vicinity of the Refinery were also surveyed. The inventory showed that nearly 99 percent of the releases were airborne at the facility. Most of the remainder involved land disposal of solid wastes. Specific sources of major pollutants are identified

  10. Hazardous-waste landfill research, US EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomaker, N.B.

    1988-08-01

    The Land Pollution Control Division (LPCD), Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Lab. (HWERL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in Cincinnati, Ohio, has responsibility for research in solid- and hazardous-waste management with respect to land disposal of wastes. To fulfill the responsibility, the LPCD is developing concepts and is documenting the environmental effects of various waste-disposal practices; and is collecting data necessary to support implementation of disposal guidelines mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). This paper presents an overview of the land-disposal research associated with the LPCD hazardous waste program plan and will report the current status of work in the following categorical areas: Hazardous-waste facilities - landfills and surface impoundments; Non-Hazardous waste facilities; and Technology transfer.

  11. Assessing exposure to radon in the United States: An EPA [Environmental Protection Agency] perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimond, R.J.; Magno, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    A number of investigators have suggested that exposure to radon decay products may be a significant factor associated with the incidence of some lung cancers in the US. Various scientists have estimated that 5,000 to greater than 20,000 lung cancers per year may be attributable to radon if the average level in the US is 0.004 working levels (WL). To help assess the significance of exposure to radon across the US and within specific geographical regions, more information is needed. The paper describes efforts in the Environmental Protection Agency to assess this problem and determine the most appropriate means for dealing with risks posed by radon in new and existing housing

  12. Critical comments on the US Environmental Protection Agency Standards 40 CFR 191

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pflum, C.G.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Krishna, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is about the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ''Environmental Standards for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Wastes,'' 40 CFR 191. These standards regulate the disposal of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories. Currently, two repository sites are under investigation: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, may become the repository for defense-generated transuranic waste (TRU); and the Yucca Mountain site, located near Las Vegas, Nevada, may become the repository for spent reactor fuel and a small amount of reprocessing waste (hereinafter called high-level radioactive waste or HLW). The paper was written for readers who have an interest in 40 CFR 191 but do not have the time or inclination to ponder the technical details

  13. Nanotechnology applications and implications research supported by the US Environmental Protection Agency STAR grants program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Nora; Thomas, Treye A; Duncan, Jeremiah S

    2007-10-01

    Since 2002, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been funding research on the environmental aspects of nanotechnology through its Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants program. In total, more than $25 million has been awarded for 86 research projects on the environmental applications and implications of nanotechnology. In the applications area, grantees have produced promising results in green manufacturing, remediation, sensors, and treatment using nanotechnology and nanomaterials. Although there are many potential benefits of nanotechnology, there has also been increasing concern about the environmental and health effects of nanomaterials, and there are significant gaps in the data needed to address these concerns. Research performed by STAR grantees is beginning to address these needs.

  14. Amoco-US Environmental Protection Agency, pollution prevention project, Yorktown, Virginia: Yorktown refinery project workplan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curran, L.; Grieves, C.; Browning, R.; Hanlon, D.; Crane, C.

    1990-09-01

    The report provides a detailed workplan for obtaining data and analyzing results for a 2-year pollution prevention study of Amoco Oil Company's Yorktown Virginia Refinery. The study was jointly sponsored as a cooperative effort of Amoco Corporation and the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study include (1) a multi-media inventory of all releases entering the environment from the Refinery, (2) development of possible engineering options to reduce the releases, (3) analysis of each option in terms of release reduction potential, impact on human health risk, ecological impact, changes in future liability, etc. and (4) identification of obstacles and incentives for implementation of any of the options considered

  15. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the FY 1998 Army General Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    ... Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 1998: Summary Audit Rep oft." Our objective was to determine the accuracy and completeness of the Army Audit Agency audit of the FY 1998 Army General Fund Fund Financial Statements...

  16. Inspector General, DOD, Oversight of the Air Force Audit Agency Audit of the FY 1999 Air Force General Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    2000-01-01

    ..., "Opinion on Fiscal Year 1999 Air Force Consolidated Financial Statements." Our objective was to determine the accuracy and completeness of the Air Force Audit Agency audit of the FY 1999 Air Force General Fund financial statements...

  17. Radiological protection of patients in general diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karigi, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    With medical radiation exposures to mankind ranking the highest among man-made radiation, radiation protection safeguards have to be put in place in all countries. Competent authorities should have the legal legislation and adequate infrastructure to ensure implementation, enforcement and compliance with the radiation protection standards. Justification, optimization, quality assurance and control are to be the guiding ideals for those who prescribe and/or carry out radiographic procedures. Radiation dose limitation in medical practices is to be encouraged so far as it does not compromise image quality and the provision of a direct benefit to the exposed individual. (author)

  18. Health Physics Society Comments to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Reform Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Joseph; Tupin, Edward; Elder, Deirdre; Hiatt, Jerry; Sheetz, Michael; Kirner, Nancy; Little, Craig

    2018-05-01

    The Health Physics Society (HPS) provided comment to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on options to consider when developing an action plan for President Trump's Executive Order to evaluate regulations for repeal, replacement, or modification. The HPS recommended that the EPA reconsider their adherence to the linear no-threshold (LNT) model for radiation risk calculations and improve several documents by better addressing uncertainties in low-dose, low dose-rate (LDDR) radiation exposure environments. The authors point out that use of the LNT model near background levels cannot provide reliable risk projections, use of the LNT model and collective-dose calculations in some EPA documents is inconsistent with the recommendations of international organizations, and some EPA documents have not been exposed to the public comment rule-making process. To assist in establishing a better scientific basis for the risks of low dose rate and low dose radiation exposure, the EPA should continue to support the "Million Worker Study," led by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement.

  19. Letter - Response to 'How to protect general practice from child protection'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Danny

    2011-08-18

    The bad news is that the BJGP published under such a negative and provocative title without balanced debate, in contrast to the recent BMJ head-to-head debate 'Has child protection become a form of madness'.1,2 One interesting comparison made in that debate is that Sweden and Finland spend 50% more of their gross domestic product on children and families than we do in the UK, we spend 200% more than they do on social problems. In my view these figures help us understand societal attitudes that have knock-on effects through all services for children and families including general practice. The current UK GP contract is certainly not child and family friendly and it is unlikely that current NHS changes will improve matters.Mike Fitzpatrick's latest letter over-emphasises the personal while flagging up the real difficulties for general practice.3 My work as a frontline GP and my statutory role as a named doctor for safeguarding children allows me to understand these difficulties, and indeed the importance of making vulnerable adults safe that he highlights in the same Journal.4The good news is that the great majority of children grow up well and happy in their families and GP practices support them in this. I emphasise this when delivering safeguarding training to GPs. In doing this work GPs can develop a sense of why something is going wrong. With appropriate use of their knowledge, skills, and information, GPs can address the needs of children and their families across the spectrum of vulnerability and need through to abuse and neglect. There is no question that this is challenging, but in the UK all professionals are obliged by statute to fulfil our professional roles and responsibilities. Those specific to general practice are on pages 60-63 of Working Together to Safeguard Children 2012.5GP colleagues in Cornwall show appreciation of the importance of safeguarding, but many feel there is too much guidance and insufficient resources. The majority of the practices

  20. US Environmental Protection Agency's assessment of environmental impacts of TENORM radiation sources: The example of uranium mining TENORM wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, L.W.

    2002-01-01

    Over the last 30 years the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has conducted field, laboratory, and scientific literature studies on a variety of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials. In doing so, EPA has recognized that the physical and chemical characteristics of these wastes and products can vary significantly, and the Agency is conducting detailed evaluations of these radioactive materials on an industry-by-industry basis. An example of the Agency's current efforts to characterize and assess the risks of these materials from the uranium mining industry in a technical report is presented along with information on EPA's current field and laboratory studies. (author)

  1. General principles of radiation protection in hospital media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanteur, J.

    1993-01-01

    Principles of radiation protection given by ICRP in term of justification, optimization, limitation are applicable in hospital media. The medical act has to be justified and, in France, it is not possible to use ionizing radiations without a prescription from a doctor. The acceleration of technologies development make non radiological techniques more employed than radiologic ones, in an aim of efficiency more than an aim radiation protection. The second principle of optimization means to give medical care with the minimum of ionizing radiations for the patients as well the operators. For the principle of limitation which applied only for operators, we have the new recommends of ICRP, but it would be reasonable to give the most part of decision to the works doctor to decide if somebody has the aptitude to work at an exposed place. The last points concern the quality of equipment, the safety of installations, the organization of works which are under laws and regulations. 3 tabs

  2. The general principles of radiation protection and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.; Cesarini, J.P.; Lecomte, J.F.; Barbier, G.; Crescini, D.; Biau, A.; Blain, A.; Bailloeuil, C.; Gonin, M.; Bergot, D.

    2003-01-01

    Seven articles constitute this chapter about the radiation protection and the regulation. Radiological risk, reduction of public exposure to ultraviolet radiations, regulation for the radon, evolution of the French legislation against the dangers of ionizing radiations, the medical follow up after the professional life, the information system to reproduce the dosimetric data of workers, proposition of a scale to classify the radiations incidents in function of their seriousness. (N.C.)

  3. Methodology for Assessing the Status of a Physical Protection System on the Basis of Agency Inspections and Site Self-Assessments in Rosatom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piskarev, Alexandr S.; Babkin, Vladimir; Izmaylov, Alexandr V.; Kulikovsky, Mikhail; Matveev, V.A.; Shull, Douglas; Livingston, Linwood H.

    2010-01-01

    The Methodology presents general approaches to the assessment of PPS status including criteria and indicators of such assessment and procedures for evaluating different aspects of physical protection, taking into consideration the significance of the criteria. The regulation includes specific methods of the application of the criteria for the evaluation of different aspects of physical protection (PP), as well as for the comprehensive assessment of the PPS status in the form of text, tables, diagrams and examples. The Methodology is intended to facilitate agency inspections and site self-assessments of PPS at a NS as well as evaluation of their results. This regulation was approved by Rosatom Headquarters in October 2008 and is currently used in the process of agency PP inspections. The Methodology was discussed by Rosatom PP specialists, who take part in agency inspections and site self-assessments, at a workshop in Moscow, June 2009, and was presented at the 4th MPC and A Conference in Obninsk, October 2009. This paper presents the methodology and its practical application during Rosatom agency inspections and site self-assessments.

  4. General comments on radiological patient protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellez de Cepeda, M.; Plaza, R.; Corredoira, E.; Martin Curto, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an observation series about different aspects of the radiological protection of the patient in nuclear medicine is provided. It includes: The specific legislation contribution, the justification and, especially, optimization, as a fundamental base of the quality guarantee program, the importance of the fulfillment of the program and the importance of getting done the corresponding internal audits of the pursuit, the communication between the different groups of professionals implicated and between these and the patient, the volunteers who collaborate in the patient's care and the people in the patient's environment, knowing that the patient is a source of external radiation and contamination. (author) [es

  5. Statement of the Director General to the forty-second regular session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In his Statement on the forty-second regular session of the General Conference of the IAEA, the Director General of the Agency highlighted the role of the IAEA in four areas: nuclear power and the fuel cycle, nuclear and radiation safety, nuclear verification and the security of material, and transfer of technology. The final part of the Statement is devoted to the process of programme and management review initiated by the Director General to ensure that the Agency maintains and enhances its record as an effective and efficient organization

  6. General principles of advertising practices and consumer protection

    OpenAIRE

    Slánská, Martina

    2008-01-01

    Diploma thesis provides an overview of legal and ethical regulation of advertising, defines the basic concepts in advertising, summarizes the functions and objectives of advertising and characterized various forms of advertising by the communication media. Through the questionnaire survey detects and analyzes the general attitudes towards advertising as specific views on ethically problematic advertisements.

  7. 26 CFR 1.179B-1T - Deduction for capital costs incurred in complying with Environmental Protection Agency sulfur...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for capital costs incurred in... capital costs incurred in complying with Environmental Protection Agency sulfur regulations (temporary... the deduction allowable under section 179B(a) for qualified capital costs paid or incurred by a small...

  8. 29 CFR 553.213 - Public agency employees engaged in both fire protection and law enforcement activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... regardless of how the employee's time is divided between the two activities. However, all time spent in... spends the majority of work time during the work period. ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public agency employees engaged in both fire protection and...

  9. Technical issues affecting the implementation of US environmental protection agency's proposed fish tissue-based aquatic criterion for selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis Lemly; Joseph P. Skorupa

    2007-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is developing a national water quality criterion for selenium that is based on concentrations of the element in fish tissue. Although this approach offers advantages over the current water-based regulations, it also presents new challenges with respect to implementation. A comprehensive protocol that answers the ‘‘what, where, and...

  10. Amoco-US Environmental Protection Agency, pollution prevention project, Yorktown, Virginia: Surface water data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloo, S.

    1991-08-01

    The report summarizes the surface water sampling program at the Amoco Refinery at Yorktown, Virginia. This was undertaken as a part of the joint project between Amoco Corporation and the United States Environmental Protection Agency to review pollution prevention alternatives at a petroleum refinery. The surface water data provides a snapshot of surface water pollutant generation and discharge from the refinery. Different process units contribute to the total wastewater flow of 460 GPM in the refinery. Water in the ditch system, which is non-process water, is free of organic contamination. Oil and grease, phenols, ammonia and sulfides are the significant components measured in the process wastewater. The concentrations of organics in most water streams leaving the individual process units are relatively low, in the 1-5 parts per million (ppm) range. A few individual streams such as the crude desalter brine and tank water draws have high pollutant loadings. Concentrations of metals in the refinery wastewater are very low. The wastewater treatment plant is very effective in reducing the pollutant loading in the water with overall removal efficiencies greater than 99% for most organics and inorganics

  11. 40 CFR 166.25 - Agency review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency review. 166.25 Section 166.25... Health Exemptions § 166.25 Agency review. (a) General. The Agency will review all requests as... is needed. The Agency will review the application and other available data necessary to make a...

  12. Amendments to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's public health and environmental radiation protection standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (40 CFR PART 197) - 16156

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Raymond L.; Czyscinski, Kenneth; Rosnick, Reid J.; Schultheisz, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In 2001, as directed by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued public health and environmental radiation protection standards for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Several parties sued the Agency on numerous aspects of the rule. A Federal Court upheld EPA on all counts except for the compliance period associated with the individual-protection standard, which the Agency had limited to 10,000 years for a number of technical and policy reasons. However, the National Academy of Sciences WAS) had recommended that the standard be set for the time of peak risk, within the limits imposed by the long-term stability of the geologic environment, which NAS estimated at 1 million years. EPA's standards required that the Department of Energy (DOE) project doses to the time of peak dose but did not apply a compliance standard to these longer term projections. The Court ruled that EPA's 10,000-year compliance period was inconsistent with the NAS recommendation. This aspect of the rule was vacated and remanded to the Agency for revision. In 2005, EPA proposed amendments to the standards. Following public hearings and a public review period, the final amendments were issued in September 2008. This paper discusses the new requirements. (authors)

  13. Letter of 5 December 1991 to the Director General from the Resident Representative of Iraq to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The document reproduces a letter dated 5 December 1991 to the Director General of the IAEA from the Resident Representative of Iraq to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning the presentation of a Distinguished Service Award to Mr. David Kay for his activity in the Safeguard inspections in Iraq (Attachment 1). The Director General's reply is reproduced in Attachment 2

  14. Senior expert group for the review of the Agency's programme of activities. Opening remarks by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the opening remarks made by the Director General of the IAEA on 23 March 1998 at the first meeting of the Senior Expert Group for the review of the Agency's programme and activities. The Director General explains his considerations in establishing the group, and the major challenges facing the safe use of nuclear energy and technologies

  15. Radiation Protection Ordinance 1989. Supplement with Radiation Protection Register Ordinance, general administration regulation pursuant to Sect. 45 Radiation Protection Ordinance, general administration regulation pursuant to Sect. 62 sub-sect. radiation passport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veith, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    The addendum contains regulations issued supplementary to the Radiation Protection Ordinance: The Radiation Protection Register as of April 3, 1990 including the law on the setting up of a Federal Office on Radiation Protection; the general administration regulation pursuant to Sect. 45 Radiation Protection Ordinance as of February 21, 1990; the general administration regulation pursuant to Sect. 62 sub-sect. 2 Radiation Protection Ordinance as of May 3, 1990 (AVV Radiation passport). The volume contains, apart from the legal texts, the appropriate decision by the Bundesrat, the official explanation from the Bundestag Publications as well as a comprehensive introduction into the new legal matter. (orig.) [de

  16. Radiation protection standards for radioluminous timepieces. Recommendations of the European Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Users of radioluminous timepieces are exposed to ionizing radiations from the luminous paints contained in the timepieces. There standards have been prepared to ensure that users of radioluminous timepieces are exposed to as little ionizing radiation as practicable, and not to levels in excess of the maximum permissible levels laid down in basic radiation protection standards; and that the contribution to the dose received by the whole population from the use of radioluminous timepieces is kept within the limits adopted by the appropriate national authority.

  17. Radiation protection guidance to Federal agencies for occupational exposure. Recommendations approved by the President. Part II The President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Lee M.

    1987-01-01

    This memorandum transmits recommendations that would update previous guidance to Federal agencies for the protection of workers exposed to ionizing radiation. These recommendations were developed cooperatively by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Mine Safety and Health Administration, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) of the States, and the Health Physics Society were consulted during the development of this guidance. These recommendations are based on consideration of (1) current scientific understanding of effects on health from ionizing radiation, (2) recommendations of international and national organizations involved in radiation protection, (3) proposed 'Federal Radiation Protection Guidance for Occupational Exposure' published on January 23, 1981 (46 FR 7836) and public comments on that proposed guidance, and (4) the collective experience of the Federal agencies in the control of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. A summary of the considerations that led to these recommendations is provided

  18. General comments on radiological patient protection in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellez de Cepeda, M; Plaza, R; Corredoira, E [Servicio de Radiofisica y Radioproteccion, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain); Martin Curto, L M [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    In this paper an observation series about different aspects of the radiological protection of the patient in nuclear medicine is provided. It includes: The specific legislation contribution, the justification and, especially, optimization, as a fundamental base of the quality guarantee program, the importance of the fulfillment of the program and the importance of getting done the corresponding internal audits of the pursuit, the communication between the different groups of professionals implicated and between these and the patient, the volunteers who collaborate in the patient's care and the people in the patient's environment, knowing that the patient is a source of external radiation and contamination. (author) [Spanish] Se resumen en este trabajo, una serie de observaciones sobre distintos aspectos de la proteccion radiologica del paciente en Medicina Nuclear que incluyen: El aporte de la legislacion especifica, los principios de justificacion y optimizacion (en especial este ultimo) como base fundamental del programa de garantia de calidad asi como la importancia de que dicho programa se cumpla y se lleven a cabo las correspondientes auditorias internas de seguimiento, la comunicacion tanto entre los diferentes grupos de profesionales implicados como entre estos y el paciente, los voluntarios que colaboran en su cuidado y las personas de su entorno, teniendo en cuenta que el paciente es una fuente de radiacion externa y contaminacion. (author)

  19. Radiobiological basis of radiation protection and ICRP 2007 general recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.S.

    2014-01-01

    The ICRP 2007 General Recommendations are based on the detailed review of the new information on the biological effects and risk evaluation done during the last decade. Most of this information reinforces the validity of earlier findings. Since the publication of ICRP 60 general recommendations in 1991(ICRP 1991b), sufficient new information on the health effects of ionizing radiations has accrued based on radiobiological and epidemiological studies (UNSCEAR 2000, ICRP Publication 99). There is an improvement in understanding the mechanistic aspects of the induction of radiation damage at cellular level. Biophysical studies based on Monte Carlo track structure codes have provided information on the nature of critical damage to DNA leading to the radiation effects at cellular level. Experimental work with model animal systems has provided information on the role of post irradiation repair processes and the genes influencing the process of radiation carcinogenesis. Longer follow up of A-Bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provides a more reliable risk estimate based on the cancer incidence data and also a better model for the transfer of risk among different populations with varying frequency of background incidence. At present it is clear that the breast cancer contributes substantially to the radiation risk and provides quantitative risk estimates for brain and salivary glands. In the light of the new information, Tissue Weighting factors (WT) have been revised

  20. What is risk perception in general and in radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, David Te-Yao

    2000-01-01

    In view of the universal roll Risk Perception plays in our daily life, the author makes an effort to understand this notion better. For such a subtle task, it will be good to know something about the person, who undertakes such a challenge. Thus, he first makes a short description of himself in a number of relevant personal feature, emphasising rather what he is not: cadre of insurance company.... etc. He starts with a literal understanding of the idiom Risk Perception in English and in other languages (in Chinese). This formulation, still abstract, is framed with concrete objects, and materialised into touchable structures. He then puts life into these structures, and makes them accessible to emotion and experience. Now that this notion is animated, he follows it's way into life in the field of Radiation Protection, and find among others that the term Cost and Benefit correspond to the Chinese idiom, and that the system of Justification and Optimisation is as difficult to achieve objectively as an Upright Walk on the Confucian Path to-ward the Middle. One of the difficulties lies in the difference in the scale in estimating values. For instance, though the idea of Asian and Western Values are rather diffuse, their difference is never-the-less high enough to render it to be insurmountable, at least at present. These observation belong actually to common experience of Health physicists, and nothing new or spectacular is presented. The author emphasises only, again not a new idea of his own, only putting weight to, that perception depends on point of view, or rather on stand of viewing points, and rarely represent the whole story, the true situation. This leads, according to the author, to the well known and accepted term of Risk Residuum, in German, Rest Risiko. Despite of partialness of all perceptions, solid decisions are based on perception. We all know mournful consequences of unsound decision in our daily life. It is tragic, when this happens in history. The

  1. What is risk perception in general and in radiation protection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, David Te-Yao [CH-5400 Baden (Switzerland)

    2000-05-01

    In view of the universal role Risk Perception plays in our daily life, the author makes an effort to understand this notion better. For such a subtle task, it will be good to know something about the person who undertakes such a challenge. Thus, he first makes a short description of himself in a number of relevant personal feature, emphasising rather what he is not: cadre of insurance company.... etc. He starts with a literal understanding of the idiom Risk Perception in English and in other languages (in Chinese). This formulation, still abstract, is framed with concrete objects, and materialised into touchable structures. He then puts life into these structures, and makes them accessible to emotion and experience. Now that this notion is animated, he follows its way into life in the field of Radiation Protection, and find among others that the term Cost and Benefit correspond to the Chinese idiom, and that the system of Justification and Optimisation is as difficult to achieve objectively as an Upright Walk on the Confucian Path to-ward the Middle. One of the difficulties lies in the difference in the scale in estimating values. For instance, though the idea of Asian and Western Values are rather diffuse, their difference is never-the-less high enough to render it to be insurmountable, at least at present. These observation belong actually to common experience of Health physicists, and nothing new or spectacular is presented. The author emphasises only, again not a new idea of his own, only putting weight to, that perception depends on point of view, or rather on stand of viewing points, and rarely represent the whole story, the true situation. This leads, according to the author, to the well known and accepted term of Risk Residuum, in German, Rest Risiko. Despite of partialness of all perceptions, solid decisions are based on perception. We all know mournful consequences of unsound decision in our daily life. It is tragic, when this happens in history. The

  2. Can an hour or two of sun protection education keep the sunburn away? Evaluation of the Environmental Protection Agency's Sunwise School Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenausis Kristin

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma incidence is rising at a rate faster than any other preventable cancer in the United States. Childhood exposure to ultraviolet (UV light increases risk for skin cancer as an adult, thus starting positive sun protection habits early may be key to reducing the incidence of this disease. Methods The Environmental Protection Agency's SunWise School Program, a national environmental and health education program for sun safety of children in primary and secondary schools (grades K-8, was evaluated with surveys administered to participating students and faculty. Results Pretests (n = 5,625 and posttests (n = 5,028 were completed by students in 102 schools in 42 states. Significant improvement was noted for the three knowledge variables. Intentions to play in the shade increased from 68% to 75%(p Conclusions Brief, standardized sun protection education can be efficiently interwoven into existing school curricula, and result in improvements in knowledge and positive intentions for sun protection.

  3. Let the IRIS Bloom:Regrowing the integrated risk information system (IRIS) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourson, Michael L

    2018-05-03

    The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has an important role in protecting public health. Originally it provided a single database listing official risk values equally valid for all Agency offices, and was an important tool for risk assessment communication across EPA. Started in 1986, IRIS achieved full standing in 1990 when it listed 500 risk values, the effort of two senior EPA groups over 5 years of monthly face-to-face meetings, to assess combined risk data from multiple Agency offices. Those groups were disbanded in 1995, and the lack of continuing face-to-face meetings meant that IRIS became no longer EPA's comprehensive database of risk values or their latest evaluations. As a remedy, a work group of the Agency's senior scientists should be re-established to evaluate new risks and to update older ones. Risk values to be reviewed would come from the same EPA offices now developing such information on their own. Still, this senior group would have the final authority on posting a risk value in IRIS, independently of individual EPA offices. This approach could also lay the groundwork for an all-government IRIS database, especially needed as more government Agencies, industries and non-governmental organizations are addressing evolving risk characterizations. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Individual monitoring conducted by the Health Protection Agency in the London polonium-210 incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Michael; Birchall, Alan; Etherington, George; Wilkins, Bernard; Bishop, Louise; Fraser, Graham; Gross, Roger; Maguire, Helen; Evans, Barry; Shaw, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Mr. Alexander Litvinenko died on 23 November 2006, having allegedly been poisoned with polonium- 210 ( 210 Po) a few weeks earlier. The police investigation identified a number of contaminated locations, including parts of several hotels, restaurants, offices and transport. An extensive programme of individual monitoring of potentially exposed persons was rapidly initiated, based on urine sampling. Methods used for low-level measurement of 210 Po in environmental samples were adapted. The Health Protection Agency set a Reporting Level of 30 mBq d -1 , results above which indicated likely intake of 210 Po from the incident. At each location, risk assessments were undertaken to identify persons with significant risk of contamination with 210 Po. These individuals were invited to provide samples, not only to enable a direct assessment to be made of their own exposures, but also to inform decisions on whether others connected with the location should provide samples, or whether they could be reassured. Urine samples from 753 people were processed: about 500 during the first month. Of these, 139 measurements were above the Reporting Level, assessed doses for 36 were in the range ≥ 1 mSv and <6 mSv, and 17 were ≥ 6 mSv, with the highest at about 100 mSv. Many of the hotel guests were overseas visitors. An Overseas Advice Team was set up to encourage authorities abroad to adopt similar strategies. Overall, 664 persons from 52 countries and territories were identified. For 176, results of urine measurements were provided to the Overseas Advice Team, of which 13 were above the Reporting Level. Assessed doses for eight of these were <1 mSv, and the other five were in the range ≥ 1 mSv and <6 mSv. (author)

  5. The Environmental Protection Agency's waste isolation pilot plant certification process: The steps leading to our decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wene, C.; Kruger, M.

    1999-01-01

    On May 13, 1998, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its 'final certification decision' to certify that the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will comply with the radioactive waste disposal regulations set and the WIPP Compliance Criteria set forth at 40 CFR Parts 191 (US EPA, 1993) and 194 (US EPA, 1996) respectively. The WIPP will be the nation's first deep underground disposal facility for transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste generated as a result of defence activities. Since WIPP is a first-of-a-kind facility EPA's regulatory program contains an abundance of unique technical questions, as well as controversial policy considerations and legal issues. This paper presents the process that EPA undertook to reach its final decision. Oversight of the WIPP facility by EPA is governed by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (WIPP LWA), passed initially by Congress in 1992 and amended in 1996. The LWA required EPA to evaluate whether the WIPP will comply with Subparts B and C of 40 CFR Part 191, known as the disposal regulations. The EPA's final certification of compliance will allow the emplacement of radioactive waste in the WIPP to begin, provided that all other applicable health and safety standards have been met. The certification also allows Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to strip TRU waste from specific waste streams for disposal at the WIPP. However, the certification is subject to several conditions, most notably that EPA must approve site-specific waste characterisation measures and quality assurance plans before allowing sites other than LANL to ship waste for disposal at the WIPP

  6. The view of the Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, T.; Magnusson, S.

    2004-01-01

    The NEA's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has, throughout its existence, been interested in the development of recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Recently, this interest has included a very active CRPPH programme to develop ideas and suggestions that the ICRP can take into account in its work, and the CRPPH has become an active partner with the ICRP to provide the views of regulators and experts from the NEA's 28 member countries. During 2002, the ICRP Main Commission released two documents for broad stakeholder review and comment. These framework documents presented the key concepts and approaches that the ICRP was, at that time, proposing to develop into more detailed general recommendations, covering public and worker radiological protection, and the protection of non-human species. The CRPPH performed a detailed analysis of these two framework documents, focusing on the possible implications that these concepts would have should they be translated into recommendations and issued by the ICRP (NEA 2003). This work was endorsed by the NEA's Radioactive Waste Management Committee, and presented during the 2nd NEA/ICRP Forum, Lanzarote, Spain, in April 2003, where it was further broadly endorsed. Some key findings of this work were as follows: There is broad agreement that the ICRP should simplify, clarify and consolidate its recommendations. However, the goal of the ICRP to publish new recommendations by 2005 is seen as being ambitious, and not absolutely necessary. The ICRP will need to provide a clear and compelling justification as to why any significant changes are needed at this time. Costs, as well as legal and regulatory implications should be considered prior to the implementation of new recommendations. Several key ideas and concepts seem to be either completely new, or to have significantly evolved from their previous manifestations (in ICRP Publication and its subsequent

  7. The new general data protection regulation : Still a sound system for the protection of individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, Paul; Papakonstantinou, Vagelis

    2016-01-01

    The five-year wait is finally over; a few days before expiration of 2015 the “trilogue” that had started a few months earlier between the Commission, the Council and the Parlia- ment suddenly bore fruit and the EU data protection reform package has finally been concluded. As planned since the

  8. Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency to the General Assembly of the United Nations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-10-15

    The report is submitted in accordance with Article III.B.4 of the Statute and Article III of the Relationship Agreement between the two organizations and describes the important developments in the work of the Agency from 1 July 1950 to 30 June 1959. It is thus the first to cover a full year of the activities of the Agency. The important developments in the Agency's work since the report was prepared are covered briefly in this preface. The period covered is characterized by the fact that Member States began to make substantial requests to the Agency for assistance, which the Agency was able to meet. Furthermore, the Agency began to carry out its regulatory tasks, organized its first meeting, conferences and symposia, started its own research and greatly expanded the collection and publication of technical information.

  9. Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency to the General Assembly of the United Nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-10-01

    The report is submitted in accordance with Article III.B.4 of the Statute and Article III of the Relationship Agreement between the two organizations and describes the important developments in the work of the Agency from 1 July 1950 to 30 June 1959. It is thus the first to cover a full year of the activities of the Agency. The important developments in the Agency's work since the report was prepared are covered briefly in this preface. The period covered is characterized by the fact that Member States began to make substantial requests to the Agency for assistance, which the Agency was able to meet. Furthermore, the Agency began to carry out its regulatory tasks, organized its first meeting, conferences and symposia, started its own research and greatly expanded the collection and publication of technical information

  10. Overview of stakeholders issues and activities: report of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forinash, Betsy

    2004-01-01

    Over the past year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has implemented a new, more interactive stakeholder program in preparation for conducting a comprehensive technical update of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) after its first five years of operation. As the national repository for long-lived transuranic radioactive waste from U.S. defense activities and site clean-up, the facility continues to be of great interest both locally and nationally. We have worked actively with stakeholders since Congress established EPA as the regulator at WIPP in 1992. Early on, we visited with local communities near WIPP to understand their concerns and information needs. In response, we established toll-free telephone information lines and developed numerous public documents. During the technical review and regulatory decision regarding WIPP's safety, we provided numerous public hearings and solicited written comments on important topics. Ultimately, we issued the WIPP certification decision (1998), finding WIPP in compliance with EPA's radioactive waste disposal regulations and allowing it to open (1999). During 'lessons learned' assessments afterwards, we found that stakeholders appreciated some aspects of our program but were frustrated with the lack of two-way dialogue and were interested in getting clearer information on technical issues. We are using the 'lessons learned' in formulating our stakeholder activities for WIPP's first re-certification review, begun in March 2004. The re-certification review is intended to confirm that the WIPP continues to comply with EPA's regulations, taking into account the changes and new information gained over its first five years of operation. Key aspects of the stakeholder program are summarized below: - Define the goals for public information and participation. Our goal is to gain public acceptance, not necessarily full agreement, of our actions. We want to foster in the public

  11. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules.

