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Sample records for prosthetic valve dysfunction

  1. Echocardiographic evaluation of heart valve prosthetic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Ivaniv

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with replaced heart valve submitted to echocardiographic examination may have symptoms related either to valvular malfunction or ventricular dysfunction from different causes. Clinical examination is not reliable in a prosthetic valve evaluation and the main information regarding its function could be obtained using different cardiac ultrasound modalities. This review provides a description of echocardiographic and Doppler techniques useful in evaluation of prosthetic heart valves. For the interpretation of echocardiography there is a need in special knowledge of prosthesis types and possible reasons of prosthetic function deterioration. Echocardiography allows to reveal valve thrombosis, pannus formation, vegetation and such complications of infective endocarditis as valve ring abscess or dehiscence. Transthoracic echocardiography requires different section plane angles and unconventional views. Transesophageal echocardiography is more often used than in native valve examination due to better visualization of prosthetic valve structure and function. Three-dimensional echocardiography could provide more detailed visual information especially in the assessment of paravalvular regurgitation or valve obstruction.

  2. Diagnostic evaluation of left-sided prosthetic heart valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.; Symersky, Petr; van den Brink, Renee B.; de Mol, Bas A.; Mali, Willem P.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication. In clinical practice, PHV dysfunction poses a diagnostic dilemma. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging techniques of choice and are routinely used in daily practice. However, these

  3. Diagnostic evaluation of left-sided prosthetic heart valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.; Symersky, Petr; van den Brink, Renee B.; de Mol, Bas A.; Mali, Willem P.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication. In clinical practice, PHV dysfunction poses a diagnostic dilemma. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging techniques of choice and are routinely used in daily practice. However, these

  4. Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Maria-Sînziana; Bedeleanu, Daniela; Kovacs, Emese; Ciumărnean, Lorena; Molnar, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction, a complication of mechanical prosthetic valve replacement, is rare, with a slowly progressive evolution, but it can be acute, severe, requiring surgical reintervention. We present the case of a patient with a mechanical single disc aortic prosthesis, with moderate prosthesis-patient mismatch, minor pannus found on previous ultrasound examinations, who presented to our service with angina pain with a duration of 1 hour, subsequently interpreted as non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) syndrome. Coronarography showed normal epicardial coronary arteries, an ample movement of the prosthetic disc, without evidence of coronary thromboembolism, and Gated Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) with Technetium (Tc)-99m detected no perfusion defects. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) evidenced a dysfunctional prosthesis due to a subvalvular mass; transesophageal echocardiography (TOE) showed the interference of this mass, with a pannus appearance, with the closure of the prosthetic disc. Under conditions of repeated angina episodes, under anticoagulant treatment, surgery was performed, with the intraoperative confirmation of pannus and its removal. Postoperative evolution was favorable. This case reflects the diagnostic and therapeutic management problems of pannus-related prosthetic valve dysfunction.

  5. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: Is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwazah Ahmad K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function. The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replacement. A recurrent pannus was observed in a female patient who needed repeated surgical intervention to excise a localized pannus without re-replacement of a well functioning prosthetic valve. Management of our case presents several questions, whether recurrence of pannus is caused by sparing the prosthetic valve, is it simply an exaggeration of an inflammatory healing process in certain individuals or is it ideal to re-replace the valve despite a well preserved function.

  6. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwazah, Ahmad K

    2012-06-29

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function.The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replacement.A recurrent pannus was observed in a female patient who needed repeated surgical intervention to excise a localized pannus without re-replacement of a well functioning prosthetic valve.Management of our case presents several questions, whether recurrence of pannus is caused by sparing the prosthetic valve, is it simply an exaggeration of an inflammatory healing process in certain individuals or is it ideal to re-replace the valve despite a well preserved function.

  7. Recurrent pannus formation causing prosthetic aortic valve dysfunction: Is excision without valve re-replacement applicable?

    OpenAIRE

    Darwazah Ahmad K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Prosthetic valve dysfunction at aortic position is commonly caused by pannus formation. The exact etiology is not known. It arises from ventricular aspect of the prosthesis encroaching its leaflets causing stenosis or it may remain localized causing left ventricular outflow tract obstruction without affecting valve function. The difference in location entails different approaches in management. Such a pathology requires surgical excision of the pannus with or without valve re-replace...

  8. Prosthetic tricuspid valve dysfunction assessed by three-dimensional transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Toshinori; Takasaki, Kunitsugu; Mizukami, Naoko; Ueya, Nami; Kubota, Kayoko; Horizoe, Yoshihisa; Chaen, Hideto; Kuwahara, Eiji; Kisanuki, Akira; Hamasaki, Shuichi

    2013-09-01

    A 39-year-old male who had undergone tricuspid valve replacement for severe tricuspid regurgitation was admitted with palpitation and general edema. Two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography showed tricuspid prosthetic valve dysfunction. Additional three-dimensional (3D) transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) could clearly demonstrate the disabilities of the mechanical tricuspid valve. Particularly, 3D TEE demonstrated a mass located on the right ventricular side of the tricuspid prosthesis, which may have caused the stuck disk. This observation was confirmed by intra-operative findings.

  9. Intermittent acute aortic valve regurgitation: A case report of a prosthetic valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.E. Karagiannis (Stefanos); G. Karatasakis (George); K. Spargias (Konstantinos); L. Louka; D. Poldermans (Don); D.V. Cokkinos (Dennis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractComplications of any mechanical prosthesis include thrombus or pannus formation. In our case report we demonstrate that prosthetic aortic valve regurgitation due to pannus formation may be intermittent and non-cyclic in pattern and therefore not obvious at the time of original clinical

  10. Impact of pannus formation on hemodynamic dysfunction of prosthetic aortic valve: pannus extent and its relationship to prosthetic valve motion and degree of stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jung; Ha, Hojin; Kang, Joon-Won; Kim, Jeong A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Hwa Jung; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2018-02-19

    Although pannus is an important cause of prosthetic valve dysfunction, the minimum pannus size that can induce hemodynamic dysfunction has not yet been determined. This study investigated the correlation between the limitation of motion (LOM) of the prosthetic valve and pannus extent and determined the pannus extent that could induce severe aortic stenosis. This study included 49 patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) and showed pannus on cardiac computed tomography (CT). Pannus width, ratio of pannus width to valve diameter, pannus area, effective orifice area, encroachment ratio by pannus, pannus involvement angle and percent LOM of mechanical valves were evaluated on CT. Transvalvular peak velocity (TPV) and transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG) were measured by transesophageal echocardiography to determine the degree of aortic stenosis. The relationship between percent LOM of the prosthetic valve and pannus extent and the cut-off of pannus extent required to induce severe aortic stenosis were evaluated. The mean interval between AVR and pannus formation was 11 years and was longer in patients with than without severe aortic stenosis (14.0 vs. 7.3 years). On CT, the percent LOM of the prosthetic valve was significantly associated with the extent of pannus only in patients with pannus involvement angle > 180° (r = 0.55-0.68, P Pannus width, effective orifice area, and encroachment ratio were significantly associated with increased TPV and TPG (r = 0.51-0.62, P Pannus width > 3.5 mm, pannus width/valve inner diameter > 0.15, and encroachment ratio > 0.14 were significantly associated with severe aortic stenosis (TPV > 4 m/s; mean TPG ≥ 35 mmHg), with c-indices of 0.74-079 (P pannus extent parameters are good indicators of significant hemodynamic changes with increased TPV and mean TPG.

  11. Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Pannus Tissue in Patients with Prosthetic Valve Dysfunction.

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    Karakoyun, Süleyman; Ozan Gürsoy, Mustafa; Yesin, Mahmut; Kalçık, Macit; Astarcıoğlu, Mehmet Ali; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Emrah Oğuz, Ali; Çoban Kökten, Şermin; Nimet Karadayı, Ayşe; Tuncer, Altuğ; Köksal, Cengiz; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Özkan, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction due to pannus formation is a rare but serious complication. Currently, limited data are available concerning the pathogenesis and immunohistochemical properties of pannus. The study aim was to investigate the morphological, histopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics of pannus formation in patients with prosthetic valve dysfunction. A total of 35 patients (10 males, 25 females; mean age 44 ± 16 years) who had undergone re-do valve surgery due to prosthetic valve obstruction was enrolled in the study. Immunohistochemical studies were aimed at evaluating the expression of alphasmooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin in myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells; epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) in epithelial cells; and CD34, Factor VIII and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in endothelial cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) were used to demonstrate cytokine release from macrophages, leukocytes, fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Pannus appeared as a tough and thick tissue hyperplasia which began from outside the suture ring in the periannular region and extended to the inflow and outflow surfaces of the prosthetic valves. Histopathological analysis showed the pannus tissue to consist of chronic inflammatory cells (lymphocytes, plasma cells, macrophages and foreign body giant cells), spindle cells such as myofibroblasts, capillary blood vessels and endothelial cells laying down the lumens. Calcification was present in the pannus tissue of 19 explanted prostheses. Immunohistochemical studies revealed positive α-SMA expression in all patients, whereas 60.5% of patients were positive for desmin, 50% for EMA, 42.1% for VEGF, 39.5% for TBF-β, 42.1% for MMP-2, 86.8% for CD34, and 97.4% for Factor VIII. MMP-9 was negative in all patients. Pannus tissue appears to be formed as the result of a neointimal response in periannular regions of prosthetic valves that consist

  12. Sixty-Four-Section Cardiac Computed Tomography in Mechanical Prosthetic Heart Valve Dysfunction: Thrombus or Pannus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Sabahattin; Özkan, Mehmet; Kalçik, Macit; Gürsoy, Ozan Mustafa; Astarcioğlu, Mehmet Ali; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Aykan, Ahmet Çağri; Biteker, Murat; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Kaya, Hasan; Yesin, Mahmut; Duran, Nilüfer Ekşi; Sevinç, Deniz; Güneysu, Tahsin

    2015-12-01

    Distinguishing pannus and thrombus in patients with prosthetic valve dysfunction is essential for the selection of proper treatment. We have investigated the utility of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in distinguishing between pannus and thrombus, the latter amenable to thrombolysis. Sixty-two (23 men, mean age 44±14 years) patients with suspected mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction assessed by transesophageal echocardiography were included in this prospective observational trial. Subsequently, MDCT was performed before any treatment was started. Periprosthetic masses were detected by MDCT in 46 patients, and their attenuation values were measured as Hounsfield Units (HU). Patients underwent thrombolysis unless contraindicated, and those with a contraindication or failed thrombolysis underwent surgery. A mass which was completely lysed or surgically detected as a clot was classified as thrombus, whereas a mass which was surgically detected as tissue overgrowth was classified as pannus. A definitive diagnosis could be achieved in 37 patients with 39 MDCT masses (22 thrombus and 17 pannus). The mean attenuation value of 22 thrombotic masses was significantly lower than that in 17 pannus (87±59 versus 322±122; Ppannus from thrombus. Complete lysis was more common for masses with HUpannus overgrowth, whereas a lower value is associated with thrombus formation. A higher attenuation (HU>90) is associated with reduced lysis rates. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Computed Tomography of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, J.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is an infrequent but potentially life-threatening disease with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Patients with PHV dysfunction clinically can present with symptoms of congestive heart failure (dyspnea, fatigue, edema), fever, angina pectoris, dizziness

  14. Acute Mitral Valve Dysfunction Due to Escape of Prosthetic Mechanical Leaflet and Peripheral Leaftlet Embolization.

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    Calik, Eyup Serhat; Limandal, Husnu Kamil; Arslan, Umit; Tort, Mehmet; Yildiz, Ziya; Bayram, Ednan; Dag, Ozgur; Kaygin, Mehmet Ali; Erkut, Bilgehan

    2015-12-14

    Leaflet escape of prosthetic valve is rare but potentially life threatening. Early diagnosis is essential on account of avoiding mortality, and emergency surgical correction is compulsory. This complication has previously been reported for both monoleaflet and bileaflet valve models. A 30-year-old man who had undergone mitral valve replacement with a bileaflet valve 8 years prior at another center was admitted with acute-onset with cardiogenic shock as an emergency case. Transthoracic echocardiograms showed acute-starting severe mitral regurgitation associated with prosthetic mitral valve. There was a suspicious finding of a single prosthetic mitral leaflet. But the problem related with the valve wasn't specifically determined. The patient underwent emergent surgery for replacement of the damaged prosthetic valves immediately. There was no tissue impingement and thrombosis, one of the two leaflets was absent, and there were no signs of endocarditis or pannus formation in the prosthetic valve. The missing leaflet could not be found within the cardiac cavity. The abdominal fluoroscopic study and plain radiography were unable to detect the escaped leaflet during surgery. The damaged valve was removed and a replacement 29 mm bileaflet mechanical valve was inserted by right lateral thoracotomy. After post-operative week one, the abdominal computed tomography scan and the ultrasound showed the escaped leaflet in the left femoral artery. Fifteen days after the surgery the escaped leaflet was removed safely from the left femoral artery and the patient made a complete recovery. The escaped leaflet showed a fracture of one of the pivot systems caused by structural failure. Early cardiac surgery should be applied because of life-threatening problems.

  15. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

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    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  16. Prediction of thrombus-related mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction using transesophageal echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S. S.; Tiong, I. Y.; Asher, C. R.; Murphy, M. T.; Thomas, J. D.; Griffin, B. P.

    2000-01-01

    Identification of thrombus-related mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction (MPVD) has important therapeutic implications. We sought to develop an algorithm, combining clinical and echocardiographic parameters, for prediction of thrombus-related MPVD in a series of 53 patients (24 men, age 52 +/- 16 years) who had intraoperative diagnosis of thrombus or pannus from 1992 to 1997. Clinical and echocardiographic parameters were analyzed to identify predictors of thrombus and pannus. Prevalence of thrombus and diagnostic yields relative to the number of predictors were determined. There were 22 patients with thrombus, 19 patients with pannus, and 12 patients with both. Forty-two of 53 masses were visualized using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), including 29 of 34 thrombi or both thrombi and panni and 13 of 19 isolated panni. Predictors of thrombus or mixed presentation include mobile mass (p = 0.009), attachment to occluder (p = 0.02), elevated gradients (p = 0.04), and an international normalized ratio of or = 1 predictor. The prevalence of thrombus in the presence of or = 3 predictors is 14%, 69%, and 91%, respectively. Thus, TEE is sensitive in the identification of abnormal mass in the setting of MPVD. An algorithm based on clinical and transesophageal echocardiographic predictors may be useful to estimate the likelihood of thrombus in the setting of MPVD. In the presence of > or = 3 predictors, the probability of thrombus is high.

  17. Guide to prosthetic cardiac valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, D.; Steiner, R.M.; Fernandez, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The development of artificial heart valves: Introduction and historical perspective; The radiology of prosthetic heart valves; The evaluation of patients for prosthetic valve implantation; Pathology of cardiac valve replacement; and Bioengineering of mechanical and biological heart valve substitutes

  18. Prosthetic Mitral Valve Leaflet Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Darae; Hun, Sin Sang; Cho, In-Jeong; Shim, Chi-Young; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik; Ju, Hyun Chul; Sohn, Jang Won

    2013-01-01

    Leaflet escape of prosthetic valve is rare but potentially life threatening. It is essential to make timely diagnosis in order to avoid mortality. Transesophageal echocardiography and cinefluoroscopy is usually diagnostic and the location of the missing leaflet can be identified by computed tomography (CT). Emergent surgical correction is mandatory. We report a case of fractured escape of Edward-Duromedics mitral valve 27 years after the surgery. The patient presented with symptoms of acute decompensated heart failure and cardiogenic shock. She was instantly intubated and mechanically ventilated. After prompt evaluation including transthoracic echocardiography and CT, the escape of the leaflet was confirmed. The patient underwent emergent surgery for replacement of the damaged prosthetic valves immediately. Eleven days after the surgery, the dislodged leaflet in iliac artery was removed safely and the patient recovered well. PMID:23837121

  19. Mitral valve-sparing procedures and prosthetic heart valve failure: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasir A; Butany, Jagdish; Leong, Shaun W; Rao, Vivek; Cusimano, Robert J; Ross, Heather J

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve dysfunction due to thrombus or pannus formation can be a life-threatening complication. The present report describes a 47-year-old woman who developed valvular cardiomyopathy after chorda-sparing mitral valve replacement, and subsequently underwent heart transplantation for progressive heart failure. The explanted mitral valve prosthesis showed significant thrombus and pannus leading to reduced leaflet mobility and valvular stenosis. The present report illustrates the role of the subvalvular apparatus and pannus in prosthesis dysfunction. PMID:19279993

  20. Extrinsic mechanism obstructing the opening of a prosthetic mitral valve: an unusual case of suture entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Mehmet; Astarcioglu, Mehmet Ali; Karakoyun, Suleyman; Balkanay, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    Obstruction to a prosthetic cardiac valve is a well-recognized complication of cardiac valve replacement. Malfunction of the mobile component of a prosthetic valve to open or close correctly may occur in consequence of intrinsic or extrinsic causes (thrombus, vegetation, entrapment of left ventricular myocardium, suture entanglement, and pannus formation) that may result prosthetic valve stenosis and/or insufficiency. In the case we report a 48-year-old female with valve dysfunction occurred early after surgery, as one valve leaflet was only able to partially open due to suture entrapment. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Multidetector-row computed tomography for prosthetic heart valve dysfunction: is concomitant non-invasive coronary angiography possible before redo-surgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanis, Wilco [Haga Teaching Hospital, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Haga Teaching Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Sucha, Dominika; Habets, Jesse [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Laufer, Ward; Chamuleau, Steven [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Herwerden, Lex.A. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Symersky, Petr [Vrije Universiteit, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Retrospective ECG-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is increasingly used for the assessment of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction, but is also hampered by PHV-related artefacts/cardiac arrhythmias. Furthermore, it is performed without nitroglycerine or heart rate correction. The purpose was to determine whether MDCT performed before potential redo-PHV surgery is feasible for concomitant coronary artery stenosis assessment and can replace invasive coronary angiography (CAG). PHV patients with CAG and MDCT were identified. Based on medical history, two groups were created: (I) patients with no known coronary artery disease (CAD), (II) patients with known CAD. All images were scored for the presence of significant (>50 %) stenosis. CAG was the reference test. Fifty-one patients were included. In group I (n = 38), MDCT accurately ruled out significant stenosis in 19/38 (50 %) patients, but could not replace CAG in the remaining 19/38 (50 %) patients due to non-diagnostic image quality (n = 16) or significant stenosis (n = 3) detection. In group II (n = 13), MDCT correctly found no patients without significant stenosis, requiring CAG imaging in all. MDCT assessed patency in 16/19 (84 %) grafts and detected a hostile anatomy in two. MDCT performed for PHV dysfunction assessment can replace CAG (100 % accurate) in approximately half of patients without previously known CAD. (orig.)

  2. Multidetector-row computed tomography for prosthetic heart valve dysfunction: is concomitant non-invasive coronary angiography possible before redo-surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanis, Wilco; Sucha, Dominika; Habets, Jesse; Laufer, Ward; Chamuleau, Steven; Herwerden, Lex.A. van; Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Retrospective ECG-gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is increasingly used for the assessment of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction, but is also hampered by PHV-related artefacts/cardiac arrhythmias. Furthermore, it is performed without nitroglycerine or heart rate correction. The purpose was to determine whether MDCT performed before potential redo-PHV surgery is feasible for concomitant coronary artery stenosis assessment and can replace invasive coronary angiography (CAG). PHV patients with CAG and MDCT were identified. Based on medical history, two groups were created: (I) patients with no known coronary artery disease (CAD), (II) patients with known CAD. All images were scored for the presence of significant (>50 %) stenosis. CAG was the reference test. Fifty-one patients were included. In group I (n = 38), MDCT accurately ruled out significant stenosis in 19/38 (50 %) patients, but could not replace CAG in the remaining 19/38 (50 %) patients due to non-diagnostic image quality (n = 16) or significant stenosis (n = 3) detection. In group II (n = 13), MDCT correctly found no patients without significant stenosis, requiring CAG imaging in all. MDCT assessed patency in 16/19 (84 %) grafts and detected a hostile anatomy in two. MDCT performed for PHV dysfunction assessment can replace CAG (100 % accurate) in approximately half of patients without previously known CAD. (orig.)

  3. The radiology of prosthetic heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.M.; Flicker, S.

    1985-01-01

    The development of prosthetic heart valves in the late 1950s ushered in a new era in the treatment of heart disease. The radiologist has an important role to play preoperatively in the diagnosis of valvular heart disease. Radiology is valuable in identification of the implanted prosthetic valve and recognition of complications associated with valve implantation. Radiologists must be familiar with the imaging techniques best suited to evaluate the function of the valve prosthesis in question. In this chapter the authors discuss the radiographic approach to the evaluation of the status of patients for valve replacement and the imaging problems peculiar to the types of valves in current use. The relative value of plain-film radiography, fluoroscopy, videorecording and cinerecording, and aortography is addressed, as well as the potential value of magnetic resonance imaging and subsecond dynamic computed tomography

  4. Novel imaging strategies for the detection of prosthetic heart valve obstruction and endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Tanis (Wilco); R.P.J. Budde (Ricardo); I.A.C. van der Bilt (Ivo); B. Delemarre; G. Hoohenker; J.-K. Van Rooden; A.M. Scholtens (Asbjørn M.); J. Habets; S.A.J. Chamuleau (Steven)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractProsthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction remains difficult to recognise correctly by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE/TEE). ECG-triggered multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), 18-fluorine-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission

  5. Novel imaging strategies for the detection of prosthetic heart valve obstruction and endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, W; Budde, R P J; van der Bilt, I A C; Delemarre, B; Hoohenkerk, G; van Rooden, J-K; Scholtens, A M; Habets, J; Chamuleau, S

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction remains difficult to recognise correctly by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE/TEE). ECG-triggered multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), 18-fluorine-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography including

  6. Successful Thrombolysis of Aortic Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    patients with valvular heart disease). Endorsed by the Society of Cardiovascular. Anesthesiologists, Society for Cardiovascular. Angiography and Interventions, and Society of. Thoracic Surgeons. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008;52(13):e1-142. 5. Elkayam U, Bitar F. Valvular heart disease and pregnancy. Part II: prosthetic valves.

  7. Multimodality Imaging Assessment of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, D.; Symersky, Petr; Tanis, W; Mali, Willem P Th M; Leiner, Tim; van Herwerden, LA; Budde, Ricardo P J

    Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the main techniques for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) evaluation, but because of specific limitations they may not identify the morphological substrate or the extent of PHV pathology. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have

  8. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis - Successful Management With Antimicrobial Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokan Nambiar C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Middle aged male was admitted with high fever, rigor and chills of 2 days duration. He was seen in the clinic two years back for syncope. He gave history of Mitral (Starr-Edward and Aortic (Medtronic valve replacement ten years earlier from another center and was on regular anticoagulation with dose-adjusted acenocoumarol. On evaluation he had normal prosthetic valve function by trans-thoracic echo, but Holter monitoring showed Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. He had mild wall motion abnormalities and left ventricular dysfunction suggestive of coronary artery disease also and was put on additional Metoprolol.

  9. Pannus-Related Mechanical Valve Dysfunction Leading to Hemodynamic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Shiraishi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valve dysfunction caused by pannus formation is rare. Pannus restricts movement of prosthetic valve leaflets, resulting in severe aortic regurgitation. We describe the case of a 77-year-old woman who presented to the emergency room with increasing dyspnea, ischemia, and shock secondary to mechanical aortic valve dysfunction. Transesophageal echocardiography showed a blockade of the leaflets of the mechanical aortic valve, with severe aortic regurgitation. She underwent emergent cardiac surgery for aortic valve replacement. Pannus formation should be considered as a potential cause of acute severe aortic regurgitation in a patient with a small-sized mechanical aortic prosthesis in the supra-annular position. On a pathological exam, extensive pannus was found on the ventricular side of the prosthetic valve, extending from the ring into the central orifice. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(1.000: 50-53

  10. Red flag in the emergency department: fracture and primary failure of a prosthetic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsarac, Murat; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Ayrik, Cuneyt; Bozkurt, Seyran; Turkcuer, Ibrahim; Gumrukcu, Serhat

    2005-07-01

    This case report concerns a patient with fracture and primary dysfunction of a prosthetic valve. A 40-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department with a chief complaint of breakthrough pleuritic back pain and shortness of breath. Past surgical history was significant only for an aortic valve replacement and mitral valve replacement performed 16 years prior. The transthoracic echocardiography raised suspicion of prosthesis malposition. The patient was taken to the operating room by cardiothoracic surgeons for valve replacement. Operative findings revealed that a prosthetic valve leaflet in the mitral position had broken off. Primary prosthetic valve failure should not be overlooked in the differential diagnosis of patients with valve replacement and a rapidly deteriorating clinical course. Emergency echocardiography is a guide to convenient diagnosis and management. Early surgical consultation and early reparative surgery might prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality.

  11. Tomographic and echocardiographic diagnosis of mitral prosthetic valve thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz Gonzalez de la Penna, Benito; Ramos Gutierrez, Luis Benito; Gonzalez Artiles, Iovank

    2010-01-01

    Despite the progress achieved in the design of mechanical prosthetic valves, prosthetic valve thrombosis remains a frequent cause of morbidity, usually due to incorrect anticoagulation. A patient was presented with mitral prosthetic thrombosis one year after implantation, who had been diagnosed by transthoracic transesophageal echocardiography imaging and 64-slice computed tomography. Thrombolytic therapy was successful and led to the satisfactory evolution of the patient

  12. Prosthetic valve endocarditis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Thue; De Backer, Ole; Thyregod, Hans G H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an advancing mode of treatment for inoperable or high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) after TAVI is a serious complication, but only limited data exist on its incidence, outcome, and procedural......%) were treated conservatively and 1 with surgery. Four patients (22%) died from endocarditis or complications to treatment, 2 of those (11%) during initial hospitalization for PVE. An increased risk of TAVI-PVE was seen in patients with low implanted valve position (hazard ratio, 2.8 [1.1-7.2]), moderate...

  13. Re-operation for aortic and mitral prosthetic dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, T K; Sastry, M R; Mercer, J L; Meade, J B

    1985-01-01

    The overall incidence of re-operation and prosthetic valve endocarditis was low in the present series as mechanical prostheses were used predominantly. The prosthetic dysfunctions were less frequent following the primary implantation with Bjork Shiley prostheses, but high operative risk was associated with the clotted Bjork Shiley prostheses. We also had unusual experience of strut fracture and sticking of Bjork Shiley discs in the closed position in both aortic and mitral positions. The early deaths were nil since the use of cardioplegic protection. Intra-operative bleeding due to adhesions can be minimised by using synthetic or heterologous pericardium during the primary operation.

  14. Successful Management of Prosthetic Valve Brucella Endocarditis with Antibiotherapy Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Fonseca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To report a case of mechanical aortic prosthesis Brucella endocarditis successfully treated with antibiotics alone. Materials and methods: We describe a clinical case and present a review of the literature. Results: A 60-year-old female farmer with a mechanical aortic prosthetic valve presented with low back pain and fever. She was diagnosed with prosthetic valve Brucella mellitensis endocarditis and was cured with antibiotic therapy alone. Few cases of successfully treated prosthetic valve Brucella endocarditis without surgery have been reported. Conclusion: Prosthetic valve Brucella endocarditis usually requires surgical valve replacement. However, selected patients may be successfully treated with antibiotic therapy alone.

  15. Mitral Prosthetic Valve Obstruction and Its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Rajan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic Valve Obstruction (PVO is a serious complication which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. This could result from thrombus formation, development of pannus, or a combination of both. Patients with this complication often present with symptoms and signs of heart failure, systemic embolism, acute cardiovascular collapse, and sudden death. Transesophageal echocardiography and cine fluoroscopy play a vital role in diagnosis of this potentially lethal condition. Herein, we reported a 56-year-old male patient who presented with severe heart failure and was found to have obstructed ATS27 bileaflet mitral prosthetic valve. Thrombolysis and redo surgery are two important options for treating this condition although guidelines for choosing between the two are not very definite.

  16. Prosthetic valve obstruction: Redo surgery or fibrinolysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Inamdar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of surgery versus fibrinolytic therapy in patients with prosthetic valve obstruction. Materials and Methods: We compared 15 patients of prosthetic valve thrombosis treated by surgical line of management and another 15 patients treated by thrombolysis. All patients were initially assessed by clinical evaluation and diagnosis confirmed by transthoracic and transesophageal two-dimensional echocardiography. Depending on hemodynamic stability, pannus, or thrombus on transesophageal echocardiography, the patients were assigned surgical or medical line of management. Results: Patients mortality rate was 40% in fibrinolytic group and 13.33% in surgical group. Recurrence was 40% in fibrinolytic group while there was no recurrence till date in surgery group. Complications were more in fibrinolytic group as opposed to surgery group patient. Conclusion: From our experience, we conclude that redo surgery is effective and definitive treatment, especially in patients with stable hemodynamic conditions.

  17. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Tricuspid Prosthetic Valves: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Maragiannis, MD, FASE, FACC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the diagnostic value of novel echocardiographic techniques and the clinical application of recently described algorithms to assess tricuspid prosthetic valve function.

  18. Prospective ECG triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts compared with retrospective ECG gating on 256-slice CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Habets, J.; Westers, P.; Mol, de B.A.J.M.; Prokop, M.; Budde, R.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has diagnostic value for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but it is hampered by artefacts. We hypothesised that image acquisition using prospective triggering instead of retrospective gating would reduce artefacts related

  19. Successful thrombolysis of aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful thrombolysis of aortic prosthetic valve thrombosis during first trimester of pregnancy. A Shukla, AP Raval, R Shah. Abstract. Prosthetic heart valve thrombosis during pregnancy is life-threatening. Standard surgical treatment using cardiopulmonary bypass carries high maternal and fetal complications. Here we ...

  20. Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients with Prosthetic Heart Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed HA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with mechanical valve prostheses require a lifelong anticoagulant treatment. The combined use of Warfarin and low-dose aspirin appears to reduce the risk of valve thrombosis and systemic embolism at a low risk of bleeding. The management of women with prosthetic heart valves during pregnancy poses a particular challenge, as there are no available controlled clinical trials to provide guidelines for effective antithrombotic therapy. Oral anticoagulants, such as Warfarin, cause foetal embryopathy; unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin have been reported to be ineffective in preventing thromboembolic complications.This article discusses the available data and the most recent guidelines in the antithrombotic management of patients with prosthetic valves, and antithrombotic therapy in various clinical situations such as pregnant women with prosthetic heart valves, and patients with prosthetic heart valves undergoing noncardiac surgery.

  1. Novel imaging strategies for the Detection of Prosthetic Heart Valve Obstruction and Endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, W.

    2014-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is accompanied by a high mortality/morbidity and often requires prosthetic heart valve (PHV) replacement in order to improve quality of life and survival. The major drawback of both mechanical and biological PHV implantations is development of dysfunction, which is a life

  2. Complementary role of cardiac CT in the assessment of aortic valve replacement dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Alastair J; Dweck, Marc R; Dreisbach, John G; Williams, Michelle C; Mak, Sze Mun; Cartlidge, Timothy; Nicol, Edward D; Morgan-Hughes, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is the second most common cardiothoracic procedure in the UK. With an ageing population, there are an increasing number of patients with prosthetic valves that require follow-up. Imaging of prosthetic valves is challenging with conventional echocardiographic techniques making early detection of valve dysfunction or complications difficult. CT has recently emerged as a complementary approach offering excellent spatial resolution and the ability to identify a range of aortic valve replacement complications including structural valve dysfunction, thrombus development, pannus formation and prosthetic valve infective endocarditis. This review discusses each and how CT might be incorporated into a multimodal cardiovascular imaging pathway for the assessment of aortic valve replacements and in guiding clinical management. PMID:27843568

  3. Radiological visualization of prosthetic heart valves in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmeister, H.M.; Pirschel, J.

    1986-01-01

    To determine the radiographic appearance of prosthetic heart valves 15 different models were investigated in situ. Fluoroscopy with detail radiographs and standard chest-radiographs were used for identification of the specific type of the prosthesis, for determination of details of the valve apparatus and for evaluation of the motion of the valve disc/ball. - Fluoroscopy and routine radiographs provided sufficient information to identify all prosthetic heart valves with exception of the Xenomedica bioprosthesis. If radiopaque material was used for the valve disc/ball, fluoroscopic assessment of the function of the valve was possible. Thus, in most types of disc or ball valves the opening/closing of the valve can be visualized, whereas in bioprosthesis a radiological determination of the mechanical function is not possible. (orig.) [de

  4. Acute failure of a St. Jude's prosthetic aortic valve: large pannus formation masked by a small thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Seth Eric; Waxman, Daniel; Hecht, Susan

    2009-09-01

    Pannus formation and valve thrombus can cause prosthetic valve failure. The authors report the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented to the emergency room with decompensated heart failure secondary to mechanical valve dysfunction. On two-dimensional and transesophageal echocardiography, the patient had severe aortic stenosis and regurgitation. A thrombus seen on the valve was felt to be the etiology of her prosthetic valve failure. She underwent emergent cardiac surgery for aortic valve replacement. Pathology revealed that although a small thrombus was present, extensive pannus was the underlying mechanism of valve dysfunction. Differentiation between pannus and thrombus may have important clinical implications, but this case illustrates that distinguishing between these entities by echocardiographic and clinical criteria may not be possible.

  5. Early prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Corynebacterium kroppenstedtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Jürgen Benjamin; Essig, Andreas; Herrmann, Manuel; Liebold, Andreas; Quader, Mohamed Abo

    2015-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) kroppenstedtii is a rarely detected agent of bacterial infections in humans. Here, we describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by C. kroppenstedtii. Application of molecular methods using surgically excised valve tissue was a cornerstone for the establishment of the microbiological diagnosis, which is crucial for targeted antimicrobial treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel polymeric prosthetic heart valve: design, manufacture, and testing

    OpenAIRE

    Brubert, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis a flexible leaflet polymeric prosthetic aortic heart valve was designed, manufactured, and tested. The prosthesis was designed with the aim of overcoming the need for anticoagulant therapy, which is required for current mechanical prostheses; while also having lifelong durability, which current bioprosthetic heart valves are not able to achieve. Inspired by the anisotropic architecture of collagen in the natural valve, a shortlist of polystyrene based block copolymers (BCPs), w...

  7. Pregnancy after Prosthetic Aortic Valve Replacement: How Do We Monitor Prosthetic Valvular Function during Pregnancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Sahasrabudhe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. With modern medicine, many women after structural heart repair are deciding to experience pregnancy. There is a need for further study to identify normal echocardiographic parameters to better assess prosthetic valvular function in pregnancy. In addition, a multidisciplinary approach is essential in managing pregnant patients with complex cardiac conditions. Case. A 22-year-old nulliparous woman with an aortic valve replacement 18 months prior to her pregnancy presented to prenatal care at 20-week gestation. During her prenatal care, serial echocardiography showed a significant increase in the mean gradient across the prosthetic aortic valve. Multidisciplinary management and a serial echocardiography played an integral role in her care that resulted in a successful spontaneous vaginal delivery without complications. Conclusion. Further characterization of the normal echocardiographic parameters in pregnant patients with prosthetic valves is critical to optimize prenatal care for this patient population. This case report is novel in that serial echocardiograms were obtained throughout prenatal care, which showed significant changes across the prosthetic aortic valve. Teaching Points. (1 Further study is needed to identify normal echocardiographic parameters to best assess prosthetic valvular function in pregnancy. (2 Multidisciplinary management is encouraged to optimize prenatal care for women with prosthetic aortic valve replacements.

  8. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  9. Retrieval of a leaflet escaped in a Tri-technologies bileaflet mechanical prosthetic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianciulli, Tomás F; Lax, Jorge A; Saccheri, María C; Guidoin, Robert; Salvado, César M; Fernández, Adrián J; Prezioso, Horacio A

    2008-01-01

    The escape of the prosthetic heart valve disc is one of the causes of prosthetic dysfunction that requires emergency surgery. The removal of the embolized disc should be carried out because of the risk of a progressive extrusion on the aortic wall. Several imaging techniques can be used for the detection of the missing disc localization. In this report we describe a 32-year-old man who underwent mitral valve replacement with a Tri-technologies bileaflet valve three years ago, and was admitted in cardiogenic shock. Transesophageal echocardiography showed acute-onset massive mitral regurgitation. The patient underwent emergency replacement of the prosthetic valve. Only one of the two leaflets remained in the removed prosthetic valve. The missing leaflet could not be found within the cardiac cavity. The abdominal fluoroscopic study and plain radiography were unable to detect the escaped leaflet. The abdominal computed tomography scan and the ultrasound showed the escaped leaflet in the terminal portion of the aortic bifurcation. To retrieve the embolized disc laparotomy and aortotomy were performed three months later. The escaped leaflet shows a fracture of one of the pivot systems caused by structural failure. This kind of failure mode is usually the result of high stress concentration.

  10. Limitations of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis of pannus formation in prosthetic aortic valve and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumoulou, Juan Bautista; Cianciulli, Tomás Francisco; Zappi, Andrea; Cozzarin, Alberto; Saccheri, María Cristina; Lax, Jorge Alberto; Guidoin, Robert; Zhang, Ze

    2015-04-26

    Pannus formation is a rare complication and occurs almost exclusively in mechanical prosthetic valves. It consists of fibrous tissue that covers the surface of the prosthesis either concentrically or eccentrically, resulting in valve dysfunction. The pathophysiology seems to be associated to a chronic inflammatory process that explains the late and insidious clinical presentation. This diagnosis should be considered in patients with high transvalvular gradients on transthoracic echo, and workup should be completed with fluoroscopy and transesophageal echocardiography. Treatment is always surgical and recurrence is rare. We present a case of pannus formation in a prosthetic aortic valve and a review of the literature regarding this disorder.

  11. Lactococcus garvieae Endocarditis on a Prosthetic Biological Aortic Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, A; Slutzki, T; Flusser, D

    2015-09-01

    Lactococcus garvieae (LG) endocarditis is a rare disease in humans. There are only about 16 reported cases in the world. We report a 76-year-old male patient with LG endocarditis. In depth interview with the patient revealed that 2 weeks prior to admission, he had eaten sushi containing raw fish. Unlike many of the other infections reported, which were on a native mitral valve, our patient's vegetation was on a prosthetic aortic valve. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Role of CT in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, D.

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease accounts for a substantial part of the cardiovascular disease worldwide with an estimated prevalence of 2.5% in the Western population aged <65 years and over 13% in the population aged >75 years. Surgical prosthetic heart valve (PHV) replacement is the indicated therapy for

  13. Exophiala (Wangiella dermatitidis Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis and Prosthetic Graft Infection in an Immune Competent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S. Berger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exophiala (Wangiella dermatitidis is an emerging dematiaceous fungus associated with high mortality rates and is a rare cause of endocarditis. We describe the first case of E. dermatitidis endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve and aortic graft in an immune competent patient with no clear risk factors of hematological acquisition.

  14. LOW-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT HEPARIN TREATMENT FAILURE IN PREVENTION OF PROSTHETIC MITRAL VALVE THROMBOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    David Šuran; Vojko Kanič; Tatjana Golob Gulič; Husam Franjo Naji; Robert Lipovec

    2009-01-01

    Background Prosthetic heart valve thrombosis (PHVT) represents a dangerous postoperative complication following prosthetic heart valve replacement. Incidence varies according to different data from 0.5–4 % per year following mitral or aortic valve replacement in spite of adequate oral anticoagulation with coumarins. Case report We are presenting a case of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis as a result of 6-month lowmolecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (nadroparine) treatment failure. Our pat...

  15. Tomographic PIV behind a prosthetic heart valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, D.; Landolt, A.; Obrist, D.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field past a bioprosthetic heart valve was measured using tomographic particle image velocimetry. Two digital cameras were used together with a mirror setup to record PIV images from four different angles. Measurements were conducted in a transparent silicone phantom with a simplified geometry of the aortic root. The refraction indices of the silicone phantom and the working fluid were matched to minimize optical distortion from the flow field to the cameras. The silicone phantom of the aorta was integrated in a flow loop driven by a piston pump. Measurements were conducted for steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Results of the instantaneous, ensemble and phase-averaged flow field are presented. The three-dimensional velocity field reveals a flow topology, which can be related to features of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  16. Curved butterfly bileaflet prosthetic cardiac valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    1991-06-25

    An annular valve body having a central passageway for the flow of blood therethrough with two curved leaflets each of which is pivotally supported on an accentric positioned axis in the central passageway for moving between a closed position and an open position. The leaflets are curved in a plane normal to the eccentric axis and positioned with the convex side of the leaflets facing each other when the leaflets are in the open position. Various parameters such as the curvature of the leaflets, the location of the eccentric axis, and the maximum opening angle of the leaflets are optimized according to the following performance criteria: maximize the minimum peak velocity through the valve, maximize the net stroke volume, and minimize the mean forward pressure difference, thereby reducing thrombosis and improving the hemodynamic performance.

  17. Maximizing prosthetic valve size with the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jan; Geha, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM OF THE STUDY: The CarboMedics Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve allows a one-size (and often two-size) increase over the standard intra-annular valve. This advantage should minimize the risk of patient-prosthesis mismatch, where the effective prosthetic valve orifice area....... This study evaluates the authors' clinical experience with Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve size selection, and the technical aspects of implantation. METHODS: Between January 1999 and October 2005, a total of 251 consecutive patients underwent 252 aortic valve replacements with Top Hat supra...... required unplanned coronary bypass, and 30-day mortality was 2.0% (5/251), indicating a good safety profile for the valves implanted in this series. CONCLUSION: The general distribution of implant sizes in the US indicates that cardiac surgeons may be under-sizing the Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve...

  18. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Maria; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE. PMID:25695043

  19. Evaluation of p53 Polymorphism in Patients with Pannus-Derived Prosthetic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Mustafa Ozan; Karakoyun, Suleyman; Kalcik, Macit; Yesin, Mahmut; Gunduz, Sabahattin; Astarcioğlu, Mehmet Ali; Oğuz, Ali Emrah; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Prosthetic valve dysfunction (PVD) due to pannus formation is considered to occur due to a bioreaction to prosthetic material. The p53 gene plays a critical role in apoptosis and cell proliferation. p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism has been found to be associated with coronary stent restenosis, but has not yet been studied in prosthetic heart valve dysfunction. The study aim was to evaluate the association between pannus-derived PVD and p53 G72C(Arg72Pro) polymorphism. This single-center, prospective study included 25 patients (20 females, five males; mean age 45.6 +/- 12.5 years; group 1) who underwent redo valve surgery due to PVD, and 49 age- and gender-matched control patients (44 females, five males; mean age 47.3 +/- 12.2 years; group 2) with normofunctional prostheses. The prostheses were examined using transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography. Analyses of p53 G72C(Arg72Pro) polymorphism were performed using Roche LightCyler 2.0 Real-time polymerase chain reaction. The most common location of replaced valves was the mitral position in both groups (88% and 89.8%, respectively). In group 1, normal alleles (GG) were observed in 12 patients (48%), while one patient (4%) showed a homozygous mutation (GC) and 12 patients (48%) showed a heterozygous mutation (CC). In group 2, 21 patients (42.9%) had normal alleles (GG), while four (8.2%) had a homozygous mutation (CC) and 24 (48.9%) had a heterozygous mutation (GC). No significant difference was observed between the groups with regards to p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism (p = 0.769). In patients with prosthetic valves, the underlying mechanism behind pannus formation is unrelated to p53 Arg72Pro polymorphism.

  20. A STUDY OF INDICATIONS, COMPLICATIONS OF PROSTHETIC VALVES AND PROGNOSIS AFTER TREATMENT OF STUCK VALVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Subba Reddy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Implantation of prosthetic cardiac valves to treat haemodynamically significant valvular diseases has become common; however, it is associated with complications. Thus, this study was intended to evaluate the indications for implantation of prosthetic valve and complications after its implantation and prognosis after treatment of one of its complication, i.e. stuck valve. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a single-centered study wherein 50 patients who came to the emergency department with stuck valve were assessed. The 2D echocardiography was performed in all patients. Thrombolysis was done and the gradients were reassessed. Further response to treatment and development of complications before and after treatment were observed. RESULTS Of total patients, 60% were females. Mean age group was 30-40 yrs. Most of them were asymptomatic for 6 years and there was lack of compliance in 90% of patients. Most common indication for valve replacement was mitral stenosis (60% followed by mitral regurgitation (20%, aortic regurgitation and aortic stenosis (10% and combined mitral and tricuspid regurgitation (10%. Commonest valve was St. Jude (90%. Pannus was observed in 10% patients and thrombus was observed in 50% patients. Most patients had gradients 45/20 mmHg across mitral valve. In about 90% patients, gradients decreased after thrombolysis (12/5 mmHg. The complications after thrombolysis were hemiparesis (4%, death before thrombolysis (6% and death after thrombolysis (4%. CONCLUSION Considering these results, it can be concluded that prosthetic valves are seldom associated with some complications. Further, thrombolysis can be effective in patients with prosthetic valve thrombosis.

  1. Transcatheter, valve-in-valve transapical aortic and mitral valve implantation, in a high risk patient with aortic and mitral prosthetic valve stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter valve implantation continues to grow worldwide and has been used principally for the nonsurgical management of native aortic valvular disease-as a potentially less invasive method of valve replacement in high-risk and inoperable patients with severe aortic valve stenosis. Given the burden of valvular heart disease in the general population and the increasing numbers of patients who have had previous valve operations, we are now seeing a growing number of high-risk patients presenting with prosthetic valve stenosis, who are not potential surgical candidates. For this high-risk subset transcatheter valve delivery may be the only option. Here, we present an inoperable patient with severe, prosthetic valve aortic and mitral stenosis who was successfully treated with a trans catheter based approach, with a valve-in-valve implantation procedure of both aortic and mitral valves.

  2. Prosthetic valve endocarditis 7 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation diagnosed with 3D TEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Sarı

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI was introduced as an alternative treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis for whom surgery would be high-risk. Prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis is a serious complication of surgical AVR (SAVR with high morbidity and mortality. According to recent cases, post-TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE seems to occur very rarely. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who underwent TAVI (Edwards Saphien XT with an uneventful postoperative stay. She was diagnosed with endocarditis using three dimensional (3D echocardiography on the TAVI device 7 months later and she subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement. Little experience of the interpretation of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE and the clinical course and effectiveness of treatment strategies in post-TAVI endocarditis exists. We report a case of PVE in a TAVI patient which was diagnosed with three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE.

  3. Correctness of multi-detector-row computed tomography for diagnosing mechanical prosthetic heart valve disorders using operative findings as a gold standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, I.Chen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taichung (China); Institute of Clinical Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Lin, Yung-Kai; Chang, Yen; Wang, Chung-Chi; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Wei, Hao-Ji; Tsai, Hung-Wen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Surgery, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Ling [Institute of Clinical Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Taichung (China); Wang, Kuo-Yang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of General Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Chung-Shan Medical University, Department of Medicine, Taichung (China); Chen, Min-Chi; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taichung (China); Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiological Technology, Taichung (China)

    2009-04-15

    The purpose was to compare the findings of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in prosthetic valve disorders using the operative findings as a gold standard. In a 3-year period, we prospectively enrolled 25 patients with 31 prosthetic heart valves. MDCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were done to evaluate pannus formation, prosthetic valve dysfunction, suture loosening (paravalvular leak) and pseudoaneurysm formation. Patients indicated for surgery received an operation within 1 week. The MDCT findings were compared with the operative findings. One patient with a Bjoerk-Shiley valve could not be evaluated by MDCT due to a severe beam-hardening artifact; thus, the exclusion rate for MDCT was 3.2% (1/31). Prosthetic valve disorders were suspected in 12 patients by either MDCT or TTE. Six patients received an operation that included three redo aortic valve replacements, two redo mitral replacements and one Amplatzer ductal occluder occlusion of a mitral paravalvular leak. The concordance of MDCT for diagnosing and localizing prosthetic valve disorders and the surgical findings was 100%. Except for images impaired by severe beam-hardening artifacts, MDCT provides excellent delineation of prosthetic valve disorders. (orig.)

  4. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus – different methods of cardiac surgical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. Case study 1 The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs’ surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. Case study 2 The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored

  5. Artificial aortic valve dysfunction due to pannus and thrombus - different methods of cardiac surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Stanisław; Marcinkiewicz, Anna; Kośmider, Anna; Walczak, Andrzej; Zwoliński, Radosław; Jaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 60 000 prosthetic valves are implanted annually in the USA. The risk of prosthesis dysfunction ranges from 0.1% to 4% per year. Prosthesis valve dysfunction is usually caused by a thrombus obstructing the prosthetic discs. However, 10% of prosthetic valves are dysfunctional due to pannus formation, and 12% of prostheses are damaged by both fibrinous and thrombotic components. The authors present two patients with dysfunctional aortic prostheses who were referred for cardiac surgery. Different surgical solutions were used in the treatment of each case. The first patient was a 71-year-old woman whose medical history included arterial hypertension, stable coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and hypercholesterolemia; she had previously undergone left-sided mastectomy and radiotherapy. The patient was admitted to the Cardiac Surgery Department due to aortic prosthesis dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed complete obstruction of one disc and a severe reduction in the mobility of the second. The mean transvalvular gradient was very high. During the operation, pannus covering the discs' surface was found. A biological aortic prosthesis was reimplanted without complications. The second patient was an 87-year-old woman with arterial hypertension, persistent atrial fibrillation, and COPD, whose past medical history included gastric ulcer disease and ischemic stroke. As in the case of the first patient, she was admitted due to valvular prosthesis dysfunction. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed an obstruction of the posterior prosthetic disc and significant aortic regurgitation. Transesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopy confirmed the prosthetic dysfunction. During the operation, a thrombus growing around a minor pannus was found. The thrombus and pannus were removed, and normal functionality of the prosthetic valve was restored. Precise and modern diagnostic methods

  6. Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis with mycotic aneurysm: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Mariana; Almeida, Jorge; Ferraz, Rita; Santos, Lurdes; Pinho, Paulo; Casanova, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an extremely severe form of infective endocarditis, with poor prognosis and high mortality despite treatment. Candida albicans is the most common etiological agent for this rare but increasingly frequent condition. We present a case of fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis due to C. albicans following aortic and pulmonary valve replacement in a 38-year-old woman with a history of surgically corrected tetralogy of Fallot, prior infective endocarditis and acute renal failure with need for catheter-based hemodialysis. Antifungal therapy with liposomal amphotericin B was initiated prior to cardiac surgery, in which the bioprostheses were replaced by homografts, providing greater resistance to recurrent infection. During hospitalization, a mycotic aneurysm was diagnosed following an episode of acute arterial ischemia, requiring two vascular surgical interventions. Despite the complications, the patient's outcome was good and she was discharged on suppressive antifungal therapy with oral fluconazole for at least a year. The reported case illustrates multiple risk factors for fungal endocarditis, as well as complications and predictors of poor prognosis, demonstrating its complexity. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Prosthetic Aortic Valve Fixation Study: 48 Replacement Valves Analyzed Using Digital Pressure Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Candice Y; Wong, Joshua K; Ross, Ronald E; Liu, David C; Khabbaz, Kamal R; Martellaro, Angelo J; Gorea, Heather R; Sauer, Jude S; Knight, Peter A

    Prostheses attachment is critical in aortic valve replacement surgery, yet reliable prosthetic security remains a challenge. Accurate techniques to analyze prosthetic fixation pressures may enable the use of fewer sutures while reducing the risk of paravalvular leaks (PVL). Customized digital thin film pressure transducers were sutured between aortic annulus models and 21-mm bioprosthetic valves with 15 × 4-mm, 12 × 4-mm, or 9 × 6-mm-wide pledgeted mattress sutures. Simulating open and minimally invasive access, 4 surgeons, blinded to data acquisition, each secured 12 valves using manual knot-tying (hand-tied [HT] or knot-pusher [KP]) or automated titanium fasteners (TFs). Real-time pressure measurements and times were recorded. Two-dimensional (2D) and 3D pressure maps were generated for all valves. Pressures less than 80 mm Hg were considered at risk for PVL. Pressures under each knot (intrasuture) fell less than 80 mm Hg for 12 of 144 manual knots (5/144 HT, 7/144 KP) versus 0 of 288 TF (P prosthetic valve security.

  8. Reoperation for non-structural valvular dysfunction caused by pannus ingrowth in aortic valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Jin; Park, Samina; Kim, Jun Sung; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Ki Bong; Ahn, Hyuk

    2013-07-01

    The authors' clinical experience is presented of non-structural valvular dysfunction of the prosthetic aortic valve caused by pannus ingrowth during the late postoperative period after previous heart valve surgery. Between January 1999 and April 2012, at the authors' institution, a total of 33 patients underwent reoperation for increased mean pressure gradient of the prosthetic aortic valve. All patients were shown to have pannus ingrowth. The mean interval from the previous operation was 16.7 +/- 4.3 years, and the most common etiology for the previous aortic valve replacement (AVR) was rheumatic valve disease. The mean effective orifice area index (EOAI) of the previous prosthetic valve was 0.97 +/- 0.11 cm2/m2, and the mean pressure gradient on the aortic prosthesis before reoperation was 39.1 +/- 10.7 mmHg. Two patients (6.1%) died in-hospital, and late death occurred in six patients (18.2%). At the first operation, 30 patients underwent mitral or tricuspid valve surgery as a concomitant procedure. Among these operations, mitral valve replacement (MVR) was combined in 24 of all 26 patients with rheumatic valve disease. Four patients underwent pannus removal only while the prosthetic aortic valve was left in place. The mean EOAI after reoperation was significantly increased to 1.16 +/- 0.16 cm2/m2 (p pannus ingrowth was shown in patients with a small EOAI of the prosthetic aortic valve and combined MVR for rheumatic disease. As reoperation for pannus overgrowth showed good clinical outcomes, an aggressive resection of pannus and repeated AVR should be considered in symptomatic patients to avoid the complications of other cardiac diseases.

  9. Coronary artery assessment by multidetector computed tomography in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habets, Jesse; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Brink, Renee B.A. van den; Uijlings, Ruben; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Chamuleau, Steven A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with prosthetic heart valves may require assessment for coronary artery disease. We assessed whether valve artefacts hamper coronary artery assessment by multidetector CT. ECG-gated or -triggered CT angiograms were selected from our PACS archive based on the presence of prosthetic heart valves. The best systolic and diastolic axial reconstructions were selected for coronary assessment. Each present coronary segment was scored for the presence of valve-related artefacts prohibiting coronary artery assessment. Scoring was performed in consensus by two observers. Eighty-two CT angiograms were performed on a 64-slice (n = 27) or 256-slice (n = 55) multidetector CT. Eighty-nine valves and five annuloplasty rings were present. Forty-three out of 1160 (3.7%) present coronary artery segments were non-diagnostic due to valve artefacts (14/82 patients). Valve artefacts were located in right coronary artery (15/43; 35%), left anterior descending artery (2/43; 5%), circumflex artery (14/43; 32%) and marginal obtuse (12/43; 28%) segments. All cobalt-chrome containing valves caused artefacts prohibiting coronary assessment. Biological and titanium-containing valves did not cause artefacts except for three specific valve types. Most commonly implanted prosthetic heart valves do not hamper coronary assessment on multidetector CT. Cobalt-chrome containing prosthetic heart valves preclude complete coronary artery assessment because of severe valve artefacts. circle Most commonly implanted prosthetic heart valves do not hamper coronary artery assessment circle Prosthetic heart valve composition determines the occurrence of prosthetic heart valve-related artefacts circle Bjoerk-Shiley and Sorin tilting disc valves preclude diagnostic coronary artery segment assessment. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of prosthetic heart valves by transesophageal echocardiography: problems, pitfalls, and timing of echocardiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Renee B. A.

