WorldWideScience

Sample records for prostatic fluid eps

  1. Clinical significance of determination of levels of several cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 and TNF) in expressed prostatic fluid (EPS) from patients with various types of chronic prostatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Juxing; Zhang Jiyun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the levels of several cytokines in EPS from patients with different types of chronic prostatitis. Methods: The EPS levels of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 and TNF were determined with RIA in 86 patients with various types of chronic prostatitis as well as in 30 controls. Results: The EPS levels of IL-1β, IL-2 and TNF in all the 86 patients with various types of chronic prostatitis were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 10/HP, lecithin body < + +) (n=31) were significantly higher than those in patients with CPPS IIIB (WRC < 10/HP, lecithin body normal, n=29)(P<0.05 or P<0.01 ), while the IL-10 levels were significantly lower (P<0.01). Conclusion: EPS levels of the cytokines IL-β, IL-2, TNF and IL-10 might be of value for diagnosis and classification of chronic prostatitis. (authors)

  2. Nuclear Ep-ICD expression is a predictor of poor prognosis in "low risk" prostate adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet Assi

    Full Text Available Molecular markers for predicting prostate cancer (PCa that would have poor prognosis are urgently needed for a more personalized treatment for patients. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule results in shedding of the extracellular domain (EpEx and release of its intracellular domain (Ep-ICD which triggers oncogenic signaling and might correlate to tumor aggressiveness. This study aimed to explore the potential of Ep-ICD and EpEx to identify PCa that have poor prognosis.Immunohistochemical analysis of Ep-ICD and EpEx was carried out in normal prostate tissues (n = 100, benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH, n = 83, and prostate cancer (n = 249 using domain specific antibodies. The expression of Ep-ICD and EpEx was correlated with clinico- pathological parameters and disease free survival (DFS.Reduced expression of nuclear Ep-ICD and membrane EpEx was observed in PCa in comparison with BPH and normal prostate tissues (p = 0.006, p < 0.001 respectively. For patients who had PCa with Gleason Score less than 7, preserved nuclear Ep-ICD emerged as the most significant marker in multivariate analysis for prolonged DFS, where these patients did not have recurrence during follow up of up to 12 years (p = 0.001.Reduced expression of nuclear Ep-ICD was associated with shorter disease free survival in patients with a Gleason Score less than 7 and may be useful in identifying patients likely to have aggressive tumors with poor prognosis. Furthermore, nuclear Ep-ICD can differentiate between normal and prostate cancer tissues for ambiguous cases.

  3. IL-6 Overexpression in ERG-Positive Prostate Cancer Is Mediated by Prostaglandin Receptor EP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Constanze; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Queisser, Angela; Vogel, Wenzel; Andrén, Ove; Kirfel, Jutta; Duensing, Stefan; Perner, Sven; Nowak, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer in men and multiple risk factors and genetic alterations have been described. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion event and the overexpression of the transcription factor ERG are present in approximately 50% of all prostate cancer patients, however, the clinical outcome is still controversial. Prostate tumors produce various soluble factors, including the pleiotropic cytokine IL-6, regulating cellular processes such as proliferation and metastatic segregation. Here, we used prostatectomy samples in a tissue microarray format and analyzed the co-expression and the clinicopathologic data of ERG and IL-6 using immunohistochemical double staining and correlated the read-out with clinicopathologic data. Expression of ERG and IL-6 correlated strongly in prostate tissue samples. Forced expression of ERG in prostate tumor cell lines resulted in significantly increased secretion of IL-6, whereas the down-regulation of ERG decreased IL-6 secretion. By dissecting the underlying mechanism in prostate tumor cell lines we show the ERG-mediated up-regulation of the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP3. The prostanoid receptor EP2 was overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissue. Furthermore, the proliferation rate and IL-6 secretion in DU145 cells was reduced after treatment with EP2-receptor antagonist. Collectively, our study shows that the expression of ERG in prostate cancer is linked to the expression of IL-6 mediated by the prostanoid receptor EP2. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Correlation of IL-8 and IL-6 in prostatic fluid with serum prostate-specific antigen level in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia complicated by prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xingfei; Wu, Chunlei; Yu, Qinnan; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Pei; Zhang, Huiqing

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-6 in the prostatic fluid with serum levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) complicated by prostatitis. A series of 211 patients undergoing surgery of BPH were divided into BPH group (n=75) and BPH with prostatitis group (n=136) according to the white blood cell count in the prostatic fluid. The clinical and laboratory findings were compared between the two groups, and stepwise regression analysis was used to assess the association of IL-8 and IL-6 with serum PSA level. No significant differences were found in age, BMI, blood pressure, blood glucose, blood lipids, IPSS score, PSA-Ratio, or prostate volume between the two groups (Pprostatitis had significantly increased serum PSA and prostate fluid IL-8 and IL-6 levels compared with those without prostatitis (Pprostatic fluid were all positively correlated with serum PSA level. Prostatitis is an important risk factor for elevated serum PSA level in patients with BPH, and both IL-8 and IL-6 levels in the prostatic fluid are correlated with serum PSA level.