  12. Building a Sustainable Future: A Report on the Environmental Protection Agency's Brownfields Sustainability Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes each of the Brownfields Sustainability Pilots and provides findings and recommendations for future projects. It is intended for use by people, communities, organizations, and agencies helping make brownfields more sustainable.

  13. 40 CFR 240.203 - General design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General design. 240.203 Section 240.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR... design. ...

  14. Review of existing issues, ethics and practices in general medical research and in radiation protection research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner-Karoussou, A.

    2008-01-01

    A literature review was carried out in relation to general medical research and radiation protection research. A large number of documents were found concerning the subject of ethics in general medical research. For radiation protection research, the number of documents and the information available is very limited. A review of practices in 13 European countries concerning general medical research and radiation protection research was carried out by sending a questionnaire to each country. It was found that all countries reviewed were well regulated for general medical research. For research that involves ionising radiation, the UK and Ireland are by far the most regulated countries. For other countries, there does not seem to be much information available. From the literature review and the review of practices, a number of existing ethical issues were identified and exposed, and a number of conclusions were drawn. (authors)

  15. Health physics society position on draft environmental protection agency recommendations for federal radiation protection guidance for occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Specific recommendations of the Health Physics Society are presented. There should not be any occupational exposure to ionizing radiation without the expectation of an overall benefit from the activity causing the exposure. Such activities should be permitted only when exposure to workers is controlled under a comprehensive radiation protection program that includes several elements: adequate, practical standards; adequately trained and qualified staff; adequately designed, operated and maintained facilities and equipment; appropriate monitoring programs, dose assessment programs and occupational exposure records; appropriate methods and procedures for controlling exposures in conformance with both the applicable limits and the ALARA philosophy; and appropriate quality assurance and audit programs

  16. IEEE guide for general principles of reliability analysis of nuclear power generating station protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Presented is the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) guide for general principles of reliability analysis of nuclear power generating station protection systems. The document has been prepared to provide the basic principles needed to conduct a reliability analysis of protection systems. Included is information on qualitative and quantitative analysis, guides for failure data acquisition and use, and guide for establishment of intervals

  17. 78 FR 33839 - Access by United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Contractors to Information Claimed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ... health and the environment by regulating air pollution from motor vehicles, engines, and the fuels used... Standards for Moving Sources, and Act To Prevent Pollution From Ships (APPS) AGENCY: Environmental... Pollution from Ships (APPS) that may be claimed as, or may be determined to be, confidential business...

  18. 36 CFR 1223.22 - How must agencies protect vital records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... place of business. (b) Dispersal. Once records are duplicated, they must be dispersed to sites a... locations of the same agency or some other site. (c) Storage considerations. Copies of emergency operating.... Copies of legal and financial rights records may not be needed as quickly. In deciding where to store...

  19. 75 FR 28034 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... enforcement agencies; and the Federal intelligence community to assist in the decisions they make related to... the collection of fingerprints from two prints to 10. The new collection time of 35 seconds, an... overseas posts; other DHS officers; and appropriate officers of the United States intelligence and law...

  20. 41 CFR 102-83.15 - Is there a general hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of space? 102-83.15 Section 102-83... general hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of space? Yes, Federal agencies must follow the hierarchy of consideration identified in § 102-79.55 of this chapter. ...

  1. On Structure and Agency in Ethnographies of Education: Examples from This Special Issue and More Generally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    The articles in this collection are about the development, possibility, exercise and possible frustration of human agency within educational exchanges. They are also all based on ethnography, which is now a common approach to educational research. Ethnography is not a seamless, neutral observational practice but is instead variable in relation to…

  2. 34 CFR 461.3 - What are the general responsibilities of the State educational agency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... application and plan, and any amendments to these documents. (2) Evaluation of activities, as described in... appropriate agencies, groups, and individuals involved in the planning, administration, evaluation, and... successfully recruiting, retaining, and improving the literacy skills of the individuals served under those...

  3. US Environmental Protection Agency National Coastal Assessment for American Samoa 2004: water quality, sediment grain, and chemistry data (NODC Accession 0000455)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2004, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Assessment (NCA), coordinated through the...

  4. Consolidated permit regulations and hazardous waste management system: Environmental Protection Agency. Notice of issuance of regulation interpretation memorandum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-10

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is issuing today a Regulation Interpretation Memorandum (RIM) which provides official interpretation of the issue of whether a generator who accumulates hazardous waste pursuant to 40 CFR 262.34, may qualify for interim status after November 19, 1980. This issue arose when the requirements for submitting a Part A permit application (one of the prerequisites to qualifying for interim status) were amended on November 19, 1980. The provisions interpreted today are part of the Consolidated Permit Regulations promulgated under Subtitle C of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended (RCRA).

  5. Feasibility study for automating the analytical laboratories of the Chemistry Branch, National Enforcement Investigation Center, Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, W.F.; Fisher, E.R.; Barton, G.W. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of automating the analytical laboratories of the Chemistry Branch of the National Enforcement Investigation Center, Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, Colorado, is explored. The goals of the chemistry laboratory are defined, and instrumental methods and other tasks to be automated are described. Five optional automation systems are proposed to meet these goals and the options are evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and other specified criteria. The instruments to be automated include (1) a Perkin-Elmer AA spectrophotometer 403, (2) Perkin-Elmer AA spectrophotometer 306, (3) Technicon AutoAnalyzer II, (4) Mettler electronic balance, and a (5) Jarrell-Ash ICP emission spectrometer

  6. The Comparison of Four Different Methods of Perioperative Eye Protection under General Anesthesia in Prone Position

    OpenAIRE

    Özlem Kocatürk; Tolga Kocatürk; Nil Kaan; Volkan Dayanır

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare and assess the efficacy of hypoallergen adhesive tape, antibiotic ointment, artificial tear liquid gel and ocular lubricant pomade for perioperative protection of eyes under general anesthesia in prone position. Material and Method: One hundred and eighty four patients (368 eyes) undergoing general anesthesia for >90 min for spinal procedures were divided randomly into four groups. Hypoallergen adhesive tape, antibiotic ointment, artificial tea...

  7. Selected aspects of proposed new EU general data protection legal framework and the Croatian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina GUMZEJ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Proposed new EU general data protection legal framework profoundly affects a large number of day-to-day business operations of organizations processing personal data and calls for significant effort on their part toward the necessary legal-regulatory compliance. In this paper the author examines key legislative developments towards this new EU frame and impact for the Republic of Croatia as the youngest EU Member State. Following introductory overview, legal analysis of draft EU General Data Protection Regulation as proposed by the European Commission and recently adopted amendments by the European Parliament mainly focuses on selected solutions impacting national data protection supervisory authorities. This is complemented with examination of relevant sources of EU law, including the case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union. Assessment of results of this research is next made with respect to prospects of the data protection legal framework of the Republic of Croatia. The paper is concluded with the author’s critical overview of analyzed EU proposals impacting national data protection supervisory authorities in light of EU pivotal goals, and de lege ferenda proposals to timely address identified obstacles towards more adequate enforcement of data protection legislation in Croatia.

  8. Digitalising the General Data Protection Regulation with Dynamic Condition Response Graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuck, Emil; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Kiærulff Lerche, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    We describe how the declarative Dynamic Condition Response (DCR) Graphs proces notation can be used to digitalise the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and make a first evaluation to what extend the formalisation and associated tool for end-user modelling and simulation can be used to cla...

  9. [Child protection system: Knowledge and role of the general practitioners in Ille-et-Vilaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balençon, M; Arrieta, A; You, C A; Brun, J-F; Federico-Desgranges, M; Roussey, M

    2016-01-01

    On 5 March 2007 the law concerning the child protection system was reformed. Since this date, child protection services are responsible for child abuse and neglect. Child protection services are now attempting to determine the rightful place for parents. Asking for child protection is now easier for the general practitioner (GP), who can submit a "preoccupying information (PI)" form. The aim of this study was to review GPs' knowledge on this issue 6 years after the passage of this new law. Prospective postal investigation between 04/01/2013 and 06/01/2013. A total of 298 (113 women) of the 899 GPs of the Ille-et-Vilaine area in Brittany answered a few questions about their activity and their knowledge on child abuse and neglect. The sample's mean age, sex, and practice was representative of the GPs in this area. Only 25.5% of the GPs had any knowledge of this new law. The term "preoccupying information" was unfamiliar to 70.1% of the GPs and what to do with the PI was unknown to 77.2%. The GPs did not know which type of letter to send nor where to send it between legal child protection and social protection services. Only 5% of the GPs had child protection training on PI. The main problem informing the child protection services was the lack of training. Consequently, 91.9% of the GPs would like training. The GPs in the Ille-et-Vilaine area in Brittany are unfamiliar with the child protection updates and need special training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. 40 CFR 1.21 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other national and international governmental organizations; (c) The Office of Inspector General; (d... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General. 1.21 Section 1.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL...

  11. Environmental Public Health Research at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency – Addressing Community Exposures and Outcomes from One Researcher’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) mission is to protect human health and the environment. Those not familiar with U.S. EPA’s mission often do not realize that U.S. EPA is a public health agency. In this presentation, Dr. Danelle Lobdell will provid...

  12. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Method Study 12, cyanide in water. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, J.; Britton, P.; Kroner, R.

    1984-05-01

    EPA Method Study 12, Cyanide in Water reports the results of a study by EMSL-Cincinnati for the parameters, Total Cyanide and Cyanides Amendable to Chlorination, present in water at microgram per liter levels. Four methods: pyridine-pyrazolone, pyridine-barbituric acid, electrode and Roberts-Jackson were used by 112 laboratories in Federal and State agencies, municipalities, universities, and the private/industrial sector. Sample concentrates were prepared in pairs with similar concentrations at each of three levels. Analysts diluted samples to volume with distilled and natural waters and analyzed them. Precision, accuracy, bias and the natural water interference were evaluated for each analytical method and comparisons were made between the four methods.

  13. Determining Nuclear Fingerprints: Glove Boxes, Radiation Protection, and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentetzi, Maria

    2017-06-01

    In a nuclear laboratory, a glove box is a windowed, sealed container equipped with two flexible gloves that allow the user to manipulate nuclear materials from the outside in an ostensibly safe environment. As a routine laboratory device, it invites neglect from historians and storytellers of science. Yet, since especially the Gulf War, glove boxes have put the interdependence of science, diplomacy, and politics into clear relief. Standing at the intersection of history of science and international history, technological materials and devices such as the glove box can provide penetrating insight into the role of international diplomatic organizations to the global circulation and control of scientific knowledge. The focus here is on the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of general data protection regulation on children's rights in digital environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krivokapić Đorđe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Raising the age of consent to data processing to 16 and allowing member states to set it at a lower age, was one of the major points of argument in the wake of passing the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR, otherwise hailed for introducing the Article 8 that recognizes children as a vulnerable group. This paper analyzes legal grounds for concerns raised over the provisions related to personal data protection of minors, possible ramifications and remedies within the given framework. It also highlights innovations and positive solutions set in the GDPR, with respect to privacy risks and opportunities for children in the information society.

  15. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1984. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The year 1984 can be described as one during which efforts were made to increase momentum in the development co-operation between the Agency and its Member States while continuing to improve the quality of the technical assistance rendered. For the first time, the adjusted programme exceeded $50 million. During the year, changes were introduced in the administration of the programme in line with recommendations endorsed by the Board in 1983 at the end of its first technical co-operation policy review. In 1984, when the new technical co-operation policies were applied, there were three principal aims. First, the flow of Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund resources was to be improved; by decreasing accumulated unobligated balances, an optimum level of resource utilization was to be attained by 1986. Second, procedures for the procurement of goods and services were to be streamlined in order to permit substantial increases in programme delivery. Third, systematic project evaluation was to lead to a number of specific actions that would increase the effectiveness of the Agency's development assistance. With regard to the first aim, implementation increased by 44% over the 1983 level, passing the $30 million mark in October and reaching $36.6 million by the end of the year. Of this amount, $31.8 million related to the implementation of activities programmed for 1984. Therefore, an increase in total resources of only 4% was accompanied by an increase in current-year implementation of 34%. As a result, the upward trend in the unobligated balance was checked, and earmarkings against the TACF actually decreased. The implementation rate against the TACF rose from 58% in 1983 to 65% in 1984, reaching the level that had been set as a target. If this performance can be maintained in 1985, it will be possible to reach the optimum level of TACF resource utilization one year earlier than originally expected. As regards the second aim, streamlined procedures introduced in

  16. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1987. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This report is part of a wide range of documentation which the Agency provides to Member States on its technical co-operation activities at various times during the year. It is, in particular, complemented by the achievement reporting submitted to the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Committee of the Board in the annual implementation reports that give the status of the technical co-operation programmes as at 30 September in each year. Following the 1986 Technical Co-operation Seminar and based on continuing consultations with Member States various steps to improve the quality of the programme were taken in 1987: for example, new project request forms and management plans were introduced and preparatory assistance was expanded. Office automation was intensified and the computerized data base covering technical co-operation was enhanced further. Work continues on the adaptation of data provided by the new Financial Information and Control System (FIGS) to the needs of the technical co-operation programmes and vice-versa. While several problems have still to be overcome, it has on the whole, been possible in this report to re-establish data comparability with previous years. Evaluation has become an integral part of the Agency's technical cooperation activities. In addition to on-going mid-project and end-of-project evaluations, expert services and fellowships were evaluated in 1987 and the first country programme evaluation was also undertaken. During 1987, a total of 962 projects were operational and 64 training courses were held. These activities involved 1808 expert assignments while 1975 persons received training abroad. Of the provisions in the 1987 total adjusted programme, one half was earmarked for equipment, while the other half was equally divided between ear markings for experts and for training. Of the Agency's technical co-operation resources in 1987, 72.5% came from the Technical Assistance and Co-operation Fund, 13.7% from extra budgetary

  17. Improving radioactive waste management: an overview of the Environmental Protection Agency's low-activity waste effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheisz, Daniel J; Czyscinski, Kenneth S; Klinger, Adam D

    2006-11-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in the United States is marked by a fragmented regulatory system, with requirements that often focus on the origin or statutory definition of the waste, rather than the hazard of the material in question. It may be possible to enhance public protection by moving toward a system that provides disposal options appropriate for the hazard presented by the waste in question. This paper summarizes aspects of an approach focusing on the potential use, with appropriate conditions, of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle-C hazardous waste landfills for disposal of "low-activity" wastes and public comments on the suggested approach.

  18. The provision of technical assistance by the Agency with special reference to 1971. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-07-01

    Following its usual practice, the Board of Governors has requested the communication to the General Conference of the material it used in reviewing the provision of technical assistance by the Agency, with special reference to 1971; this material is accordingly reproduced in the present document. The review was carried out pursuant to paragraph 20 of the Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. 2. The use of the resources placed at the Agency's disposal, in the form of voluntary contributions, gifts in kind, UNDP(SF) and UNDP(TA) funds, for the provision of technical assistance is reviewed in this document; data on UNDP(SF) assistance in respect of projects for which the IAEA was the executing agent have been incorporated in the statistical tables and figures for the first time. This has been done to establish a broader basis for comparison of the data that will be included in the report to be submitted one year hence, in which special reference will be made to the technical assistance provided by the Agency in 1972, which will reflect the full integration of the Special Fund and Technical Assistance components of UNDP, In addition, information is given with regard to the UNDP(SF) projects for which the Agency served as sub-contractor in 1971 in Annex III. 3. The three principal elements of the technical assistance provided are expert services, equipment and fellowships. The main objectives of the assistance are to promote the transfer of skills and knowledge relating to the peaceful uses of atomic energy, to support the efforts made by recipient countries to carry out their atomic energy activities more efficiently, and to ensure that the knowledge acquired can continue to be applied after Agency projects have been completed. The achievement of the latter objective, however, depends largely on the ability of Governments to make adequate facilities available and to recruit and retain the requisite

  19. The provision of technical assistance by the Agency with special reference to 1971. Report by the Director General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-07-15

    Following its usual practice, the Board of Governors has requested the communication to the General Conference of the material it used in reviewing the provision of technical assistance by the Agency, with special reference to 1971; this material is accordingly reproduced in the present document. The review was carried out pursuant to paragraph 20 of the Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. 2. The use of the resources placed at the Agency's disposal, in the form of voluntary contributions, gifts in kind, UNDP(SF) and UNDP(TA) funds, for the provision of technical assistance is reviewed in this document; data on UNDP(SF) assistance in respect of projects for which the IAEA was the executing agent have been incorporated in the statistical tables and figures for the first time. This has been done to establish a broader basis for comparison of the data that will be included in the report to be submitted one year hence, in which special reference will be made to the technical assistance provided by the Agency in 1972, which will reflect the full integration of the Special Fund and Technical Assistance components of UNDP, In addition, information is given with regard to the UNDP(SF) projects for which the Agency served as sub-contractor in 1971 in Annex III. 3. The three principal elements of the technical assistance provided are expert services, equipment and fellowships. The main objectives of the assistance are to promote the transfer of skills and knowledge relating to the peaceful uses of atomic energy, to support the efforts made by recipient countries to carry out their atomic energy activities more efficiently, and to ensure that the knowledge acquired can continue to be applied after Agency projects have been completed. The achievement of the latter objective, however, depends largely on the ability of Governments to make adequate facilities available and to recruit and retain the requisite

  20. International legal protection of environment in the system of fundamental generally recognized principles of international law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meherremov, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of international legal protection of environment in the system of fundamental, generally recognized principles of international law is analyzed in the article taking into consideration the different opinions in legal scientific researches and international practice. It is concluded that the protection of environment for the present and next generations - is a basic principle of international legal protection of environment. The meaning of this principleis that the countries will take all necessary measures for preservation and promotion of the quality of environment for the present and next generations, as well as rational management of natural resources. Adoption and national legal implementation of specific norms, in conformity with that basic principle, is a main factor in resolution of environmental problemsand ensuring environmental security

  1. The Agency's Technical Co-operation activities in 1986. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    major role in Agency training activities. Close to one fifth of these activities depended on this type of assistance in 1986. From 1980 to 1986, the total volume of the technical assistance delivered by the Agency increased by 112.3%; during the same period, the staff of the Department of Technical Co-operation engaged in technical co-operation activities grew by 12.2%. The views of Member States expressed during the 1986 Policy Review Seminar and subsequent discussions will guide the future programme. Major emphasis will be placed on project quality. In its efforts to ensure that technical co-operation projects are consonant with Member States' development priorities, the Agency will seek to strengthen its co-operation with UNDP and other organizations of the United Nations system, particularly as regards programming and project formulation

  2. The Agency's technical co-operation activities in 1985. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    balance was a source of concern; this situation has now been brought under control. Expert component implementation increased further. With regard to the TACF, the expert component accounted for most of the year-end earmarkings in previous years, but in 1985 it accounted for only A3.8%, on a par with the percentage of the earmarkings for equipment. During the period 1981-85, there was a 93% increase in the number of purchase orders processed by the Field Procurement Section and a 63% increase in the volume of equipment purchased. During the same period, the number of experts recruited rose by 158% and that of expert assignments by 214%. The number of fellows increased by 7% and that of visiting scientists by 506%. Also, the number of training courses doubled, the number of participants increasing by 86%. From 1980 to 1985 the total volume of technical assistance delivered by the Agency increased by 79%; during the same period, expenditures under the Regular Budget for technical co-operation servicing grew by 18%. The Secretariat is examining how it can best handle the future increases which it expects in the total volume of Agency technical assistance within a frame of severe Regular Budget constraints. The Evaluation Section is playing an important role in Agency efforts to enhance the effectiveness of the technical co-operation programme. Over 500 interim implementation reports were completed in 1985, and 50 mid-project and end-of-project evaluations were conducted. Two evaluations of major processes (equipment provision and group training) were also carried out

  3. Strategic trade between two regions with partial local consumer protection - General setup and nash equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanov, Iordan V.; Vassilev, Andrey A.

    2017-12-01

    We construct a model of the trade relations between two regions for the case when the trading entities (consumers) compete for a scarce good and there is an element of strategic interdependence in the trading process. Additionally, local consumers enjoy partial protection in the form of guaranteed access to a part of the locally-supplied quantity of the good. The model is formulated for the general asymmetric case, where the two regions differ in terms of parameters such as income, size of the local market supply, degree of protection and transportation costs. For this general model we establish the existence of Nash equilibria and obtain their form as a function of the model parameters, producing a typology of the equilibria. This is a required step in order to rigorously study various types of price dynamics for the model.

  4. 76 FR 64942 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; General...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... public comments, access the index listing of the contents of the docket, and to access those documents in..., mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g..., and Indian tribal governments. Title: General Administrative Requirements for Assistance Programs. ICR...

  5. 76 FR 28038 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; General Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... population to which generalizations will be made, the sampling frame, the sample design (including....gov : http://www.regulations.gov . Submit comments via the Federal eRulemaking portal by inputting... that are designed to yield reliably actionable results, such as monitoring trends over time or...

  6. The impact of the EU general data protection regulation on scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassang, Gauthier

    2017-01-01

    The use of personal data is critical to ensure quality and reliability in scientific research. The new Regulation [European Union (EU)] 2016/679 of 27 April 2016 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data [general data protection regulation (GDPR)], repealing Directive 95/46/EC, strengthens and harmonises the rules for protecting individuals' privacy rights and freedoms within and, under certain conditions, outside the EU territory. This new and historic legal milestone both prolongs and updates the EU acquis of the previous Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC. The GDPR fixes both general rules applying to any kind of personal data processing and specific rules applying to the processing of special categories of personal data such as health data taking place in the context of scientific research, this including clinical and translational research areas. This article aims to provide an overview of the new rules to consider where scientific projects include the processing of personal health data, genetic data or biometric data and other kinds of sensitive information whose use is strictly regulated by the GDPR in order to give the main key facts to researchers to adapt their practices and ensure compliance to the EU law to be enforced in May 2018.

  7. Catalog of physical protection equipment. Book 3: Volume VII. General purpose display components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    A catalog of commercially available physical protection equipment has been prepared under MITRE contract AT(49-24)-0376 for use by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Included is information on barrier structures and equipment, interior and exterior intrusion detection sensors, entry (access) control devices, surveillance and alarm assessment equipment, contraband detection sensors, automated response equipment, general purpose displays and general purpose communications, with one volume devoted to each of these eight areas. For each item of equipment the information included consists of performance, physical, cost and supply/logistics data. The entire catalog is contained in three notebooks for ease in its use by licensing and inspection staff at NRC

  8. Technical products for radiation shielding. Shield assembled from lead blocks for radiation protection. General technical requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The object of this standard description is the general technological requirements of 50 and 100 mm thick radiation protection shields assembled from lead blocks. The standard contains the definitions, types, parameters and dimensions of shields, their technical and acceptance criteria with testing methods, tagging, packaging, transportation and storage requirements, producer's liability. Some illustrated assembling examples, preferred parameters and dosimetry methods for shield inspection are given. (R.P.)

  9. The Comparison of Four Different Methods of Perioperative Eye Protection under General Anesthesia in Prone Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Kocatürk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare and assess the efficacy of hypoallergen adhesive tape, antibiotic ointment, artificial tear liquid gel and ocular lubricant pomade for perioperative protection of eyes under general anesthesia in prone position. Material and Method: One hundred and eighty four patients (368 eyes undergoing general anesthesia for >90 min for spinal procedures were divided randomly into four groups. Hypoallergen adhesive tape, antibiotic ointment, artificial tear liquid gel or ocular lubricant pomade was applied into the eyes. The patients underwent complete ophthalmic examination, including corrected visual acuity measurement, basal tear production, corneal and conjunctival staining both before and after surgery. Results: Basal tear production was reduced in all groups compared to preoperative values (P0.05. There was no difference between pre and postoperative visual acuity. Discussion: All of the methods are suitable for protecting corneal injuries. But none of them is good enough to avoid temporary symptoms in postoperative period. During general anesthesia eyes need protection either by tape, gel, ointment or pomade to reduce the incidence of corneal injuries.

  10. Total cylindrospermopsins, microcystins/nodularins, and saxitoxins data for the 2007 United States Environmental Protection Agency National Lake Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Keith A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Maksimowicz, Megan M.; Toyne, Kathryn D.

    2016-05-26

    Phytoplankton communities in freshwater lakes, ponds, and reservoirs may be dominated by cyanobacteria (also called blue-green algae) under certain environmental conditions. Cyanobacteria may cause a range of water-quality impairments, including the potential for toxin production. Cyanobacteria toxins (cyanotoxins) may adversely impact human and ecological health. Microcystins are considered to be one of the most commonly found classes of cyanotoxins in freshwater ecosystems, and as such were selected as a recreational indicator of water quality for the 2007 United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Lakes Assessment. However, much less is known about the occurrence of other classes of cyanotoxins in fresh surface water such as anatoxins, cylindrospermopsins, nodularins, and saxitoxins.

  11. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency 2005-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This report satisfies the annual reporting requirements of the ARPANS Act in addition to the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet requirements for annual reporting by Agencies. The report includes: details of the operations of the CEO and details of directions given by the Minister under section 16 at Part 1; details of the operations of ARPANSA at Part 3; details of the operations of the Radiation Health Advisory Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee and details of all reports received from the Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council on matters related to radiation protection and nuclear safety or the Nuclear Safety Committee on matters related to nuclear safety and the safety of controlled facilities at Part 4; details of any breach of licence conditions by a licensee at Appendix 4; an index of compliance with the annual reporting requirements at Appendix 8

  12. The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency megavoltage photon thermoluminescence dosimetry postal audit service 2007–2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, C.P.; Butler, D.J.; Webb, D.V.

    2012-01-01

    The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency (ARPANSA) has continuously provided a level 1 mailed thermoluminescence dosimetry audit service for megavoltage photons since 2007. The purpose of the audit is to provide an independent verification of the reference dose output of a radiotherapy linear accelerator in a clinical environment. Photon beam quality measurements can also be made as part of the audit in addition to the output measurements. The results of all audits performed between 2007 and 2010 are presented. The average of all reference beam output measurements calculated as a clinically stated dose divided by an ARPANSA measured dose is 0.9993. The results of all beam quality measurements calculated as a clinically stated quality divided by an ARPANSA measured quality is 1.0087. Since 2011 the provision of all auditing services has been transferred from the Ionizing Radiation Standards section to the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) which is currently housed within ARPANSA.

  13. Present State of Knowledge of the Upper Atmosphere 1996: An Assessment Report to Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, M. J.; Kaye, J. A.; Decola, P. L.; Friedl, R. R.; Peterson, D. B.

    1997-01-01

    This document is issued in response to the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990, Public Law 101-549, which mandates that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and other key agencies submit triennial report to congress and the Environmental Protection Agency. NASA is charged with the responsibility to report on the state of our knowledge of the Earth's upper atmosphere, particularly the Stratosphere. Part 1 of this report summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported under NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program for the period of 1994-1996. Part 2 (this document) presents summaries of several scientific assessments, reviews, and summaries. These include the executive summaries of two scientific assessments: (Section B) 'Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 1994'; (Section C) 'l995 Scientific Assessment of the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft); end of mission/series statements for three stratospherically-focused measurement campaigns: (Section D) 'ATLAS End-of-Series Statement'; (Section E) 'ASHOE/MAESA End-of-Mission Statement'; (Section F) 'TOTE/VOTE End-of-Mission Statement'; a summary of NASA's latest biennial review of fundamental photochemical processes important to atmospheric chemistry 'Chemical Kinetics and Photochemical Data for Use in Stratospheric Modeling'; and (Section H) the section 'Atmospheric Ozone Research" from the Mission to Planet Earth Science Research Plan, which describes NASA's current and future research activities related to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry.

  14. Disparity between state fish consumption advisory systems for Methylmercury and US Environmental Protection Agency recommendations: a case study of the South Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kimberly; Drenner, Ray W.; Chumchal, Matthew M.; Donato, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Fish consumption advisories are used to inform citizens in the United States about noncommercial game fish with hazardous levels of methylmercury (MeHg). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) suggests issuing a fish consumption advisory when concentrations of MeHg in fish exceed a human health screening value of 300 ng/g. However, states have authority to develop their own systems for issuing fish consumption advisories for MeHg. Five states in the south central United States (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas) issue advisories for the general human population when concentrations of MeHg exceed 700 ng/g to 1000 ng/g. The objective of the present study was to estimate the increase in fish consumption advisories that would occur if these states followed USEPA recommendations. The authors used the National Descriptive Model of Mercury in Fish to estimate the mercury concentrations in 5 size categories of largemouth bass–equivalent fish at 766 lentic and lotic sites within the 5 states. The authors found that states in this region have not issued site-specific fish consumption advisories for most of the water bodies that would have such advisories if USEPA recommendations were followed. One outcome of the present study may be to stimulate discussion between scientists and policy makers at the federal and state levels about appropriate screening values to protect the public from the health hazards of consuming MeHg-contaminated game fish.

  15. Site-specific data confirm arsenic exposure predicted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S; Griffin, S

    1998-03-01

    The EPA uses an exposure assessment model to estimate daily intake to chemicals of potential concern. At the Anaconda Superfund site in Montana, the EPA exposure assessment model was used to predict total and speciated urinary arsenic concentrations. Predicted concentrations were then compared to concentrations measured in children living near the site. When site-specific information on concentrations of arsenic in soil, interior dust, and diet, site-specific ingestion rates, and arsenic absorption rates were used, measured and predicted urinary arsenic concentrations were in reasonable agreement. The central tendency exposure assessment model successfully described the measured urinary arsenic concentration for the majority of children at the site. The reasonable maximum exposure assessment model successfully identified the uppermost exposed population. While the agreement between measured and predicted urinary arsenic is good, it is not exact. The variables that were identified which influenced agreement included soil and dust sample collection methodology, daily urinary volume, soil ingestion rate, and the ability to define the exposure unit. The concentration of arsenic in food affected agreement between measured and predicted total urinary arsenic, but was not considered when comparing measured and predicted speciated urinary arsenic. Speciated urinary arsenic is the recommended biomarker for recent inorganic arsenic exposure. By using site-specific data in the exposure assessment model, predicted risks from exposure to arsenic were less than predicted risks would have been if the EPA's default values had been used in the exposure assessment model. This difference resulted in reduced magnitude and cost of remediation while still protecting human health.

  16. The Whistleblower Protection Act: An Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitaker, L. P

    2007-01-01

    .... Generally, whistleblower protections may be raised within four forums or proceedings: (1) employee appeals to the Merit Systems Protection Board of an agency's adverse action against an employee, known as Chapter 77 appeals; (2...

  17. General aspects of radiological protection to consider for the licensing a hospital cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrada Contardi, F.A.; Fruttero, N.H.; Bozzo, R.H.; Moschella, E.G.

    2010-01-01

    The use of PET/PET-CT studies for a variety of diagnoses has increased significantly on a global scale. Modern medical cyclotrons must be placed in or near hospitals on account of the short radioactive half-life of the pharmaceuticals used in such studies. Many countries in Latin America are now licensing cyclotrons and laboratories for the production of radio-pharmaceuticals for the first time, and most are expected to have installations within the near future. This report outlines the general aspects of radiological protection important to consideration during the licensing of these facilities, and includes the following: general operation of the cyclotron and laboratory for the production of radiopharmaceuticals, safety systems (shielding, interlocks, ventilation, manual safety systems, alarms and monitors), and general aspects for licensing an installation (monitoring, accidental and incidental events, activation of components, etc.) and personnel. (authors) [es

  18. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2016; 2 - Operational safety: encouraging results; 3 - High-profile focus on safety; 4 - Risk prevention: effort must be intensified; 5 - Team skills and commitment; 6 - Simplification; 7 - Maintenance quality; 8 - Nuclear fuel; 9 - New build; 10 - Protection against site security threats; 11 - Appendices

  19. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    After a first chapter in which the Inspector General states his own vision of facts and results regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection for 2012, the next chapters address the following topics: the contrasted results of nuclear operating safety, the need to remain vigilant in nuclear safety management, the challenge of occupational safety, the need of new ambitious goals for radiation protection, an updated training which must be better led by line management, maintenance as a strategic issue, the long road ahead for nuclear technical information system (SDIN), the need of better attention to chemistry in operations, the new impetus of EPRs, plant life extension conditioned by nuclear safety, the mobilization of nuclear operators after Fukushima, and noteworthy operating events

  20. Supporting and Protecting the Victims of Crime and the European Union. Some General Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana-Minodora Rusu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper there were examined, the general provisions of Directive 2012/29/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 establishing minimum standards on the rights, support and protection of victims of crime and replacing the Framework Decision 2001/220/JHA. The paper continues other studies relating to international judicial cooperation in criminal matters, published in national or international journals or conference proceedings. Developed in a modern way that allows understanding the terms used by the European legislator and the described objectives, the paper can be useful to academics, practitioners or European legislator in terms of changing and supplementing this legislative act. The innovations consist in the brief examination, in the critical opinions and in formulating de lege ferenda, by which we propose a single act regulating the rights, supporting and protecting victims of crime by amending and completion of the examined document.