    2006-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is especially suitable for examination of prosthetic valves because of the proximity of the esophagus to the heart and absence of interference with lungs and ribs. This article reviews normal and abnormal morphologic characteristics of prosthetic valves such as

  11. Prosthetic valves in adult patients with congenital heart disease : Rationale and design of the Dutch PROSTAVA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freling, H. G.; van Slooten, Y. J.; van Melle, J. P.; Mulder, B. J. M.; van Dijk, A. P. J.; Hillege, H. L.; Post, M. C.; Sieswerda, G. Tj; Jongbloed, M. R. M.; Willems, T. P.; Pieper, P. G.

    2012-01-01

    Data on long-term complications in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and a prosthetic valve are scarce. Moreover, the influence of prosthetic valves on quality of life (QoL) and functional outcome in ACHD patients with prosthetic valves has not been studied. The primary objective

  12. Prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus capitis: report of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Yuko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although Staphylococcus capitis is considered to be a rare causative organism for prosthetic valve endocarditis, we report 4 such cases that were encountered at our hospital over the past 2 years. Case 1 was a 79-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthetic valve and presented with fever 24 days later. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed an annular abscess in the aorto-mitral continuity and mild perivalvular regurgitation. We performed emergency surgery 5 days after the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis was made. Case 2 was a 79-year-old woman presenting with fever 40 days after aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis. Transesophageal echocardiography showed vegetation on the valve, and she underwent urgent surgery 2 days after prosthetic valve endocarditis was diagnosed. In case 3, a 76-year-old man presented with fever 53 days after aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis. Vegetation on the prosthetic leaflet could be seen by transesophageal echocardiography. He underwent emergency surgery 2 days after the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis was made. Case 4 was a 68-year-old woman who collapsed at her home 106 days after aortic and mitral valve replacement with bioprosthetic valves. Percutaneous cardiopulmonary support was started immediately after massive mitral regurgitation due to prosthetic valve detachment was revealed by transesophageal echocardiography. She was transferred to our hospital by helicopter and received surgery immediately on arrival. In all cases, we re-implanted another bioprosthesis after removal of the infected valve and annular debridement. All patients recovered without severe complications after 2 months of antibiotic treatment, and none experienced re-infection during 163 to 630 days of observation. Since the time interval between diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis and valve re-replacement ranged from 0 to 5 days, early surgical removal

  13. A global perspective on mechanical prosthetic heart valve thrombosis: Diagnostic and therapeutic challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Kalçık, Macit; Yesin, Mahmut; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Bayam, Emrah; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Özkan, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the major causes of primary valve failure, which can be life-threatening. Multimodality imaging is necessary for determination of leaflet immobilization, cause of underlying pathology (thrombus versus pannus or both), and whether thrombolytic therapy attempt in the patient would be successful or surgery is needed. Current guidelines for the management of prosthetic valve thrombosis lack definitive class I recommendations due to lack of randomized controlled trials, and usually leave the choice of treatment to the clinician’s experience. In this review, we aimed to summarize the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of mechanical prosthetic valve thrombosis. PMID:28005024

  14. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and Laser Doppler Anemometry velocity measurements downstream of replacement heart valves: implications for in vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, A A; Heinrich, R S; Walker, P G; Pedersen, E M; Scheidegger, M B; Boesiger, P; Walton, S P; Yoganathan, A P

    1996-01-01

    The non-invasive, in-vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function is compromised by the lack of accurate measurements of the transvalvular flow fields or hemodynamics by current techniques. Short echo time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide a method for the non-invasive, in vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function by accurately measuring changes in the transvalvular flow fields associated with normal and dysfunctional prosthetic valves. The objectives of these in vitro experiments were to investigate the potential for using MRI as a tool to measure the complex flow fields distal to replacement heart valves, and to assess the accuracy of MRI velocity measurements by comparison with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), a gold standard. The velocity fields downstream of tilting disc, bileaflet, ball and cage, and pericardial tissue valves were measured using both three-component LDA and MRI phase velocity encoding under a steady flow rate of 22.8 l/min, simulating peak systolic flow. The valves were tested under normal and stenotic conditions to assess the MRI capabilities under a wide range of local flow conditions, velocities and turbulence levels. A new short echo time MRI technique (FAcE), which allowed velocity measurements in stenotic jets with high turbulence, was tested. Good overall agreement was obtained between the MRI velocity measurements and the LDA data. The MRI velocity measurements adequately reproduced the spatial structure of the flow fields. In most cases peak velocities were accurately measured to within 15%. The results indicate that the FAcE MRI method has the potential to be used as a diagnostic tool to assess prosthetic valve function.

  15. Mechanical performance of pyrolytic carbon in prosthetic heart valve applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H

    1996-06-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed for rigorous characterization of the fracture resistance and fatigue crack extension in pyrolytic carbon for prosthetic heart valve application. Experiments were conducted under sustained and cyclic loading in a simulated biological environment using Carbomedics Pyrolite carbon. While the material was shown to have modest fracture toughness, it exhibited excellent resistance to subcritical crack growth. The crack growth kinetics in pyrolytic carbon were formulated using a phenomenological description. A fatigue threshold was observed below which the crack growth rate diminishes. A damage tolerance concept based on fracture mechanics was used to develop an engineering design approach for mechanical heart valve prostheses. In particular, a new quantity, referred to as the safe-life index, was introduced to assess the design adequacy against subcritical crack growth in brittle materials. In addition, a weakest-link statistical description of the fracture strength is provided and used in the design of component proof-tests. It is shown that the structural reliability of mechanical heart valves can be assured by combining effective flaw detection and manufacturing quality control with adequate damage tolerance design.

  16. Prosthetic valve endocarditis 7 months after transcatheter aortic valve implantation diagnosed with 3D TEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, Cenk; Durmaz, Tahir; Karaduman, Bilge Duran; Keleş, Telat; Bayram, Hüseyin; Baştuğ, Serdal; Özen, Mehmet Burak; Bayram, Nihal Akar; Bilen, Emine; Ayhan, Hüseyin; Kasapkara, Hacı Ahmet; Bozkurt, Engin

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced as an alternative treatment for patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis for whom surgery would be high-risk. Prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis is a serious complication of surgical AVR (SAVR) with high morbidity and mortality. According to recent cases, post-TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) seems to occur very rarely. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman who underwent TAVI (Edwards Saphien XT) with an uneventful postoperative stay. She was diagnosed with endocarditis using three dimensional (3D) echocardiography on the TAVI device 7 months later and she subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement. Little experience of the interpretation of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and the clinical course and effectiveness of treatment strategies in post-TAVI endocarditis exists. We report a case of PVE in a TAVI patient which was diagnosed with three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE). Copyright © 2016 Hellenic Cardiological Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoletti, Michele; Tumietto, Fabio; Fasulo, Giovanni; Giannella, Maddalena; Cristini, Francesco; Bonfiglioli, Rachele; Raumer, Luigi; Nanni, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Silvia; Di Eusanio, Marco; Scotton, Pier Giorgio; Graziosi, Maddalena; Rapezzi, Claudio; Fanti, Stefano; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-13

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis is challenging. The gold standard for prosthetic valve endocarditis diagnosis is trans-esophageal echocardiography. However, trans-esophageal echocardiography may result in negative findings or yield images difficult to differentiate from thrombus in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis. Combined computed tomography and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is a potentially promising diagnostic tool for several infectious conditions and it has also been employed in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis but data are still scant. We reviewed the charts of 6 patients with prosthetic aortic valves evaluated for suspicion of prosthetic valve endocarditis, at two different hospital, over a 3-year period. We found 3 patients with early-onset PVE cases and blood cultures yielding Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus lugdunensis, respectively; and 3 late-onset cases in the remaining 3 patients with isolation in the blood of Streptococcus bovis, Candida albicans and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Initial trans-esophageal echocardiography was negative in all the patients, while fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed images suspicious for prosthetic valve endocarditis. In 4 out of 6 patients valve replacement was done with histology confirming the prosthetic valve endocarditis diagnosis. After an adequate course of antibiotic therapy fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed resolution of prosthetic valve endocarditis in all the patients. Our experience confirms the potential role of fluoroseoxyglucose positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and follow-up of prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  18. Vent-induced prosthetic leaflet thrombosis treated by open-heart valve-in-valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Christof; Pasic, Miralem; Buz, Semih; Hetzer, Roland

    2015-09-01

    A patient required emergency mitral valve replacement and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support for acute biventricular failure. The left ventricular (LV) vent inserted via the left upper pulmonary vein induced thrombotic immobilization of a prosthetic valve leaflet, with significant intra-prosthesis regurgitation after ECMO explantation. Therefore, the left atrium was opened on the beating heart during conventional extracorporeal circulation, all prosthesis leaflets were excised and a 29-mm expandable Edwards Sapien prosthesis was inserted within the scaffold of the original prosthesis under direct vision. This case illustrates the benefits and potential problems of LV venting on ECMO support, and a rapid and safe way of replacing the prosthesis leaflets in a critical situation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcomes of Reoperative Valve Replacement in Patients with Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: A 20-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Woong Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE is a serious complication of cardiac valve replacement, and many p atients with P VE r equire r eoperation. The aim of t his study was to r eview our institutional 2 0 -year experience of surgical reoperative valve replacement in patients with PVE. Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 84 patients (mean age, 54.8±12.7 years; 51 males who were diagnosed with PVE and underwent reoperative valve replacement from January 1995 to December 2016. Results: PVE was found in 1 valve in 61 cases (72.6%, and in 2 or more valves in 23 cases (27.4%. The median follow-up duration was 47.3 months (range, 0 to 250 months. Postoperative complications occurred in 39 patients (46.4%. Reinfection occurred in 6 cases, all within 1 year. The freedom from reinfection rate at 5 years was 91.0%±3.5%. The overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 64.4%±5.8% and 54.3%±7.3%, respectively. In stepwise multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 2.10; p=0.027 and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB time (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.0 1; p =0 . 0 33 e merged a s independent risk f actors f or d eath. Conclusion: Older age and a longer CPB time were associated with an increased risk of overall mortality in PVE patients.

  20. Baseline MDCT findings after prosthetic heart valve implantation provide important complementary information to echocardiography for follow-up purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sucha, Dominika; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Habets, Jesse [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Chamuleau, Steven A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Symersky, Petr [VU Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meijs, Matthijs F.L. [Thoraxcentrum Twente, Medisch Spectrum Twente, Department of Cardiology, Enschede (Netherlands); Brink, Renee B.A. van den [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mol, Bas A.J.M. de [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herwerden, Lex A. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Recent studies have proposed additional multidetector-row CT (MDCT) for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction. References to discriminate physiological from pathological conditions early after implantation are lacking. We present baseline MDCT findings of PHVs 6 weeks post implantation. Patients were prospectively enrolled and TTE was performed according to clinical guidelines. 256-MDCT images were systematically assessed for leaflet excursions, image quality, valve-related artefacts, and pathological and additional findings. Forty-six patients were included comprising 33 mechanical and 16 biological PHVs. Overall, MDCT image quality was good and relevant regions remained reliably assessable despite mild-moderate PHV-artefacts. MDCT detected three unexpected valve-related pathology cases: (1) prominent subprosthetic tissue, (2) pseudoaneurysm and (3) extensive pseudoaneurysms and valve dehiscence. The latter patient required valve surgery to be redone. TTE only showed trace periprosthetic regurgitation, and no abnormalities in the other cases. Additional findings were: tilted aortic PHV position (n = 3), pericardial haematoma (n = 3) and pericardial effusion (n = 3). Periaortic induration was present in 33/40 (83 %) aortic valve patients. MDCT allowed evaluation of relevant PHV regions in all valves, revealed baseline postsurgical findings and, despite normal TTE findings, detected three cases of unexpected, clinically relevant pathology. (orig.)

  1. Dysfunction of mechanical heart valve prosthesis: experience with surgical management in 48 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Hou, Bin; Abdurusul, Adiljan; Gong, Ding-Xu; Tang, Yue; Chang, Qian; Xu, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysfunction of mechanical heart valve prostheses is an unusual but potentially lethal complication after mechanical prosthetic valve replacement. We seek to report our experience with mechanical valve dysfunction regarding etiology, surgical techniques and early outcomes. Methods Clinical data of 48 patients with mechanical valve dysfunction surgically treated between October 1996 and June 2011 were analyzed. Results Mean age was 43.7±10.9 years and 34 were female (70.8%). The median interval from primary valve implantation to dysfunction was 44.5 months (range, 1 hour to 20 years). There were 21 emergent and 27 elective reoperations. The etiology was thrombosis in 19 cases (39.6%), pannus in 12 (25%), thrombosis and pannus in 11 (22.9%), improper disc orientation in 2 (4.1%), missing leaflet in 1 (2.1%), excessively long knot end in 1 (2.1%), endogenous factor in 1 (2.1%) and unidentified in 1 (2.1%). Surgical procedure was mechanical valve replacement in 37 cases (77.1%), bioprosthetic valve replacement in 7 (14.9%), disc rotation in 2 (4.2%) and excision of excessive knot end in 1 (2.1%). Early deaths occurred in 7 patients (14.6%), due to low cardiac output in 3 (6.3%), multi-organ failure in 2 (4.2%) and refractory ventricular fibrillation in 2 (4.2%). Complications occurred in 10 patients (20.8%). Conclusions Surgical management of mechanical valve dysfunction is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Earlier identification and prompt reoperation are vital to achieving better clinical outcomes. The high incidence of thrombosis in this series highlights the need for adequate anticoagulation and regular follow-up after mechanical valve replacement. PMID:26793354

  2. Impact of Early Valve Surgery on Outcome of Staphylococcus aureus Prosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis: Analysis in the International Collaboration of Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chirouze, Catherine; Alla, François; Fowler, Vance G.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.; Wang, Andrew; Erpelding, Marie-Line; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Hannan, Margaret M.; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Miró, José M.; Muñoz, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Using appropriate analytical methods to examine data from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study, we found that early valve surgery was not associated with reduced 1-year mortality in Staphylococcus aureus prosthetic valve infective endocarditis.

  3. sup 99m Tc-labelled anti NCA-95 antibodies in prosthetic heart valve endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, H J; Becker, W; Wolf, F [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Volkholz, H J [Dept. of Internal Medicine 1, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    1991-08-01

    A 54-y old women with earlier replacement of the mitral and aortic valves and clinical signs of localized endocarditis was studied with {sup 99m}Tc-labelled anti NCA-95 antibody. Whereas echocardiographic findings were negative, increased radionuclide uptake was observed left parasternal over the mitral valve as a sign of prosthetic valve endocarditis. This result could be confirmed by a similar study with leukocytes labelled in vitro with {sup 111}In-oxine. (orig.).

  4. Acupuncture in patients with valvular heart disease and prosthetic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellon, Anthony

    2003-09-01

    Endocarditis has been reported in patients with valvular heart disease who have undergone acupuncture treatment, although most have been associated with the use of semi-permanent needles. This has led reviewers to suggest that acupuncture may not only be contraindicated in such patients but that prophylactic antibiotics should be given. This study investigated the use of acupuncture treatment in patients with proven valvular heart disease and observed whether endocarditis developed in such patients. All patients in a single-handed GP practice with proven valvular heart disease, including those with prosthetic valves, were identified over a ten-year period. Those who had undergone acupuncture treatment underwent a clinical examination and diagnostic tests, which focused on the signs, symptoms and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of endocarditis and included a transthoracic echocardiogram. Autopsy findings were reviewed in any patient who died. Based on these clinical and laboratory data, using the modified Duke's criteria for the diagnosis of endocarditis, patients were identified as having definite or possible endocarditis, or the diagnosis was rejected. All patients underwent brief acupuncture with no skin disinfectant and no prophylactic antibiotics were given. Semi-permanent needles were avoided. Thirty-six patients with valvular heart disease underwent a total of 479 acupuncture treatments over a ten-year period. The median number of treatments was 9 (range 1-72), with a follow-up after treatment of 5.75 years (range 0.5-10 years). Definite endocarditis was not found in any patient, but two patients had possible endocarditis, eventually discounted by both negative blood cultures and echocardiography. In conclusion, brief acupuncture was safe in this small cohort of valvular heart disease patients and no case of endocarditis was detected over a ten-year period.

  5. Single leg separation prevalence among explanted Björk-Shiley prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Cohen, Sarah S; Ibrahim, Michel A

    2007-11-01

    Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (BSCC) prosthetic heart valves are believed to have been implanted in over 86,000 patients worldwide. Limited data are available on the prevalence of single leg separations (SLS) of the valves' outlet struts, a potential precursor to complete valve fracture. Data maintained by the manufacturer, including results of examinations for SLS in explanted valves, were merged with available information on the characteristics of the valve. The prevalence of SLS in the examined valves was calculated according to valve angle, size, position, and study. Among 343 examined valves, the overall prevalence of SLS was 8.2%, but this varied significantly by valve size, being three-fold higher among 29+ mm valves than among smaller valves, with statistically non-significantly higher prevalences among mitral than aortic, and among 70 degrees than 60 degrees valves. By applying the size, position and angle-specific SLS prevalences to the worldwide valve distribution, it is estimated that SLS may be present in 6.8% (95% confidence limits 4.1-9.4%) of all BSCC valves. These findings suggest that SLS may affect between 820 and 1,880 of the almost 20,000 BSCC valves among surviving patients worldwide. Such estimates help frame the context for potential patient screenings, should imaging and acoustic techniques to detect SLS become available.

  6. Effect of the sinus of valsalva on the closing motion of bileaflet prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Y; Kikuta, Y; Shimooka, T; Mitamura, Y; Yuhta, T; Dohi, T

    2000-04-01

    Conventional bileaflet prosthetic mechanical heart valves close passively with backflow. Naturally, the valve has problems associated with closure, such as backflow, water hammer effect, and fracture of the leaflet. On the other hand, in the case of the natural aortic valve, the vortex flow in the sinus of Valsalva pushes the leaflet to close, and the valve starts the closing motion earlier than the prosthetic valve as the forward flow decelerates. This closing mechanism is thought to decrease backflow at valve closure. In this study, we propose a new bileaflet mechanical valve resembling a drawbridge in shape, and the prototype valve was designed so that the leaflet closes with the help of the vortex flow in the sinus. The test valve was made of aluminum alloy, and its closing motion was compared to that of the CarboMedics (CM) valve. Both valves were driven by a computer controlled hydraulic mock circulator and were photographed at 648 frames/s by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Each frame of the valve motion image was analyzed with a personal computer, and the opening angles were measured. The flow rate was set as 5.0 L/min. The system was pulsed with 70 bpm, and the systolic/diastolic ratio was 0.3. Glycerin water was used as the circulation fluid at room temperature, and polystyrene particles were used to visualize the streamline. The model of the sinus of Valsalva was made of transparent silicone rubber. As a result, high speed video analysis showed that the test valve started the closing motion 41 ms earlier than the CM valve, and streamline analysis showed that the test valve had a closing mechanism similar to the natural one with the effect of vortex flow. The structure of the test valve was thought to be effective for soft closure and could solve problems associated with closure.

  7. Capnocytophaga canimorsus: a rare case of conservatively treated prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalava-Karvinen, Päivi; Grönroos, Juha O; Tuunanen, Helena; Kemppainen, Jukka; Oksi, Jarmo; Hohenthal, Ulla

    2018-05-01

    We describe a rare case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by the canine bacterium Capnocytophaga canimorsus in a male aged 73 years. The diagnosis of infective endocarditis was unequivocal, as it blood cultures were positive for C. canimorsus and vegetations were detected on transesophageal echocardiography; the modified Duke criteria were fulfilled. PET-CT showed intense 18 F-FDG uptake of the prosthetic valve area. The patient was treated with antibiotics alone (no surgery), and is now on life-long suppressive antibiotic therapy. To our knowledge, this is the third reported case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by C. canimorsus and the first one to have been treated conservatively. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Dysfunction of an On-X Heart Valve by Pannus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Cipriano; Urso, Stefano; Gomez, Elsa; De la Vega, Maria

    2016-09-01

    A 68-year-old woman with a history of previous double-valve replacement with On-X mechanical heart valves presented with clinical, echocardiographic and cardiac catheterization signs of obstruction of the On-X tricuspid heart valve prosthesis. The patient was successfully reoperated, but at surgery the valve was seen to be invaded by an abnormal overgrowth of pannus that blocked one of the leaflets. A small amount of non-obstructive fresh thrombus was also observed. The valve was successfully replaced with a biological heart valve prosthesis. The patient was discharged home, and is doing well four months after the operation, when echocardiography demonstrated normal function in the tricuspid valve. The present case represents the first ever report of pannus formation and subsequent dysfunction in an On-X heart valve, and also the first case of tricuspid valve malfunction and obstruction using this type of heart valve substitute.

  9. A rare case of prosthetic endocarditis and dehiscence in a mechanical valved conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Arun; Smith, Cristy; Subramanian, Sreekumar; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2014-02-07

    A middle-aged adult patient with a history of aortic root replacement with a mechanical valved conduit and remote chest trauma was referred to our institution with prosthetic endocarditis. Transoesophageal echocardiogram at our institution confirmed a near-complete dehiscence of the prosthetic aortic valve from the conduit, with significant perivalvular flow forming a pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent a high-risk re-operation, involving redo aortic root replacement with a homograft after extensive debridement of the infected tissue. The patient was discharged to an outside facility after an uncomplicated hospital course, and remains stable.

  10. A pulsatile flow model for in vitro quantitative evaluation of prosthetic valve regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Giuliatti

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A pulsatile pressure-flow model was developed for in vitro quantitative color Doppler flow mapping studies of valvular regurgitation. The flow through the system was generated by a piston which was driven by stepper motors controlled by a computer. The piston was connected to acrylic chambers designed to simulate "ventricular" and "atrial" heart chambers. Inside the "ventricular" chamber, a prosthetic heart valve was placed at the inflow connection with the "atrial" chamber while another prosthetic valve was positioned at the outflow connection with flexible tubes, elastic balloons and a reservoir arranged to mimic the peripheral circulation. The flow model was filled with a 0.25% corn starch/water suspension to improve Doppler imaging. A continuous flow pump transferred the liquid from the peripheral reservoir to another one connected to the "atrial" chamber. The dimensions of the flow model were designed to permit adequate imaging by Doppler echocardiography. Acoustic windows allowed placement of transducers distal and perpendicular to the valves, so that the ultrasound beam could be positioned parallel to the valvular flow. Strain-gauge and electromagnetic transducers were used for measurements of pressure and flow in different segments of the system. The flow model was also designed to fit different sizes and types of prosthetic valves. This pulsatile flow model was able to generate pressure and flow in the physiological human range, with independent adjustment of pulse duration and rate as well as of stroke volume. This model mimics flow profiles observed in patients with regurgitant prosthetic valves.

  11. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement by hybrid approach using a novel polymeric prosthetic heart valve: proof of concept in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Zhang

    Full Text Available Since 2000, transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement has steadily advanced. However, the available prosthetic valves are restricted to bioprosthesis which have defects like poor durability. Polymeric heart valve is thought as a promising alternative to bioprosthesis. In this study, we introduced a novel polymeric transcatheter pulmonary valve and evaluated its feasibility and safety in sheep by a hybrid approach.We designed a novel polymeric trileaflet transcatheter pulmonary valve with a balloon-expandable stent, and the valve leaflets were made of 0.1-mm expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE coated with phosphorylcholine. We chose glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium valves as control. Pulmonary valve stents were implanted in situ by a hybrid transapical approach in 10 healthy sheep (8 for polymeric valve and 2 for bovine pericardium valve, weighing an average of 22.5±2.0 kg. Angiography and cardiac catheter examination were performed after implantation to assess immediate valvular functionality. After 4-week follow-up, angiography, echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac catheter examination were used to assess early valvular function. One randomly selected sheep with polymeric valve was euthanized and the explanted valved stent was analyzed macroscopically and microscopically.Implantation was successful in 9 sheep. Angiography at implantation showed all 9 prosthetic valves demonstrated orthotopic position and normal functionality. All 9 sheep survived at 4-week follow-up. Four-week follow-up revealed no evidence of valve stent dislocation or deformation and normal valvular and cardiac functionality. The cardiac catheter examination showed the peak-peak transvalvular pressure gradient of the polymeric valves was 11.9±5.0 mmHg, while that of two bovine pericardium valves were 11 and 17 mmHg. Gross morphology demonstrated good opening and closure characteristics. No thrombus or calcification was seen macroscopically

  12. Experimental substantiation of the design of a prosthetic heart valve for «valve-in-valve» implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Klyshnikov

    2017-01-01

    of the developed design, intended for the replacement of a failed prosthetic valve of the heart with the «valve-in-valve» implantation.

  13. Real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in valve disease: comparison with surgical findings and evaluation of prosthetic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugeng, Lissa; Shernan, Stanton K; Weinert, Lynn; Shook, Doug; Raman, Jai; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; DuPont, Frank; Fox, John; Mor-Avi, Victor; Lang, Roberto M

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a novel real-time 3-dimensional (3D) matrix-array transesophageal echocardiographic (3D-MTEE) probe was found to be highly effective in the evaluation of native mitral valves (MVs) and other intracardiac structures, including the interatrial septum and left atrial appendage. However, the ability to visualize prosthetic valves using this transducer has not been evaluated. Moreover, the diagnostic accuracy of this new technology has never been validated against surgical findings. This study was designed to (1) assess the quality of 3D-MTEE images of prosthetic valves and (2) determine the potential value of 3D-MTEE imaging in the preoperative assessment of valvular pathology by comparing images with surgical findings. Eighty-seven patients undergoing clinically indicated transesophageal echocardiography were studied. In 40 patients, 3D-MTEE images of prosthetic MVs, aortic valves (AVs), and tricuspid valves (TVs) were scored for the quality of visualization. For both MVs and AVs, mechanical and bioprosthetic valves, the rings and leaflets were scored individually. In 47 additional patients, intraoperative 3D-MTEE diagnoses of MV pathology obtained before initiating cardiopulmonary bypass were compared with surgical findings. For the visualization of prosthetic MVs and annuloplasty rings, quality was superior compared with AV and TV prostheses. In addition, 3D-MTEE imaging had 96% agreement with surgical findings. Three-dimensional matrix-array transesophageal echocardiographic imaging provides superb imaging and accurate presurgical evaluation of native MV pathology and prostheses. However, the current technology is less accurate for the clinical assessment of AVs and TVs. Fast acquisition and immediate online display will make this the modality of choice for MV surgical planning and postsurgical follow-up.

  14. Apparent culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by Peptostreptococcus magnus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vorm, E. R.; Dondorp, A. M.; van Ketel, R. J.; Dankert, J.

    2000-01-01

    In two patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis due to Peptostreptococcus magnus, blood cultures in the BacT/Alert and BACTEC 9240 systems were signal negative. The capability of the BacT/Alert system to detect various Peptostreptococcus species was assessed. P. magnus and P. anaerobius could not

  15. The additional value of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in complex aortic prosthetic heart valve endocarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, Wilco; Teske, Arco J.; Van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven; Meijboom, Folkert; Budde, Ricardo P J; Cramer, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Two-dimensional transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography (2DTTE and 2DTEE) may fail to detect signs of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) endocarditis due to acoustic shadowing. Three-dimensional (3D) TEE may have additional value; however, data are scarce. This study was performed to

  16. Novel imaging strategies for the detection of prosthetic heart valve obstruction and endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, W; Budde, R P J; van der Bilt, I A C; Delemarre, B; Hoohenkerk, G; van Rooden, J-K; Scholtens, A M; Habets, J; Chamuleau, S

    2016-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction remains difficult to recognise correctly by two-dimensional (2D) transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography (TTE/TEE). ECG-triggered multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), 18-fluorine-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography including low-dose CT (FDG-PET) and three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (3D-TEE) may have additional value. This paper reviews the role of these novel imaging tools in the field of PHV obstruction and endocarditis.For acquired PHV obstruction, MDCT is of additional value in mechanical PHVs to differentiate pannus from thrombus as well as to dynamically study leaflet motion and opening/closing angles. For biological PHV obstruction, additional imaging is not beneficial as it does not change patient management. When performed on top of 2D-TTE/TEE, MDCT has additional value for the detection of both vegetations and pseudoaneurysms/abscesses in PHV endocarditis. FDG-PET has no complementary value for the detection of vegetations; however, it appears more sensitive in the early detection of pseudoaneurysms/abscesses. Furthermore, FDG-PET enables the detection of metastatic and primary extra-cardiac infections. Evidence for the additional value of 3D-TEE is scarce.As clinical implications are major, clinicians should have a low threshold to perform additional MDCT in acquired mechanical PHV obstruction. For suspected PHV endocarditis, both FDG-PET and MDCT have complementary value.

  17. Simulation of personalised haemodynamics by various mounting positions of a prosthetic valve using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongert, Markus; Geller, Marius; Pennekamp, Werner; Nicolas, Volkmar

    2018-03-03

    Diseases of the cardiovascular system account for nearly 42% of all deaths in the European Union. In Germany, approximately 12,000 patients receive surgical replacement of the aortic valve due to heart valve disease alone each year. A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model based on patient-specific anatomy derived from four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data was developed to investigate preoperatively the flow-induced impact of mounting positions of aortic prosthetic valves to select the best orientation for individual patients. Systematic steady-state analysis of blood flow for different rotational mounting positions of the valve is only possible using a virtual patient model. A maximum velocity of 1 m/s was used as an inlet boundary condition, because the opening angle of the valve is at its largest at this velocity. For a comparative serial examination, it is important to define the standardised general requirements to avoid impacts other than the rotated implantation of the prosthetic aortic valve. In this study, a uniform velocity profile at the inlet for the inflow of the aortic valve and the real aortic anatomy were chosen for all simulations. An iterative process, with the weighted parameters flow resistance (1), shear stress (2) and velocity (3), was necessary to determine the best rotated orientation. Blood flow was optimal at a 45° rotation from the standard implantation orientation, which will offer a supply to the coronary arteries.

  18. 3D velocity field characterization of prosthetic heart valve with two different valve testers by means of stereo-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avenio, Giuseppe; Grigioni, Mauro; Daniele, Carla; Morbiducci, Umberto; Hamilton, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valves can be associated to mechanical loading of blood, potentially linked to complications (hemolysis and thrombogenicity) which can be clinically relevant. In order to test such devices in pulsatile mode, pulse duplicators (PDs) have been designed and built according to different concepts. This study was carried out to compare anemometric measurements made on the same prosthetic device, with two widely used PDs. The valve (a 27-mm bileaflet valve) was mounted in the aortic section of the PD. The Sheffield University PD and the RWTH Aachen PD were selected as physical models of the circulation. These two PDs differ mainly in the vertical vs horizontal realization, and in the ventricular section, which in the RWTH PD allows for storage of potential energy in the elastic walls of the ventricle. A glassblown aorta, realized according to the geometric data of the same anatomical district in healthy individuals, was positioned downstream of the valve, obtaining 1:1 geometric similarity conditions. A NaI-glycerol-water solution of suitable kinematic viscosity and, at the same time, the proper refractive index, was selected. The flow field downstream of the valve was measured by means of the stereo-PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) technique, capable of providing the complete 3D velocity field as well as the entire Reynolds stress tensor. The measurements were carried out at the plane intersecting the valve axis. A three-jet profile was clearly found in the plane crossing the leaflets, with both PDs. The extent of the typical recirculation zone in the Valsalva sinus was much larger in the RWTH PD, on account of the different duration of the swirling motion in the ventricular chamber, caused by the elasticity of the ventricle and its geometry. The comparison of the hemodynamical behaviour of the same bileaflet valve tested in two PDs demonstrated the role of the mock loop in affecting the valve performance.

  19. Alternative causes of bioreaction to prosthetic heart valves: three cases with pannus formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoyun, Süleyman; Gürsoy, Ozan Mustafa; Kalçık, Macit; Coban Kökten, Sermin; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Pannus formation is an infrequent but serious complication of prosthetic heart valve surgery. The cause of pannus is recognized as a bioreaction to the prostheses; histological investigations have shown that pannus comprises collagen and elastic tissues containing endothelial cells, chronic inflammatory cells, and myofibroblasts. However, the detailed mechanism of its formation has not been fully demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in the pathogenesis of pannus formation in three patients with mechanical prosthetic heart valves. Pannus specimens removed from the prostheses were fixed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin for 24 hours after surgical removal and paraffin-embedded using standard procedures. Serial sections were cut at 4 µm for immunohistochemistry analysis. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) was used in the histological analysis. VEGF and MMP-2 were studied in the immunohistochemistry analysis. Three patients with mechanical prosthetic obstruction due to pannus overgrowth underwent redo valve surgery. In the first and second patients, the mitral prosthesis was explanted along with the pannus overgrowth. The third patient had both aortic and mitral prostheses; the aortic prosthesis was explanted with obstructive pannus formation, whereas the mitral valve was spared with excision of the nonobstructive pannus. The immunohistochemical study demonstrated the expressions of MMP-2 and VEGF in all of the pannus specimens acquired from these cases. VEGF and MMP-2 may play a role in the mechanism of pannus formation as the elements of the chronic active inflammatory process.

  20. A funnel shaped pannus formation above the mitral prosthetic valve diagnosed with real time three-dimensional echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Polat Ocaklı

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic valve obstruction due to pannus formation can be a life-threatening complication. We showed that real time three dimensional echocardiography has incremental value in diagnosing pannus localization and extent.

  1. Development and marketing of a prosthetic urinary control valve system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, J. B., Jr.; Rabinowitz, R.; Rogers, D. W.; Harrison, H. N.

    1983-01-01

    An implantable prosthetic for the control of urinary incontinence was developed and marketed. Three phases are presented: bench development studies, animal trials, and human clinical trials. This work was performed under the direction of a Research Team at Rochester General Hospital (RGH). Bench trials were completed on prototype hardware and provided early verification of the device's ability to withstand repeated cyclic testing. Configurational variants were evaluated and a preferred design concept was established. Silicone rubber (medical grade) was selected as the preferred material for the prosthesis.

  2. Incremental benefit of 3D transesophageal echocardiography: a case of a mass overlying a prosthetic mitral valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauras, James M; Zhang, Zhihang; Taub, Cynthia C

    2011-05-01

    A young woman with a mechanical mitral valve and prosthetic mitral stenosis underwent multiple imaging modalities (including transthoracic ECHO, fluoroscopy, and two-dimensional transesophageal ECHO) to determine the cause of her stenosis. Only three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated the full size and extent of an obstructing mass on the strut and sewing ring of the prosthetic mitral valve. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. QT Prolongation Complicated with Torsades de Pointes in Prosthetic Mitral Valve Endocarditis: A Case Report

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    A. Tounsi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 49-year-old male patient with prosthetic mitral valve endocarditis associated with QT prolongation and torsades de pointes. He was asymptomatic until the end of January 2012, when he was admitted to our hospital emergency unit because of syncope, fever, and suspicion of endocarditis. Cardiologic evaluation was requested and the transthoracic (TTE and transesophageal (TEE echocardiograms revealed vegetations on the prosthetic mitral valve. All cultures were positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The corrected QT (QTc interval was markedly prolonged upon admission (QTc 540 ms. He experienced torsades de pointes (TdP several times and he was recovered after bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The clinical course and the long QTc interval with deep inverted T wave were completely normalized 4 weeks after. He continued on triple antibiotic therapy for 45 days with a good revolution. The clinical features and the possible mechanisms of QT prolongation (inflammation, infection of this patient are discussed.

  4. Aortic allografts in treatment of aortic valve and ascending aorta prosthetic endocarditis

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    S.V. Spiridonov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to assess short- and long-term results of aortic root replacement using aortic allografts in patients with prosthetic endocarditis. Materials and methods. Since February 2009 until June 2016 aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement using aortic allografts was performed in 26 patients with prosthetic endocarditis. In 50 % of cases at initial operation aortic valve replacement was performed, in another 50 % of cases – aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement. Echocardiography was performed 10 days, 3, 6 and 12 months, 2, 3 and 5 years after surgery. Analysis of long-term results included all cases of deaths, prosthesis-related complications and recurrence of endocarditis. Results. 30-day mortality was 23.1 %. Extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (ECMO was used only in 5 patients (19.2 %. Four patients were weaned from ECMO. We did not observe any allograft-related complications. During follow-up period there were no cases of reoperation due to structural allograft failure. Relapse of infection occurred in 1 patient (3.8 % four years after the operation and led to lethal outcome. Conclusion. Reoperations using allografts are an effective surgical treatment of prosthetic endocarditis. In majority of cases prosthetic endocarditis was caused by gram-positive cocci (Staphylococcus. In 84.6 % of cases it was associated with destruction of paravalvular structures and abscesses formation. Heart failure was a causative factor of different complications in these patients, which required ECMO in 19.2 % of patients. In 80 % of cases patients were weaned from ECMO. Allografts using for the treatment of prosthetic endocarditis is associated with high resistance to infection and with a significant rate of freedom from recurrence of endocarditis within 3 years after surgery.

  5. The clinical significance of perivalvular pannus in prosthetic mitral valves: Can cardiac CT be helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Byung-Chul; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2017-12-15

    The clinical significance of pannus in the prosthetic mitral valve (MV) is not well documented. To investigate the clinical significance of pannus on cardiac computed tomography (CT) in patients with a prosthetic MV. A total of 130 patients with previous MV replacement who underwent cardiac CT were retrospectively included in this study. The presence of pannus, paravalvular leak (PVL) around the prosthetic MV and limitation of motion (LOM) of the MV were analyzed using CT. Between patients with MV pannus and those without pannus, CT, echocardiographic, and redo-surgery findings were compared. The diagnostic performance of CT and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) for the detection of MV pannus was also compared, using surgical findings as a standard reference. MV pannus was observed on cardiac CT in 32.3% of the study population. Patients with MV pannus detected on CT more commonly had LOM (28.2% vs. 15.2%) and less frequently had PVL of the prosthetic MV (16.7% vs. 25%) than patients without MV pannus (P>0.05). Prosthetic valve obstruction (PVO) due prosthetic MV pannus requiring redo-surgery was present in only five patients (11.9%). Cardiac CT detected MV pannus with sensitivity of 65.2% and specificity of 80.9% and showed better diagnostic performance than TEE (Ppannus can frequently be seen on cardiac CT. However, its clinical significance should be assessed with careful consideration, because PVO due to MV pannus is relatively uncommon, and pannus can be seen in patients without any clinical problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... surgery. Your heart valve has been damaged by infection ( endocarditis ). You have received a new heart valve ...

  7. Regression in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to prosthetic valve size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Morgan L; Schaff, Hartzell V; Suri, Rakesh M; Li, Zhuo; Sundt, Thoralf M; Dearani, Joseph A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2011-08-01

    We examined the role of prosthesis-patient mismatch on left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic valve regurgitation. We selected patients who had complete preoperative and follow-up echocardiograms with measurement of left ventricular mass. Patients were excluded who had moderate or greater aortic valve stenosis, concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, or mitral valve procedures. Patients' mean age was 55 ± 17 years; 21% were female. The mean preoperative indexed left ventricular mass was 150 ± 45 g/m(2). Patients with mildly (n = 44; mean indexed mass, 126 ± 15 g/m(2)), moderately (n = 31; mean indexed mass, 168 ± 11 g/m(2)), or severely (n = 15; mean indexed mass, 241 ± 34 g/m(2)) increased preoperative indexed left ventricular mass, were similar, except for lower ejection fractions, larger end-diastolic dimensions, and larger ventricular wall thicknesses in the severely enlarged group (P regression was unrelated to labeled valve size, prosthesis-patient mismatch, or measured indexed effective aortic valve area. A greater preoperative indexed left ventricular mass (P regression. Despite having greater left ventricular mass regression, patients with severe preoperative indexed left ventricular mass did not return to normal values (mean, 142 ± 25 g/m(2)). Left ventricular mass regression after aortic valve replacement for chronic aortic regurgitation is unrelated to indexed prosthetic valve area. Although incomplete, regression is greatest in patients with the largest preoperative indexed left ventricular mass. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A 3D velocimetry study of the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.; Sanchez, E.; Juarez, A.

    2006-11-01

    Blood damage commonly appears in medical valve prothesis. It is a mayor concern for the designers and surgeons. It is well known that this damage and other complications result from the modified fluid dynamics through the replacement valve. To evaluate the performance of prosthetic heart valves, it is necessary to study the flow through them. To conduct this study , we have built a flow channel that emulates cardiac conditions and allows optical access such that a 3D-PIV velocimetry system could be used. The experiments are aimed to reconstruct the downstream structure of the flow through a mechanical and a bio-material tricuspid heart valve prothesis. Preliminary results show that the observed coherent structures can be related with haemolysis and trombosis, illnesses commonly found in valve prothesis recipients. The mean flow, the levels of strain rate and the turbulence intensity generated by the valves can also be directly related to blood damage. In general, bio-material made valves tend to reduce these complications.

  9. Identification of critical zones in the flow through prosthetic heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A.; Ledesma, R.; Zenit, R.; Pulos, G.

    2008-11-01

    The hemodynamic properties of prosthetic heart valves can cause blood damage and platelet activation due to the non- physiological flow patterns. Blood recirculation and elevated shear stresses are believed to be responsible for these complications. The objective of this study is to identify and quantify the conditions for which recirculation and high stress zones appear. We have performed a comparative study between a mechanical monoleaflet and biological valve. In order to generate the flow conditions to test the prosthesis, we have built a hydraulic circuit which reproduces the human systemic circulation, on the basis of the Windkessel model. This model is based on an electrical analogy which consists of an arterial resistance and compliance. Using PIV 3D- Stereo measurements, taken downstream from the prosthetic heart valves, we have reconstructed the full phase-averaged tridimensional velocity field. Preliminary results show that critical zones are more prominent in mechanical prosthesis, indicating that valves made with bio-materials are less likely to produce blood trauma. This is in accordance with what is generally found in the literature.

  10. Successful thrombectomy of a stuck mechanical prosthetic mitral valve guided by perioperative transesophageal echocardiography and cinefluoroscopy

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    Paulo César Gobert Damasceno Campos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 53-year-old man with past history of rheumatic valvular disease who developed acute decompensated heart failure due to thrombosis of his mechanical mitral valve prosthesis. The diagnosis was established after a combined and complementary approach of echocardiography and cinefluoroscopy. Because of the severe heart failure at presentation, the patient was taken to surgery. The intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography was critical to guide a successful thrombectomy procedure. Postoperative pathological findings revealed the presence of thrombus and fibrotic tissue (pannus in the surgical specimens removed from the valve. The success of this case and the treatment choice are supported by the most recent literature data on prosthetic valve thrombosis. We highlight the use of three diagnostic approaches in our patient: echocardiography, cinefluoroscopy and pathology.

  11. Prosthetic mitral valve obstruction: role of real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Arun; Jahan, Kahroba; Lotun, Kapildeo; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2015-09-21

    Acute prosthetic valve thrombosis is a potentially serious complication with an incidence as high as 6% per patient-year for prostheses in the mitral position. Accurate diagnosis of the degree of obstruction and differentiation of pannus versus thrombus is critical in determination of the best mode of therapy. We discuss a case of a patient with multiple comorbidities who presented with mechanical mitral valve obstruction where both transthoracic and two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) were limited in making an accurate diagnosis regarding the mechanism of obstruction. Real-time 3D-TEE (RT-3DTEE) was critical in identifying a partial thrombus on the mechanical valve and guided the choice of thrombolysis as the most appropriate intervention, thus avoiding high-risk surgery in this patient with significant multiple comorbidities. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Prosthetic valve sparing aortic root replacement: an improved technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leacche, Marzia; Balaguer, Jorge M; Umakanthan, Ramanan; Byrne, John G

    2008-10-01

    We describe a modified surgical technique to treat patients with a previous history of isolated aortic valve replacement who now require aortic root replacement for an aneurysmal or dissected aorta. This technique consists of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron conduit, leaving intact the previously implanted prosthesis, and re-implanting the coronary arteries in the Dacron graft. Our technique differs from other techniques in that we do not leave behind any aortic tissue remnant and also in that we use a felt strip to obliterate any gap between the old sewing ring and the newly implanted graft. In our opinion, this promotes better hemostasis. We demonstrate that this technique is safe, feasible, and results in acceptable outcomes.

  13. Obstructed bi-leaflet prosthetic mitral valve imaging with real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimbo, Mai; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Shunsuke; Terada, Mai; Iino, Takako; Iino, Kenji; Ito, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT3D-TEE) can provide unique visualization and better understanding of the relationship among cardiac structures. Here, we report the case of an 85-year-old woman with an obstructed mitral prosthetic valve diagnosed promptly by RT3D-TEE, which clearly showed a leaflet stuck in the closed position. The opening and closing angles of the valve leaflets measured by RT3D-TEE were compatible with those measured by fluoroscopy. Moreover, RT3D-TEE revealed, in the ring of the prosthetic valve, thrombi that were not visible on fluoroscopy. RT3D-TEE might be a valuable diagnostic technique for prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements of steady flow through two bi-leaflet prosthetic heart valves

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    Ovandir Bazan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In vitro hydrodynamic characterization of prosthetic heart valves provides important information regarding their operation, especially if performed by noninvasive techniques of anemometry. Once velocity profiles for each valve are provided, it is possible to compare them in terms of hydrodynamic performance. In this first experimental study using laser doppler anemometry with mechanical valves, the simulations were performed at a steady flow workbench. OBJECTIVE: To compare unidimensional velocity profiles at the central plane of two bi-leaflet aortic prosthesis from St. Jude (AGN 21 - 751 and 21 AJ - 501 models exposed to a steady flow regime, on four distinct sections, three downstream and one upstream. METHODS: To provide similar conditions for the flow through each prosthesis by a steady flow workbench (water, flow rate of 17L/min. and, for the same sections and sweeps, to obtain the velocity profiles of each heart valve by unidimensional measurements. RESULTS: It was found that higher velocities correspond to the prosthesis with smaller inner diameter and instabilities of flow are larger as the section of interest is closer to the valve. Regions of recirculation, stagnation of flow, low pressure, and flow peak velocities were also found. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the hydrodynamic aspect and for every section measured, it could be concluded that the prosthesis model AGN 21 - 751 (RegentTM is superior to the 21 AJ - 501 model (Master Series. Based on the results, future studies can choose to focus on specific regions of the these valves.

  15. Early prosthetic aortic valve infection identified with the use of positron emission tomography in a patient with lead endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amraoui, Sana; Tlili, Ghoufrane; Sohal, Manav; Bordenave, Laurence; Bordachar, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (FDG PET/CT) scanning has recently been proposed as a diagnostic tool for lead endocarditis (LE). FDG PET/CT might be also useful to localize associated septic emboli in patients with LE. We report an interesting case of a LE patient with a prosthetic aortic valve in whom a trans-esophageal echocardiogram did not show associated aortic endocarditis. FDG PET/CT revealed prosthetic aortic valve infection. A second TEE performed 2 weeks after identified aortic vegetation. A longer duration of antimicrobial therapy with serial follow-up echocardiography was initiated. There was also increased uptake in the sigmoid colon, corresponding to focal polyps resected during a colonoscopy. FDG PET/CT scanning seems to be highly sensitive for prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis diagnosis. This promising diagnostic tool may be beneficial in LE patients, by identifying septic emboli and potential sites of pathogen entry.

  16. Live 3D TEE demonstrates and guides the management of prosthetic mitral valve obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Mangeet; Pandya, Utpal; Adlakha, Satjit; Khouri, Samer J

    2011-08-01

    A 43-year-old woman, with a remote history of rheumatic mitral stenosis and a St. Jude prosthetic mitral valve replacement, presented with shortness of breath and palpitations, shortly after a long flight. On admission, atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response was noted in the setting of a long history of noncompliance with her anticoagulation. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) demonstrated multiple laminated thrombi in the left atrial appendage. Live three-dimensional (3D) TEE confirmed this diagnosis and demonstrated an immobile posterior leaflet of the mitral prosthesis, which had direct implications in her management. She successfully underwent surgery for mitral valve replacement, left atrial appendage ligation, and a Maze procedure on the following day. The multiple thrombi within the atrial appendage were confirmed intraoperatively and pannus formation was determined to be the etiology of the leaflet immobility. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Obstructive Prosthetic Mitral Valve Thrombosis Successfully Thrombolysed with Low-Dose Ultra-Slow Infusion of Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macit Kalçık

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT is one of the major causes of posthetic heart valve failure. Treatment modalities for this rare but life threatening complication include anticoagulation with heparin, thrombolytic therapy (TT and re-do valve surgery. Guidelines lack definitive class I recommendations due to lack of randomised controlled trials, and usually leave the choice of treatment to the clinician’s experience. Surgery is suggested as a first line strategy in most situations of left sided PVT; however, TT has been recently used with successful outcomes1-3. This report describes a patient with giant thrombus located on the prosthetic mitral valve, which was succesfully treated with ultraslow infusion (25 hours of low dose (25 mg tissue plasminogen activator (tPA under the guidance of two-dimensional (2D and real-time three-dimensional (RT -3D transesophageal echocardiography (TEE and fluoroscopy.

  18. Perivalvular pannus and valve thrombosis: two concurrent mechanisms of mechanical valve prosthesis dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; Bueno-Codoñer, María E; López-Rodríguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorlí, María José; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Arribas-Jiménez, Antonio; Diego-Nieto, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Collado, Javier; Rodríguez-López, Jose María

    2015-02-01

    A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our institution with progressive dyspnea. She had previously been diagnosed with rheumatic heart disease and had undergone cardiac surgery for mechanical mitral valve replacement ten years previously. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed blockage of the mechanical prosthesis and the patient was scheduled for surgery, in which a thrombus was removed from the left atrial appendage. A partial thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis and circumferential pannus overgrowth were concomitantly detected. Prosthetic heart valve blockage is a rare but life-threatening complication, the main causes of which are thrombosis and pannus formation. The two conditions are different but both are usually misdiagnosed. Two concurrent mechanisms of prosthesis blockage were found in this patient. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Initial experience with xenograft bioconduit for the treatment of complex prosthetic valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubelakis, Apostolos; Karangelis, Dimos; Sadeque, Syed; Yanagawa, Bobby; Modi, Amit; Barlow, Clifford W; Livesey, Steven A; Ohri, Sunil K

    2017-07-01

    The treatment of complex prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) with aortic root abscess remains a surgical challenge. Several studies support the use of biological tissues to minimize the risk of recurrent infection. We present our initial surgical experience with the use of an aortic xenograft conduit for aortic valve and root replacement. Between October 2013 and August 2015, 15 xenograft bioconduits were implanted for complex PVE with abscess (13.3% female). In 6 patients, concomitant procedures were performed: coronary bypass (n=1), mitral valve replacement (n=5) and tricuspid annuloplasty (n=1). The mean age at operation was 60.3±15.5 years. The mean Logistic European system for cardiac operating risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 46.6±23.6. The median follow-up time was 607±328 days (range: 172-1074 days). There were two in-hospital deaths (14.3% mortality), two strokes (14.3%) and seven patients required permanent pacemaker insertion for conduction abnormalities (46.7%). The mean length of hospital stay was 26 days. At pre-discharge echocardiography, the conduit mean gradient was 9.3±3.3mmHg and there was either none (n=6), trace (n=6) or mild aortic insufficiency (n=1). There was no incidence of mid-term death, prosthesis-related complications or recurrent endocarditis. Xenograft bioconduits may be safe and effective for aortic valve and root replacement for complex PVE with aortic root abscess. Although excess early mortality reflects the complexity of the patient population, there was good valve hemodynamics, with no incidence of recurrent endocarditis or prosthesis failure in the mid-term. Our data support the continued use and evaluation of this biological prosthesis in this high-risk patient cohort.

  20. International normalized ratio self-management lowers the risk of thromboembolic events after prosthetic heart valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitz, Thomas; Schenk, Soren; Fritzsche, Dirk; Bairaktaris, Andreas; Wagner, Otto; Koertke, Heinrich; Koerfer, Reiner

    2008-03-01

    Although prosthetic valves are durable and easy to implant, the need for lifetime warfarin-based anticoagulation restricts their exclusive usage. We investigated if anticoagulation self-management improves outcome in a single-center series. Between 1994 and 1998, 765 patients with prosthetic valve replacements were prospectively enrolled and randomized to receive conventional anticoagulation management by their primary physician (group 1, n = 295) or to pursue anticoagulation self-management (group 2, n = 470). A study head office was implemented to coordinate and monitor anticoagulation protocols, international normalized ratios (INR), and adverse events. Patients were instructed on how to obtain and test their own blood samples and to adjust warfarin dosages according to the measured INR (target range, 2.5 to 4). Mean INR values were slightly yet significantly smaller in group 1 than in group 2 (2.8 +/- 0.7 vs 3.0 +/- .6, p events were similar in both groups. Time-related multivariate analysis identified INR self-management and higher INR as independent predictors for better outcome. Anticoagulation self-management can improve INR profiles up to 2 years after prosthetic valve replacement and reduce adverse events. Current indications of prosthetic rather than biologic valve implantations may be extended if the benefit of INR self-management is shown by future studies with longer follow-up.

  1. A dynamic model-based approach to motion and deformation tracking of prosthetic valves from biplane x-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Martin G; Hatt, Charles R; Dunkerley, David A P; Bodart, Lindsay E; Raval, Amish N; Speidel, Michael A

    2018-04-16

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a minimally invasive procedure in which a prosthetic heart valve is placed and expanded within a defective aortic valve. The device placement is commonly performed using two-dimensional (2D) fluoroscopic imaging. Within this work, we propose a novel technique to track the motion and deformation of the prosthetic valve in three dimensions based on biplane fluoroscopic image sequences. The tracking approach uses a parameterized point cloud model of the valve stent which can undergo rigid three-dimensional (3D) transformation and different modes of expansion. Rigid elements of the model are individually rotated and translated in three dimensions to approximate the motions of the stent. Tracking is performed using an iterative 2D-3D registration procedure which estimates the model parameters by minimizing the mean-squared image values at the positions of the forward-projected model points. Additionally, an initialization technique is proposed, which locates clusters of salient features to determine the initial position and orientation of the model. The proposed algorithms were evaluated based on simulations using a digital 4D CT phantom as well as experimentally acquired images of a prosthetic valve inside a chest phantom with anatomical background features. The target registration error was 0.12 ± 0.04 mm in the simulations and 0.64 ± 0.09 mm in the experimental data. The proposed algorithm could be used to generate 3D visualization of the prosthetic valve from two projections. In combination with soft-tissue sensitive-imaging techniques like transesophageal echocardiography, this technique could enable 3D image guidance during TAVR procedures. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Three-dimensional flow structures past a bio-prosthetic valve in an in-vitro model of the aortic root

    OpenAIRE

    Hasler, David; Obrist, Dominik

    2018-01-01

    The flow field past a prosthetic aortic valve comprises many details that indicate whether the prosthesis is functioning well or not. It is, however, not yet fully understood how an optimal flow scenario would look, i.e. which subtleties of the fluid dynamics in place are essential regarding the durability and compatibility of a prosthetic valve. In this study, we measured and analyzed the 3D flow field in the vicinity of a bio-prosthetic heart valve in function of the aortic root size. The m...