  5. Combined serum and EPS-urine proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology for discovery of potential prostate cancer biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mo; Chen, Lizhu; Yuan, Zhengwei; Yang, Zeyu; Li, Yue; Shan, Liping; Yin, Bo; Fei, Xiang; Miao, Jianing; Song, Yongsheng

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignant tumors and a major cause of cancer-related death for men worldwide. The aim of our study was to identify potential non-invasive serum and expressed prostatic secretion (EPS)-urine biomarkers for accurate diagnosis of PCa. Here, we performed a combined isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis to compare protein profiles using pooled serum and EPS-urine samples from 4 groups of patients: benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), localized PCa and metastatic PCa. The differentially expressed proteins were rigorously selected and further validated in a large and independent cohort using classical ELISA and Western blot assays. Finally, we established a multiplex biomarker panel consisting of 3 proteins (serum PF4V1, PSA, and urinary CRISP3) with an excellent diagnostic capacity to differentiate PCa from BPH [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.941], which showed an evidently greater discriminatory ability than PSA alone (AUC, 0.757) (P<0.001). Importantly, even when PSA level was in the gray zone (4-10 ng/mL), a combination of PF4V1 and CRISP3 could achieve a relatively high diagnostic efficacy (AUC, 0.895). Furthermore, their combination also had the potential to distinguish PCa from HGPIN (AUC, 0.934). Our results demonstrated that the combined application of serum and EPS-urine biomarkers can improve the diagnosis of PCa and provide a new prospect for non-invasive PCa detection.

  6. The effect of chronic prostatitis on zinc concentration of prostatic fluid and seminal plasma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Dong; Han, GuangWei; Shang, YongGang; Mu, LiJun; Long, QingZhi; Du, YueFeng

    2015-01-01

    Prostatitis is a common disease in urology departments. Prostatic zinc accumulation is connected with the secretory function of the prostate, and zinc concentrations present in prostatic diseases differ greatly from the normal level. Studies have investigated the effect of chronic prostatitis on zinc concentration of prostatic fluid and seminal plasma, but have shown inconsistent results. Hence, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the effect of chronic prostatitis on the zinc concentration of prostatic fluid and seminal plasma. Systematic literature searches were conducted with PubMed, Embase, Science Direct/Elsevier, CNKI and the Cochrane Library up to March 2015 for case-control studies that involved the relationship between chronic prostatitis and zinc concentration of prostatic fluid and seminal plasma. Meta-analysis was performed with Review Manager and Stata software. Standard mean differences (SMDs) of zinc concentration were identified with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) in a random- or fixed-effects model. Our results illustrated that the zinc concentrations in prostatic fluid and seminal plasma from chronic prostatitis patients were significantly lower than normal controls (SMD [95% CI] -246.71 [-347.97, -145.44], -20.74 [-35.11, -6.37], respectively). The sample size of each study was relatively small, and a total of 731 chronic prostatitis patients and 574 normal controls were investigated in all fourteen studies. Several studies related to the subject were excluded due to lack of control data or means and standard deviations. The present study illustrates that there was a significant negative effect of chronic prostatitis on zinc concentrations of prostatic fluid and seminal plasma. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to better illuminate the negative impact of chronic prostatitis on zinc concentrations.

  7. Characterisation of the bacterial community in expressed prostatic secretions from patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and infertile men: a preliminary investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Sheng Hou; Wen-Min Long; Jian Shen; Li-Ping Zhao; Xiao-Yan Pang; Chen XU

    2012-01-01

    The expressed prostatic secretions (EPSs) of men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS),infertile men and normal men were subjected to microbiological study.EPSs were collected from the subjects,which included 26 normal men,11 infertile patients and 51 CP/CPPS patients.DNA was extracted from each specimen,and the V3 regions of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified using universal bacterial primers.The results showed that the EPS 16S rRNA gene-positive rate in the CP/CPPS and infertile patients was much higher than in the normal men,but without any difference among the three patient groups.The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was used to characterize the EPS bacterial community structure of the prostate fluid from patients with CP/CPPS or infertility issues.Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) analyses of PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that the EPS bacterial community structure differed among the three groups.Three bands were identified as the key factors responsible for the discrepancy between CP/CPPS patients and infertile patients (P<0.05).Two bands were identified as priority factors in the discrepancy of category ⅢA and category ⅢB prostatitis patients (P<0.05).According to this research,the ecological balance of the prostate and low urethra tract,when considered as a microenvironment,might play an important role in the maintenance of a healthy male reproductive tract.