  1. 40 CFR 1.29 - Office of Inspector General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office of Inspector General. 1.29 Section 1.29 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION... operations. The Office provides leadership and coordination and recommends policies for other Agency...

  2. 5th December 1990 - Royal Order amending the provisions of the General Regulations for protection at work, concerning the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Royal Order amending the 1946 General Regulations for the protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation implements on a national level the European Community Directives No. 80/836 Euratom of 15 July 1980 laying down basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the hazards of ionizing radiations and No. 84/466 Euratom of 3 September 1984 laying down basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment [fr

  3. Statement to the 34th session of the general conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 17 September 1990. Statement to the 45th session of the United Nations general assembly, 23 October 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1991-01-01

    The document contains the following two statements of Hans Blix, Director General of the IAEA: Statement to the 34th Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 17 September 1990; Statement to the 45th Session of the United Nations General Assembly, 23 October 1990. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these statements

  4. Statement to the 35th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 16 September 1991; Statement to the 46th session of the United Nations General Assembly 21 October 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1991-01-01

    The document contains the following two statements of Hans Blix, Director General of the IAEA: Statement to the 35th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 16 September 1991; Statement to the 46th session of the United Nations General Assembly, 21 October 1991. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these statements

  5. Implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation in companies in the Republic of Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Starčević

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the current issue of protecting individuals regarding the processing of their personal data and the free movement of such data. As this matter is also regulated by the European Union legislation, the paper describes and analyzes the scope, implications, methods and tools for applying the new EU regulation adopted on 27 April 2016 by the Parliament and the Council of the European Union. The subject matter is the Regulation (EU 2016/679 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data. The short title of this Regulation is General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR. The term GDPR is thus in common everyday use in companies and among business people, and will also be used in this paper. In addition, the paper analyzes the research conducted on the existing state of affairs and the way in which all collected personal data are processed and used by all stakeholders in the company Atlantic Grupa d.d., Zagreb. In addition, a harmonized project of a structured and methodologically correct procedure for implementation of the provisions of the new Regulation is described for the purpose of achieving the highest degree of compliance of all members of Atlantic Grupa d.d. with the provisions of the GDPR. Finally, the basic objective of the described project is explained, which is to avoid situations that would lead to the extremely high fines for non-compliance with the Regulation.

  6. THE MAIN NOVELTIES AND IMPLICATIONS OF THE NEW GENERAL DATA PROTECTION REGULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Chirica

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulation (EU 2016/679 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Directive 95/46/EC (General Data Protection Regulation - GDPR will become applicable beginning with 25.05.2018. As a general characteristic, the regulations adopted at EU level, have direct applicability in all EU member states, and they are automatically integrated in the national legislation beginning with entry into force. Therefore, as of 25.05.2018, the GDPR provisions will be applicable and mandatory for all natural and legal persons that process personal data, including in Romania. Based on the above, GDPR brings a series of changes affecting all the involved parties (data subjects, data controllers, supervisory authorities. This article aims to present an analysis of the main novelties brought by the new regulation, and to present a comparison with the current regulation together with the practical implications of these changes in relation to the data subjects, data controllers, and supervisory authorities.

  7. Radiographic quality and radiation protection in general medical practice and small hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, B.D.P.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation protection and image quality were assessed in a survey of 22 general medical practices (GP) and the 24 smallest hospitals with x-ray facilities. Limited radiography, usually of extremities for trauma, was being performed in these facilities since access to regular radiology services was restricted, mainly for geographic reasons. An anthropomorphic phantom foot and ankle with two simulated fractures of the lateral and medical malleoli was presented at each facility for radiography, and the resulting films assessed for radiographic technique and basic diagnostic usefulness. The x-ray equipment was adequate for the range of procedures performed. While the standard of radiographic techniques was lower than in regular x-ray departments, most films of the phantom ankle were still diagnostically useful and only four were rejected entirely. The principal deficiency in general practice x-ray was in darkrooms and x-ray film processing. Consultation in this regard with registered medical radiation technologists is recommended. Generally, the x-ray equipment and working procedures complied with the National Radiation Laboratory Code of Safe Practice for the Use of X-rays in Diagnosis (Medical). Radiation doses to the phantom ankle ranged widely for effectively the same procedure, although none was excessive. Improved x-ray film processing, and tighter x-ray beam collimation, would result in a narrower range of doses to patients. Personnel exposures to radiation were satisfactorily low and special shieldings are not required in general practice. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Special procedural measures and the protection of human rights
    General report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A.E. Vervaele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the general report is to conduct a comparative analysis of the national reports in order to trace transformation processes in domestic criminal justice systems, in particular criminal process, as special procedural measures are introduced to deal with terrorism and organised crime, and to map whether this has led countries to depart from their own fundamental rules, procedures, principles and applicable human rights standards. Starting from the premise that the integrated system of criminal law has three dimensions – the protection of individuals (the shield dimension, the provision of instruments of law enforcement (the sword dimension, and of checks and balances/trias politica (the constitutional dimension – the report provides a comprehensive overview of interrelated transformations, mostly in the pre-trial setting, that have affected all three in three waves of ‘war’ (on drugs, organised crime and terrorism. In many countries, procedural guarantees and principles that protect against the infringement of fair trial rights are considered a burden to the efficiency of serious crime enforcement. These reforms have resulted in a clear expansion of the punitive state and a blurring of classic distinctions, and do not favour the rule of law. The focus on public security and preventive coercive investigation undermines the criminal justice system. With the criminal justice system increasingly used as an instrument to regulate the present and/or the future rather than to punish past behaviour, and a criminal process in which pre-trial investigation is not about truth-finding related to committed crime, but about the construction and de-construction of social dangerousness, the interests of national security may be said to be prevailing over justice and to be threatening due process and the protection of human rights – notwithstanding that general principles of criminal procedure seem to have become more important in the reporting

  9. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2013 2 - Safety in operation: good standing of results; 3 - Management of safety priority; 4 - Occupational safety: managers mobilization is necessary in France; 5 - Radiation protection: a new dynamics to initiate; 6 - Maintenance: regaining the essentials for the great careening; 7 - Fostering occupations to improve safety; 8 - A new momentum to the EPRs; 9 - Nuclear fuel, a major contribution to safety; 10 - Research-development: a lever to anticipate; 11 - Japan: safety under reconstruction; 12 - Noteworthy operational events; 13- Appendices: Results for the nuclear fleets (EDF SA, EDF Energy; Maps of the nuclear power plants(EDF SA, EDF Energy); Key dates for the nuclear units (EDF SA, EDF Energy); Abbreviations

  10. RESTORATION PLUS: A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY RESEARCH PROGRAM TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS TO ACHIEVE ECOLOGICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is evaluating ecosystem restoration and management techniques to ensure they create sustainable solutions for degraded watersheds. The ORD/NRMRL initiated the Restoration Plus (RePlus) program in 2002, which emphasizes collabora...

  11. Tiny Stowaways: Analyzing the Economic Benefits of a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Permit Regulating Ballast Water Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Sabrina J.; Drake, Lisa A.

    2009-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has proposed permitting ballast water discharges—a benefit of which would be to reduce the economic damages associated with the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species. Research on ship-borne aquatic invasive species has been conducted in earnest for decades, but determining the economic damages they cause remains troublesome. Furthermore, with the exception of harmful algal blooms, the economic consequences of microscopic invaders have not been studied, despite their potentially great negative effects. In this paper, we show how to estimate the economic benefits of preventing the introduction and spread of harmful bacteria, microalgae, and viruses delivered in U.S. waters. Our calculations of net social welfare show the damages from a localized incident, cholera-causing bacteria found in shellfish in the Gulf of Mexico, to be approximately 706,000 (2006). On a larger scale, harmful algal species have the potential to be transported in ships’ ballast tanks, and their effects in the United States have been to reduce commercial fisheries landings and impair water quality. We examine the economic repercussions of one bloom-forming species. Finally, we consider the possible translocation within the Great Lakes of a virus that has the potential to harm commercial and recreational fisheries. These calculations illustrate an approach to quantifying the benefits of preventing invasive aquatic microorganisms from controls on ballast water discharges.

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document, Area 15 Environmental Protection Agency Farm Laboratory Building, Corrective Action Unit No. 95, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-18

    This report is the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 15 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, Laboratory Building (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 95), at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The scope of this CADD is to identify and evaluate potential corrective action alternatives for the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of the Laboratory Building, which were selected based on the results of investigative activities. Based on this evaluation, a preferred corrective action alternative is recommended. Studies were conducted at the EPA Farm from 1963 to 1981 to determine the animal intake and retention of radionuclides. The main building, the Laboratory Building, has approximately 370 square meters (4,000 square feet) of operational space. Other CAUS at the EPA Farm facility that will be investigated and/or remediated through other environmental restoration subprojects are not included in this CADD, with the exception of housekeeping sites. Associated structures that do not require classification as CAUS are considered in the evaluation of corrective action alternatives for CAU 95.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document, Area 15 Environmental Protection Agency Farm Laboratory Building, Corrective Action Unit No. 95, Revision 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report is the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 15 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, Laboratory Building (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 95), at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The scope of this CADD is to identify and evaluate potential corrective action alternatives for the decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) of the Laboratory Building, which were selected based on the results of investigative activities. Based on this evaluation, a preferred corrective action alternative is recommended. Studies were conducted at the EPA Farm from 1963 to 1981 to determine the animal intake and retention of radionuclides. The main building, the Laboratory Building, has approximately 370 square meters (4,000 square feet) of operational space. Other CAUS at the EPA Farm facility that will be investigated and/or remediated through other environmental restoration subprojects are not included in this CADD, with the exception of housekeeping sites. Associated structures that do not require classification as CAUS are considered in the evaluation of corrective action alternatives for CAU 95

  14. Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Acid rain Brownfields Drinking water Lead Mold PFAS Radon Superfund A-Z index | Browse environmental topics ... Beach Grants for Pacific Islands Territories New England PFAS Community Session, June 25 Idaho Delegated Pollutant Discharge ...

  15. 41 CFR 102-79.55 - Is there a general hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is there a general hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of space? 102-79.55 Section 102-79... Utilization of Space Utilization of Space § 102-79.55 Is there a general hierarchy of consideration that...

  16. 2008 Contruction General Permits & Multi-Sector General Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — View stormwater notices of intent (NOIs) for construction projects under EPA's 2008 Construction General Permit (CGP), for Low Erosivity Waivers (LEWs) submitted...

  17. Assessing Protective Factors for Violence Risk in U.K. General Mental Health Services Using the Structured Assessment of Protective Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Alina; Brown, Andrew; Javaid, Syed Fahad; Khan, Fayyaz; Noblett, Steve; Omodunbi, Oladipupo; Sadiq, Khurram; Zaman, Wahid; Whittington, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Violence risk assessment and management are key tasks in mental health services and should be guided by validated instruments covering both risk and protective factors. This article is part of an international effort to validate the Structured Assessment of Protective Factors (SAPROF) for violence. The SAPROF, Historical, Clinical, Risk Management-20 (HCR-20) and the Psychopathy Checklist-Screening Version (PCL-SV) were administered in a sample of 261 patients in U.K. forensic, general inpatient, and community mental health settings. There was significant variation between these groups on SAPROF scores with fewer protective factors in the forensic group. The prospective validity of the SAPROF for nonviolence in the general inpatient and community samples was moderate (area under the curve [AUC] = .60). Adoption of the SAPROF or similar instruments as a supplement to risk-focused assessments has the potential to improve awareness of protective factors and enhance therapeutic engagement in a range of mental health services.

  18. Protection motivation theory and physical activity in the general population: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Linh; Mullan, Barbara; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    An appropriate theoretical framework may be useful for guiding the development of physical activity interventions. This review investigates the effectiveness of the protection motivation theory (PMT), a model based on the cognitive mediation processes of behavioral change, in the prediction and promotion of physical activity participation. A literature search was conducted using the databases MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science, and a manual search was conducted on relevant reference lists. Studies were included if they tested or applied the PMT, measured physical activity, and sampled from healthy populations. A total of 20 studies were reviewed, grouped into four design categories: prediction, stage discrimination, experimental manipulation, and intervention. The results indicated that the PMT's coping appraisal construct of self-efficacy generally appears to be the most effective in predicting and promoting physical activity participation. In conclusion, the PMT shows some promise, however, there are still substantial gaps in the evidence.

  19. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After a first chapter in which the Inspector General states his own vision of facts and results regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection for 2009, the relationship with the ASN (Nuclear safety authority), and also gives his own impression on the whole EDF nuclear system, the next chapters more particularly address the following topics: safety management, radiation protection of interveners, abilities and education for new challenges, the exploitation quality, the implementation of new regulatory arrangements, the extension of exploitation duration, the EPR project, the doctors as actors of safety management, service providing or subcontracting companies and fleet performance, prevention and struggle against fire, the activity of British Energy which is part of the EDF group, events which occurred within the EDF group (exposure of an intervener, incidents involving fuel components, biases in work monitoring, a fire on a turbo generator, an incident in Dungeness), lessons drawn from other industrial events (in a Russian hydroelectric station and in a refinery in Texas), and visits in China and in Japan

  20. Permitted decompilation of a computer program in order to protect the general interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Sanja M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer program is an intellectual creation protected by copyright. However, unlike other items with equivalent legal protection, a computer program has a strong technical functionality, which is, in nowadays' society, an indispensable factor in everyday business activities, exchange of information, entertainment or achieving other similar purposes. Precisely because of this feature, computer program can rarely be seen in isolation from the hardware and software environment. In other words, the functionality of a computer program reaches its full scope only in interaction with other computer program or device. Bearing in mind the fact that this intellectual creation is in the focus of technological, and thus social, development, legislators are trying to provide a legal framework in which these interactions take place unhindered. In fact, considering that each aspect of the use of a computer program presents the exclusive right of the author, relying on his or her consent to undertake certain perpetration which would provide the necessary connectivity of the various components, could put in risk further technological development. Therefore, the lawmakers provide that, in certain cases and under certain conditions, the author's exclusive right could be restricted or excluded. This paper aims to analyze a normative contribution in achieving, technical and technological needed, and therefore, in terms of general interest justified, interactions.

  1. Protection of facilities against sabotage general approaches and studies in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venot, R.; Loiseau, O.; Cheval, K.

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the measures taken in the frame of the nuclear safety demonstration, the French nuclear facilities are subjected to a specific verification approach concerning the risk resulting from a malevolent action that may cause a release of radioactive materials in the environment. This approach aims at determining the protection level for facilities, based on predefined threats and the provisions to be set, if necessary, to ensure a satisfactory protection. The approach presented in this paper basically consists of a sensitivity analysis followed by a vulnerability analysis. In the French national control system also shortly described in the paper, the competent authority asks the operator to present a demonstration based on the approach and IRSN is charged with the technical assessment of the dossier. Because these analyses are generally based on specific tools, particularly in the case of vulnerability assessment, IRSN has raised a program to collect a set of methods and data on this subject, presented in the second part of this paper. It must be pointed out that no quantitative results or detailed examples will be given in the paper due to the sensitivity of the subject and the confidentiality measures applying. (orig.)

  2. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2017; 2 - Nuclear safety results; 3 - Nuclear safety priority affirmed; 4 - Risk prevention: important to remain vigilant; 5 - Adapting people skills; 6 - Operating experience: contrasting approaches; 7 - Operations fundamentals to be reaffirmed; 8 - Importance of working closely with contract partners; 9 - Engineering support for the French fleet and new-build projects; 10 - Spares: an area for greater engagement by owners on-site; 11 - Appendices

  3. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2014; 2- Contrasting trends in nuclear safety in different sets of plants; 3 - Making safety culture central to management; 4 - Towards an integrated approach to risk management; 5 - Relying on professional unified operations; 6 - The quest for robust maintenance; 7 - Nuclear engineering: a major asset for the operator; 8 - Nuclear managers - confidence builders; 9 - on course for reactor operation beyond 40 years in France; 10 - Service life challenges in the UK; 11 - Preparing the future: from the EPR to other new models; 12 - Noteworthy operational events; 13- Appendices: Results for the nuclear fleets (EDF SA, EDF Energy; Maps of the nuclear power plants(EDF SA, EDF Energy); Key dates for the nuclear units (EDF SA, EDF Energy); Abbreviations

  4. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's view of 2015; 2 - Operational safety: mixed results; 3 - Nuclear safety clearly prioritised; 4 - Risk prevention: progress in France; 5 - Reinforced emergency preparedness post-Fukushima; 6 - Fire prevention: still a weak link; 7 - Continuous investment in training and careers; 8 - Using maintenance to leverage improved operational quality; 9 - Chemistry in France: a transition in need of strong support; 10 - Decommissioning projects are progressing; 11 - EPRs in China, France and the UK; 12 - Preparing for the future; 13 - A window on the world; 14 - Appendices: Results for the nuclear fleets (EDF SA, EDF Energy; Maps of the nuclear power plants(EDF SA, EDF Energy); Key dates for the nuclear units (EDF SA, EDF Energy); Abbreviations

  5. Validation of three new methods for determination of metal emissions using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Method 301

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherine A. Yanca; Douglas C. Barth; Krag A. Petterson; Michael P. Nakanishi; John A. Cooper; Bruce E. Johnsen; Richard H. Lambert; Daniel G. Bivins [Cooper Environmental Services, LLC, Portland, OR (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Three new methods applicable to the determination of hazardous metal concentrations in stationary source emissions were developed and evaluated for use in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compliance applications. Two of the three independent methods, a continuous emissions monitor-based method (Xact) and an X-ray-based filter method (XFM), are used to measure metal emissions. The third method involves a quantitative aerosol generator (QAG), which produces a reference aerosol used to evaluate the measurement methods. A modification of EPA Method 301 was used to validate the three methods for As, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Hg, representing three hazardous waste combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) metal categories (low volatile, semivolatile, and volatile). The measurement methods were evaluated at a hazardous waste combustor (HWC) by comparing measured with reference aerosol concentrations. The QAG, Xact, and XFM met the modified Method 301 validation criteria. All three of the methods demonstrated precisions and accuracies on the order of 5%. The measurement methods should be applicable to emissions from a wide range of sources, and the reference aerosol generator should be applicable to additional analytes. EPA recently approved an alternative monitoring petition for an HWC at Eli Lilly's Tippecanoe site in Lafayette, IN, in which the Xact is used for demonstrating compliance with the HWC MACT metal emissions (low volatile, semivolatile, and volatile). The QAG reference aerosol generator was approved as a method for providing a quantitative reference aerosol, which is required for certification and continuing quality assurance of the Xact. 30 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Adverse reactions from essential oil-containing natural flea products exempted from Environmental Protection Agency regulations in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Allison G; McLean, Mary Kay; Khan, Safdar A

    2012-08-01

    To describe adverse effects in dogs and cats exposed to Environmental Protection Agency exempted plant-derived flea preventatives containing mixtures of essential oils. Retrospective study from 2006 to 2008. Records of dog and cat cases were reviewed from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Animal Poison Control Center database. Thirty-nine cats and 9 dogs with history of exposure to natural flea preventatives. The following information was retrieved from each incident: number of animals, species involved, frequency, types, onset time, duration of clinical signs, exposure appropriateness, final outcome, and treatment information. Ninety-two percent of animals (n = 44) showed presence of one or more adverse effects. The frequency of adverse effects in dogs (n = 8; 89%) and cats (n = 36; 92%) was similar. Onset time of adverse effects in 39 of 44 animals occurred within 24 hours. The duration of signs in 24 animals ranged from 30 minutes to 149 hours. The products were used as per label in 77% animals (n = 37). Of 28 animals with known outcome, 50% (n = 14) recovered with bathing alone while others received intravenous fluids, muscle relaxants, and anticonvulsive medications. Death (1 cat; n = 1/28; 4%) or euthanasia (1 cat and 1 dog; n = 2/28; 7%) was reported in 3 animals. Dogs and cats can experience significant adverse effects when exposed to plant-derived flea preventatives even when used according to label directions. The number of reports of exposure in cats was higher than dogs, but the frequency of reported adverse effects was similar between the 2 species. Agitation and hypersalivation were common in cats, whereas lethargy and vomiting were common in dogs. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2012.

  7. The view of the Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, T.; Magnusson, S.

    2004-07-01

    The NEA's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has, throughout its existence, been interested in the development of recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Recently, this interest has included a very active CRPPH programme to develop ideas and suggestions that the ICRP can take into account in its work, and the CRPPH has become an active partner with the ICRP to provide the views of regulators and experts from the NEA's 28 member countries. During 2002, the ICRP Main Commission released two documents for broad stakeholder review and comment. These framework documents presented the key concepts and approaches that the ICRP was, at that time, proposing to develop into more detailed general recommendations, covering public and worker radiological protection, and the protection of non-human species. The CRPPH performed a detailed analysis of these two framework documents, focusing on the possible implications that these concepts would have should they be translated into recommendations and issued by the ICRP (NEA 2003). This work was endorsed by the NEA's Radioactive Waste Management Committee, and presented during the 2nd NEA/ICRP Forum, Lanzarote, Spain, in April 2003, where it was further broadly endorsed. Some key findings of this work were as follows: There is broad agreement that the ICRP should simplify, clarify and consolidate its recommendations. However, the goal of the ICRP to publish new recommendations by 2005 is seen as being ambitious, and not absolutely necessary. The ICRP will need to provide a clear and compelling justification as to why any significant changes are needed at this time. Costs, as well as legal and regulatory implications should be considered prior to the implementation of new recommendations. Several key ideas and concepts seem to be either completely new, or to have significantly evolved from their previous manifestations (in ICRP Publication and its

  8. Statement to the 41st session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 29 September 1997; Statement to the 52nd session of the United Nations General Assembly 12 November 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1997-12-01

    The document presents Statement to the 41st Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency and Statement to the 52nd Session of the United Nations General Assembly made at the 40th anniversary of the IAEA

  9. Statement to the 40th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 16 September 1996; Statement to the 51st session of the United Nations General Assembly 28 October 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1996-11-01

    In the Statement to the 40th Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency main directions of the IAEA activities and plans for the future are outlined. In the Statement to the 51th Session of the United Nations General Assembly main achievements and challenge facing the international community in the field of IAEA competence are discussed

  10. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This report, written for the Chairman of EDF, gives the Inspector General's assessment of nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. The report is also intended for all those in the company who contribute in any way to nuclear safety and radiation protection through their day-to-day actions and decisions. It also aims to identify any early warning signs and recommend areas for improvement. It therefore focuses on difficulties and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress. It is based on information gathered and observations made during the year, both in France and the UK, whether from workers in the field, or during visits to plants and meetings with the main stakeholders: managers, staff representatives, members of the medical profession, chairmen of local information commissions in France and of Site stakeholder groups (British equivalent of the French Local Information Commissions) in the UK, and contractors. It also makes use of visits and comparisons with other international players on the nuclear scene, and of dialogue with WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) and the nuclear safety authorities. Content: 1 - the Inspector General's analysis and conclusions at the end of 2008; 2 - Nuclear safety management; 3 - Radiation protection; 4 - A changing relationship with the nuclear safety authority; 5 - Support for the nuclear plants in service; 6 - Succeeding with the EPR; 7 - Operating the installations for longer; 8 - Further opening up to the outside world; 9 - Renewal of skills; 10 - Labour relations; 11 - The driving forces of cultural change; 12 - Promote change and regulate its pace; 13 - The contribution of the medical staff; 14 - Relations with contractors; 15 - The fire hazard; 16 - Nuclear fuel; 17 - Decommissioning; 18 - Emergency response management; 19 - Events at EDF; 19.1 - The Tricastin nuclear power plant fuel assemblies; 19.2 - Steam generator behaviour; 19.3 - Reactor building evacuation; 20 - Visits

  11. Expanding the European data protection scope beyond territory: Article 3 of the General Data Protection Regulation in its wider context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, Paul; Czerniawski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Jurisdiction based solely on the territoriality principle is becoming less evident in the digital age This article engages in a discussion with authors such as Kuner and Svantesson, that have expressed a critical view on expansive jurisdiction of the EU data protection regime in issue 4, November

  12. Protecting and improving health through the radiological sciences. A report to the Surgeon General

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-04-01

    This is the third in a series of reports prepared by the-National Advisory Committee on Radiation for the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service. The first two were directed to the broad responsibilities of the Service in the field of radiation control and to problems concerned with the protection of the public against undue radiation exposure from contamination of the environment with radioactive materials. In this report the Committee traces the remarkable growth that has taken place in the uses of ionizing radiation in the health professions, in industry, and in other walks of life. It also notes a number of emerging problems which not only are of importance from the point of view of radiation protection, but also, if not alleviated, threaten the quality of medical care in the United States and the translation of the advances of atomic research into needed benefits for the people. These problems include (a) serious weaknesses in academic departments of radiology which have restricted efforts to provide adequate instruction of medical and post-doctoral students in the clinical applications of ionizing radiation, including radiation protection; and (b) an increasingly severe shortage of manpower in all branches of the radiological sciences. The magnitude and complexity of these problems are sufficiently great that a concerted effort is needed by the Public Health Service to correct them. The alleviation of the problems just cited is but a part of a more comprehensive series of responsibilities faced by the Service in the radiological sciences. The Service must play an important role in the prevention of undue exposure of the population from medical, occupational, and environmental sources of ionizing radiation; at the same time, it must actively support the development and application of radiological methods in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In order that the Service may effectively meet its enlarging responsibilities in the radiological sciences

  13. Protecting and improving health through the radiological sciences. A report to the Surgeon General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-04-01

    This is the third in a series of reports prepared by the-National Advisory Committee on Radiation for the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service. The first two were directed to the broad responsibilities of the Service in the field of radiation control and to problems concerned with the protection of the public against undue radiation exposure from contamination of the environment with radioactive materials. In this report the Committee traces the remarkable growth that has taken place in the uses of ionizing radiation in the health professions, in industry, and in other walks of life. It also notes a number of emerging problems which not only are of importance from the point of view of radiation protection, but also, if not alleviated, threaten the quality of medical care in the United States and the translation of the advances of atomic research into needed benefits for the people. These problems include (a) serious weaknesses in academic departments of radiology which have restricted efforts to provide adequate instruction of medical and post-doctoral students in the clinical applications of ionizing radiation, including radiation protection; and (b) an increasingly severe shortage of manpower in all branches of the radiological sciences. The magnitude and complexity of these problems are sufficiently great that a concerted effort is needed by the Public Health Service to correct them. The alleviation of the problems just cited is but a part of a more comprehensive series of responsibilities faced by the Service in the radiological sciences. The Service must play an important role in the prevention of undue exposure of the population from medical, occupational, and environmental sources of ionizing radiation; at the same time, it must actively support the development and application of radiological methods in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In order that the Service may effectively meet its enlarging responsibilities in the radiological sciences

  14. The Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed-based Approach: where social and natural sciences meet to address today's water resource challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    A growing number of governmental organizations at the local, state, and federal level collaborate with nongovernmental organizations and individuals to solve watershed scale problems (Imperial and Koontz, 2007). Such a shift in policy approach from hierarchical regulation to bottom-up collaboration is largely a result of regulator’s recognition of the interdependence of natural and socio-economic systems on a watershed scale (Steelman and Carmin, 2002. Agencies throughout the federal government increasingly favored new governing institutions that encourage cooperation between local actors with conflicting interests, divergent geographic bases, and overlapping administrative jurisdictions to resolve continuing disputes over resource management (Bardach 1998). This favoritism of collaborative over command-and-control approaches for managing nonpoint source pollution led to the development of watershed partnerships and the watershed-based approach (Lubell et al., 2002). This study aims to further collaborative governance scholarship and aid decision-makers in identifying the critical elements of collaborative governance resulting in environmental improvements. To date, this relationship has not been empirically determined, in spite of the fact that collaborative governance is used routinely by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in resolving issues related to watershed management and other applications. This gap in the research is largely due to the lack of longitudinal data. In order to determine whether changes have occurred, environmental data must be collected over relatively long time periods (Koontz and Thomas, 2006; Sabatier, et al., 2005). However, collecting these data is often cost prohibitive. Monitoring water quality is expensive and requires technical expertise, and is often the first line item cut in environmental management budgets. This research is interdisciplinary, looking at the physical, chemical, and biological parameters for 44 waterbodies

  15. Review of technical justification of assumptions and methods used by the Environmental Protection Agency for estimating risks avoided by implementing MCLs for radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1992-11-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed regulations for allowable levels of radioactive material in drinking water (40 CFR Part 141, 56 FR 33050, July 18, 1991). This review examined the assumptions and methods used by EPA in calculating risks that would be avoided by implementing the proposed Maximum Contaminant Levels for uranium, radium, and radon. Proposed limits on gross alpha and beta-gamma emitters were not included in this review

  16. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Chinese Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-03-15

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules.

  17. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules. [es

  18. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules.

  19. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules.