  3. Are homografts superior to conventional prosthetic valves in the setting of infective endocarditis involving the aortic valve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon Bum; Ejiofor, Julius I; Yammine, Maroun; Camuso, Janice M; Walsh, Conor W; Ando, Masahiko; Melnitchouk, Serguei I; Rawn, James D; Leacche, Marzia; MacGillivray, Thomas E; Cohn, Lawrence H; Byrne, John G; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-05-01

    Surgical dogma suggests that homografts should be used preferentially, compared with conventional xenograft or mechanical prostheses, in the setting of infective endocarditis (IE), because they have greater resistance to infection. However, comparative data that support this notion are limited. From the prospective databases of 2 tertiary academic centers, we identified 304 consecutive adult patients (age ≥17 years) who underwent surgery for active IE involving the aortic valve (AV), in the period 2002 to 2014. Short- and long-term outcomes were evaluated using propensity scores and inverse-probability weighting to adjust for selection bias. Homografts, and xenograft and mechanical prostheses, were used in 86 (28.3%), 139 (45.7%), and 79 (26.0%) patients, respectively. Homografts were more often used in the setting of prosthetic valve endocarditis (58.1% vs 28.8%, P = .002) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (25.6% vs 12.1%, P = .002), compared with conventional prostheses. Early mortality occurred in 17 (19.8%) in the homograft group, and 20 (9.2%) in the conventional group (P = .019). During follow-up (median: 29.4 months; interquartile-range: 4.7-72.6 months), 60 (19.7%) patients died, and 23 (7.7%) experienced reinfection, with no significant differences in survival (P = .23) or freedom from reinfection rates (P = .65) according to the types of prostheses implanted. After adjustments for baseline characteristics, using propensity-score analyses, use of a homograft did not significantly affect early death (odds ratio 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-3.40, P = .23), overall death (hazard ratio 1.10; 95% CI, 0.62-1.94, P = .75), or reinfection (hazard ratio 1.04; 95% CI, 0.49-2.18, P = .93). No significant benefit to use of homografts was demonstrable with regard to resistance to reinfection in the setting of IE. The choice among prosthetic options should be based on technical and patient-specific factors. Lack of availability of homografts should

  4. Dynamic tracking of prosthetic valve motion and deformation from bi-plane x-ray views: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Charles R.; Wagner, Martin; Raval, Amish N.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) requires navigation and deployment of a prosthetic valve within the aortic annulus under fluoroscopic guidance. To support improved device visualization in this procedure, this study investigates the feasibility of frame-by-frame 3D reconstruction of a moving and expanding prosthetic valve structure from simultaneous bi-plane x-ray views. In the proposed method, a dynamic 3D model of the valve is used in a 2D/3D registration framework to obtain a reconstruction of the valve. For each frame, valve model parameters describing position, orientation, expansion state, and deformation are iteratively adjusted until forward projections of the model match both bi-plane views. Simulated bi-plane imaging of a valve at different signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) levels was performed to test the approach. 20 image sequences with 50 frames of valve deployment were simulated at each SDNR. The simulation achieved a target registration error (TRE) of the estimated valve model of 0.93 +/- 2.6 mm (mean +/- S.D.) for the lowest SDNR of 2. For higher SDNRs (5 to 50) a TRE of 0.04 mm +/- 0.23 mm was achieved. A tabletop phantom study was then conducted using a TAVR valve. The dynamic 3D model was constructed from high resolution CT scans and a simple expansion model. TRE was 1.22 +/- 0.35 mm for expansion states varying from undeployed to fully deployed, and for moderate amounts of inter-frame motion. Results indicate that it is feasible to use bi-plane imaging to recover the 3D structure of deformable catheter devices.

  5. Recommendations for the imaging assessment of prosthetic heart valves: a report from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging endorsed by the Chinese Society of Echocardiography, the Inter-American Society of Echocardiography, and the Brazilian Department of Cardiovascular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Pibarot, Philippe; Chambers, John; Edvardsen, Thor; Delgado, Victoria; Dulgheru, Raluca; Pepi, Mauro; Cosyns, Bernard; Dweck, Mark R; Garbi, Madalina; Magne, Julien; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Bernard, Anne; Lowenstein, Jorge; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Vyhmeister, Rodrigo Hernández; Zhou, Xiao; Zhang, Yun; Zamorano, Jose-Luis; Habib, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is rare but potentially life-threatening. Although often challenging, establishing the exact cause of PHV dysfunction is essential to determine the appropriate treatment strategy. In clinical practice, a comprehensive approach that integrates several parameters of valve morphology and function assessed with 2D/3D transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography is a key to appropriately detect and quantitate PHV dysfunction. Cinefluoroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and to a lesser extent, nuclear imaging are complementary tools for the diagnosis and management of PHV complications. The present document provides recommendations for the use of multimodality imaging in the assessment of PHVs. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis associated with prosthetic heart valve replacement: rheological study of erythrocyte modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprari, Patrizia; Tarzia, Anna; Mojoli, Giorgio; Cianciulli, Paolo; Mannella, Emilio; Martorana, Maria Cristina

    2009-04-01

    The implantation of a prosthetic heart valve (HVP) in patients with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) is rare, and the changes in the structure and deformability of erythrocytes that follow implantation in these patients have been poorly described. In the present study, the erythrocytes in HS and HE patients with mechanical HVP were compared to the erythrocytes in patients with only congenital membrane defects, in terms of biochemical modifications and rheological behaviour. Integral and cytoskeletal erythrocyte membrane proteins were studied, and blood viscosity (shear rate/shear stress ratio), aggregation ratio [eta(1 s(-1))/eta(200 s(-1))], and red cell visco-elasticity were determined. Valve replacement with a mechanical prosthesis worsened anaemia and resulted in a change in haemolysis, from sub-clinical to evident. The rheological investigation of erythrocytes from HS patients confirmed the characteristic increased viscosity and aggregation ratio and the decreased deformability. The rheological behaviour of erythrocytes from patients with HVP showed a decrease in viscosity and an increase in elastic modulus. In these patients, the prosthesis seems to have induced traumatic damage to the erythrocyte membrane, leading to fragmentation and lysis, which in turn modified rheological parameters. The biochemical and rheological investigation allowed us to understand the clinical and haematological pictures of the patients and to describe the role played by different factors in haemolytic anaemia.

  7. Risk Factors for Late Aortic Valve Dysfunction After the David V Valve-Sparing Root Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Jiro; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose N; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Guyton, Robert A; Chen, Edward P

    2017-11-01

    Valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) is an established therapy for aortic root pathology. However, late aortic valve dysfunction requiring reoperation remains a primary concern of this procedure. This study examines risk factors for late aortic insufficiency (AI) and aortic stenosis (AS) after David V VSRR. A retrospective review from 2005 to 2015 at a US academic center identified 282 patients who underwent VSRR. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for late AI and AS after VSRR. The mean age was 46.4 years. Sixty-four patients (22.7%) had bicuspid valves, and 41 patients (14.5%) had Marfan syndrome. The incidence of reoperations was 27 (9.6%), and 42 cases (14.9%) presented with acute type A dissection. Operative mortality was 8 (2.8%). Seven-year survival was 90.9%. Seven-year cumulative incidence of reoperation, greater than 2+ AI and greater than moderate AS were 3.1%, 2.2%, and 0.8%, respectively. Multivariable analysis showed aortic root size 55 mm or larger (hazard ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval: 1.27 to 9.29, p = 0.01) to be a risk factor for late AI whereas bicuspid valve (hazard ratio 16.07, 95% confidence interval: 3.12 to 82.68, p = 0.001) and cusp repair were found to be risk factors (hazard ratio 5.91, 95% confidence interval: 1.17 to 29.86, p = 0.03) for late AS. Valve-sparing root replacement can be performed with low operative risk and good overall long-term survival even in complex clinical settings. Durable valve function can be expected; however, aortic root size 55 cm or more, bicuspid valve anatomy, and cusp repair represent independent risk factors for late aortic valve dysfunction after these procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fracture and embolization of a Björk-Shiley disc. Fatal failure of a prosthetic mitral valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norenberg, D D; Evans, R W; Gundersen, A E; Abellera, R M

    1977-12-01

    A case of fracture of the disc occluder of a Bjork-Shiley mitral prosthesis with embolization of the disc fragments to distal aorta is presented. The possibility of valve dysfunction and the diagnostic value of echocardiography should be considered whenever acute heart failure occurs in a patient with an artificial valve.

  9. Differentiation of thrombus from pannus as the cause of acquired mechanical prosthetic heart valve obstruction by non-invasive imaging: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanis, Wilco; Habets, Jesse; van den Brink, Renee B. A.; Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.

    2014-01-01

    For acquired mechanical prosthetic heart valve (PHV) obstruction and suspicion on thrombosis, recently updated European Society of Cardiology guidelines advocate the confirmation of thrombus by transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and fluoroscopy. However, no

  10. Editorial to: Baseline MDCT findings after prosthetic heart valve implantation provide important complementary information to echocardiography for follow-up purposes by Sucha et al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, F.E.C.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kietselaer, B.L.J.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Over the last years a growing number of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) implantation procedures have been performed in sequence with the aging of the population and improving surgical techniques. Currently, echocardiography is the most important tool in the follow-up and evaluation of complications associated with the PHV (pannus, thrombus, endocarditis). However, echocardiographic examination of PHV associated disease may be hampered by poor acoustic window or scatter artefacts caused by the PHV. PHV related disease such as endocarditis is related with a poor prognosis, especially when complications such as periannular abscess formation occurs. Early treatment of PHV associated disease improves prognosis. Therefore, an unmet clinical need for early detection of complications exists. In the evaluation of PHV (dys)function, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) has shown to be of additive value. A necessity for MDCT to be implemented in daily practice is to be able to distinguish between normal and pathological features. (orig.)

  11. Editorial to: Baseline MDCT findings after prosthetic heart valve implantation provide important complementary information to echocardiography for follow-up purposes by Sucha et al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, F.E.C.M.; Kietselaer, B.L.J.H.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years a growing number of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) implantation procedures have been performed in sequence with the aging of the population and improving surgical techniques. Currently, echocardiography is the most important tool in the follow-up and evaluation of complications associated with the PHV (pannus, thrombus, endocarditis). However, echocardiographic examination of PHV associated disease may be hampered by poor acoustic window or scatter artefacts caused by the PHV. PHV related disease such as endocarditis is related with a poor prognosis, especially when complications such as periannular abscess formation occurs. Early treatment of PHV associated disease improves prognosis. Therefore, an unmet clinical need for early detection of complications exists. In the evaluation of PHV (dys)function, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) has shown to be of additive value. A necessity for MDCT to be implemented in daily practice is to be able to distinguish between normal and pathological features. (orig.)

  12. Acute aortic regurgitation secondary to disk embolization of a Björk-Shiley prosthetic aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Robert D; Katz, William E

    2011-03-01

    Having passed the 30th anniversary of the first implantation of a Björk-Shiley convexo-concave tilting mechanical valve, recognition of the life-threatening complication of strut fracture is not widespread. The authors report the case of a 48-year-old man with acute-onset chest pain and dyspnea found to have strut fracture and disk embolization of a 26-year-old Björk-Shiley prosthetic aortic valve. The value of echocardiography in the diagnosis of this condition is discussed. Copyright © 2010 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnosis of the prosthetic heart valve pannus formation with real-time three-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Mehmet; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Yildiz, Mustafa; Duran, Nilüfer Eksi

    2010-05-01

    Prosthetic heart valve obstruction (PHVO) caused by pannus formation is an uncommon but serious complication. Although two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (2D-TEE) is the method of choice in the evaluation of PHVO, visualization of pannus is almost impossible with 2D-TEE. While demonstrating the precise aetiology of PHVO is essential for guiding the therapy, either thrombolysis for valve thrombosis or surgery for pannus formation, more sophisticated imaging techniques are needed in patients with suspected pannus formation. We present real-time 3D-TEE imaging in a patient with mechanical mitral PHVO, clearly demonstrating pannus overgrowth.

  14. Cost of vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant treatment in patients with metallic prosthetic valve in mitral position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Gabriela; Garcia Raso, Aránzazu; Gonzalez-Dominguez Weber, Almudena; Hidalgo-Vega, Álvaro; Llamas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy after valve replacement surgery requires strict monitoring because these patients are at high risk for the development of thrombotic complications and present an increased risk of bleeding. The aim of this study was to examine the total healthcare costs of oral anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists in patients with metallic prosthetic valves in the mitral position. Data from clinical records were used in the study including international normalized ratio results, number of medical visits, type of anticoagulant, use of rescue medication and hospital admissions from related complications. The drug cost was calculated based on the official Spanish Ministry of Health price list. Monitoring expenses were included in the cost of the medical supplies used in the procedures. Hospitalization costs were calculated using the diagnosis-related group price for each case. We collected data from 151 patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonist who were diagnosed with mitral prosthesis (n = 90), mitro-aortic prosthesis (n = 57), and mitral and tricuspid prosthesis (n = 4). The total direct healthcare cost was €15302.59, with a mean total cost per patient per year of €1558.15 (±2774.58) consisting of 44.38 (±42.30) for drug cost, €71.41 (±21.43) for international normalized ratio monitoring, €429.52 (±126.87) for medical visits, €26.31 (±28.38) for rescue medication and €986.53 (±2735.68) for related complications. Most direct healthcare costs associated with the sampled patients arose from the specialist-care monitoring required for treatment. Good monitoring is inversely related to direct healthcare costs.

  15. Cost of vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant treatment in patients with metallic prosthetic valve in mitral position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ene

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy after valve replacement surgery requires strict monitoring because these patients are at high risk for the development of thrombotic complications and present an increased risk of bleeding. Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the total healthcare costs of oral anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists in patients with metallic prosthetic valves in the mitral position. Methods: Data from clinical records were used in the study including international normalized ratio results, number of medical visits, type of anticoagulant, use of rescue medication and hospital admissions from related complications. The drug cost was calculated based on the official Spanish Ministry of Health price list. Monitoring expenses were included in the cost of the medical supplies used in the procedures. Hospitalization costs were calculated using the diagnosis-related group price for each case. Results: We collected data from 151 patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy with vitamin K antagonist who were diagnosed with mitral prosthesis (n = 90, mitro-aortic prosthesis (n = 57, and mitral and tricuspid prosthesis (n = 4. The total direct healthcare cost was €15302.59, with a mean total cost per patient per year of €1558.15 (±2774.58 consisting of 44.38 (±42.30 for drug cost, €71.41 (±21.43 for international normalized ratio monitoring, €429.52 (±126.87 for medical visits, €26.31 (±28.38 for rescue medication and €986.53 (±2735.68 for related complications. Conclusion: Most direct healthcare costs associated with the sampled patients arose from the specialist-care monitoring required for treatment. Good monitoring is inversely related to direct healthcare costs.

  16. Identify of Granulicatella adiacens from blood cultures of a patient bearer of prosthetic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Gargiulo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case studied concerns a woman 81 years old, with a history of prosthetic valve and mitral insufficiency, admitted to internal medicine ward of NOCSAE hospital as a result of a recurrent fever. Due to the suspicion of endocarditis and with the aim to identify the presence of aerobic/anaerobic microorganisms, two set of blood cultures collected within 24 hours were sent to the Laboratory of microbiology. All the bottles were incubated into the Bact-Alert 3D System (bioMérieux. After an 19 hours incubation time, the samples were identified as positive by the automated system; consequently they cultured on a blood agar and selective media, according to our laboratory operational protocol. In the same time Gram stain of the cultural broth revealed the presence of Gram positive cocci arranged in chains different in length. Since there wasn’t an evident microbial growth on solid media after 24-48 hours of incubation, a new culture was carried out on blood and chocolate agar after the addition of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. After 24 hours of incubation it was possible appreciate the growth of tiny colonies around the S. aureus ones. These colonies were identified by Vitek2 and Api Rapid 32 Strep (bioMérieux as Granulicatella adiacens. The results were confirmed by PCR and sequencing of the groESL gene. MIC values obtained by the means of E-test (bioMérieux were: 0.016mg/L for penicillin, 0.125mg/L for cefotaxime, 1mg/L for both vancomicin and levofloxacin. Resistance was observed for cloramphenicol (MIC=16mg/L. The timely communication of these findings, supported by clinical data like the appearance of vegetation on mitral valve highlighted by trans-oesophageal echocardiography, allowed to establish an adequate antibiotic therapy, rapid resolution of fever and normalisation of inflammatory parameters.

  17. Role of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of device and prosthetic valve infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Fran?ois Sarrazin; Fran?ois Philippon; Mika?l Trottier; Michel Tessier

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device(CIED) infection and prosthetic valve endocarditis(PVE) remain a diagnostic challenge.Cardiac imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CIED infection or PVE.Over the past few years,cardiac radionuclide imaging has gained a key role in the diagnosis of these patients,and in assessing the need for surgery,mainly in the most difficult cases.Both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography(18F-FDG PET/CT) and radiolabelled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography(WBC SPECT/CT) have been studied in these situations.In their 2015 guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis,the European Society of Cardiology incorporated cardiac nuclear imaging as part of their diagnostic algorithm for PVE,but not CIED infection since the data were judged insufficient at the moment.This article reviews the actual knowledge and recent studies on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT and WBC SPECT/CT in the context of CIED infection and PVE,and describes the technical aspects of cardiac radionuclide imaging.It also discusses their accepted and potential indications for the diagnosis and management of CIED infection and PVE,the limitations of these tests,and potential areas of future research.

  18. Role of radionuclide imaging for diagnosis of device and prosthetic valve infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, Jean-François; Philippon, François; Trottier, Mikaël; Tessier, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection and prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remain a diagnostic challenge. Cardiac imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with CIED infection or PVE. Over the past few years, cardiac radionuclide imaging has gained a key role in the diagnosis of these patients, and in assessing the need for surgery, mainly in the most difficult cases. Both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) and radiolabelled white blood cell single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (WBC SPECT/CT) have been studied in these situations. In their 2015 guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis, the European Society of Cardiology incorporated cardiac nuclear imaging as part of their diagnostic algorithm for PVE, but not CIED infection since the data were judged insufficient at the moment. This article reviews the actual knowledge and recent studies on the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT and WBC SPECT/CT in the context of CIED infection and PVE, and describes the technical aspects of cardiac radionuclide imaging. It also discusses their accepted and potential indications for the diagnosis and management of CIED infection and PVE, the limitations of these tests, and potential areas of future research. PMID:27721936

  19. Does positron emission tomography/computed tomography aid the diagnosis of prosthetic valve infective endocarditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmforth, Damian; Chacko, Jacob; Uppal, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) aids the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE)? A total of 107 publications were found using the reported search, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. The reported outcome of all studies was a final diagnosis of confirmed endocarditis on follow-up. All the six studies were non-randomized, single-centre, observational studies and thus represented level 3 evidence. The diagnostic capability of PET/CT for PVE was compared with that of the modified Duke Criteria and echocardiography, and reported in terms of sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values. All studies demonstrated an increased sensitivity for the diagnosis of PVE when PET/CT was combined with the modified Duke Criteria on admission. A higher SUVmax on PET was found to be significantly associated with a confirmed diagnosis of endocarditis and an additional diagnostic benefit of PET/CT angiography over conventional PET/non-enhanced CT is reported due to improved anatomical resolution. However, PET/CT was found to be unreliable in the early postoperative period due to its inability to distinguish between infection and residual postoperative inflammatory changes. PET/CT was also found to be poor at diagnosing cases of native valve endocarditis. We conclude that PET/CT aids in the diagnosis of PVE when combined with the modified Duke Criteria on admission by increasing the diagnostic sensitivity. The diagnostic ability of PET/CT can be potentiated by the use of PET/CTA; however, its use may be unreliable in the early postoperative period or in native valve endocarditis. © The Author 2016. Published by

  20. Validation of a numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction model for a prosthetic valve based on experimental PIV measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guivier-Curien, Carine; Deplano, Valérie; Bertrand, Eric

    2009-10-01

    A numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of a prosthetic aortic valve was developed, based on a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program using an Arbitrary Eulerian Lagrangian (ALE) formulation. To make sure of the validity of this numerical model, an equivalent experimental model accounting for both the geometrical features and the hydrodynamic conditions was also developed. The leaflet and the flow behaviours around the bileaflet valve were investigated numerically and experimentally by performing particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Through quantitative and qualitative comparisons, it was shown that the leaflet behaviour and the velocity fields were similar in both models. The present study allows the validation of a fully coupled 3-D FSI numerical model. The promising numerical tool could be therefore used to investigate clinical issues involving the aortic valve.

  1. Time-resolved PIV technique for high temporal resolution measurement of mechanical prosthetic aortic valve fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, R; Morbiducci, U; Rossi, M; Scalise, L; Verdonck, P; Grigioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) have been used to replace diseased native valves for more than five decades. Among these, mechanical PHVs are the most frequently implanted. Unfortunately, these devices still do not achieve ideal behavior and lead to many complications, many of which are related to fluid mechanics. The fluid dynamics of mechanical PHVs are particularly complex and the fine-scale characteristics of such flows call for very accurate experimental techniques. Adequate temporal resolution can be reached by applying time-resolved PIV, a high-resolution dynamic technique which is able to capture detailed chronological changes in the velocity field. The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the evolution of the flow field in a detailed time domain of a commercial bileaflet PHV in a mock-loop mimicking unsteady conditions, by means of time-resolved 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The investigated flow field corresponded to the region immediately downstream of the valve plane. Spatial resolution as in "standard" PIV analysis of prosthetic valve fluid dynamics was used. The combination of a Nd:YLF high-repetition-rate double-cavity laser with a high frame rate CMOS camera allowed a detailed, highly temporally resolved acquisition (up to 10000 fps depending on the resolution) of the flow downstream of the PHV. Features that were observed include the non-homogeneity and unsteadiness of the phenomenon and the presence of large-scale vortices within the field, especially in the wake of the valve leaflets. Furthermore, we observed that highly temporally cycle-resolved analysis allowed the different behaviors exhibited by the bileaflet valve at closure to be captured in different acquired cardiac cycles. By accurately capturing hemodynamically relevant time scales of motion, time-resolved PIV characterization can realistically be expected to help designers in improving PHV performance and in furnishing comprehensive validation with experimental data

  2. ECG-gated computed tomography: a new role for patients with suspected aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagman, Erika; Flinck, Agneta; Lamm, Carl [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Perrotta, Sossio [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Anaesthesia, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bech-Hanssen, Odd [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Gothenburg (Sweden); Olaison, Lars [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Gothenburg (Sweden); Svensson, Gunnar [Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery and Anaesthesia, Gothenburg (Sweden); The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the agreement in findings between ECG-gated CT and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). Twenty-seven consecutive patients with PVE underwent 64-slice ECG-gated CT and TEE and the results were compared. Imaging was compared with surgical findings (surgery was performed in 16 patients). TEE suggested the presence of PVE in all patients [thickened aortic wall (n = 17), vegetation (n = 13), abscess (n = 16), valvular dehiscence (n = 10)]. ECG-gated CT was positive in 25 patients (93 %) [thickened aortic wall (n = 19), vegetation (n = 7), abscess (n = 18), valvular dehiscence (n = 7)]. The strength of agreement [kappa (95 % CI)] between ECG-gated CT and TEE was very good for thickened wall [0.83 (0.62-1.0)], good for abscess [0.68 (0.40-0.97)] and dehiscence [0.75 (0.48-1.0)], and moderate for vegetation [0.55 (0.26-0.88)]. The agreement was good between surgical findings (abscess, vegetation and dehiscence) and imaging for ECG-gated CT [0.66 (0.49-0.87)] and TEE [0.79 (0.62-0.96)] and very good for the combination of ECG-gated CT and TEE [0.88 (0.74-1.0)]. Our results indicate that ECG-gated CT has comparable diagnostic performance to TEE and may be a valuable complement in the preoperative evaluation of patients with aortic PVE. (orig.)

  3. ECG-gated computed tomography: a new role for patients with suspected aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagman, Erika; Flinck, Agneta; Lamm, Carl; Perrotta, Sossio; Bech-Hanssen, Odd; Olaison, Lars; Svensson, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the agreement in findings between ECG-gated CT and transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in patients with aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). Twenty-seven consecutive patients with PVE underwent 64-slice ECG-gated CT and TEE and the results were compared. Imaging was compared with surgical findings (surgery was performed in 16 patients). TEE suggested the presence of PVE in all patients [thickened aortic wall (n = 17), vegetation (n = 13), abscess (n = 16), valvular dehiscence (n = 10)]. ECG-gated CT was positive in 25 patients (93 %) [thickened aortic wall (n = 19), vegetation (n = 7), abscess (n = 18), valvular dehiscence (n = 7)]. The strength of agreement [kappa (95 % CI)] between ECG-gated CT and TEE was very good for thickened wall [0.83 (0.62-1.0)], good for abscess [0.68 (0.40-0.97)] and dehiscence [0.75 (0.48-1.0)], and moderate for vegetation [0.55 (0.26-0.88)]. The agreement was good between surgical findings (abscess, vegetation and dehiscence) and imaging for ECG-gated CT [0.66 (0.49-0.87)] and TEE [0.79 (0.62-0.96)] and very good for the combination of ECG-gated CT and TEE [0.88 (0.74-1.0)]. Our results indicate that ECG-gated CT has comparable diagnostic performance to TEE and may be a valuable complement in the preoperative evaluation of patients with aortic PVE. (orig.)

  4. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallyamov, Marat O.; Chaschin, Ivan S.; Khokhlova, Marina A.; Grigorev, Timofey E.; Bakuleva, Natalia P.; Lyutova, Irina G.; Kondratenko, Janna E.; Badun, Gennadii A.; Chernysheva, Maria G.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2014-01-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H 2 O and CO 2 . Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16–33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1 wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. - Highlights: • Treatment of GA-stabilised bovine

  5. First report of Sneathia sanguinegens together with Mycoplasma hominis in postpartum prosthetic valve infective endocarditis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaskova, Iva; Nemec, Petr; Vanerkova, Martina; Malisova, Barbora; Tejkalova, Renata; Orban, Marek; Zampachova, Vita; Freiberger, Tomas

    2017-08-14

    The presence of more than one bacterial agent is relatively rare in infective endocarditis, although more common in prosthetic cases. Molecular diagnosis from a removed heart tissue is considered a quick and effective way to diagnose fastidious or intracellular agents. Here we describe the case of postpartum polymicrobial prosthetic valve endocarditis in a young woman. Sneathia sanguinegens and Mycoplasma hominis were simultaneously detected from the heart valve sample using broad range 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing while culture remained negative. Results were confirmed by independent PCR combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Before the final agent identification, the highly non-compliant patient left from the hospital against medical advice on empirical intravenous treatment with aminopenicillins, clavulanate and gentamicin switched to oral amoxycillin and clavulanate. Four months after surgery, no signs of inflammation were present despite new regurgitation and valve leaflet flail was detected. However, after another 5 months the patient died from sepsis and recurrent infective endocarditis of unclarified etiology. Mycoplasma hominis is a rare causative agent of infective endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, presented case is the first report of Sneathia sanguinegens detected in this condition. Molecular techniques were shown to be useful even in polymicrobial infective endocarditis samples.

  6. Characteristics of aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hong Ju [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Kun; Kim, Jun Suk [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sung Min [Konkuk University Medical Center, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To characterize aortic valve dysfunction and ascending aorta dimensions according to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology using computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We retrospectively enrolled 209 patients with BAVs who underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and CT. BAVs were classified as anterior-posterior (BAV-AP) or lateral (BAV-LA) orientation of the cusps and divided according to the presence (raphe+) or absence (raphe-) of a raphe. Ascending aortic dimensions were measured by CT at four levels. BAV-AP was present in 129 patients (61.7 %) and raphe+ in 120 (57.4 %). Sixty-nine patients (33.0 %) had aortic regurgitation (AR), 70 (33.5 %) had aortic stenosis (AS), and 58 (27.8 %) had combined AS and AR. AR was more common in patients with BAV-AP and raphe+; AS was more common with BAV-LA and raphe-.Annulus/body surface area and tubular portion/body surface area diameters in patients with BAV-AP (17.1 ± 2.3 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.3 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe+ (17.3 ± 2.2 mm/m{sup 2} and 24.2 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) were significantly different from those with BAV-LA (15.8 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.4 ± 5.5 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively) and raphe- (15.7 ± 1.9 mm/m{sup 2} and 26.2 ± 5.4 mm/m{sup 2}, respectively). The morphological characteristics of BAV might be associated with the type of valvular dysfunction, and degree and location of an ascending aorta dilatation. (orig.)

  7. Anatomical features of acute mitral valve repair dysfunction: Additional value of three-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkx, Salomé; Nguyen, Virginia; Cimadevilla, Claire; Verdonk, Constance; Lepage, Laurent; Raffoul, Richard; Nataf, Patrick; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2017-03-01

    Recurrence of mitral regurgitation after mitral valve repair is correlated with unfavourable left ventricular remodelling and poor outcome. This pictorial review describes the echocardiographic features of three types of acute mitral valve repair dysfunction, and the additional value of three-dimensional echocardiography. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The current status of fluoroscopy and echocardiography in the diagnosis of prosthetic valve thrombosis-a review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Mustafa Ozan; Kalçik, Macit; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Özkan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) is a potentially life-threatening complication of heart valve replacement. Early diagnosis is crucial for the prevention of significantly morbid and lethal complications. Cinefluoroscopy (CF) and echocardiography have been widely used for diagnosing PVT. In recent years, the role of CF has declined since the introduction of transesophageal echocardiography and the great improvements in ultrasound technology including real time three-dimensional imaging. Nevertheless, both echocardiography and CF provide different kinds of information on prosthesis function, and therefore they are considered as complementary and not alternative. In this review, we aimed to summarize the current status of CF and echocardiography in the diagnosis of PVT. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Collagen tissue treated with chitosan solutions in carbonic acid for improved biological prosthetic heart valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallyamov, Marat O., E-mail: glm@spm.phys.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chaschin, Ivan S. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Khokhlova, Marina A. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Grigorev, Timofey E. [Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bakuleva, Natalia P.; Lyutova, Irina G.; Kondratenko, Janna E. [Bakulev Scientific Center for Cardiovascular Surgery of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Roublyevskoe Sh. 135, Moscow 121552 (Russian Federation); Badun, Gennadii A.; Chernysheva, Maria G. [Radiochemistry Division, Faculty of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, Alexei R. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory 1–2, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 28, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-01

    Calcification of bovine pericardium dramatically shortens typical lifetimes of biological prosthetic heart valves and thus precludes their choice for younger patients. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate that the calcification is to be mitigated by means of treatment of bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid, i.e. water saturated with carbon dioxide at high pressure. This acidic aqueous fluid unusually combines antimicrobial properties with absolute biocompatibility as far as at normal pressure it decomposes spontaneously and completely into H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. Yet, at high pressures it can protonate and dissolve chitosan materials with different degrees of acetylation (in the range of 16–33%, at least) without any further pretreatment. Even exposure of the bovine pericardium in pure carbonic acid solution without chitosan already favours certain reduction in calcification, somewhat improved mechanical properties, complete biocompatibility and evident antimicrobial activity of the treated collagen tissue. The reason may be due to high extraction ability of this peculiar compressed fluidic mixture. Moreover, exposure of the bovine pericardium in solutions of chitosan in carbonic acid introduces even better mechanical properties and highly pronounced antimicrobial activity of the modified collagen tissue against adherence and biofilm formation of relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. Yet, the most important achievement is the detected dramatic reduction in calcification for such modified collagen tissues in spite of the fact that the amount of the thus introduced chitosan is rather small (typically ca. 1 wt.%), which has been reliably detected using original tritium labelling method. We believe that these improved properties are achieved due to particularly deep and uniform impregnation of the collagen matrix with chitosan from its pressurised solutions in carbonic acid. - Highlights: • Treatment of GA

  10. Evaluation Of Factors Influencing On Causes Of Prosthetic Valve Re-operation And Early Postoperative Survival Tehran Emam hospital (1991-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Reaza

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic valve re-operation has greater mortality and morbidity than primary valve replacement. By recognition of factors influencing on causes of redo operation and preoperative survival, one can select appropriate prosthesis at primary valve replacement and when operation performed at appropriate time, surgical risk can be reduced."nMethods and Materials: Two hundred patients that underwent prosthetic valve re-operation from October 1991 through November 2001 were included in this study. There were 68 men and 132 women with the mean age of 42:tl 1.8 years. Structural failure was the commonest cause of bio-prosthesis replacement (93%. Valve thrombosis was the common cause of mechanical valve replacement (32%. Age younger Than 50 (P= 0.01 and interval after the first implantation more than 10 years (P= 0.01 affected bio-prosthesis degeneration."nResults: Atrial fibrillation (P<0.01, Older age especially more than 40 (P<0.05 and mitral position (P<0.01 affected mechanical valve thrombosis. Cross clamp time (P= 0.005, Tricuspid insufficiency (P = 0.001, NYHA IV (P = 0.005 and emergent operation (P= 0.001 were independent determinants of hospital mortality."nConclusion: In conclusion, in patients with more than 10-years life expectancy and age younger than 50, mechanical valve can be selected for primary valve replacement. If operation performed before patients reach deteriorated condition, preoperative survival would be excellent.

  11. Real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the assessment of mechanical prosthetic mitral valve ring thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Mehmet; Gürsoy, Ozan Mustafa; Astarcıoğlu, Mehmet Ali; Gündüz, Sabahattin; Cakal, Beytullah; Karakoyun, Süleyman; Kalçık, Macit; Kahveci, Gökhan; Duran, Nilüfer Ekşi; Yıldız, Mustafa; Cevik, Cihan

    2013-10-01

    Although 2-dimensional (2D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of prosthetic valve thrombosis, nonobstructive clots located on mitral valve rings can be missed. Real-time 3-dimensional (3D) TEE has incremental value in the visualization of mitral prosthesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of real-time 3D TEE in the diagnosis of mitral prosthetic ring thrombosis. The clinical outcomes of these patients in relation to real-time 3D transesophageal echocardiographic findings were analyzed. Of 1,263 patients who underwent echocardiographic studies, 174 patients (37 men, 137 women) with mitral ring thrombosis detected by real-time 3D TEE constituted the main study population. Patients were followed prospectively on oral anticoagulation for 25 ± 7 months. Eighty-nine patients (51%) had thrombi that were missed on 2D TEE and depicted only on real-time 3D TEE. The remaining cases were partially visualized with 2D TEE but completely visualized with real-time 3D TEE. Thirty-seven patients (21%) had thromboembolism. The mean thickness of the ring thrombosis in patients with thromboembolism was greater than that in patients without thromboembolism (3.8 ± 0.9 vs 2.8 ± 0.7 mm, p 3D TEE during follow-up. There were no thrombi in 39 patients (25%); 45 (29%) had regression of thrombi, and there was no change in thrombus size in 68 patients (44%). Thrombus size increased in 3 patients (2%). Thrombosis was confirmed surgically and histopathologically in 12 patients (7%). In conclusion, real-time 3D TEE can detect prosthetic mitral ring thrombosis that could be missed on 2D TEE and cause thromboembolic events. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of a 3D segmental prosthetic system for tricuspid valve annulus remodelling on the right coronary artery: a human cadaveric coronary angiography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riki-Marishani, Mohsen; Gholoobi, Arash; Sazegar, Ghasem; Aazami, Mathias H; Hedjazi, Aria; Sajjadian, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Aghaii-Zade Torabi, Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    A prosthetic system to repair secondary tricuspid valve regurgitation was developed. The conceptual engineering of the current device is based on 3D segmental remodelling of the tricuspid valve annulus in lieu of reductive annuloplasty. This study was designed to investigate the operational safety of the current prosthetic system with regard to the anatomical integrity of the right coronary artery (RCA) in fresh cadaveric human hearts. During the study period, from January to April 2016, the current prosthetic system was implanted on the tricuspid valve annulus in fresh cadaveric human hearts that met the study's inclusion criteria. The prepared specimens were investigated via selective coronary angiography of the RCA in the catheterization laboratory. The RCA angiographic anatomies were categorized as normal, distorted, kinked or occluded. Sixteen specimens underwent implantation of the current prosthetic system. The mean age of the cadaveric human hearts was 43.24 ± 15.79 years, with vehicle accident being the primary cause of death (59%). A dominant RCA was noticed in 62.5% of the specimens. None of the specimens displayed any injury, distortion, kinking or occlusion in the RCA due to the implantation of the prostheses. In light of the results of the present study, undertaken on fresh cadaveric human heart specimens, the current segmental prosthetic system for 3D remodelling of the tricuspid valve annulus seems to be safe vis-à-vis the anatomical integrity of the RCA. Further in vivo studies are needed to investigate the functional features of the current prosthetic system with a view to addressing the complex pathophysiology of secondary tricuspid valve regurgitation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Healthcare-associated prosthetic heart valve, aortic vascular graft, and disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections subsequent to open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Philipp; Kuster, Stefan P; Bloemberg, Guido; Schulthess, Bettina; Frank, Michelle; Tanner, Felix C; Rössle, Matthias; Böni, Christian; Falk, Volkmar; Wilhelm, Markus J; Sommerstein, Rami; Achermann, Yvonne; Ten Oever, Jaap; Debast, Sylvia B; Wolfhagen, Maurice J H M; Brandon Bravo Bruinsma, George J; Vos, Margreet C; Bogers, Ad; Serr, Annerose; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Sax, Hugo; Böttger, Erik C; Weber, Rainer; van Ingen, Jakko; Wagner, Dirk; Hasse, Barbara

    2015-10-21

    We identified 10 patients with disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections subsequent to open-heart surgery at three European Hospitals. Infections originated from the heater-cooler unit of the heart-lung machine. Here we describe clinical aspects and treatment course of this novel clinical entity. Interdisciplinary care and follow-up of all patients was documented by the study team. Patients' characteristics, clinical manifestations, microbiological findings, and therapeutic measures including surgical reinterventions were reviewed and treatment outcomes are described. The 10 patients comprise a 1-year-old child and nine adults with a median age of 61 years (range 36-76 years). The median duration from cardiac surgery to diagnosis was 21 (range 5-40) months. All patients had prosthetic material-associated infections with either prosthetic valve endocarditis, aortic graft infection, myocarditis, or infection of the prosthetic material following banding of the pulmonary artery. Extracardiac manifestations preceded cardiovascular disease in some cases. Despite targeted antimicrobial therapy, M. chimaera infection required cardiosurgical reinterventions in eight patients. Six out of 10 patients experienced breakthrough infections, of which four were fatal. Three patients are in a post-treatment monitoring period. Healthcare-associated infections due to M. chimaera occurred in patients subsequent to cardiac surgery with extracorporeal circulation and implantation of prosthetic material. Infections became clinically apparent after a time lag of months to years. Mycobacterium chimaera infections are easily missed by routine bacterial diagnostics and outcome is poor despite long-term antimycobacterial therapy, probably because biofilm formation hinders eradication of pathogens. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Conduit Dysfunction After the Ross Procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillespie, Matthew J; McElhinney, Doff B; Kreutzer, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) conduit dysfunction is a limitation of the Ross procedure. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TPVR) could alter the impact of conduit dysfunction and the risk-benefit balance for the Ross procedure. METHODS: Retrospective review of databa......BACKGROUND: Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) conduit dysfunction is a limitation of the Ross procedure. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TPVR) could alter the impact of conduit dysfunction and the risk-benefit balance for the Ross procedure. METHODS: Retrospective review....... Of these, 56 (84%) received a Melody valve; in 5 of the 11 patients who did not, the implant was aborted due to concern for coronary artery compression, and 1 implanted patient required emergent surgery for left coronary compression. The RVOT gradient decreased from a median 38 mm Hg to 13.5 mm Hg (p

  15. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. (Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Victoria General Hospital Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  16. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess

  17. Three-dimensional flow structures past a bio-prosthetic valve in an in-vitro model of the aortic root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, David; Obrist, Dominik

    2018-01-01

    The flow field past a prosthetic aortic valve comprises many details that indicate whether the prosthesis is functioning well or not. It is, however, not yet fully understood how an optimal flow scenario would look, i.e. which subtleties of the fluid dynamics in place are essential regarding the durability and compatibility of a prosthetic valve. In this study, we measured and analyzed the 3D flow field in the vicinity of a bio-prosthetic heart valve in function of the aortic root size. The measurements were conducted within aortic root phantoms of different size, mounted in a custom-built hydraulic setup, which mimicked physiological flow conditions in the aorta. Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to measure the 3D instantaneous velocity field at various instances. Several 3D fields (e.g. instantaneous and mean velocity, 3D shear rate) were analyzed and compared focusing on the impact of the aortic root size, but also in order to gain general insight in the 3D flow structure past the bio-prosthetic valve. We found that the diameter of the aortic jet relative to the diameter of the ascending aorta is the most important parameter in determining the characteristics of the flow. A large aortic cross-section, relative to the cross-section of the aortic jet, was associated with higher levels of turbulence intensity and higher retrograde flow in the ascending aorta.

  18. Dynamic behavior of prosthetic aortic tissue valves as viewed by high-speed cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, W G; Christopher, R A; Sadler, T R; Hilgenberg, A D

    1979-09-01

    Using a valve testing apparatus of our own design and with a high-speed (600 to 800 frames per second) 16 mm movie camera, films were made of Hancock porcine, Carpentier-Edwards porcine, and Ionescu-Shiley bovine pericardial valves mounted in the aortic position and cycled under physiological conditions at 72 to 100 beats per minute. Fresh and explanted valves were observed using saline or 36.5% glycerol as the pumping solution. When fresh valves were studied using saline solution as the pumpint fluid, the Hancock and Carpentier-Edwards porcine valves showed high-frequency leaflet vibration, which increased in frequency with higher cycling rates. Abnormal leaflet motion was decreased when glycerol was used as the blood analogue. The Ionescu-Shiley bovine pericardial valve did not show abnormal leaflet motion under these conditions. Conclusions drawn from tissue valve testing studies that use excessively high pulsing rates and pressures (accelerated testing) and saline or water as pumping solutions cannot be transposed to predict the fate of tissue valves in a clinical setting.

  19. Utilization of a pressure sensor guidewire to measure bileaflet mechanical valve gradients: hemodynamic and echocardiographic sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorey, Andrew J; Gakhal, Mandip; Pasquale, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    Suspected prosthetic valve dysfunction is a difficult clinical problem, because of the high risk of repeat valvular surgery. Echocardiographic measurements of prosthetic valvular dysfunction can be misleading, especially with bileaflet valves. Direct measurement of trans-valvular gradients is problematic because of potentially serious catheter entrapment issues. We report a case in which a high-fidelity pressure sensor angioplasty guidewire was used to cross prosthetic mitral and aortic valves in a patient, with hemodynamic and echocardiographic assessment. This technique was safe and effective, refuting the inaccurate non-invasive tests that over-estimated the aortic valvular gradient.

  20. Quantitative assessment of the presence of a single leg separation in Björk-Shiley convexoconcave prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrooman, H A; Maliepaard, C; van der Linden, L P; Jessurun, E R; Ludwig, J W; Plokker, H W; Schalij, M J; Weeda, H W; Laufer, J L; Huysmans, H A; Reiber, J H

    1997-09-01

    The authors developed an analytic software package for the objective and reproducible assessment of a single leg separation (SLS) in the outlet strut of Björk-Shiley convexoconcave (BSCC) prosthetic heart valves. The radiographic cinefilm recordings of 18 phantom valves (12 intact and 6 SLS) and of 43 patient valves were acquired. After digitization of regions of interest in a cineframe, several processing steps were carried out to obtain a one-dimensional corrected and averaged density profile along the central axis of each strut leg. To characterize the degree of possible separation, two quantitative measures were introduced: the normalized pit depth (NPD) and the depth-sigma ratio (DSR). The group of 43 patient studies was divided into a learning set (25 patients) and a test set (18 patients). All phantom valves with an SLS were detected (sensitivity, 100%) at a specificity of 100%. The threshold values for the NPD and the DSR to decide whether a fracture was present or not were 3.6 and 2.5, respectively. On the basis of the visual interpretations of the 25 patient studies (learning set) by an expert panel, it was concluded that none of the patients had an SLS. To achieve a 100% specificity by quantitative analysis, the threshold values for the NPD and the DSR were set at 5.8 and 2.5, respectively, for the patient data. Based on these threshold values, the analysis of patient data from the test set resulted in one false-negative detection and three false-positive detections. An analytic software package for the detection of an SLS was developed. Phantom data showed excellent sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%). Further research and software development is needed to increase the sensitivity and specificity for patient data.

  1. Echocardiographic pattern and severity of valve dysfunction in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is the commonest acquired heart disease in children worldwide but in Uganda, data is scarce regarding its morbidity and mortality. The disease has a progressive course and patients usually require valve repair/replacement in the future. Objectives:To describe the frequency of ...

  2. Non-cardiac surgery in patients with prosthetic heart valves: a 12 years experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, R.P.; Khan, J.S.; Abid, A.R.; Gardezi, S.J.R.

    2007-01-01

    To study patients with mechanical heart valves undergoing non-cardiac surgery and their anticoagulation management during these procedures. Patients with mechanical heart valves undergoing non-cardiac surgical operation during this period, were included. Their anticoagulation was monitored and anticoagulation related complications were recorded. In this study, 507 consecutive patients with a mechanical heart valve replacement were followed-up. Forty two (8.28%) patients underwent non-cardiac surgical operations of which 24 (57.1%) were for abdominal and non-abdominal surgeries, 5 (20.8%) were emergency and 19 (79.2%) were planned. There were 18 (42.9%) caesarean sections for pregnancies. Among the 24 procedures, there were 7(29.1%) laparotomies, 7(29.1%) hernia repairs, 2 (8.3%) cholecystectomies, 2 (8.3%) hysterectomies, 1(4.1%) craniotomy, 1(4.1%) spinal surgery for neuroblastoma, 1(4.1%) ankle fracture and 1(4.1%) carbuncle. No untoward valve or anticoagulation related complication was seen during this period. Patients with mechanical valve prosthesis on life-long anticoagulation, if managed properly, can undergo any type of noncardiac surgical operation with minimal risk. (author)

  3. Non-cardiac surgery in patients with prosthetic heart valves: a 12 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Raja Parvez; Abid, Abdul Rehman; Zafar, Hasnain; Gardezi, Syed Javed Raza; Waheed, Abdul; Khan, Jawad Sajid

    2007-10-01

    To study patients with mechanical heart valves undergoing non-cardiac surgery and their anticoagulation management during these procedures. It was a cohort study. The study was conducted at the Department of Cardiac Surgery, Punjab Institute of Cardiology, Lahore and Department of Surgery, Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore, from September 1994 to June 2006. Patients with mechanical heart valves undergoing non-cardiac surgical operation during this period, were included. Their anticoagulation was monitored and anticoagulation related complications were recorded. In this study, 507 consecutive patients with a mechanical heart valve replacement were followed-up. Forty two (8.28%) patients underwent non-cardiac surgical operations of which 24 (57.1%) were for abdominal and non-abdominal surgeries, 5 (20.8%) were emergency and 19 (79.2%) were planned. There were 18 (42.9%) caesarean sections for pregnancies. Among the 24 procedures, there were 7(29.1%) laparotomies, 7(29.1%) hernia repairs, 2 (8.3%) cholecystectomies, 2 (8.3%) hysterectomies, 1(4.1%) craniotomy, 1(4.1%) spinal surgery for neuroblastoma, 1(4.1%) ankle fracture and 1(4.1%) carbuncle. No untoward valve or anticoagulation related complication was seen during this period. Patients with mechanical valve prosthesis on life-long anticoagulation, if managed properly, can undergo any type of non-cardiac surgical operation with minimal risk.

  4. Tricuspid Valve Dysfunction Following Pacemaker or Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, James D; Manning, Warren J; Ebrille, Elisa; Zimetbaum, Peter J

    2017-05-09

    The potential for cardiac implantable electronic device leads to interfere with tricuspid valve (TV) function has gained increasing recognition as having hemodynamic and clinical consequences associated with incremental morbidity and death. The diagnosis and treatment of lead-related (as distinct from functional) tricuspid regurgitation pose unique challenges. Because of pitfalls in routine diagnostic imaging, a high level of clinical suspicion must be maintained to avoid overlooking the possibility that worsening heart failure is a consequence of mechanical interference with TV leaflet mobility or coaptation and is amenable to lead extraction or valve repair or replacement. The future of cardiac implantable electronic devices includes pacing and perhaps defibrillation without a lead traversing the TV. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gamma radiation and its role in bio prosthetic aortic valves implanted in rat hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamas, Gloria I.; Kairiyama, Eulogia; Navia, Jose

    2000-01-01

    Porcine heart valves glutaraldehyde fixed are implanted in patients with valvular deterioration. Mineralization may be the major factor in the long-term failure of tissue bio prosthesis. Gamma radiation randomly breaks some glutaraldehyde cross-links. As a consequence of irradiation, the polymeric fibers belonging to the valvular tissue are broken too, leading to sites of collagen fiber disorganisation. It is well known that the collagen fibers may act as a passive nucleator of salts where the calcium phosphate salts precipitate. This salt concentration has been described in association with disintegrated sites of protein fiber, which may favour new sites where the calcium salts would be deposit. The irradiation process is a technique used for sterilization of porcine heart valve. The main objective of this work was to study the effect of different doses of gamma radiation on the calcification process of subcutaneously implanted valves in rats. Small pieces from glutaraldehyde fixed valves, irradiated to different doses with a 60 Co sources were implanted subcutaneously in rats. The calcium was measured by X-ray and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In our experimental conditions and at the radiation doses used in these tests, the calcium measurements on control and irradiated material were not significantly different. We conclude that, at the employed doses, the gamma radiation does not alter the process. (author) [es

  6. Impact of Early Valve Surgery on Outcome of Staphylococcus aureus Prosthetic Valve Infective Endocarditis: Analysis in the International Collaboration of Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirouze, Catherine; Alla, François; Fowler, Vance G.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.; Wang, Andrew; Erpelding, Marie-Line; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Hannan, Margaret M.; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Miró, José M.; Muñoz, Patricia; Murdoch, David R.; Tattevin, Pierre; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Hoen, Bruno; Clara, Liliana; Sanchez, Marisa; Nacinovich, Francisco; Oses, Pablo Fernandez; Ronderos, Ricardo; Sucari, Adriana; Thierer, Jorge; Casabé, José; Cortes, Claudia; Altclas, Javier; Kogan, Silvia; Spelman, Denis; Athan, Eugene; Harris, Owen; Kennedy, Karina; Tan, Ren; Gordon, David; Papanicolas, Lito; Eisen, Damon; Grigg, Leeanne; Street, Alan; Korman, Tony; Kotsanas, Despina; Dever, Robyn; Jones, Phillip; Konecny, Pam; Lawrence, Richard; Rees, David; Ryan, Suzanne; Feneley, Michael P.; Harkness, John; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Jones, Phillip; Ryan, Suzanne; Jones, Phillip; Post, Jeffrey; Reinbott, Porl; Ryan, Suzanne; Gattringer, Rainer; Wiesbauer, Franz; Andrade, Adriana Ribas; de Brito, Ana Cláudia Passos; Guimarães, Armenio Costa; Grinberg, Max; Mansur, Alfredo José; Siciliano, Rinaldo Focaccia; Strabelli, Tania Mara Varejao; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; de Medeiros Tranchesi, Regina Aparecida; Paiva, Marcelo Goulart; Fortes, Claudio Querido; de Oliveira Ramos, Auristela; Ferraiuoli, Giovanna; Golebiovski, Wilma; Lamas, Cristiane; Santos, Marisa; Weksler, Clara; Karlowsky, James A.; Keynan, Yoav; Morris, Andrew M.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Jones, Sandra Braun; Garcia, Patricia; Cereceda, M; Fica, Alberto; Mella, Rodrigo Montagna; Barsic, Bruno; Bukovski, Suzana; Krajinovic, Vladimir; Pangercic, Ana; Rudez, Igor; Vincelj, Josip; Freiberger, Tomas; Pol, Jiri; Zaloudikova, Barbora; Ashour, Zainab; El Kholy, Amani; Mishaal, Marwa; Rizk, Hussien; Aissa, Neijla; Alauzet, Corentine; Alla, Francois; Campagnac, Catherine; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Selton-Suty, Christine; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier; Thuny, Franck; Delahaye, François; Delahaye, Armelle; Vandenesch, Francois; Donal, Erwan; Donnio, Pierre Yves; Michelet, Christian; Revest, Matthieu; Tattevin, Pierre; Violette, Jérémie; Chevalier, Florent; Jeu, Antoine; Sorel, Claire; Tribouilloy, Christophe; Bernard, Yvette; Chirouze, Catherine; Hoen, Bruno; Leroy, Joel; Plesiat, Patrick; Naber, Christoph; Neuerburg, Carl; Mazaheri, Bahram; Naber, Christoph; Neuerburg, Carl; Athanasia, Sofia; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Mylona, Elena; Paniara, Olga; Papanicolaou, Konstantinos; Pyros, John; Skoutelis, Athanasios; Sharma, Gautam; Francis, Johnson; Nair, Lathi; Thomas, Vinod; Venugopal, Krishnan; Hannan, Margaret; Hurley, John; Gilon, Dan; Israel, Sarah; Korem, Maya; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Rubinstein, Ethan; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Casillo, Roberta; Cuccurullo, Susanna; Dialetto, Giovanni; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele; Irene, Mattucci; Ragone, Enrico; Tripodi, Marie Françoise; Utili, Riccardo; Cecchi, Enrico; De Rosa, Francesco; Forno, Davide; Imazio, Massimo; Trinchero, Rita; Tebini, Alessandro; Grossi, Paolo; Lattanzio, Mariangela; Toniolo, Antonio; Goglio, Antonio; Raglio, Annibale; Ravasio, Veronica; Rizzi, Marco; Suter, Fredy; Carosi, Giampiero; Magri, Silvia; Signorini, Liana; Baban, Tania; Kanafani, Zeina; Kanj, Souha S.; Yasmine, Mohamad; Abidin, Imran; Tamin, Syahidah Syed; Martínez, Eduardo Rivera; Soto Nieto, Gabriel Israel; van der Meer, Jan T.M.; Chambers, Stephen; Holland, David; Morris, Arthur; Raymond, Nigel; Read, Kerry; Murdoch, David R.; Dragulescu, Stefan; Ionac, Adina; Mornos, Cristian; Butkevich, O.M.; Chipigina, Natalia; Kirill, Ozerecky; Vadim, Kulichenko; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Edathodu, Jameela; Halim, Magid; Lum, Luh-Nah; Tan, Ru-San; Lejko-Zupanc, Tatjana; Logar, Mateja; Mueller-Premru, Manica; Commerford, Patrick; Commerford, Anita; Deetlefs, Eduan; Hansa, Cass; Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Almela, Manuel; Armero, Yolanda; Azqueta, Manuel; Castañeda, Ximena; Cervera, Carlos; del Rio, Ana; Falces, Carlos; Garcia-de-la-Maria, Cristina; Fita, Guillermina; Gatell, Jose M.; Marco, Francesc; Mestres, Carlos A.; Miró, José M.; Moreno, Asuncion; Ninot, Salvador; Paré, Carlos; Pericas, Joan; Ramirez, Jose; Rovira, Irene; Sitges, Marta; Anguera, Ignasi; Font, Bernat; Guma, Joan Raimon; Bermejo, Javier; Bouza, Emilio; Fernández, Miguel Angel Garcia; Gonzalez-Ramallo, Victor; Marín, Mercedes; Muñoz, Patricia; Pedromingo, Miguel; Roda, Jorge; Rodríguez-Créixems, Marta; Solis, Jorge; Almirante, Benito; Fernandez-Hidalgo, Nuria; Tornos, Pilar; de Alarcón, Arístides; Parra, Ricardo; Alestig, Eric; Johansson, Magnus; Olaison, Lars; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Pachirat, Orathai; Pachirat, Pimchitra; Pussadhamma, Burabha; Senthong, Vichai; Casey, Anna; Elliott, Tom; Lambert, Peter; Watkin, Richard; Eyton, Christina; Klein, John L.; Bradley, Suzanne; Kauffman, Carol; Bedimo, Roger; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Crowley, Anna Lisa; Douglas, Pamela; Drew, Laura; Fowler, Vance G.; Holland, Thomas; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Mudrick, Daniel; Samad, Zaniab; Sexton, Daniel; Stryjewski, Martin; Wang, Andrew; Woods, Christopher W.; Lerakis, Stamatios; Cantey, Robert; Steed, Lisa; Wray, Dannah; Dickerman, Stuart A.; Bonilla, Hector; DiPersio, Joseph; Salstrom, Sara-Jane; Baddley, John; Patel, Mukesh; Peterson, Gail; Stancoven, Amy; Afonso, Luis; Kulman, Theresa; Levine, Donald; Rybak, Michael; Cabell, Christopher H.; Baloch, Khaula; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Dixon, Christy C.; Fowler, Vance G.; Harding, Tina; Jones-Richmond, Marian; Pappas, Paul; Park, Lawrence P.; Redick, Thomas; Stafford, Judy; Anstrom, Kevin; Athan, Eugene; Bayer, Arnold S.; Cabell, Christopher H.; Chu, Vivian H.; Corey, G. Ralph; Fowler, Vance G.; Hoen, Bruno; Karchmer, A. W.; Miró, José M.; Murdoch, David R.; Sexton, Daniel J.; Wang, Andrew; Bayer, Arnold S.; Cabell, Christopher H.; Chu, Vivian; Corey, G. Ralph; Durack, David T.; Eykyn, Susannah; Fowler, Vance G.; Hoen, Bruno; Miró, José M.; Moreillon, Phillipe; Olaison, Lars; Raoult, Didier; Rubinstein, Ethan; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The impact of early valve surgery (EVS) on the outcome of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) prosthetic valve infective endocarditis (PVIE) is unresolved. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between EVS, performed within the first 60 days of hospitalization, and outcome of SA PVIE within the International Collaboration on Endocarditis–Prospective Cohort Study. Methods. Participants were enrolled between June 2000 and December 2006. Cox proportional hazards modeling that included surgery as a time-dependent covariate and propensity adjustment for likelihood to receive cardiac surgery was used to evaluate the impact of EVS and 1-year all-cause mortality on patients with definite left-sided S. aureus PVIE and no history of injection drug use. Results. EVS was performed in 74 of the 168 (44.3%) patients. One-year mortality was significantly higher among patients with S. aureus PVIE than in patients with non–S. aureus PVIE (48.2% vs 32.9%; P = .003). Staphylococcus aureus PVIE patients who underwent EVS had a significantly lower 1-year mortality rate (33.8% vs 59.1%; P = .001). In multivariate, propensity-adjusted models, EVS was not associated with 1-year mortality (risk ratio, 0.67 [95% confidence interval, .39–1.15]; P = .15). Conclusions. In this prospective, multinational cohort of patients with S. aureus PVIE, EVS was not associated with reduced 1-year mortality. The decision to pursue EVS should be individualized for each patient, based upon infection-specific characteristics rather than solely upon the microbiology of the infection causing PVIE. PMID:25389255

  7. Echocardiographic Assessment of Heart Valve Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordelli, Chiara; Severino, Sergio; Ascione, Luigi; Coppolino, Pasquale; Caso, Pio

    2014-01-01

    Patients submitted to valve replacement with mechanical or biological prosthesis, may present symptoms related either to valvular malfunction or ventricular dysfunction from other causes. Because a clinical examination is not sufficient to evaluate a prosthetic valve, several diagnostic methods have been proposed to assess the functional status of a prosthetic valve. This review provides an overview of echocardiographic and Doppler techniques useful in evaluation of prosthetic heart valves. Compared to native valves, echocardiographic evaluation of prosthetic valves is certainly more complex, both for the examination and the interpretation. Echocardiography also allows discriminating between intra- and/or peri-prosthetic regurgitation, present in the majority of mechanical valves. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) requires different angles of the probe with unconventional views. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is the method of choice in presence of technical difficulties. Three-dimensional (3D)-TEE seems to be superior to 2D-TEE, especially in the assessment of paravalvular leak regurgitation (PVL) that it provides improved localization and analysis of the PVL size and shape. PMID:28465917

  8. Successful management of multiple permanent pacemaker complications – infection, 13 year old silent lead perforation and exteriorisation following failed percutaneous extraction, superior vena cava obstruction, tricuspid valve endocarditis, pulmonary embolism and prosthetic tricuspid valve thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Pankaj; Adluri, Krishna; Javangula, Kalyana; Baig, Wasir

    2009-01-01

    A 59 year old man underwent mechanical tricuspid valve replacement and removal of pacemaker generator along with 4 pacemaker leads for pacemaker endocarditis and superior vena cava obstruction after an earlier percutaneous extraction had to be abandoned, 13 years ago, due to cardiac arrest, accompanied by silent, unsuspected right atrial perforation and exteriorisation of lead. Postoperative course was complicated by tricuspid valve thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism requiring TPA thrombolysis which was instantly successful. A review of literature of pacemaker endocarditis and tricuspid thrombosis along with the relevant management strategies is presented. We believe this case report is unusual on account of non operative management of right atrial lead perforation following an unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous removal of right sided infected pacemaker leads and the incidental discovery of the perforated lead 13 years later at sternotomy, presentation of pacemaker endocarditis with a massive load of vegetations along the entire pacemaker lead tract in superior vena cava, right atrial endocardium, tricuspid valve and right ventricular endocardium, leading to a functional and structural SVC obstruction, requirement of an unusually large dose of warfarin postoperatively occasioned, in all probability, by antibiotic drug interactions, presentation of tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis uniquely as vasovagal syncope and isolated hypoxia and near instantaneous resolution of tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis with Alteplase thrombolysis. PMID:19239701

  9. Successful management of multiple permanent pacemaker complications – infection, 13 year old silent lead perforation and exteriorisation following failed percutaneous extraction, superior vena cava obstruction, tricuspid valve endocarditis, pulmonary embolism and prosthetic tricuspid valve thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javangula Kalyana

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 59 year old man underwent mechanical tricuspid valve replacement and removal of pacemaker generator along with 4 pacemaker leads for pacemaker endocarditis and superior vena cava obstruction after an earlier percutaneous extraction had to be abandoned, 13 years ago, due to cardiac arrest, accompanied by silent, unsuspected right atrial perforation and exteriorisation of lead. Postoperative course was complicated by tricuspid valve thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism requiring TPA thrombolysis which was instantly successful. A review of literature of pacemaker endocarditis and tricuspid thrombosis along with the relevant management strategies is presented. We believe this case report is unusual on account of non operative management of right atrial lead perforation following an unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous removal of right sided infected pacemaker leads and the incidental discovery of the perforated lead 13 years later at sternotomy, presentation of pacemaker endocarditis with a massive load of vegetations along the entire pacemaker lead tract in superior vena cava, right atrial endocardium, tricuspid valve and right ventricular endocardium, leading to a functional and structural SVC obstruction, requirement of an unusually large dose of warfarin postoperatively occasioned, in all probability, by antibiotic drug interactions, presentation of tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis uniquely as vasovagal syncope and isolated hypoxia and near instantaneous resolution of tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis with Alteplase thrombolysis.

  10. Evaluation of prosthetic valve obstruction on electrocardiographically gated multidetector-row computed tomography--identification of subprosthetic pannus in the aortic position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Tomohiro; Teshima, Hideki; Fukunaga, Shuji; Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the diagnostic role of electrocardiographically gated multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for prosthetic valve obstruction (PVO) in the aortic position. Between 2002 and 2006, 9 patients were diagnosed with PVO of an aortic bileaflet mechanical valve based on echocardiographic and cineradiographic criteria. These 9 patients were examined using MDCT before replacement of the mechanical valve, and intraoperative findings were compared to morphologic periprosthetic abnormalities observed on MDCT. CT attenuation (Hounsfield units; HU) of the periprosthetic abnormalities was measured to investigate the underlying cause of the PVO. MDCT showed subprosthetic masses extending beyond the prosthetic ring into the orifice of the valve. At reoperation, presence of subprosthetic pannus was confirmed in all of the 9 patients, but no periprosthetic thrombus was found. The mean CT attenuation of the subprosthetic pannus was 170 HU, and it was significantly greater than that obtained from the interventricular septum (108 HU; Ppannus causing PVO and the mean CT attenuation of subprosthetic pannus is significantly higher than that of the interventricular septum on MDCT.

  11. Self-reported quality of life and health among Björk-Shiley convexo-concave prosthetic heart valve patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorello, L B; Kennedy, J A; Richmond, R A; Sieu, K L; Blot, W J; Harrison, D C

    2001-03-01

    The risk of fracture of Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (BSCC) prosthetic heart valves has resulted in consideration of prophylactic explantation and replacement for patients with high-risk valves. Little information exists on perceived quality of life, health status, and serious morbidity among BSCC patients, including those who have undergone explantation. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by a cohort of 585 BSCC patients who participated in an X-ray imaging study to detect precursors to valve fracture up to seven years (average 3.9 years) previously. Responses from 31 explant patients were contrasted with those from 554 BSCC patients in whom explant surgery was not attempted. Perceived quality of life and health status and risk of hospitalization after participating in the imaging study varied considerably among patients, but on average tended not to differ significantly between those with and without explants. A slightly greater proportion of explantees tended to report both improved health status and high rates of heart attack and pacemaker implantation. The health status of these patients was, in general, considerably worse than previously reported among valve implant patients. Over half the cohort were hospitalized during follow up, and half were unable to walk up more than one flight of stairs without shortness of breath. The less than optimal health status of most BSCC patients and relatively high rates of morbidity should be taken into account when considering potential explantation of the valves.

  12. Correlation of two-dimensional echocardiography and pathologic findings in porcine valve dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, M B; Phelan, B K; Robertson, R M; Virmani, R

    1985-02-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiographic findings in porcine valve dysfunction were compared with pathologic findings in 10 patients (12 valves). Three specific echocardiographic findings were identified in patients with regurgitant lesions: prolapse, fracture and flail leaflets. Prolapse was associated pathologically with thinning of the leaflets, longitudinal tears close to the ring margin and acid mucopolysaccharide accumulation. Valve fracture was seen with and without prolapse and was accompanied pathologically by small pinpoint perforations or tears of the leaflet. A flail leaflet was seen with a linear tear of the free margin and was associated with calcific deposits. Mild degrees of fracture seen pathologically were missed on the echocardiographic study in five patients. Thickening or calcification, when present in moderate or severe amounts, was correctly identified by echocardiography. When all abnormal features were considered collectively, two-dimensional echocardiography correctly identified at least one of them in all patients. Therefore, two-dimensional echocardiography may prove useful in assessing the source of valvular regurgitation in patients with bioprosthetic valves.

  13. The value of real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography in the assessment of paravalvular leak origin following prosthetic mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mustafa; Duran, Nilüfer Ekşi; Gökdeniz, Tayyar; Kaya, Hasan; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2009-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) echocardiographic approaches are not sufficient to determine the origin of paravalvular leak (PVL) that occurs after prosthetic mitral valve replacement (MVR). In this study, we investigated the role of real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (RT-3D TEE) in detecting the origin and size of PVL occurring after prosthetic MVR. The study included 13 patients (7 females; 6 males; mean age 56+/-10 years; range 37 to 71 years) who developed PVL within a mean of 8.3+/-3.8 years following mechanical prosthetic MVR. Nine patients (69.2%) had atrial fibrillation, and four patients (30.8%) had normal sinus rhythm. Four patients (30.8%) had hemolysis. Paravalvular leak was mild, moderate, and severe in two, six, and five patients, respectively. Real-time 3D TEE was performed using a 3D matrix-array TEE transducer immediately after detection of PVL on 2D TEE examination. Localization of PVL was made using a clock-wise format in relation to the aortic valve and the size of dehiscence was measured. The mean PVL width measured by 2D TEE was 3.00+/-0.92 mm. The mean length of dehiscence was 13.6+/-8.8 mm, and the mean width was 3.88+/-2.04 mm on RT-3D TEE. The PVLs were mainly localized in the posterior and anterior annular positions between 12 to 03 hours (n=7) and 06 to 09 hours (n=3) on RT-3D TEE, respectively, which corresponded to the posteromedial or anterolateral sectors of the posterior annulus. Considering that only the width of the PVL defect can be assessed by 2D TEE, delineation by RT-3D TEE includes the localization of PVL together with the length and width of the defect.

  14. Influence of three mechanical bileaflet prosthetic valve designs on the three-dimensional flow field inside a simulated aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Toshinosuke; Matsumoto, Akira

    2010-12-01

    The current design of the bileaflet valve, the leaflets of which open outside first, differs significantly from the natural valve whose leaflets open center first. This difference generates a completely different flow field in the bileaflet valve compared to that in the natural heart valve. In a previous study, it was demonstrated that the valve design greatly affects the aortic flow field as well as the circulatory flow inside sinuses of Valsalva, using saline solution as a working fluid. A limited discussion on the turbulence flow field that could be generated by the valve was provided. In this continuation of that study, therefore, a dynamic PIV study was conducted to analyze the influence of the heart valve design on the aortic flow field, and particularly on the turbulent profile. This study also aimed to determine the influence of the viscosity of the testing fluid. Three bileaflet prostheses-the St. Jude Medical (SJM), the On-X, and the MIRA valves-were tested under pulsatile flow conditions. Flow through the central orifice of the SJM valve was slower than that through the newer designs. The newer designs tend to show strong flow through all orifices. The On-X valve generates simple jet-type flow while the MIRA valve with circumferentially curved leaflets generates a strong but three-dimensionally diffuse flow, resulting in a more complex flow field downstream of the aortic valve with higher turbulence. A 180° orientation that is more popular clinically seems to provide a less diffuse flow than a 90° orientation. The effect of increasing the viscosity was found to be an increase in the flow velocity through the central orifice and a more organized flow field for all of the valves tested.

  15. Left Ventricular Function Improves after Pulmonary Valve Replacement in Patients with Previous Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Reconstruction and Biventricular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Colin; Kogon, Brian; Pernetz, Maria; McConnell, Michael; Kirshbom, Paul; Rodby, Katherine; Book, Wendy M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects that have a component of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, such as tetralogy of Fallot, are frequently palliated in childhood by disruption of the pulmonary valve. Although this can provide an initial improvement in quality of life, these patients are often left with severe pulmonary valve insufficiency. Over time, this insufficiency can lead to enlargement of the right ventricle and to the deterioration of right ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pulmonary valve replacement in these patients decreases right ventricular volume overload and improves right ventricular performance. To date, few studies have examined the effects of pulmonary valve replacement on left ventricular function in patients with biventricular dysfunction. We sought to perform such an evaluation. Records of adult patients who had undergone pulmonary valve replacement from January 2003 through November 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. We reviewed preoperative and postoperative echocardiograms and calculated left ventricular function in 38 patients. In the entire cohort, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by a mean of 0.07 after pulmonary valve replacement, which was a statistically significant change (P < 0.01). In patients with preoperative ejection fractions of less than 0.50, mean ejection fractions increased by 0.10. We conclude that pulmonary valve replacement in patients with biventricular dysfunction arising from severe pulmonary insufficiency and right ventricular enlargement can improve left ventricular function. Prospective studies are needed to verify this finding. PMID:21720459

  16. Rare early prosthesis obstruction after mitral valve replacement: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a dreadful complication after the mechanical heart valve replacement, prosthetic valve obstruction caused by pannus formation occurs increasingly with time. The authors here present a case of 42-year-old woman who was urgently admitted to hospital with acute heart failure symptoms due to the mechanical mitral valve failure only 3 months after surgery. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated that the bileaflet of the mitral prosthesis were completely immobilized with only a small transvalvular jet remained. During the reoperation, the reason of the prosthetic valve obstruction was attributed to the noncircular pannus ingrowth extending from the atrioventricular side. For a better understanding of the prosthetic valve dysfunction caused by pannus formation, the authors then compile a literature review to briefly discuss the status quo of the clinical characteristics of this uncommon complication.

  17. Tratamento clínico de endocardite em prótese valvar complicada por abscesso para-protético Successful medical management of prosthetic-valve endocarditis complicated by perivalvular abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Pereira Nunes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo relata o caso de um paciente do sexo masculino, 44 anos, com endocardite em prótese aórtica complicada por abscesso para-protético. Evoluiu com melhora do processo infeccioso apenas com o tratamento clínico. História prévia de doença reumática, submetido a três cirurgias cardíacas para troca valvar por disfunção de prótese e endocardite prévia. Neste relato de caso, discutiremos as características principais do abscesso para-protético como complicação de endocarditeWe present a case of a 44-year-old man with prosthetic aortic endocarditis complicated by a perivalvular abscess. He evolved with improvement of the infectious process only under clinical treatment. The patient presented a prior history of rheumatic fever and had previously been undergone three valve replacements due to prosthesis dysfunction and previous endocarditis. In this case report we discuss the main features of perivalvular abscess complicating infective endocarditis

  18. Long-term bladder dysfunction and renal function in boys with posterior urethral valves based on urodynamic findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.I. Ghanem (Mazen); K.P. Wolffenbuttel (Katja); A. de Vylder (Ann); R.J.M. Nijman (Rien)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Posterior urethral valves are the most common cause of congenital obstructive uropathy leading to renal failure in childhood. We investigate the influence of bladder dysfunction on renal function impairment. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 116

  19. Long-term bladder dysfunction and renal function in boys with posterior urethral valves based on urodynamic findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghanem, MA; Wolffenbuttel, KP; De Vylder, A; Nijman, RJ

    Purpose: Posterior urethral valves are the most common cause of congenital obstructive uropathy leading to renal failure in childhood. We investigate the influence of bladder dysfunction on renal function impairment. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 116 patients with

  20. Use of multidetector-row computed tomography scan to detect pannus formation in prosthetic mechanical aortic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladmawi, Mohamed A; Pragliola, Claudio; Vriz, Olga; Galzerano, Domenico

    2017-04-01

    Obstruction of a mechanical aortic valve by pannus formation at the subvalvular level is a major long-term complication of aortic valve replacement (AVR). In fact, pannus is sometime difficult to differentiate from patient-prosthesis mismatch or valve thrombosis. In most cases cine-angiography and echocardiography, either transthoracic or transesophageal, cannot correctly visualize the complication when the leaflets show a normal mobility. Recent technological refinements made this difficult diagnosis possible by ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) scan which shows adequate images in 90% of the cases and can differentiate pannus from fresh and organized thrombus.

  1. Mitral valve stenosis caused by abnormal pannus extension over the prosthetic ring and leaflets after Duran ring mitral annuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Junji; Minato, Naoki; Katayama, Yuji; Sato, Hisashi

    2009-01-01

    We treated a 61-year-old woman with mitral stenosis caused by pannus formation after Duran ring annuloplasty. Pannus overgrowth on the ring with extension onto both leaflets narrowed the mitral orifice and severely restricted the mobility of the valve leaflets. Mitral valve replacement with a St. Jude Medical mechanical heart valve prosthesis was successfully performed, and the postoperative course was uneventful. Patients undergoing Duran ring annuloplasty should be followed up with the consideration of possible mitral stenosis caused by pannus extension, as the cause for pannus formation remains unclear.

  2. Annular dynamics after mitral valve repair with different prosthetic rings: A real-time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Toda, Koichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Kawamura, Masashi; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Saito, Tetsuya; Ueno, Takayoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2016-09-01

    We assessed the effects of different types of prosthetic rings on mitral annular dynamics using real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE). RT3DE was performed in 44 patients, including patients undergoing mitral annuloplasty using the Cosgrove-Edwards flexible band (Group A, n = 10), the semi-rigid Sorin Memo 3D ring (Group B, n = 17), the semi-rigid Edwards Physio II ring (Group C, n = 7) and ten control subjects. Various annular diameters were measured throughout the cardiac cycle. We observed flexible anterior annulus motion in all of the groups except Group C. A flexible posterior annulus was only observed in Group B and the Control group. The mitral annular area changed during the cardiac cycle by 8.4 ± 3.2, 6.3 ± 2.0, 3.2 ± 1.3, and 11.6 ± 5.0 % in Group A, Group B, Group C, and the Control group, respectively. The dynamic diastolic to systolic change in mitral annular diameters was lost in Group C, while it was maintained in Group A, and to a good degree in Group B. In comparison to the Control group, the mitral annulus shape was more ellipsoid in Group B and Group C, and more circular in Group A. Although mitral regurgitation was well controlled by all of the types of rings that were utilized in the present study, we demonstrated that the annulus motion and annulus shape differed according to the type of prosthetic ring that was used, which might provide important information for the selection of an appropriate prosthetic ring.

  3. Stent fracture, valve dysfunction, and right ventricular outflow tract reintervention after transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation: patient-related and procedural risk factors in the US Melody Valve Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhinney, Doff B; Cheatham, John P; Jones, Thomas K; Lock, James E; Vincent, Julie A; Zahn, Evan M; Hellenbrand, William E

    2011-12-01

    Among patients undergoing transcatheter pulmonary valve (TPV) replacement with the Melody valve, risk factors for Melody stent fracture (MSF) and right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) reintervention have not been well defined. From January 2007 to January 2010, 150 patients (median age, 19 years) underwent TPV implantation in the Melody valve Investigational Device Exemption trial. Existing conduit stents from a prior catheterization were present in 37 patients (25%, fractured in 12); 1 or more new prestents were placed at the TPV implant catheterization in 51 patients. During follow-up (median, 30 months), MSF was diagnosed in 39 patients. Freedom from a diagnosis of MSF was 77±4% at 14 months (after the 1-year evaluation window) and 60±9% at 39 months (3-year window). On multivariable analysis, implant within an existing stent, new prestent, or bioprosthetic valve (combined variable) was associated with longer freedom from MSF (Pbioprosthetic valve was associated with lower risk of MSF and reintervention.

  4. Strut fracture and disc embolization of a Björk-Shiley mitral valve prosthesis: localization of embolized disc by computerized axial tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrieu, A J; Puglia, E; Allen, P

    1982-08-01

    The case of a patient who survived strut fracture and embolization of a Björk-Shiley mitral prosthetic disc is presented. Prompt surgical treatment was directly responsible for survival. In addition, computerized axial tomography of the abdomen aided in localizing and retrieving the embolized disc, which was lodged at the origin of the superior mesenteric artery. A review of similar case reports from the literature supports our conclusions that the development of acute heart failure and absent or muffled prosthetic heart sounds in a patient with a Björk-Shiley prosthetic heart valve inserted prior to 1978 should raise the possibility of valve dysfunction and lead to early reoperation.

  5. Delayed onset of tricuspid valve flow in repaired tetralogy of Fallot: an additional mechanism of diastolic dysfunction and interventricular dyssynchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Lee N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diastolic dysfunction of the right ventricle (RV is common after repair of tetralogy of Fallot. While restrictive physiology in late diastole has been well known, dysfunction in early diastole has not been described. The present study sought to assess the prevalence and mechanism of early diastolic dysfunction of the RV defined as delayed onset of the tricuspid valve (TV flow after TOF repair. Methods The study population consisted of 31 children with repaired TOF (mean age ± SD, 12.3 ± 4.1 years who underwent postoperative cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. The CMR protocol included simultaneous phase-contrast velocity mapping of the atrioventricular valves, which enabled direct comparison of the timing and patterns of tricuspid (TV and mitral (MV valve flow. The TV flow was defined to have delayed onset when its onset was > 20 ms later than the onset of the MV flow. The TV and MV flow from 14 normal children was used for comparison. The CMR results were correlated with the findings on echocardiography and electrocardiography. Result Delayed onset of the TV flow was observed in 16/31 patients and in none of the controls. The mean delay time was 64.81 ± 27.07 ms (8.7 ± 3.2% of R-R interval. The delay time correlated with the differences in duration of the TV and MV flow (55.94 ± 32.88 ms (r = 0.90, p Conclusions Early diastolic dysfunction with delayed onset of TV flow is common after TOF repair, and is associated with reduced RV ejection fraction. It is a further manifestation of interventricular dyssynchrony and represent an additional mechanism of ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  6. Biochemical and molecular characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes isolates from a prosthetic mitral heart valve-bearing patient´s blood cultures

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    Nilma Cintra Leal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Brazil, listeriosis is not a notifiable disease; thus, the incidence of Brazilian cases remains unknown. Listeria monocytogenes is not always included in automated systems, and its detection depends on the high skill level of microbiology laboratory professionals. This paper describes the characteristics of L. monocytogenes isolates fortuitously obtained from an endocarditis case in Recife, PE, Brazil. Methods: Six bacterial isolates obtained from six blood cultures from a 28-year-old male bearing a prosthetic mitral heart valve were analyzed by PCR using primers specific of L. monocytogenes to confirm a presumptive identification, determine the serotype and presence of the virulence genes (inlA, inlB, inlC, inlJ, hly, plcA, actA, prfA in an attempt to determine the Listeria genotype by PCR-ribotyping. Results: The samples were identified as L. monocytogenes 4b. All investigated virulence genes were amplified by PCR, and the identity of the amplified segments was confirmed by sequencing. A deletion of 105 base pairs was detected in the actA gene. All of the samples generated the same PCR-ribotype pattern, clustered into a single ribotype, and were considered a single strain. Conclusion: L. monocytogenes infection should be considered in endocarditis differential diagnoses, especially among high-risk groups, due to its high pathogenicity and the environmental ubiquity.

  7. BIOCHEMICAL AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERISTICS OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES ISOLATES FROM A PROSTHETIC MITRAL HEART VALVE-BEARING PATIENT´S BLOOD CULTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilma Cintra Lea

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Brazil, listeriosis is not a notifiable disease; thus, the incidence of Brazilian cases remains unknown. Listeria monocytogenes is not always included in automated systems, and its detection depends on the high skill level of microbiology laboratory professionals. This paper describes the characteristics of L. monocytogenes isolates fortuitously obtained from an endocarditis case in Recife, PE, Brazil. Methods: Six bacterial isolates obtained from six blood cultures from a 28-year-old male bearing a prosthetic mitral heart valve were analyzed by PCR using primers specific of L. monocytogenes to confirm a presumptive identification, determine the serotype and presence of the virulence genes (inlA, inlB, inlC, inlJ, hly, plcA, actA, prfA in an attempt to determine the Listeria genotype by PCR-ribotyping. Results: The samples were identified as L. monocytogenes 4b. All investigated virulence genes were amplified by PCR, and the identity of the amplified segments was confirmed by sequencing. A deletion of 105 base pairs was detected in the actA gene. All of the samples generated the same PCR-ribotype pattern, clustered into a single ribotype, and were considered a single strain. Conclusion: L. monocytogenes infection should be considered in endocarditis differential diagnoses, especially among high-risk groups, due to its high pathogenicity and the environmental ubiquity.

  8. Surgery for rheumatic mitral valve disease in sub-saharan African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, controversies exist on the choice between valve repair or prosthetic valve replacement. Although the advantages of mitral valve repair over prosthetic valve replacement in degenerative mitral disease are well established, this has not been the case for rheumatic lesions, where the use of prosthetic valves, ...

  9. Inter-ethnic differences in valve morphology, valvular dysfunction, and aortopathy between Asian and European patients with bicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, William K F; Regeer, Madelien V; Poh, Kian K; Yip, James W; van Rosendael, Philippe J; Yeo, Tiong C; Tay, Edgar; Kamperidis, Vasileios; van der Velde, Enno T; Mertens, Bart; Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Delgado, Victoria; Bax, Jeroen J

    2018-04-14

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been shown safe and feasible in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) morphology. Evaluation of inter-ethnic differences in valve morphology and function and aortic root dimensions in patients with BAV is important for the worldwide spread of this therapy in this subgroup of patients. Comparisons between large European and Asian cohorts of patients with BAV have not been performed, and potential differences between populations may have important implications for TAVR. The present study evaluated the differences in valve morphology and function and aortic root dimensions between two large cohorts of European and Asian patients with BAV. Aortic valve morphology was defined on transthoracic echocardiography according to the number of commissures and raphe: type 0 = no raphe and two commissures, type 1 = one raphe and two commissures, type 2 = two raphes and one commissure. Aortic stenosis and regurgitation were graded according to current recommendations. For this study, aortic root dimensions were manually measured on transthoracic echocardiograms at the level of the aortic annulus, sinus of Valsalva (SOV), sinotubular junction (STJ), and ascending aorta (AA). Of 1427 patients with BAV (45.2 ± 18.1 years, 71.9% men), 794 (55.6%) were Europeans and 633 (44.4%) were Asians. The groups were comparable in age and proportion of male sex. Asians had higher prevalence of type 1 BAV with raphe between right and non-coronary cusps than Europeans (19.7% vs. 13.6%, respectively; P < 0.001), whereas the Europeans had higher prevalence of type 0 BAV (two commissures, no raphe) than Asians (14.5% vs. 6.8%, respectively; P < 0.001). The prevalence of moderate and severe aortic regurgitation was higher in Europeans than Asians (44.2% vs. 26.8%, respectively; P < 0.001) whereas there were no differences in BAV with normal function or aortic stenosis. After adjusting for demographics, comorbidities

  10. Risks of fracture of Björk-Shiley 60 degree convexo-concave prosthetic heart valves: long-term cohort follow up in the UK, Netherlands and USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, W J; Omar, R Z; Kallewaard, M; Morton, L S; Fryzek, J P; Ibrahim, M A; Acheson, D; Taylor, K M; van der Graaf, Y

    2001-03-01

    Approximately 82,000 Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (BSCC) 60 degree prosthetic heart valves were implanted in patients worldwide between 1979 and 1986. Outlet strut fractures (OSF) of some of the valves were first reported shortly after their introduction. Here, the determinants of OSF are examined, and the between-country variation and long-term risk are assessed. Cohorts of patients in the UK, Netherlands and USA with 15,770 BSCC 60 degree heart valves were followed up to 18 years for the occurrence of OSF. Crude rates of OSF were highest in the UK (0.18% per year), intermediate in the Netherlands (0.13%), and lowest in the USA (0.06%), although risk factor adjustment reduced the inter-country differences. Furthermore, in the UK and Netherlands, OSF rates (particularly for mitral valves) declined with time since implantation, and between-country differences were considerably diminished 10 or more years post implantation. The risk of OSF decreased steadily with advancing patient age. Fracture rates were lower among women than men, and also varied significantly with valve size and position and OSF status of other valves in the same shoporder. This long-term follow up of BSCC 60 degree heart valve patients indicates that risk factors for valve fracture are generally similar in the UK, Netherlands and USA. It also identifies a strong association between fracture risk and age, newly reveals gender-related differences, and shows that the risk of valve fracture persisted, albeit at a reduced rate, into the 1990s.

  11. Transient severe left ventricular dysfunction following percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus closure in an adult with bicuspid aortic valve: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    HWANG, HUI-JEONG; YOON, KYUNG LIM; SOHN, IL SUK

    2016-01-01

    The present study reported the case of a 60-year-old female with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and a bicuspid aortic valve, who presented with transient severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction following percutaneous closure of PDA, as identified by speckle tracking analysis. Transient LV dysfunction following PDA closure has previously been reported; however, severe LV dysfunction is rare. In the present case, the combination of a large PDA size, large amount of shunting, LV remodeling and ...

  12. Survival after aortic valve replacement for severe aortic stenosis with low transvalvular gradients and severe left ventricular dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jeremy J.; Lauer, Michael S.; Bashir, Mohammad; Afridi, Imran; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Stewart, William J.; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.; Asher, Craig R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess whether aortic valve replacement (AVR) among patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS), severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and a low transvalvular gradient (TVG) is associated with improved survival. BACKGROUND: The optimal management of patients with severe AS with severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG remains controversial. METHODS: Between 1990 and 1998, we evaluated 68 patients who underwent AVR at our institution (AVR group) and 89 patients who did not undergo AVR (control group), with an aortic valve area < or = 0.75 cm(2), LV ejection fraction < or = 35% and mean gradient < or = 30 mm Hg. Using propensity analysis, survival was compared between a cohort of 39 patients in the AVR group and 56 patients in the control group. RESULTS: Despite well-matched baseline characteristics among propensity-matched patients, the one- and four-year survival rates were markedly improved in patients in the AVR group (82% and 78%), as compared with patients in the control group (41% and 15%; p < 0.0001). By multivariable analysis, the main predictor of improved survival was AVR (adjusted risk ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.39; p < 0.0001). The only other predictors of mortality were age and the serum creatinine level. CONCLUSIONS: Among select patients with severe AS, severe LV dysfunction and a low TVG, AVR was associated with significantly improved survival.

  13. Quantification of the antibody response to Propionibacterium acnes in a patient with prosthetic valve endocarditis: - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herren, T; Middendorp, M A; Zbinden, R

    2016-04-29

    The isolation of Propionibacterium acnes in blood cultures is often considered a contaminant. On rare occasions, P. acnes can cause severe infections, including endocarditis and intravascular prosthesis-associated infections. To evaluate the discrimination between a contaminant and a clinically relevant infection we used an Ouchterlony test system to quantify the antibody response to P. acnes in a patient with a proven P. acnes endocarditis. We report on a 64-year-old Caucasian man who developed P. acnes endocarditis four years following a composite valve-graft conduit replacement of the aortic root. Bacterial growth in blood cultures was detected after an incubation period of 6 days. However, the antibody titer to P. acnes was 1:8 at the time of diagnosis and declined slowly thereafter over 2½ years. The patient's response to the antibiotic treatment was excellent, and no surgical re-intervention was necessary. The working hypothesis of infective endocarditis can be substantiated by serologic testing, which, if positive, provides one additional minor criterion. Moreover, quantification of the antibody response to P. acnes, though not specific, may assist in the differentiation between contaminants and an infection. This quantification may have implications for the patient management, e.g. indication for and choice of the antibiotic therapy.

  14. Radiographic detection of single-leg fracture in Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave prosthetic valves: a phantom model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, I C; Cardella, J F; Fox, P S; Pae, W E; el-Ghamry Sabe, A A; Landis, J R; Localio, A R; Kunselman, A R; Hopper, K D

    1997-02-01

    Cineradiography can identify patients with single-leg fractured Björk-Shiley Convexo-Concave valves, although little is known about the sensitivity and specificity of this technique. We evaluated three normal and six (0 microm gap) single-leg fractured Björk-Shiley valves that were placed in a working phantom model. Valves were randomly imaged a total of 33 times and duplicated into a 120-valve series with a 1:9 ratio of abnormal/normal valves. Six reviewers independently graded each valve and demonstrated markedly different rates of identifying the fractured valves. Average sensitivity at the grade that clinically results in valve explanation was 47%. Among the normal valves, a correct identification was made 96% (range 91% to 99%) of the time. Present radiographic technology may have significant difficulty in identifying true single-leg fracture in Björk-Shiley valves with limb separations that are common among clinically explanted valves.

  15. Impact of recipient-related factors on structural dysfunction of xenoaortic bioprosthetic heart valves

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    Barbarash O

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Olga Barbarash, Natalya Rutkovskaya, Oksana Hryachkova, Olga Gruzdeva, Evgenya Uchasova, Anastasia Ponasenko, Natalya Kondyukova, Yuri Odarenko, Leonid Barbarash Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Diseases, Kemerovo, Russia Objective: To analyze the influence of recipient-related metabolic factors on the rate of structural dysfunction caused by the calcification of xenoaortic bioprostheses. Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed clinical status, calcium–phosphorus metabolism, and nonspecific markers of inflammatory response in bioprosthetic mitral valve recipients with calcific degeneration confirmed by histological and electron microscopic studies (group 1, n=22, and in those without degeneration (group 2, n=48. Results: Patients with confirmed calcification of bioprostheses were more likely to have a severe clinical state (functional class IV in 36% in group 1 versus 15% in group 2, P=0.03 and a longer cardiopulmonary bypass period (112.8±18.8 minutes in group 1 versus 97.2±23.6 minutes in group 2, P=0.02 during primary surgery. Patients in group 1 demonstrated moderate hypovitaminosis D (median 34.0, interquartile range [21.0; 49.4] vs 40 [27.2; 54.0] pmol/L, P>0.05, osteoprotegerin deficiency (82.5 [44.2; 115.4] vs 113.5 [65.7; 191.3] pg/mL, P>0.05 and osteopontin deficiency (4.5 [3.3; 7.7] vs 5.2 [4.1; 7.2] ng/mL, P>0.05, and significantly reduced bone-specific alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme (17.1 [12.2; 21.4] vs 22.3 [15.5; 30.5] U/L, P=0.01 and interleukin-8 levels (9.74 [9.19; 10.09] pg/mL vs 13.17 [9.72; 23.1] pg/mL, P=0.045 compared with group 2, with an overall increase in serum levels of proinflammatory markers. Conclusion: Possible predictors of the rate of calcific degeneration of bioprostheses include the degree of decompensated heart failure, the duration and invasiveness of surgery, and the characteristics of calcium–phosphorus homeostasis in

  16. Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation, stress-corrosion, and fracture-toughness behavior in pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite for prosthetic heart valve applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, R O; Dauskardt, R H; Yu, W K; Brendzel, A M

    1990-02-01

    Fracture-mechanics tests were performed to characterize the cyclic fatigue, stress-corrosion cracking, and fracture-toughness behavior of a pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite composite material used in the manufacture of cardiac valve prostheses. Testing was carried out using compact tension C(T) samples containing "atomically" sharp precracks, both in room-temperature air and principally in a simulated physiological environment of 37 degrees C Ringer's lactate solution. Under sustained (monotonic) loads, the composite exhibited resistance-curve behavior, with a fracture toughness (KIc) between 1.1 and 1.9 MPa square root of m, and subcritical stress-corrosion crack velocities (da/dt) which were a function of the stress intensity K raised to the 74th power (over the range approximately 10(-9) to over 10(-5) m/s). More importantly, contrary to common perception, under cyclic loading conditions the composite was found to display true (cyclic) fatigue failure in both environments; fatigue-crack growth rates (da/dN) were seen to be a function of the 19th power of the stress-intensity range delta K (over the range approximately 10(-11) to over 10(-8) m/cycle). As subcritical crack velocities under cyclic loading were found to be many orders of magnitude faster than those measured under equivalent monotonic loads and to occur at typically 45% lower stress-intensity levels, cyclic fatigue in pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite is reasoned to be a vital consideration in the design and life-prediction procedures of prosthetic devices manufactured from this material.

  17. Differentiation of thrombus from pannus as the cause of acquired mechanical prosthetic heart valve obstruction by non-invasive imaging: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Wilco; Habets, Jesse; van den Brink, Renee B A; Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P J; Chamuleau, Steven A J

    2014-02-01

    For acquired mechanical prosthetic heart valve (PHV) obstruction and suspicion on thrombosis, recently updated European Society of Cardiology guidelines advocate the confirmation of thrombus by transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and fluoroscopy. However, no evidence-based diagnostic algorithm is available for correct thrombus detection, although this is clinically important as fibrinolysis is contraindicated in non-thrombotic obstruction (isolated pannus). Here, we performed a review of the literature in order to propose a diagnostic algorithm. We performed a systematic search in Pubmed and Embase. Included publications were assessed on methodological quality based on the validated Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) II checklist. Studies were scarce (n = 15) and the majority were of moderate methodological quality. In total, 238 mechanical PHV's with acquired obstruction and a reliable reference standard were included for the evaluation of the role of fluoroscopy, echocardiography, or multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). In acquired PHV obstruction caused by thrombosis, mass detection by TEE and leaflet restriction detected by fluoroscopy were observed in the majority of cases (96 and 100%, respectively). In contrast, in acquired PHV obstruction free of thrombosis (pannus), leaflet restriction detected by fluoroscopy was absent in some cases (17%) and mass detection by TEE was absent in the majority of cases (66%). In case of mass detection by TEE, predictors for obstructive thrombus masses (compared with pannus masses) were leaflet restriction, soft echo density, and increased mass length. In situations of inconclusive echocardiography, MDCT may correctly detect pannus/thrombus based on the morphological aspects and localization. In acquired mechanical PHV obstruction without leaflet restriction and absent mass on TEE, obstructive PHV thrombosis cannot be confirmed and consequently, fibrinolysis

  18. Complete Transversal Disc Fracture in a Björk-Shiley Delrin Mitral Valve Prosthesis 43 Years After Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Santos, Jose María; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Dalmau-Sorlí, María José; Sastre-Rincón, Jose Alfonso; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Pérez-Losada, María Elena; Sagredo-Meneses, Víctor; López-Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    A patient who underwent previous implantation of a mitral valve replacement with a Björk-Shiley Delrin (BSD) mitral valve prosthesis during infancy was admitted to our institution 43 years later after an episode of syncope and cardiac arrest. Under extreme hemodynamic instability, a mitral valve prosthetic dysfunction causing massive mitral regurgitation was identified. The patient underwent an emergent cardiac operation, and a complete disc fracture with partial disc migration was found. Exceptional cases of mechanical prosthetic heart valve fracture exist. We report the first case of complete transversal disc rupture of a BSD mitral valve prosthesis after the longest period of implantation ever reported in that position. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors influencing mortality after bioprosthetic valve replacement; a midterm outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Hassan; Javadzadegan, Amir; Mehdizadeh Baghbani, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Although valve repair is applied routinely nowadays, particularly for mitral regurgitation (MR) or tricuspid regurgitation (TR), valve replacement using prosthetic valves is also common especially in adults. Unfortunately the valve with ideal hemodynamic performance and long-term durability without increasing the risk of bleeding due to long-term anticoagulant therapy has not been introduced. Therefore, patients and physicians must choose either bioprosthetic or mechanical valves. Currently, there is an increasing clinical trend of using bioprosthetic valves instead of mechanical valves even in young patients apparently because of their advantages. Seventy patients undergone valvular replacement using bioprosthetic valves were evaluated by ECG and Echocardiography to assess the rhythm and ejection fracture. Mean follow-up time was 33 months (min 9, max 92). Mortality rate was 25.9% (n=18) within 8 years of follow-up. Statistical analysis showed a significant relation between atrial fibrillation rhythm and mortality (P=0.02). Morbidities occurred in 30 patients (42.8%). Significant statistical relation was found between the morbidities and age over 65 years old (P=0.005). In follow-up period, 4 cases (5.7%) underwent re-operation due to global valve dysfunction. Our study shows that using biprosthetic valve could reduce the risk of morbidity occurrence in patient who needs valve replacement. However, if medical treatments fail, patients should be referred for surgery. This would reduce the risk of mortality because of lower incident of complications such as atrial fibrillation and morbidities due to younger patients' population.

  20. Evaluation of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic aortic heart valves by rest and dobutamine stress echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minardi Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prosthesis used for aortic valve replacement in patients with small aortic root can be too small in relation to body size, thus showing high transvalvular gradients at rest and/or under stress conditions. This study was carried out to evaluate rest and Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE hemodynamic response of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJMR-17 mm in relatively aged patients at mean 24 months follow-up. Methods and results The study population consisted of 19 patients (2 men, 17 women, mean age 69.2 ± 7.3 years. All patients underwent rest Doppler echocardiography before and after surgery and basal and DSE at follow up (infused at rate of 5 micrg/Kg/min and increased by 5 microg/Kg/min at 5 min intervals up to 40 microg/Kg/min. The following parameters were evaluated at rest and/or under DSE: heart rate (HR, ejection fraction (EF, cardiac output (CO, peak and mean velocity and pressure gradients (MxV, MnV, MxPG, MnPG, effective orifice area (EOA, indexed EOA (EOAi, left ventricular mass (LVM, indexed LVM (LVMi, Velocity Time Integral at left ventricular outflow tract (VTI LVOT and transvalvular (Aortic VTI, Doppler velocity index (DVI. At rest MxPG and MnPG were 29.2 ± 7.1 and 16.6 ± 5.8mmHg, respectively; EOA and EOAi resulted 1.14 ± 0.3 cm2 and 0.76 ± 0.2 cm2/m2; DVI was normal (0.50 ± 0.1. At follow-up LVM and LVMi decreased significantly from pre-operative value of 258 ± 43g and 157.4 ± 27.7g/m2 to 191 ± 23.8g and 114.5 ± 10.6g/m2, respectively. DSE increased significantly HR, CO, EF, MxGP (up to 83.4 ± 2 1.9mmHg, MnPG (up to 43.2 ± 12.7mmHg. EOA, EOAi, DVI increased insignificantly (from baseline up to 1.2 ± 0.4 cm2, 0.75 ± 0.3cm2/m2 and 0.48 ± 0.1 respectively. Two patients developed significant intraventricular gradients. Conclusion These data show that SJMR 17-mm prostheses can be safely implanted in aortic position in relatively aged patients, offering a satisfactory hemodynamic

  1. Transient severe left ventricular dysfunction following percutaneous patent ductus arteriosus closure in an adult with bicuspid aortic valve: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hui-Jeong; Yoon, Kyung Lim; Sohn, Il Suk

    2016-03-01

    The present study reported the case of a 60-year-old female with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and a bicuspid aortic valve, who presented with transient severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction following percutaneous closure of PDA, as identified by speckle tracking analysis. Transient LV dysfunction following PDA closure has previously been reported; however, severe LV dysfunction is rare. In the present case, the combination of a large PDA size, large amount of shunting, LV remodeling and bicuspid aortic valve may have induced serious deterioration of LV function following PDA closure. Furthermore, speckle-tracking echocardiography may be useful in the estimation of functional alterations in the myocardium of the LV following PDA closure. The observations detailed in the present study may improve the understanding of the pathophysiology and myocardial patterns of transient left ventricular dysfunction following PDA closure in adult humans.

  2. Subvalvular pannus and thrombosis in a mitral valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun Ha; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Kim, Dae-Hee; Jung, Sung-Ho; Lim, Tae-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female underwent cardiac CT to evaluate prosthetic valve (PHV) dysfunction detected on echocardiography. A CT coronal and en face views of the mitral annular plane showed a low-density, mass-like lesion on the left atrial side of the PHV and a high-density, plate-like lesion on the left ventricular side of PHV. A repeat of the mitral valve replacement was performed, and preoperative CT findings of both the thrombus on the left atrial side and pannus formation on the LV side were confirmed in the operative findings. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-year hemodynamic performance, left ventricular mass regression, and prosthetic-patient mismatch after rapid deployment aortic valve replacement in 287 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverich, Axel; Wahlers, Thorsten C; Borger, Michael A; Shrestha, Malakh; Kocher, Alfred A; Walther, Thomas; Roth, Matthias; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W; Kempfert, Joerg; Dohmen, Pascal M; Schmitz, Christoph; Rahmanian, Parwis; Wiedemann, Dominik; Duhay, Francis G; Laufer, Günther

    2014-12-01

    Superior aortic valve hemodynamic performance can accelerate left ventricular mass regression and enhance survival and functional status after surgical aortic valve replacement. This can be achieved by rapid deployment aortic valve replacement using a subannular balloon-expandable stent frame, which functionally widens and reshapes the left ventricular outflow tract, to ensure a larger effective orifice area compared with conventional surgical valves. We report the intermediate-term follow-up data from a large series of patients enrolled in the Surgical Treatment of Aortic Stenosis With a Next Generation Surgical Aortic Valve (TRITON) trial. In a prospective, multicenter (6 European hospitals), single-arm study, 287 patients with aortic stenosis underwent rapid deployment aortic valve replacement using a stented trileaflet bovine pericardial bioprosthesis. Core laboratory echocardiography was performed at baseline, discharge, and 3 months, 1 year, and 3 years after rapid deployment aortic valve replacement. The mean patient age was 75.7 ± 6.7 years (range, 45-93; 49.1% women). The mean aortic valve gradient significantly decreased from discharge to 3 years of follow-up. The mean effective orifice area remained stable from discharge to 3 years. At 1 year, the left ventricular mass index had decreased by 14% (P replacement using a subannular balloon-expandable stent frame demonstrated excellent hemodynamic performance and significant left ventricular mass regression. With continued follow-up, future studies will establish whether these favorable structural changes correlate with improvement in long-term survival and functional status. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Reoperative valve replacement in patients undergoing cardiac reoperation: a report of 104 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liang-jian; Xu, Zhi-yun; Wang, Zhi-nong; Lang, Xi-long; Han, Lin; Lu, Fang-lin; Xu, Ji-bin; Tang, Hao; Ji, Guang-yu; Wang, Er-song; Wang, Jun; Qu, Yi

    2010-08-15

    To review the experience of reoperative valve replacement for 104 patients. From January 2002 to December 2009, 104 patients underwent heart valve replacement in reoperations, accounting for 2.92% of the total patient population (3557 cases) who had valve replacement during this period. In this group, 53 male and 51 female patients were included with a median age of 46 years (ranged from 13 to 72 years). The reasons of reoperation included 28 cases suffered from another valve lesion after valve replacement, 10 cases suffered from valve lesion after mitral valvuloplasty, 19 cases suffered from perivalvular leakage after valve replacement, 18 cases suffered from valve lesion after previous correction of congenital heart defect, 7 cases suffered from bioprosthetic valve decline, 10 cases suffered from prosthetic valve endocarditis, 9 cases suffered from dysfunction of machine valve, and 3 cases suffered from other causes. The re-operations were mitral and aortic valve replacement in 2 cases, mitral valve replacement in 59 cases, aortic valve replacement in 24 cases, tricuspid valve replacement in 16 cases, and Bentall's operation in 3 cases. The interval from first operation to next operation was 1 month-19 years. There were 8 early deaths from heart failure, renal failure and multiple organ failure (early mortality 7.69%). Major complications were intraoperative hemorrhage in 2 cases, re-exploration for mediastinal bleeding in 2 cases and sternotomy surgical site infection in 1 case. Complete follow-up (3 months-7 years and 2 months) was available for all patients. Two patients died, one patient died of intracranial hemorrhage, and another cause was unknown. Satisfactory short-term and long-term results can be obtained in reoperative valve replacement with appropriate timing of operation control, satisfactory myocardial protection, accurate surgical procedure and suitable perioperative treatment.

  5. Impact of Aortic Valve Replacement on Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis and Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahmane Bakkali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aortic valve replacement on left ventricular function and remodeling among patients with severe aortic stenosis and severe left ventricular dysfunction. Methods: In this retrospective bicentric study extended over a 15-year period, 61 consecutive patients underwent isolated AVR for severe AS associated to reduced LV function. The mean age was 58.21 ± 12.50 years and 83.60 % were men. 70.50% of patients were in class III or IV NYHA. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 32.9 ± 5.6.The mean LVEDD and LVESD were respectively 63.6 ± 9.2 and 50.2 ± 8.8 mm. The mean calculated logistic EuroScore was 12.2 ±4.5. Results: The hospital mortality was 11.5%. Morbidity was marked mainly by low output syndrome in 40.8% of cases. After a median follow-up of 38 months we have recorded 3 deaths. Almost all survivors were in class I and II of NYHA. The mean LV end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters decreased significantly at late postoperative stage. The mean LV ejection fraction increased significantly from 32.9 ± 5.6 to 38.2 ± 9.3 and to 50.3 ± 9.6 in early and late postoperative stages, respectively. Multivariate linear regression analysis found that increased early postoperative LVEF (β= 0.44, 95% CI [0.14; 0.75], p=0.006 and low mean transprosthesis gradient (β=-0.72, 95% CI [-1.42; -0.02], p= 0.04 were the independent predictors of left ventricular systolic function recovery. Conclusion: Patients with aortic valve stenosis and impaired LV systolic function benefited from AVR as regard improvement of LV function parameters and regression of the LV diameters .This improvement depends mainly on early postoperative LVEF and mean transprosthesis gradient.

  6. The prognosis of infective endocarditis treated with biological valves versus mechanical valves: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ende; Wan, Li; Wang, WenJun; Luo, YunLong; Zeng, JinFu; Wu, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Surgery remains the primary form of treatment for infective endocarditis (IE). However, it is not clear what type of prosthetic valve provides a better prognosis. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the prognosis of infective endocarditis treated with biological valves to cases treated with mechanical valves. Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched from January 1960 to November 2016.Randomized controlled trials, retrospective cohorts and prospective studies comparing outcomes between biological valve and mechanical valve management for infective endocarditis were analyzed. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale(NOS) was used to evaluate the quality of the literature and extracted data, and Stata 12.0 software was used for the meta-analysis. A total of 11 publications were included; 10,754 cases were selected, involving 6776 cases of biological valves and 3,978 cases of mechanical valves. The all-cause mortality risk of the biological valve group was higher than that of the mechanical valve group (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.44, P = 0.023), as was early mortality (RR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.43, P = 0.033). The recurrence of endocarditis (HR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.42, P = 0.001), as well as the risk of reoperation (HR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.80, P = 0.010) were more likely to occur in the biological valve group. The incidence of postoperative embolism was less in the biological valve group than in the mechanical valve group, but this difference was not statistically significant (RR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.07, P = 0.245). For patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE), there was no significant difference in survival rates between the biological valve group and the mechanical valve group (HR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.21, P = 0.520). The results of our meta-analysis suggest that mechanical valves can provide a significantly better prognosis in patients with infective endocarditis. There were significant differences in the clinical features of patients

  7. Fluid-Structure Interaction Simulation of Prosthetic Aortic Valves: Comparison between Immersed Boundary and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Techniques for the Mesh Representation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M Bavo

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of FSI (fluid-structure interaction simulations in the analysis of the fluid-mechanics of heart valves is becoming more and more important, being able to capture the interaction between the blood and both the surrounding biological tissues and the valve itself. When setting up an FSI simulation, several choices have to be made to select the most suitable approach for the case of interest: in particular, to simulate flexible leaflet cardiac valves, the type of discretization of the fluid domain is crucial, which can be described with an ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian or an Eulerian formulation. The majority of the reported 3D heart valve FSI simulations are performed with the Eulerian formulation, allowing for large deformations of the domains without compromising the quality of the fluid grid. Nevertheless, it is known that the ALE-FSI approach guarantees more accurate results at the interface between the solid and the fluid. The goal of this paper is to describe the same aortic valve model in the two cases, comparing the performances of an ALE-based FSI solution and an Eulerian-based FSI approach. After a first simplified 2D case, the aortic geometry was considered in a full 3D set-up. The model was kept as similar as possible in the two settings, to better compare the simulations' outcomes. Although for the 2D case the differences were unsubstantial, in our experience the performance of a full 3D ALE-FSI simulation was significantly limited by the technical problems and requirements inherent to the ALE formulation, mainly related to the mesh motion and deformation of the fluid domain. As a secondary outcome of this work, it is important to point out that the choice of the solver also influenced the reliability of the final results.

  8. Prosthetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the household and community environments may lead to falls and injuries. This research aims to develop an ankle that can invert and evert and thereby control the center of pressure under the prosthetic foot; enhancing balance and stability of lower limb amputees. Foot-Ankle ...

  9. On the fractography of overload, stress corrosion, and cyclic fatigue failures in pyrolytic-carbon materials used in prosthetic heart-valve devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, R O; Dauskardt, R H; Pennisi, F J

    1992-01-01

    A scanning electron microscopy study is reported of the nature and morphology of fracture surfaces in pyrocarbons commonly used for the manufacture of mechanical heart-valve prostheses. Specifically, silicon-alloyed low-temperature-isotropic (LTI)-pyrolytic carbon is examined, both as a coating on graphite and as a monolithic material, following overload, stress corrosion (static fatigue), and cyclic fatigue failures in a simulated physiological environment of 37 degrees C Ringer's solution. It is found that, in contrast to most metallic materials yet in keeping with many ceramics, there are no distinct fracture morphologies in pyro-carbons which are characteristic of a specific mode of loading; fracture surfaces appear to be identical for both catastrophic and subcritical crack growth under either sustained or cyclic loading. We conclude that caution should be used in assigning the likely cause of failure of pyrolytic carbon heart-valve components using fractographic examination.