  20. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules. [fr

  1. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules. [ru

  2. Communication to the Director General of 24 April 1996 received from the resident representative of Saudi Arabia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a letter dated 24 April 1996 received by the Director General of the IAEA on 25 April 1996 from the Resident Representative of Saudi Arabia on behalf of Members of the Agency and Members of the Board of Governors from the Arab States, concerning the Israeli Dimona reactor

  3. Protecting the privacy of individual general practice patient electronic records for geospatial epidemiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Soumya; Konings, Paul; Hewett, Michael; Bagheri, Nasser; McRae, Ian; Del Fante, Peter

    2014-12-01

    General practitioner (GP) practices in Australia are increasingly storing patient information in electronic databases. These practice databases can be accessed by clinical audit software to generate reports that inform clinical or population health decision making and public health surveillance. Many audit software applications also have the capacity to generate de-identified patient unit record data. However, the de-identified nature of the extracted data means that these records often lack geographic information. Without spatial references, it is impossible to build maps reflecting the spatial distribution of patients with particular conditions and needs. Links to socioeconomic, demographic, environmental or other geographically based information are also not possible. In some cases, relatively coarse geographies such as postcode are available, but these are of limited use and researchers cannot undertake precision spatial analyses such as calculating travel times. We describe a method that allows researchers to implement meaningful mapping and spatial epidemiological analyses of practice level patient data while preserving privacy. This solution has been piloted in a diabetes risk research project in the patient population of a practice in Adelaide. The method offers researchers a powerful means of analysing geographic clinic data in a privacy-protected manner. © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  4. Effect of protected research time on ABSITE scores during general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Bruce A; Poirier, Jennifer; Kowal-Vern, Areta; Chan, Edie; Ohara, Karen; Mendoza, Brian

    2018-02-01

    Objective - To determine whether residents with one or more years of dedicated research time (Research Residents, RR) improved their ABSITE scores compared to those without (Non-Research Residents, N-RR). A retrospective review of general surgery residents' ABSITE scores from 1995 to 2016 was performed. RR were compared to N-RR. Additional analysis of At Risk (AR) v Not At Risk residents (NAR) (35th percentile as PGY1-2) was also performed. Cohort - 147 residents (34 RR and 113 N-RR). There were no differences in initial ABSITE scores (p = 0.47). By definition, the AR group had lower scores than NAR. Overall, post-research RR v PGY-4 N-RR scores did not differ (p = 0.84). Only the AR residents improved their scores (p = 0.0009 v NAR p = 0.42), regardless of research group (p = 0.70). Protected research time did not improve residents' ABSITE scores, regardless of initial scores. At Risk residents improved regardless of research group status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inspection methods for physical protection Task III review of other agencies' physical security activities for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Task I of this project, the current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) position-on physical security practices and procedures at research reactors were reviewed. In the second task, a sampling of the physical security plans was presented and the three actual reactor sites described in the security plans were visited. The purpose of Task III is to review other agencies' physical security activities for research reactors. During this phase, the actions, procedures and policies of two domestic and two foreign agencies other than the NRC that relate to the research reactor community were examined. The agencies examined were: International Atomic Energy Agency; Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board; Department of Energy; and American Nuclear Insurers

  6. The Use of the Agency's Two Mobile Radioisotope Laboratories during the Period 1958-1965. Memorandum by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Two mobile laboratories, specially equipped for training courses on the use of radioisotopes, were donated by the Government of the United States of America to the Agency in 195 8. The first one was exhibited in Geneva at the Second International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy in September of that year, and was subsequently taken over by the Agency; the second laboratory was taken over at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1959 and sent directly to Mexico

  7. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandonnet, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This report is destined for the President of EDF with the purpose of informing him of the judgement the Inspector General has about the nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. It is also intended for all who, in any way, play a role at EDF in improving nuclear safety. It may also prove useful to those outside the company who work in the nuclear field or indeed any branch of industry where there are risks to be managed and who wish to participate in the debate. It also contributes to the pool of information shared with the other nuclear operators under the auspices of WANO. The continuous improvement of nuclear safety results is a fundamental commitment of the EDF Group. This is notably reflected in a policy of transparency, whether in France, Britain, America or China. This document constitutes an example of this, offering an independent view of the operational situation. It is based on facts and findings derived in EDF's contacts with field staff and meetings with the decision makers, managers, medical personnel and players on both sides of this industry as well as outside stakeholders, especially contractor companies. The resulting snapshot of the situation in the field is particularly instructive. This report therefore concentrates more on problems and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress, except as concerns happenings outside France, where the focus is more on good practices than difficulties. Contents: 1 - The view from the Inspector General of EDF about the nuclear safety in the EDF group; 2 - A panorama of 2011: The management, The state of the installations, Maintenance of the French nuclear power plants, Relations with the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), The EPR projects, The players in the fields of health and safety, Radiation protection, Fire prevention and fire fighting, Increasing nuclear power plant security, Decommissioning; 3 - Nuclear safety management; 4 - The Fukushima Daiichi accident; 5 - Training to

  8. Noise from wind power plants. A study in anticipation of the recommendation from the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almgren, Martin

    2006-03-01

    Noise from wind turbines are today treated as industrial noise sources according to the guidelines for external industry noise set by Naturvaardsverket (the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency) in RR 1978:5. A praxis has been established with recommended limit 40 dBA equivalent continuous sound pressure level outside dwellings day, evening and night. Naturvaardsverket is planning new guidelines specific for wind turbine noise. A draft was presented at an information meeting 13th May 2005. Special requirements, which in some cases may be far-reaching, are planned for wind turbines. The purpose of this investigation is to illustrate the fairness of the planned requirements. Application of the recommended prediction model for sound propagation above a sea surface in the draft of Naturvaardsverket may lead to serious consequences for the planning of wind power plants near the coast. Research with measurements on sound propagation above water is at present made by the Royal Institute of Technology in Kalmarsund in Sweden. The results of these measurements, which probably will be completed during the spring 2006, should be waited for before a prediction model is recommended. If the model would be valid for sound propagation from wind turbines at sea, there should be some reports on complaint on noise from offshore based wind power plants. We have not been able to locate such complaints in Sweden (Bockstigen), in Denmark (Middelgrunden, Nystedts havmoellepark and Horns rev) or in the Netherlands. For Middelgrund and Nysted, the sound level calculated with Naturvaardsverkets model at 4,5 km and 7 km respectively is around 48 dBA. According to Swedish studies, such a level is annoying to many people. Two methods to set out limits for wind turbine noise are used internationally. In the first an absolute limit for the equivalent continuous sound pressure level is set. In the other, the sound pressure level is related to the background noise level. Naturvaardsverket is

  9. Development of regional environmental protection agencies in Italy; Lo stato di evoluzione delle agenzie regioanli per l'ambiente in Italia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, E. [Agenzia Regionale per l' Ambiente, Milan (Italy); Milan Univ. Bocconi, Milan (Italy). Ist. di Economia delle Fonti di Energia e dell' Ambiente; Verga, V. [Milan Univ. Bocconi, Milan (Italy). Ist. di Economia delle Fonti di Energia e dell' Ambiente

    2000-04-01

    The Italian agencies' system of environmental protection is almost completed: in fact, beside the national agency, 19 regional and provincial agencies have been instituted, 16 of which are already operative. Nevertheless, the system is quite heterogeneous in terms of degree of experience and operational capacity of the different agencies. A new phase of development of the agency system is beginning where the main task is the necessity to guarantee a minimum level of environmental quality over the whole national territory, respecting local peculiarities. Agencies need to have guaranteed technical-scientific autonomy as well as adequate financial allowance. However, all this must be related to the definition of adequate, homogeneous and wide working methodologies and performance assessment criteria. [Italian] Il sistema delle agenzie per la protezione dell'ambientein Italia e' oggi quasi completo e vede 19 agenzie regionali e delle province autonome istituite, di cui 16 operative, oltre all'agenzia nazionale. Il sistema e' tuttavia caratterizzato da rilevanti disomogeneita' in termini di esperienza e capacita' operativa. Si entra in nuova fase di sviluppo del sistema agenziale la cui principale criticita' e' costituita dalla necessita' di garantire un livello minimo di qualita' ambientale su tutto il territorio nazionale, nel rispetto delle specificita' locali. A tal fine deve essere garantita l'autonomai tecnico-scientifica delle agenzie e attribuita loro un'adeguata dotazione finanziaria, a fronte, pero', della definizione di adeguati metodi di lavoro e criteri di valutazione delle performance sufficientemente omogeni e condivisi.

  10. General conclusions arising from a field evaluation of the Agency's RAPAT and WAMAP programmes in the Asia and Pacific region 1984-1993. Special evaluation review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.; Fitch, J.; Cooley, C.; Saire, D.E.; Colombo, P.; Palacios, E.

    1994-01-01

    In support of the assistance provided to the developing Member States of IAEA in the areas of radiation protection and radioactive waste management, two advisory programmes were established by IAEA. The radiation Protection Advisory Teams (RAPATs) in 1984, and the Radioactive Waste Management Programme (WAMAP) in 1987. This report summarizes general achievements, finding, conclusions and recommendations regarding these two programmes in Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, and Philippines

  11. Royal Order of 22 April 1974 on Establishment of Fees in Implementation of Regulations on Protection at Work, Protection against Hazardous Equipment and Ionizing Radiations and amending the General Regulations on Protection at Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Order was made in implementation of the Act of 3 December 1969 empowering the King to establish fees in application of regulations on protection at work, dangerous equipment and ionizing radiations. In particular, it sets fees for the licensing procedure for establishment classified according to the General Regulations for the Protection of the Population and Workers against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations of 28 February 1963. (NEA) [fr

  12. 34 CFR 222.40 - How does a local educational agency select a local contribution rate based on generally...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IMPACT AID PROGRAMS Payments for Federally Connected Children Under Section 8003(b..., size, location, or a combination of these factors, (that is, in the case of the significantly impacted... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does a local educational agency select a local...

  13. 41 CFR 102-80.80 - With what general accident and fire prevention policy must Federal agencies comply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agencies must— (a) Comply with the occupational safety and health standards established in the Occupational... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 80-SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Accident and Fire Prevention § 102...

  14. Protective mechanical ventilation during general anesthesia for open abdominal surgery improves postoperative pulmonary function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severgnini, Paolo; Selmo, Gabriele; Lanza, Christian; Chiesa, Alessandro; Frigerio, Alice; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Novario, Raffaele; Gregoretti, Cesare; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Schultz, Marcus J.; Jaber, Samir; Futier, Emmanuel; Chiaranda, Maurizio; Pelosi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The impact of intraoperative ventilation on postoperative pulmonary complications is not defined. The authors aimed at determining the effectiveness of protective mechanical ventilation during open abdominal surgery on a modified Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score as primary outcome and

  15. A general description of the Swedish radiation protection regulations of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staalnacke, C.-G.

    2001-01-01

    The regulation of ionizing radiation in Sweden is based on both the Radiation Protection Act and Ordinance from 1998. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (SSI) acts as the regulatory authority for radiation safety and issues detailed regulations in specific areas. The report summarizes how the SSI controls radiation sources, including orphan sources for which a process for analyzing their occurrence has started in Sweden. A number of proposed procedures for the control and follow-up of sealed radioactive sources is provided. (author)

  16. Consumer protection issues in energy: a guide for attorneys general. Insulation, solar, automobile device, home devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Harry I.; Hulse, William S.; Jones, Robert R.; Langer, Robert M.; Petrucelli, Paul J.; Schroeder, Robert J.

    1979-11-01

    The guide attempts to bring together two important and current issues: energy and consumer protection. Perhaps the most basic consumer-protection issue in the energy area is assuring adequate supplies at adequate prices. It is anticipated, though, that consumers will want to consider new ways to lower enegy consumption and cost, and will thus be susceptible to fraudulent energy claims. Information is prepared on insulation, solar, energy-saving devices for the home, and energy-saving devices for the automobile.

  17. Variability in the Use of Protective Mechanical Ventilation During General Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladha, Karim S; Bateman, Brian T; Houle, Timothy T; De Jong, Myrthe A C; Vidal Melo, Marcos F; Huybrechts, Krista F; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether significant variation exists in the use of protective ventilation across individual anesthesia providers and whether this difference can be explained by patient, procedure, and provider-related characteristics. The cohort consisted of 262 anesthesia providers treating 57,372 patients at a tertiary care hospital between 2007 and 2014. Protective ventilation was defined as a median positive end-expiratory pressure of 5 cm H2O or more, tidal volume of protective ventilation was modified in sensitivity analyses. In unadjusted analysis, the mean probability of administering protective ventilation was 53.8% (2.5th percentile of provider 19.9%, 97.5th percentile 80.8%). After adjustment for a large number of covariates, there was little change in the results with a mean probability of 51.1% (2.5th percentile 24.7%, 97.5th percentile 77.2%). The variations persisted when the thresholds for protective ventilation were changed. There was significant variability across individual anesthesia providers in the use of intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation. Our data suggest that this variability is highly driven by individual preference, rather than patient, procedure, or provider-related characteristics.

  18. The Environmental Protection Agency's Safety Standards for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel: Potential Path Forward in Response to the Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future - 13388

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forinash, Betsy; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Following the decision to withdraw the Yucca Mountain license application, the Department of Energy created a Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future, tasked with recommending a national strategy to manage the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. The BRC issued its final report in January 2012, with recommendations covering transportation, storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF); potential reprocessing; and supporting institutional measures. The BRC recommendations on disposal of SNF and high-level waste (HLW) are relevant to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which shares regulatory responsibility with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC): EPA issues 'generally applicable' performance standards for disposal repositories, which are then implemented in licensing. For disposal, the BRC endorses developing one or more geological repositories, with siting based on an approach that is adaptive, staged and consent-based. The BRC recommends that EPA and NRC work cooperatively to issue generic disposal standards-applying equally to all sites-early in any siting process. EPA previously issued generic disposal standards that apply to all sites other than Yucca Mountain. However, the BRC concluded that the existing regulations should be revisited and revised. The BRC proposes a number of general principles to guide the development of future regulations. EPA continues to review the BRC report and to assess the implications for Agency action, including potential regulatory issues and considerations if EPA develops new or revised generic disposal standards. This review also involves preparatory activities to define potential process and public engagement approaches. (authors)

  19. 2013 EPA Vessels General Permit (VGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Information for any vessel that submitted a Notice of Intent (NOI), Notice of Termination (NOT), or annual report under EPA's 2013 Vessel General Permit (VGP)....

  20. 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2011 EPA Pesticide General Permit (PGP) covers discharges of biological pesticides, and chemical pesticides that leave a residue, in areas where EPA is the NPDES...

  1. Level of Awareness and Basic Knowledge Related to Radiation Protection Based on Academic Qualification and Service Tenure in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munira Shaikh Nasir

    2015-01-01

    Effective radiation protection program is vital to ensure the safety of workers involved in work related to radiation. This objective of this research was to determine the level of awareness towards radiation protection among the workers at Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Questionnaire forms containing questions related to relevant work experience and knowledge of radiation safety were distributed to a group of identified radiation workers. The hypothesis of this study is that all workers involved have high levels of awareness and basic knowledge as they work in an institution which activities frequently and routinely involve radiation. The result of this research show that the level of awareness and knowledge of the respondents were at a good level, with an average overall score of 87.2% showed a high level of awareness among respondents. Overall, highest academic qualifications did not affect the level of knowledge (p > 0.05). In contrast, service tenure affects their level of knowledge (p < 0.05). (author)

  2. Producing remote sensing-based emission estimates of prescribed burning in the contiguous United States for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2011 National Emissions Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, J. L.; Pouliot, G. A.; Soja, A. J.; Miller, M. E.; Rao, T.

    2013-12-01

    Prescribed fires in agricultural landscapes generally produce smaller burned areas than wildland fires but are important contributors to emissions impacting air quality and human health. Currently, there are a variety of available satellite-based estimates of crop residue burning, including the NOAA/NESDIS Hazard Mapping System (HMS) the Satellite Mapping Automated Reanalysis Tool for Fire Incident Reconciliation (SMARTFIRE 2), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Official Burned Area Product (MCD45A1)), the MODIS Direct Broadcast Burned Area Product (MCD64A1) the MODIS Active Fire Product (MCD14ML), and a regionally-tuned 8-day cropland differenced Normalized Burn Ratio product for the contiguous U.S. The purpose of this NASA-funded research was to refine the regionally-tuned product utilizing higher spatial resolution crop type data from the USDA NASS Cropland Data Layer and burned area training data from field work and high resolution commercial satellite data to improve the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The final product delivered to the EPA included a detailed database of 25 different atmospheric emissions at the county level, emission distributions by crop type and seasonality, and GIS data. The resulting emission databases were shared with the U.S. EPA and regional offices, the National Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWGC) Smoke Committee, and all 48 states in the contiguous U.S., with detailed error estimations for Wyoming and Indiana and detailed analyses of results for Florida, Minnesota, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Oregon. This work also provided opportunities in discovering the different needs of federal and state partners, including the various geospatial abilities and platforms across the many users and how to incorporate expert air quality, policy, and land management knowledge into quantitative earth observation-based estimations of prescribed fire emissions. Finally, this work

  3. 40 CFR 141.700 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... described in §§ 141.721 through 141.722. (7) Systems must address significant deficiencies identified in... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements. 141.700 Section 141.700 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS...

  4. 40 CFR 450.11 - General definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General definitions. 450.11 Section 450.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND.... (a) New source. New source means any source, whose discharges are defined in 40 CFR 122.26(b)(14)(x...

  5. 40 CFR 164.130 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General. 164.130 Section 164.130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS RULES OF PRACTICE... on a pest for which registration has been finally cancelled or suspended by the Administrator...

  6. ["Epistemic Negotiations" and the Pluralism of the Radiation Protection Regime: The Determination of Radiation Protection Standards for the General Population in the Early Years After World War II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Toshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Radiation protection standards for the general population have constituted one of the most controversial subjects in the history of atomic energy uses. This paper reexamines the process in which the first such standards evolved in the early postwar period. While the existing literature has emphasized a "collusion" between the standard-setters and users, the paper seeks to examine the horizontal relationship among the standard-setters. It first examines a series of expert consultations between the United States and the United Kingdom. Representing a different configuration of power and interest, the two failed to agree on the assessment of genetic damage and cancer induction whose occurrence might have no threshold and therefore be dependent on the population size. This stalemate prevented the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), established in 1950, from formulating separate guidelines for the general public. Situations radically changed when the Bikini incident in 1954 led to the creation of more scientific panels. One such panel under the U.S. Academy of Sciences enabled the geneticists to bridge their internal divide, unanimously naming 100 mSv as the genetically permissible dose for the general population. Not to be outdone, ICRP publicized its own guidelines for the same purpose. The case examined in this paper shows that the standard-setting process is best understood as a series of "epistemic negotiations" among and within the standard-setters, whose agendas were determined from the outset but whose outcomes were not.

  7. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the FY 1998 Army General Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    An audit of the Army General Fund Financial Statements is required by Public Law 101-576, the "Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990," November 15, 1990, as amended by Public Law 103-356, the "Federal...

  8. UMTRA Project remedial action planning and disposal cell design to comply with the proposed EPA [Environmental Protection Agency] standards (40 CFR Part 192)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project involves stabilizing 24 inactive uranium mill tailings piles in 10 states. Remedial work must meet standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Remedial action must be designed and constructed to prevent dispersion of the tailings and other contaminated materials, and must prevent the inadvertent use of the tailings by man. This report is prepared primarily for distribution to parties involved in the UMTRA Project, including the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and states and tribes. It is intended to record the work done by the DOE since publication of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards, and to show how the DOE has attempted to respond and react in a positive way to the new requirements that result from the proposed standards. This report discusses the groundwater compliance strategies now being defined and implemented by the DOE, and details the changes in disposal cell designs that result from studies to evaluate ways to facilitate compliance with the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. This report also serves to record the technical advances, planning, and progress made on the UMTRA Project since the appearance of the proposed EPA groundwater protection standards. The report serves to establish, document, and disseminate technical approaches and engineering and groundwater information to people who may be interested or involved in similar or related projects. 24 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Annual report of the Chief Executive Officer of Australian Radiation Protection And Nuclear Safety Agency, 2001-200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In the period analysed ARPANSA contributed to the (then) Health and Aged Care portfolio's 'Outcome 1: Population Health and Safety'. The objective of this outcome was the promotion and protection of the health of all Australians and minimising the incidence of preventable mortality, illness, injury and disability. The main outcomes, as outlined in the reports are: regulation of Commonwealth activities involving radiation sources and nuclear facilities; progress towards the development of a National Directory for Radiation Protection; quality assurance programs in medical radiation and conduct evaluations of individual and population doses; health impact assessment of radiation exposure and methodologies for this assessment, recommendations and guidelines for limiting radiation exposure; progress towards third-party quality assurance certification for the personal radiation monitoring service, radionuclide analysis of gamma ray emitting nuclides, Ultraviolet Protection Factor; assessing radiopharmaceutical testing and the protection dosimeter calibration service; maintenance of a network for monitoring radionuclides in the atmosphere; safety standards and guidance in support of the work of the Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council, the Radiation Health Committee and the Nuclear Safety Committee. The major priorities for ARPANSA in the reporting year, included the assessment of an application to construct the replacement research reactor at ANSTO, implementation of a process for public consultation and participation in the licensing of nuclear facilities and the development of national standards and codes of practice, including a standard for radiofrequency radiation

  10. Some legal aspects related implementation at Brazil of the International Atomic Energy Agency recommendations related to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezrahi, Arnaldo; Matos, Gilberto Cardoso de; Wieland, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) - the Brazilian nuclear regulatory authority- applies the basic guidelines regarding Radiation Protection (CNEN standard NE-3.01) in force since June 1988, for the licensing and control of nuclear, industrial, medical and research facilities, as well as for the safety of sources and for radioactive material transportation. In 1996, the IAEA published a new recommendations that established patterns for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources and recommended Member States to adopt them. The adoption of the IAEA document, namely Safety Series 115, by a member state, does not imply to follow the whole text. The application of IAEA recommendations, contained in its documents, should take into consideration the autochthonous characteristics of each Member State. The Safety Series 115 has a very broad scope involving recommendation to countries at different development stages, especially those that do not even have a nuclear regulatory authority. In the specific case of Brazil, besides its advanced technological level, there exists a very complex and effective legal framework that hinders the establishment of norms and regulations regarding radiation protection guidelines. Therefore the direct application of the IAEA's recommendations requires a very careful legal evaluation in order to avoid conflicts of competence and duplication of efforts among the different involved authorities. This paper presents some of the important legal aspects especially in what concerns CNEN's competence, which is responsible for the issuance of the new radiation protection guidelines in accordance with the legislation. (author)

  11. Letter from Mr. M. Gorbachev, General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, to Dr. H. Blix, Director General of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    The full text of the letter from Mr. M. Gorbachev, General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, to Dr. H. Blix, Director General of the IAEA after the nuclear accident at Chernobyl power station is presented. Suggestions for the establishment of an international regime of safe nuclear power development as a result of lessons from the Chernobyl accident are made

  12. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national network of research centers: A case study in socio-political influences on research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morehouse, K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-01

    During the 15 years that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has supported university-based research centers, there have been many changes in mission, operating style, funding level, eligibility, and selection process. Even the definition of the term {open_quotes}research center{close_quotes} is open to debate. Shifting national priorities, political realities, and funding uncertainties have powered the evolution of research centers in EPA, although the agency`s basic philosophy on the purpose and value of this approach to research remains essentially unchanged. Today, EPA manages 28 centers, through the Office of Exploratory Research. These centers are administered under three distinct programs. Each program has its own mission and goals which guide the way individual centers are selected and operated. This paper will describe: (1) EPA`s philosophy of reserach centers, (2) the complicated history of EPA research centers, (3) coordination and interaction among EPA centers and others, (4) opportunities for collaboration, and (5) plans for the future.

  13. Protection Motivation and Self-Efficacy: Toward a General Expectancy-Value Model of Attitude Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, James E.; Rogers, Ronald W.

    Rogers' protection motivation theory that, in a fear-producing situation, stresses cognitive processes rather than emotional ones and emphasizes coping with or avoiding aversive events rather than reducing unpleasant emotional states and Bandura's theory of self-efficacy, i.e., all processes of psychological change operate through the alteration…

  14. 45 CFR 164.502 - Uses and disclosures of protected health information: general rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... disclosures by a health plan that is a government program providing public benefits, if eligibility for, or... that such decision must be made by a licensed health care professional, in the exercise of professional... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Uses and disclosures of protected health...

  15. Protective mechanical ventilation during general anesthesia for open abdominal surgery improves postoperative pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severgnini, Paolo; Selmo, Gabriele; Lanza, Christian; Chiesa, Alessandro; Frigerio, Alice; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Novario, Raffaele; Gregoretti, Cesare; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Schultz, Marcus J; Jaber, Samir; Futier, Emmanuel; Chiaranda, Maurizio; Pelosi, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    The impact of intraoperative ventilation on postoperative pulmonary complications is not defined. The authors aimed at determining the effectiveness of protective mechanical ventilation during open abdominal surgery on a modified Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score as primary outcome and postoperative pulmonary function. Prospective randomized, open-label, clinical trial performed in 56 patients scheduled to undergo elective open abdominal surgery lasting more than 2 h. Patients were assigned by envelopes to mechanical ventilation with tidal volume of 9 ml/kg ideal body weight and zero-positive end-expiratory pressure (standard ventilation strategy) or tidal volumes of 7 ml/kg ideal body weight, 10 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure, and recruitment maneuvers (protective ventilation strategy). Modified Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score, gas exchange, and pulmonary functional tests were measured preoperatively, as well as at days 1, 3, and 5 after surgery. Patients ventilated protectively showed better pulmonary functional tests up to day 5, fewer alterations on chest x-ray up to day 3 and higher arterial oxygenation in air at days 1, 3, and 5 (mmHg; mean ± SD): 77.1 ± 13.0 versus 64.9 ± 11.3 (P = 0.0006), 80.5 ± 10.1 versus 69.7 ± 9.3 (P = 0.0002), and 82.1 ± 10.7 versus 78.5 ± 21.7 (P = 0.44) respectively. The modified Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score was lower in the protective ventilation strategy at days 1 and 3. The percentage of patients in hospital at day 28 after surgery was not different between groups (7 vs. 15% respectively, P = 0.42). A protective ventilation strategy during abdominal surgery lasting more than 2 h improved respiratory function and reduced the modified Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score without affecting length of hospital stay.

  16. 40 CFR 205.55-1 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements. 205.55-1 Section 205.55-1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.55-1 General...

  17. 40 CFR 76.3 - General Acid Rain Program provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General Acid Rain Program provisions. 76.3 Section 76.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.3 General Acid Rain Program provisions...

  18. The OENORM S 5200 'Radioactivity in building materials' as a tool for radiation protection of the general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunsch, B.

    1989-04-01

    This report comprises two papers, one which is announced in the title, i.e. B. Kunsch, F. Steger, E. Tschirf: The OENORM S 5200 'Radioactivity in building materials' as a tool for radiation protection of the general population; and in addition a paper by F. Steger, H. Stadtmann, P. Kindl, L. Breitenhuber: Radon in dwellings: investigations and measurements. The two papers are treated separately. (qui)

  19. 28 CFR 60.3 - Agencies with authorized personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of Indian Affairs Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife National Park Service (5) Department of...: Office of Inspector General (14) Department of Housing and Urban Development: Office of Inspector General... Inspector General (17) Environmental Protection Agency: Office of Criminal Investigations (18) Social...

  20. Anatomy of a public health agency turnaround: the case of the general health district in Mahoning County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honoré, Peggy A; Stefanak, Matthew; Dessens, Scott

    2012-01-01

    A turnaround describes an organization's ability to recover from successive periods of decline. Current and projected declines in US economic conditions continue to place local public health departments at risk of fiscal exigency. This examination focused on turnaround methodologies used by a local public health department to reverse successive periods of operational and financial declines. Illustrations are provided on the value added by implementing financial ratio and trend analysis in addition to using evidence-based private sector turnaround strategies of retrenchment, repositioning, and reorganization. Evidence has shown how the financial analysis and strategies aided in identifying operational weakness and set in motion corrective measures. The Public Health Uniform Data System is introduced along with a list of standards offered for mainstreaming these and other routine stewardship practices to diagnose, predict, and prevent agency declines.

  1. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of the general public toward sun exposure and protection: A national survey in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; AlAklabi, Aeed S; AlQahtani, Abdulla Z

    2016-11-01

    Background: Many international studies have been conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of the public toward sun exposure and sun-protection measures. However, there are scarce data on these factors from the Middle East. Objectives: This study aimed to explore the KAP of the public toward sun exposure and sun-protection measures among Saudis. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using a specially designed questionnaire was conducted on a stratified random sample of the general population in the five geographical regions of Saudi Arabia (central, eastern, northern, southern, and western). Data were collected between October 2010 and March 2011. Multiple logistic regressions were applied to relate the use of sunscreen and skin cancer awareness with various socio-demographic variables. Results: The questionnaire was distributed to 2900 Saudis. A total of 2622 questionnaires were completed, returned, and included in the data analysis, corresponding to a response rate of 90.4%. The mean (SD) age of respondents was 27.8 ± 9.7 years. Fifty percent (1301/1601) of the respondents were males. Fifty-five percent (1406/2544) were aware of the association between sun exposure and skin cancer. Female, young and student respondents were more likely to be aware of the connection between sun exposure and skin cancer ( p  Protective clothes were the most commonly used sun protection measure as reported by more than 90% of our participants. Conclusion: This study has shown that sun awareness and protection are generally inadequate in the Saudi population and suggests the need for health education programs.

  2. Royal Order of 5 December 1975 amending the Royal Order of 11 May 1971 embodying the general Military Regulations for Protection Against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Royal Order amends the Royal Order on general Military Regulations for Protection against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations to bring it into line with the Royal Order of 23 December 1970, amending the general Regulations for Protection of the Population and Workers against the Hazards of Ionizing Radiations of 28 February 1963, subject to certain adaptations specific to military activities. (NEA) [fr

  3. Protection of consumer rights in the field of economic services of general economic interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Dinu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, the demand for services of general interest and the manner they are provided have evolved significantly. Services that the state would traditionally provide in a direct form have been increasingly outsourced by national, regional and local authorities, and are now often provided by the private sector (with or without profit. This changed approach is driven by the processes of deregulation, the changes in government policies and the changing needs and expectations of users According to its European definition, a general interest service is a service that "public authorities classify as being general interest, and is subject to specific public service obligations". These services were identified as having a central role in the European model of society that the European Union has been built on, because they meet people’s basic needs.

  4. A diffusion model of protected population on bilocal habitat with generalized resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Maxim D.; Trofimtsev, Yuri I.; Vasilyeva, Natalya V.

    2017-11-01

    A model of population distribution in a two-dimensional area divided by an ecological barrier, i.e. the boundaries of natural reserve, is considered. Distribution of the population is defined by diffusion, directed migrations and areal resource. The exchange of specimens occurs between two parts of the habitat. The mathematical model is presented in the form of a boundary value problem for a system of non-linear parabolic equations with variable parameters of diffusion and growth function. The splitting space variables, sweep method and simple iteration methods were used for the numerical solution of a system. A set of programs was coded in Python. Numerical simulation results for the two-dimensional unsteady non-linear problem are analyzed in detail. The influence of migration flow coefficients and functions of natural birth/death ratio on the distributions of population densities is investigated. The results of the research would allow to describe the conditions of the stable and sustainable existence of populations in bilocal habitat containing the protected and non-protected zones.

  5. An Assessment Of Plateau Environmental Protection And Sanitation Agency Pepsa As A Waste Management Institution In Jos City Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogboji Frederick Eche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Municipal solid waste constitutes mans unwanted materials that need to be discarded. It is consisting of substances materials and objects considered as worthless or defective and of no value for human economic productive activities at a point in time. Apart from constituting an eye sore to urban environment it constitute health hazards and threatens the health of man and animals in the city. This research attempts an assessment of the performance of Plateau Environmental agency the research made use of both primary and secondary data. Data generated was analyzed using descriptive statistics while inferential technique of chi-square was used to test the research hypothesis. Results obtained shows that majority of the respondents were traders 34.3 with secondary education 36. Forty-five percent 45 of landuse type responsible for waste generation is residential that 42 of waste generated is mostly ashes. Majority of waste containers used are plastic 33 and that 52 of respondents are aware of PEPSA activities in their locations. A focus group discussion FGD shaded more light on the prospect and limitations of PEPSA. The research concludes that there is the need to overhaul methods of municipal solid waste collection and disposal in metropolitan Jos. Relevant recommendations were made in respect of the study area.

  6. Special procedural measures and the protection of human rights General report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervaele, J.A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the general report is to conduct a comparative analysis of the national reports in order to trace transformation processes in domestic criminal justice systems, in particular criminal process, as special procedural measures are introduced to deal with terrorism and organised crime, and to

  7. 10 CFR 61.41 - Protection of the general population from releases of radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... radioactivity. 61.41 Section 61.41 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR... from releases of radioactivity. Concentrations of radioactive material which may be released to the... maintain releases of radioactivity in effluents to the general environment as low as is reasonably...

  8. General strategy for the protection of organs at risk in IMRT therapy of a moving body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolfath, Ramin M.; Papiez, Lech

    2009-01-01

    We investigated protection strategies of organs at risk (OARs) in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These strategies apply to delivery of IMRT to moving body anatomies that show relative displacement of OAR in close proximity to a tumor target. We formulated an efficient genetic algorithm which makes it possible to search for global minima in a complex landscape of multiple irradiation strategies delivering a given, predetermined intensity map to a target. The optimal strategy was investigated with respect to minimizing the dose delivered to the OAR. The optimization procedure developed relies on variability of all parameters available for control of radiation delivery in modern linear accelerators, including adaptation of leaf trajectories and simultaneous modification of beam dose rate during irradiation. We showed that the optimization algorithms lead to a significant reduction in the dose delivered to OAR in cases where organs at risk move relative to a treatment target.

  9. General strategy for the protection of organs at risk in IMRT therapy of a moving body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolfath, Ramin M.; Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We investigated protection strategies of organs at risk (OARs) in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These strategies apply to delivery of IMRT to moving body anatomies that show relative displacement of OAR in close proximity to a tumor target. We formulated an efficient genetic algorithm which makes it possible to search for global minima in a complex landscape of multiple irradiation strategies delivering a given, predetermined intensity map to a target. The optimal strategy was investigated with respect to minimizing the dose delivered to the OAR. The optimization procedure developed relies on variability of all parameters available for control of radiation delivery in modern linear accelerators, including adaptation of leaf trajectories and simultaneous modification of beam dose rate during irradiation. We showed that the optimization algorithms lead to a significant reduction in the dose delivered to OAR in cases where organs at risk move relative to a treatment target.