  10. Acute obstruction by Pannus in patients with aortic medtronic-hall valves: 30 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellensen, Vegard Skalstad; Andersen, Knut Sverre; Vitale, Nicola; Davidsen, Einar Skulstad; Segadal, Leidulf; Haaverstad, Rune

    2013-12-01

    Acute dysfunction of mechanical aortic valve prostheses is a life-threatening adverse event. Pannus overgrowth, which is fibroelastic hyperplasia originating from the periannular area, is one cause of dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine the annual incidence of readmittance resulting from acute obstruction caused by pannus during 30 years of observation in patients with Medtronic-Hall aortic valve prostheses and to analyze the risk factors associated with pannus development. From 1982 to 2004, 1,187 patients in our department underwent aortic valve replacement with Medtronic-Hall mechanical monoleaflet valve prostheses. As of December 31, 2012, 27 of these patients (2.3%) had presented with acute valve dysfunction caused by pannus obstruction. The annual incidence of pannus was 0.7 per 1,000. The median time from the primary operation to prosthetic dysfunction was 11.1 years (range, 1.2 to 26.8 years). Of the 20 patients who underwent reoperation, 2 died. Seven patients died before reoperation. Women had a higher risk for the development of obstructing pannus, and patients with pannus obstruction were younger. Valve size was not an independent risk factor. Women and younger patients are at higher risk for pannus development. When acute dysfunction by pannus is suspected in a mechanical aortic valve, an immediate echocardiogram and an emergency aortic valve replacement should be carried out because of the potential of a fatal outcome. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ten-year results of the Freedom Solo stentless heart valve: excellent haemodynamics but progressive valve dysfunction in the long term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponga, Sandro; Barbera, Mila Della; Pavoni, Daisy; Lechiancole, Andrea; Mazzaro, Enzo; Valente, Marialuisa; Nucifora, Gaetano; Thiene, Gaetano; Livi, Ugolino

    2017-05-01

    Freedom Solo (FS) is a pericardial stentless heart valve showing excellent haemodynamic performance at mid-term. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term performance of such bioprostheses. Between December 2004 and November 2009, 109 patients (31 men; mean age 76 ± 6 years) underwent aortic valve replacement with FS. Preoperatively, the mean NYHA class was 2.5 ± 0.7, the mean EuroSCORE II, 2.8 ± 2.5. Mean prosthesis size was 22.7 ± 1.9 mm; concomitant procedures were performed in 65 patients. Structural valve deterioration (SVD) was diagnosed according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 definition. Two patients (1.8%) died within 30 days. Follow-up (72 ± 36 months) was 100% completed. The 1-, 5- and 10-year actuarial survival rates were 89, 73 and 42%, respectively, with 8 valve-related deaths; the actuarial freedom from SVD was 99, 93 and 76%. During 61 ± 39 months of follow-up, echocardiographic findings worsened progressively: At discharge, 3-5 and 7-9 years, the mean gradient was 8 ± 4, 12 ± 11 and 19 ± 19 mmHg ( P  < 0.01); the indexed effective orifice area was 1.0 ± 0.2, 0.9 ± 0.2 and 0.8 ± 0.3 cm 2 /m 2 ( P  < 0.01). Of the 13 patients who developed SVD, it was due to aortic stenosis in 11. SVD was a predictor of cardiovascular mortality at univariate analysis (HR 2.87, 1.12-7.29); 2 explanted prostheses showed massive calcium deposits with mean calcium and phosphorus contents of 234 ± 16 and 116 ± 7 mg/g dry weight, respectively. The FS bioprosthesis shows excellent mid-term clinical and haemodynamic results and offers an alternative to other valves, particularly in the case of a small aortic annulus. Worsening of FS performance was observed at late follow-up because of progressive SVD with stenosis, questioning whether it should be used in patients with a long life expectancy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  12. Disc dislodgment in Björk Shiley mitral valve prosthesis: two successfully operated cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubernet, J; Irarrázaval, M J; Urzúa, J; Maturana, G; Morán, S; Lema, G; Asenjo, F; Fajuri, A

    1986-02-01

    Two patients with Björk Shiley mitral valve replacement had migration and embolization of the occluding disc. One patient suffered migration of the disc a few hours after surgery and the other had a strut fracture with disc translocation six years after the initial operation. Clinical signs in both cases were pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, and absence of prosthetic sounds. Both patients were reoperated on an emergency basis, recovering after a complicated postoperative course. They are on functional Class I, 8 and 1 years later, respectively, with their dislodged discs still in the abdominal aorta. The only hope for survival in these patients is emergency reoperation, once the prosthetic mitral valve dysfunction is confirmed.

  13. Comparison of outcomes of tricuspid annuloplasty with 3D-rigid versus flexible prosthetic ring for functional tricuspid regurgitation secondary to rheumatic mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiping; Liu, Xiancheng; Wang, Xin; Lv, Zhenqian; Liu, Xiaojun; Xu, Ping

    2016-11-01

    Annuloplasty bands and rings are widely used for repairing functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR). However, the question regarding which is the ideal annuloplasty device remains unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and mid-term durability of tricuspid ring annuloplasty for FTR secondary to rheumatic mitral valve disease using flexible Cosgrove-Edwards band and the rigid Edwards MC3 ring (Edwards Lifesciences, LLC, Irvine, CA, USA). We retrospectively collected the clinical data of those who underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) in concomitant with tricuspid ring annuloplasty from 2009 to 2013. The flexible band was used in 46 patients (flexible group), and the 3D rigid ring was used in 60 patients (rigid group). Echocardiographic evaluation of tricuspid function was performed preoperatively and postoperatively. The grade of TR was significantly improved compared to preoperative values in two groups. There was no significant difference regarding postoperative TR grade between the two groups at 1 week and 2-3 months but there was statistical significant difference at postoperative 6-12 months, and 2-3 years. During the follow up period, 25 of 46 patients (54.3%) in flexible group and 22 of 60 patients (30.3%) in rigid group developed recurrent TR. Freedom from recurrent TR in flexible group is significant lower than rigid group in each postoperative follow up period. These findings suggest that 3D rigid ring annuloplasty might be more effective for tricuspid ring annuloplasty in FTR in mid-term postoperative periods when compared to flexible band.

  14. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation in patients with dysfunction of a "native" right ventricular outflow tract - Mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Stanimir; Tanase, Daniel; Ewert, Peter; Meierhofer, Christian; Hager, Alfred; von Ohain, Jelena Pabst; Eicken, Andreas

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility and mid-term results of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) in patients with conduit free or "native" right ventricular outflow tracts (RVOT). We identified all 18 patients with conduit free or "native" right ventricular outflow tract, who were treated with percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) in our institution. They were divided into two groups - these in whom the central pulmonary artery was used as an anchoring point for the preparation of the landing zone (n=10) for PPVI and these, in whom a pulmonary artery branch was used for this purpose (n=8). PPVI was performed successfully in all patients with significant immediate RVOT gradient and pulmonary regurgitation grade reduction. Four patients had insignificant paravalvular regurgitation. In one patient the valve was explanted after 4months because of bacterial endocarditis. A follow-up of 19 (4-60) months showed sustained good function of the other implanted valves. The MRI indexed right ventricular end diastolic volume significantly decreased from 108(54-174) ml/m 2 before the procedure to 76(60-126) ml/m 2 six months after PPVI, p=0.01. PPVI is feasible with good mid-term results in selected patients with a "native" RVOT without a previously implanted conduit. Creating a stable landing zone with a diameter less than the largest available valve (currently 29mm) is crucial for the technical success of the procedure. Further studies and the development of new devices could widen the indications for this novel treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Left atrial volume index as a predictor for persistent left ventricular dysfunction after aortic valve surgery in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: the role of early postoperative echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, In-Jeong; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Geu-Ru; Heo, Ran; Sung, Ji Min; Lee, Sang-Eun; Chang, Byung-Chul; Shim, Chi Young; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to explore whether echocardiographic measurements during the early postoperative period can predict persistent left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) after aortic valve surgery in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation (AR). We prospectively recruited 54 patients (59 ± 12 years) with isolated chronic severe AR who subsequently underwent aortic valve surgery. Standard transthoracic echocardiography was performed before the operation, during the early postoperative period (≤2 weeks), and then 1 year after the surgery. Twelve patients with preoperative LVSD demonstrated LVSD at early after the surgery. Of the 42 patients without LVSD at preoperative echocardiography, 15 patients (36%) developed early postoperative LVSD after surgical correction. All 27 patients without LVSD at early postoperative echocardiography maintained LV function at 1 year after surgery. In the other 27 patients with postoperative LVSD, 17 patients recovered from LVSD and 10 patients did not at 1 year after surgery. Multiple logistic analysis demonstrated that postoperative left atrial volume index (LAVI) was the only independent predictor for persistent LVSD at 1 year after surgery in patients with postoperative LVSD (OR 1.180, 95% CI, 1.003-1.390, P = 0.046). The optimal LAVI cutoff value (>34.9 mL/m(2) ) had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 88% for the prediction of persistent LVSD. Prevalence of early postoperative LVSD was relatively high, even in the patients without LVSD at preoperative echocardiography. Postoperative LAVI could be useful to predict persistent LVSD after aortic valve surgery in patients with early postoperative LVSD. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen....... We report the first case of surgical valve replacement in a patient with a dysfunctional transcatheter-implanted aortic valve prosthesis 4 months after implantation....

  17. Trans-apical aortic valve implantation in a patient with stentless valve degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; MacCarthy, Philip; Monaghan, Mark; Wendler, Olaf

    2011-06-01

    Trans-apical valve-in-valve trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has successfully been performed in selected, high-risk patients, who suffered prosthetic degeneration after aortic valve replacement using stented xenografts. We report the case of a 79-year-old male patient who underwent one of the first successful TAVIs in a failing stentless bioprosthesis. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors Influencing Mortality after Bioprosthetic Valve Replacement; A Midterm Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Javadzadegan; Amir Javadzadegan; Jafar Mehdizadeh Baghbani

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although valve repair is applied routinely nowadays, particularly for mitral regurgitation (MR) or tricuspid regurgitation (TR), valve replacement using prosthetic valves is also common especially in adults. Unfortunately the valve with ideal hemodynamic performance and long-term durability without increasing the risk of bleeding due to long-term anticoagulant therapy has not been introduced. Therefore, patients and physicians must choose either bioprosthetic or mechanical valve...

  19. Estudo comparativo das características fluidodinâmicas de próteses valvulares biológicas de pericárdio bovino de perfil alto e baixo Comparative study of fluid dynamic characteristics in high and low biological prosthetic heart valves from bovine pericardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron J. P Andrade

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available O comportamento fluidodinâmico e a vida útil média de uma prótese valvular cardíaca são características muito importantes na escolha do modelo de prótese a ser implantada em um determinado paciente. Por esse motivo, foi realizado um estudo comparativo entre as válvulas biológicas de perfil alto e baixo, para se verificarem possíveis alterações na vida média, gradiente de pressão e refluxo, causadas pela diminuição do perfil dessas próteses. Com o auxílio de um duplicador de pulso, foram analisadas cinco próteses de perfil alto e cinco de perfil baixo, todas tamanho 29, fabricadas no Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia (IDPC. Mantendo-se a freqüência de batimentos em 100 bpm e a diferença de pressão em 1000 mmHg, verificou-se que a vida útil média da válvula de perfil baixo permaneceu equivalente à de perfil alto. Em outro equipamento, denominado simulador cardíaco, as próteses foram submetidas a condições semelhantes às condições fisiológicas de funcionamento para uma freqüência cardíaca de 75 bpm. Os resultados mostraram que o volume de retorno necessário para fechamento (refluxo, nas válvulas de perfil baixo, é menor do que nas de perfil alto. Isso traz um melhor aproveitamento do efeito de bombeamento do coração. As perdas de carga das válvulas foram comparadas através dos gradientes máximos de pressão visibilizados com a sobreposição dos sinais de pressão. Observou-se que as válvulas de perfil baixo oferecem menos resistência ao fluxo; assim, quando são implantadas, possibilitam uma passagem mais livre e desobstruída do sangue.The fluid dynamic performance and lifetime of a prosthetic heart valve are one of the most important characteristics to determine the choice of what prosthesis must be applied to a patient. Because of this, two different biological prosthetic heart valves profiles (one high profile and other low profile were studied, to verify possible alterations of working

  20. Evolving Concepts in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhoff, F.

    2015-01-01

    Part I of the present thesis is dedicated to implantation technique and the clinical performance of new valve prostheses. A satisfactory TAVI result not solely depends on patient characteristics, but also relies on proper valve positioning and final placement. Moreover, prosthetic design is

  1. [Late complications following Björk-Shiley and St. Jude Medical heart valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, D; Körfer, R; Budde, T; Haerten, K; Schulte, H D; Bircks, W; Loogen, F

    1983-05-01

    Valve-related complications after Björk-Shiley mitral (n = 475), aortic (n = 424), or mitral-aortic implantation (n = 119) were compared to complications after St. Jude mitral (n = 173), aortic (n = 152), and St. Jude mitral and aortic (n = 63) replacements. The 1,018 consecutive patients with Björk-Shiley valves had been operated upon between 1974 and 1982, those with St. Jude valves between 1978 and 1982. All patients were placed on anticoagulant therapy with phenprocoumon early after operation and no significant intergroup differences in the effectiveness of the anticoagulant therapy were found. At a comparable follow-up time of approximately 23 months, 24 major thromboembolic episodes were observed after Björk-Shiley mitral (BSM) and 3 after St. Jude mitral valve implantation (SJM), corresponding to a thromboembolic rate of 2.82/100 patient years with BSM and 0.93/100 patient years with SJM. After aortic valve replacements, 1.93 events in 100 patient years occurred after Björk-Shiley aortic (BSA) and 0.73 after St. Jude aortic implantation (SJA). In patients with double valve replacements, these rates were 3.2 (BSM + BSA) and 0.88 (SJM + SJA), respectively. The cerebral vessels were involved in 52% and the arteries of the extremities in 22% of these major events. Six Björk-Shiley prostheses had to be replaced because of valve thrombosis. The overall incidence of severe hemorrhagic complications was 2.94/100 patient years in BSM and 1.79 in SJM. After aortic valve replacement, we found rates of 1.80/100 patient years (BSA) and 2.57/100 patient years (SJA), respectively. Intravascular hemolysis no longer seems to be a significant clinical problem. However, indications of red cell damage after heart valve replacement were significantly greater in patients with perivalvular leakage, valve thrombosis, or dysfunction than in those with normally functioning prostheses. Reoperations were necessary because of valve thrombosis (0.46%), perivalvular leakage (2

  2. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  3. Detection of a prosthetic aortic valvular abscess with indium-111-labeled leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    An unsuspected annular abscess at the base of a prosthetic aortic valve in a patient with endocarditis was identified by indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy alone. This highly sensitive and specific technique expediently demonstrated the surgically proven inflammatory focus.

  4. Detection of a prosthetic aortic valvular abscess with indium-111-labeled leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    An unsuspected annular abscess at the base of a prosthetic aortic valve in a patient with endocarditis was identified by indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy alone. This highly sensitive and specific technique expediently demonstrated the surgically proven inflammatory focus

  5. Late thrombosis of a mitral bioprosthetic valve with associated massive left atrial thrombus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetham R Muskula

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An 84-year-old man presented 5 years after bioprosthetic mitral valve replacement with three months of worsening dyspnea on exertion. A new mitral stenosis murmur was noted on physical examination, and an electrocardiogram revealed newly recognized atrial fibrillation. Severe mitral stenosis (mean gradient = 13 mmHg was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed markedly thickened mitral bioprosthetic leaflets with limited mobility, and a massive left atrial thrombus (>4 cm in diameter (Fig. 1A, B, C, D and Videos 1, 2, 3 and 4. Intravenous heparin was initiated, and 5 days later, he was taken to the operating room for planned redo mitral valve replacement and left atrial thrombus extraction. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed near-complete resolution of the bioprosthetic leaflet thickening, and a mean mitral gradient of only 3 mmHg (Fig. 2A, B, C and Videos 5, 6 and 7. The patient underwent resection of the massive left atrial thrombus (Fig. 2D but did not require redo mitral valve replacement. He was initiated on heparin (and transitioned to warfarin early in the post-operative period, with complete resolution of dyspnea on exertion at 3-month follow-up. Bioprosthetic valve thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a cause of early prosthetic valve dysfunction (1, 2. This case illustrates that bioprosthetic valve thrombosis may occur years after valve replacement; therefore, any deterioration in a patient’s clinical status (new-onset dyspnea, heart failure or atrial fibrillation warrants a thorough evaluation of the bioprosthetic valve with transesophageal echocardiography. In this case, initiation of anticoagulation obviated the need for redo mitral valve replacement.

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis surgically replaced 4 months after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Hans Gustav; Lund, Jens Teglgaard; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a new and rapidly evolving treatment option for high-risk surgical patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis. Long-term results with these new valve prostheses are lacking, and potential valve dysfunction and failure would require valve replacemen...

  7. Indium-111 leukocyte localization in infected prosthetic graft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purnell, G.L.; Walker, C.W.; Allison, J.W.; Dalrymple, G.V. (Univ. of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Infective endocarditis can be difficult to prove, even in the face of strong clinical suspicion. A case in which standard methods of diagnosis failed to demonstrate endocarditis in a patient with recurrent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and porcine aortic valve is reported. An In-111 labelled leukocyte SPECT study demonstrated uptake in the aortic root and leaflets, and autopsy demonstrated vegetations on the leaflets. In-111 may prove useful in demonstrating endocarditis in patients with prosthetic valve infection.

  8. Indium-111 leukocyte localization in infected prosthetic graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purnell, G.L.; Walker, C.W.; Allison, J.W.; Dalrymple, G.V.

    1990-01-01

    Infective endocarditis can be difficult to prove, even in the face of strong clinical suspicion. A case in which standard methods of diagnosis failed to demonstrate endocarditis in a patient with recurrent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and porcine aortic valve is reported. An In-111 labelled leukocyte SPECT study demonstrated uptake in the aortic root and leaflets, and autopsy demonstrated vegetations on the leaflets. In-111 may prove useful in demonstrating endocarditis in patients with prosthetic valve infection

  9. Bjork-Shiley convexoconcave valves: Susceptibility artifacts at brain MR imaging and mechanical valve fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorp, Maarten J.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Bakker, Chris J. G.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Ramos, Lino M. P.; Mali, Willem P. T. M.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the relationship between heart valve history and susceptibility artifacts at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain in patients with Bjork-Shiley convexoconcave (BSCC) valves. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR images of the brain were obtained in 58 patients with prosthetic heart

  10. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  11. [Directions for reoperation of patients with Björk-Shiley convexo-concave valve prosthesis, based on long-term experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, F; Nakano, K; Endo, M; Hashimoto, A; Koyanagi, H

    1994-02-01

    Although a high incidence of strut fracture of the Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (C-C) valve prosthesis has been reported, it is still controversial whether the prosthesis functioning normally should be replaced electively. To clarify our policy for this issue, we reviewed 28 patients who had undergone mitral valve replacement with a C-C valve prosthesis, and evaluated long-term results according to STS guidelines. The incidence of valve-related complications expressed as % patient-year were; structural deterioration 0.30, nonstructural dysfunction 0.30, thromboembolism 1.20. There were no thrombosed valves, anticoagulant-related hemorrhage or prosthetic valve endocarditis. The actuarial free rate after valve replacement with the C-C at 10 years, constructed by the Kaplan-Meier method, were compared with those with St. Jude Medical (SJM) valve prosthesis. (1) Actuarial survival: 77.9 vs 87.3 (NS), (2) Reoperation-free: 91.6 vs 98.0 (p valve-related complications: 71.2 vs 77.7 (NS). The long-term results with the C-C were compatible to those with a SJM valve prosthesis. However, if a strut fracture occurs, it is very difficult to save the patient's life. The hospital mortality of re-replacement of valve prosthesis during the last 10 years, at our institute, was 2.6%, which is almost equal to the cumulative risk of strut fracture of the C-C valve after 10 years (3.0%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Björk-Shiley convexoconcave valves: susceptibility artifacts at brain MR imaging and mechanical valve fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gorp, Maarten J; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Mol, Bas A J M; Bakker, Chris J G; Witkamp, Theo D; Ramos, Lino M P; Mali, Willem P T M

    2004-03-01

    To assess the relationship between heart valve history and susceptibility artifacts at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain in patients with Björk-Shiley convexoconcave (BSCC) valves. MR images of the brain were obtained in 58 patients with prosthetic heart valves: 20 patients had BSCC valve replacements, and 38 had other types of heart valves. Two experienced neuroradiologists determined the presence or absence of susceptibility artifacts in a consensus reading. Artifacts were defined as characteristic black spots that were visible on T2*-weighted gradient-echo MR images. The statuses of the 20 explanted BSCC valves-specifically, whether they were intact or had an outlet strut fracture (OSF) or a single-leg fracture (SLF)-had been determined earlier. Number of artifacts seen at brain MR imaging was correlated with explanted valve status, and differences were analyzed with nonparametric statistical tests. Significantly more patients with BSCC valves (17 [85%] of 20 patients) than patients with other types of prosthetic valves (18 [47%] of 38 patients) had susceptibility artifacts at MR imaging (P =.005). BSCC valve OSFs were associated with a significantly higher number of artifacts than were intact BSCC valves (P =.01). No significant relationship between SLF and number of artifacts was observed. Susceptibility artifacts at brain MR imaging are not restricted to patients with BSCC valves. These artifacts can be seen on images obtained in patients with various other types of fractured and intact prosthetic heart valves. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  13. Percutaneous aortic valve implantation of the Medtronic CoreValve self-expanding valve prosthesis via left subclavian artery access: the first case report in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolias, George K; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Houri, Mazen; Sbarouni, Eftihia; Thomopoulou, Sofia; Tsiapras, Dimitrios; Smirli, Anna; Balanika, Marina; Voudris, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a percutaneous aortic valve implantation with the Medtronic CoreValve selfexpanding valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis. The approach was made via the left subclavian artery because of the lack of femoral vessel access. The patient was a 78-year-old female with breathlessness on minimal effort, a recent hospitalisation due to pulmonary oedema, and frequent episodes of pre-syncope; surgical valve replacement had been ruled out. The prosthetic valve was successfully implanted with mild paravalvular aortic regurgitation. At 30 days, the patient's clinical condition had significantly improved, with excellent functioning of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  14. Implante valve-in-valve transcateter em posição aórtica: uma mudança de seleção? Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation: a selection change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Felipe Gaia

    2012-09-01

    . Minimally invasive transcatheter aortic "valve-in-valve" implant appears to be an alternative, reducing morbidity and mortality. The objective is to evaluate aortic valve-in-valve procedure using Braile Inovare prosthesis. METHODS: The Braile Inovare prosthesis, transcatheter, expandable balloon, was used in 14 cases. Average EuroSCORE was 42.9%. All patients had double aortic bioprosthesis dysfunction. Procedures were performed in a surgical hybrid environment under echocardiographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Using left minithoracotomy prostheses were implanted through the ventricular apex under high-frequency ventricular pacing. Serial clinical and echocardiographic controls were performed. Follow-up ranged 1-30 months. RESULTS: Correct prosthetic deployment was obtained in all cases. There was no conversion. There was no operative mortality. The 30-day mortality was 14.3% (two cases. Ejection fraction increased significantly after the 7th postoperative day. Aortic gradient significantly reduced. The residual aortic regurgitation was not present. There were no vascular complications or complete atrioventricular block. CONCLUSION: The transcatheter "valve-in-valve" procedure for bioprosthesis dysfunction is safe with low morbidity. This possibility may change prosthesis choice during the first aortic valve replacement, favoring bioprostheses.

  15. Fluid mechanics of heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganathan, Ajit P; He, Zhaoming; Casey Jones, S

    2004-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is a life-threatening disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide and leads to approximately 250,000 valve repairs and/or replacements each year. Malfunction of a native valve impairs its efficient fluid mechanic/hemodynamic performance. Artificial heart valves have been used since 1960 to replace diseased native valves and have saved millions of lives. Unfortunately, despite four decades of use, these devices are less than ideal and lead to many complications. Many of these complications/problems are directly related to the fluid mechanics associated with the various mechanical and bioprosthetic valve designs. This review focuses on the state-of-the-art experimental and computational fluid mechanics of native and prosthetic heart valves in current clinical use. The fluid dynamic performance characteristics of caged-ball, tilting-disc, bileaflet mechanical valves and porcine and pericardial stented and nonstented bioprostheic valves are reviewed. Other issues related to heart valve performance, such as biomaterials, solid mechanics, tissue mechanics, and durability, are not addressed in this review.

  16. Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood. There are 4 valves in the heart: tricuspid, pulmonary, mitral, and aortic. Two types of problems can disrupt blood flow through the valves: regurgitation or stenosis. Regurgitation is also called insufficiency or incompetence. Regurgitation happens when a valve doesn’ ...

  17. Rehabilitation and Prosthetic Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Review Resources AT Education Blind Rehab Chiropractic Service Polytrauma/TBI Prosthetics & Sensory Aids Recreation Therapy More Health ... Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research (MIRECC) Military Exposures Polytrauma Rehabilitation Spinal Cord Injury Telehealth Womens Health Issues ...

  18. Prosthetics / Limb Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... implant to encourage the sealing process. Implanting titanium prosthetic components avoids the need for a socket. But preventing bacterial invasion and infection is a key challenge, one that this research ...

  19. Prosthetic Joint Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Saima; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections represent a major therapeutic challenge for both healthcare providers and patients. This paper reviews the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, microbiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of prosthetic joint infection. The most optimal management strategy should be identified based on a number of considerations including type and duration of infection, antimicrobial susceptibility of the infecting pathogen, condition of infected tissues and bone stock, patient wishes and functional status. PMID:22847032

  20. Concepção de bancada e montagem de experimento para a análise in vitro de próteses cardíacas mitrais Design conception and experimental setup for in vitro evaluation of mitral prosthetic valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovandir Bazan

    2011-06-01

    prosthetic heart valves is due to disturbances of flow, its hydrodynamic characterization is a useful aid in the design of new prostheses. Simulations of pulsatile flow in cardiac prostheses began nearly 40 years ago, through the development of different mock human circulatory systems, improving the clinical results interpretation. A new design of a pulse duplicator system was developed at Polytechnic School of USP to study prosthetic heart valves. OBJECTIVE: To present the conception of a new mock circulatory system for hydrodynamic simulations of cardiac prosthetic valves and the assembly plan of an experiment whose focus is the test of mitral prosthesis. METHODS: Its conception is based on the state-of-art's review of these studies and the experience got with the previous mock circulatory systems, particularly the one used in the Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. RESULTS: In this design, an electric servomotor controlled by computer emits, through a hydraulic piston, a pulse to the left ventricular chamber model, where the heart valves are accomodated. To characterize, in the future, the dynamic operation of mitral prosthetic valves, an experimental setup was mounted to provide measurements of volumetric flow, instantaneous pressure and velocity fields on these valves. Optical access is conveniently provided on the design, making possible the use, in the future, of a LDA system. CONCLUSIONS: In order to improve the analysis of hydrodynamic shear stress and prediction of haemolysis, the experimental results may be used to regulate a numerical model using 'Computational Fluid Dynamics' (CFD.

  1. The contribution of matrix and cells to leaflet retraction in heart valve tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlimmeren, van M.A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Heart valve tissue engineering is a promising technique to overcome the drawbacks of currently used mechanical and prosthetic heart valve replacements. Tissue engineered (TE) heart valves are viable and autologous implants that have the capacity to grow, remodel and repair throughout a patient’s

  2. Afebrile Pannus-Induced Blood Culture-Negative Mechanical Valve Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Seiji; Eishi, Kiyoyuki; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Miura, Takashi; Matsumaru, Ichiro; Hisatomi, Kazuki; Tsuneto, Akira

    2016-12-01

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis may be challenging in patients with an atypical clinical presentation. Virtually all infections associated with mechanical prosthetic valves are localized to the prosthesis-tissue junction at the sewing ring and are accompanied by tissue destruction around the prosthesis. Because the orifice of the mechanical prosthetic valve is made of metal and pyrolytic carbon, which do not enable the adherence of microorganisms, any vegetation originating from the interior of the valve orifice is usually rare. Here we present a rare case of pannus-induced mechanical prosthetic valve endocarditis that was difficult to diagnose. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tight valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedj, F.

    1987-01-01

    This sealed valve is made with a valve seat, an axial valve with a rod fixed to its upper end, a thick bell surrounding the rod and welded by a thin join on the valve casing, a threated ring screwed onto the upper end of the rod and a magnet or electromagnet rotating the ring outside the bell [fr

  4. Strut fracture in a Bjork-Shiley aortic valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschultz, B D; Donoghue, E R

    1985-10-01

    Strut fracture can be a life-threatening adverse effect of mechanical prosthetic heart valves. This complication has occurred in the DeBakey, the Beall, the Cooley-Cutter and, most recently, the Bjork-Shiley valves. We report the case of a 35-year-old man who died suddenly 16 months after a 60 degree Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valve prosthesis was inserted in the aortic position. At autopsy, the two welded attachments of the valve's outlet strut had fractured. The valve's tilting disc was found in his abdominal aorta.

  5. Mitral Valve Replacement with a Pulmonary Autograft in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ho Jeong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A 76-day-old infant weighing 3.4 kg was referred for surgical intervention for severe mitral valve stenoinsufficiency caused by leaflet fibrosis and calcification. He had experienced a cerebral infarction in the left middle cerebral artery territory, which was deemed attributable to an embolism of a calcified particle from the dysmorphic mitral valve. Because mitral valve replacement using a prosthetic valve was not feasible in this small baby, mitral valve replacement with a pulmonary autograft was performed. After a brief period of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO support, he was weaned from ECMO and was discharged home without further cardiovascular complications.

  6. [Tricuspid valve insufficiency: what should be done?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Segesser, L K; Stauffer, J C; Delabays, A; Chassot, P G

    1998-12-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation is relatively common. Due to the progress made in echocardiography, its diagnosis is in general made readily and in reliable fashion. Basically one has to distinguish between functional tricuspid valve regurgitation due to volume and/or pressure overload of the right ventricle with intact valve structures versus tricuspid valve regurgitation due to pathologic valve structures. The clear identification of the regurgitation mechanism is of prime importance for the treatment. Functional tricuspid valve regurgitation can often be improved by medical treatment of heart failure, and eventually a tricuspid valve plasty can solve the problem. However, the presence of pathologic tricuspid valve structures makes in general more specific plastic surgical procedures and even prosthetic valve replacements necessary. A typical example for a structural tricuspid valve regurgitation is the case of a traumatic papillary muscle rupture. Due to the sudden onset, this pathology is not well tolerated and requires in general surgical reinsertion of the papillary muscle. In contrast, tricuspid valve regurgitation resulting from chronic pulmonary embolism with pulmonary artery hypertension, can be improved by pulmonary artery thrombendarteriectomy and even completely cured with an additional tricuspid annuloplasty. However, tricuspid regurgitations due to terminal heart failure are not be addressed with surgery directed to tricuspid valve repair or replacement. Heart transplantation, dynamic cardiomyoplasty or mechanical circulatory support should be evaluated instead.

  7. Check valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, H.A.; Garcia, P.

    1999-08-24

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion. 5 figs.

  8. Check valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, H.A.; Garcia, P.

    1999-01-01

    A check valve for use in a GDCS of a nuclear reactor and having a motor driven disk including a rotatable armature for rotating the check valve disk over its entire range of motion is described. In one embodiment, the check valve includes a valve body having a coolant flow channel extending therethrough. The coolant flow channel includes an inlet end and an outlet end. A valve body seat is located on an inner surface of the valve body. The check valve further includes a disk assembly, sometimes referred to as the motor driven disc, having a counterweight and a disk shaped valve. The disk valve includes a disk base having a seat for seating with the valve body seat. The disk assembly further includes a first hinge pin member which extends at least partially through the disk assembly and is engaged to the disk. The disk valve is rotatable relative to the first hinge pin member. The check valve also includes a motor having a stator frame with a stator bore therein. An armature is rotatably positioned within the stator bore and the armature is coupled to the disk valve to cause the disk valve to rotate about its full range of motion. 5 figs

  9. Computed Flow Through An Artificial Heart Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stewart E.; Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin; Chang, I-Dee

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses computations of blood flow through prosthetic tilting disk valve. Computational procedure developed in simulation used to design better artificial hearts and valves by reducing or eliminating following adverse flow characteristics: large pressure losses, which prevent hearts from working efficiently; separated and secondary flows, which causes clotting; and high turbulent shear stresses, which damages red blood cells. Report reiterates and expands upon part of NASA technical memorandum "Computed Flow Through an Artificial Heart and Valve" (ARC-12983). Also based partly on research described in "Numerical Simulation of Flow Through an Artificial Heart" (ARC-12478).

  10. Gonococcal Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassiep, Ian; Gilpin, Bradley; Douglas, Joel; Siebert, David

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoea is a common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Disseminated gonococcal infection is an infrequent presentation and rarely can be associated with septic arthritis. Incidence of this infection is rising, both internationally and in older age groups. We present the first documented case of N. gonorrhoea prosthetic joint infection which was successfully treated with laparoscopic debridement and antimicrobial therapy.

  11. Amputation and Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Amputation and Prosthetics Email to a friend * required ...

  12. Control Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Wayne R.

    2018-03-20

    A control valve includes a first conduit having a first inlet and a first outlet and defining a first passage; a second conduit having a second inlet and a second outlet and defining a second passage, the second conduit extending into the first passage such that the second inlet is located within the first passage; and a valve plate disposed pivotably within the first passage, the valve plate defining a valve plate surface. Pivoting of the valve plate within the first passage varies flow from the first inlet to the first outlet and the valve plate is pivotal between a first position and a second position such that in the first position the valve plate substantially prevents fluid communication between the first passage and the second passage and such that in the second position the valve plate permits fluid communication between the first passage and the second passage.

  13. Tricuspid valve endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed T.; Witten, James; Shrestha, Nabin K.; Blackstone, Eugene H.

    2017-01-01

    Right-sided infective endocarditis (RSIE) is less common than left-sided infective endocarditis (IE), encompassing only 5–10% of cases of IE. Ninety percent of RSIE involves the tricuspid valve (TV). Given the relatively small numbers of TVIE cases operated on at most institutions, the purpose of this review is to highlight and discuss the current understanding of IE involving the TV. RSIE and TVIE are strongly associated with intravenous drug use (IVDU), although pacemaker leads, defibrillator leads and vascular access for dialysis are also major risk factors. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant causative organism in TVIE. Most patients with TVIE are successfully treated with antibiotics, however, 5–16% of RSIE cases eventually require surgical intervention. Indications and timing for surgery are less clear than for left-sided IE; surgery is primarily considered for failed medical therapy, large vegetations and septic pulmonary embolism, and less often for TV regurgitation and heart failure. Most patients with an infected prosthetic TV will require surgery. Concomitant left-sided IE has its own surgical indications. Earlier surgical intervention may potentially prevent further destruction of leaflet tissue and increase the likelihood of TV repair. Fortunately, TV debridement and repair can be accomplished in most cases, even those with extensive valve destruction, using a variety of techniques. Valve repair is advocated over replacement, particularly in IVDUs patients who are young, non-compliant and have a higher risk of recurrent infection and reoperation with valve replacement. Excising the valve without replacing, it is not advocated; it has been reported previously, but these patients are likely to be symptomatic, particularly in cases with septic pulmonary embolism and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Patients with concomitant left-sided involvement have worse prognosis than those with RSIE alone, due predominantly to greater likelihood of

  14. Mechanical valve obstruction: Review of diagnostic and treatment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Jason; Munoz-Mendoza, Jerson; Liebelt, Jared J; Taub, Cynthia C

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic valve obstruction (PVO) is a rare but feared complication of mechanical valve replacement. Diagnostic evaluation should focus on differentiating prosthetic valve thrombosis (PVT) from pannus formation, as their treatment options differ. History of sub-optimal anti-coagulation and post-op time course to development of PVO are useful clinical characteristics in differentiating thrombus from pannus formation. Treatment of PVT is influenced by the patient’s symptoms, valve location, degree of obstruction and thrombus size and may include thrombolysis or surgical intervention. Alternatively, pannus formation requires surgical intervention. The purpose of this article is to review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnostic approach and treatment options for aortic and mitral valve PVO. PMID:26730292

  15. Valve assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandling, M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved valve assembly, used for controlling the flow of radioactive slurry, is described. Radioactive contamination of the air during removal or replacement of the valve is prevented by sucking air from the atmosphere through a portion of the structure above the valve housing. (U.K.)

  16. Outlet strut fracture and leaflet escape of Bjork-Shiley convexo-concave valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Gaku; Yoshida, Hideo; Sakoda, Naoya; Hattori, Shigeru; Kawabata, Takuya; Saiki, Munehiro; Fujita, Yasufumi; Yunoki, Keiji; Hisamochi, Kunikazu; Mine, Yoshinari

    2017-06-01

    Prosthetic valve fracture is a serious complication and may arise in patient post-valve replacement. We experienced an outlet strut fracture and leaflet escape of a Bjork-Shiley convexo-concave valve. We performed an emergency redo mitral valve replacement and successfully retrieved the fractured strut and escaped leaflet from superficial femoral artery and the abdominal aorta. The patient showed an uneventful postoperative recovery.

  17. Structural valve deterioration in a starr-edwards mitral caged-disk valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Okazaki, Teiji; Shintani, Yusuke; Kono, Michitaka; Wada, Kumiko; Kosuga, Ken-Ichi; Mori, Ryusuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The durability of the Starr-Edwards (SE) mitral caged-disk valve, model 6520, is not clearly known, and structural valve deterioration in the SE disk valve is very rare. Replacement of the SE mitral disk valve was performed in 7 patients 23-40 years after implantation. Macroscopic examination of the removed disk valves showed no structural abnormalities in 3 patients, in whom the disk valves were removed at valves excised >36 years after implantation in 4 patients. Disk fracture, a longitudinal split in the disk along its circumference at the site of incorporation of the titanium ring, was detected in the valves removed 36 and 40 years after implantation, respectively, and many cracks were also observed on the outflow aspect of the disk removed 40 years after implantation. Disk fracture and localized disk wear were found in the SE mitral disk valves implanted >36 years previously. The present results suggest that SE mitral caged-disk valves implanted >20 years previously should be carefully followed up, and that those implanted >30 years previously should be electively replaced with modern prosthetic valves

  18. Prosthetics in Paediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulićević Zoran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss of teeth in children may lead to both functional and esthetic problems. Missing teeth in both anterior and posterior regions may cause malfunctions in mastication and proper pronunciation. If the missing teeth are not replaced, further complications may occur, including adjacent tooth migration, loss of alveolar bone, and irregular occlusion. Considering the sensitive nature of children, loss of teeth may cause the development of insecurities and low self esteem problems. Due to dynamic nature of growth in children and adolescents, prosthetic appliances must not hinder development of orofacial system, and must meet adequate esthetic and functional standards. Dental prosthetic appliances in paediatrics must be planned with respect to the special conditions that led to tooth loss or damage. Multi-disciplinary approach is needed, under constant supervision of paediatric dentist and orthodontist, as well as regular checkups with clinical and radiographical examinations.

  19. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  20. Smart Sensing and Dynamic Fitting for Enhanced Comfort and Performance of Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    conductive foam: the antenna radiation patch, the ground plane, and the reflectors can be cut from the conductive foams using laser machining. The patch...Detailed structure of “limb-socket” test setup; (c) Internal pressure sensor array with associated solenoid valves Accomplishment #7: Built an...motion; Linear stage Load cell “Limb-socket” (a) Prosthetic liner Bubble actuator patch “Limb” “Socket” (b) Internal pressure sensors Solenoid valves

  1. Heart valve replacements with regenerative capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, P.E.; Fioretta, E.S.; Frese, L.; Pasqualini, F.S.; Hoerstrup, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of severe valvular dysfunctions (e.g., stenosis and insufficiency) is increasing, leading to over 300,000 valves implanted worldwide yearly. Clinically used heart valve replacements lack the capacity to grow, inherently requiring repetitive and high-risk surgical interventions during

  2. Surgery for rheumatic mitral valve disease in sub-saharan African countries: why valve repair is still the best surgical option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mvondo, Charles Mve; Pugliese, Marta; Giamberti, Alessandro; Chelo, David; Kuate, Liliane Mfeukeu; Boombhi, Jerome; Dailor, Ellen Marie

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatic valve disease, a consequence of acute rheumatic fever, remains endemic in developing countries in the sub-Saharan region where it is the leading cause of heart failure and cardiovascular death, involving predominantly a young population. The involvement of the mitral valve is pathognomonic and mitral surgery has become the lone therapeutic option for the majority of these patients. However, controversies exist on the choice between valve repair or prosthetic valve replacement. Although the advantages of mitral valve repair over prosthetic valve replacement in degenerative mitral disease are well established, this has not been the case for rheumatic lesions, where the use of prosthetic valves, specifically mechanical devices, even in poorly compliant populations remains very common. These patients deserve more accurate evaluation in the choice of the surgical strategy which strongly impacts the post-operative outcomes. This report discusses the factors supporting mitral repair surgery in rheumatic disease, according to the patients' characteristics and the effectiveness of the current repair techniques compared to prosthetic valve replacement in developing countries.

  3. Gamma Ray Sterilization of Starr-Edwards Heart Valve Prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, J. R. P.; Alladine, M. F. [London Chest Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    Starr-Edwards valves have normally been sterilized by exposure to ethylene oxide or by autoclaving. Patients having a prosthetic valve replacement are known to have a higher incidence of endocarditis in comparison with patients in which no prosthesis has been used. Ethylene oxide will only sterilize the surface of the valve and autoclaving has caused distortion of the polytetrafluorethylene ring. Work has been done on the effect of gamma radiation on the components of these valve prostheses and is given in detail. The bacteriological efficiency, at a total absorbed dose of 2. 5 Mrad, has been established. Thirty valves treated by this method have now been inserted and twelve patients have been examined post-operatively for a period of one to two years. All valves are working normally and there has been no evidence of blood-borne infection or malfunction of the valve. (author)

  4. A 29-Year-Old Harken Disk Mitral Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, David H.; Ryan, Gerald F.; Taft, Janice; Arnone, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman was evaluated for prosthetic mitral valve function. She had received a Harken disk mitral valve 29 years earlier due to severe mitral valve disease. This particular valve prosthesis is known for premature disk edge wear and erosion. The patient's 2-dimensional Doppler echocardiogram showed the distinctive appearance of a disk mitral valve prosthesis. Color Doppler in diastole showed a unique crown appearance, with initial flow acceleration around the disk followed by convergence to laminar flow in the left ventricle. Cineradiographic imaging revealed normal valve function and minimal disk erosion. We believe this to be the longest reported follow-up of a surviving patient with a rare Harken disk valve. We present images with unique echocardiographic and cineangiographic features. (Tex Heart Inst J 2003;30:319–21) PMID:14677746

  5. Bentall Procedure Using Cryopreserved Valved Aortic Homografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T.; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T.; Didier, Dominique; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 ± 21 years (range, 15–74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 ± 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6–72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft. PMID:15745290

  6. Determinants and outcomes of acute transcatheter valve-in-valve therapy or embolization: a study of multiple valve implants in the U.S. PARTNER trial (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, Raj R; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Chakravarty, Tarun; Fontana, Gregory P; Kapadia, Samir; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Cheng, Wen; Thourani, Vinod H; Bavaria, Joseph; Svensson, Lars; Kodali, Susheel; Shiota, Takahiro; Siegel, Robert; Tuzcu, E Murat; Xu, Ke; Hahn, Rebecca T; Herrmann, Howard C; Reisman, Mark; Whisenant, Brian; Lim, Scott; Beohar, Nirat; Mack, Michael; Teirstein, Paul; Rihal, Charanjit; Douglas, Pamela S; Blackstone, Eugene; Pichard, Augusto; Webb, John G; Leon, Martin B

    2013-07-30

    This study investigated the determinants and outcomes of acute insertion of a second transcatheter prosthetic valve (TV) within the first (TV-in-TV) or transcatheter valve embolization (TVE) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). TAVR failure can occur with both TV-in-TV and TVE as a consequence of TAVR malpositioning. Only case reports and limited series pertaining to these complications have been reported to date. Patients undergoing TAVR in the PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve) randomized trial (cohorts A and B) and accompanying registries were studied. Data were dichotomized for those with and without TV-in-TV or TVE, respectively. From a total of 2,554 consecutive patients, 63 (2.47%) underwent TV-in-TV and 26 (1.01%) TVE. The indication for TV-in-TV was significant aortic regurgitation in most patients, often due not only to malpositioning but also to leaflet dysfunction. Despite similar aortic valve function on follow-up echoes, TV-in-TV was an independent predictor of 1-year cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03 to 3.38, p = 0.041), with a nonsignificant trend toward greater all-cause mortality (HR: 1.43, 95% CI: 0.88 to 2.33, p = 0.15). Technical and anatomical reasons accounted for most cases of TVE. A multivariable analysis found TVE to be an independent predictor of 1-year mortality (HR: 2.68, 95% CI: 1.34 to 5.36, p = 0.0055) but not cardiovascular mortality (HR: 1.30, 95% CI: 0.48 to 3.52, p = 0.60). Acute TV-in-TV and TVE are serious sequelae of TAVR, often resulting in multiple valve implants. They carry an excess of mortality and are caused by anatomic and technical factors, which may be avoidable with judicious procedural planning. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Surgical Treatment of Posterior Mitral Valve Prolapse: Towards 100% Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Pedro M; Coutinho, Gonçalo F; Branco, Carlos; Garcia, Ana; Antunes, Manuel J

    2015-11-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the immediate and long-term results of surgical treatment of isolated posterior mitral valve leaflet prolapse (PLP), focusing on survival and freedom from recurrent mitral regurgitation (MR). Between January 1998 and December 2012, a total of 492 consecutive patients (375 males, 117 females; mean age 61.8 ± 12.1 years; range: 13-86 years) with isolated PLP [304 (61.8%) with myxomatous degeneration; 188 (38.2%) with fibroelastic deficiency] were treated at the authors' institution. Of these patients, 202 (41.1%) were in NYHA class III-IV, and atrial fibrillation was present in 104 (21.1%). Mitral valve repair was achieved in 484 patients (98.4%), resection was performed in 419 (85.2%), and prosthetic ring annuloplasty was used in 436 (88.6%). Concomitant procedures were performed in 153 patients (31.1%), including tricuspid valve repair in 50 (10.2%), aortic valve surgery in 34 (6.9%), and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in 64 (13%). The hospital mortality rate was 0.2%, and the mean follow up was 7.1 ± 3.9 years. There were 71 late deaths (14.4%), and overall survival at five, 10 and 15 years was 91.7 ± 1.3%, 82.1 ± 2.3% and 64.7 ± 6.1%, respectively. There was no significant difference in long-term survival compared with the age- and gender-matched general population (p = 0.146). Multivariate Cox-proportional hazard analysis showed older age (HR 1.03 per annum), left ventricular dysfunction (HR 2.44), atrial fibrillation (HR 1.96), left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (HR 1.05 per mm) and non-use of prosthetic ring (HR 3.03) as significant predictors of late mortality. Recurrence of moderate or severe MR occurred in 31 patients, six of whom underwent mitral valve reoperation. Predictors of late recurrence of MR were fibroelastic deficiency (HR 2.38), mitral calcification (HR 5.26), posterior leaflet plication (HR 3.58), absence of complete ring annuloplasty (HR 3.84) and systolic pulmonary artery pressure at discharge

  8. [Late outlet strut fracture of an aortic Björk-Shiley and embolization of the prosthetic disc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochet, E; Bougis de Brux, M A; Assayag, P; Benacin, Y; Gamerman, G; Guerot, C; Valère, P E

    1988-09-01

    A new case of late fracture of an outlet strut in a convexo-concave Björk-Shiley valve is reported. The fracture occurred 6 years after aortic implantation of the valve and was responsible for aorto-iliac embolization by the prosthetic disc and death of the patient from cardiogenic shock. This not uncommon complication of the Björk-Shiley valve prosthesis is usually ascribed to the relative fragility of its outlet strut welded to the metallic ring and subjected to strong pressures. Although most cases were observed within the first two years of prosthetic valve insertion, and mainly with valves manufactured in 1981 and 1982, our case and a few others demonstrate the possibility of late rupture. Cardiologists must be aware of this possible complication, since in some favourable cases it can be diagnosed at an early stage and the patient's life can be saved by an emergency operation.

  9. An Evaluation of Dental Prosthetic Status and Prosthetic Needs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    present cross‑sectional study aimed to evaluate the dental prosthetic status and prosthetic needs among eunuchs .... who consented to become part of the study guided us to the .... to the reason that our study population comprised of adults with low SES. ... Arora M, Schwarz E, Sivaneswaran S, Banks E. Cigarette smoking.

  10. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  11. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  12. Mitral Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for mitral valve replacement—mechanical valves (metal) or biological valves (tissue). The principal advantage of mechanical valves ... small risk of stroke due to blood clotting. Biological valves usually are made from animal tissue. Biological ...

  13. Added value of cardiac computed tomography for evaluation of mechanical aortic valve: Emphasis on evaluation of pannus with surgical findings as standard reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Young Joo; Lee, Sak; Im, Dong Jin; Chang, Suyon; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chang, Byung-Chul; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Young Jin

    2016-07-01

    The added value of cardiac computed tomography (CT) with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) for evaluating mechanical aortic valve (AV) dysfunction has not yet been investigated. The purposes of this study were to investigate the added value of cardiac CT for evaluation of mechanical AVs and diagnoses of pannus compared to TEE, with surgical findings of redo-aortic valve replacement (AVR) used as a standard reference. 25 patients who underwent redo-AVR due to mechanical AV dysfunction and cardiac CT before redo-AVR were included. The presence of pannus, encroachment ratio by pannus, and limitation of motion (LOM) were evaluated on CT. The diagnostic performance of pannus detection was compared using TEE, CT, and CT+TEE, with surgical findings as a standard reference. The added value of CT for diagnosing the cause of mechanical AV dysfunction was assessed compared to TTE+TEE. In two patients, CT analysis was not feasible due to severe metallic artifacts. On CT, pannus and LOM were found in 100% (23/23) and 60.9% (14/23). TEE identified pannus in 48.0% of patients (12/25). CT, TEE, and CT+TEE correctly identified pannus with sensitivity of 92.0%, 48.0%, and 92.0%, respectively (P=0.002 for CT vs. TEE). In 11 of 13 cases (84.6%) with inconclusive or negative TEE results for pannus, CT detected the pannus. Among 13 inconclusive cases of TTE+TEE for the cause of mechanical AV dysfunction, CT suggested 6 prosthetic valve obstruction (PVO) by pannus, 4 low-flow low-gradient PVO, and one LOM without significant PVO. Cardiac CT showed added diagnostic value with TEE in the detection of pannus as the cause of mechanical AV dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bentall Operation with Valved Homograft Conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shiv K.; Talwar, Sachin; Kumar, A. Sampath

    2000-01-01

    Lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease are usually treated by implanting a prosthetic valved conduit (Bentall procedure). In this report, we present our experience in which a valved homograft conduit was used for the procedure. Six patients underwent a Bentall procedure with the use of a cryopreserved valved homograft conduit. Two of the patients had annuloaortic ectasia, 2 had Marfan syndrome, and 1 had an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the aorta. One patient had severe aortic stenosis due to a bicuspid aortic valve, along with an aneurysm and localized dissection of the ascending aorta. In all of the patients, the aortic annulus was substantially dilated, with accompanying moderate-to-severe aortic regurgitation. A standard procedure was performed with moderate hypothermia, cardiopulmonary bypass, and aortic and bicaval cannulation. The ascending aorta and the aortic valve were replaced with a cryopreserved valved homograft conduit (aortic in 5 patients and pulmonary in 1). The native coronary ostia were anastomosed directly to the homograft. Echocardiography, which was performed intraoperatively, before discharge from the hospital, and at follow-up visits (1 to 36 months), revealed good valve function without dilatation of the homograft conduits. There was 1 late death due to Aspergillus fumigatus endocarditis, 6 months postoperatively. In 1 patient, magnetic resonance imaging performed at 24 months revealed normal caliber of the homograft conduit. We conclude that the Bentall procedure can be performed, safely and with excellent results, using cryopreserved homograft conduits. PMID:11198310

  15. Dilatation and Dysfunction of the Neo-aortic Root and in 76 Patients After the Ross Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Corina A; Weber, Roland; Greutmann, Matthias; Dave, Hitendu; Müller, Christoph; Prêtre, René; Seifert, Burkhardt; Buechel, Emanuela Valsangiacomo; Kretschmar, Oliver; Attenhofer Jost, Christine H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary autograft replacement (Ross procedure) is used as an alternative to prosthetic aortic valve replacement patients with aortic valve disease. There are limited data on incidence and risk factors for dilatation and dysfunction of the neo-aortic after the Ross procedure. Ross procedure was performed in 100 patients at our institution between 1993 and 2011. In 76 patients, complete follow-up data were available. Their median age at surgery was 16 (0.4-58) years (76 % males; 95 % with congenital aortic valve disease). Median follow-up duration was 5.2 years (0.3-16.0 years). We analyzed their clinical and echocardiographic follow-up to identify possible risk factors for neo-aortic root dilatation and dysfunction. Ross procedure included reduction plasty of the native ascending aorta in 25 % of patients. During follow-up, 21 patients (28 %) developed neo-aortic root dilatation, 38 patients (50 %) dilatation oft the native ascending aorta and 7 patients (9 %) at least moderate neo-aortic regurgitation. Univariate risk factors for neo-aortic root dilatation were preoperative aortic regurgitation (p = 0.04), concomitant reduction plasty of the ascending aorta (p = 0.009) and a longer duration of follow-up (p = 0.005). Younger age at surgery was associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta (p = 0.03). Reoperation on the neo-aortic root because of severe dilatation was necessary in 6 patients (8 %), where 2 patients had at least moderate neo-aortic root regurgitation. Neo-aortic root and aortic dilatation are common after the Ross procedure. This is often combined with neo-aortic valve dysfunction. Close follow-up of these patients is mandatory.