  10. Regulatory issues for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant long-term compliance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR 191B and 268

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.R.; Marietta, M.G.; Higgins, P.J. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), specifically the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191), and the Land Disposal Restrictions (40 CFR 268) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This paper provides background information on the regulations, describes the SNL WIPP PA Departments approach to developing a defensible technical basis for consistent compliance evaluations, and summarizes the major observations and conclusions drawn from the 1991 and 1992 PAs

  11. Statement to the 36th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 21 September 1992; Statement to the 47th session of the United Nations General Assembly 21 October 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1993-01-01

    IAEA Director General, Hans Blix, in his statements to the 47th session of the United Nations General Assembly and to the 36th session of the General Conference of the IAEA, reminded that 1992 marks the fiftieth anniversary of controlled nuclear fission and the thirty-fifth anniversary of the IAEA. He specially commented on the various measures taken during the past year to strengthen the IAEA's safeguards system as a part of the challenge to reduce the risk of a further spread of nuclear weapons. He also discussed the role of the IAEA in the fields of nuclear safety, nuclear waste, transfer of technology and assistance to developing countries and the financing and management of the Agency within the UN system

  12. A review of the methods used by the US Environmental Protection Agency to assess the financial impacts of the repository regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pflum, C.G.; Mattson, S.R.; Matthusen, A.C.

    1994-01-01

    All Federal agencies must consider the financial impacts of their regulations. When costs significantly outweigh benefits, the Office of Management and Budget can recommend that Congress not provide the funds needed to implement the regulation. Without funds, the agency is forced to either revise or retract the regulation. This has happened previously with a regulation on uranium mill tailings proposed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and it could happen again with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations that govern the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The EPA (1985, 1992) claims that its regulation: ''Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Waste'' (40 CFR Part 191 or standards) does not increase costs above what the US Department of Energy (DOE) would spend anyway or, at most, what the DOE would spend to comply with 10 CFR Part 60: a regulation promulgated by the NRC. This report reviews and disputes the EPA claim. In Chapter 2 a summary of the basis for the EPA claim is presented and in Chapter 3 a critique of the basis of the claim is presented. This critique finds the EPA basis unrealistic, incomplete, and misleading. According to the EPA, a repository at Yucca Mountain would easily meet 40 CFR Part 191 even without the use of special engineered barriers. Because the NRC regulation (10 CFR Part 60) requires engineered barriers, the EPA places the onus for regulatory costs on the NRC. We disagree; the EPA standards drive regulatory costs as much as NRC regulations. The EPA has the higher responsibility for setting the overall standard for safety while the NRC can only implement this standard

  13. [General survey and protection of intangible cultural heritage in traditional medicine in Zhejiang Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, D M

    2017-07-28

    From January 2003 to October 2008, the Zhejiang Provincial Department of Culture, together with the Intangible Cultural Heritage Management Department of 11 cities and counties, including Hangzhou, Ningbo, Wenzhou, Huzhou, Jiaxing, Shaoxing, Jinhua, Quzhou, Zhoushan, Taizhou, Lishui, surveyed the Province's intangible cultural heritage in traditional medicine, with a total of 7849 items, including 7 kinds of traditional medicine in 8 major categories: living Chinese medicine culture, ethnic medicine, acu-moxibustion, osteopathic therapy, unique therapies, and Chinese crude drugs, herbal medicine and traditional Chinese medicine preparation, TCM processing.Among them, 9 items have been included in the Representative Project List of National Traditional Medicine Intangible Cultural Heritage, 18 items were listed in Representative Project Directory of Zhejiang Traditional Medicine Intangible Cultural Heritage.Theprotection and inheritance of traditional of the intangible heritage of traditional medicine in Zhejiang province are mainly through the 4 batches of master guidance apprentices.In addition, protection is carried out through organizational support, literature systematization and other measures.

  14. Patient and population protection in X-ray examinations -a general roentgenological and health problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadzhidekov, G.; Dermendzhiev, Kh.

    1975-01-01

    Population exposure in excess of that due to natural radiation background is known to result primarily (to 70-90%) from medical X-rays given in mass screening. Protection of the population is a problem of great concern in present-day radiology and is approached by balancing benefits of diagnostic X-rays against risks presented by the probability of overexposing the patient. An evaluation on such a basis necessitates detailed and accurate information on patient radiation exposure and takes into account factors leading to a population hazard by making assessments in terms of so-called genetically significant doses. Gonad doses have to be carefully analysed, implying a need for studies of various types of X-ray procedures, precautionary measures taken, etc. An important issue in the choice and adoption of an appropriate method for large-scale gonad dose assessments in routine practice. To obtain an estimate of radiation hazard from medical roentgenology in terms of genetically significant doses and identify measures necessary to limit exposure risks, collaborative efforts are needed involving participation of roentgenologists and hygienists, and use of dosimetric, organizational-methodological, and statistical techniques. These efforts should lead to an abrupt reduction in radiation burden to the population from diagnostic X-rays. (author)

  15. Predation and aggressiveness in host plant protection: a generalization using ants from the genus Azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejean, Alain; Grangier, Julien; Leroy, Céline; Orivel, Jerôme

    2009-01-01

    In studying the ant genus Azteca, a Neotropical group of arboreal species, we aimed to determine the extent to which the ants use predation and/or aggressiveness to protect their host plants from defoliating insects. We compared a territorially dominant, carton-nester, Azteca chartifex, and three plant-ant species. Azteca alfari and Azteca ovaticeps are associated with the myrmecophyte Cecropia (Cecropiaceae) and their colonies shelter in its hollow branches; whereas Azteca bequaerti is associated with Tococa guianensis (Melastomataceae) and its colonies shelter in leaf pouches situated at the base of the laminas. Whereas A. bequaerti workers react to the vibrations transmitted by the lamina when an alien insect lands on a leaf making it unnecessary for them to patrol their plant, the workers of the three other species rather discover prey by contact. The workers of all four species use a predatory behaviour involving spread-eagling alien insects after recruiting nestmates at short range, and, in some cases, at long range. Because A. alfari and A. ovaticeps discard part of the insects they kill, we deduced that the workers’ predatory behaviour and territorial aggressiveness combine in the biotic defence of their host tree.

  16. Protective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam M. Abdel-Wahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many active ingredients extracted from herbal and medicinal plants are extensively studied for their beneficial effects. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging properties of thymoquinone (TQ have been reported. The present study evaluated the possible protective effects of TQ against the toxicity and oxidative stress of sodium fluoride (NaF in the liver of rats. Rats were divided into four groups, the first group served as the control group and was administered distilled water whereas the NaF group received NaF orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks, TQ group was administered TQ orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 weeks, and the NaF-TQ group was first given TQ for 1 week and was secondly administered 10 mg/kg/day NaF in association with 10 mg/kg TQ for 4 weeks. Rats intoxicated with NaF showed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation whereas the level of reduced glutathione (GSH and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione S-transferase (GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were reduced in hepatic tissues. The proper functioning of the liver was also disrupted as indicated by alterations in the measured liver function indices and biochemical parameters. TQ supplementation counteracted the NaF-induced hepatotoxicity probably due to its strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the results obtained clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress in the induction of NaF toxicity and suggested hepatoprotective effects of TQ against the toxicity of fluoride compounds.

  17. Act No. 61 of 21 January 1994-Transformation into law, with amendments, of Decree-Law No. 496 of 4 December 1996 laying down urgent provisions on reorganising environmental controls and creating the National Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Act sets up the National Environmental Protection Agency-ANPA which replaces the Nuclear Safety and Health Protection Directorate (ENEA/DISP) of the National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment (ENEA). The ENEA/DISP's tasks, staff, structures, technical equipment and financial resources are transferred to the new Agency. ANPA is responsible for all the national technical and scientific activities and co-ordinates the working methods of the above-mentioned regional and provincial agencies. It also provides consultation and support services to the Ministry of the environment. In particular, ANPA is competent for supervising activities related to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and analysing the impact of radiation on the environment. (NEA)

  18. Radiation-induced cataracts: the Health Protection Agency's response to the ICRP statement on tissue reactions and recommendation on the dose limit for the eye lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffler, Simon; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Gilvin, Phil; Harrison, John

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the response of the Health Protection Agency (HPA) to the 2011 statement from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) on tissue reactions and recommendation of a reduced dose limit for the lens of the eye. The response takes the form of a brief review of the most recent epidemiological and mechanistic evidence. This is presented together with a discussion of dose limits in the context of the related risk and the current status of eye dosimetry, which is relevant for implementation of the limits. It is concluded that although further work is desirable to quantify better the risk at low doses and following protracted exposures, along with research into the mechanistic basis for radiation cataractogenesis to inform selection of risk projection models, the HPA endorses the conclusion reached by the ICRP in their 2011 statement that the equivalent dose limit for the lens of the eye should be reduced from 150 to 20 mSv per year, averaged over a five year period, with no year's dose exceeding 50 mSv.

  19. Role of general and specific competence skills in protecting inner-city adolescents from alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, J A; Griffin, K W; Botvin, G J

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal investigation was to test whether higher levels of general competence are linked to greater refusal assertiveness that is, in turn, related to less subsequent alcohol use among inner-city adolescents. A large sample of students attending 22 middle and junior high schools in New York City participated. Students completed surveys at baseline, at 1-year follow-up and at 2-year follow-up (N = 1,459; 54% female). The students self-reported alcohol use. decision-making skills, self-efficacy and refusal assertiveness. Teams of three to five data collectors administered the questionnaire following a standardized protocol. The data were collected in school during a regular 40-minute class period. According to the tested structural equation model, Decision Making (beta = .07, p Assertiveness and this greater assertiveness predicted less drinking at the 2-year follow-up (beta = -.21, p assertiveness within adolescent alcohol prevention programs.

  20. Dental radiological protection - an investigation of the status in general practice in the Republic of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeliger, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    The historical events relating to the discovery of x-rays in 1895 by W.C. Roentgen, are briefly sketched and previous surveys on radiological protection in dental practice are critically examined. The most important factors influencing the radiation dose in dental radiography are discussed, as well as the biological effects of ionizing radiation. The aims and objectives of the study were to carry out a survey on a representative sample of dentists in private practice to ascertain the current status of dental radiological protection, to analyse the results and to compare them to the findings of surveys performed in other countries. The final aim was to be able to make, wherever necessary and possible, recommendations to improve the standard of radiation protection in general practice. A personal survey was made of 141 randomly-selected dental practices throughout the country. Observations and measurements were made and a questionnaire was completed by the investigator. The findings were subsequently analysed statistically by a computer and compared to both various norms and the findings of previous surveys carried out overseas. The results showed conclusively that, whereas, in general, the hazard to the dentist, staff members and persons in the environs, from dental radiology is low, to the patient it is significant. Various specific recommendations made include the replacement of the old low-kilovoltage x-ray machines, short, unlined plastic dental cones and faulty exposure timers. They include the promotion of the use of Speed Group E Film, the Paralleling technique, correct film processing techniques, professional judgement in the use of radiographs, leaded aprons, thyroid shields film badges and continuing education courses. The compulsory recording in the patient's own identity book of each patient exposure to x-radiation, from all sources, is also recommended

  1. 40 CFR 1508.16 - Lead agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lead agency. 1508.16 Section 1508.16 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.16 Lead agency. Lead agency means the agency or agencies preparing or having taken primary responsibility for preparing the...

  2. 40 CFR 95.3 - Findings prior to application to Attorney General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Attorney General. 95.3 Section 95.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... General. The Administrator, or the Administrator's designee, may apply to the Attorney General for a... application to the Attorney General; (c) The patent under which a patent license is sought in the application...

  3. 40 CFR 141.400 - General requirements and applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system with fecally contaminated source water or with significant deficiencies subject to the treatment... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General requirements and applicability. 141.400 Section 141.400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER...

  4. 40 CFR 230.5 - General procedures to be followed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... components which characterize the non-living environment of the candidate site, the substrate and the water... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General procedures to be followed. 230.5 Section 230.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING...

  5. 40 CFR 86.201-94 - General applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General applicability. 86.201-94 Section 86.201-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... 1994 and Later Model Year Gasoline-Fueled New Light-Duty Vehicles, New Light-Duty Trucks and New Medium...

  6. 40 CFR 86.201-11 - General applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General applicability. 86.201-11 Section 86.201-11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... 1994 and Later Model Year Gasoline-Fueled New Light-Duty Vehicles, New Light-Duty Trucks and New Medium...

  7. State agency for environment, measurements and nature protection Baden-Wuerttemberg. Environmental data 2015 Baden-Wuerttemberg; Landesanstalt fuer Umwelt, Messungen und Naturschutz Baden-Wuerttemberg. Umweltdaten 2015 Baden-Wuerttemberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-10-15

    The report environmental data 2015 Baden-Wuerttemberg of the State agency for environment, measurements and nature protection Baden-Wuerttemberg, covers the following issues: Sustainability of Baden-Wuerttemberg, climate, air, soils, water, nature and agriculture, noise, waste management, radioactivity, electromagnetic fields, surveillance/monitoring, warning and alter services.

  8. 40 CFR 1068.15 - What general provisions apply for EPA decision-making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What general provisions apply for EPA decision-making? 1068.15 Section 1068.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Miscellaneous Provisions § 1068.15 What general provisions apply for EPA decision-making? (a) The Administrator...

  9. Radiation protection - Performance criteria for laboratories performing cytogenetic triage for assessment of mass casualties in radiological or nuclear emergencies - General principles and application to dicentric assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    threshold for deterministic effects, by using the ISO 19238 criteria. These latter data also assist in counselling for the risk of late stochastic disease. Part of the information in this International Standard is contained in other international guidelines and scientific publications, primarily in ISO 19238 and the International Atomic Energy Agency?s Technical Report No.405, on Biological Dosimetry [4]. However, this International Standard details and standardizes the quality assurance and quality control of performance criteria for cytogenetic assessment of individual exposures in radiological or nuclear mass casualties. This International Standard is generally compliant with ISO/IEC 17025, with particular consideration given to the specific needs of rapid, emergency biological dosimetry. The expression of uncertainties in dose estimations given in this International Standard complies with the ISO Guide 98 and ISO 5725

  10. Air monitoring activities of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Environmental Response Team during the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turpin, R.; Mickunas, D.; Campagna, P.; Burchette, S. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Response Team, Edison, NJ (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The Environmental Response Team (ERT) of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) conducted air monitoring activities during the September 11, 2001 attack on the World Trade Center in New York City. This paper describes ERT's response actions and analytical support. It covers ERT activities from the morning of September 11 to October 17, 2001 when ERT was alerted of anthrax activities in Washington, DC and Boca Raton, Florida. ERT members provided technical support regarding respirator/personnel protective equipment selection, decontamination and health and safety protocols. In the first few weeks, ERT was also providing analytical laboratory support to the EPA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the New York City Department of Health. ERT also provided on-site gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis via the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer (TAGA) bus, providing real-time direct readings to the EPA and the New York Fire Department. Site boundary air monitoring stations were maintained until early November at which point the EPA Region 2 took over all monitoring responsibilities. Air sampling efforts were initially directed at worker health and safety and the surrounding environments. Air sampling was conducted for asbestos, acid gases, heavy metals, phosgene, mercury, dioxins/furans, volatile organic compounds, and polychlorinated biphenyls. The sampling activities were later expanded to include chlorine, hydrogen chloride, sulfur dioxide, and hydrogen cyanide. Site assessment is still ongoing. What began as a typical emergency response air sampling effort soon became a huge air monitoring effort with the original six stations expanded to more than 20. ERT made every effort to collect, analyze, quality assure and transfer data for posting on publicly accessible website within less than 24 hours. It was noted that one of the lessons learned from the disaster is

  11. The use and acceptance of Other Scientifically Relevant Information (OSRI) in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Patricia L; Willett, Catherine E

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) currently relies on an initial screening battery (Tier 1) consisting of five in vitro and six in vivo assays to evaluate a chemical's potential to interact with the endocrine system. Chemical companies may request test waivers based on Other Scientifically Relevant Information (OSRI) that is functionally equivalent to data gathered in the screening battery or that provides information on a potential endocrine effect. Respondents for 47 of the first 67 chemicals evaluated in the EDSP submitted OSRI in lieu of some or all Tier 1 tests, seeking 412 waivers, of which EPA granted only 93. For 20 of the 47 chemicals, EPA denied all OSRI and required the entire Tier 1 battery. Often, the OSRI accepted was either identical to data generated by the Tier 1 assay or indicated a positive result. Although identified as potential sources of OSRI in EPA guidance, Part 158 guideline studies for pesticide registration were seldom accepted by EPA. The 93 waivers reduced animal use by at least 3325 animals. We estimate 27,731 animals were used in the actual Tier 1 tests, with additional animals being used in preparation for testing. Even with EPA's shift toward applying 21st-century toxicology tools to screening of endocrine disruptors in the future, acceptance of OSRI will remain a primary means for avoiding duplicative testing and reducing use of animals in the EDSP. Therefore, it is essential that EPA develop a consistent and transparent basis for accepting OSRI. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Comparative evaluation of the US Environmental Protection Agency's and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education's environmental survey and site assessment program field sampling procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitkus, T.J.; Bright, T.L.; Roberts, S.A.

    1997-10-01

    At the request of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Headquarters Office, the Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) compared the documented procedures that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and ESSAP use for collecting environmental samples. The project objectives were to review both organizations' procedures applicable to collecting various sample matrices, compare the procedures for similarities and differences, and then to evaluate the reason for any identified procedural differences and their potential impact on ESSAP's sample data quality. The procedures reviewed included those for sampling surface and subsurface soil, surface and groundwater, vegetation, air, and removable surface contamination. ESSAP obtained copies of relevant EPA documents and reviewed and prepared a tabulated summary of each applicable procedure. The methods for collecting and handling each type of sample were evaluated for differences, and where these were identified, the significance and effect of the differences on analytical quality were determined. The results of the comparison showed that, overall, the procedures and methods that EPA and ESSAP use for sample collection are very similar. The number of minor differences noted were the result of restrictions or procedures necessary to ensure sample integrity and prevent the introduction of interfering compounds when samples are to be analyzed for chemical parameters. For most radio nuclide analyses, these additional procedures are not necessary. Another item noted was EPA's inclusion of steps that reduce the potential for sample cross-contamination by preparing (dressing) a location prior to collecting a sample or removing a portion of a sample prior to containerization

  13. Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Carbonate Species and Solid Carbonate Phases of Selected Trace Elements pertinent to Drinking Water Standards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, John A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wilkin, Richard T. [US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This report contains a series of tables summarizing the thermodynamic properties of aqueous carbonate complexes and solid carbonate phases of the following elements: arsenic (As), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni) thallium (Tl), uranium (U) and zinc (Zn). Most of these elements are potentially hazardous as defined by extant primary drinking water standards of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The remainder are not considered hazardous, but are either listed by EPA under secondary standards, or because they can adversely affect drinking water quality. Additional tables are included giving the thermodynamic properties for carbonates of the alkali metal and alkali earth elements, sodium (Na), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), calcium (Ca), and strontium (Sr), because of their value in developing correlative models to estimate the thermodynamic properties of carbonate minerals for which no such data currently exist. The purpose in creating the tables in this report is to provide future investigators with a convenient source for selecting and tracing the sources of thermodynamic data of the above listed elements for use in modeling their geochemical behavior in “underground sources of drinking water” (USDW). The incentive for doing so lies with a heightened concern over the potential consequences of the proposed capture and storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) generated by fossil fuel fired power plants in deep subsurface reservoirs. If CO2 were to leak from such reservoirs, it could migrate upward and contaminate USDWs with undesirable, but undetermined, consequences to water quality. The EPA, Office of Research and Development, through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, funded the preparation of this report.

  14. Summary of the development the US Environmental Protection Agency's Medaka Extended One Generation Reproduction Test (MEOGRT) using data from 9 multigenerational medaka tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kevin; Lothenbach, Doug; Whiteman, Frank; Hammermeister, Dean; Touart, Leslie W; Swintek, Joe; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Onishi, Yuta; Iguchi, Taisen; Johnson, Rodney

    2017-12-01

    In response to various legislative mandates, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) formed its Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP), which in turn, formed the basis of a tiered testing strategy to determine the potential of pesticides, commercial chemicals, and environmental contaminants to disrupt the endocrine system. The first tier of tests is intended to detect the potential for endocrine disruption mediated through estrogen, androgen, or thyroid pathways, whereas the second tier is intended to further characterize the effects on these pathways and to establish a dose-response relationship for adverse effects. One of these tier 2 tests, the Medaka Extended One Generation Reproduction Test (MEOGRT), was developed by the USEPA for the EDSP and, in collaboration with the Japanese Ministry of the Environment, for the Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The MEOGRT protocol was iteratively modified based on knowledge gained after the successful completion of 9 tests with variations in test protocols. The present study describes both the final MEOGRT protocol that has been published by the USEPA and the OECD, and the iterations that provided valuable insights into nuances of the protocol. The various tests include exposure to 17β-estradiol, 4-t-octylphenol, o,p'- dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, tamoxifen, 17β-trenbolone, vinclozolin, and prochloraz. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3387-3403. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  15. Radiation protection in the diagnostic radiology. General viewpoint including CT; Strahlenschutz in der diagnostischen Radiologie. Allgemeine Sichtweise einschliesslich CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroepil, Patric [Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2017-07-01

    Radiation protection in radiology has received public attention due to reports in the media on radiation hazards due to CT. The contribution covers the issues radiation protection in radiology, including the documentation of dose information, the responsibility of radiologists for their patients, new developments with respect to dose intensive CT and the changes due to the new radiation protection law.

  16. The Protective Effects of Family Support on the Relationship between Official Intervention and General Delinquency across the Life Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Beidi; Krohn, Marvin D

    2017-03-01

    Previous research on the labeling perspective has identified mediational processes and the long-term effects of official intervention in the life course. However, it is not yet clear what factors may moderate the relationship between labeling and subsequent offending. The current study integrates Cullen's (1994) social support theory to examine how family social support conditions the criminogenic, stigmatizing effects of official intervention on delinquency and whether such protective effects vary by developmental stage. Using longitudinal data from the Rochester Youth Development Study, we estimated negative binomial regression models to investigate the relationships between police arrest, family social support, and criminal offending during both adolescence and young adulthood. Police arrest is a significant predictor of self-reported delinquency in both the adolescent and adult models. Expressive family support exhibits main effects in the adolescent models; instrumental family support exhibits main effects at both developmental stages. Additionally, instrumental family support diminishes some of the predicted adverse effects of official intervention in adulthood. Perception of family support can be critical in reducing general delinquency as well as buffering against the adverse effects of official intervention on subsequent offending. Policies and programs that work with families subsequent to a criminal justice intervention should emphasize the importance of providing a supportive environment for those who are labeled.

  17. 77 FR 8860 - Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ...; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... agencies. The emergency exemptions may take the following form: Crisis, public health, quarantine, or.... These are rarely requested. 3. A ``crisis exemption'' is initiated by a State or Federal agency (and is...

  18. Regulated and unregulated emissions from highway heavy-duty diesel engines complying with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2007 emissions standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalek, Imad A; Bougher, Thomas L; Merritt, Patrick M; Zielinska, Barbara

    2011-04-01

    As part of the Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study (ACES), regulated and unregulated exhaust emissions from four different 2007 model year U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-compliant heavy-duty highway diesel engines were measured on an engine dynamometer. The engines were equipped with exhaust high-efficiency catalyzed diesel particle filters (C-DPFs) that are actively regenerated or cleaned using the engine control module. Regulated emissions of carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and particulate matter (PM) were on average 97, 89, and 86% lower than the 2007 EPA standard, respectively, and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) were on average 9% lower. Unregulated exhaust emissions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions were on, average 1.3 and 2.8 times higher than the NO, emissions reported in previous work using 1998- and 2004-technology engines, respectively. However, compared with other work performed on 1994- to 2004-technology engines, average emission reductions in the range of 71-99% were observed for a very comprehensive list of unregulated engine exhaust pollutants and air toxic contaminants that included metals and other elements, elemental carbon (EC), inorganic ions, and gas- and particle-phase volatile and semi-volatile organic carbon (OC) compounds. The low PM mass emitted from the 2007 technology ACES engines was composed mainly of sulfate (53%) and OC (30%), with a small fraction of EC (13%) and metals and other elements (4%). The fraction of EC is expected to remain small, regardless of engine operation, because of the presence of the high-efficiency C-DPF in the exhaust. This is different from typical PM composition of pre-2007 engines with EC in the range of 10-90%, depending on engine operation. Most of the particles emitted from the 2007 engines were mainly volatile nuclei mode in the sub-30-nm size range. An increase in volatile nanoparticles was observed during C-DPF active regeneration, during which the observed particle number was

  19. HS.Register - An Audit-Trail Tool to Respond to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Ferreira, Duarte; Leite, Mariana; Santos-Pereira, Cátia; Correia, Manuel E; Antunes, Luis; Cruz-Correia, Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) compels health care institutions and their software providers to properly document all personal data processing and provide clear evidence that their systems are inline with the GDPR. All applications involved in personal data processing should therefore produce meaningful event logs that can later be used for the effective auditing of complex processes. Aim This paper aims to describe and evaluate HS.Register, a system created to collect and securely manage at scale audit logs and data produced by a large number of systems. Methods HS.Register creates a single audit log by collecting and aggregating all kinds of meaningful event logs and data (e.g. ActiveDirectory, syslog, log4j, web server logs, REST, SOAP and HL7 messages). It also includes specially built dashboards for easy auditing and monitoring of complex processes, crossing different systems in an integrated way, as well as providing tools for helping on the auditing and on the diagnostics of difficult problems, using a simple web application. HS.Register is currently installed at five large Portuguese Hospitals and is composed of the following open-source components: HAproxy, RabbitMQ, Elasticsearch, Logstash and Kibana. Results HS.Register currently collects and analyses an average of 93 million events per week and it is being used to document and audit HL7 communications. Discussion Auditing tools like HS.Register are likely to become mandatory in the near future to allow for traceability and detailed auditing for GDPR compliance.

  20. 40 CFR 501.13 - Attorney General's statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney General's statement. 501.13... from the State Attorney General (or the attorney for those State or interstate agencies which have... Attorney General or independent legal counsel shall be in the form of lawfully adopted State statutes and...

  1. 40 CFR 271.7 - Attorney General's statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney General's statement. 271.7... Authorization § 271.7 Attorney General's statement. (a) Any State that seeks to administer a program under this subpart shall submit a statement from the State Attorney General (or the attorney for those State agencies...

  2. 40 CFR 145.24 - Attorney General's statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney General's statement. 145.24... (CONTINUED) STATE UIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS State Program Submissions § 145.24 Attorney General's statement... State Attorney General (or the attorney for those State or interstate agencies which have independent...

  3. 31 March 1992 - Royal Order amending Section 133(1) of the General Regulation on safety at Work concerning protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    A Royal Order of 31 March 1992 amends certain provisions of the Regulations on safety at work with respect to protection of workers against the hazards of ionizing radiation, amended in 1990. The purpose of the amendment is to avoid that certain international and national civil servants be hindered in their control duties. The following inspectors are concerned: the International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors; the persons designated as responsible for surveillance under the Euratom Treaty and the Act of 1955 on State security in the nuclear field; the inspectors designated by the Act of 1972 on inspections at work. (NEA)

  4. 78 FR 20316 - Final Issuance of General NPDES Permits (GP) for Small Suction Dredges in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... System (NPDES) General Permit (IDG-37-0000) to placer mining operations in Idaho for small suction... Small Suction Dredges in Idaho AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10. ACTION: Final notice... significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.'' EPA has concluded that NPDES general...

  5. Female adolescent sexual and nonsexual violent offenders: a comparison of the prevalence and impact of risk and protective factors for general recidivism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Put, C.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study adds to the scarce literature on female adolescent sexual offenders by examining differences between female adolescent sexual and nonsexual violent offenders in the prevalence and impact of dynamic risk and protective factors for general recidivism. Method: The sample

  6. Rationale and study design of PROVHILO - a worldwide multicenter randomized controlled trial on protective ventilation during general anesthesia for open abdominal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, S.N.T.; Severgnini, P.; Jaber, S.; Canet, J.; Wrigge, H.; Hiesmayr, M.; Tschernko, E.M.; Hollmann, M.W.; Binnekade, J.M.; Hedenstierna, G.; Putensen, C.; Gama de Abreu, M.; Pelosi, P.; Schultz, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Post-operative pulmonary complications add to the morbidity and mortality of surgical patients, in particular after general anesthesia > 2 hours for abdominal surgery. Whether a protective mechanical ventilation strategy with higher levels of positive end-expiratory pressure

  7. The New UN CRC General Comment 13: "The Right of the Child to Freedom from All Forms of Violence"--Changing How the World Conceptualizes Child Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svevo-Cianci, Kimberly A.; Herczog, Maria; Krappmann, Lothar; Cook, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child established CRC General Comment 13 (April 2011) to address today's unabating high rates of violence against children globally despite CRC advances. GC13 provides clear interpretations and stronger detail to supplement the legal language of CRC Article 19, intended to establish protection of children from…

  8. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Program, FY 1996 Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1997-01-01

    The audit objective was to determine the accuracy and completeness of the audit of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works Program, FY 1996, financial statements conducted by the Army Audit Agency...

  9. Inspector General, DoD, Oversight of the Army Audit Agency Audit of the FY 2000 Army Working Capital Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    Our objectives were to oversee the Army Audit Agency audit of the FY 2000 Department of the Army Working Capital Fund financial statements to verify whether we can rely on their work and to determine...

  10. Agency IP Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Public data set for NASA Agency Intellectual Property (IP). The distribution contains both Patent information as well as General Release of Open Source Software.

  11. Radiation protection standards in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.A.; Arsenault, F.J.; Conti, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Standards to protect workers and members of the general public against any harmful effects of ionizing radiation are numerous and complex in the United States. Many Federal agencies have protection responsibilities, our Congress limits the discretionary authority given to these agencies in providing for this protection, and our court system appears at times to render judgments that are illogical to our sense of the degree of radiological protection required. To many our standards appear to be overprotective in that they have, at best, marginal health benefits and without question are costly to implement. Government agencies, the Congress, industry, professional organizations, and others have expressed their concerns and interests regarding standards in a variety of ways

  12. Rationale and study design of PROVHILO - a worldwide multicenter randomized controlled trial on protective ventilation during general anesthesia for open abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmes, Sabrine N T; Severgnini, Paolo; Jaber, Samir; Canet, Jaume; Wrigge, Hermann; Hiesmayr, Michael; Tschernko, Edda M; Hollmann, Markus W; Binnekade, Jan M; Hedenstierna, Göran; Putensen, Christian; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Pelosi, Paolo; Schultz, Marcus J

    2011-05-06

    Post-operative pulmonary complications add to the morbidity and mortality of surgical patients, in particular after general anesthesia >2 hours for abdominal surgery. Whether a protective mechanical ventilation strategy with higher levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and repeated recruitment maneuvers; the "open lung strategy", protects against post-operative pulmonary complications is uncertain. The present study aims at comparing a protective mechanical ventilation strategy with a conventional mechanical ventilation strategy during general anesthesia for abdominal non-laparoscopic surgery. The PROtective Ventilation using HIgh versus LOw positive end-expiratory pressure ("PROVHILO") trial is a worldwide investigator-initiated multicenter randomized controlled two-arm study. Nine hundred patients scheduled for non-laparoscopic abdominal surgery at high or intermediate risk for post-operative pulmonary complications are randomized to mechanical ventilation with the level of PEEP at 12 cmH(2)O with recruitment maneuvers (the lung-protective strategy) or mechanical ventilation with the level of PEEP at maximum 2 cmH(2)O without recruitment maneuvers (the conventional strategy). The primary endpoint is any post-operative pulmonary complication. The PROVHILO trial is the first randomized controlled trial powered to investigate whether an open lung mechanical ventilation strategy in short-term mechanical ventilation prevents against postoperative pulmonary complications. ISRCTN: ISRCTN70332574.

  13. Rationale and study design of PROVHILO - a worldwide multicenter randomized controlled trial on protective ventilation during general anesthesia for open abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedenstierna Göran

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-operative pulmonary complications add to the morbidity and mortality of surgical patients, in particular after general anesthesia >2 hours for abdominal surgery. Whether a protective mechanical ventilation strategy with higher levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP and repeated recruitment maneuvers; the "open lung strategy", protects against post-operative pulmonary complications is uncertain. The present study aims at comparing a protective mechanical ventilation strategy with a conventional mechanical ventilation strategy during general anesthesia for abdominal non-laparoscopic surgery. Methods The PROtective Ventilation using HIgh versus LOw positive end-expiratory pressure ("PROVHILO" trial is a worldwide investigator-initiated multicenter randomized controlled two-arm study. Nine hundred patients scheduled for non-laparoscopic abdominal surgery at high or intermediate risk for post-operative pulmonary complications are randomized to mechanical ventilation with the level of PEEP at 12 cmH2O with recruitment maneuvers (the lung-protective strategy or mechanical ventilation with the level of PEEP at maximum 2 cmH2O without recruitment maneuvers (the conventional strategy. The primary endpoint is any post-operative pulmonary complication. Discussion The PROVHILO trial is the first randomized controlled trial powered to investigate whether an open lung mechanical ventilation strategy in short-term mechanical ventilation prevents against postoperative pulmonary complications. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN70332574

  14. Evaluation and use of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clean Watersheds Needs Survey data to quantify nutrient loads to surface water, 1978–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivahnenko, Tamara I.

    2017-12-07

    Changes in municipal and industrial point-source discharges over time have been an important factor affecting nutrient trends in many of the Nation’s streams and rivers. This report documents how three U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) national datasets—the Permit Compliance System, the Integrated Compliance Information System, and the Clean Watersheds Needs Survey—were evaluated for use in the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment project to assess the causes of nutrient trends. This report also describes how a database of total nitrogen load and total phosphorous load was generated for select wastewater treatment facilities in the United States based on information reported in the EPA Clean Watersheds Needs Survey. Nutrient loads were calculated for the years 1978, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012 based on average nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations for reported treatment levels and on annual reported flow values.The EPA Permit Compliance System (PCS) and Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS), which monitor point-source facility discharges, together are the Nation’s most spatially comprehensive dataset for nutrients released to surface waters. However, datasets for many individual facilities are incomplete, the PCS/ICIS historical data date back only to 1989, and historical data are available for only a limited number of facilities. Additionally, inconsistencies in facility reporting make it difficult to track or identify changes in nutrient discharges over time. Previous efforts made by the U.S. Geological Survey to “fill in” gaps in the PCS/ICIS data were based on statistical methods—missing data were filled in through the use of a statistical model based on the Standard Industrial Classification code, size, and flow class of the facility and on seasonal nutrient discharges of similar facilities. This approach was used to estimate point-source loads for a single

  15. Schools as Agencies of Protection in Namibia and Swaziland: Can They Prevent Dropout and Child Labor in the Context of HIV/AIDS and Poverty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordtveit, Bjorn Harald

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses a particular area of research in the field of education and child protection: the protective role of schools in the contexts of HIV/AIDS and poverty. Such adverse situations may lead children not to enroll in school or to drop out of school and subsequently to be subjected to abusive child labor and, in some cases, the worst…

  16. Teacher agency:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sarah; Priestley, Mark; Biesta, Gert

    2015-01-01

    The concept of teacher agency has emerged in recent literature as an alternative means of understanding how teachers might enact practice and engage with policy (e.g. Lasky, 2005; Leander & Osbourne, 2008; Ketelaar et al., 2012; Priestley, Biesta & Robinson, 2013). But what is agency? Agency rema...

  17. Agency doctorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Staff members of the Agency working at the Seibersdorf laboratory are continuing to achieve high academic distinction. Two more - both Austrian - have now been awarded the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. Joachim Kramer, who is 26, graduated from the Hochschule fur Bodenkultur in 1967 with the degree of Diplom-Ingenieur and then started work in the plant breeding and genetics section of the laboratory under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen. The results of the research work he carried out were accepted as the subject of a thesis for which he has now been granted his doctorate. The doctoral promotion took place on 30 June, at a ceremony attended by Dr. Andre Finkelstein, Deputy Director General for Research and Isotopes. The subject of Dr. Kramer's thesis was a comprehensive study of the mutagenic effects of fast neutrons and gamma rays, and the influence of various modifying factors such as water content, oxygen and metabolic state of seeds at the time of irradiation. This work has contributed significantly to the understanding of the mechanisms by which these two types of ionizing radiation produce mutations in seeds. The knowledge gained will be of great importance in the efficient use of ionizing radiation in practical plant breeding. Paul Wassermann, who is 33 years old, joined the Agency in 1965. He, too, graduated from the Hochschule fur Bodenkultur as Diplom-Ingenieur in agriculture, having graduated with honours previously from the agricultural secondary school at Raumberg, Austria, in 1958. Dr. Wassermann's own words may be used to explain how he came to gain his doctorate. 'In October, 1966, I completed my studies at the Hochschule,' he writes. 'I was employed at the Agency laboratories in Seibersdorf, working in the plant and soils group. Encouraged by the interesting research which was performed there, a thesis entitled 'the Fate of Nitrogen in Submerged Rice Soils' was started, which finally led to the doctor's degree in Agriculture in June this year

  18. Using the example of Istanbul to outline general aspects of protecting reservoirs, rivers and lakes used for drinking water abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanik, A

    2000-01-01

    The six main drinking water reservoirs of Istanbul are under the threat of pollution due to rapid population increase, unplanned urbanisation and insufficient infrastructure. In contrast to the present land use profile, the environmental evaluation of the catchment areas reveals that point sources of pollutants, especially of domestic origin, dominate over those from diffuse sources. The water quality studies also support these findings, emphasising that if no substantial precautions are taken, there will be no possibility of obtaining drinking water from them. In this paper, under the light of the present status of the reservoirs, possible and probable short- and long-term protective measures are outlined for reducing the impact of point sources. Immediate precautions mostly depend on reducing the pollution arising from the existing settlements. Long-term measures mainly emphasise the preparation of new land use plans taking into consideration the protection of unoccupied lands. Recommendations on protection and control of the reservoirs are stated.

  19. Advertising Agencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Advertising agencies are the most significant organizations in the development of advertising and marketing worldwide. An advertising agency is an independent service company, composed of business, marketing and creative people, who develop, prepare, and place advertising in advertising media...... for their clients, the advertisers, who are in search of customers for their goods and services. Agencies thus mediate between three different but interlocking social groups: industry, media, and consumers. The history of advertising is largely the history of the advertising agencies that have served the needs....... This article is concerned with the origins, early developments, organization, compensation arrangements, and accounts of contemporary full-service advertising agencies....

  20. Assumptions used in determining the radiation exposure according to the amended Radiation Protection Ordinance, and required adjustments in the General Administrative Regulation relating to paragraph 45 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, E.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the amendment of the Radiation Protection Ordinance, the need arises to also amend the General Administrative Regulation on calculation of the radiation exposure due to radioactivity release with gaseous or liquid effluents, for the purpose of verification of compliance with the dose limits given in section 45 of the Radiation Protection Ordinance. The General Administrative regulation has to be harmonized with European legislation, EURATOM Directive 96/29. The required consultations for decision making have been a task of the working group for 'Anpassung der radiooekologischen Berechnungsgrundlage', of the Radioecology Committee of the SSK. The paper discusses the resulting draft document for amendment presented to and accepted by the SSK Committee. The document is awaiting discussion for final decision among members of the SSK, and between the SSK and representatives of Land governments as well as various bodies representing interests. (orig./CB) [de

  1. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart N of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart N

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart N 1 Table 1 to Subpart N of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks Pt. 63, Subpt. N, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart N of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart N General provisionsreference Applies to subpart N Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1592 - Which General Provisions apply to my POTW treatment plant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... POTW treatment plant? 63.1592 Section 63.1592 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... CATEGORIES National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Publicly Owned Treatment Works General Requirements § 63.1592 Which General Provisions apply to my POTW treatment plant? (a) Table 1 to this subpart...

  3. The role of regional nerve block anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy: an experimental comparison with previous series with the use of general anesthesia and barbiturates for cerebral protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrifoglio, G; Agus, G B; Bonalumi, F; Costantini, A; Carlesi, R

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on a consecutive series of 60 cases divided into two groups given carotid endarterectomy (C.E.) for atherosclerotic disease. In the first group general anesthesia and barbiturate cerebral protection were employed; in group two, loco-regional anesthesia. Indications and risk factors were similar in the two groups; the surgical procedure was identical. The differences in the results are reported and factors contributing to cerebral protection or reduction in the risk of stroke are analyzed. The analysis indicates that loco-regional anesthesia for C.E. is a reliable method for detecting cerebral ischemia and guaranteeing cerebral protection by means of a temporary shunt when strictly necessary.

  4. General Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  5. Radiation protection: Principles, recommendations and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitan, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation protection is a highly international dicipline with a high degree of international harmonization. Especially within the Nordic countries there is general agreement upon principles and standards, despite the actual practice may differ slightly. The basic recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) are accepted by the regulatory bodies and should be followed by all users of radiation. The users are in principle responsible for the radiation protection standard and activities themselves. Because most companies or hospitals lack sufficient expertise by themselves, they must rely upon recommendations from others. Primarily they should contact the national radiation protection agency. However, due to the international harmonization of radiation protection, information from other national or international agencies may be used with confidence. All users of radiation in the Nordic countries are obliged to act according to recognition and assessment of both risks and benefits, and they are responsible for updating their knowledge

  6. Communication dated 23 February 2007 addressed to the Director General from the Ambassador of the Sultanate of Oman on behalf of the Arab States that are Members and Observers of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 23 February 2007 from the Ambassador of the Sultanate of Oman on behalf of the Arab States that are members and observers of the Agency concerning Israeli nuclear capabilities. In the light of the request expressed by the Ambassador of the Sultanate of Oman in his letter of 23 February 2007, his letter is attached for the information of all Member States

  7. Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

  8. Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 3 (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This publication is the new edition of the International Basic Safety Standards. The edition is co-sponsored by seven other international organizations — European Commission (EC/Euratom), FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO, UNEP and WHO. It replaces the interim edition that was published in November 2011 and the previous edition of the International Basic Safety Standards which was published in 1996. It has been extensively revised and updated to take account of the latest finding of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The publication details the requirements for the protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. All circumstances of radiation exposure are considered

  9. Radiation protection and safety of radiation sources: International basic safety standards. General safety requirements. Pt. 3 (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication is the new edition of the International Basic Safety Standards. The edition is co-sponsored by seven other international organizations — European Commission (EC/Euratom), FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO, UNEP and WHO. It replaces the interim edition that was published in November 2011 and the previous edition of the International Basic Safety Standards which was published in 1996. It has been extensively revised and updated to take account of the latest finding of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The publication details the requirements for the protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. All circumstances of radiation exposure are considered

  10. Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 3 (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the new edition of the International Basic Safety Standards. The edition is co-sponsored by seven other international organizations — European Commission (EC/Euratom), FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO, UNEP and WHO. It replaces the interim edition that was published in November 2011 and the previous edition of the International Basic Safety Standards which was published in 1996. It has been extensively revised and updated to take account of the latest finding of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The publication details the requirements for the protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. All circumstances of radiation exposure are considered

  11. The general principles of radiation protection and regulation; Les principes generaux de la radioprotection et la reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurengo, A [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, 34 - Montpellier (France); Cesarini, J P [Societe Francaise de Radioprotection, Section Rayonnements non ionisants, 75 - Paris (France); Lecomte, J F; Barbier, G; Crescini, D; Biau, A [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, 92 (France); Blain, A [FRAMATOME, Dir. Combustible Nucleaire, Dept. Radioprotection Securite, 69 - Lyon (France); Bailloeuil, C; Gonin, M [Electricite de France, EDF-SCAST, 75 - Paris (France); Bergot, D [Ministere des Affaires Sociales, du Travail et de la Solidarite, Dir. des Relations du Travail, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    Seven articles constitute this chapter about the radiation protection and the regulation. Radiological risk, reduction of public exposure to ultraviolet radiations, regulation for the radon, evolution of the French legislation against the dangers of ionizing radiations, the medical follow up after the professional life, the information system to reproduce the dosimetric data of workers, proposition of a scale to classify the radiations incidents in function of their seriousness. (N.C.)

  12. Communication dated 6 March 2013 received from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency regarding the Report of the Director General on the Implementation of Safeguards in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 6 March 2013 from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency enclosing an explanatory note by the Permanent Mission dated 6 March 2013, on the report of the Director General on ''Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement and relevant provisions of Security Council resolutions in the Islamic Republic of Iran'' contained in GOV/2013/6 (21 February 2013) and three letters from the Resident Representative of Iran addressed to the Director General. The communication and, as requested by the Permanent Mission, the explanatory note and the letters are circulated herewith for information.

  13. 40 CFR 13.21 - Employee salary offset-general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee salary offset-general. 13.21... STANDARDS Administrative Offset § 13.21 Employee salary offset—general. (a) Purpose. This section... collection by salary offset under 5 U.S.C. 5514 of debts owed EPA and debts owed to other Federal agencies by...

  14. 75 FR 17253 - Revisions to the General Conformity Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Part III Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 51 and 93 Revisions to the General... under the minor source New Source Review (NSR) programs similar to the EPA's existing General Conformity... EPA is making two minor revisions to the definition. First, EPA is correcting the citation for the SIP...

  15. Solving the problems we face: the United States Environmental Protection Agency, sustainability, and the challenges of the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addressing the problems of the twenty-first century will require new initiatives that complement traditional regulatory activities. Existing regulations, such as the Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act are important safety nets in the United States for protecting human health and t...

  16. Nuclear safety in France: Extracts from 'Revue Generale Nucleaire'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    Translations of 3 articles are included in this report. The first covers briefly the tasks and organisation of the Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety (IPSN) in France. In the second article the principles of cost effectiveness are described and the applications of the general methodology to radiation protection is outlined. A study by the US Environmental Protection Agency is summarised. Methods for risk estimation in nuclear energy are presented in the final article

  17. General Practitioner (GP) trainees' experience of a '1-h protected supervision model' given during psychiatry placements in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; McNeill, Helen

    2018-01-05

    Background A '1-hour protected supervision model' is well established for Psychiatry trainees. This model is also extended to GP trainees who are on placement in psychiatry. To explore the experiences of the '1-hour protected supervision model' for GP trainees in psychiatry placements in the UK. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, an anonymous online questionnaire was sent to GP trainees in the North West of England who had completed a placement in Psychiatry between February and August 2015. Results Discussing clinical cases whilst using the e-portfolio was the most useful learning event in this model. Patient care can potentially improve if a positive relationship develops between trainee/supervisor, which is impacted by the knowledge of this model at the start of the placement. Trainees found that clinical pressures were impacting on the occurrence of supervision. Conclusion The model works best when both GP trainees and their supervisors understand the model. The most frequently used and educationally beneficial aspect for GP trainees in psychiatry is the exploration of clinical cases using the learning portfolio as an educational tool. For effective delivery of this model of supervision, organisations must reflect on the balance between service delivery and allowing the supervisor and trainee adequate time for it to occur.

  18. Diplomatic agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    diplomatic agency has been conceptualized in International Relations theory (English School, game theory, Foreign Policy Analysis, constructivism, practice theory, post-positivism) before presenting and exemplifying major and overlapping types of diplomatic agency, including communication, negotiation......Diplomatic agency is intriguing. On the one hand, diplomats are crucial to the management of day-to-day international relations and the negotiation of war and peace. On the other hand, most diplomatic action is highly constrained or invisible. This chapter provides an overview of the ways in which...... and advocacy. It analyzes how professionalization, legalization, personalization and popularization of diplomacy have shaped diplomatic agency including how international law, bureaucracy, public diplomacy and new information technologies have impacted the scope and content of diplomatic agency. Finally...

  19. Japan Sports Arbitration Agency (JSAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina P. Rusakova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article author analyzes the activities of Japan Sports Arbitration Agency. Author considers the goals, objectives and procedure for dealing with disputes relating to the use of performance-enhancing drugs by athletes. Author study the regulation of Japan Sports Arbitration Agency, to resolve disputes relating to the use of doping, as well as the procedure for application and acceptance of its agency, the choice of arbitrators, counterclaim, protection of evidence.

  20. Notification: Audit of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Compliance with the Federal Information Security Management Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY14-0135, February 10, 2014. The Office of Inspector General plans to begin fieldwork for an audit of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's compliance with the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA).

  1. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations and general advice on nuclear medicine; issued on April 28, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    These regulations and general advice are applicable to nuclear medicine within human medical care. The regulations are also applicable to activities where radioactive substances are administered to individuals in connection to medical or biomedical research and medical examinations for insurance or legal purposes

  2. The Swedish radiation protection institute's regulations and general advice on nuclear medicine; issued on April 28, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    These regulations and general advice are applicable to nuclear medicine within human medical care. The regulations are also applicable to activities where radioactive substances are administered to individuals in connection to medical or biomedical research and medical examinations for insurance or legal purposes.

  3. Statement to the 38th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 19 September 1994; Statement to the 49th session of the United Nations General Assemblies 17 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1994-10-01

    The document reproduces the two statements of the IAEA Director General to the 38th Session of the General conference of the IAEA from 19 September 1994 and to the 49th Session of the United Nations General Assembly from 17 October 1994. A separate abstract was prepared for each statement

  4. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Landsat Data Continuity Mission Simulated Data Products for Bureau of Land Management and Environmental Protection Agency Abandoned Mine Lands Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Leland

    2007-01-01

    Presently, the BLM (Bureau of Land Management) has identified a multitude of abandoned mine sites in primarily Western states for cleanup. These sites are prioritized and appropriate cleanup has been called in to reclaim the sites. The task is great in needing considerable amounts of agency resources. For instance, in Colorado alone there exists an estimated 23,000 abandoned mines. The problem is not limited to Colorado or to the United States. Cooperation for reclamation is sought at local, state, and federal agency level to aid in identification, inventory, and cleanup efforts. Dangers posed by abandoned mines are recognized widely and will tend to increase with time because some of these areas are increasingly used for recreation and, in some cases, have been or are in the process of development. In some cases, mines are often vandalized once they are closed. The perpetrators leave them open, so others can then access the mines without realizing the danger posed. Abandoned mine workings often fill with water or oxygen-deficient air and dangerous gases following mining. If the workings are accidentally entered into, water or bad air can prove fatal to those underground. Moreover, mine residue drainage negatively impacts the local watershed ecology. Some of the major hazards that might be monitored by higher-resolution satellites include acid mine drainage, clogged streams, impoundments, slides, piles, embankments, hazardous equipment or facilities, surface burning, smoke from underground fires, and mine openings.

  5. The Canadian Space Agency, Space Station, Strategic Technologies for Automation and Robotics Program technology development activity in protection of materials from the low Earth orbit space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francoeur, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Strategic Technologies in Automation and Robotics (STEAR) program is managing a number of development contracts to improve the protection of spacecraft materials from the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) space environment. The project is structured in two phases over a 3 to 4 year period with a budget of 3 to 4 million dollars. Phase 1 is designed to demonstrate the technical feasibility and commercial potential of a coating/substrate system and its associated application process. The objective is to demonstrate a prototype fabrication capability using a full scale component of a commercially viable process for the protection of materials and surface finishes from the LEO space environment, and to demonstrate compliance with a set of performance requirements. Only phase 1 will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Indiana application for interim authorization, phase I, hazardous waste management program--Environmental Protection Agency. Notice of public hearing and public comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-12

    EPA regulations to protect human health and the environment from the improper management of hazardous waste were published in the Federal Register on May 19, 1980 (45 FR 33063). These regulations include provisions for authorization of State programs to operate in lieu of the Federal program. Today EPA is announcing the availability for public review of the Indiana application for Phase I Interim Authorization, inviting public comment, and giving notice of a public hearing to be held on the application.

  7. 40 CFR 428.60 - Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the medium-sized general molded, extruded, and fabricated rubber plants subcategory. 428.60 Section 428.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  8. Multilateral approaches to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Expert Group Report submitted to the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The text of the report of the independent Expert Group on Multilateral Approaches to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, commissioned by the Director General, is reproduced in this document for the information of Member States

  9. Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies: FY2007 Appropriations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vincent, Carol H; Bearden, David M; Corn, M. L; Gorte, Ross W; Humphries, Marc; Sheikh, Pervaze A; Whiteman, David L; Boren, Susan; Walke, Roger; Bea, Keith

    2007-01-01

    ... of Health and Human Services. It also includes funding for arts and cultural agencies; the Environmental Protection Agency, which was recently transferred to the appropriations subcommittees that deal with Interior and Related Agencies...

  10. Effect of protective ventilation on postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing general anaesthesia: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tianzhu; Bo, Lulong; Chen, Feng; Xie, Qun; Zou, Yun; Hu, Baoji; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2014-06-24

    To determine whether anaesthetised patients undergoing surgery could benefit from intraoperative protective ventilation strategies. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched up to February 2014. Eligible studies evaluated protective ventilation versus conventional ventilation in anaesthetised patients without lung injury at the onset of mechanical ventilation. The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Included studies must report at least one of the following end points: the incidence of atelectasis or acute lung injury or pulmonary infections. Four studies (594 patients) were included. Meta-analysis using a random effects model showed a significant decrease in the incidence of atelectasis (OR=0.36; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.60; pprotective ventilation. Ventilation with protective strategies did not reduce the incidence of acute lung injury (OR=0.40; 95% CI 0.07 to 2.15; p=0.28; I(2)=12%), all-cause mortality (OR=0.77; 95% CI 0.33 to 1.79; p=0.54; I(2)=0%), length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference (WMD)=-0.52 day, 95% CI -4.53 to 3.48 day; p=0.80; I(2)=63%) or length of intensive care unit stay (WMD=-0.55 day, 95% CI -2.19 to 1.09 day; p=0.51; I(2)=39%). Intraoperative use of protective ventilation strategies has the potential to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing general anaesthesia. Prospective, well-designed clinical trials are warranted to confirm the beneficial effects of protective ventilation strategies in surgical patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Effect of protective ventilation on postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing general anaesthesia: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tianzhu; Bo, Lulong; Chen, Feng; Xie, Qun; Zou, Yun; Hu, Baoji; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether anaesthetised patients undergoing surgery could benefit from intraoperative protective ventilation strategies. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) were searched up to February 2014. Eligible studies evaluated protective ventilation versus conventional ventilation in anaesthetised patients without lung injury at the onset of mechanical ventilation. The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Included studies must report at least one of the following end points: the incidence of atelectasis or acute lung injury or pulmonary infections. Results Four studies (594 patients) were included. Meta-analysis using a random effects model showed a significant decrease in the incidence of atelectasis (OR=0.36; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.60; pprotective ventilation. Ventilation with protective strategies did not reduce the incidence of acute lung injury (OR=0.40; 95% CI 0.07 to 2.15; p=0.28; I2=12%), all-cause mortality (OR=0.77; 95% CI 0.33 to 1.79; p=0.54; I2=0%), length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference (WMD)=−0.52 day, 95% CI −4.53 to 3.48 day; p=0.80; I2=63%) or length of intensive care unit stay (WMD=−0.55 day, 95% CI −2.19 to 1.09 day; p=0.51; I2=39%). Conclusions Intraoperative use of protective ventilation strategies has the potential to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing general anaesthesia. Prospective, well-designed clinical trials are warranted to confirm the beneficial effects of protective ventilation strategies in surgical patients. PMID:24961718

  12. Communication dated 12 August 2005 received from the Resident Representative of Yemen to the Agency concerning a letter from the Secretary General of the League of Arab States to the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 12 August 2005 from the Resident Representative of Yemen attaching a letter dated 8 August 2005 from Mr. Amre Moussa, Secretary General of the League of Arab States, to the Director General. In the light of the request expressed by the Resident Representative of Yemen in his letter of 12 August 2005, his letter and the letter of the Secretary General of the League of Arab States are attached for the information of all Member States

  13. 2015 annual report of the managing director of the CEA general and nuclear inspection for nuclear safety and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-08-01

    After an introduction by the managing director of the CEA general and nuclear inspection about activities and events of 2015, this report proposes some key figures and indicators to illustrate these activities and events. The next parts discuss, present and comment how a culture of safety is at the heart of the continuous progress approach by the CEA. The next chapters propose overviews and comments of lessons learned from nuclear inspections within the frame of audit programme or within the frame of centres' safety audits, and from reactive inspections. The last parts address the follow-up of recommendations, and progress orientations and perspectives

  14. Transformative Agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Klaus

    The purpose of this paper is to enhance the conceptual understanding of the mediatory relationship between paradoxes on an organizational and an individual level. It presents a concept of agency that comprises and mediates between a structural and individual pole. The constitution of this agency ...... is achieved through narrative activity that oscillates between the poles and transforms paradoxes through the configuration of plots and metaphors. Empirical cases are introduced in order to illustrate the implications of this understanding....

  15. 76 FR 69729 - Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... following form: Crisis, public health, quarantine, or specific. EPA has also listed denied emergency... or public health purposes. These are rarely requested. 3. A ``crisis exemption'' is initiated by a...

  16. Statement to the 39th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 18 September 1995. Statement to the 50th session of the United Nations General Assembly 1 November 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1995-11-01

    In the Statement to the 39th Session of the General Conference of the IAEA main directions of IAEA activities for 1994 and plans for the future are outlined. In the Statement to the 50th Session of the United Nations General Assembly main achievements and challenges facing the international community in the field of IAEA competence are discussed

  17. Statement to the 39th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 18 September 1995. Statement to the 50th session of the United Nations General Assembly 1 November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blix, H

    1995-11-01

    In the Statement to the 39th Session of the General Conference of the IAEA main directions of IAEA activities for 1994 and plans for the future are outlined. In the Statement to the 50th Session of the United Nations General Assembly main achievements and challenges facing the international community in the field of IAEA competence are discussed.

  18. Communication dated 5 March 2014 received from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency regarding the Report of the Director General on the Implementation of Safeguards in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 5 March 2014 from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency, enclosing an explanatory note by the Permanent Mission on the report of the Director General on ''Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement and Relevant Provisions of Security Council Resolutions in the Islamic Republic of Iran'' contained in document GOV/2014/10 (20 February 2014). The communication and, as requested by the Permanent Mission, the explanatory note are circulated herewith for information

  19. Communication dated 5 March 2014 received from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency regarding the Report of the Director General on the Implementation of Safeguards in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 5 March 2014 from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency, enclosing an explanatory note by the Permanent Mission on the report of the Director General on ''Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement and Relevant Provisions of Security Council Resolutions in the Islamic Republic of Iran'' contained in document GOV/2014/10 (20 February 2014). The communication and, as requested by the Permanent Mission, the explanatory note are circulated herewith for information [es

  20. Communications dated 18 March 2013 received from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency regarding the Report of the Director General on the Implementation of Safeguards in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Secretariat has received two communications dated 18 March 2013 from the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Iran to the Agency enclosing explanatory notes by the Permanent Mission dated September 2012 and November 2012 respectively, on the reports of the Director General on 'Implementation of the NPT Safeguards Agreement and relevant provisions of Security Council resolutions in the Islamic Republic of Iran' contained in GOV/2012/37 (30 August 2012) and GOV/2012/55 (16 November 2012). 2. The communications and, as requested by the Permanent Mission, the explanatory notes are circulated herewith for information.

  1. Protective relay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Mu Ji; Jung, Hae Sang

    1974-10-01

    This book is divided into two chapters, which deals with protective relay. The first chapter deals with the basic knowledge of relay on development of relay, classification of protective relay, rating of protective relay general structure of protective relay, detecting of ground protection, about point of contact, operating relay and trip relaying. The second chapter is about structure and explanation of relay on classification by structure such as motor type and moving-coil type, explanation of other relays over current relay, over voltage relay, short voltage relay, relay for power, relay for direction, test of over voltage relay, test of short voltage relay and test of directional circuit relay.

  2. Communication dated 29 May 2006 received from the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic to the Agency concerning a letter from the Secretary General of the League of Arab States to the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 29 May 2006 from the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic attaching a letter dated 28 May 2006 from Mr. Amre Moussa, Secretary General of the League of Arab States, to the Director General. In the light of the request expressed by the Resident Representative of the Syrian Arab Republic in his letter of 29 May 2006, his letter and the letter of the Secretary General of the League of Arab States are attached for the information of all Member States

  3. Photoprotection and vitamin D status: a study on awareness, knowledge and attitude towards sun protection in general population from Kuwait, and its relation with vitamin D levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mutairi, Nawaf; Issa, Bayoumi Ibrahim; Nair, Vasanthy

    2012-01-01

    The primary cause of skin cancers is exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. And, for decades sun protection has been promoted in various public health education campaigns. Recently, however, vitamin D deficiency has been related to increased risk of skin cancers. And, skin being the primary site for the synthesis of active form of vitamin D, excessive sun protection could lead to vitamin D-deficient states. But, the results have so far been conflicting. To study the level of awareness, knowledge and attitude of representative groups from the general population from Kuwait towards sun protection. And, also study the correlation of the level of sun protective measures used and vitamin D levels in these groups. The study constituted of two main parts. First part comprised a questionnaire-based survey of representative group of people aged 18 and above to assess their knowledge, awareness and attitude towards sun protection. The second part consisted of measuring serum vitamin D levels in 150 volunteers amongst the responders of the questionnaire, who had been regularly using sunscreens for at least 2 years and compare to the levels seen in 150 age and sex-matched responders of similar skin phototypes, who had never used sunscreens. Out of the total of 1044 responders, 80% of them had adequate knowledge of the beneficial and harmful effects of sun exposure, and had been using sunscreens regularly, and adopting other sun protective measures in their daily life. The levels of vitamin D were found to be deficient in both sunscreen users and those who had never used sunscreens. The difference between the two groups was statistically insignificant (60.67% vs 54.67%; P value>0.001). Population at large seems to be adequately informed about the beneficial and deleterious effects of sun exposure. Vitamin D levels are deficient in majority of our people, and there is a need to do larger surveys covering all parts of the country and give supplemental doses of vitamin D to those

  4. Photoprotection and vitamin D status: A study on awareness, knowledge and attitude towards sun protection in general population from Kuwait, and its relation with vitamin D levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaf Al-Mutairi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The primary cause of skin cancers is exposure to ultraviolet (UV radiation. And, for decades sun protection has been promoted in various public health education campaigns. Recently, however, vitamin D deficiency has been related to increased risk of skin cancers. And, skin being the primary site for the synthesis of active form of vitamin D, excessive sun protection could lead to vitamin D-deficient states. But, the results have so far been conflicting. Aims: To study the level of awareness, knowledge and attitude of representative groups from the general population from Kuwait towards sun protection. And, also study the correlation of the level of sun protective measures used and vitamin D levels in these groups. Methods: The study constituted of two main parts. First part comprised a questionnaire-based survey of representative group of people aged 18 and above to assess their knowledge, awareness and attitude towards sun protection. The second part consisted of measuring serum vitamin D levels in 150 volunteers amongst the responders of the questionnaire, who had been regularly using sunscreens for at least 2 years and compare to the levels seen in 150 age and sex-matched responders of similar skin phototypes, who had never used sunscreens. Results: Out of the total of 1044 responders, 80% of them had adequate knowledge of the beneficial and harmful effects of sun exposure, and had been using sunscreens regularly, and adopting other sun protective measures in their daily life. The levels of vitamin D were found to be deficient in both sunscreen users and those who had never used sunscreens. The difference between the two groups was statistically insignificant (60.67% vs 54.67%; P value>0.001. Conclusion: Population at large seems to be adequately informed about the beneficial and deleterious effects of sun exposure. Vitamin D levels are deficient in majority of our people, and there is a need to do larger surveys covering all

  5. Federal Emergency Management Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Term(s): About the Agency Text Messages Federal Interagency Operational Plans Whole Community Technological Hazards Division - Contacts Accessible ASL ... content. Home About Us Download Plug-ins Doing Business with FEMA Privacy ... General Strategic Plan Whitehouse.gov DHS.gov Ready.gov USA.gov ...

  6. Agency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linder, Stefan; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    Agency theory studies the problems and solutions linked to delegation of tasks from principals to agents in the context of conflicting interests between the parties. Beginning from clear assumptions about rationality, contracting and informational conditions, the theory addresses problems of ex...... ante (“hidden characteristics”) as well as ex post information asymmetry (“hidden action”), and examines conditions under which various kinds of incentive instruments and monitoring arrangements can be deployed to minimize the welfare loss. Its clear predictions and broad applicability have allowed...... agency theory to enjoy considerable scientific impact on social science; however, it has also attracted considerable criticism....