  16. Characterization of a bioprosthetic bicuspid venous valve hemodynamics: implications for mechanism of valve dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, W-H; Chen, H Y; Berwick, Z C; Krieger, J; Chambers, S; Dabiri, D; Kassab, G S

    2014-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) of the lower extremities is a common clinical problem. Although bioprosthetic valves have been proposed to treat severe reflux, clinical success has been limited due to thrombosis and neointima overgrowth of the leaflets that is, in part, related to the hemodynamics of the valve. A bioprosthetic valve that mimics native valve hemodynamics is essential. A computational model of the prosthetic valve based on realistic geometry and mechanical properties was developed to simulate the interaction of valve structure (fluid-structure interaction, FSI) with the surrounding flow. The simulation results were validated by experiments of a bioprosthetic bicuspid venous valve using particle image velocimetry (PIV) with high spatial and temporal resolution in a pulse duplicator (PD). Flow velocity fields surrounding the valve leaflets were calculated from PIV measurements and comparisons to the FSI simulation results were made. Both the spatial and temporal results of the simulations and experiments were in agreement. The FSI prediction of the transition point from equilibrium phase to valve-closing phase had a 7% delay compared to the PD measurements, while the PIV measurements matched the PD exactly. FSI predictions of reversed flow were within 10% compared to PD measurements. Stagnation or stasis regions were observed in both simulations and experiments. The pressure differential across the valve and associated forces on the leaflets from simulations showed the valve mechanism to be pressure driven. The flow velocity simulations were highly consistent with the experimental results. The FSI simulation and force analysis showed that the valve closure mechanism is pressure driven under the test conditions. FSI simulation and PIV measurements demonstrated that the flow behind the leaflet was mostly stagnant and a potential source for thrombosis. The validated FSI simulations should enable future valve design optimizations that are needed for

  17. VALIDATION OF MITRAL VALVE ANNULUS DIMENSIONS MEASURED BY 2D TRANS-THORACIC ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY WITH GOLD STANDARD DIRECT INTRA-OPERATIVE MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen; Yadav; Ankur; Saket; Kaushal

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Precise estimation of Mitral valve annulus dimensions preoperatively through Echocardiography is of paramount importance in replacement/repair surgeries. However a frequent disagreement was experienced between anticipated size of prosthetic valve based on echocardiography and actual valve size. This fact encouraged the authors to validate the measurements through echocardiography with gold-standard direct intra operative measurement. AIM: To compare the mitral val...

  18. Fatal association of mechanical valve thrombosis with dabigatran: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Shaul; Wishniak, Alice; Shturman, Alexander; Shtiwi, Sewaed; Brezins, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants have been approved for thromboembolism prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. However, they are not yet approved for anticoagulation use in patients with prosthetic mechanical valves, and no randomized data have been published so far on their safety of use in these patients. We present two cases of patients with prosthetic mechanical mitral valves who were switched from warfarin and acenocoumarol to dabigatran and within 1 month experienced severe valve complications resulting in death. One patient experienced stroke and later cardiogenic shock and death, and the other experienced pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, and subsequent death.

  19. THE RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF TRICUSPID VALVE INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS USING VALVE REPAIR AND VALVE REPLACEMENT OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kovalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate in-hospital and long-term results of surgical treatment of patients with infective endocarditis of the tricuspid valve, to compare the effectiveness of valve repair and valve replacement techniques, and to identify risk factors of mortality and reoperations. Materials and methods. 31 surgical patients with tricuspid valve infective endocarditis were evaluated. Patients were divided into 2 groups. In Group 1 (n = 14 repairs of the tricuspid valve were performed, in Group 2 (n = 17 patients had undergone tricuspid valve replacements. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and echocardiographic data were studied. Methods of comparative analysis, the Kaplan–Meier method, and Cox risk models were applied. Results. The most common complication of in-hospital stay was atrioventricular block (17.7% of cases in Group 2. In Group 1, this type of complication was not found. Hospital mortality was 7.14% in Group 1, and 0% in Group 2. Long-term results have shown the significant reduction of heart failure in general cohort and in both groups. In Group 1 the severity of heart failure in the long term was less than in Group 2. No significant differences in the severity of tricuspid regurgitation were found between the groups. In 7-year follow up no cases of death were registered in Group 1. Cumulative survival rate in Group 2 within 60 months was 67.3 ± 16.2%. No reoperations were performed in patients from Group 1. In Group 2, the freedom from reoperation within 60 months was 70.9 ± 15.3%. Combined intervention was found as predictor of postoperative mortality. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was identified as risk factor for reoperation. Conclusion. Valve repair and valve replacement techniques of surgical treatment of tricuspid valve endocarditis can provide satisfactory hospital and long-term results. Tricuspid valve repair techniques allowed reducing the incidence of postoperative atrioventricular block. In the long-term, patients

  20. Classification of heart valve condition using acoustic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Prosthetic heart valves and the many great strides in valve design have been responsible for extending the life spans of many people with serious heart conditions. Even though the prosthetic valves are extremely reliable, they are eventually susceptible to long-term fatigue and structural failure effects expected from mechanical devices operating over long periods of time. The purpose of our work is to classify the condition of in vivo Bjork-Shiley Convexo-Concave (BSCC) heart valves by processing acoustic measurements of heart valve sounds. The structural failures of interest for Bscc valves is called single leg separation (SLS). SLS can occur if the outlet strut cracks and separates from the main structure of the valve. We measure acoustic opening and closing sounds (waveforms) using high sensitivity contact microphones on the patient`s thorax. For our analysis, we focus our processing and classification efforts on the opening sounds because they yield direct information about outlet strut condition with minimal distortion caused by energy radiated from the valve disc.

  1. [Pannus Formation Six-years after Aortic and Mitral Valve Replacement with Tissue Valves;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Muraoka, Arata; Aizawa, Kei; Akutsu, Hirohiko; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-07-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with exertional dyspnea. He had undergone aortic and mitral valve replacement with tissue valves 6-years earlier. The patient's hemoglobin level was 9.8 g/dl and serum aspartate aminotransferase (70 mU/ml) and lactate dehydrogenase (1,112 mU/ml) were elevated. Echocardiography revealed stenosis of the prosthetic valve in the aortic position with peak flow velocity of 3.8 m/second and massive mitral regurgitation. The patient underwent repeat valve replacement. Pannus formation around both implanted valves was observed. The aortic valve orifice was narrowed by the pannus, and one cusp of the prosthesis in the mitral position was fixed and caused the regurgitation, but they were free from cusp laceration or calcification. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and he continues to do well 14 months after surgery.

  2. Aortic root replacement after previous surgical intervention on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, E W Matthias; Radu, N Costin; Mekontso-Dessap, Armand; Hillion, Marie-Line; Loisance, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Aortic root replacement after a previous operation on the aortic valve, aortic root, or ascending aorta remains a major challenge. Records of 56 consecutive patients (44 men; mean age, 56.4 +/- 13.6 years) undergoing reoperative aortic root replacement between June 1994 and June 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation was performed 9.4 +/- 6.7 years after the last cardiac operation. Indications for reoperation were true aneurysm (n = 14 [25%]), false aneurysm (n = 10 [18%]), dissection or redissection (n = 9 [16%]), structural or nonstructural valve dysfunction (n = 10 [18%]), prosthetic valve-graft infection (n = 12 [21%]), and miscellaneous (n = 1 [2%]). Procedures performed were aortic root replacement (n = 47 [84%]), aortic root replacement plus mitral valve procedure (n = 5 [9%]), and aortic root replacement plus arch replacement (n = 4 [7%]). In 14 (25%) patients coronary artery bypass grafting had to be performed unexpectedly during the same procedure or immediately after the procedure to re-establish coronary perfusion. Hospital mortality reached 17.9% (n = 10). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the need for unplanned perioperative coronary artery bypass grafting as the sole independent risk factor for hospital death (P = .005). Actuarial survival was 83.8% +/- 4.9% at 1 month, 73.0% +/- 6.3% at 1 year, and 65.7% +/- 9.0% at 5 years after the operation. One patient had recurrence of endocarditis 6.7 months after the operation and required repeated homograft aortic root replacement. Reoperative aortic root replacement remains associated with a high postoperative mortality. The need to perform unplanned coronary artery bypass grafting during reoperative aortic root replacement is a major risk factor for hospital death. The optimal technique for coronary reconstruction in this setting remains to be debated.

  3. Long-Term Outcomes of Homografts in the Aortic Valve and Root Position: A 20-Year Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Yeon Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The advantages of using a homograft in valve replacement surgery are the excellent hemodynamic profile, low risk of thromboembolism, and low risk of prosthetic valve infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of homograft implantation in the aortic valve position. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 33 patients (>20 years old who underwent aortic valve replacement or root replacement with homografts between April 1995 and May 2015. Valves were collected within 24 hours from explanted hearts of heart transplant recipients (<60 years and organ donors who were not suitable for heart transplantation. The median follow-up duration was 35.6 months (range, 0 to 168 months. Results: Aortic homografts were used in all patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 9.1%. The 1- and 5-year survival rates were 80.0%±7.3% and 60.8%±10.1%, respectively. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year freedom from reoperation rates were 92.3%±5.2%, 68.9%±10.2%, and 50.3%±13.6%, respectively. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year freedom from significant aortic dysfunction rates were 91.7%±8.0%, 41.7%±14.2%, and 25.0%±12.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Homografts had the advantages of a good hemodynamic profile and low risk of thromboembolic events, and with good outcomes in cases of aortitis.

  4. Management of Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J; Gomez-Urena, Eric O; Berbari, Elie F; Osmon, Douglas R

    2017-06-01

    Although uncommon, prosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication. This challenging condition requires a coordinated management approach to achieve good patient outcomes. This review details the general principles to consider when managing patients with prosthetic joint infection. The different medical/surgical treatment strategies and how to appropriately select a strategy are discussed. The data to support each strategy are presented, along with discussion of antimicrobial strategies in specific situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    modules to train individuals to distinguish gait deviations (trunk motion and lower-limb motion). Each of these modules help trainers improve their...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0870 TITLE: Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Karim Abdel-Malek CONTRACTING...study is to produce a computer-based Advanced Prosthetic Gait Training Tool to aid in the training of clinicians at military treatment facilities

  6. Which prosthetic foot to prescribe?

    OpenAIRE

    De Asha, AR; Barnett, CT; Struchkov, V; Buckley, JG

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: \\ud Clinicians typically use findings from cohort studies to objectively inform judgements regarding the potential (dis)advantages of prescribing a new prosthetic device. However, before finalising prescription a clinician will typically ask a patient to 'try out' a change of prosthetic device while the patient is at the clinic. Observed differences in gait when using the new device should be the result of the device’s mechanical function, but could also conceivably be due to pa...

  7. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeramalai Naidu Devaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges.

  8. Intracardiac echocardiography to diagnose pannus formation after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Ohara, Takahiro; Funada, Akira; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A 66-year-old female, under regular follow-up for 20 years after aortic valve replacement (19-mm Carbomedics), presented dyspnea on effort and hypotension during hemodialysis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed elevation of transvalvular velocity up to 4 m/s, but the structure around the aortic prosthesis was difficult to observe due to artifacts. Fluoroscopy revealed normal motion of the leaflets of the mechanical valve. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) revealed a pannus-like structure in the left ventricular outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiogram also revealed this structure. ICE can visualize structural abnormalities around a prosthetic valve after cardiac surgery even in patients in whom conventional imaging modalities failed.

  9. Renal Haemosiderosis in Patients with· Prosthetic Heart Valves

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-13

    Apr 13, 1974 ... vascular haemolysis as revealed by renal haemosiderosis. S. AII'. Med. l., 48 ... blood by intravascular haemolysis, it is deposited exclu- sively in the ..... disturbances, such as turbulent blood flow and shearing stress resulting ...

  10. The Bundle of His in Prosthetic Heart Valve Replacement*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-27

    Jan 27, 1973 ... The tract has been slightly en- larged due to displacement of suture material during cutting of the section. (H. and E. x 4.) Group 1. Group 2. Controls. It is significant that recent haemorrhage within the conduction system was only found in patients belonging to group 1 (Tables II and IV). Such haemorrhage is.

  11. Strut fracture of Björk-Shiley convexo-concave valve in Japan--risk of small valve size--.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watarida, S; Shiraishi, S; Nishi, T; Imura, M; Yamamoto, Y; Hirokawa, R; Fujita, M

    2001-08-01

    The Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (BSCC) prosthetic valve was introduced in 1979. Between 1979 and 1986, approximately 86,000 BSCC valves were implanted. By December 31, 1994, 564 complete strut fractures had been reported to the manufacture. We experienced a case of an outlet strut fracture and investigated the risk of BSCC prosthetic valve fractures in Japan. To investigate the risk factor of a strut fracture in Japan, we investigated published cases of strut fractures. Between 1979 and 1986, 2021 BSCC valves were implanted in Japan. By January 31, 2000, 11 complete strut fractures of 60-degree BSCC valves including our case had occurred. The patients were eight males and three females. The average age at valve replacement was 42.4+/-8.1 years, and nine of eleven (81.8%) were patients valve fractured was 47.7+/-6.4 years, and eight of eleven (72.7%) were patients valve were 27 mm (n=5) (45.5%), 29 mm (n=3) (27.2%), and 31 mm (n=3) (27.2%). Four patients died and seven patients survived. Although only 11 BSCC valve struts fractured and statistical analysis could not be performed, our findings suggest that the high risk group for a strut fracture in Japan is young male patients with a mitral valve, >= 27 mm in size with BSCC models manufactured before March 1982. When following-up patients with BSCC models manufactured before March 1982, the possibility of a strut fracture in all BSCC valve sizes should be kept in mind.

  12. Characterizing nanoscale topography of the aortic heart valve basement membrane for tissue engineering heart valve scaffold design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Sarah; Anilkumar, Thapasimuthu; Liliensiek, Sara; Last, Julie A; Murphy, Christopher J; Pandit, Abhay

    2006-02-01

    A fully effective prosthetic heart valve has not yet been developed. A successful tissue-engineered valve prosthetic must contain a scaffold that fully supports valve endothelial cell function. Recently, topographic features of scaffolds have been shown to influence the behavior of a variety of cell types and should be considered in rational scaffold design and fabrication. The basement membrane of the aortic valve endothelium provides important parameters for tissue engineering scaffold design. This study presents a quantitative characterization of the topographic features of the native aortic valve endothelial basement membrane; topographical features were measured, and quantitative data were generated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and light microscopy. Optimal conditions for basement membrane isolation were established. Histological, immunohistochemical, and TEM analyses following decellularization confirmed basement membrane integrity. SEM and AFM photomicrographs of isolated basement membrane were captured and quantitatively analyzed. The basement membrane of the aortic valve has a rich, felt-like, 3-D nanoscale topography, consisting of pores, fibers, and elevations. All features measured were in the sub-100 nm range. No statistical difference was found between the fibrosal and ventricular surfaces of the cusp. These data provide a rational starting point for the design of extracellular scaffolds with nanoscale topographic features that mimic those found in the native aortic heart valve basement membrane.

  13. CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF THE BIOLOGICAL PROSTHESIS “ASPIRE” FOR SURGICAL CORRECTION OF MITRAL VALVE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Esin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess clinical and functional efficacy of implanted biological prosthesis “ASPIRE” (manufactured by Vascutek for correction of mitral valve disease.Materials and methods: From October 2008 to December 2013, biological prostheses “ASPIRE” (Vascutek were implanted to 34 patients with mitral valve disease (mean age 63.59 ± 4.96 years, 79.4% female. From these, 24 patients had mitral stenosis and 10 patients had mitral insufficiency. 73.5% of all patients had heart failure Strazhesko-Vasilenko IIA grade and 85.3% of patients had chronic heart failure NYHA III. Isolated mitral valve replacement was performed only in 8 (23.5% of patients. In 22 (64.7% of cases mitral valve replacement was combined with tricuspid valvuloplasty in various modifications. Duration of cardiopulmonary bypass and of aortic clamping was 88.09 ± 25.95 and 65.68 ± 25.51 minutes, respectively. Before and after surgery all patients underwent echocardiographic assessment and clinical assessment of their general status.Results: In-hospital mortality was 5.88% (n = 2 and was related to multiorgan failure in the early postoperative period. All 32 (94.12% surviving patients improved with decrease or complete disappearance of heart failure. Postoperative complications were typical for cardiac surgery. There were no episodes of embolism, structural dysfunction, thrombosis of the prosthesis and endocarditis of the prosthesis in the early postoperative period. Pressure gradients across prosthetic valves were not high and corresponded to good clinical and hemodynamic results in the early postoperative period.Conclusion: Taking into account good immediate results of mitral valve replacement, as well as no need in lifelong anticoagulation in patients with multiple concomitant disorders, implantation of the biological prosthesis “ASPIRE” (Vascutek could become a procedure of choice for correction of valve abnormalities in patients above 65 years. For more comprehensive

  14. Piezoelectric valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Serhiy Fedorovich

    2013-01-15

    A motorized valve has a housing having an inlet and an outlet to be connected to a pipeline, a saddle connected with the housing, a turn plug having a rod, the turn plug cooperating with the saddle, and a drive for turning the valve body and formed as a piezoelectric drive, the piezoelectric drive including a piezoelectric generator of radially directed standing acoustic waves, which is connected with the housing and is connectable with a pulse current source, and a rotor operatively connected with the piezoelectric generator and kinematically connected with the rod of the turn plug so as to turn the turn plug when the rotor is actuated by the piezoelectric generator.

  15. Automatic segmentation of the aortic root in CT angiography of candidate patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elattar, M.A.; Wiegerinck, E.; Planken, R.N.; VanBavel, E.T.; Assen, van H.C.; Baan Jr., J.; Marquering, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a minimal-invasive intervention for implanting prosthetic valves in patients with aortic stenosis. Accurate automated sizing for planning and patient selection is expected to reduce adverse effects such as paravalvular leakage and stroke. Segmentation of

  16. DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kuzhel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitral valve prolapse (MVP is one of the most inconsistent diagnose. In the most cases patients with MVP have the good long-term prognosis, and therapy is aimed at reduction in psychovegetative dysfunction. Careful follow-up and timely cardiosurgical correction should be performed, if necessary, in patients with classical MPV. The choice method in these cases is the mitral valve plasty.

  17. Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis with aortic and tricuspid valve involvement using cryopreserved aortic and mitral valve allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Yury; Spirydonau, Siarhei; Shchatsinka, Mikalai; Shket, Aliaksandr

    2015-05-01

    Surgical treatment of infective and prosthetic endocarditis using allografts gives good results. Aortic allograft implantation is a common technique, while tricuspid valve replacement with a mitral allograft is very rare. Multiple valve disease in case of infective endocarditis is a surgical challenge as such patients are usually in a grave condition and results of surgical treatment are often unsatisfactory. In this article we describe a clinical case of successful surgical treatment in a patient with active infective endocarditis of aortic and tricuspid valve, complicated by an aortic-right ventricular fistula. The aortic valve and ascending aorta were replaced with a cryopreserved aortic allograft; the tricuspid valve was replaced with a cryopreserved mitral allograft. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  18. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtman, E.A.

    1983-09-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole.

  19. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, E.A.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York

    1983-01-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  20. Heart valve replacement with the Sorin tilting-disc prosthesis. A 10-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, A; Bortolotti, U; Mazzucco, A; Mossuto, E; Testolin, L; Thiene, G; Gallucci, V

    1992-02-01

    From 1978 to 1988, 697 patients with a mean age of 48 +/- 11 years (range 5 to 75 years) received a Sorin tilting-disc prosthesis; 358 had had aortic valve replacement, 247 mitral valve replacement, and 92 mitral and aortic valve replacement. Operative mortality rates were 7.8%, 11.3%, and 10.8%, respectively, in the three groups. Cumulative duration of follow-up is 1650 patient-years for aortic valve replacement (maximum follow-up 11.4 years), 963 patient-years for mitral valve replacement (maximum follow-up 9.9 years) and 328 patient-years for mitral and aortic valve replacement (maximum follow-up 9.4 years). Actuarial survival at 9 years is 72% +/- 4% after mitral valve replacement, 70% +/- 3% after aortic valve replacement, and 50% +/- 12% after mitral and aortic valve replacement, and actuarial freedom from valve-related deaths is 97% +/- 2% after mitral valve replacement, 92% +/- 2% after aortic valve replacement, and 62% +/- 15% after mitral and aortic valve replacement. Thromboembolic events occurred in 21 patients with aortic valve replacement (1.3% +/- 0.2%/pt-yr), in 12 with mitral valve replacement (1.2% +/- 0.3% pt-yr), and in seven with mitral and aortic valve replacement (2.1% +/- 0.8%), with one case of prosthetic thrombosis in each group; actuarial freedom from thromboembolism at 9 years is 92% +/- 3% after mitral valve replacement, 91% +/- 3% after aortic valve replacement, and 74% +/- 16% after mitral and aortic valve replacement. Anticoagulant-related hemorrhage was observed in 15 patients after aortic valve replacement (0.9% +/- 0.2%/pt-yr), in 9 after mitral valve replacement (0.9% +/- 0.3%/pt-yr), and in 6 with mitral and aortic valve replacement (0.9% +/- 0.5%/pt-yr); actuarial freedom from this complication at 9 years is 94% +/- 2% after aortic valve replacement, 91% +/- 4% after mitral valve replacement, and 68% +/- 16% after mitral and aortic valve replacement. Actuarial freedom from reoperation at 9 years is 97% +/- 2% after mitral and

  1. Prosthetic management of deciduous teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Bassil, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Projeto de Pós-Graduação/Dissertação apresentado à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Medicina Dentária Introduction: Situations of single or multiple edentulous are not an exception during childhood. Prosthetic management is necessary in case of absence of replacing tooth or when its eruption is planned too far in time. Indications of prosthetic rehabilitation for children are multiple and rise from the etiologic factors caus...

  2. Leaflet escape in a new bileaflet mechanical valve: TRI technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottio, Tomaso; Casarotto, Dino; Thiene, Gaetano; Caprili, Luca; Angelini, Annalisa; Gerosa, Gino

    2003-05-13

    Leaflet escape is a mode of structural valve failure for mechanical prostheses. This complication previously has been reported for both monoleaflet and bileaflet valve models. We report 2 leaflet escape occurrences observed in 2 patients who underwent valve replacement with a TRI Technologies valve prosthesis. At the University of Padua, between November 2000 and February 2002, 36 TRI Technologies valve prostheses (26 aortic and 10 mitral) were implanted in 34 patients (12 women and 22 men) with a mean age of 59.9+/-10.3 years (range, 30 to 75 years). There were 5 deaths: 3 in hospital, 1 early after discharge, and 1 late. Two patients experienced a catastrophic prosthetic leaflet escape; the first patient was a 52-year-old man who died 10 days after aortic valve and ascending aorta replacement, and the second was a 58-year-old man who underwent a successful emergency reoperation 20 months after mitral valve replacement. Examination of the explanted prostheses showed in both cases a leaflet escape caused by a leaflet's pivoting system fracture. Prophylactic replacement was then successfully accomplished so far in 12 patients, without evidence of structural valve failure in any of them. Among other significant postoperative complications, we observed 3 major thromboembolisms, 1 hemorrhage, and 1 paravalvular leak. These catastrophes prompted us to interrupt the implantation program, and they cast a shadow on the durability of the TRI Technologies valve prosthesis because of its high risk of structural failure.

  3. Control method for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  4. Late complications in patients with Björk-Shiley and St. Jude Medical heart valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, D; Körfer, R; Seipel, L; Bircks, W; Loogen, F

    1983-09-01

    Valve-related complications after Björk-Shiley mitral valve implantation (n = 475), aortic valve implantation (n = 424), or mitral-aortic valve implantation (n = 119) were compared with those after St. Jude Medical mitral valve replacement (n = 173), aortic valve replacement (n = 152), or mitral-aortic valve replacement (n = 69). All patients were placed on anticoagulant therapy with phenprocoumon early after operation. All patients had a comparable follow-up time of approximately 23 months, which showed that cumulative thromboembolic rates were significantly higher after St. Jude valve implantation than after Björk-Shiley valve implantation. Reoperations were necessary because of valve thrombosis (0.46%), perivalvular leakage (2.2%), or prosthetic valve endocarditis with perivalvular regurgitation (0.46%). One Björk-Shiley mitral valve prosthesis had to be replaced because of fracture of the outlet strut. Without significant intergroup differences, hemorrhage due to anticoagulant treatment was the most frequent complication. Thromboembolic complications were significantly more frequent after Björk-Shiley mitral, aortic, and double valve replacements than after St. Jude valve implantation. This may lead to consideration of changes in the prophylaxis of thrombus formations in the St. Jude valve, especially in aortic valve replacements, in patients with sinus rhythm.

  5. Should patients with Björk-Shiley valves undergo prophylactic replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkmeyer, J D; Marrin, C A; O'Connor, G T

    1992-08-29

    About 85,000 patients have undergone replacement of diseased heart valves with prosthetic Björk-Shiley convexo-concave (CC) valves. These valves are prone to fracture of the outlet strut, which leads to acute valve failure that is usually fatal. Should patients with these valves undergo prophylactic replacement to avoid fracture? The incidence of strut fracture varies between 0% and 1.5% per year, depending on valve opening angle (60 degrees or 70 degrees), diameter (less than 29 mm or greater than or equal to 29 mm), and location (aortic or mitral). Other factors include the patient's life expectancy and the expected morbidity and mortality associated with reoperation. We have used decision analysis to identify the patients most likely to benefit from prophylactic reoperation. The incidence of outlet strut fracture was estimated from the data of three large studies on CC valves, and stratified by opening angle, diameter, and location. A Markov decision analysis model was used to estimate life expectancy for patients undergoing prophylactic valve replacement and for those not undergoing reoperation. Prophylactic valve replacement does not benefit patients with CC valves that have low strut fracture risks (60 degrees aortic valves and less than 29 mm, 60 degrees mitral valves). For most patients with CC valves that have high strut fracture risks (greater than or equal to 29 mm, 70 degrees CC), prophylactic valve replacement increases life expectancy. However, elderly patients with such valves benefit from prophylactic reoperation only if the risk of operative mortality is low. Patient age and operative risk are most important in recommendations for patients with CC valves that have intermediate strut fracture risks (less than 29 mm, 70 degrees valves and greater than or equal to 29 mm, 60 degrees mitral valves). For all patients and their doctors facing the difficult decision on whether to replace CC valves, individual estimates of operative mortality risk that

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation and Morbidity and Mortality-Related Factors: a 5-Year Experience in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Silveira Souza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has become an option for high-surgical-risk patients with aortic valve disease. Objective: To evaluate the in-hospital and one-year follow-up outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods: Prospective cohort study of transcatheter aortic valve implantation cases from July 2009 to February 2015. Analysis of clinical and procedural variables, correlating them with in-hospital and one-year mortality. Results: A total of 136 patients with a mean age of 83 years (80-87 underwent heart valve implantation; of these, 49% were women, 131 (96.3% had aortic stenosis, one (0.7% had aortic regurgitation and four (2.9% had prosthetic valve dysfunction. NYHA functional class was III or IV in 129 cases (94.8%. The baseline orifice area was 0.67 ± 0.17 cm2 and the mean left ventricular-aortic pressure gradient was 47.3±18.2 mmHg, with an STS score of 9.3% (4.8%-22.3%. The prostheses implanted were self-expanding in 97% of cases. Perioperative mortality was 1.5%; 30-day mortality, 5.9%; in-hospital mortality, 8.1%; and one-year mortality, 15.5%. Blood transfusion (relative risk of 54; p = 0.0003 and pulmonary arterial hypertension (relative risk of 5.3; p = 0.036 were predictive of in-hospital mortality. Peak C-reactive protein (relative risk of 1.8; p = 0.013 and blood transfusion (relative risk of 8.3; p = 0.0009 were predictive of 1-year mortality. At 30 days, 97% of patients were in NYHA functional class I/II; at one year, this figure reached 96%. Conclusion: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a high success rate and low mortality. Blood transfusion was associated with higher in-hospital and one-year mortality. Peak C-reactive protein was associated with one-year mortality.

  7. Aortic valve bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens T; Jensen, Maiken Brit; Arendrup, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In aortic valve bypass (AVB) a valve-containing conduit is connecting the apex of the left ventricle to the descending aorta. Candidates are patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis rejected for conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). ...

  8. Leaving Moderate Tricuspid Valve Regurgitation Alone at the Time of Pulmonary Valve Replacement: A Worthwhile Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogon, Brian; Mori, Makoto; Alsoufi, Bahaaldin; Kanter, Kirk; Oster, Matt

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary valve disruption in patients with tetralogy of Fallot and congenital pulmonary stenosis often results in pulmonary insufficiency, right ventricular dilation, and tricuspid valve regurgitation. Management of functional tricuspid regurgitation at the time of subsequent pulmonary valve replacement remains controversial. Our aims were to (1) analyze tricuspid valve function after pulmonary valve replacement through midterm follow-up and (2) determine the benefits, if any, of concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty. Thirty-five patients with tetralogy of Fallot or congenital pulmonary stenosis were analyzed. All patients had been palliated in childhood by disrupting the pulmonary valve, and all patients had at least moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation at the time of subsequent pulmonary valve replacement. Preoperative and serial postoperative echocardiograms were analyzed. Pulmonary and tricuspid regurgitation, along with right ventricular dilation and dysfunction were scored as 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe). Right ventricular volume and area were also calculated. Comparisons were made between patients who underwent pulmonary valve replacement alone and those who underwent concomitant tricuspid valve annuloplasty. At 1 month after pulmonary valve replacement, there were significant reductions in pulmonary valve regurgitation (mean 3 vs 0.39, p tricuspid valve regurgitation (mean 2.33 vs 1.3, p tricuspid regurgitation 1 month postoperatively between patients who underwent concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty and those who underwent pulmonary valve replacement alone (mean 1.31 vs 1.29, p = 0.81). However, at latest follow-up (mean 7.0 ± 2.8 years), the degree of tricuspid regurgitation was significantly higher in the concomitant annuloplasty group (mean 1.87 vs 1.12, p = 0.005). In patients with at least moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation, significant improvement in tricuspid valve function and right ventricular size occurs in the first

  9. Are anticoagulant independent mechanical valves within reach-fast prototype fabrication and in vitro testing of innovative bi-leaflet valve models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotten, Lawrence N; Siegel, Rolland

    2015-08-01

    Exploration for causes of prosthetic valve thrombogenicity has frequently focused on forward or post-closure flow detail. In prior laboratory studies, we uncovered high amplitude flow velocities of short duration close to valve closure implying potential for substantial shear stress with subsequent initiation of blood coagulation pathways. This may be relevant to widely accepted clinical disparity between mechanical and tissue valves vis-à-vis thrombogenicity. With a series of prototype bi-leaflet mechanical valves, we attempt reduction of closure related velocities with the objective of identifying a prototype valve with thrombogenic potential similar to our tissue valve control. This iterative design approach may find application in preclinical assessment of valves for anticoagulation independence. Tested valves included: prototype mechanical bi-leaflet BVs (n=56), controls (n=2) and patented early prototype mechanicals (n=2) from other investigators. Pulsatile and quasi-steady flow systems were used for testing. Projected dynamic valve area (PDVA) was measured using previously described novel technology. Flow velocity over the open and closing periods was determined by volumetric flow rate/PDVA. For the closed valve interval, use was made of data obtained from quasi-steady back pressure/flow tests. Performance was ranked by a proposed thrombogenicity potential index (TPI) relative to tissue and mechanical control valves. Optimization of the prototype valve designs lead to a 3-D printed model (BV3D). For the mitral/aortic site, BV3D has lower TPI (1.10/1.47) relative to the control mechanical valve (3.44/3.93) and similar to the control tissue valve (ideal TPI ≤1.0). Using unique technology, rapid prototyping and thrombogenicity ranking, optimization of experimental valves for reduced thrombogenic potential was expedited and simplified. Innovative mechanical valve configurations were identified that merit consideration for further development which may bring

  10. Resurgery for recurrent heart valve diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-lei REN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the experience with resurgery for recurrent valvular heart diseases. Methods From June 2004 to June 2015, 28 patients (15 males and 13 females with ages ranging from 44 to 67 years (55.6±6.5 years with recurrent heart valve disease underwent resurgery. The reasons for resurgery included perivalvular leakage (7 cases, bioprosthetic valve decline (6 cases in mitral valve and 3 in tricuspid valve, mechanical prostheses dysfunction (2cases, infective endocarditis after valve replacement (2 cases, restenosis of repaired native valve (1 case, and severe tricuspid insufficiency after left-side valve surgery (7 cases. Resurgery included mitral valve replacement in 18 patients and tricuspid valve replacement in 10. All the patients underwent third or fourth or even fifth cardiac surgery for valve replacement. Results There were 2 hospital deaths with a mortality of 7.1% (2/28. The main causes of early-stage deaths were low cardiac output syndrome. The main postoperative complications were respiratory failure in 3, low cardiac output syndrome in 2, reexploration for bleeding in 2 and serious infectious shock in 1. All the patients were found with the great improvement in heart function and the re-implanted prostheses worked well during follow-up. Conclusions Although resurgery for recurrent heart valve disease poses a continuing challenge to cardiac surgeon, it could be performed with the satisfactory results. The keys to a successful cardiac resurgery include appropriate operational timing, refined surgical technique and reasonable perioperative managements. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.11

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007684.htm Transcatheter aortic valve replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is surgery to replace the aortic valve. ...

  12. Prevalence of pannus formation after aortic valve replacement: clinical aspects and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yoshimasa; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Ishii, Shinichi; Shingo, Taguchi; Kagawa, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Pannus formation after aortic valve replacement is not common, but obstruction due to chronic pannus is one of the most serious complications of valve replacement. The causes of pannus formation are still unknown and effective preventive methods have not been fully elucidated. We reviewed our clinical experience of all patients who underwent reoperation for prosthetic aortic valve obstruction due to pannus formation between 1973 and 2004. We compared the initial 18-year period of surgery, when the Björk-Shiley tilting-disk valve was used, and the subsequent 13-year period of surgery, when the St. Jude Medical valve was used. Seven of a total of 390 patients (1.8%) required reoperation for prosthetic aortic valve obstruction due to pannus formation. All seven patients were women; four patients underwent resection of the pannus and three patients needed replacement of the valve. The frequency of pannus formation in the early group was 2.4% (6/253), whereas it was 0.73% (1/137) in the late group (P Pannus was localized at the minor orifice of the Björk-Shiley valve in the early group and turbulent transvalvular blood flow was considered to be one of the important factors triggering its growth. We also consider that small bileaflet valves have the possibility of promoting pannus formation and that the implantation of a larger prosthesis can contribute to reducing the occurrence of pannus.

  13. Magnetically operated check valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.; Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    A magnetically operated check valve is disclosed. The valve is comprised of a valve body and a movable poppet disposed therein. A magnet attracts the poppet to hold the valve shut until the force of fluid flow through the valve overcomes the magnetic attraction and moves the poppet to an unseated, open position. The poppet and magnet are configured and disposed to trap a magnetically attracted particulate and prevent it from flowing to a valve seating region.

  14. What Is Heart Valve Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... working correctly. Most valve replacements involve the aortic Tricuspid valve and mitral valves. The aortic valve separates ... where it shouldn’t. This is called incompetence, insufficiency or regurgitation. • Prolapse — mitral valve flaps don’t ...

  15. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made from pig, cow, or human ... the valve. Man-made valves last longer than biological valves and usually don’t have to be ...

  16. Control System for Prosthetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that of movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part through the full-shrg position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  17. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    suspension system, socket- ankle /knee interface, etc.) associated with a complete prosthetic system. More specific, the purpose of these deliverables was...strap. The waist belt consists of an adjustable belt utilizing polypropylene buckles and a 2‖ elastic suspension strap which descends to the anchor ...Superior View. Step 8: The suspension component consists of a 1’ anchor strap with a buckle and a 5’ – 6’ long shoulder strap with hook and

  18. Assisted circulation using the Tandemheart®, percutaneous transseptal left ventricular assist device, during percutaneous aortic valve implantation: The Rotterdam experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vranckx (Pascal); A. Otten (Amber); C.J. Schultz (Carl); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); P.P.T. de Jaegere (Peter); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAims: The morbidity and mortality of surgical aortic valve replacement are increased in elderly patients with multiple high risk comorbid conditions. Percutaneous prosthetic aortic valve replacement (PAVR) via the femoral arterial approach is feasible in selected patients, who are poor

  19. Leaflet embolisation from Duromedics valves: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, N; Balasundaram, S; Rickard, M; al Halees, Z; Duran, C M

    1991-12-01

    Embolization of parts of mechanical valves has been reported since the inception of prosthetic valve implantation. We report here two cases of embolization of one hemileaflet of a Duromedic bileaflet prosthesis in the mitral position due to a pivot fracture. Both presented with moderately severe mitral regurgitation and pulmonary edema and were successfully managed by replacement of the malfunctioning prostheses. The embolised disc was located in the left common iliac artery by abdominal ultrasound and removed by an inguinal, retroperitoneal approach with low morbidity. Both patients left hospital and are doing well to-date.

  20. MANAGEMENT OF FAILED MITRAL VALVE REPLACEMENT. THE DURBAN EXPERIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistan, D; Booysen, M; Alexander, G; Madiba, T E

    2017-06-01

    Mitral valve replacement is the procedure of choice in patients with severe mitral valve disease. However, these patients are surviving longer and are thus at an increased risk of prosthesis failure or valve-related complications. Study setting: Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, a tertiary referral Hospital in Durban. Study population: All patients undergoing redo mechanical mitral valve replacement surgery between January 2005 and December 2014. Study design: Retrospective analysis of patients undergoing redo mitral valve replacement. Patients were identified from theatre record books, their files were electronically accessed and pertinent information extracted onto a data capture sheet. Information documented included demographics, duration to failure, INR, Albumin, HIV status, clinical findings and outcome. The data was stored on an Excel datasheet. Fifty-eight patients were documented (mean age 32 ± 15.81 years; M:F 1:3). Ten patients (17%) were HIV positive (median CD4 count 478). Mean duration between first surgery and redo was 8.8 years. Thirty-five patients (60%) had no co-morbidities. Presenting features at redo surgery were congestive cardiac failure (27), chest pain (11) and palpitations (17). Mean preoperative Ejection Fraction was 51.65 %. Twenty-nine patients (55%) had emergency redo surgery. Twenty-two patients (75%) had acute prosthetic valve thrombosis. Thirty-two patients had tricuspid regurgitation. Original pathology was documented in 23 patients (40%) as Rheumatic valve disease. Prosthetic valve thrombosis was documented in 31 patients (54%). The most commonly used valve was the On-X. Mean presenting INR was 1.96 + 1.2 and mean presenting serum albumin was 36.7 + 7.8 g/l. Forty-one patients (71%) were found to be compliant to Warfarin therapy prior to redo surgery. Mean ICU stay was 6 +9 days. Two patients died postoperatively. Mean followup was 32 + 26.6 months. Twelve patients (20.7%) developed postoperative complications. Patients

  1. Nursing Casuistry in Heart Surgery : Plastic Mitral Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Břízová, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    Topic of this thesis is " Mitral Valvuloplasty". The thesis has been divided into theoretical and practical parts. The theoretical part begins with the classification of heart diseases. Main topic of this thesis is mitral insufficiency - its etiology and pathogenesis, clinical picture, therapy, the possibility of prosthetic valves and post surgery complications. Theoretical part also contains information about the preoperative and post-operative care at cardiac surgery department. The practic...

  2. Computer Aided Facial Prosthetics Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial deformities can impose burden to the patient. There are many solutions for facial deformities such as plastic surgery and facial prosthetics. However, current fabrication method of facial prosthetics is high-cost and time consuming. This study aimed to identify a new method to construct a customized facial prosthetic. A 3D scanner, computer software and 3D printer were used in this study. Results showed that the new developed method can be used to produce a customized facial prosthetics. The advantages of the developed method over the conventional process are low cost, reduce waste of material and pollution in order to meet the green concept.

  3. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  4. Microfluidic sieve valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  5. Rotary pneumatic valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Harry C.

    1991-01-01

    A rotary pneumatic valve which is thrust balanced and the pneumatic pressure developed produces only radial loads on the valve cylinder producing negligible resistance and thus minimal torque on the bearings of the valve. The valve is multiplexed such that at least two complete switching cycles occur for each revolution of the cylinder spindle.

  6. Mitral Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the left ventricle from flowing backward. A defective heart valve fails to either open or close fully. Risk factors Mitral valve stenosis is less common today than it once was because the most common cause, ... other heart valve problems, mitral valve stenosis can strain your ...

  7. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most cases, doctors don't know why a heart valve fails to develop properly, so it isn't something you could have prevented. Calcium buildup on the valve. With age, heart valves may accumulate deposits of calcium (aortic valve ...

  8. Remote actuated valve implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  9. Perioperative management of patient with Bombay blood group undergoing mitral valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shio Priye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bombay red blood cell phenotype is an extremely rare blood type for which patients can receive only autologous or Bombay phenotype red blood cells. We report a case of stenotic mitral valve with Bombay phenotype who underwent minimal invasive right lateral thoracotomy for the replacement of the mitral valve. A male patient from Bangladesh presented to the hospital with New York Heart Association III symptoms. His medical evaluation revealed severe mitral valve stenosis and mild aortic valve regurgitation. The patient received erythropoietin, intravenous iron succinate and folic acid tablets. Autologous blood transfusion was carried out. The mitral valve was replaced with a prosthetic valve successfully. After weaning off from cardiopulmonary bypass, heparinisation was corrected with protamine. Post-operatively, the patient received autologous red blood cells. The patient recovered after 1-day of inotropic support with adrenaline and milrinone, and diuretics and was discharged on the 5 th post-operative day.

  10. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  11. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  12. Aortic valve function after bicuspidization of the unicuspid aortic valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicher, Diana; Bewarder, Moritz; Kindermann, Michael; Abdul-Khalique, Hashim; Schäfers, Hans-Joachim

    2013-05-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) anatomy leads to dysfunction of the valve in young individuals. We introduced a reconstructive technique of bicuspidizing the UAV. Initially we copied the typical asymmetry of a normal bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) (I), later we created a symmetric BAV (II). This study compared the hemodynamic function of the two designs of a bicuspidized UAV. Aortic valve function was studied at rest and during exercise in 28 patients after repair of UAV (group I, n = 8; group II, n = 20). There were no differences among the groups I and II with respect to gender, age, body size, or weight. All patients were in New York Heart Association class I. Six healthy adults served as control individuals. All patients were studied with transthoracic echocardiography between 4 and 65 months postoperatively. Systolic gradients were assessed by continuous wave Doppler while patients were at rest and exercising on a bicycle ergometer. Aortic regurgitation was grade I or less in all patients. Resting gradients were significantly elevated in group I compared with group II and control individuals (group I, peak 33.8 ± 7.8 mm Hg; mean 19.1 ± 5.4 mm Hg; group II, peak 15.8 ± 5.4, mean 8.2 ± 2.8 mm Hg; control individuals, peak 6.0 ± 1.6, mean 3.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg; p competence. A symmetric repair design leads to improved systolic aortic valve function at rest and during exercise. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pathophysiology of shunt dysfunction in shunt treated hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blegvad, C.; Skjolding, A D; Broholm, H

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that shunt dysfunction in the ventricular catheter and the shunt valve is caused by different cellular responses. We also hypothesized that the cellular responses depend on different pathophysiological mechanisms....

  14. Aortic valve sparing root surgery for Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalanis, George; Perera, Nisal K

    2017-11-01

    Aortic valve sparing root surgery (AVSRS) is a safe and durable alternative for patients with dilated roots or pure aortic regurgitation (AR), which avoids the risks of anticoagulation or valvular degeneration with prosthetic valves. Notwithstanding the theoretical challenges of greater tissue fragility in Marfan syndrome (MFS), AVSRS has been demonstrated to have equal outcomes in this condition as it does in those without MFS. The benefits of retaining the native aortic valve in this generally younger age group extend beyond those of avoiding the inconvenience and complications of prolonged exposure to anticoagulants and include ease of management for future aortic, cardiac and non-cardiac procedures which are the norm for these patients. The essential principles of AVSRS in MFS do not differ from those for the rest of the population. Successful repair and durable valve function depend on a sound understanding of the close interaction between the structure and function of this exquisitely designed piece of engineering. We are fortunate to have numerous tools in our surgical armamentarium to preserve these valves. It is the purpose of this paper to demystify the complex structure-function interactions of the aortic valve, thereby gaining an intuition for AVSRS. We will also elaborate on specific technical details of established techniques that we have found successful in preserving the normal function of these valves in the long term.

  15. A 29-year-old Harken disk mitral valve: long-term follow-up by echocardiographic and cineradiographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, David H; Ryan, Gerald F; Taft, Janice; Arnone, Thomas J

    2003-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman was evaluated for prosthetic mitral valve function. She had received a Harken disk mitral valve 29 years earlier due to severe mitral valve disease. This particular valve prosthesis is known for premature disk edge wear and erosion. The patients 2-dimensional Doppler echocardiogram showed the distinctive appearance of a disk mitral valve prosthesis. Color Doppler in diastole showed a unique crown appearance, with initial flow acceleration around the disk followed by convergence to laminar flow in the left ventricle. Cineradiographic imaging revealed normal valve function and minimal disk erosion. We believe this to be the longest reported follow-up of a surviving patient with a rare Harken disk valve. We present images with unique echocardiographic and cineangiographic features.

  16. Recurrent acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery due to trachea malacia and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankatsing, S. U. C.; Hanselaar, W. E. J. J.; van Steenwijk, R. P.; Van der Sloot, J. A. P.; Broekhuis, E.; Kok, W. E. M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report we describe a patient with recurrent episodes of acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery. The first episode of pulmonary oedema was caused by mitral valve dysfunction. The second episode of pulmonary oedema was not clearly associated with a mitral valve problem,

  17. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  18. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors

  19. Preventative valve-sparing aortic root replacement and pregnancy outcome in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Vesna; Zlopasa, Gordan; Herman, Mislav; Planinić, Pavao; Micevska, Ana

    2012-06-01

    In Marfan syndrome, with dilatation of the aortic root secondary to an underlying connective tissue defect, pregnancy can cause hemodynamic stress leading to the development of an aortic aneurysm and even a fatal aortic dissection. In the presence of existing aortic root enlargement and a family history of aortic dissection, preventative elective surgery is suggested. Aortic root replacement with or without a valve-sparing procedure is superior to total aortic root replacement with prosthetic valve/tube graft. It provides excellent survival with low rates of aortic - valve related complications.

  20. Prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokpong Amornvit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular trauma can be caused by road traffic accidents, falls, assaults, or work-related accidents. Enucleation is often indicated after ocular injury or for the treatment of intraocular tumors, severe ocular infections, and painful blind eyes. Rehabilitation of an enucleated socket without an intraocular implant or with an inappropriately sized implant can result in superior sulcus deepening, enophthalmos, ptosis, ectropion, and lower lid laxity, which are collectively known as post-enucleation socket syndrome. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of post-enucleation socket syndrome with a modified ocular prosthesis. Modifications to the ocular prosthesis were performed to correct the ptosis, superior sulcus deepening, and enophthalmos. The rehabilitation procedure produced satisfactory results.

  1. Which valve is which?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Saxena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man presented with a history of breathlessness for the past 2 years. He had a history of operation for Tetralogy of Fallot at the age of 5 years and history suggestive of Rheumatic fever at the age of 7 years. On echocardiographic examination, all his heart valves were severely regurgitating. Morphologically, all the valves were irreparable. The ejection fraction was 35%. He underwent quadruple valve replacement. The aortic and mitral valves were replaced by metallic valve and the tricuspid and pulmonary by tissue valve.

  2. Bioprosthetic Valve Fracture Improves the Hemodynamic Results of Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Allen, Keith B; Saxon, John T; Cohen, David J; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Hart, Anthony J; Baron, Suzanne J; Dvir, Danny; Borkon, A Michael

    2017-07-01

    Valve-in-valve (VIV) transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) may be less effective in small surgical valves because of patient/prosthesis mismatch. Bioprosthetic valve fracture (BVF) using a high-pressure balloon can be performed to facilitate VIV TAVR. We report data from 20 consecutive clinical cases in which BVF was successfully performed before or after VIV TAVR by inflation of a high-pressure balloon positioned across the valve ring during rapid ventricular pacing. Hemodynamic measurements and calculation of the valve effective orifice area were performed at baseline, immediately after VIV TAVR, and after BVF. BVF was successfully performed in 20 patients undergoing VIV TAVR with balloon-expandable (n=8) or self-expanding (n=12) transcatheter valves in Mitroflow, Carpentier-Edwards Perimount, Magna and Magna Ease, Biocor Epic and Biocor Epic Supra, and Mosaic surgical valves. Successful fracture was noted fluoroscopically when the waist of the balloon released and by a sudden drop in inflation pressure, often accompanied by an audible snap. BVF resulted in a reduction in the mean transvalvular gradient (from 20.5±7.4 to 6.7±3.7 mm Hg, P valve effective orifice area (from 1.0±0.4 to 1.8±0.6 cm 2 , P valves to facilitate VIV TAVR with either balloon-expandable or self-expanding transcatheter valves and results in reduced residual transvalvular gradients and increased valve effective orifice area. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. 3D Bioprinting of Heterogeneous Aortic Valve Conduits with Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4±3.4% for SMC and 83.2±4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin when printed in stiff matrix, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin in soft matrix. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  4. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve syndrome . What happens during MVP? Watch an animation of mitral valve prolapse When the heart pumps ( ... our brochures Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  5. Problem: Mitral Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... each time the left ventricle contracts. Watch an animation of mitral valve regurgitation A leaking mitral valve ... Not Alone Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  6. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should be completely closed For example: Watch an animation of mitral valve regurgitation A leaking mitral valve ... Not Alone Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  7. Aortic valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007408.htm Aortic valve surgery - open To use the sharing features on this page, ... separates the heart and aorta. The aortic valve opens so blood can flow out. It then closes ...

  8. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  9. Mitral valve surgery - open

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Taking warfarin (Coumadin) References Otto CM, Bonow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ... A.M. Editorial team. Heart Surgery Read more Heart Valve Diseases Read more Mitral Valve Prolapse Read more A. ...

  10. Swing check valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eminger, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    A swing check valve which includes a valve body having an inlet and outlet is described. A recess in the valve body designed to hold a seal ring and a check valve disc swingable between open and closed positions. The disc is supported by a high strength wire secured at one end in a support spacer pinned through bearing blocks fixed to the valve body and at its other end in a groove formed on the outer peripheral surface of the disc. The parts are designed and chosen such to provide a lightweight valve disc which is held open by minimum velocity of fluid flowing through the valve which thus reduces oscillations and accompanying wear of bearings supporting the valve operating parts. (Auth.)

  11. Mitral valve surgery in the adult Marfan syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhudia, Sunil K; Troughton, Richard; Lam, Buu-Khanh; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Mills, William R; Gillinov, A Marc; Griffin, Brian P; Blackstone, Eugene H; Lytle, Bruce W; Svensson, Lars G

    2006-03-01

    Because mitral valve dysfunction in adults with Marfan syndrome is poorly characterized, this study compares mitral valve pathophysiology and morphology with that of myxomatous mitral disease, documents types of mitral valve operations, and assesses long-term survival and durability of mitral valve surgery in Marfan patients. From May 1975 to June 2000, 27 adults with Marfan syndrome underwent mitral valve surgery. Their valve pathophysiology and morphology was compared with that of 119 patients with myxomatous mitral disease undergoing surgery from September 1995 to March 1999. Survival and repair durability were assessed at follow-up. Compared with myxomatous disease patients, Marfan patients had less posterior leaflet prolapse (44% versus 70%, p = 0.01), more bileaflet (44% versus 28%, p = 0.09) and anterior leaflet prolapse (11% versus 3%, p = 0.07), and presented earlier for surgery (age 41 +/- 12 years versus 57 +/- 13, p Marfan patients had longer and thinner leaflets. Mitral valve repair was performed less frequently in Marfan (16 of 27, 59%) than myxomatous disease patients (112 of 119, 94%). There were no hospital deaths; at 10 years, survival was 80% and freedom from reoperation 96%, with only 1 reoperation among the 16 repairs. Mitral valve pathophysiology and morphology differ between Marfan and myxomatous mitral valve diseases. Valve repair in Marfan patients is durable and gives acceptable long-term results, even in adults who present with advanced mitral valve pathology. With increasing use of the modified David reimplantation operation and sparing of the aortic valve, mitral valve repair is a greater imperative, particularly since we have not had to reoperate on any Marfan patients with reimplantations.

  12. Mitral Valve Prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) occurs when one of your heart's valves doesn't work properly. The flaps of the valve are "floppy" and ... to run in families. Most of the time, MVP doesn't cause any problems. Rarely, blood can ...

  13. Overflow control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessinger, B.A.; Hundal, R.; Parlak, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    An overflow control valve for use in a liquid sodium coolant pump tank which can be remotely engaged with and disengaged from the pump tank wall to thereby permit valve removal. An actuating shaft for controlling the valve also has means for operating a sliding cylinder against a spring to retract the cylinder from sealing contact with the pump tank nozzle. (author)

  14. Fluid control valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, J.

    1980-01-01

    A fluid control valve is described in which it is not necessary to insert a hand or a tool into the housing to remove the valve seat. Such a valve is particularly suitable for the control of radioactive fluids since maintenance by remote control is possible. (UK)

  15. A remote control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachard, Maurice de; Dumont, Maurice.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns a remote control valve for shutting off or distributing a fluid flowing at a high rate and low pressure. Among the different valves at present in use, electric valves are the most recommended for remote control but their reliability is uncertain and they soon become costly when large diameter valves are used. The valve described in this invention does away with this drawback owing to its simplicity and the small number of moving parts, this makes it particularly reliable. It mainly includes: a tubular body fitted with at least one side opening; at least one valve wedge for this opening, coaxial with the body, and mobile; a mobile piston integral with this wedge. Several valves to the specifications of this invention can be fitted in series (a shut-off valve can be used in conjunction with one or more distribution valves). The fitting and maintenance of the valve is very simple owing to its design. It can be fabricated in any material such as metals, alloys, plastics and concrete. The structure of the valve prevents the flowing fluid from coming into contact with the outside environment, thereby making it particularly suitable in the handling of dangerous or corrosive fluids. Finally, the opening and shutting of the valve occurs slowly, thereby doing away with the water hammer effect so frequent in large bore pipes [fr

  16. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  17. Preoperative computer tomography evaluation in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groudeva, V.; Stoynova, V.; Trendafilova, D.; Dzhorgova, Y.; Nachev, G.

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is rapidly emerging technique alternative to surgery in high risk patients. Imaging and especially computer tomography is important in preoperative assessment of the aortic ring and the prosthetic valve choice. The aim of this study is to share authors initial experience in CT assessment of the aortic ring prior to Transcatheter aortic valve replacement. 49 patients (mean age 76,55) underwent 320 rows MDCT (Acquilon One) prior TAVI. Protocol involved scanning from thoracic inlet to common femoral arteries. Aortic root size, aortic diameter at the level of coronary sinuses and the sinotubular junction and distance to coronary ostia were evaluated on a Vitrea work station. MDCT established maximal aortic ring diameter from 18 to 31 mm mean 25,04 mm while the lesser rate was from 16 to 21 mm. Accordingly positioned prostheses were in 34,75% No. 23, in 49% - No. 26 and in16,3% - No. 29. MDCT is crucial in aortic valve assessment prior to TAVI in experienced hands and multidisciplinary team. (authors) Key words: TRANSCATHETER AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT (TAVI). MDCT AORTIC VALVE ASSESSMENT

  18. Defect in mitochondrial functions in damaged human mitral valve

    OpenAIRE

    Shinde, Santosh; Kumar, Pawan; Mishra, Kaushala; Patil, Neela

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders in which a primary mitochondrial dysfunction is proven by morphological, biochemical, and genetic examinations. The mitral valve has important function in the regulation of blood flow from one chamber to another. Often, the mitral valve becomes abnormal with age, in Rheumatic fever or it is abnormal from birth (Congenital) or it can be destroyed by infection i.e. bacterial endocarditis and needs replacement. Myocardial function dep...