  7. Agency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linder, Stefan; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2015-01-01

    Agency theory studies the problems and solutions linked to delegation of tasks from principals to agents in the context of conflicting interests between the parties. Beginning from clear assumptions about rationality, contracting, and informational conditions, the theory addresses problems of ex...... ante (‘hidden characteristics’) as well as ex post information asymmetry (‘hidden action’), and examines conditions under which various kinds of incentive instruments and monitoring arrangements can be deployed to minimize the welfare loss. Its clear predictions and broad applicability have allowed...... agency theory to enjoy considerable scientific impact on social science; however, it has also attracted considerable criticism....

  8. Application of the council directive of 15 July 1980 laying down the Euratom basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Commission of the European Communities. Luxembourg

    Application of the council directive of 15 July 1980 laying down the Euratom basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation

  9. Calfornia General Plans

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — We undertook creating the first ever seamless statewide General Plan map for California. All county general plans and many city general plans were integrated into 1...

  10. Towards a Complete Classification of Symmetry-Protected Topological Phases for Interacting Fermions in Three Dimensions and a General Group Supercohomology Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Rui; Gu, Zheng-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    The classification and construction of symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases in interacting boson and fermion systems have become a fascinating theoretical direction in recent years. It has been shown that (generalized) group cohomology theory or cobordism theory gives rise to a complete classification of SPT phases in interacting boson or spin systems. The construction and classification of SPT phases in interacting fermion systems are much more complicated, especially in three dimensions. In this work, we revisit this problem based on an equivalence class of fermionic symmetric local unitary transformations. We construct very general fixed-point SPT wave functions for interacting fermion systems. We naturally reproduce the partial classifications given by special group supercohomology theory, and we show that with an additional B ˜H2(Gb,Z2) structure [the so-called obstruction-free subgroup of H2(Gb,Z2) ], a complete classification of SPT phases for three-dimensional interacting fermion systems with a total symmetry group Gf=Gb×Z2f can be obtained for unitary symmetry group Gb. We also discuss the procedure for deriving a general group supercohomology theory in arbitrary dimensions.

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jj of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart JJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart JJ 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY.... JJ, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJ of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart JJ Reference Applies to subpart JJ Comment 63.1(a) Yes 63.1(b)(1) No Subpart JJ specifies applicability. 63.1(b)(2) Yes...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart W of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart W

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart W 1 Table 1 to Subpart W of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Polyamides Production Pt. 63, Subpt. W, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart W of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart W Reference Applies to subpart W BLR WSR WSR alternative standard, and BLR equipment...

  13. 40 CFR 1033.201 - General requirements for obtaining a certificate of conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... certificate of conformity. 1033.201 Section 1033.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....201 General requirements for obtaining a certificate of conformity. Certification is the process by... certificate of conformity for freshly manufactured locomotives. Anyone meeting the definition of...

  14. Assessment of aflatoxin exposure of laboratory worker during food contamination analyses. Assessment of the procedures adopted by an A.R.P.A.L. laboratory (Liguria Region Environmental Protection Agency).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, A; Bassoli, Viviana; Cioè, A; Anselmo, Silvia; Ferro, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins derived from foodstuffs colonized by fungal species of the genus Aspergillus; they are common food contaminants with immunosuppressive, mutagenic and carcinogenic activity. Aflatoxins are heat-resistant and are thus easily transmitted along the food chain. They are hepatotoxic and have the potential to induce hepatocellular carcinoma. Agri-food industry workers are thus at risk of ingestion as well as transmucosal absorption or inhalation of toxins released during product preparation or processing. To measure the levels of airborne mycotoxins, particularly aflatoxins, in a laboratory analysing imported foodstuffs for mycotoxin contamination. The protocol used to analyse a batch of shelled peanuts from Vietnam, especially the grinding phase, which is held to be at the highest risk ofgenerating airborne toxins, was assessed at the A.R.PA.L. laboratory (Liguria Region Environmental Protection Agency) of Genoa, Italy, which participates in a European aflatoxin monitoring project. Wet grinding was performed to avoid production of large amounts of dust. Comparison of airborne concentrations before and after grinding with legal thresholds disclosed that the analytical procedures involved negligible aflatoxin levels for operators (environmental burden 0.11 pg/ m3). Given the toxicity of aflatoxins, worker protection measures should be consistently adopted and enforced. Threshold limit values for working environments should be introduced besides the existing ones for public health.

  15. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The new member since the last list of Member States of the Agency was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.44) is Yemen. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the 122 States became members of the Agency, as well as the State whose application for membership of the Agency was approved by the General Conference, but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  16. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The new members since the last list of Member States of the Agency was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.42) are: Armenia, Coratia, the Czech Republic, Lithuania, the Marshall Islands, the Slovak Republic and Uzbekistan. The Attachment to the circular shows the dates on which the 120 States became members of the Agency, as well as those States whose application for membership of the Agency was approved by the General Conference, but who have not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  17. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-13

    The new member since the last list of Member States of the Agency was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.44) is Yemen. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the 122 States became members of the Agency, as well as the State whose application for membership of the Agency was approved by the General Conference, but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute.

  18. Agency doctorates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1970-07-01

    Mr. Wen-chuan Li of China has become the first student to obtain a doctor's degree as a result of research work carried out in the Agency. Mr. Li, who is 33, graduated as a Bachelor of Agriculture at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University in 1960 and in 1966 was granted a fellowship to study mutations in plant breeding at the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory near Vienna, under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen, a professor of the University of Bergen. The Hochschule fur Bodenkultur of Vienna accepted the research as being suitable for a thesis and have now granted the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. The subject of the thesis was modifying factors influencing the mutagenic effects of alkylating agents as compared with ionizing radiations in barley. Alkylating agents are involved in the use of chemicals as a means of changing the characteristics of seeds to bring about changes aimed at improving the quality of crops. Mr. Li's work is regarded as a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanics by which mutations are induced, to the efficient use of chemicals and ionizing radiations in practical applications, and to the efforts of the Agency in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization to benefit food supplies. Mr. Li has now completed his fellowship with the Agency and has been appointed an Assistant Professor in Plant Breeding at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University. The photograph, taken in the plastic hot house at Seibersdorf, shows him studying rice plants grown from seeds subjected to irradiation. Another noteworthy achievement is that of Mr. Karl-Franz Lacina, a security guard at the Agency's headquarters. At the age of 50 he has been accorded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Vienna University, the result of six years' work in his leisure time. The major subject was Arabic, with French and philosophy as supporting subject. (author)

  19. Agency doctorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    Mr. Wen-chuan Li of China has become the first student to obtain a doctor's degree as a result of research work carried out in the Agency. Mr. Li, who is 33, graduated as a Bachelor of Agriculture at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University in 1960 and in 1966 was granted a fellowship to study mutations in plant breeding at the Agency's Seibersdorf Laboratory near Vienna, under the direction of Dr. Knut Mikaelsen, a professor of the University of Bergen. The Hochschule fur Bodenkultur of Vienna accepted the research as being suitable for a thesis and have now granted the degree of Doctor of Agriculture. The subject of the thesis was modifying factors influencing the mutagenic effects of alkylating agents as compared with ionizing radiations in barley. Alkylating agents are involved in the use of chemicals as a means of changing the characteristics of seeds to bring about changes aimed at improving the quality of crops. Mr. Li's work is regarded as a significant contribution to the understanding of the mechanics by which mutations are induced, to the efficient use of chemicals and ionizing radiations in practical applications, and to the efforts of the Agency in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization to benefit food supplies. Mr. Li has now completed his fellowship with the Agency and has been appointed an Assistant Professor in Plant Breeding at Taiwan Provincial Chung-hsing University. The photograph, taken in the plastic hot house at Seibersdorf, shows him studying rice plants grown from seeds subjected to irradiation. Another noteworthy achievement is that of Mr. Karl-Franz Lacina, a security guard at the Agency's headquarters. At the age of 50 he has been accorded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Vienna University, the result of six years' work in his leisure time. The major subject was Arabic, with French and philosophy as supporting subject. (author)

  20. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  1. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  2. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  3. Occupational radiation protection. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation can occur in a range of industries, medical institutions, educational and research establishments and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Adequate radiation protection of workers is essential for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. In 1996, the Agency published Safety Fundamentals on Radiation Protection and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 120) and International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing, Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115), both of which were jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the IAEA, the International Labour Organisation, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, the Pan American Health Organization and the World Health Organization. These publications set out, respectively, the objectives and principles for radiation safety and the requirements to be met to apply the principles and to achieve the objectives. The establishment of safety requirements and guidance on occupational radiation protection is a major component of the support for radiation safety provided by the IAEA to its Member States. The objective of the IAEA's occupational protection programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach to the optimization of occupational radiation protection, through the development and application of guidelines for restricting radiation exposures and applying current radiation protection techniques in the workplace. Guidance on meeting the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards for occupational protection is provided in three interrelated Safety Guides, one giving general guidance on the development of occupational radiation protection programmes and two giving more detailed guidance on the monitoring and assessment of workers' exposure due to external radiation sources and from intakes of radionuclides, respectively. These Safety

  4. A vegetarian diet does not protect against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD): A cross-sectional study between Buddhist priests and the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung Hun; Oh, Dong Jun; Kwon, Ki Hwan; Lee, Jun Kyu; Koh, Moon Soo; Lee, Jin Ho; Kang, Hyoun Woo

    2015-07-01

    There is limited data that supports a role for a vegetarian diet in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between vegetarian diets and NAFLD, considering metabolic syndrome and obesity. This is a cross-sectional, retrospective study comparing the prevalence of NAFLD of 615 Buddhist priests and age-, sex-, Body mass index (BMI)-and presence/absence of metabolic syndrome-matched controls who underwent routine health checkups in a health promotion center. Diagnosis and severity of NAFLD was determined based on ultrasonographic findings. The prevalence of NAFLD was not statistically significantly different between the Buddhist priests and the general population (29.9% vs. 25.05%, p=0.055). The Buddhist priest group had higher serum albumin, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and serum triglyceride levels and lower serum total bilirubin, serum fasting glucose, and serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels than the general population group. In univariate analysis and multivariate analysis, NAFLD was associated with old age, male gender, increased BMI, increased waist circumference, metabolic syndrome, high albumin, high glucose, high AST, high ALT, high gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), high triglycerides, low HDL, high low density lipoprotein (LDL), and high total cholesterol. The vegetarian diet does not protect against NAFLD.

  5. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The new members since the last list of Member States of the Agency was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.43) are: Kazakhstan and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The Democratic People's Republic of Korea withdrew from membership of the Agency as of 13 June 1994. The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the 121 States became members of the Agency, as well as those States whose application for membership of the Agency was approved by the General Conference, but who have not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  6. Amoco-US Environmental Protection Agency, pollution prevention project, Yorktown, Virginia: Project peer review. Report of the Peer Review Committee of the Amoco/EPA Pollution Prevention Project at the Yorktown, Virginia refinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klee, H.; Podar, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Amoco/EPA Pollution Prevention Project involved a number of representatives from federal and Virginia regulatory agencies, and Amoco's refining business. Participants believed that the Project could benefit from a broader perspective than these organizations along might provide. The Project Work Group selected an independent Peer Review Process which was conducted by Resource for the Future (RFF), a Washington DC think tank. A group of technical, policy and environmental experts from diverse backgrounds served as Peer Review members. The Peer Review Committee met on three occasions to discuss (1) the Project Work Plan (2) sampling data and interpretation and (3) project conclusions and recommendations. The focus of the meeting was on the general scope and content of the project

  7. Occupational radiation protection legislation in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadmor, J.; Schlesinger, T.; Lemesch, C.

    1980-01-01

    Various governmental agencies, including the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Labor and the Israel AEC are responsible for the control of the use of radioactive materials and medical X-ray machines in Israel. Present legislation deals mainly with the legal aspects of the purchase, transport and possession of radioactive materials and the purchase and operation of medical X-ray machines. No legislation refers explicitly to the protection of the worker from ionizing (and non-ionizing) radiation. A special group of experts appointed by the Minister of Labor recently worked out a comprehensive draft law concerning all legal aspects of occupational radiation protection in Israel. Among the main chapters of the draft are: general radiation protection principles, national radiation protection standards, medical supervision of radiation workers, personal monitoring requirements. The present situation with regard to radiation hazard control in Israel and details of the proposed radiation protection law is discussed. (Author)

  8. Statement to the 46th regular session of the IAEA General Conference 2002. Vienna, 16 September 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2002-01-01

    In his Statement to the forty-six regular session of the General Conference of the IAEA, the Director General of the Agency highlighted some of the IAEA's activities and challenges in the fields of: nuclear operation and construction; radioactive waste management; nuclear applications; radiotherapy; sterile insect technique; water resources management; international co-operation and conventions; establishment of global safety standards; radiation protection; management of nuclear knowledge; safeguards; implementation of United Nations Security Council resolutions relating to Iraq; convention on the physical protection of nuclear material. He also discussed the Agency's technical co-operation programme and the Agency management

  9. Statement to the 46th regular session of the IAEA General Conference 2002. Vienna, 16 September 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElBaradei, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2002-09-16

    In his Statement to the forty-six regular session of the General Conference of the IAEA, the Director General of the Agency highlighted some of the IAEA's activities and challenges in the fields of: nuclear operation and construction; radioactive waste management; nuclear applications; radiotherapy; sterile insect technique; water resources management; international co-operation and conventions; establishment of global safety standards; radiation protection; management of nuclear knowledge; safeguards; implementation of United Nations Security Council resolutions relating to Iraq; convention on the physical protection of nuclear material. He also discussed the Agency's technical co-operation programme and the Agency management.

  10. Comparison of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Composting Council microbial detection methods in finished compost and regrowth potential of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in finished compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynnells, Russell; Ingram, David T; Roberts, Cheryl; Stonebraker, Richard; Handy, Eric T; Felton, Gary; Vinyard, Bryan T; Millner, Patricia D; Sharma, Manan

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial pathogens may survive and regrow in finished compost due to incomplete thermal inactivation during or recontamination after composting. Twenty-nine finished composts were obtained from 19 U.S. states and were separated into three broad feedstock categories: biosolids (n=10), manure (n=4), and yard waste (n=15). Three replicates of each compost were inoculated with ≈ 1-2 log CFU/g of nonpathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and E. coli O157:H7. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) protocols and U.S. Composting Council's (USCC) Test Methods for the Examination of Composting and Compost (TMECC) were compared to determine which method recovered higher percentages of inoculated E. coli (representing fecal coliforms) and Salmonella spp. from 400-g samples of finished composts. Populations of Salmonella spp. and E. coli O157:H7 were determined over 3 days while stored at 25°C and compared to physicochemical parameters to predict their respective regrowth potentials. EPA Method 1680 recovered significantly (p=0.0003) more inoculated E. coli (68.7%) than TMECC 07.01 (48.1%) due to the EPA method using more compost in the initial homogenate, larger transfer dilutions, and a larger most probable number scheme compared to TMECC 07.01. The recoveries of inoculated Salmonella spp. by Environmental Protection Agency Method 1682 (89.1%) and TMECC 07.02 (72.4%) were not statistically significant (p=0.44). The statistically similar recovery percentages may be explained by the use of a nonselective pre-enrichment step used in both methods. No physicochemical parameter (C:N, moisture content, total organic carbon) was able to serve as a sole predictor of regrowth of Salmonella spp. or E. coli O157:H7 in finished compost. However, statistical analysis revealed that the C:N ratio, total organic carbon, and moisture content all contributed to pathogen regrowth potential in finished composts. It is recommended that the USCC modify TMECC protocols to test

  11. Excerpts from the introductory statement by IAEA Director General. IAEA Board of Governors, Vienna, 9 December 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    The document contains excerpts from the Introductory Statement made by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA Board of Governors on 9 December 1999. The following aspects from the Agency's activity are briefly presented: IAEA's safeguards, physical protection of nuclear material, the status of Agency's involvement in safeguards verification in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), and Agency's actions in connection with Y2K possible problems

  12. 77 FR 25717 - Proposed Issuance of a General NPDES Permit for Small Suction Dredging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ...) General Permit (IDG-37-0000) to placer mining operations in Idaho for small suction dredges (intake nozzle... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9666-1] Proposed Issuance of a General NPDES Permit for Small... certifies ``will not, if promulgated, have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small...

  13. What matters 2013. Construction and housing: Homes of tomorrow and beyond. Noise: Leaf blowers and engines. Protection of the marine environment: A blue economy - Threat or opportunity for the oceans? Annual report of the Federal Environment Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-11-01

    As of 2011, more people worldwide live in cities than in the country. The global consumption of resources, energy of heating, cooling or light, and daily environmental conditions such as air and noise pollution are very much characterised by the way we organise our cities. Although at the beginning of the industrial age, cities often were hostile, dirty and noisy places, they appealed greatly to the rural population. Today, the environmental quality of urban spaces in highly-developed countries has improved immensely. Hence, even in German, urban areas have been able to show a small population increase in the past few years. Under this aspect, the paper under consideration consists of the following contributions: (a) The EU and the two-degree limit (The many advantages of Germany's pioneering role); (b) Homes of tomorrow and beyond (A central sector for climate and site protection, the energy revolution and health); (c) Leaf blowers and engines (The struggle against noise pollution must include people); (d) A blue economy - threat or opportunity for the oceans? (Overfishing, enthrophication, contaminants and litter are threatening the oceans, but there are solutions); (e) Certificate for renewable energy (Te Federal Environment Agency's proof of origin); (f) On the gas trail (Our air monitoring network records air pollution, across borders and globally); (g) the environmental specimen bank (Environmental observation with samples from humans and the environment).

  14. What matters 2013. Construction and housing: Homes of tomorrow and beyond. Noise: Leaf blowers and engines. Protection of the marine environment: A blue economy - Threat or opportunity for the oceans? Annual report of the Federal Environment Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-11-01

    As of 2011, more people worldwide live in cities than in the country. The global consumption of resources, energy of heating, cooling or light, and daily environmental conditions such as air and noise pollution are very much characterised by the way we organise our cities. Although at the beginning of the industrial age, cities often were hostile, dirty and noisy places, they appealed greatly to the rural population. Today, the environmental quality of urban spaces in highly-developed countries has improved immensely. Hence, even in German, urban areas have been able to show a small population increase in the past few years. Under this aspect, the paper under consideration consists of the following contributions: (a) The EU and the two-degree limit (The many advantages of Germany's pioneering role); (b) Homes of tomorrow and beyond (A central sector for climate and site protection, the energy revolution and health); (c) Leaf blowers and engines (The struggle against noise pollution must include people); (d) A blue economy - threat or opportunity for the oceans? (Overfishing, enthrophication, contaminants and litter are threatening the oceans, but there are solutions); (e) Certificate for renewable energy (Te Federal Environment Agency's proof of origin); (f) On the gas trail (Our air monitoring network records air pollution, across borders and globally); (g) the environmental specimen bank (Environmental observation with samples from humans and the environment).

  15. "We must cooperate with one another against the Enemy": Agency and activism in school-aged children as protective factors against ongoing war trauma and political violence in the Gaza Strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Guido; Pepe, Alessandro; Jaradah, Alaa; Murannak, Feda; Hamdouna, Housam

    2017-08-01

    This exploratory qualitative study investigated self-perceived risk and protection factors that may reinforce the ability of children living in refugee camps on the Gaza Strip to adjust to a traumatic and risky life context characterized by loss and dispossession. The sample comprised 200 Palestinian children recruited at primary schools in four refugee camps in the Gaza Strip following the Israeli military operation "Pillar of Defence" in 2012. Thematic content analysis was applied to written materials and narratives produced by the children. Environment, friends, emotions, family, play, self, sociality, health, school, and spirituality were the dimensions that emerged from the narrative texts. Palestinian children's psychological adaptability and ability to reposition themselves along the continuum between ease and disease is underpinned by constant political agency and activism - a dimension that guides sense-making activities in a traumatizing environment marked by continuous uncertainty, loss and bereavement. We therefore recommend a politically-informed focus, both when assessing children and when designing intervention for them in contexts of chronic political violence and war. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Environmental Protection Agency Award Recipient Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itemized Award Phase information. Information about the Recipient's Responsibilities Upon Notification of the Award, The EPA Project Officer Responsibilities, and EPA Grant Specialists Responsibilities.

  17. Environmental Protection Agency Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... more easily and live more healthy lives. Building on that, EPA will develop a comprehensive strategy... stakeholders working with us to identify the most practical and effective solutions to problems, and we stress...; Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act: Actions regarding pesticide tolerances and food additive...

  18. Neutron monitoring for radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron monitoring is a subject of increasing general interest and considerable attention is being paid to the development of improved techniques and methods for neutron monitoring. The Agency, therefore, considered it important to prepare a guide on the subject of neutron monitoring for radiation protection purposes. The present Manual is intended for those persons or authorities in Member States, particularly developing countries, who are responsible for the organization of neutron monitoring programmes and practical neutron monitoring. This Manual consequently, deals with topics such as neutron dosimetry, sources of neutrons and neutron detection as well as field instruments and operational systems used in this context

  19. Early Child Social-Emotional Problems and Child Obesity: Exploring the Protective Role of a Primary Care-Based General Parenting Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Rachel S; Briggs, Rahil D; Hershberg, Rebecca S; Silver, Ellen J; Velazco, Nerissa K; Hauser, Nicole R; Racine, Andrew D

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether early social-emotional problems are associated with child feeding practices, maternal-child feeding styles, and child obesity at age 5 years, in the context of a primary care-based brief general parenting intervention led by an integrated behavioral health specialist to offer developmental monitoring, on-site intervention, and/or referrals. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of mothers with 5-year-old children previously screened using the Ages and Stages Questionnaires: Social-Emotional (ASQ:SE) during the first 3 years of life. ASQ:SE scores were dichotomized "not at risk" versus "at risk." "At risk" subjects were further classified as participating or not participating in the intervention. Regression analyses were performed to determine relationships between social-emotional problems and feeding practices, feeding styles, and weight status at age 5 years based on participation, controlling for potential confounders and using "not at risk" as a reference group. Compared with children "not at risk," children "at risk-no participation" were more likely to be obese at age 5 years (adjusted odds ratio, 3.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 9.45). Their mothers were less likely to exhibit restriction and limit setting and more likely to pressure to eat than mothers in the "not at risk" group. Children "at risk-participation" did not demonstrate differences in weight status compared with children "not at risk." Early social-emotional problems, unmitigated by intervention, were related to several feeding styles and to obesity at age 5 years. Further study is needed to understand how a general parenting intervention may be protective against obesity.

  20. Child Protection Victims and the “Evil Institutions”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolus van Nijnatten

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch child protection system has been the target of harsh criticism in recent decades. The legitimacy of child protection services seems to have eroded. In this article, we analyze this changing legitimacy of child protection against the background of declining parental authority and in relation to the disappearance of positive pedagogical ideologies and the mainly bureaucratic response of child protection agencies. Two recent inquiries in the Netherlands on child sexual abuse within child protection-related services have emphasized the position of children as vulnerable victims of negative pedagogical practices, mirroring a general trend of “victimization”. It is concluded that reinforcement of the professional role of child protection workers may be a start towards building new trust in child protection and establishing a newfound legitimacy.

  1. Annual report 2000[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2000.

  2. 12 CFR 545.96 - Agency office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency office. 545.96 Section 545.96 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS § 545.96 Agency office. (a) General. A Federal savings association may establish or maintain an agency...

  3. Expertise and Power: Agencies Operating in Complex Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Zito

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution investigates the strategies that environmental agencies develop to enhance their policy autonomy, in order to fulfil their organisational missions for protecting the environment. This article asks whether there are particular strategic moves that an agency can make to augment this policy autonomy in the face of the principals. Critiquing principal agent theory, it investigates the evolution of three environmental agencies (the European Environment Agency, the England and Wales Environment Agency and the United States Environmental Protection Agency, focusing on the case study of climate change. The contribution examines how the agencies influence environmental policy on domestic, regional and global levels, with a special focus on the principals that constrain agency autonomy. A greater focus on different multi-level contexts, which the three agencies face, may create other possible dynamics and opportunities for agency strategies. Agencies can use particular knowledge, network and alliance building to strengthen their policy/political positions.

  4. 75 FR 68809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs And Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... collection: 1651-0050. SUMMARY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) of the Department of Homeland...

  5. The Text of the Executing Agency Agreement between the Agency and the United Nations Special Fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The text of the Executing Agency Agreement between the Agency and the United Nations Special Fund, which was approved by the General Conference on 5 October 1961 and which entered into force on 29 November 1961 upon signature by the Director General of the Agency and the Managing Director of the Special Fund, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  6. The Text of the Executing Agency Agreement between the Agency and the United Nations Special Fund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-02-07

    The text of the Executing Agency Agreement between the Agency and the United Nations Special Fund, which was approved by the General Conference on 5 October 1961 and which entered into force on 29 November 1961 upon signature by the Director General of the Agency and the Managing Director of the Special Fund, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency.

  7. The Agency's budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    A total Agency Budget of $10 406 000 for 1965 was approved by the General Conference at its session of September 1964; the Budget for the year 1964 amounted to $9 812 000. The consolidated Budget figures are shown in the table at the end of this article. The Budget falls into two parts - the Regular Budget and the Operational Budget. The Regular Budget provides for the ordinary administrative expenses of the Agency, and for expert panels, special missions, symposia and conferences, distribution of information, and scientific and technical services. In conformity with the Agency's Statute, these expenses are met by contributions made according to Voluntary contributions are paid initially into a General Fund established for this purpose, and money for operations is transferred to the respective Operating Funds as appropriate, and as approved by the Board of Governors. The scale of assessments for 1965 is based on the United Nations scale for 1964. The assessments are estimated to yield $7 713 000 - an increase of 6.8 per cent; however, more than three quarters of this increase will be offset by credits which Member States will receive as a result of a cash surplus brought forward. The Operational Budget is financed by voluntary contributions and is divided into two parts - Operating Fund I, devoted to certain laboratory and research projects, and Operating Fund II, for technical assistance, training and research contracts.

  8. Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    Pursuant to the provisions of its Statute relevant to the adoption and application of safety standards for protection against radiation, the Agency convened a panel of experts which formulated the Basic Safety Standards set forth in this publication. The panel met under the chairmanship of Professor L. Bugnard, Director of the French Institut National d'Hygiene, and representatives of the United Nations and of several of its specialized agencies participated in its work. The Basic Safety Standards thus represent the result of a most careful assessment of the variety of complex scientific and administrative problems involved. Nevertheless, of course, they will need to be revised from time to time in the light of advances in scientific knowledge, of comments received from Member States and of the work of other competent international organizations. The Agency's Board of Governors in June 1962 approved the Standards as a first edition, subject to later revision as mentioned above, and authorized Director General Sigvard Eklund to apply the Standards in Agency and Agency-assisted operations and to invite Governments of Member States to take them as a basis in formulating national regulations or recommendations on protection against the dangers arising from ionizing radiations. It is mainly for this last purpose that the Basic Safety Standards are now being published in the Safety Series; but it is hoped that this publication will also interest a much wider circle of readers.

  9. 33 CFR 238.10 - Coordination with other Federal agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... abreast of the public works programs administered by other Federal agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, Farmers Home Administration and the... help to achieve this objective (see ER 1105-2-811). ...

  10. Radiation protection in the application of ionizing radiation in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Yusof Mohamad Ali

    1987-01-01

    There is a substantial increase in the use of ionizing radiation in industry throughout the country especially in the last five years or so. With this growth in the number of users and activity of sources used, and together with the introduction of the new Atomic Energy Licensing Act (AELA) in 1984, the question of radiation safety and protection of workers and members of the public in general, can no longer be taken lightly. It has to be dealt with effectively. In this paper, a general discussion and clarification on certain practical aspects of radiation protection as recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is presented. Amongst the topics chosen are those on area monitoring, personnel monitoring, leak testing of sealed sources and training of personnel. Also presented in the paper is a brief discussion about UTN's experience in giving out radiation protection services to various agencies throughout the country. (author)

  11. Report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on behalf of the Board of Governors to all members of the Agency on the Non-Compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the agreement between the IAEA and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons (INFCIRC/403) and on the Agency's inability to verify the non-diversion of material required to be safeguarded

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The document contains the following items: Report by the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency on behalf of the Board of Governors to all members of the Agency on the non-compliance of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea with the agreement between the IAEA and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea for the application of Safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and on the Agency's inability to verify the non-diversion of material required to be safeguarded; resolution adopted by the Board on 1 April 1993 (Annex 1); Agreement of 30 January 1992 between the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons (Annex 2); resolution adopted by the Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 (Annex 3); Communications from the Director General of the IAEA to the Minister for Atomic Energy of DPRK or from the Minister for Atomic Energy of the DPRK of the Director General of the IAEA (Annexes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12); statement of the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Pyongyang, 12 March 1993 (Annex 7); resolution adopted by the Board on 18 March 1993 (Annex 10)

  12. Intraoral radiology in general dental practices. A comparison of digital and film-based X-ray systems with regard to radiation protection and dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anissi, H.D. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Dentistry; Geibel, M.A. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Surgery

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the distribution and application of digital intraoral radiographic techniques within general dental practices and to compare these with film-based systems in terms of patient dose reduction. Materials and Methods: 1100 questionnaires were handed out to general dental practitioners. Data was analyzed with respect to the type of system by using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests, i.e. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and chi-square test (SPSS 20). Results: 64% of the questioned dentists still use film-based radiology, 23% utilize storage phosphor plate (SPP) systems and 13% use a charge-coupled device (CCD). A strong correlation between the number of dentists working in a practice and the use of digital dental imaging was observed. Almost 3/4 of the film users work with E- or F-speed film. 45% of them refuse to change to a digital system. The use of lead aprons was popular, while only a minority preferred thyroid shields and rectangular collimators. A fourfold reduction of exposure time from D-speed film to CCD systems was observed. Due to detector size and positioning errors, users of CCD systems take significantly more single-tooth radiographs in total. Considering the number of radiographs per patient, there is only a slight tendency towards more X-rays with CCD systems. Up to image generation, digital systems seem to be as or even more difficult to handle than film-based systems, while their handling was favored after radiographic exposure. Conclusion: Despite a slight increase of radiographs taken with CCD systems, there is a significant dosage reduction. Corresponding to the decrease in exposure time, the patient dose for SPP systems is reduced to one half compared to film. The main issues in CCD technology are positioning errors and the size of the X-ray detectors which are difficult to eliminate. The usage of radiation protection measures still needs to be improved. (orig.)

  13. Intraoral radiology in general dental practices - a comparison of digital and film-based X-ray systems with regard to radiation protection and dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anissi, H D; Geibel, M A

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the distribution and application of digital intraoral radiographic techniques within general dental practices and to compare these with film-based systems in terms of patient dose reduction. 1100 questionnaires were handed out to general dental practitioners. Data was analyzed with respect to the type of system by using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests, i.e. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and chi-square test (SPSS 20). 64% of the questioned dentists still use film-based radiology, 23% utilize storage phosphor plate (SPP) systems and 13% use a charge-coupled device (CCD). A strong correlation between the number of dentists working in a practice and the use of digital dental imaging was observed. Almost 3/4 of the film users work with E- or F-speed film. 45% of them refuse to change to a digital system. The use of lead aprons was popular, while only a minority preferred thyroid shields and rectangular collimators. A fourfold reduction of exposure time from D-speed film to CCD systems was observed. Due to detector size and positioning errors, users of CCD systems take significantly more single-tooth radiographs in total. Considering the number of radiographs per patient, there is only a slight tendency towards more X-rays with CCD systems. Up to image generation, digital systems seem to be as or even more difficult to handle than film-based systems, while their handling was favored after radiographic exposure. Despite a slight increase of radiographs taken with CCD systems, there is a significant dosage reduction. Corresponding to the decrease in exposure time, the patient dose for SPP systems is reduced to one half compared to film. The main issues in CCD technology are positioning errors and the size of the X-ray detectors which are difficult to eliminate. The usage of radiation protection measures still needs to be improved. ► Responsible use of digital intraoral radiology results in a significant

  14. Intraoral radiology in general dental practices. A comparison of digital and film-based X-ray systems with regard to radiation protection and dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anissi, H.D.; Geibel, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the distribution and application of digital intraoral radiographic techniques within general dental practices and to compare these with film-based systems in terms of patient dose reduction. Materials and Methods: 1100 questionnaires were handed out to general dental practitioners. Data was analyzed with respect to the type of system by using descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests, i.e. Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and chi-square test (SPSS 20). Results: 64% of the questioned dentists still use film-based radiology, 23% utilize storage phosphor plate (SPP) systems and 13% use a charge-coupled device (CCD). A strong correlation between the number of dentists working in a practice and the use of digital dental imaging was observed. Almost 3/4 of the film users work with E- or F-speed film. 45% of them refuse to change to a digital system. The use of lead aprons was popular, while only a minority preferred thyroid shields and rectangular collimators. A fourfold reduction of exposure time from D-speed film to CCD systems was observed. Due to detector size and positioning errors, users of CCD systems take significantly more single-tooth radiographs in total. Considering the number of radiographs per patient, there is only a slight tendency towards more X-rays with CCD systems. Up to image generation, digital systems seem to be as or even more difficult to handle than film-based systems, while their handling was favored after radiographic exposure. Conclusion: Despite a slight increase of radiographs taken with CCD systems, there is a significant dosage reduction. Corresponding to the decrease in exposure time, the patient dose for SPP systems is reduced to one half compared to film. The main issues in CCD technology are positioning errors and the size of the X-ray detectors which are difficult to eliminate. The usage of radiation protection measures still needs to be improved. (orig.)