  19. Insidious strut fractures in a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, S M; Sethi, G K; Paulson, D M; Takaro, T

    1978-04-01

    Recent reports of cage wear occurring in DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prostheses prompted us to examine with image intensification all our patients who have had this type of prosthesis implanted. One patient, who was asymptomatic, was discovered to have a prosthesis with two fractured struts. This patient's prosthetic valve was replaced successfully with a stented porcine heterograft prosthesis. Including the valve removed from this patient, 8 DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valves with structural defects have been reported to the manufacturer. In the absence of a catastrophic event, patients with valves having fractured or worn struts may be totally asymptomatic, and routine periodic roentgenographic examination may be the only way of detecting strut wear or fracture.

  20. Twenty-five-year experience with the Björk-Shiley convexoconcave heart valve: a continuing clinical concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, William J; Ibrahim, Michel A; Ivey, Tom D; Acheson, Donald E; Brookmeyer, Ron; Weyman, Arthur; Defauw, Joseph; Smith, J Kermit; Harrison, Donald

    2005-05-31

    The first Björk-Shiley convexoconcave (BSCC) prosthetic heart valves were implanted in 1978. The 25th anniversary provided a stimulus to summarize the research data relevant to BSCC valve fracture, patient management, and current clinical options. Published and unpublished data on the risks of BSCC valve fracture and replacement were compiled, and strategies for identifying candidates for prophylactic valve reoperation were summarized. By December 2003, outlet strut fractures (OSFs), often with fatal outcomes, had been reported in 633 BSCC valves (0.7% of 86,000 valves implanted). Fractures still continue to occur, but average rates of OSFs in 60 degrees valves are now valve characteristics, especially valve angle and size, with weaker effects associated with other manufacturing variables. OSF risks are mildly lower among women than men but decline sharply with advancing age. The risks of valve replacement typically greatly exceed those of OSF. By comparing individualized estimated risks of OSF versus valve replacement, guidelines have been developed to identify the small percentage of BSCC patients (mostly younger men) who would be expected to have a gain in life expectancy should reoperative surgery be performed. Twenty-five years after the initial BSCC valve implants, fractures continue to occur. Continued monitoring of BSCC patients is needed to track and quantify risks and enable periodic updating of guidelines for patients and their physicians.

  1. Novel thoughts on patient-prosthesis mismatch in aortic valve replacement: the rationale for the PAR I trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doenst, Torsten; Amorim, Paulo A; Diab, Mahmoud; Hagendorff, Andreas; Faerber, Gloria; Graff, Jürgen; Rastan, Ardawan; Deutsch, Oliver; Eichinger, Walter

    2014-09-01

    The hemodynamic performance of prosthetic tissue valves is influenced by valve design and valve-specific sizing strategies. Design determines the actual geometric opening area (GOA) of the prosthetic valve and sizing strategy its actual chosen size. Currently, hemodynamic performance is assessed by determining the effective orifice area (EOA; derived from the continuity equation by relating flow velocities with the area of the left ventricular outflow tract [LVOTA]). The question whether a valve is too small (patient-prosthesis mismatch [PPM]) is currently addressed by relating EOA to body surface area (EOA index [EOAi]). However, this relation may not be appropriate because the EOAi relates flow velocity to patient-specific anatomic parameters twice (i.e., LVOTA and body surface area). This potential confounder may explain the controversies regarding PPM. However, intuitively, leaving a gradient behind after aortic valve replacement cannot be irrelevant. PPM becomes even more relevant with transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation, where a second prosthesis is taking up inner space of a valve that may have already been too small initially. Thus, a reliable method to determine the presence of PPM is needed. The Prosthesis-to-Annulus Relation I (PAR I) trial is a German multicenter study assessing the relation between the prosthetic GOA and the LVOTA as a potentially new parameter for the prediction of hemodynamic outcome. The results may possibly guide future valve size selection and may allow prediction of functionally relevant PPM. Here, we will demonstrate the shortcomings of the currently applied EOAi for the assessment of hemodynamic relevance and present the rationale for the PARI trial, which recently started recruiting patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Advanced upper limb prosthetic devices: implications for upper limb prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Meucci, Marissa R; Lieberman-Klinger, Shana; Fantini, Christopher; Kelty, Debra L; Disla, Roxanne; Sasson, Nicole

    2012-04-01

    The number of catastrophic injuries caused by improvised explosive devices in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars has increased public, legislative, and research attention to upper limb amputation. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has partnered with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and DEKA Integrated Solutions to optimize the function of an advanced prosthetic arm system that will enable greater independence and function. In this special communication, we examine current practices in prosthetic rehabilitation including trends in adoption and use of prosthetic devices, financial considerations, and the role of rehabilitation team members in light of our experiences with a prototype advanced upper limb prosthesis during a VA study to optimize the device. We discuss key challenges in the adoption of advanced prosthetic technology and make recommendations for service provision and use of advanced upper limb prosthetics. Rates of prosthetic rejection are high among upper limb amputees. However, these rates may be reduced with sufficient training by a highly specialized, multidisciplinary team of clinicians, and a focus on patient education and empowerment throughout the rehabilitation process. There are significant challenges emerging that are unique to implementing the use of advanced upper limb prosthetic technology, and a lack of evidence to establish clinical guidelines regarding prosthetic prescription and treatment. Finally, we make recommendations for future research to aid in the identification of best practices and development of policy decisions regarding insurance coverage of prosthetic rehabilitation. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Low radiation dose non-contrast cardiac CT: is it of value in the evaluation of mechanical aortic valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez; Moselhy, Mohamed Saleh; Rezk, Ahmad Ibrahim; Al-Murayeh, Mushabab Ayedh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prosthetic bileaflet mechanical valve function has been traditionally evaluated using echocardiography and fluoroscopy. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a novel technique for cardiac evaluation. Purpose: To evaluate bileaflet mechanical aortic valves using a low-milliampere (mA), non-contrast MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. Material and Methods: Forty patients with a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve were evaluated using a non-contrast, low-mA, ECG-gated 64 MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. MDCT findings of opening and closing valve angles were correlated to fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Also, the valve visibility was evaluated on MDCT and fluoroscopy according to a 3-point grading scale. Results: The visualization score with the MDCT was significantly superior to the fluoroscopy (3 vs. 2.7). A strong correlation was noted between the opening (r = 0.82) and closing (r = 0.96) valve angles with MDCT and fluoroscopy without a statistically significant difference (P = 0.31 and 0.16, respectively). The mean effective radiation dose of the suggested protocol was 4 ± 0.5 mSv. Five valves were evaluated using transesophageal echocardiography because the valves were difficult to evaluate with transthoracic echocardiography, and all of these valves were evaluated optimally with MDCT. A high-pressure gradient was noted in nine valves, and the MDCT showed that seven of these valves inadequately opened, and two valves opened well, which resulted in patient valve mismatch. Incomplete valve closure was noted in five valves, and the echocardiography showed significant transvalvular regurgitation in all five valves. Conclusion: MDCT can provide a precise measurement of valve function and can potentially evaluate high-pressure gradients and transvalvular regurgitation

  4. Low radiation dose non-contrast cardiac CT: is it of value in the evaluation of mechanical aortic valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeed, Mohamed Fayez (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura Univ. (Egypt)), email: m_bazeed@yahoo.com; Moselhy, Mohamed Saleh (Cardiology Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal Univ. (Egypt)); Rezk, Ahmad Ibrahim (Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Aim Shams Univ. (Egypt)); Al-Murayeh, Mushabab Ayedh (Dept. of Cardiac Services, Armed Forces Hospitals Southern Region (Saudi Arabia))

    2012-05-15

    Background: Prosthetic bileaflet mechanical valve function has been traditionally evaluated using echocardiography and fluoroscopy. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a novel technique for cardiac evaluation. Purpose: To evaluate bileaflet mechanical aortic valves using a low-milliampere (mA), non-contrast MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. Material and Methods: Forty patients with a bileaflet mechanical aortic valve were evaluated using a non-contrast, low-mA, ECG-gated 64 MDCT protocol with a limited scan range. MDCT findings of opening and closing valve angles were correlated to fluoroscopy and echocardiography. Also, the valve visibility was evaluated on MDCT and fluoroscopy according to a 3-point grading scale. Results: The visualization score with the MDCT was significantly superior to the fluoroscopy (3 vs. 2.7). A strong correlation was noted between the opening (r = 0.82) and closing (r = 0.96) valve angles with MDCT and fluoroscopy without a statistically significant difference (P = 0.31 and 0.16, respectively). The mean effective radiation dose of the suggested protocol was 4 +- 0.5 mSv. Five valves were evaluated using transesophageal echocardiography because the valves were difficult to evaluate with transthoracic echocardiography, and all of these valves were evaluated optimally with MDCT. A high-pressure gradient was noted in nine valves, and the MDCT showed that seven of these valves inadequately opened, and two valves opened well, which resulted in patient valve mismatch. Incomplete valve closure was noted in five valves, and the echocardiography showed significant transvalvular regurgitation in all five valves. Conclusion: MDCT can provide a precise measurement of valve function and can potentially evaluate high-pressure gradients and transvalvular regurgitation

  5. DME Prosthetics Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics-Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule. The list contains the fee schedule amounts, floors, and ceilings for all procedure codes...

  6. Heavy gas valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, L [Vereinigte Armaturen Gesellschaft m.b.H., Mannheim (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-01-01

    Heavy gas valves must comply with special requirements. Apart from absolute safety in operation there are stringent requirements for material, sealing and ease of operation even in the most difficult conditions. Ball valves and single plate pipe gate valves lateral sealing rings have a dual, double sided sealing effect according to the GROVE sealing system. Single plate gate valves with lateral protective plates are suitable preferably for highly contaminated media. Soft sealing gate valves made of cast iron are used for low pressure applications.

  7. Relief valve testing study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROMM, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    Reclosing pressure-actuated valves, commonly called relief valves, are designed to relieve system pressure once it reaches the set point of the valve. They generally operate either proportional to the differential between their set pressure and the system pressure (gradual lift) or by rapidly opening fully when the set pressure is reached (pop action). A pop action valve allows the maximum fluid flow through the valve when the set pressure is reached. A gradual lift valve allows fluid flow in proportion to how much the system pressure has exceeded the set pressure of the valve (in the case of pressure relief) or has decreased below the set pressure (vacuum relief). These valves are used to protect systems from over and under pressurization. They are used on boilers, pressure vessels, piping systems and vacuum systems to prevent catastrophic failures of these systems, which can happen if they are under or over pressurized beyond the material tolerances. The construction of these valves ranges from extreme precision of less than a psi tolerance and a very short lifetime to extremely robust construction such as those used on historic railroad steam engines that are designed operate many times a day without changing their set pressure when the engines are operating. Relief valves can be designed to be immune to the effects of back pressure or to be vulnerable to it. Which type of valve to use depends upon the design requirements of the system

  8. Isolated Lactobacillus chronic prosthetic knee infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David M; Shekhel, Tatyana; Radelet, Matt; Miller, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus is a gram-positive rod bacteria found primarily in the gastrointestinal and female genital tracts. Prosthetic infections in implants are being increasingly reported. The authors present a case of a 58-year-old patient with Lactobacillus septic prosthetic knee joint infection. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of chronic prosthetic knee infection with isolated Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus has been most commonly implicated with bacteremia and endocarditis and rarely with pneumonia, meningitis, and endovascular infection, and a vast majority of the cases are reported in immunocompromised patients. In the current case, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis, malnutrition, anemia, and liver failure were comorbid conditions, placing the patient at increased risk of infection. The findings suggest that further case series are necessary to establish the significance of Lactobacillus as an etiologic agent in chronic low-virulence, and potentially vancomycin-resistant, prosthetic joint infection. The need also exists for further research aimed at the risk of prosthetic joint infection with oral intake of certain probiotic foods and supplements. The goal of this case report is to bring to light the potential of this organism to be a cause of subtle chronic prosthetic joint infection.

  9. Aorta-atria-septum combined incision for aortic valve re-replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiwei; Ye, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhaolong

    2018-01-01

    This case report illustrates a patient who underwent supra-annular mechanical aortic valve replacement then suffered from prosthesis dysfunction, increasing pressure gradient with aortic valve. She was successfully underwent aortic valve re-replacement, sub-annular pannus removing and aortic annulus enlargement procedures through combined cardiac incision passing through aortic root, right atrium (RA), and upper atrial septum. This incision provides optimal visual operative field and simplifies dissection. PMID:29850170

  10. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  11. The History of Nontraditional or Ectopic Placement of Reservoirs in Prosthetic Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perito, Paul; Wilson, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir placement during implantation of prosthetic urology devices has been problematic throughout the history of the surgical treatment of erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence. We thought it would be interesting to review the history of reservoir placement leading up to current surgical techniques. To provide an overview of the past and present techniques for reservoir placement and discuss the evolutionary process leading to safe and effective placement of prosthetic reservoirs. We reviewed data pertaining to inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) reservoirs and pressure-regulating balloons (PRB) in a chronological fashion, spanning 25 years. Main outcomes included a historical review of techniques for IPP reservoir and PRB placement leading to the subsequent incremental improvements in safety and efficacy when performing penile implants and artificial urinary sphincters. Prosthetic urologic reservoirs have traditionally been placed in the retropubic space. Over the years, urologists have attempted use of alternative spaces including peritoneal, epigastric, "ectopic," posterior to transversalis, and high submuscular. Current advances in prosthetic urologic reservoir placement allow safe and effective abdominal wall placement of reservoirs. These novel approaches appear to be so effective that urologists may now be able to cease using the traditional retropubic space for reservoir placement, even in the case of virgin pelves. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hemodynamics in the Valsalva sinuses after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducci, Andrea; Tzamtzis, Spyridon; Mullen, Michael J; Burriesci, Gaetano

    2013-09-01

    The study aim was to assess, in vitro, the hemodynamic modifications produced by transcatheter valves in the Valsalva sinuses, by mean of phase-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Flow measurements were performed on a glass mock aortic root that included three polymeric valve leaflets, before and after the implantation of a Medtronic CoreValve device and of an Edwards SAPIEN valve. All experiments were carried out in a hydro-mechanical cardiovascular pulse duplicator system (Vivitro Superpump System SP3891) that reproduced physiologically equivalent pressures and flow rates conforming to the requirements of the standard ISO 5840:2005. The flow dynamics, before and after implantation of the two prosthetic devices, was characterized on the basis of phase-resolved velocity field and viscous shear rate measurements. Direct comparison indicated that both transcatheter valves determined a significant variation of flow during the early stages of valve opening and during valve closure. In general, the presence of the two valve implants significantly reduced the flow activity in the Valsalva sinuses, promoting regions of stagnation at their base. The reduction in flow in the Valsalva sinuses could be associated with the higher incidence of ischemic events reported after transcatheter heart valve implantation.

  13. Excessive strut wear allowing ball-poppet embolization in a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic valve prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, R D; Guynes, W A; Nichols, C T; Martinez, H E

    1982-01-01

    Excessive cage strut wear allowing ball-poppet embolization caused the sudden death of a 47 year old lady in whom a DeBakey-Surgitool aortic prosthesis had been implanted nine years earlier. Patients with this type of prosthesis should have periodic valvular cine fluoroscopy with image intensification to allow visualization of significant strut wear or fracture, and appropriate prosthetic valve replacement.

  14. Aortic Valve Replacement for Infective Endocarditis in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmoudi Sayda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplant recipients are more prone to developing infections. We report a 37-year old renal transplant recipient who developed infective endocarditis of the aortic valve, heart failure and renal allograft dysfunction. He underwent aortic valve replacement which was followed by improvement in cardiac as well as allograft function.

  15. [Diagnosis of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction caused by occlusion pathology and treatment of such patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semkin, V A; Rabukhina, N A; Kravchenko, D V

    2007-01-01

    Patients with temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction need complex treatment that includes prosthetic treatment in intrajoint relation stabilization. In cases of TMJ pathology it is necessary to examine patients and make axiography, function analysis, MPI-analysis, magnetic resonance tomography and zonography of TMJ, electromyography of the masticatory muscles. The authors examined 47 patients with TMJ dysfunction, 43 of them had occlusion pathology. We managed to eliminate the dysfunction symptoms and to receive stable result of the treatment in all the patients.

  16. Erectile Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or other heart problems take medications that contain nitrates to help the blood flow better to the ... erectile dysfunction can affect the way that the nitrates work—and cause blood pressure to drop to ...

  17. Bentall procedure using cryopreserved valved aortic homografts: mid- to long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Jan T; Sierra, Jorge; Trindade, Pedro T; Dominique, Didier; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2004-01-01

    The Bentall procedure is the standard operation for patients who have lesions of the ascending aorta associated with aortic valve disease. In many cases, however, mechanical prosthetic conduits are not suitable. There are few reports in the English-language medical literature concerning the mid- to long-term outcome of Bentall operations with cryopreserved homografts. Therefore, we reviewed our experience with this procedure and valved homografts. From January 1997 through December 2002, 21 patients underwent a Bentall operation with cryopreserved homografts at our institution. There were 14 males and 7 females; the mean age was 36 +/- 21 years (range, 15-74 years). Eleven patients had undergone previous aortic valve surgery. All patients had aortic dilatation or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta. Indications for surgery included aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, and aortic valve endocarditis (native valve or prosthetic). One patient had Takayasu's arteritis and 3 had Marfan syndrome. There was 1 hospital death (due to sepsis), but no other major postoperative complications. The mean hospital stay was 14 +/- 7 days. Follow-up echocardiographic and computed tomographic scans were performed yearly. The mean follow-up was 34 months (6-72 months). Follow-up imaging revealed no calcifications or degenerative processes related to the homograft. Four patients had minimal valve regurgitation. Two patients died during follow-up. The 3-year actuarial survival rate was 85.7%. Our data suggest that the Bentall procedure with a valved homograft conduit is a safe procedure with excellent mid- to long-term results, comparable to results reported with aortic valve replacement with a homograft.

  18. Intelligent Flow Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is an intelligent flow control valve which may be inserted into the flow coming out of a pipe and activated to provide a method to stop, measure, and meter flow coming from the open or possibly broken pipe. The intelligent flow control valve may be used to stop the flow while repairs are made. Once repairs have been made, the valve may be removed or used as a control valve to meter the amount of flow from inside the pipe. With the addition of instrumentation, the valve may also be used as a variable area flow meter and flow controller programmed based upon flowing conditions. With robotic additions, the valve may be configured to crawl into a desired pipe location, anchor itself, and activate flow control or metering remotely.

  19. Nuclear valves latest development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, F.; Monier, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the frame of Nuclear Power Plant upgrade (Emergency Power Supply and Emergency Core Cooling), Westinghouse had to face a new valve design philosophy specially for motor operated valves. The valves have to been designed to resist any operating conditions, postulated accident or loss of control. The requirements for motor operated valves are listed and the selected model and related upgrading explained. As part of plant upgrade and valves replacement, Westinghouse has sponsored alternative hardfacing research programme. Two types of materials have been investigated: nickel base alloys and iron base alloys. Programme requirements and test results are given. A new globe valve model (On-Off or regulating) is described developed by Alsthom Velan permitting the seat replacement in less than 10 min. (Z.S.) 2 figs

  20. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  1. Low noise control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    Noise is one of the problems associated with the use of any type of control valve in systems involving the flow of fluids. The advent of OSHA standards has prompted control valve manufacturers to design valves with special trim to lower the sound pressure level to meet these standards. However, these levels are in some cases too high, particularly when a valve must be located in or near an area where people are working at tasks requiring a high degree of concentration. Such locations are found around and near research devices and in laboratory-office areas. This paper describes a type of fluid control device presently being used at PPL as a bypass control valve in deionized water systems and designed to reduce sound pressure levels considerably below OSHA standards. Details of the design and construction of this constant pressure drop variable flow control valve are contained in the text and are shown in photographs and drawings. Test data taken are included

  2. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  3. Magnetic Check Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brian G.; Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Poppet in proposed check valve restored to closed condition by magnetic attraction instead of spring force. Oscillations suppressed, with consequent reduction of wear. Stationary magnetic disk mounted just upstream of poppet, also containing magnet. Valve body nonmagnetic. Forward pressure or flow would push poppet away from stationary magnetic disk so fluid flows easily around poppet. Stop in valve body prevents poppet from being swept away. When flow stopped or started to reverse, magnetic attraction draws poppet back to disk. Poppet then engages floating O-ring, thereby closing valve and preventing reverse flow. Floating O-ring facilitates sealing at low loads.

  4. Butterfly valves for seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Katsuto

    1991-01-01

    Recently in thermal and nuclear power stations and chemical plants which have become large capacity, large quantity of cooling water is required, and mostly seawater is utilized. In these cooling water systems, considering thermal efficiency and economy, the pipings become complex, and various control functions are demanded. For the purpose, the installation of shut-off valves and control valves for pipings is necessary. The various types of valves have been employed, and in particular, butterfly valves have many merits in their function, size, structure, operation, maintenance, usable period, price and so on. The corrosion behavior of seawater is complicated due to the pollution of seawater, therefore, the environment of the valves used for seawater became severe. The structure and the features of the butterfly valves for seawater, the change of the structure of the butterfly valves for seawater and the checkup of the butterfly valves for seawater are reported. The corrosion of metallic materials is complicatedly different due to the locating condition of plants, the state of pipings and the condition of use. The corrosion countermeasures for butterfly valves must be examined from the synthetic viewpoints. (K.I.)

  5. Redo mitral valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redoy Ranjan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on the findings of a single surgeon’s practice of mitral valve replacement of 167 patients from April 2005 to June 2017 who developed symptomatic mitral restenosis after closed or open mitral commisurotomy. Both clinical and color doppler echocardiographic data of peri-operative and six months follow-up period were evaluated and compared to assess the early outcome of the redo mitral valve surgery. With male-female ratio of 1: 2.2 and after a duration of 6 to 22 years symptom free interval between the redo procedures, the selected patients with mitral valve restenosis undergone valve replacement with either mechanical valve in 62% cases and also tissue valve in 38% cases. Particular emphasis was given to separate the adhered pericardium from the heart completely to ameliorate base to apex and global contraction of the heart. Besides favorable post-operative clinical outcome, the echocardiographic findings were also encouraging as there was statistically significant increase in the mitral valve area and ejection fraction with significant decrease in the left atrial diameter, pressure gradient across the mitral valve and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Therefore, in case of inevitable mitral restenosis after closed or open commisurotomy, mitral valve replacement is a promising treatment modality.

  6. Diseases of the Tricuspid Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stenosis. Tricuspid Regurgitation Tricuspid regurgitation is also called tricuspid insufficiency or tricuspid incompetence. It means there is a ... require valve surgery. Tags: heart valves , tricuspid incompetence , ... tricuspid regurgitation , tricuspid stenosis , valve disease Related Links ...

  7. Methods of estimation of mitral valve regurgitation for the cardiac surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baikoussis Nikolaos G

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitral valve regurgitation is a relatively common and important heart valve lesion in clinical practice and adequate assessment is fundamental to decision on management, repair or replacement. Disease localised to the posterior mitral valve leaflet or focal involvement of the anterior mitral valve leaflet is most amenable to mitral valve repair, whereas patients with extensive involvement of the anterior leaflet or incomplete closure of the valve are more suitable for valve replacement. Echocardiography is the recognized investigation of choice for heart valve disease evaluation and assessment. However, the technique is depended on operator experience and on patient's hemodynamic profile, and may not always give optimal diagnostic views of mitral valve dysfunction. Cardiac catheterization is related to common complications of an interventional procedure and needs a hemodynamic laboratory. Cardiac magnetic resonance (MRI seems to be a useful tool which gives details about mitral valve anatomy, precise point of valve damage, as well as the quantity of regurgitation. Finally, despite of its higher cost, cardiac MRI using cine images with optimized spatial and temporal resolution can also resolve mitral valve leaflet structural motion, and can reliably estimate the grade of regurgitation.

  8. A new one-step procedure for pulmonary valve implantation of the melody valve: Simultaneous prestenting and valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjemline, Younes

    2018-01-01

    To describe a new modification, the one-step procedure, that allows interventionists to pre-stent and implant a Melody valve simultaneously. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) is the standard of care for managing patients with dysfunctional right ventricular outflow tract, and the approach is standardized. Patients undergoing PPVI using the one-step procedure were identified in our database. Procedural data and radiation exposure were compared to those in a matched group of patients who underwent PPVI using the conventional two-step procedure. Between January 2016 and January 2017, PPVI was performed in 27 patients (median age/range, 19.1/10-55 years) using the one-step procedure involving manual crimping of one to three bare metal stents over the Melody valve. The stent and Melody valve were delivered successfully using the Ensemble delivery system. No complications occurred. All patients had excellent hemodynamic results (median/range post-PPVI right ventricular to pulmonary artery gradient, 9/0-20 mmHg). Valve function was excellent. Median procedural and fluoroscopic times were 56 and 10.2 min, respectively, which significantly differed from those of the two-step procedure group. Similarly, the dose area product (DAP), and radiation time were statistically lower in the one-step group than in the two-step group (P step procedure is a safe modification that allows interventionists to prestent and implants the Melody valve simultaneously. It significantly reduces procedural and fluoroscopic times, and radiation exposure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Seguimento de 9 anos da bioprótese valvular cardíaca de pericárdio bovino IMC-Biomédica: estudo multicêntrico Nine year follow-up of the bovine pericardial prosthetic valve IMC-Biomedica: a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre V Brick

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available De dezembro de 1977 a novembro de 1986, foi usado o bioenxerto valvular cardíaco de pericárdio bovino IMC-Biomédica na posição mitral, em 798 pacientes, com idade média de 42 anos. Os 722 pacientes sobreviventes foram observados por um período de até 9 anos, representando 27036 meses, ou 2253 anos. O estudo indicou um índice de sobrevida de 66% para os adultos e 69% para os jovens, sendo de 94% e 80% o índice de sobrevida para os adultos e jovens, respectivamente, com pós-operatório de 5 anos. A freqüência das complicações diante da amostra analisada foi: 0,4% de rotura do tecido; 0,4% de vazamento paravalvular; 2,7% de acidente vascular cerebral; 3,2% de endocardite infecciosa; 4,4% de calcificação. A curva atuarial de calcificação entre os anos de 1978 e 1982 (Grupo I mostrou 94% dos adultos e 12% dos jovens livres dessa complicação. Por outro lado, de 1982 a 1986 (Grupo II, esse índice subiu para 99,0% entre os adultos e 92,0% para os jovens. Deste modo, concluímos que a nossa opção pela bioprótese de pericárdio bovino foi apropriada, visto que 96% dos pacientes estiveram livres de complicações fatais relacionadas à bioprótese, o que significa que, em 9 anos, o potencial da bioprótese foi apenas de 4%.A mitral pericardial bioprosthetic valve IMC-Biomedica was implanted in a consecutive series of 798 patients with mean age of 52 years, from December 1977 to November 1978. The 722 patients who survived operation were observed during a period of 9 years (mean 27036 months or 2253 years. Actuarial studies indicated an expected survived rate at 9 years of 66% for adult patients and 68% for younger patients. The probability of complications were the following: rupture 0.4; perivalvar leak 0.4%; thromboembolysm 2.7%; endocarditis 3.2%; calcification 4.4%. The actuarial freedom from calcification between 1977 to 1982 (Group I was 94.0% to adults and 12.0% to younger patients. On the other hand, between 1982 to 1986

  10. Risk-adjusted survival after tissue versus mechanical aortic valve replacement: a 23-year assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaca, Jeffrey G; Clare, Robert M; Rankin, J Scott; Daneshmand, Mani A; Milano, Carmelo A; Hughes, G Chad; Wolfe, Walter G; Glower, Donald D; Smith, Peter K

    2013-11-01

    Detailed analyses of risk-adjusted outcomes after mitral valve surgery have documented significant survival decrements with tissue valves at any age. Several recent studies of prosthetic aortic valve replacement (AVR) also have suggested a poorer performance of tissue valves, although analyses have been limited to small matched series. The study aim was to test the hypothesis that AVR with tissue valves is associated with a lower risk-adjusted survival, as compared to mechanical valves. Between 1986 and 2009, primary isolated AVR, with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), was performed with currently available valve types in 2148 patients (1108 tissue valves, 1040 mechanical). Patients were selected for tissue valves to be used primarily in the elderly. Baseline and operative characteristics were documented prospectively with a consistent variable set over the entire 23-year period. Follow up was obtained with mailed questionnaires, supplemented by National Death Index searches. The average time to death or follow up was seven years, and follow up for survival was 96.2% complete. Risk-adjusted survival characteristics for the two groups were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model with stepwise selection of candidate variables. Differences in baseline characteristics between groups were (tissue versus mechanical): median age 73 versus 61 years; non-elective surgery 32% versus 28%; CABG 45% versus 35%; median ejection fraction 55% versus 55%; renal failure 6% versus 1%; diabetes 18% versus 7% (pvalves; however, after risk adjustment for the adverse profiles of tissue valve patients, no significant difference was observed in survival after tissue or mechanical AVR. Thus, the hypothesis did not hold, and risk-adjusted survival was equivalent, of course qualified by the fact that selection bias was evident. With selection criteria that employed tissue AVR more frequently in elderly patients, tissue and mechanical valves achieved similar survival

  11. [Localized purpura revealing vascular prosthetic graft infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, A S; Lescalie, F; Cassagnau, E; Clairand, R; Connault, J

    2013-07-01

    Prosthetic graft infection after vascular reconstruction is a rare but serious complication. We report a case of infection occurring late after implantation of an iliofemoral prosthetic vascular graft. The Staphylococcus aureus infection was revealed by vascular purpura localized on the right leg 7 years after implantation of a vascular prosthesis. This case illustrates an uncommonly late clinical manifestation presenting as an acute infection 7 years after the primary operation. In this situation, the presentation differs from early infection, which generally occurs within the first four postoperative months. Diagnosis and treatment remain a difficult challenge because prosthetic graft infection is a potentially life-threatening complication. Morbidity and mortality rates are high. Here we detail specific aspects of the clinical and radiological presentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Validation of the prosthetic esthetic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özhayat, Esben B; Dannemand, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In order to diagnose impaired esthetics and evaluate treatments for these, it is crucial to evaluate all aspects of oral and prosthetic esthetics. No professionally administered index currently exists that sufficiently encompasses comprehensive prosthetic esthetics. This study aimed...... to validate a new comprehensive index, the Prosthetic Esthetic Index (PEI), for professional evaluation of esthetics in prosthodontic patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The content, criterion, and construct validity; the test-retest, inter-rater, and internal consistency reliability; and the sensitivity...... furthermore distinguish between participants and controls, indicating sufficient sensitivity. CONCLUSION: The PEI is considered a valid and reliable instrument involving sufficient aspects for assessment of the professionally evaluated esthetics in prosthodontic patients. CLINICAL RELEVANCE...

  13. Responsiveness of the Prosthetic Esthetic Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzhayat, Esben Boeskov

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the responsiveness of the Prosthetic Esthetic Index (PEI) in a population who received prosthetic replacements. Materials and methods Fifty-seven patients who received prosthetic replacement of at least one tooth by means of fixed or removable...... prosthesis were professionally esthetically evaluated using the PEI and the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) before and after treatment. The participants further evaluated their oral esthetics using the Oral Health Impact Profile Aesthetic (OHIP-Aes) and Orofacial Esthetic Index (OES). Responsiveness......-Aes and OES scores. The PEI was more consistent in responsiveness than the DAI. Conclusions The PEI shows sufficient responsiveness for use in longitudinal studies and for use as a follow-up measure in clinical practice. Clinical relevance The PEI can in a standardized manner monitor and document esthetic...

  14. Ten questions on prosthetic shoulder infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Elizabeth M; Ong, Joshua Cy; Bale, R Stephen; Trail, Ian A

    2016-07-01

    Prosthetic shoulder infection can cause significant morbidity secondary to pain and stiffness. Symptoms may be present for years before diagnosis because clinical signs are often absent and inflammatory markers may be normal. An emerging common culprit, Propionibacterium acnes, is hard to culture and so prolonged incubation is necessary. A negative culture result does not always exclude infection and new synovial fluid biochemical markers such as α defensin are less sensitive than for lower limb arthroplasty. A structured approach is necessary when assessing patients for prosthetic shoulder joint infection. This includes history, examination, serum inflammatory markers, plain radiology and aspiration and/or biopsy. A classification for the likelihood of prosthetic shoulder infection has been described based on culture, pre-operative and intra-operative findings. Treatment options include antibiotic suppression, debridement with component retention, one-stage revision, two-stage revision and excision arthroplasty. Revision arthroplasty is associated with the best outcomes.

  15. Utilization of penile prosthesis and male incontinence prosthetics in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwaal, Amjad; Al-Sayyad, Ahmad J

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a prevalent disease affecting over 50% of men between the ages of 40 and 70 years. Penile prosthesis represents the end of the line treatment when other less invasive therapies fail or are contraindicated. Male stress urinary incontinence can significantly diminish quality of life and lead to embarrassment and social withdrawal. Surgical therapies, such as male urethral slings and artificial urinary sphincters (AUS), are considered effective and safe treatments for male stress incontinence. No data exist on the utilization of penile prosthesis or male incontinence surgical treatment in Saudi Arabia. Generally, urological prosthetic surgery is performed either in private hospitals or in government hospitals. Our aim was to assess the trend of penile prosthesis and male incontinence device utilization in Saudi Arabia. We utilized sales' data of penile prosthetics, male slings, and AUS from the only two companies selling these devices in Saudi Arabia (AMS ® and Coloplast ® ), from January 2013 to December 2016. There were 2599 penile prosthesis implantation procedures done in the study period, with 67% of them performed in private institutions. There was a progressively increased use of penile prosthetics which nearly doubled from 2013 to 2016. The main type of prosthesis utilized was the semirigid type 70% versus 11% of the 2-piece inflatable and 17% of the 3-piece inflatable device. Only 10 slings and 31 AUS were inserted during the same study period. There is an increased utilization of penile prosthetics in Saudi Arabia. The private sector performs the majority of penile prosthesis procedures, and most of them are of the semirigid type. The governmental sector is more likely to perform inflatable penile prosthesis and male incontinence device procedures. Male incontinence prosthetics' use is very limited in Saudi Arabia.

  16. Bruxism and prosthetic treatment: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders; Omar, Ridwaan; Carlsson, Gunnar E

    2011-07-01

    Based on the findings from available research on bruxism and prosthetic treatment published in the dental literature, an attempt was made to draw conclusions about the existence of a possible relationship between the two, and its clinical relevance. MEDLINE/PubMed searches were conducted using the terms 'bruxism' and 'prosthetic treatment', as well as combinations of these and related terms. The few studies judged to be relevant were critically reviewed, in addition to papers found during an additional manual search of reference lists within selected articles. Bruxism is a common parafunctional habit, occurring both during sleep and wakefulness. Usually it causes few serious effects, but can do so in some patients. The etiology is multifactorial. There is no known treatment to stop bruxism, including prosthetic treatment. The role of bruxism in the process of tooth wear is unclear, but it is not considered a major cause. As informed by the present critical review, the relationship between bruxism and prosthetic treatment is one that relates mainly to the effect of the former on the latter. Bruxism may be included among the risk factors, and is associated with increased mechanical and/or technical complications in prosthodontic rehabilitation, although it seems not to affect implant survival. When prosthetic intervention is indicated in a patient with bruxism, efforts should be made to reduce the effects of likely heavy occlusal loading on all the components that contribute to prosthetic structural integrity. Failure to do so may indicate earlier failure than is the norm. Copyright © 2011 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mycobacterium goodii endocarditis following mitral valve ring annuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Rohan B; Grant, Matthew

    2017-03-21

    Mycobacterium goodii is an infrequent human pathogen which has been implicated in prosthesis related infections and penetrating injuries. It is often initially misidentified as a gram-positive rod by clinical microbiologic laboratories and should be considered in the differential diagnosis. We describe here the second reported case of M. goodii endocarditis. Species level identification was performed by 16S rDNA (ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid) gene sequencing. The patient was successfully treated with mitral valve replacement and a prolonged combination of ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Confirmation of the diagnosis utilizing molecular techniques and drug susceptibility testing allowed for successful treatment of this prosthetic infection.

  18. Optimising the prescription of prosthetic technologies (opptec): Outcome measures for evidence based prosthetic practice and use

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryall, Dr Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This study provided a forum for patients and service providers to voice their opinions in what they believe to be the important predictors and outcomes involved in successful rehabilitation following limb loss. To develop a consensus on the most important outcomes and factors to address for both the lower limb and upper limb prosthetic prescription process, the above data relating to lower limb and upper prosthetics were subsequently used in the next phase of the research involving two Delphi surveys of 23 and 53 experts within the lower limb and upper limb amputation and prosthetic field respectively, including users, service providers and researchers.\\r\

  19. [Multiple agenesis and prosthetic restoration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, P

    1990-03-01

    Cases of multiple agenesia present some difficulties in the treatment planing. Three situations may be encountered: limited agenesia, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia without remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by a fixed, bonded or cemented prosthesis or the partial adjacent prosthesis, multiple uni- or bimaxillary agenesia with remaining of deciduous teeth, restored by means of a supra-dental prosthesis. The first two situations have been described in dental literature and are relatively easy to treat. The same is not true for the third situation, where the decision to keep the temporary teeth considerably increases the difficulty of prosthetic restoration. This subject will be illustrated by the presentation of a clinical case of multiple bi-maxillary agenesia. The patient has: on the maxilla: an absence of 9 permanent teeth (18, 15, 14, 12, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28) and the presence of 4 deciduous teeth (62, 63, 64, 65), on the mandible: an absence of all permanent teeth, with the exception of 36 and 46, and the remaining of 4 deciduous teeth (75, 73, 83, 84). The remaining of deciduous teeth and the presence of a very high inter-arch space led to opting for dental coverage so as to keep the deciduous teeth and a proper vertical dimension. The patient wished to solve his "problem" in the maxilla first, and is not wanting to undergo the extraction of his deciduous teeth. The following therapeutic proposal was adapted: On the maxilla, a three-step procedure: first step: building of metal copings on 13, 16 and 26 and metal-ceramic crowns on 11 and 21, second step: building of telescop crowns on 16 and 26 and clasps on 13, 11 and 21, third step: casting of the removable partial denture framework and soldering to the telescop crowns and clasps. On the mandible, a provisional restoration using a supra-dental resin removable partial denture with ceramic occlusal surfaces was adopted. The aesthetic and functional

  20. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  1. Delayed Presentation of a Giant Ascending Aortic Aneurysm following Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Göncü

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant ascending aortic aneurysm formation following aortic valve replacement is rare. A 28-year-old man who underwent aortic valve replacement with a prosthetic valve for aortic regurgitation secondary to congenital bicuspid aortic valve about 10 years ago was diagnosed with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm about 16 cm in diameter in follow-up. The aneurysm was resected leaving the functional old mechanical prosthesis in place and implanted a 34-mm Hemashield woven graft, associated with the left and right coronary artery button implantation. Histological findings of the aortic aneurysm wall showed cystic medial necrosis. The postoperative course was uneventful and postoperative examination demonstrated good surgical results.

  2. Danfos: Thermostatic Radiator Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Oliver, James; Hjorth, Poul G.

    2000-01-01

    This problem deals with modelling the flow through a typical Danfoss thermostatic radiator valve.Danfoss is able to employ Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in calculations of the capacity of valves, but an experienced engineer can often by rules of thumb "guess" the capacity, with a precision...

  3. Bioprinting a cardiac valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Soumen; Lerman, Amir

    2015-12-01

    Heart valve tissue engineering could be a possible solution for the limitations of mechanical and biological prostheses, which are commonly used for heart valve replacement. In tissue engineering, cells are seeded into a 3-dimensional platform, termed the scaffold, to make the engineered tissue construct. However, mimicking the mechanical and spatial heterogeneity of a heart valve structure in a fabricated scaffold with uniform cell distribution is daunting when approached conventionally. Bioprinting is an emerging technique that can produce biological products containing matrix and cells, together or separately with morphological, structural and mechanical diversity. This advance increases the possibility of fabricating the structure of a heart valve in vitro and using it as a functional tissue construct for implantation. This review describes the use of bioprinting technology in heart valve tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Space Vehicle Valve System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Lindner, Jeffrey L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a space vehicle valve system which controls the internal pressure of a space vehicle and the flow rate of purged gases at a given internal pressure and aperture site. A plurality of quasi-unique variable dimension peaked valve structures cover the purge apertures on a space vehicle. Interchangeable sheet guards configured to cover valve apertures on the peaked valve structure contain a pressure-activated surface on the inner surface. Sheet guards move outwardly from the peaked valve structure when in structural contact with a purge gas stream flowing through the apertures on the space vehicle. Changing the properties of the sheet guards changes the response of the sheet guards at a given internal pressure, providing control of the flow rate at a given aperture site.

  5. Multiple-port valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doody, T.J.

    1978-01-01

    A multiple-port valve assembly is designed to direct flow from a primary conduit into any one of a plurality of secondary conduits as well as to direct a reverse flow. The valve includes two mating hemispherical sockets that rotatably receive a spherical valve plug. The valve plug is attached to the primary conduit and includes diverging passageways from that conduit to a plurality of ports. Each of the ports is alignable with one or more of a plurality of secondary conduits fitting into one of the hemispherical sockets. The other hemispherical socket includes a slot for the primary conduit such that the conduit's motion along that slot with rotation of the spherical plug about various axes will position the valve-plug ports in respect to the secondary conduits

  6. [A clinical experience of continuous warm blood cardioplegia in two cases of repeat aortic valve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, H; In-nami, R; Watanabe, M; Funakoshi, N; Hirooka, K; Fujiwara, A

    1992-11-01

    The continuous warm blood cardioplegia (CWBC) was used for myocardial protection during aortic cross clamping in two cases of repeat aortic valve operations with good results. Case 1: A 46-year-old man, who underwent an aortic valve replacement because of the rheumatic aortic regurgitation (AR) in 1978, have suffered from orthopnea due to para-prosthetic valvular regurgitation since 1983. He was revealed to have bi-ventricular hypertrophy with myocardial damage on ECG, EF 0.27 on UCG, PCWP 20 mmHg and severe AR on cardiac catheterization. Case 2: A 43-year-old man, who had an aortic valvuloplasty for the non-rheumatic incompetency in 1981, have had a recurrent regurgitation, resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy accompanied by chest pain. Both cases were reoperated upon, having aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthetic valves through the re-median sternotomy, utilizing CWBC with good recovery. CWBC provides an ideal circumstances for myocardial oxygen utilization during aortic cross clamping and moreover a benefit that needs not the wide dissection of the heart in a redo case because it has no need of topical cooling and ventricular defibrillation following aortic declamping. In conclusion, CWBC is very useful in a repeat aortic valve surgery.

  7. Cryptococcus neoformans infective endocarditis of native valves in an immunocompetent host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moni Roy

    Full Text Available With the emergence of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and the resulting immunocompromised state, Cryptococcus neoformans infections have gained more importance in clinical practice. Cryptococcal infections in immunocompetent hosts continue to be uncommon. We present a rare case of Cryptococcus neoformans infective endocarditis (IE in a young immunocompetent male. As per our literature review, this is the first reported case of native valve Cryptococcus neoformans endocarditis in an immunocompetent host. All cases till date have been reported in patients with underlying immunocompromised state or prosthetic valve.

  8. A case of native valve endocarditis caused by Burkholderia cepacia without predisposing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Seong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infective endocarditis is rarely caused by Burkholderia cepacia. This infection is known to occur particularly in immunocompromised hosts, intravenous heroin users, and in patients with prosthetic valve replacement. Most patients with Burkholderia cepacia endocarditis usually need surgical treatment in addition to antimicrobial treatment. Case Presentation Here, we report the case of a patient who developed Burkholderia cepacia-induced native valve endocarditis with consequent cerebral involvement without any predisposing factors; she was successfully treated by antimicrobial agents only. Conclusion In this report, we also present literature review of relevant cases.

  9. Floppy Mitral Valve (FMV) - Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) - Mitral Valvular Regurgitation and FMV/MVP Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Pitsis, Antonios A; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2016-01-01

    Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) results from the systolic movement of a portion(s) or segment(s) of the mitral valve leaflet(s) into the left atrium during left ventricular (LV) systole. It should be emphasised that MVP alone, as defined by imaging techniques, may comprise a non-specific finding because it also depends on the LV volume, myocardial contractility and other LV hemodynamics. Thus, a floppy mitral valve (FMV) should be the basis for the diagnosis of MVP. Two types of symptoms may be defined in these patients. In one group, symptoms are directly related to progressive mitral regurgitation and its complications. In the other group, symptoms cannot be explained only by the degree of mitral regurgitation alone; neuroendocrine dysfunction has been implicated for the explanation of symptoms in this group of patients that today is referred as the FMV/MVP syndrome. When significant mitral regurgitation is present in a patient with FMV/MVP, surgical intervention is recommended. In patients with a prohibitive risk for surgery, transcatheter mitral valve repair using a mitraclip device may be considered. Furthermore, transcatheter mitral valve replacement may represent an option in the near future as clinical trials are underway. In this brief review, the current concepts related to FMV/MVP and FMV/MVP syndrome will be discussed. Copyright © 2016 Hellenic Cardiological Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Valve repair for traumatic tricuspid regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisano, F; Lorusso, R; Sandrelli, L; Torracca, L; Coletti, G; La Canna, G; Alfieri, O

    1996-01-01

    The review of six cases of valve repair for traumatic tricuspid regurgitation in our institution and 74 in the literature in order to assess effective methods of treating this lesion. Tricuspid valve regurgitation is a rare complication of blunt chest trauma. Optimal treatment for this condition is still controversial ranging from long-term medical therapy to early surgical correction. We followed the cases of six consecutive patients with post-traumatic tricuspid incompetence who were successfully treated with reparative techniques. All patients were male and their ages ranged from 18 years to 42 years. Valve regurgitation was always secondary to blunt chest trauma due to motor vehicle accident. The mechanism of valve insufficiency was invariably anterior leaflet prolapse due to chordal or papillary muscle rupture associated with annular dilatation. Surgical procedures included Carpentier ring implant (5 patients), Bex posterior annuloplasty (1 patient), implant of artificial chordae (4 patients), papillary muscle reinsertion (2 patients), commissuroplasty (1 patient) and "artificial double orifice" technique (1 patient). Tricuspid insufficiency improved in all patients after the correction. No complications were recorded and all patients were asymptomatic at the follow-up. Since post-traumatic tricuspid regurgitation is effectively correctable with reparative techniques, early operation is recommended to relieve symptoms and to prevent right ventricular dysfunction.

  11. Erectile Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cut out alcohol. Excess alcohol can contribute to erectile dysfunction. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for men older than age 65, and up to two drinks ...

  12. Outlet strut fracture of Björk-Shiley convexo-concave valves: can valve-manufacturing characteristics explain the risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, R Z; Morton, L S; Beirne, M; Blot, W J; Lawford, P V; Hose, R; Taylor, K M

    2001-06-01

    Björk-Shiley 60 degrees convexo-concave prosthetic heart valves (Shiley, Inc, Irvine, Calif, a subsidiary of Pfizer, Inc) continue to be a concern for approximately 35,000 nonexplanted patients worldwide, with approximately 600 events reported to the manufacturer to date. Fractures of the outlet struts of the valves began to appear in the early 1980s and have continued to the present, but their causes are only partially understood. A matched case-control study was conducted evaluating manufacturing records for 52 valves with outlet strut fractures and 248 control subjects matched for age at implantation, valve size, and valve position. In addition to the risk factors recognized as determinants of outlet strut fracture, the United Kingdom case-control study has observed 7- to 9-fold increased risk with performance of multiple hook deflection tests. This test was performed more than once, usually after rework on the valve. Six valves in this study underwent multiple hook deflection tests, of which 4 experienced an outlet strut fracture. Cracks and further rework were noted for these valves. Significant associations were also observed between outlet strut fracture and disc-to-strut gap measurements taken before the attachment of the sewing ring. It is our view that a combination of factors related to valve design, manufacturing process, and patient characteristics are responsible for outlet strut fractures of Björk-Shiley convexo-concave valves. Multiple hook deflection tests have emerged as a potential new risk factor for outlet strut fracture in both The Netherlands and the United Kingdom. This factor appears to be correlated with the presence of other abnormalities. A further study is needed to investigate the factors correlated with multiple hook deflection tests. On confirmation of risk, the presence of multiple hook deflection tests may be added to equations, quantifying the risk of outlet strut fracture for comparison against risk of mortality and serious

  13. Tactile Sensing Reflexes for Advanced Prosthetic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Jeremy A. Fishel, Member, IEEE Figure 1. A) Custom NumaTac prosthetic fingertip sensor core and foam; B) Ottobock VariPlus Speed hand installed with two...oal – H ardw are P rototype D evelopm ent R   Identify alternatives for outcom e m easures R   E xplore sensor design param eters C Y16 G oals – C

  14. Prosthetic Management of Patients Presenting with Juvenile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighteen were referred for prosthetic replacement. Their age ranged between 18 and 36 years. A total of 24 removable partial dentures were fabricated, 17[70.8%] were kennedy class III type, of which 11[64.7%] had the bounded saddle located in the anterior segment. Majority 8[44.4%] of the patients had 2-4 teeth replaced ...

  15. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling...

  16. Consumer satisfaction in prosthetics and orthotics facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Gankema, H.G.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    The aim of this study was to assess consumer/patient satisfaction with the services of the prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) facilities in the north of the Netherlands, using a modified SERVQUAL questionnaire. In this questionnaire, consumer interests and experiences are assessed on a 5-point Likert

  17. The relevance of aortic endograft prosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cernohorsky, Paul; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M. M.; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Vascular prosthetic graft infection is a severe complication after open aortic aneurysm repair. Reports of infected endografts are scarce. General treatment consensus with infected graft material is that it should be removed completely. The objective of this study was to describe the

  18. Intraoperative echocardiography of a dislodged Björk-Shiley mitral valve disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M; Abe, T; Takeuchi, E; Watanabe, T; Tamaki, S

    1991-02-01

    The successful management of a patient who suffered an outlet strut fracture of a Björk-Shiley 60-degree convexo-concave mitral valve prosthesis is reported. Emergency operation was life-saving. Preoperative echocardiography assisted in making a prompt diagnosis, and intraoperative echocardiography allowed the detection and removal of the dislodged disc from the left ventricle at the time of the operation. The role of intraoperative echocardiography in the diagnosis of prosthetic strut fracture is emphasized.

  19. Gate valve performance prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, D.H.; Damerell, P.S.; Wang, J.K.; Kalsi, M.S.; Wolfe, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute is carrying out a program to improve the performance prediction methods for motor-operated valves. As part of this program, an analytical method to predict the stem thrust required to stroke a gate valve has been developed and has been assessed against data from gate valve tests. The method accounts for the loads applied to the disc by fluid flow and for the detailed mechanical interaction of the stem, disc, guides, and seats. To support development of the method, two separate-effects test programs were carried out. One test program determined friction coefficients for contacts between gate valve parts by using material specimens in controlled environments. The other test program investigated the interaction of the stem, disc, guides, and seat using a special fixture with full-sized gate valve parts. The method has been assessed against flow-loop and in-plant test data. These tests include valve sizes from 3 to 18 in. and cover a considerable range of flow, temperature, and differential pressure. Stem thrust predictions for the method bound measured results. In some cases, the bounding predictions are substantially higher than the stem loads required for valve operation, as a result of the bounding nature of the friction coefficients in the method

  20. Modeling valve leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, S.R.; Rohrscheib, R.

    1994-01-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code requires individual valve leakage testing for Category A valves. Although the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has recognized that it is more appropriate to test containment isolation valves in groups, as allowed by 10 CFR 50, Appendix J, a utility seeking relief from these Code requirements must provide technical justification for the relief and establish a conservative alternate acceptance criteria. In order to provide technical justification for group testing of containment isolation valves, Illinois Power developed a calculation (model) for determining the size of a leakage pathway in a valve disc or seat for a given leakage rate. The model was verified experimentally by machining leakage pathways of known size and then measuring the leakage and comparing this value to the calculated value. For the range of values typical of leakage rate testing, the correlation between the experimental values and calculated values was quote good. Based upon these results, Illinois Power established a conservative acceptance criteria for all valves in the inservice testing (IST) program and was granted relief by the USNRC from the individual leakage testing requirements of the ASME Code. This paper presents the results of Illinois Power's work in the area of valve leakage rate testing

  1. Face-Sealing Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Valve plate made to translate as well as rotate. Valve opened and closed by turning shaft and lever. Interactions among lever, spring, valve plate, and face seal cause plate to undergo combination of translation and rotation so valve plate clears seal during parts of opening and closing motions.

  2. Heart valve bioprosthesis durability: a challenge to the new generation of porcine valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, M; Minarini, M; Maizza, A F; Bortolotti, U; Thiene, G

    1992-01-01

    Long-term experience with first generation porcine valve xenografts enabled identification of the major limitations to their durability: (1) prosthetic-ventricular mismatch due to the high profile of the stent in patients with mitral stenosis and a small left ventricle; (2) high-pressure fixation with loss of natural collagen crimping in the fibrosa, and wash-out of proteoglycans in the spongiosa; (3) xenograft tissue autolysis, due to the long interval between animal slaughter and aortic valve removal fixation; (4) muscle shelf in the right coronary cusp, which created a gradient and could undergo accelerated calcification and/or spontaneous perforation with time; (5) a flexible polypropylene stent, which could creep or even fracture with consequent inward bending of the stent; (6) progressive time-related dystrophic calcification; (7) host fibrous tissue ingrowth. An awareness of these limitations stimulated technical modifications, which frequently brought about distinct improvements: (1) the reduction of the stent profile eliminated the problem of mismatch, but resulted in a higher tendency towards cusp prolapse and earlier commissural tearing; (2) natural collagen waviness, proteoglycans and cusp extensibility were preserved by employing low or even zero pressure during the fixation process; (3) earlier valve fixation enabled preservation of cell integrity; (4) a new orifice for small valves was designed by replacing the right muscular cusp, thus achieving less gradient and avoiding muscle-shelf-related complications; (5) polypropylene was replaced by Delrin as stent material; (6) calcium-retarding agents like T6 and toluidine blue were applied during commercial processing and storage in order to mitigate tissue mineralization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Is the femoral cannulation for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, J; Rodriguez-Delgadillo, M A; Valle, J V; Campos, V; Herrera, J M; Rodriguez, F; Portela, F; Sorribas, F; Juffe, A

    1998-10-01

    sizes were 19, 21,23, and 25 mm in diameter were placed in four, nine, nine, and one of the cases, respectively. All patients underwent AVR electively and a transesophageal echocardiography probe is made. During surgery, conversion to median sternotomy was not required in any patient. Mean aortic cross-clamp time was 68 min (range 38-90 min). Mean total bypass time was 87 min (range 50-120 min). Mean postoperative bleeding was 434 ml. (range 200-850 ml). Perioperative blood transfusion was required in 17% of the patients. Mean mechanical ventilation time was 7.3 h (range 3-24 h), with a mean ICU stay of 18 h. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.5 days (range 3-10 days). In all cases, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography were performed postoperatively Prosthetic valve dysfunction was not observed. On the other hand, just one patient (4%) died 5 days after operation due to sudden cardiac death. Further, in two patients (8%), during follow-up, pericardial effusion is detected. In one case, cardiac tamponade with hemodynamic instability required a pericardial window procedure. In addition, in two patients (8%), non-infectious sternal dehiscence required reinforced sternal closure. Minimally invasive AVR surgery without femoral vessel cannulation is a safe procedure with less surgical aggression. After a learning curve, benefits on fast-track programs will be accomplished.

  4. Mathematical multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including mitral valve dynamics. Application to ischemic mitral insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valve dysfunction is a common cardiovascular pathology. Despite significant clinical research, there is little formal study of how valve dysfunction affects overall circulatory dynamics. Validated models would offer the ability to better understand these dynamics and thus optimize diagnosis, as well as surgical and other interventions. Methods A cardiovascular and circulatory system (CVS model has already been validated in silico, and in several animal model studies. It accounts for valve dynamics using Heaviside functions to simulate a physiologically accurate "open on pressure, close on flow" law. However, it does not consider real-time valve opening dynamics and therefore does not fully capture valve dysfunction, particularly where the dysfunction involves partial closure. This research describes an updated version of this previous closed-loop CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve, and is defined over the full cardiac cycle. Results Simulations of the cardiovascular system with healthy mitral valve are performed, and, the global hemodynamic behaviour is studied compared with previously validated results. The error between resulting pressure-volume (PV loops of already validated CVS model and the new CVS model that includes the progressive opening of the mitral valve is assessed and remains within typical measurement error and variability. Simulations of ischemic mitral insufficiency are also performed. Pressure-Volume loops, transmitral flow evolution and mitral valve aperture area evolution follow reported measurements in shape, amplitude and trends. Conclusions The resulting cardiovascular system model including mitral valve dynamics provides a foundation for clinical validation and the study of valvular dysfunction in vivo. The overall models and results could readily be generalised to other cardiac valves.

  5. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department - Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Adrian; Muresan, Ioan; Trifan, Catalin; Pop, Dana; Sacui, Diana

    2015-01-01

    positive. In 3 cases it matched the germ identified in the hemocultures, and in 2 cases it evidenced another bacterium. The overall mortality of 5% is well between the limits presented in literature, being higher (30%) in patients who required emergency surgery. For the patients who return into our clinic with prosthetic valve endocarditis, the mortality after surgery was even higher (50%).

  6. Surgical outcomes in native valve infectious endocarditis: the experience of the Cardiovascular Surgery Department – Cluj-Napoca Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLNAR, ADRIAN; MURESAN, IOAN; TRIFAN, CATALIN; POP, DANA; SACUI, DIANA

    2015-01-01

    examination of valve pieces excised during surgery was positive. In 3 cases it matched the germ identified in the hemocultures, and in 2 cases it evidenced another bacterium. Conclusion The overall mortality of 5% is well between the limits presented in literature, being higher (30%) in patients who required emergency surgery. For the patients who return into our clinic with prosthetic valve endocarditis, the mortality after surgery was even higher (50%). PMID:26609267

  7. Valve monitoring ITI-MOVATS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moureau, S.

    1993-01-01

    ITI-MOVATS provides a wide range of test devices to monitor the performance of valves: motor operated gate or globe valve, butterfly valve, air operated valve, and check valve. The ITI-MOVATS testing equipment is used in the following three areas: actuator setup/baseline testing, periodic/post-maintenance testing, and differential pressure testing. The parameters typically measured with the MOVATS diagnostic system as well as the devices used to measure them are described. (Z.S.)

  8. Bioprosthetic Valve Fracture to Facilitate Transcatheter Valve-in-Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Keith B; Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Cohen, David J; Saxon, John T; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Hart, Anthony; Baron, Suzanne; Davis, J Russell; Pak, Alex F; Dvir, Danny; Borkon, A Michael

    2017-11-01

    Valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement is less effective in small surgical bioprostheses. We evaluated the feasibility of bioprosthetic valve fracture with a high-pressure balloon to facilitate valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement. In vitro bench testing on aortic tissue valves was performed on 19-mm and 21-mm Mitroflow (Sorin, Milan, Italy), Magna and Magna Ease (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA), Trifecta and Biocor Epic (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN), and Hancock II and Mosaic (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN). High-pressure balloons Tru Dilation, Atlas Gold, and Dorado (C.R. Bard, Murray Hill, NJ) were used to determine which valves could be fractured and at what pressure fracture occurred. Mitroflow, Magna, Magna Ease, Mosaic, and Biocor Epic surgical valves were successfully fractured using high-pressures balloon 1 mm larger than the labeled valve size whereas Trifecta and Hancock II surgical valves could not be fractured. Only the internal valve frame was fractured, and the sewing cuff was never disrupted. Manufacturer's rated burst pressures for balloons were exceeded, with fracture pressures ranging from 8 to 24 atmospheres depending on the surgical valve. Testing further demonstrated that fracture facilitated the expansion of previously constrained, underexpanded transcatheter valves (both balloon and self-expanding) to the manufacturer's recommended size. Bench testing demonstrates that the frame of most, but not all, bioprosthetic surgical aortic valves can be fractured using high-pressure balloons. The safety of bioprosthetic valve fracture to optimize valve-in-valve transcatheter aortic valve replacement in small surgical valves requires further clinical investigation. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical treatment of aortic valve endocarditis: a 26-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylan Adademir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have retrospectively analyzed the results of the operations made for aortic valve endocarditis in a single center in 26 years. Methods: From June 1985 to January 2011, 174 patients were operated for aortic valve endocarditis. One hundred and thirty-eight (79.3% patients were male and the mean age was 39.3±14.4 (9-77 years. Twenty-seven (15.5% patients had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The mean duration of follow-up was 7.3±4.2 years (0.1-18.2 adding up to a total of 1030.8 patient/years. Results: Two hundred and eighty-two procedures were performed. The most frequently performed procedure was aortic valve replacement with mechanical prosthesis (81.6%. In-hospital mortality occurred in 27 (15.5% cases. Postoperatively, 25 (14.4% patients had low cardiac output and 17 (9.8% heart block. The actuarial survival rates for 10 and 15 years were 74.6±3.7% and 61.1±10.3%, respectively. In-hospital mortality was found to be associated with female gender, emergency operation, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output. The long term mortality was significantly associated with mitral valve involvement. Male gender was found to be a significant risk factor for recurrence in the follow-up. Conclusion: Surgery for aortic valve endocarditis has significant mortality. Emergency operation, female gender, postoperative renal failure and low cardiac output are significant risk factors. Risk for recurrence and need for reoperation is low.

  10. Clinical Implication of Transaortic Mitral Pannus Removal During Repeat Cardiac Surgery for Patients With Mechanical Mitral Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungjoon; Sung, Kiick; Park, Pyo Won

    2018-01-25

    This study aimed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of transaortic mitral pannus removal (TMPR).Methods and Results:Between 2004 and 2016, 34 patients (median age, 57 years; 30 women) with rheumatic disease underwent pannus removal on the ventricular side of a mechanical mitral valve through the aortic valve during reoperation. The median time interval from the previous surgery was 14 years. TMPR was performed after removal of the mechanical aortic valve (n=21) or diseased native aortic valve (n=11). TMPR was performed in 2 patients through a normal aortic valve. The mitral transprosthetic mean pressure gradient (TMPG) was ≥5 mmHg in 11 patients, including 3 with prosthetic valve malfunction. Prophylactic TMPR was performed in 23 patients. There were no early deaths. Concomitant operations included 22 tricuspid valve surgeries (13 replacements, 15 repairs) and 32 aortic valve replacements (24 repeats, 8 primary). The mean gradient in patients who had mitral TMPG ≥5 mmHg was significantly decreased from 6.46±1.1 to 4.37±1.17 mmHg at discharge (Ppannus overgrowth in such valves.

  11. In vitro 2D PIV measurements and related aperture areas of tricuspid bioprosthetic mitral valves at the beginning of diastole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto; Fukumasu, Newton Kiyoshi; Pacifico, Antonio Luiz; Yanagihara, Jurandir Itizo

    2016-07-04

    Besides ventricular parameters, the design and angular orientation of a prosthetic heart valve induce a specific flow field. The aim of this study was to know the inflow characteristics of a left ventricular model (LVM), investigating the behavior of tricuspid bioprosthetic mitral valves in terms of velocity profiles and related valve aperture areas at the beginning of diastole, under different conditions. 3 heart rates (HRs) were established in the LVM and each mitral bioprosthesis (27 and 31 mm diameter) was installed in 2 orientations, rotated by 180° . For each experimental setup, 2-dimensional particle image velocimetry (2D PIV) measurements and simultaneous mitral valve (MV) area detection were obtained from 50 samples. The results from the velocity profiles immediately downstream of mitral bioprostheses showed the influence of valve orientation for moderate HRs, although for a similar magnitude of mean velocity vectors. The geometries of MV open areas for each HR were similar regardless of valve orientation, except for the 27-mm valve at 90 beats per minute (bpm), and for the 31-mm valve at 60 bpm. Moreover, for each HR, similar percentages of valve open area were obtained regardless of MV nominal diameters. In conclusion, the experimental setup for the 2D PIV measurements synchronized with the MV area detection was a useful tool for knowing the inflow characteristics of the LVM.

  12. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery - discharge Images Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... Saunders; 2016:chap 69. Otto CM, Bownow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ...

  13. Mitral valve regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and dentist if you have a history of heart valve disease or congenital heart disease before treatment. Some people ... the middle Heart, front view References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  14. Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... team will discuss with you the advantages and disadvantages of both valve types. Regardless of which type ... Diagnosis and Treatment Options Recovery Questions for Your Doctor Will my condition ever get better without treatment? ...

  15. Dry product valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greaves, James D.

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides a system for delivering particulate radioactive or other toxic wastes to a container in which they can be solidified. The system includes a set of valves that prevent the escape of dusty materials to the atmosphere

  16. Ball check valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, F.

    1978-01-01

    A pressurized nuclear reactor having an instrument assembly sheathed in a metallic tube which is extended vertically upward into the reactor core by traversing a metallic guide tube which is welded to the wall of the vessel is described. Sensors in each instrument assembly are connected to instruments outside the vessel to manifest the conditions within the core. Each instrument assembly probe is moved into position within a metallic guide channel. The guide channel penetrates the wall of the vessel and forms part of the barrier to the environment within the pressure vessel. Each channel includes a ball check valve which is opened by the instrument assembly probe when the probe passes through the valve. A ball valve element is moved from its seat by the probe to a position lateral of the bore of the channel and is guided to its seat along a sloped path within the valve body when the probe is removed. 5 claims, 3 figures

  17. The effect of varying degrees of stenosis on the characteristics of turbulent pulsatile flow through heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, D; Einav, S

    1995-08-01

    Many problems and complications associated with heart valves are related to the dynamic behavior of the valve and the resultant unsteady flow patterns. An accurate depiction of the spatial and temporal velocity and rms distributions imparts better understanding of flow related valve complications, and may be used as a guideline in valve design. While the generalized correlation between increased turbulence level and the severity of the stenosis is well established, few studies addressed the issue of the intermittent nature of turbulence and its timing in the cardiac cycle, and almost none assessed the effect of a progressive stenosis on the flow characteristics through heart valves. In this experimental work we simulated the type of flow which is present in normal and stenosed valves and conducted a comprehensive investigation of valve hemodynamics, valvular turbulence and morphology under varying degrees of stenosis. The characteristics of valves and stenoses were simulated closely, to achieve the flow conditions that initiate turbulent flow conditions. Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were carried out in a pulse duplicator system distal to trileaflet polyurethane prosthetic heart valves, installed at mitral and aortic positions. The effect of the degree of the stenosis was comparatively studied through the structure of the turbulent jets emerging from normal and stenotic heart valves. Maximum turbulence level was achieved during the decelerating phase and correlated to the severity of the stenosis, followed by relaminarization of the flow during the acceleration phase. The intermittent nature of the turbulence emphasized the importance of realizing the timing of the turbulence production and its spatial location for optimizing current valve designs. The plug flow through the normal aortic valve prosthesis was replaced by jet like behavior for a 65% stenosis, with the jet becoming narrower and stronger for a 90% stenosis. The morphology of the velocity

  18. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian von der Brelie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%. 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS. IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD, before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the

  19. Valve for gas centrifuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  20. Coanda effect in valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uruba Václav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coanda effect takes place in flow within valves diffuser for certain conditions. The valve plug in half-closed position forms wall-jet, which could be stable or instable, depending on geometry and other conditions. This phenomenon was subject of experimental study using time-resolved PIV technique. For the acquired data analysis the special spatio-temporal methods have been used.

  1. Nanopatterned acellular valve conduits drive the commitment of blood-derived multipotent cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Liddo R

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rosa Di Liddo,1,2 Paola Aguiari,3 Silvia Barbon,1,2 Thomas Bertalot,1 Amit Mandoli,1 Alessia Tasso,1 Sandra Schrenk,1 Laura Iop,3 Alessandro Gandaglia,3 Pier Paolo Parnigotto,2 Maria Teresa Conconi,1,2 Gino Gerosa31Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padova, 2Foundation for Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Engineering and Signaling ONLUS, 3Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy Abstract: Considerable progress has been made in recent years toward elucidating the correlation among nanoscale topography, mechanical properties, and biological behavior of cardiac valve substitutes. Porcine TriCol scaffolds are promising valve tissue engineering matrices with demonstrated self-repopulation potentiality. In order to define an in vitro model for investigating the influence of extracellular matrix signaling on the growth pattern of colonizing blood-derived cells, we cultured circulating multipotent cells (CMC on acellular aortic (AVL and pulmonary (PVL valve conduits prepared with TriCol method and under no-flow condition. Isolated by our group from Vietnamese pigs before heart valve prosthetic implantation, porcine CMC revealed high proliferative abilities, three-lineage differentiative potential, and distinct hematopoietic/endothelial and mesenchymal properties. Their interaction with valve extracellular matrix nanostructures boosted differential messenger RNA expression pattern and morphologic features on AVL compared to PVL, while promoting on both matrices the commitment to valvular and endothelial cell-like phenotypes. Based on their origin from peripheral blood, porcine CMC are hypothesized in vivo to exert a pivotal role to homeostatically replenish valve cells and contribute to hetero- or allograft colonization. Furthermore, due to their high responsivity to extracellular matrix nanostructure signaling, porcine CMC could be useful for a preliminary

  2. Patient-prosthesis mismatch has no influence on in-hospital mortality after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yottasurodom, Chaiwut; Namthaisong, Kriengkrai; Porapakkham, Pramote; Kasemsarn, Choosak; Chotivatanapong, Taweesak; Chaiseri, Pradistchai; Wongdit, Suwannee; Yasotarin, Suwanna

    2012-08-01

    To analyze the relationship between prosthetic aortic valve orifice and body surface area (Effective Orifice Area Index, EOAI) and in-hospital mortality after aortic valve replacement. A prospective study was conducted between October 2007 to September 2010, 536 patients underwent isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR) was recorded on preoperative, operative and postoperative data. Patient Prosthesis Mismatch (PPM) was classified by Effective Orifice Area Indexed (EOAI) by prosthetic valve area divided by body surface area as mild or no significance if the EOAI is greater than 0.85 cm2/m2, moderate if between 0.65 cm2/m2 and 0.85 cm2/m2, and severe if less than 0.65 cm2/m2. Statistical differences were analyzed by Chi-square and student t-test with p-value less than 0.05 considered significant. There were 304 men, mean age was 60.98 years, mean valve orifice area 1.69 cm2, body surface area 1.60 m2, cross clamp time 1.13 hrs., bypass time 1.67 hrs. Mechanical valves were used in 274 patients (51.2%) and Bioprosthesis were used in 181 patients (48.8%). PPM was found in 33.7%, 6.7% was severe PPM, 27% was moderate PPM and 66.3% has no significant PPM Over all in-hospital mortality was 1.5%. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality between no PPM group, moderate PPM and severe PPM group (1.4% vs. 1.4% vs. 5.4%, p-value = 0.86). In a large aortic valve surgery population, moderate and severe patient prosthesis mismatch occurred in 35.6% of patients but had no influence on in-hospital mortality.

  3. Associations between valve repair and reduced operative mortality in 21,056 mitral/tricuspid double valve procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, J Scott; Thourani, Vinod H; Suri, Rakesh M; He, Xia; O'Brien, Sean M; Vassileva, Christina M; Shah, Ashish S; Williams, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    Repair of either the mitral (M) or tricuspid (T) valve in single valve surgery is associated with reduced operative mortality. It is unclear, however, how valve repair influences mortality in combined MT procedures. This topic was evaluated in the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database. From 1993 through 2007, 21 056 patients underwent concomitant MT valve surgery. Group I had M&T replacement (n = 1130), Group II had M repair and T replacement (n = 216), Group III had M replacement and T repair (n = 11 448) and Group IV had both M&T repair (n = 8262). Unadjusted operative mortalities (UOMs) and morbidities of Groups I-IV were assessed, and logistic regression analysis adjusted for differences in baseline patient profiles. Surgical outcomes were expressed as UOMs, and also adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for mortality. Group IV was older with more coronary artery bypass grafting and generally less comorbidity, and Group I had more endocarditis, mitral stenosis and reoperation. UOM values were: Group I = 16.8, Group II = 10.2, Group III = 10.3 and Group IV = 8.0%. In the multivariable model, factors influencing mortality included: age (per 5-year increase, OR = 1.15), renal failure with dialysis (OR = 3.22), emergency status (OR = 3.14), second or more reoperations (OR = 1.92) and later surgical date (OR = 0.63). Both M and T repair were independently associated with lower operative mortalities vs prosthetic valve replacement (OR = 0.83 and 0.60, respectively, P replacement and, when feasible, multiple valve repair should be considered the optimal treatment. Within the limitations of observational analysis, these data support continued efforts to increase M&T repair rates.

  4. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Diniz Affonso da Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods: From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results: Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95% at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97% and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97% at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions: Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results.

  5. Prosthetic vascular graft infection and prosthetic joint infection caused by Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonares, Michael J; Vaisman, Alon; Sharkawy, Abdu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is infrequently isolated from clinical specimens, and if isolated, more likely represents colonization or contamination rather than infection. Despite this, there are dozens of case reports which describe clinically significant P. stutzeri infections at variable sites. A 69-year-old man had a P. stutzeri infection of a prosthetic vascular graft infection, which he received in Panama City. He was successfully treated with a single antipseudomonal agent for 6 weeks and the removal of the infected vascular graft. A 70-year-old man had a P. stutzeri infection of a prosthetic joint, which was successfully treated with a single anti-pseudomonal agent for 6 weeks. There is only one other documented case of a prosthetic vascular graft infection secondary to P. stutzeri . There are 5 documented cases of P. stutzeri prosthetic joint infections. The previous cases were treated with antibiotics and variably, source control with the removal of prosthetic material. Most cases of P. stutzeri infection are due to exposure in health care settings. Immunocompromised states such as HIV or hematological and solid tumor malignancies are risk factors for P. stutzeri infection. Infections caused by P. stutzeri are far less frequent and less fatal than those caused by P. aeruginosa. The etiology of a P. stutzeri infection could be exposure to soil and water, but also contaminated material in the health care setting or an immunocompromised state. Iatrogenic infections that are secondary to health care tourism are a potential cause of fever in the returned traveler.

  6. Memory Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  7. Prosthetic management of an ocular defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddesh Kumar Chintal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The disfigurement associated with the loss of an eye can cause significant physical and emotional problems. Various treatment modalities are available, one of which is implants. Although implant has a superior outcome, it may not be advisable in all patients due to economic factors. The present article describes the prosthetic management of an ocular defect with a custom-made ocular prosthesis.

  8. New developments in prosthetic arm systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujaklija I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Vujaklija,1 Dario Farina,1 Oskar C Aszmann2 1Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems, Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Göttingen, Germany; 2Christian Doppler Laboratory for Restoration of Extremity Function, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Absence of an upper limb leads to severe impairments in everyday life, which can further influence the social and mental state. For these reasons, early developments in cosmetic and body-driven prostheses date some centuries ago, and they have been evolving ever since. Following the end of the Second World War, rapid developments in technology resulted in powered myoelectric hand prosthetics. In the years to come, these devices were common on the market, though they still suffered high user abandonment rates. The reasons for rejection were trifold – insufficient functionality of the hardware, fragile design, and cumbersome control. In the last decade, both academia and industry have reached major improvements concerning technical features of upper limb prosthetics and methods for their interfacing and control. Advanced robotic hands are offered by several vendors and research groups, with a variety of active and passive wrist options that can be articulated across several degrees of freedom. Nowadays, elbow joint designs include active solutions with different weight and power options. Control features are getting progressively more sophisticated, offering options for multiple sensor integration and multi-joint articulation. Latest developments in socket designs are capable of facilitating implantable and multiple surface electromyography sensors in both traditional and osseointegration-based systems. Novel surgical techniques in combination with modern, sophisticated hardware are enabling restoration of dexterous upper limb

  9. Control system and method for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the movable body part through the full-shrug position of the movable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the movable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective movable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  10. Smart Prosthetic Hand Technology - Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    functional magnetic resonance imaging (f- MRI ) was used to analyze the reciprocal adaptation between the human brain and the prosthetic hand by the...Schmidt PC. Influence of compacted hydrophobic and hydrophilic colloidal silicon dioxide on tableting properties of pharmaceutical excipients. Drug Dev...nanoparticles, and manganese nanoparticles) in magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) in the detection and staging of cancer [2]. 2.1 Iron Oxide

  11. Dynamic elasticity measurement for prosthetic socket design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yujin; Kim, Junghoon; Son, Hyeryon; Choi, Youngjin

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a novel apparatus to measure the dynamic elasticity of human limb in order to help the design and fabrication of the personalized prosthetic socket. To take measurements of the dynamic elasticity, the desired force generated as an exponential chirp signal in which the frequency increases and amplitude is maintained according to time progress is applied to human limb and then the skin deformation is recorded, ultimately, to obtain the frequency response of its elasticity. It is referred to as a Dynamic Elasticity Measurement Apparatus (DEMA) in the paper. It has three core components such as linear motor to provide the desired force, loadcell to implement the force feedback control, and potentiometer to record the skin deformation. After measuring the force/deformation and calculating the dynamic elasticity of the limb, it is visualized as 3D color map model of the limb so that the entire dynamic elasticity can be shown at a glance according to the locations and frequencies. For the visualization, the dynamic elasticities measured at specific locations and frequencies are embodied using the color map into 3D limb model acquired by using 3D scanner. To demonstrate the effectiveness, the visualized dynamic elasticities are suggested as outcome of the proposed system, although we do not have any opportunity to apply the proposed system to the amputees. Ultimately, it is expected that the proposed system can be utilized to design and fabricate the personalized prosthetic socket in order for releasing the wearing pain caused by the conventional prosthetic socket.

  12. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-08-01

    With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of annular dimension and annuloplasty in tricuspid aortic valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerchove, Laurent; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Boodhwani, Munir; Astarci, Parla; Rubay, Jean; Poncelet, Alain; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Noirhomme, Philippe; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2016-02-01

    reimplantation was superior to subcommissural annuloplasty (P = 0.04). Despite similar intraoperative reduction in basal ring size in subcommissural annuloplasty and valve sparing reimplantation, patients with subcommissural annuloplasty exhibited greater increase in basal ring size during the follow-up compared with the valve sparing reimplantation group (P tricuspid aortic valve undergoing repair with the subcommissural annuloplasty technique. This recurrence is caused by basal ring dilatation over time after subcommissural annuloplasty. With the valve sparing reimplantation technique, large basal ring did not predict aortic regurgitation recurrence, as prosthetic-based circumferential annuloplasty displayed better stability over time. Stable circumferential annuloplasty is recommended in tricuspid aortic valve repair whenever the basal ring size is ≥28 mm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. Executive Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  15. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerative Bioprosthetic Surgical Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John; Brecker, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation is an emerging therapeutic alternative for patients with a failed surgical bioprosthesis and may obviate the need for reoperation. We evaluated the clinical results of this technique using a large, worldwide registry....

  16. NRC valve performance test program - check valve testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanmougin, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Valve Performance Test Program addresses the current requirements for testing of pressure isolation valves (PIVs) in light water reactors. Leak rate monitoring is the current method used by operating commercial power plants to survey the condition of their PIVs. ETEC testing of three check valves (4-inch, 6-inch, and 12-inch nominal diameters) indicates that leak rate testing is not a reliable method for detecting impending valve failure. Acoustic emission monitoring of check valves shows promise as a method of detecting loosened internals damage. Future efforts will focus on evaluation of acoustic emission monitoring as a technique for determining check valve condition. Three gate valves also will be tested to evaluate whether the check valve results are applicable to gate type PIVs

  17. Vascular complications of prosthetic inter-vertebral discs

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Kevin J.; Ross, E. Raymond S.; Norris, Heather; McCollum, Charles N.

    2006-01-01

    Five consecutive cases of prosthetic inter-vertebral disc displacement with severe vascular complications on revisional surgery are described. The objective of this case report is to warn spinal surgeons that major vascular complications are likely with anterior displacement of inter-vertebral discs. We have not been able to find a previous report on vascular complications associated with anterior displacement of prosthetic inter-vertebral discs. In all five patients the prosthetic disc had e...

  18. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    OpenAIRE

    van Jaarsveld, H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; de Vries, J.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the hysteresis, which are the topics of this paper, are not properly prescribed, but could be adapted to improve the prosthetic walking performance. The shape is strongly related to the cosmetic appearance a...

  19. Fused Filament Fabrication of Prosthetic Components for Trans-Humeral Upper Limb Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Steven M.

    Presented below is the design and fabrication of prosthetic components consisting of an attachment, tactile sensing, and actuator systems with Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technique. The attachment system is a thermoplastic osseointegrated upper limb prosthesis for average adult trans-humeral amputation with mechanical properties greater than upper limb skeletal bone. The prosthetic designed has: a one-step surgical process, large cavities for bone tissue ingrowth, uses a material that has an elastic modulus less than skeletal bone, and can be fabricated on one system. FFF osseointegration screw is an improvement upon the current two-part osseointegrated prosthetics that are composed of a fixture and abutment. The current prosthetic design requires two invasive surgeries for implantation and are made of titanium, which has an elastic modulus greater than bone. An elastic modulus greater than bone causes stress shielding and overtime can cause loosening of the prosthetic. The tactile sensor is a thermoplastic piezo-resistive sensor for daily activities for a prosthetic's feedback system. The tactile sensor is manufactured from a low elastic modulus composite comprising of a compressible thermoplastic elastomer and conductive carbon. Carbon is in graphite form and added in high filler ratios. The printed sensors were compared to sensors that were fabricated in a gravity mold to highlight the difference in FFF sensors to molded sensors. The 3D printed tactile sensor has a thickness and feel similar to human skin, has a simple fabrication technique, can detect forces needed for daily activities, and can be manufactured in to user specific geometries. Lastly, a biomimicking skeletal muscle actuator for prosthetics was developed. The actuator developed is manufactured with Fuse Filament Fabrication using a shape memory polymer composite that has non-linear contractile and passive forces, contractile forces and strains comparable to mammalian skeletal muscle, reaction

  20. Check valves aging assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, H.D.

    1991-01-01

    In support of the NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has carried out an assessment of several check value diagnostic monitoring methods, in particular, those based on measurements of acoustic emission, ultrasonics, and magnetic flux. The evaluations have focussed on the capabilities of each method to provide information useful in determining check valve aging and service wear effects, check valve failures, and undesirable operating modes. This paper describes the benefits and limitations associated with each method and includes recent laboratory and field test data, including data obtained from the vendors who recently participated in a comprehensive series of tests directed by a nuclear industry users group. In addition, as part of the ORNL Advanced Diagnostic Engineering Research and Development Center (ADEC), two novel nonintrusive monitoring methods were developed that provide several unique capabilities. These methods, based on external ac- an dc-magnetic monitoring are also described. None of the examined methods could, by themselves, monitor both the instantaneous position and motion of check valve internals and valve leakage; however, the combination of acoustic emission monitoring with one of the other methods provides the means to determine vital check valve operational information

  1. Factors Associated with Prosthetic Looseness in Lower Limb Amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phonghanyudh, Thong; Sutpasanon, Taweesak; Hathaiareerug, Chanasak; Devakula, M L Buddhibongsa; Kumnerddee, Wipoo

    2015-12-01

    To determine the factors associated with prosthetic looseness in lower limb amputees in Sisaket province. The present was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Subjects were lower limb amputees who previously obtained prostheses and required prosthetic replacements at the mobile prosthetic laboratory unit under the Prostheses Foundation of H.R.H. the Princess Mother at Khun Han Hospital, Sisaket province, in February 2013. Data including participant characteristics, prosthetic looseness data, and various variables were collected by direct semi-structured interview. Energy expenditures in physical activities were measured using the Thai version of the short format international physical activity questionnaire. Data between participants with and without prosthetic looseness were compared to determine prosthetic loosening associated factors. Among 101 participants enrolled, 33 (32.7%) had prosthetic looseness with average onset of 1.76 ± 1.67 years. Diabetes mellitus was the only significant factor associated with prosthetic looseness from both univariate and multivariate analyses (HR = 7.05, p = 0.002 and HR = 5.93, p = 0.007 respectively). Among the lower limb amputees in Sisaket province, diabetes mellitus was the only factor associated with prosthetic looseness. Therefore, diabetic screening should be supplemented in lower limb amputee assessment protocol. In addition, we recommend that amputees with diabetes mellitus should receive prosthesis check out at approximately

  2. The role of osteoblasts in peri-prosthetic osteolysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, S C

    2013-08-01

    Peri-prosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening is the most common reason for revising total hip replacements. Wear particles originating from the prosthetic components interact with multiple cell types in the peri-prosthetic region resulting in an inflammatory process that ultimately leads to peri-prosthetic bone loss. These cells include macrophages, osteoclasts, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. The majority of research in peri-prosthetic osteolysis has concentrated on the role played by osteoclasts and macrophages. The purpose of this review is to assess the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis. In peri-prosthetic osteolysis, wear particles may affect osteoblasts and contribute to the osteolytic process by two mechanisms. First, particles and metallic ions have been shown to inhibit the osteoblast in terms of its ability to secrete mineralised bone matrix, by reducing calcium deposition, alkaline phosphatase activity and its ability to proliferate. Secondly, particles and metallic ions have been shown to stimulate osteoblasts to produce pro inflammatory mediators in vitro. In vivo, these mediators have the potential to attract pro-inflammatory cells to the peri-prosthetic area and stimulate osteoclasts to absorb bone. Further research is needed to fully define the role of the osteoblast in peri-prosthetic osteolysis and to explore its potential role as a therapeutic target in this condition.

  3. Prosthetic hip joint infection due to Campylobacter fetus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, C J; Clarke, T C; Spencer, R C

    1994-01-01

    A case of postoperative prosthetic hip joint infection due to Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus is described. Difficulties in isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of this organism are discussed.

  4. Aortic valve replacement and the stentless Freedom SOLO valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wollersheim, L.W.L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis has become the most prevalent valvular heart disease in Europe and North America, and is generally caused by age-related calcification of the aortic valve. For most patients, severe symptomatic aortic stenosis needs effective mechanical relief in the form of valve replacement

  5. Recurrent protein-losing enteropathy and tricuspid valve insufficiency in a transplanted heart: a causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Delius, Ralph E; Walters, Henry L; L'Ecuyer, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes a toddler who developed a protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) 4 years after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). He was born with a hypoplastic left heart syndrome for which he underwent a successful Norwood procedure, a Hemi-Fontan palliation, and a Fontan palliation at 18 months of age. Fifteen months following the Fontan operation, he developed a PLE and Fontan failure requiring OHT. Four years after OHT, he developed a severe tricuspid regurgitation and a PLE. His PLE improved after tricuspid valve replacement. It is now 2 years since his tricuspid valve replacement and he remains clinically free of ascites and peripheral edema with a normal serum albumin level. His prosthetic tricuspid valve is functioning normally. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. 19 mm sized bileaflet valve prostheses' flow field investigated by bidimensional laser Doppler anemometry (part I: velocity profiles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, V; Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; D'Avenio, G; Boccanera, G

    1997-11-01

    The investigation of the flow field downstream of a cardiac valve prosthesis is a well established task. In particular turbulence generation is of interest if damage to blood constituents is to be assessed. Several prosthetic valve flow studies are available in literature but they generally concern large-sized prostheses. The FDA draft guidance requires the study of the maximum Reynolds number conditions for a cardiac valve model to assess the worst case in turbulence by choosing both the minimum valve diameter and a high cardiac output value as protocol set up. Within the framework of a national research project regarding the characterization of cardiovascular endoprostheses, the Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering is currently conducting an in-depth study of turbulence generated downstream of bileaflet cardiac valves. Four models of 19 mm sized bileaflet valve prostheses, namely St Jude Medical HP Edwards Tekna, Sorin Bicarbon, and CarboMedics, were studied in aortic position. The prostheses were selected for the nominal annulus diameter reported by the manufacturers without any assessment of the valve sizing method. The hemodynamic function was investigated using a bidimensional LDA system. Results concern velocity profiles during the peak flow systolic phase, at high cardiac output regime, highlighting the different flow field features downstream of the four small-sized cardiac valves.

  7. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  8. Comparative study of Butterfly valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galmes Belmonte, F.B.

    1998-01-01

    This work tries to justify the hydrodynamic butterfly valves performance, using the EPRI tests, results carried out in laboratory and in situ. This justification will be possible if: - The valves to study are similar - Their performance is calculated using EPRI's methodology Looking for this objective, the elements of the present work are: 1. Brief EPRI butterfly valve description it wild provide the factors which are necessary to define the butterfly valves similarity. 2. EPRI tests description and range of validation against test data definition. 3. Description of the spanish butterfly analyzed valves, and comparison with the EPRI performance results, to prove that this valves are similar to the EPRI test valves. In this way, it will not be necessary to carry out particular dynamic tests on the spanish valves to describe their hydrodynamic performance. (Author)

  9. A symmetric safety valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtraw, Dallas; Palmer, Karen; Kahn, Danny

    2010-01-01

    How to set policy in the presence of uncertainty has been central in debates over climate policy. Concern about costs has motivated the proposal for a cap-and-trade program for carbon dioxide, with a 'safety valve' that would mitigate against spikes in the cost of emission reductions by introducing additional emission allowances into the market when marginal costs rise above the specified allowance price level. We find two significant problems, both stemming from the asymmetry of an instrument that mitigates only against a price increase. One is that most important examples of price volatility in cap-and-trade programs have occurred not when prices spiked, but instead when allowance prices collapsed. Second, a single-sided safety valve may have unintended consequences for investment. We illustrate that a symmetric safety valve provides environmental and welfare improvements relative to the conventional one-sided approach.

  10. Nuclear reactor steam depressurization valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes improvement in a nuclear reactor plant, an improved steam depressurization valve positioned intermediate along a steam discharge pipe for controlling the venting of steam pressure from the reactor through the pipe. The improvement comprises: a housing including a domed cover forming a chamber and having a partition plate dividing the chamber into a fluid pressure activation compartment and a steam flow control compartment, the valve housing being provided with an inlet connection and an outlet connection in the steam flow control compartment, and a fluid duct in communication with a source of fluid pressure for operating the valve; a valve set mounted within the fluid flow control compartment comprising a cylindrical section surrounding the inlet connection with one end adjoining the connection and having a radially projecting flange at the other end with a contoured extended valve sealing flange provided with an annular valve sealing member, and a valve cylinder traversing the partition plate and reciprocally movable within an opening in the partition plate with one terminal and extending into the fluid pressure activation compartment and the other terminal end extending into the steam flow control compartment coaxially aligned with the valve seat surrounding the inlet connection, the valve cylinder being surrounded by two bellow fluid seals and provided with guides to inhibit lateral movement, an end of the valve cylinder extending into the fluid flow control compartment having a radially projecting flange substantially conterminous with the valve seat flange and having a contoured surface facing and complimentary to the contoured valve seating surface whereby the two contoured valve surfaces can meet in matching relationship, thus providing a pressure actuated reciprocatable valve member for making closing contact with the valve seat and withdrawing therefrom for opening fluid flow through the valve

  11. Valve spindle gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burda, Z.; Harazim, A.; Kerlin, K.

    1979-01-01

    A gland is proposed of the valve spindle designed for radioactive or otherwise harmful media, such as in nuclear power plant primary circuits. The gland is installed in the valve cover and consists of a primary and a secondary part and of a gland case partitioning the gland space into two chambers. The bottom face of the gland case is provided with a double-sided collar for controlling the elements of the bottom primary gland while the top face is provided with a removable flange. (M.S.)

  12. Building valve amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    Building Valve Amplifiers is a unique hands-on guide for anyone working with tube audio equipment--as an electronics hobbyist, audiophile or audio engineer. This 2nd Edition builds on the success of the first with technology and technique revisions throughout and, significantly, a major new self-build project, worked through step-by-step, which puts into practice the principles and techniques introduced throughout the book. Particular attention has been paid to answering questions commonly asked by newcomers to the world of the valve, whether audio enthusiasts tackling their first build or

  13. Valve thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Soriano, Juan G; Puri, Rishi; Amat-Santos, Ignacio; Ribeiro, Henrique B; Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; del Trigo, María; Paradis, Jean-Michel; Dumont, Eric; Urena, Marina; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Despite the rapid global uptake of transcatheter aortic valve implantation, valve trombosis has yet to be systematically evaluated in this field. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics, diagnostic criteria, and treatment outcomes of patients diagnosed with valve thrombosis following transcatheter aortic valve implantation through a systematic review of published data. Literature published between 2002 and 2012 on valve thrombosis as a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation was identified through a systematic electronic search. A total of 11 publications were identified, describing 16 patients (mean age, 80 [5] years, 65% men). All but 1 patient (94%) received a balloon-expandable valve. All patients received dual antiplatelet therapy immediately following the procedure and continued to take either mono- or dual antiplatelet therapy at the time of valve thrombosis diagnosis. Valve thrombosis was diagnosed at a median of 6 months post-procedure, with progressive dyspnea being the most common symptom. A significant increase in transvalvular gradient (from 10 [4] to 40 [12] mmHg) was the most common echocardiographic feature, in addition to leaflet thickening. Thrombus was not directly visualized with echocardiography. Three patients underwent valve explantation, and the remaining received warfarin, which effectively restored the mean transvalvular gradient to baseline within 2 months. Systemic embolism was not a feature of valve thrombosis post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Although a rare, yet likely under-reported complication of post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation, progressive dyspnea coupled with an increasing transvalvular gradient on echocardiography within the months following the intervention likely signifies valve thrombosis. While direct thrombus visualization appears difficult, prompt initiation of oral anticoagulation therapy effectively restores baseline valve function. Copyright © 2014

  14. Cavitation problems in sodium valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elie, X.

    1976-01-01

    Cavitation poses few problems for sodium valves, in spite of the fact that the loops are not pressurized. This is no doubt due to the low flow velocities in the pipes. For auxiliary loop valves we are attempting to standardize performances with respect to cavitation. For economic reasons cavitation thresholds are approached with large diameter valves. (author)

  15. Valva mitral heteróloga sem suporte: resultados clínicos a médio prazo Heterologous mitral stentless valve: mid-term clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario O Vrandecic

    1996-09-01

    sistólico e diastólico final, em avaliações ecocardiográficas seriadas CONCLUSÃO: As valvas mitrais porcinas sem suporte têm mostrado melhor performance hemodinâmica, com maior possibilidade de manutenção da função e do tamanho do ventrículo esquerdo. Embora este estudo tenha demonstrado uma curva de aprendizado bem definida relacionada a um novo substituto valvar e à técnica cirúrgica, estes fatores são superados com treino e aderência à técnica atualmente em uso.The concept of replacing diseased mitral valve with porcine mitral stentless valve allowed to address the "idiosyncrasy" of the left ventricular flow and contractility. From March 92 to December 95, 108 patients had their mitral valves replaced by stentless mitral valves. Their age varied from 11 to 65 years (mean 35.22 ± 14.98. There were 67 (62% females and 41 (38% males. The predominant ethiology was rheumatic heart disease 94 (87% cases, followed by a prosthetic dysfunction 6 (5.6% cases, myxomatous disease 5 (4.6% cases, infective endocarditis 2 (1.9% cases and ischemic lesion 1 (0.9% case, 26 (24.1% patients had mitral stenosis, 24 (22.2% mitral regurgitation and the remaining 58 (53.7% mixed lesions; 21.3% of the patients had previous open heart operations. The great majority of the operated patients (97.2% were in functional class III and IV (NYHA. Associated procedures were performed in 9.3% (10 of the cases. RESULTS: Hospital mortality occurred in 7 (6.5% patients non valved related with exception of one whom developed early endocarditis. Of the 101 remaining 3 required reoperations, in two due to valved size mismatch and 1 due to papillary muscle tear. Of the 98 remaining patients, 2 were lost to follow-up, 96 patients have been followed for 3.2 to 45 months. During the late follow-up there were six (6.25% deaths, of the 3 patients with late prosthetic endocarditis, 2 had their valves replaced with standard bioprosthesis, with one death. The third patient expired before

  16. Pre prosthetic reconstruction of alveolar ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhuji Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiahenkatesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dento-alveolar bony defects are common and occur due to a variety of causes, such as, pulpal pathology, traumatic tooth extraction, advanced periodontal disease, implant failure, tumor or congenital anomalies. These defects often cause a significant problem in dental treatment and rehabilitation. Many techniques exist for effective soft and hard tissue augmentation. The approach is largely based on the extent of the defect and specific procedures to be performed for the implant or prosthetic rehabilitation. This article presents case reports of soft and hard tissue ridge augmentation.

  17. Prevention of Infection in Orthopedic Prosthetic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirca, Ioana; Marculescu, Camelia

    2017-06-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is a generally safe orthopedic procedure; however, infection is a potentially devastating complication. Multiple risk factors have been identified for development of prosthetic joint infections. Identification of patients at risk and preoperative correction of known risk factors, such as smoking, diabetes mellitus, anemia, malnutrition, and decolonization of Staphylococcus carriers, represent well-established actions to decrease the infection risk. Careful operative technique, proper draping and skin preparation, and appropriate selection and dosing of antimicrobials for perioperative prophylaxis are also very important in prevention of infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in failed bioprosthetic surgical valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvir, Danny; Webb, John G; Bleiziffer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    for patients with structural valve deterioration; however, a comprehensive evaluation of survival after the procedure has not yet been performed. OBJECTIVE: To determine the survival of patients after transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation inside failed surgical bioprosthetic valves. DESIGN, SETTING......, stroke, and New York Heart Association functional class. RESULTS: Modes of bioprosthesis failure were stenosis (n = 181 [39.4%]), regurgitation (n = 139 [30.3%]), and combined (n = 139 [30.3%]). The stenosis group had a higher percentage of small valves (37% vs 20.9% and 26.6% in the regurgitation...... and combined groups, respectively; P = .005). Within 1 month following valve-in-valve implantation, 35 (7.6%) patients died, 8 (1.7%) had major stroke, and 313 (92.6%) of surviving patients had good functional status (New York Heart Association class I/II). The overall 1-year Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 83...

  19. Mitral valve replacement in infants and children 5 years of age or younger: Evolution in practice and outcome over three decades with a focus on supra-annular prosthesis implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Elif Seda Selamet; Pigula, Frank A.; Berul, Charles I.; Lock, James E.; del Nido, Pedro J.; McElhinney, Doff B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Successful mitral valve replacement in young children is limited by the lack of small prosthetic valves. Supra-annular prosthesis implantation can facilitate mitral valve replacement with a larger prosthesis in children with a small annulus, but little is known about its effect on the outcomes of mitral valve replacement in young children. Methods One hundred eighteen children underwent mitral valve replacement at 5 years of age or younger from 1976–2006. Mitral valve replacement was supra-annular in 37 (32%) patients. Results Survival was 74% ± 4% at 1 year and 56% ± 5% at 10 years but improved over time (10-year survival of 83% ± 7% from 1994–2006). Factors associated with worse survival included earlier mitral valve replacement date, age less than 1 year, complete atrioventricular canal, and additional procedures at mitral valve replacement, but not supra-annular mitral valve replacement. As survival improved during our more recent experience, the risks of supra-annular mitral valve replacement became apparent; survival was worse among patients with a supra-annular prosthesis after 1991. A pacemaker was placed in 18 (15%) patients within 1 month of mitral valve replacement and was less likely in patients who had undergone supra-annular mitral valve replacement. Among early survivors, freedom from redo mitral valve replacement was 72% ± 5% at 5 years and 45% ± 7% at 10 years. Twenty-one patients with a supra-annular prosthesis underwent redo mitral valve replacement. The second prosthesis was annular in 15 of these patients and upsized in all but 1, but 5 required pacemaker placement for heart block. Conclusions Supra-annular mitral valve replacement was associated with worse survival than annular mitral valve replacement in our recent experience. Patients with supra-annular mitral valve replacement were less likely to have operative complete heart block but remained at risk when the prosthesis was subsequently replaced. PMID:18954636

  20. Anticoagulation in pregnant females with mechanical heart valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafique, H.; Chaudhry, A.; Ayyub, M.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the complications and outcome of anticoagulation therapy in pregnant females with valvular heart diseases. All pregnant females with prosthetic heart valves admitted in Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology from Jan 2004 to Dec 2004 were included in this study Basic demographic data including age, duration of pregnancy and complications observed were recorded. Warfarin was replaced with un-fractionated heparin (UFH) in first trimester and after that warfarin was continued with a targeted INR between 2.0-3.0. At 36 weeks warfarin was stopped and UFH was added; however, if patient went into spontaneous labour before this then immediate caesarian section was performed and UFH was restarted 4-6 hours after delivery along with oral warfarin. Out of 21 patients, sixteen (76.1%) had mitral valve diseases and five (23.9%) had both mitral and atrial. Majority (42.3%)of patients were in age group 26-30 years. Eleven (52.2%) reported in 9th month of gestation. Complications observed were hypertension (1), transient ischaemic attacks (1), pulmonary embolism (1), haemoptysis (1) and abortion (1). All patients, except one had successful completion of pregnancy. No case of foetal abnormality was seen. In 76% patients, daily dose of warfarin was <5 mg. Thrombo-prophylaxis in pregnancy with warfarin and UFH with an INR of 2.0-3.0 is effective in preventing thrombotic complications in females with mechanical valves without resulting in increase hemorrhagic complications. (author)

  1. Anesthetic management for combined mitral valve replacement and aortic valve repair in a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jiapeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare disorder of connective tissues and presents multiple challenges, including difficult airway, hyperthermia, coagulopathy and respiratory dysfunction, for anesthesiologists, especially during cardiac surgery. We present anesthetic management of a patient with osteogenesis impertecta during double valve surgery. Dexmedetomidine infusion minimized the risks of malignant hyperthermia. Glidescope and in-line stabilization facilitated endotracheal intubation and protected his oral structures and cervical spine. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE diagnosed a flail A3 segment and redundant left coronary cusp causing mitral and aortic regurgitation. The mitral valve was replaced and the aortic valve repaired. Coagulopathy was corrected according to comprehensive coagulation analysis. Glidescope, dexmedetomidine, coagulation analysis and TEE could facilitate anesthetic management in these patients.

  2. SAFETY SHUTOFF VALVE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    It is disclosed a shut-off valve which acts automatically and has a fully mechanical performance with respect to the loosing of the tower-shape part balance under the effect of the special acceleration Which is arisen from the quakes waves or serious vibrations, while such vibrations are mainly r...

  3. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACC guideline for the management of patients with valvular heart disease: executive summary: a report of the American College ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Surgery Heart Valve Diseases Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  4. Poppet valve tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, G. F.

    1973-01-01

    Tester investigates fundamental factors affecting cyclic life and sealing performance of valve seats and poppets. Tester provides for varying impact loading of poppet against seat and rate of cycling, and controls amount and type of relative motion between sealing faces of seat and poppet. Relative motion between seat and poppet can be varied in three modes.

  5. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  6. Blocked Urethral Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if any damage has occurred to the upper urinary tract. Your pediatrician will consult with a pediatric nephrologist (kidney specialist) or nurologist, who may recommend surgery to remove the obstructing valves and prevent further infection or damage to the kidneys or urinary system. ...

  7. Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Children: An Alternative Clinical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Carolina Teixeira Marques

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete and partial removable dentures have been used successfully in numerous patients with oligodontia and/or anodontia. However, there is little information in the literature regarding the principles and guidelines to prosthetic rehabilitation for growing children. This case report describes the management of a young child with oligodontia as well as the treatment planning and the prosthetic rehabilitation technique.

  8. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3025... intended for medical purposes to support, protect, or aid in the use of a cast, orthosis (brace), or prosthesis. Examples of prosthetic and orthotic accessories include the following: A pelvic support band and...

  9. Stiffness and hysteresis properties of some prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, H.W.L.; Grootenboer, H.J.; de Vries, J.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is an important element of a prosthesis, although it is not always fully recognized that the properties of the foot, along with the prosthetic knee joint and the socket, are in part responsible for the stability and metabolic energy cost during walking. The stiffness and the

  10. Prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands: An interview with clinical experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Linde, H.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Hofstad, C.J.; Van Limbeek, Jacques; Postema, K.

    2004-01-01

    In the process of guideline development for prosthetic prescription in the Netherlands the authors made a study of the daily clinical practice of lower limb prosthetics. Besides the evidence-based knowledge from literature the more implicit knowledge from clinical experts is of importance for

  11. 38 CFR 17.150 - Prosthetic and similar appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... appliances. 17.150 Section 17.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.150 Prosthetic and similar appliances... appliances including invalid lifts and therapeutic and rehabilitative devices, and special clothing made...

  12. Review of Prosthetic Joint Infection from Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Gilbert; Al-Tarawneh, Mohammed; Myers, James

    2016-12-01

    Prosthetic joint infection from Listeria monocytogenes is rare. We decided to shed light on this illness and review the reported cases to better understand its characteristics. We conducted a comprehensive review of the English literature using PubMed. We also included one case that we had managed. We found 25 cases of prosthetic joint infection from L. monocytogenes reported individually and a retrospective study of 43 cases of joint and bone listerial infection, including 34 with prosthetic joint infection, conducted in France. We have described their clinical and para-clinical features and tried to elaborate on the pathophysiology, treatment, and prevention. Prosthetic joint infection from L. monocytogenes is mainly late. Systemic inflammation may be absent. Although rare, it must be suspected in patients at high risk for both prosthetic joint and listerial infections. In addition, those patients must be instructed on appropriate preventive measures.

  13. Nitinol for Prosthetic and Orthotic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emma; Buis, Arjan

    2011-07-01

    As global populations age, conditions such as stroke and diabetes require individuals to use rehabilitation technology for many years to come due to chronic musculoskeletal, sensory, and other physical impairments. One in four males currently aged 45 will experience a stroke within 40 years and will often require access to prolonged rehabilitation. In addition, worldwide, one individual loses a limb every 30 s due to the complications of diabetes. As a result, innovative ideas are required to devise more effective prosthetic and orthotic devices to enhance quality of life. While Nitinol has already found much favor within the biomedical industry, one area, which has not yet exploited its unique properties, is in the field of physical rehabilitation, ranging from prosthetic and orthotic devices to assistive technology such as wheelchairs. Improved intervention capabilities based on materials such as Nitinol have the potential to vastly improve patients' quality of life and in the case of orthoses, may even reduce the severity of the condition over time. It is hoped that this study will spark discussion and interest for the materials community in a field which has yet to be fully exploited.

  14. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation.

  15. The Prosthetic Workflow in the Digital Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Tordiglione

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this retrospective study was to clinically evaluate the benefits of adopting a full digital workflow for the implementation of fixed prosthetic restorations on natural teeth. To evaluate the effectiveness of these protocols, treatment plans were drawn up for 15 patients requiring rehabilitation of one or more natural teeth. All the dental impressions were taken using a Planmeca PlanScan® (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland intraoral scanner, which provided digital casts on which the restorations were digitally designed using Exocad® (Exocad GmbH, Germany, 2010 software and fabricated by CAM processing on 5-axis milling machines. A total of 28 single crowns were made from monolithic zirconia, 12 vestibular veneers from lithium disilicate, and 4 three-quarter vestibular veneers with palatal extension. While the restorations were applied, the authors could clinically appreciate the excellent match between the digitally produced prosthetic design and the cemented prostheses, which never required any occlusal or proximal adjustment. Out of all the restorations applied, only one exhibited premature failure and was replaced with no other complications or need for further scanning. From the clinical experience gained using a full digital workflow, the authors can confirm that these work processes enable the fabrication of clinically reliable restorations, with all the benefits that digital methods bring to the dentist, the dental laboratory, and the patient.

  16. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anatomic, histopathologic, and echocardiographic features in a dog with an atypical pulmonary valve stenosis with a fibrous band of tissue and a patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hakyoung; Kim, Jaehwan; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Eom, Kidong

    2017-07-11

    Congenital pulmonary valve stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus are common congenital heart defects in dogs. However, concurrence of atypical pulmonary valve stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus is uncommon. This report describes the anatomic, histopathologic, and echocardiographic features in a dog with concomitant pulmonary valve stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus with atypical pulmonary valve dysplasia that included a fibrous band of tissue. A 1.5-year-old intact female Chihuahua dog weighing 3.3 kg presented with a continuous grade VI cardiac murmur, poor exercise tolerance, and an intermittent cough. Echocardiography indicated pulmonary valve stenosis, a thickened dysplastic valve without annular hypoplasia, and a type IIA patent ductus arteriosus. The pulmonary valve was thick line-shaped in systole and dome-shaped towards the right ventricular outflow tract in diastole. The dog suffered a fatal cardiac arrest during an attempted balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty. Necropsy revealed pulmonary valve dysplasia, commissural fusion, and incomplete opening and closing of the pulmonary valve because of a fibrous band of tissue causing adhesion between the right ventricular outflow tract and the dysplastic intermediate cusp of the valve. A fibrous band of tissue between the right ventricular outflow track and the pulmonary valve should be considered as a cause of pulmonary valve stenosis. Pulmonary valve stenosis and patent ductus arteriosus can have conflicting effects on diastolic and systolic dysfunction, respectively. Therefore, beta-blockers should always be used carefully, particularly in patients with a heart defect where there is concern about left ventricular systolic function.

  18. Mitral valve repair: an echocardiographic review: Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Echocardiographic imaging of the mitral valve before and immediately after repair is crucial to the immediate and long-term outcome. Prior to mitral valve repair, echocardiographic imaging helps determine the feasibility and method of repair. After the repair, echocardiographic imaging displays the new baseline anatomy, assesses function, and determines whether or not further management is necessary. Three-dimensional imaging has improved the assessment of the mitral valve and facilitates communication with the surgeon by providing the surgeon with an image that he/she might see upon opening up the atrium. Further advancements in imaging will continue to improve the understanding of the function and dysfunction of the mitral valve both before and after repair. This information will improve treatment options, timing of invasive therapies, and advancements of repair techniques to yield better short- and long-term patient outcomes. The purpose of this review was to connect the echocardiographic evaluation with the surgical procedure. Bridging the pre- and post-CPB imaging with the surgical procedure allows a greater understanding of mitral valve repair.

  19. Mechanical suitability of glycerol-preserved human dura mater for construction of prosthetic cardiac valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, K A; Lee, J M; Boughner, D R

    1984-03-01

    We have examined the tensile viscoelastic properties of fresh and glycerol-preserved human dura mater, and correlated the results with structural information from the scanning electron microscope. The interwoven laminar structure of dura produces rather high flexural stiffness, while the crossed-fibrillar laminae produce planar mechanical isotropy. Glycerol storage shifts the stress-strain curve to lower strain, reduces stress relaxation and creep, and lowers the ultimate tensile strength and strain at fracture. These changes may be due to glyceraldehyde crosslinking, or to increased interfibrillar friction. The latter hypothesis suggests that glycerol storage may reduce the fatigue lifetime of the tissue.

  20. 24. Psycho-social impact of prosthetic heart valves on young Saudi females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. AlGhamdi

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Patients with MV have the most stable psychological status, probably as a result of stronger spousal relationship. Recommendation: Counselling husbands may strengthen spousal relationship and improve psychological wellbeing of patients with PHV.