  15. The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency. Latest Status (Spanish Edition); Texto Revisado de Los Principios Rectores n Normas Generales de Ejecucion Para la Prestacion de Asistencia Tecnica por el Organismo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-03-15

    The Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules to Govern the Provision of Technical Assistance by the Agency were approved by the Board of Governors on 21 February 1979. The test is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The provisions established by the Board of Governors on 24 September 1977 for the application of safeguards in relation to the granting of technical assistance are also reproduced in the Annex to the Revised Guiding Principles and General Operating Rules. [Spanish] El 21 de febrero de 1979 la Junta de Gobernadores aprobo el texto revisado de los Principios rectores y normas generales de ejecucion para la prestacion de asistencia tecnica por el Organismo. Para informacion de todos los Estados Miembros, en el presente documento se transcribe dicho texto. En el Anexo del texto revisado de los Principios rectores y normas generales de ejecucion se transcriben tambien las disposiciones prescritas por la Junta de Gobernadores el 24 de septiembre de 1977 acerca de la aplicacion de salvaguardias en relacion con la asistencia tecnica.

  16. Proposed modifications of Environmental Protection Agency Method 1601 for detection of coliphages in drinking water, with same-day fluorescence-based detection and evaluation by the performance-based measurement system and alternative test protocol validation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Robert S; Durbin, Gregory W; Conklin, Ernestine; Rosen, Jeff; Clancy, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    Coliphages are microbial indicators specified in the Ground Water Rule that can be used to monitor for potential fecal contamination of drinking water. The Total Coliform Rule specifies coliform and Escherichia coli indicators for municipal water quality testing; thus, coliphage indicator use is less common and advances in detection methodology are less frequent. Coliphages are viral structures and, compared to bacterial indicators, are more resistant to disinfection and diffuse further distances from pollution sources. Therefore, coliphage presence may serve as a better predictor of groundwater quality. This study describes Fast Phage, a 16- to 24-h presence/absence modification of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1601 for detection of coliphages in 100 ml water. The objective of the study is to demonstrate that the somatic and male-specific coliphage modifications provide results equivalent to those of Method 1601. Five laboratories compared the modifications, featuring same-day fluorescence-based prediction, to Method 1601 by using the performance-based measurement system (PBMS) criterion. This requires a minimum 50% positive response in 10 replicates of 100-ml water samples at coliphage contamination levels of 1.3 to 1.5 PFU/100 ml. The laboratories showed that Fast Phage meets PBMS criteria with 83.5 to 92.1% correlation of the same-day rapid fluorescence-based prediction with the next-day result. Somatic coliphage PBMS data are compared to manufacturer development data that followed the EPA alternative test protocol (ATP) validation approach. Statistical analysis of the data sets indicates that PBMS utilizes fewer samples than does the ATP approach but with similar conclusions. Results support testing the coliphage modifications by using an EPA-approved national PBMS approach with collaboratively shared samples.

  17. Agency, time and causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eWidlok

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Scientists interested in causal cognition increasingly search for evidence from non-WEIRD people but find only very few cross-cultural studies that specifically target causal cognition. This article suggests how information about causality can be retrieved from ethnographic monographs, specifically from ethnographies that discuss agency and concepts of time. Many apparent cultural differences with regard to causal cognition dissolve when cultural extensions of agency and personhood to non-humans are taken into account. At the same time considerable variability remains when we include notions of time, linearity and sequence. The article focuses on ethnographic case studies from Africa but provides a more general perspective on the role of ethnography in research on the diversity and universality of causal cognition.

  18. Agencies Collaborate, Develop a Cyanobacteria Assessment Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collaborative effort integrates the efforts of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide an approach for mainstrea...

  19. 45 CFR 61.7 - Reporting licensure actions taken by Federal or State licensing and certification agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting licensure actions taken by Federal or State licensing and certification agencies. 61.7 Section 61.7 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION HEALTHCARE INTEGRITY AND PROTECTION DATA BANK FOR FINAL ADVERSE...

  20. 40 CFR 152.95 - Citation of all studies in the Agency's files pertinent to a specific data requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES Procedures To Ensure Protection of Data Submitters' Rights § 152.95 Citation of all studies in the... requirement. The applicant who selects this cite-all option must submit to the Agency: (a) A general offer to... may be limited to apply only to data pertinent to the specific data requirement(s) for which the cite...

  1. 75 FR 3731 - Proposed Issuance of a General NPDES Permit for Small Suction Dredging-Permit Number IDG-37-0000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... System (NPDES) general permit to placer mining operations in Idaho for small suction dredges (intake... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9104-3] Proposed Issuance of a General NPDES Permit for Small... significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.'' EPA has concluded that NPDES general...

  2. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document lists the 129 Member States of the Agency as of 1 June 1999. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/51) is Benin. The dates on which the present 129 states became Members, and the state (Honduras) whose application for membership of the Agency has been recommended by the Board of Governors to be considered at the 43rd session of the General Conference are given in an Attachment

  3. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The document lists the 135 Member States of the Agency as of 19 March 2003. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/56) is the Republic of Honduras. The dates on which the present 135 Member States became Members are given in an Attachment. It also shows the States whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  4. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document lists the 130 Member States of the Agency as of 1 December 1999. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/52) is Angola. The dates on which the present 130 Member States became Members, and the state Honduras) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute are given in an Attachment

  5. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document lists the 128 Member States of the Agency as of 18 September 1998. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/50) is Burkina Faso. In an attachment the dates on which the present 128 states became Members, and the state (Benin) whose application for membership of the Agency has been recommended by the Board of Governors to be considered at the 42nd session of the General Conference are given

  6. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The document lists the 132 Member States of the Agency as of 1 June 2001. The new Members since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/53) are Central African Republic and Azerbaijan. The dates on which the present 132 Member States became Members are given in an Attachment. It also shows the States whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  7. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document lists the 127 Member States of the Agency as of 1 January 1998. The new Members since the last issue of of the list (INFCIRC/2/49) are Malta and the Republic of Moldova. In an attachment are given the dates on which the present 127 states become Members, the state (Burkina Faso) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  8. The members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-15

    The document lists the 127 Member States of the Agency as of 1 January 1998. The new Members since the last issue of of the list (INFCIRC/2/49) are Malta and the Republic of Moldova. In an attachment are given the dates on which the present 127 states become Members, the state (Burkina Faso) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute.

  9. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-18

    The document lists the 128 Member States of the Agency as of 18 September 1998. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/50) is Burkina Faso. In an attachment the dates on which the present 128 states became Members, and the state (Benin) whose application for membership of the Agency has been recommended by the Board of Governors to be considered at the 42nd session of the General Conference are given

  10. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-16

    The document lists the 129 Member States of the Agency as of 1 June 1999. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/51) is Benin. The dates on which the present 129 states became Members, and the state (Honduras) whose application for membership of the Agency has been recommended by the Board of Governors to be considered at the 43rd session of the General Conference are given in an Attachment.

  11. 76 FR 39101 - EPA and Army Corps of Engineers Guidance Regarding Identification of Waters Protected by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... Waters Protected by the Clean Water Act AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and U.S. Army... the agencies will identify waters protected by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of...

  12. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The document lists the 136 Member States of the Agency as of 6 May 2003. The new Members since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/57) are Eritrea and the Republic of Seychelles. Cambodia withdrew from the Agency with effect from 26 March 2003. The dates on which the present 136 Member States became Members are given in an Attachment. It also shows the States whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute

  13. 40 CFR 13.39 - Agency determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency determination. 13.39 Section 13... Referral of Debts to IRS for Tax Refund Offset § 13.39 Agency determination. (a) Following review of the evidence, EPA will issue a written decision. (b) If EPA either sustains or amends its determination, it...

  14. Safety guide on fire protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of the Safety Guide is to give specific design and operational guidance for protection from fire and explosion in nuclear power plants, based on the general guidance given in the relevant sections of the 'Safety Code of Practice - Design' and the 'Safety Code of Practice - Operation' of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The guide will confine itself to fire protection of safety systems and items important to safety, leaving the non-safety matters of fire protection in nuclear power plants to be decided upon the basis of the various available national and international practices and regulations. (HP) [de

  15. Annual report 2003[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three 'pillars' of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report, starting on page 9, generally follows the programme structure as it applied in 2003. The introductory chapter, seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. Additional information on specific issues can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review and Technical Co-operation Report. This material is also available on the Agency's WorldAtom web site (http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2003/). All sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to Technology are: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environments; Physical and Chemical Applications. Topics related to safety discussed in this report are: Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Security of Material. Topics related to Verification are Safeguards and Verification in Iraq Pursuant to UNSC Resolutions. A separate chapter is devoted to Management of Technical Cooperation for Development.

  16. Merger of Science Agencies Proposed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    A bill proposing the establishment of a cabinet-level Department of Science, Space, Energy and Technology was introduced in the House of Representatives on July 1 by Robert Walker (R-Pa.), George Brown (D-Calif.), Ron Packard (R-Calif.), and Joe Kolter (D-Pa.). The department would be a conglomerate of existing civilian science and technology agencies, including NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, the National Technical Information Service, and research functions at the Department of Energy.

  17. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The document lists the 125 Member States of the Agency as of 1 September 1997. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/Rev.48) is Latvia. In an Attachment are given the dates on which the present 125 States became Members, the State (Republic of Moldova) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the States (Malta and Burkina Faso) whose applications for membership have been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference

  18. The members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The document lists the 124 Member States of the Agency as of 1 September 1996. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/Rev.47) is Georgia. In an attachment are given the dates on which the 124 Member States became Members, the State (Latvia) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the State (Republic of Moldova) whose application for membership has been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference

  19. The Members of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    No new Member has joined the Agency since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.45). The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 122 Member States became Members. It also shows the State whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the States whose applications for membership have been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference

  20. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-22

    The document lists the 125 Member States of the Agency as of 1 September 1997. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/Rev.48) is Latvia. In an Attachment are given the dates on which the present 125 States became Members, the State (Republic of Moldova) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the States (Malta and Burkina Faso) whose applications for membership have been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference.

  1. The members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-10

    The document lists the 124 Member States of the Agency as of 1 September 1996. The new Member since the last issue of the list (INFCIRC/2/Rev.47) is Georgia. In an attachment are given the dates on which the 124 Member States became Members, the State (Latvia) whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the State (Republic of Moldova) whose application for membership has been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference.

  2. The Members of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-11

    No new Member has joined the Agency since the last list of Member States was issued (INFCIRC/2/Rev.45). The Attachment hereto shows the dates on which the present 122 Member States became Members. It also shows the State whose application for membership of the Agency has been approved by the General Conference but which has not yet deposited an instrument of acceptance of the Statute and the States whose applications for membership have been recommended by the Board of Governors for approval by the General Conference.

  3. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Aman; Sharma, Shivam; Parasher, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Radiation dose measurement, field of radiobiology, is considered to be critical factor for optimizing radiation protection to the health care practitioners, patients and the public. This lead to equipment that has dose - area product meters permanently installed. In many countries and even institution, the range of equipment is vast and with the opportunity for radiation protection and dose recording varies considerably. Practitioners must move with the changed demands of radiation protection but in many cases without assistance of modern advancements in technology Keeping the three basic safety measures Time, Dose and Shielding we can say 'Optimum dose is safe dose' instead of 'No dose is safe dose'. The purpose enclosed within the title 'Radiation Protection'. The use of radiation is expanding widely everyday around the world and crossing boundaries of medical imaging, diagnostic and. The way to get the ''As low as reasonably achievable' is only achievable by using methodology of radiation protection and to bring the concern of general public and practitioners over the hazards of un-necessary radiation dose. Three basic principles of radiation protection are time, distance and shielding. By minimizing the exposure time increasing the distance and including the shielding we can reduce the optimum range of dose. The ability of shielding material to attenuate radiation is generally given as half value layer. This is the thickness of the material which will reduce the amount of radiation by 50%. Lab coat and gloves must be worn when handling radioactive material or when working in a labeled radiation work area. Safety glasses or other appropriate splash shields should be used when handling radioactive material. 1. Reached to low dose level to occupational workers, public as per prescribed dose limit. 2. By mean of ALARA principle we achieved the protection from radiation besides us using the radiation for our benefit

  4. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biopower at the Chanute Air Force Base in Rantoul, Illinois. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarlata, C.; Mosey, G.

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Chanute Air Force Base site in Rantoul, Illinois, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was contacted to provide technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study was to assess the site for a possible biopower system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and impacts of different biopower options.

  5. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of a Hydroelectric Installation at the Jeddo Mine Drainage Tunnel. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Jeddo Tunnel discharge site for a feasibility study of renewable energy potential. The purpose of this report is to assess technical and economic viability of the site for hydroelectric and geothermal energy production. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system.

  6. 77 FR 22347 - Agency Information Collection Agencies: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested Reinstatement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... Approval Has Expired: Survey of General Purpose Law Enforcement Agencies, 2012 ACTION: 60-Day notice of information collection under review. The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE [OMB Number 1121-0240] Agency Information Collection Agencies: Proposed...

  7. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Azorin V, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  8. Operational Radiological Protection and Aspects of Optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, E.; Lindvall, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1992, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), along with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has sponsored the Information System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE). ISOE collects and analyses occupational exposure data and experience from over 400 nuclear power plants around the world and is a forum for radiological protection experts from both nuclear power plants and regulatory authorities to share lessons learned and best practices in the management of worker radiation exposures. In connection to the ongoing work of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to develop new recommendations, the ISOE programme has been interested in how the new recommendations would affect operational radiological protection application at nuclear power plants. Bearing in mind that the ICRP is developing, in addition to new general recommendations, a new recommendation specifically on optimisation, the ISOE programme created a working group to study the operational aspects of optimisation, and to identify the key factors in optimisation that could usefully be reflected in ICRP recommendations. In addition, the Group identified areas where further ICRP clarification and guidance would be of assistance to practitioners, both at the plant and the regulatory authority. The specific objective of this ISOE work was to provide operational radiological protection input, based on practical experience, to the development of new ICRP recommendations, particularly in the area of optimisation. This will help assure that new recommendations will best serve the needs of those implementing radiation protection standards, for the public and for workers, at both national and international levels. (author)

  9. Radiological Protection Miscellaneous Provisions Act 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish Legislation

    2014-07-01

    This Act provides for the dissolution of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and the transfer of all its functions, assets, liabilities and staff to the Environmental Protection Agency, to give effect to the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material done at Vienna on 8 July 2005, to amend the Radiological Protection Act 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency Act 1992 and certain other enactments, and to provide for matters connected therewith

  10. 40 CFR 52.2179 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2179 Section 52.2179 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Dakota § 52.2179 Visibility protection...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1606 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1606 Section 52.1606 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) New Jersey § 52.1606 Visibility protection...

  12. 40 CFR 52.1236 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1236 Section 52.1236 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Minnesota § 52.1236 Visibility protection. (a...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1488 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1488 Section 52.1488 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Nevada § 52.1488 Visibility protection. (a...

  14. 40 CFR 52.2781 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2781 Section 52.2781 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... protection. (a) The requirements of section 169A of the Clean Air Act are not met, because the plan does not...

  15. 40 CFR 52.2383 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2383 Section 52.2383 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Vermont § 52.2383 Visibility protection. (a...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2498 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2498 Section 52.2498 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Washington § 52.2498 Visibility protection...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2304 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2304 Section 52.2304 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Texas § 52.2304 Visibility protection. (a...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1387 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1387 Section 52.1387 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Montana § 52.1387 Visibility protection. (a...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1831 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1831 Section 52.1831 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) North Dakota § 52.1831 Visibility protection...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2533 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2533 Section 52.2533 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) West Virginia § 52.2533 Visibility protection...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2132 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2132 Section 52.2132 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... protection. (a) The requirements of section 169A of the Clean Air Act are not met, because the plan does not...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1183 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1183 Section 52.1183 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Michigan § 52.1183 Visibility protection. (a...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1531 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1531 Section 52.1531 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) New Hampshire § 52.1531 Visibility protection...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2452 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.2452 Section 52.2452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Virginia § 52.2452 Visibility protection. (a...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1033 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1033 Section 52.1033 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Maine § 52.1033 Visibility protection. (a...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1339 - Visibility protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visibility protection. 52.1339 Section 52.1339 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Missouri § 52.1339 Visibility protection. (a...

  7. The provision of radiological protection services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This publication is a code of practice for the provision or radiological protection services for establishments in which, or in part of which, work is primarily with radiation sources. It was prepared with the help of an international panel of experts and representatives of international organizations which have an interest in this field and was promulgated by the Director General of the Agency under the authority of the Board of Governors of the Agency as a code of practice in the framework of the Agency's Safety Standards. The Board of Governors also authorized the Director General to recommend to Member States that the code of practice be taken into account in the formulation of national regulations or recommendations. The Appendix to the code contains a number of examples of the organization of radiological protection services that have been provided by the members of the panel of experts. These examples do not form a part of the code of practice, but are intended to illustrate the methods of organization which have been adopted in different countries.

  8. Text of the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    The Final Act of the Meeting of Governmental Representatives to Consider the Drafting of a Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material was signed on 26 October 1979. According to paragraph 11 of the Final Act, ''The Meeting recommended that the text of the Convention be transmitted for information to the Twenty-Third General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency.''

  9. Import of ICRP 60 for general mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Riordan, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the ubiquity of natural, the International Commission on Radiological Protection limits the definition of occupational exposure to circumstances that can reasonably be regarded as the responsibility of management. Radon in workplaces in given as the prime example in ICRP Publication 60, the new recommendations of the Commission. But not all workplaces are to be included, and the Commission advises that agencies should identify the particular circumstances in which protection is required. It offers some guidance: spas, uranium mines, other underground mines and caves are mentioned. Few would dispute the suggestion that underground exposure to radon in general non-uranium mining may be appreciable and that the system of protection needs to be applied in the industry. Conditions in underground mining are examined in this paper. (author)

  10. 78 FR 44930 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... furnished negative information about them to a consumer reporting agency, that they have a right to opt out... they reported to a consumer reporting agency, that they maintain rights with respect to knowing what is... BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION [Docket No CFPB-2013-0023] Agency Information Collection...

  11. 7 CFR 1901.260 - Coordination with other agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coordination with other agencies. 1901.260 Section... AGRICULTURE PROGRAM REGULATIONS PROGRAM-RELATED INSTRUCTIONS Procedures for the Protection of Historical and Archeological Properties § 1901.260 Coordination with other agencies. (a) When other Agencies are directly...

  12. 75 FR 50772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... information collection requirement concerning the: Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is...

  13. General conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1993-01-01

    In conclusion, a general consensus of a number of points which the author endeavours to summarize in this article: -doctors are an excellent channel for passing on information to the public -doctors feel that they do not know enough about the subject and a training on radiobiology and radiation protection is a necessity for them -communication between doctors and the general public is poor in this field -research should be encouraged in numerous areas such as: carcinogenic effect of low doses of radiation, pedagogy and risk perception

  14. 76 FR 25342 - Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations to the Children's Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9302-1] Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations to the Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee AGENCY: Environmental... nominations from a range of qualified candidates to be considered for appointment to its Children's Health...

  15. 77 FR 12284 - Access to Confidential Business Information; Protection Strategies Incorporated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ... Business Information; Protection Strategies Incorporated AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has authorized its contractor, Protection Strategies Incorporated (PSI) of... Business Information (CBI). DATES: Access to the confidential data occurred on or about February 16, 2012...

  16. 75 FR 19661 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... includes the following topics: --Review European Space Agency-NASA Coordination on Planetary Protection... Committee; Planetary Protection Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... (NASA) announces a meeting of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC...

  17. Monitoring the level of government trust, risk perception and intention of the general public to adopt protective measures during the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weerd, Willemien; Timmermans, Daniëlle Rm; Beaujean, Desirée Jma; Oudhoff, Jurriaan; van Steenbergen, Jim E

    2011-07-19

    During the course of an influenza pandemic, governments know relatively little about the possibly changing influence of government trust, risk perception, and receipt of information on the public's intention to adopt protective measures or on the acceptance of vaccination. This study aims to identify and describe possible changes in and factors associated with public's intentions during the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in the Netherlands. Sixteen cross-sectional telephone surveys were conducted (N = 8060) between April - November 2009. From these repeated measurements three consecutive periods were categorized based on crucial events during the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. Time trends in government trust, risk perception, intention to adopt protective measures, and the acceptance of vaccination were analysed. Factors associated with an intention to adopt protective measures or vaccination were identified. Trust in the government was high, but decreased over time. During the course of the pandemic, perceived vulnerability and an intention to adopt protective measures increased. Trust and vulnerability were associated with an intention to adopt protective measures in general only during period one. Higher levels of intention to receive vaccination were associated with increased government trust, fear/worry, and perceived vulnerability. In periods two and three receipt of information was positively associated with an intention to adopt protective measures. Most respondents wanted to receive information about infection prevention from municipal health services, health care providers, and the media. The Dutch response to the H1N1 virus was relatively muted. Higher levels of trust in the government, fear/worry, and perceived vulnerability were all positively related to an intention to accept vaccination. Only fear/worry was positively linked to an intention to adopt protective measures during the entire pandemic. Risk and crisis communication by the government should

  18. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart R of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart R

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart R 1 Table 1 to Subpart R of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Pipeline Breakout Stations) Pt. 63, Subpt. R, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart R of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart R Reference Applies to subpart R Comment 63.1(a)(1) Yes 63.1(a)(2) Yes 63.1(a)(3) Yes...

  19. 38 CFR 0.735-1 - Agency ethics officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency ethics officials... STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT AND RELATED RESPONSIBILITIES General Provisions § 0.735-1 Agency ethics officials. (a) Designated Agency Ethics Official (DAEO). The Assistant General Counsel (023) is the...

  20. Behavioural agency theory and the family business

    OpenAIRE

    Kumeto, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    The behavioural agency theory was developed to provide a more comprehensive explanation and prediction of managerial risk taking, in response to some shortcomings of agency theory. In general, the theory offers explanations of why decision makers prefer some strategic choices to others. The use of behavioural agency theory in family business research has, however, been very limited. Family business scholars recently adapted this theory to construct the family business variant, the ‘socioemoti...

  1. Rules regarding voluntary contributions to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The texts of the following Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency are reproduced for the information of all Members of the Agency. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities - adopted by the Board of Governors on 10 March 2004; Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency - approved by the General Conference on 21 September 2001 (GC (45)/RES/9)

  2. Rules regarding voluntary contributions to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The texts of the following Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency are reproduced for the information of all Members of the Agency. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities - adopted by the Board of Governors on 13 June 2001; Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency - approved by the General Conference on 21 September 2001 (GC(45)/RES/9)

  3. Physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. Safeguards and the role of the IAEA in physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolej, M.

    1999-01-01

    The physical protection and security of nuclear facilities and materials concerns utilities, manufactures, the general public, and those who are responsible for licensing and regulating such facilities. The requirements and process to ensure an acceptable physical protection and security system have been evolutionary in nature. This paper reviews the first step of such process: the State's safeguards system and the international safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), including the relationship between these two safeguards systems. The elements of these systems that are reviewed include the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material, physical protection measures, and containment and surveillance measures. In addition, the interactions between the State, the facility operator, and the IAEA are described. The paper addresses the IAEA safeguards system, including material accountancy and containment and surveillance; the State safeguards system, including material control and accountancy, and physical protection; the role of the IAEA in physical protection; a summary of safeguards system interactions.(author)

  4. Annual report 2005[International Atomic Energy Agency]; Informe anual 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three 'pillars' of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report, starting on page 13, generally follows the programme structure as it applied in 2005. The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. Information on specific issues can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review and Technical Cooperation Report. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is also provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency?s iaea.org web site (http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2005/). All sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to Technology are: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Technologies; Capacity Building and Nuclear Knowledge Maintenance for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environment; Physical and Chemical Applications. Topics related to Safety and Security discussed in this report are: Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation and Transport Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Nuclear Security. Topics related to Verification are Safeguards and Verification in Iraq Pursuant to UNSC Resolutions. A separate

  5. OIG News Release: EPA IG responds to Sen. Vitter's letter about audit report on agency's use of private and alias email accounts to conduct official business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur A. Elkins Jr., Inspector General for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has replied to a letter signed and released to the public February 20 byU.S. Sen. David Vitter, Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

  6. 46 CFR 505.5 - Agency review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Agency review. 505.5 Section 505.5 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS ADMINISTRATIVE OFFSET § 505.5 Agency review. (a... request to review a disputed debt must be submitted to the Commission official who provided notification...

  7. Rules regarding voluntary contributions to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    The texts of the following Rules Regarding Voluntary Contributions to the Agency are reproduced: 1. Rules to Govern the Acceptance of Gifts of Services, Equipment and Facilities (adopted by the Board of Governors on 13 June 1989); 2. Rules Regarding the Acceptance of Voluntary Contributions of Money to the Agency (approved by the General Conference on 29 September 1989)

  8. 14 CFR 296.5 - Agency relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency relationships. 296.5 Section 296.5 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS INDIRECT AIR TRANSPORTATION OF PROPERTY General § 296.5 Agency relationships. An indirect cargo...

  9. Apollo-12 gift to the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    On March 2 the Agency was host to the three Apollo-12 astronauts who placed the first atomic power generator on the moon. Accompanied by their wives, they were given a warm welcome and received mementos prepared by the Agency. In return they presented the Director General with a model of the SNAP-27 generator. (author)

  10. 48 CFR 1.202 - Agency compliance with the FAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... compliance with the FAR (see 1.304) is the responsibility of the Secretary of Defense (for the military departments and defense agencies), the Administrator of General Services (for civilian agencies other than...

  11. Data for Summary of the Development the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Medaka Extended One Generation Reproduction Test (MEOGRT) Using Data from Nine Multigenerational Medaka Tests

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In response to various legislative mandates the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) formed its Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP), which...

  12. Post graduate course of radiation protection. V. 1-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In September 1991, the General Conference of IAEA, in the resolution GC/XXXV/RES/552 demanded the Director General to formulate the propositions in the field of education and teaching of radiation protection. After its meeting in 1993, the General Conference (document GC/XXXVII/1067) a program of education in radiation protection and nuclear safety. The IAEA has chosen L'Instut national des science et techniques nucleaires (INSTN) de Saclay, France, to perform the french training for its long-term education in nuclear field. During the nine weeks in May and June 1994, 24 participants from 22 countries attended 80 courses presented by 70 teachers. The organizers have attained a successful cooperation of competent French organizations in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety as: Institut de protection et de surete nucleaire (IPSN), Commissariat a l'energie atomique (CEA), Compagnie generales des matieres nucleaires (COGEMA), Agence nationale pour la gestion de dechets radioactif (ANDRA), Office de protection contre les raynnements ionisants (OPRI), Electicite de France (EDF), as well as outstanding specialists in the medical field. The series of these lectures are presented in these two volumes. Admitting that the education and training in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety are responsibilities of national authorities the IAEA hopes that this published material would be widely used by the Member States as a basis for their training programs in the mentioned field

  13. [Light protection: principles of UV protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stege, H; Mang, R

    2006-05-01

    UV radiation is responsible for the induction of epithelial and melanocytic skin cancer, photoaging, and photodermatoses. UV protection is necessary to prevent damage caused by non-physiologic exposure. UV protection includes not only reduction of sun exposure but also use of sun protective filters, UV protective clothes, DNA repair enzymes, and antioxidant supplementation. Consumers are uncertain about the possibilities and limitations of commercial sun protection measures. Dermatologists must explain protective measures to the general public which continues to believe that UV-tanned skin is healthy. The sunscreen market is a highly competitive but lucrative market. The range of products with different designations and promises makes difficult for both consumers and dermatologists to determine what is sensible UV protection.

  14. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-06-22

    In accordance with Article VII.E of the Statute and of the general principles approved by the General Conference in resolution GC.1(S)/RES/13, the Board of Governors has established 'the terms and conditions on which the Agency's staff shall be appointed, remunerated and dismissed.' The Provisional Staff Regulations thus approved and amended by the Board up to 15 January 1959 are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency.

  15. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    In accordance with Article VII.E of the Statute and of the general principles approved by the General Conference in resolution GC.1(S)/RES/13, the Board of Governors has established 'the terms and conditions on which the Agency's staff shall be appointed, remunerated and dismissed.' The Provisional Staff Regulations thus approved and amended by the Board up to 15 January 1959 are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  16. Analysis of the influence of the demand rate on the accident rate of a plant equipped with a single protective channel by Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca Walter, F.L.; Alvim, A.C.M.; Silva, F.C. da; Melo e Frutuoso, P.F.

    1995-01-01

    The application of the GPT methodology to a reliability engineering problem of great practical interest is discussed: that of the analysis of the influence of the demand rate on the accident rate of a process plant equipped with a single protective channel. This problem has been solved in the literature by traditional methods, that is, for each demand rate value the system of differential equations that governs the system behavior (derived from a Markovian reliability model) is solved and the resulting points are employed to generate the desired curve. This sensitivity analysis has been performed by means of a GPT approach in order to show how it could simplify the calculations. Although an analytical solution is available for the above equations, the application of the GPT approach needed the solution of the system for a few points (reference solutions) and the results agree very well with those published. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs

  17. Influence of caffeine on the protective activity of gabapentin and topiramate in a mouse model of generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargiełło-Baszak, Małgorzata; Chrościńska-Krawczyk, Magdalena; Andres-Mach, Marta; Łuszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-08-01

    Caffeine may interact with classical antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), reducing their anticonvulsant effects in basic seizure models. The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether intraperitoneal caffeine (acute or chronic for 15 days) could attenuate the anticonvulsant effect of some newer AEDs: gabapentin (GBP) and topiramate (TPM) against electroconvulsions in mice. Maximal electroshock (MES)-induced mouse seizure model was used for the estimation of the anticonvulsant activity of TPM whilst the protective activity of GBP was evaluated in the threshold test for maximal (tonic) convulsions. Adverse effects were evaluated by measurement of long-term memory (the step-through passive avoidance task) and motor coordination (chimney test). Plasma AED concentrations were also measured to determinate any pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed effects. Caffeine (both acute and chronic at 23.1 and 46.2mg/kg) significantly reduced the protective effects of TPM against MES. As regards GBP, caffeine (acutely at 46.2mg/kg and chronically at 23.1 or 46.2mg/kg) significantly diminished the GBP-induced increases in the electroconvulsive threshold. In addition, caffeine did not affect the free plasma concentrations of TPM or GBP. Acute and chronic caffeine (23.1 and 46.2mg/kg) enhanced the impairment of motor coordination in mice pretreated with GBP whilst an opposite effect was observed in TPM injected mice and pretreated with chronic caffeine at 46.2mg/kg. The results indicate that newer AEDs, GBP or TPM behave in the exactly same way as classical antiepileptics in mice challenged with caffeine. This hazardous effect of caffeine is not subject to tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Beyond Pain and Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jieun

    2007-01-01

    discourse on homosexual youth in Korea, protection discourse and pain discourse, the notion of identity itself will be critically examined and the girls' agency in destabilizing heteronormativity will be discussed. This study also deals with the appropriation of popular culture by the girls, suggesting...

  19. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Brisbane Baylands Brownfield Site in Brisbane, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Brisbane Baylands site in Brisbane, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  20. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Ft. Hood Military Base Outside Killeen, Texas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, J.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative through the Region 6 contract, selected Ft. Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for possible photovoltaic (PV) system installations and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.