  8. [Reduced zinc concentration in expressed prostatic secretion relates to the pain symptoms of types Ⅲ and Ⅳ prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Lin-Jian; Chen, Xi; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Guang-Yu; Zhang, Xun; Huang, Shan; Xie, Zhi-Bin; Mo, Zeng-Nan

    2016-06-01

    To determine the zinc levels in the expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) of the patients with different types of chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, and explore the reference value of zinc concentration in EPS in the diagnosis and treatment of prostatitis. We collected EPS samples from 35 healthy men and 173 patients with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, including 65 cases of type ⅢA, 69 cases of type ⅢB, and 39 cases of type Ⅳ, according to the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). We compared the zinc levels in the EPS samples among different groups and analyzed the correlations of zinc concentration with the NIH-CPSI scores, WBC count, pH value, and age of the subjects. The participants were aged 17-65 (32.5±8.5) years. The zinc concentrations in the EPS were significantly lower in the ⅢA ([162.2±10.8] μg/ml) and ⅢB ([171.2±12.0] μg/ml) than in the Ⅳ ([234.6±17.9] μg/ml) (Pprostatitis may be associated with the pain symptoms of the disease, which suggests the potential reference value of measuring the zinc concentration in EPS in the diagnosis and treatment of prostatitis.

  9. Characterisation of the bacterial community in expressed prostatic secretions from patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and infertile men: a preliminary investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dong-Sheng; Long, Wen-Min; Shen, Jian; Zhao, Li-Ping; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The expressed prostatic secretions (EPSs) of men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), infertile men and normal men were subjected to microbiological study. EPSs were collected from the subjects, which included 26 normal men, 11 infertile patients and 51 CP/CPPS patients. DNA was extracted from each specimen, and the V3 regions of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified using universal bacterial primers. The results showed that the EPS 16S rRNA gene-positive rate in the CP/CPPS and infertile patients was much higher than in the normal men, but without any difference among the three patient groups. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was used to characterize the EPS bacterial community structure of the prostate fluid from patients with CP/CPPS or infertility issues. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) analyses of PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that the EPS bacterial community structure differed among the three groups. Three bands were identified as the key factors responsible for the discrepancy between CP/CPPS patients and infertile patients (Pprostatitis patients (Pprostate and low urethra tract, when considered as a microenvironment, might play an important role in the maintenance of a healthy male reproductive tract. PMID:22635162

  10. Detection of EpCAM-positive microparticles in pleural fluid: A new approach to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Elisa; Lacroix, Romaric; Judicone, Coralie; Laroumagne, Sophie; Robert, Stéphane; Cointe, Sylvie; Muller, Alexandre; Kaspi, Elise; Roll, Patrice; Brisson, Alain R; Tantucci, Claudio; Astoul, Philippe; Dignat-George, Françoise

    2016-01-19

    Pleural biomarkers allowing to mini-invasively discriminate benign from malignant pleural effusions are needed. Among potential candidates, microparticles (MPs) are extracellular vesicles that vectorize antigen derived from the parent cell. We hypothesized that tumor-derived MPs could be present in the pleural liquid and help to identify patients with malignant pleural effusions. Using highly sensitive flow cytometry and cryo-electron microscopy, we showed that large amounts of MPs from hematopoïetic and vascular origin could be detectable in pleural fluids. Their level did not differ between benign (n = 14) and malignant (n = 71) pleural effusions. Analysis of selected tumoral associated antigens (podoplanin, mucin 1 and EpCAM, epithelial-cell-adhesion-molecule) evidenced for the first time the presence of tumor-derived MPs expressing EpCAM in malignant pleural fluids only (Specificity = 93%, Sensitivity = 49% and 45% for flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively). The detection of EpCAM-positive-MPs (EpCAM + MPs) by flow cytometry showed a better specificity and sensitivity than ELISA to distinguish between pleural carcinoma and the others malignant pleural effusions (MPE; Sp: 96% vs 89%; Se: 79% vs 66%). Combining EpCAM+ MPs and cytology improved the diagnosis of MPE compared to cytology alone. This study establishes the basis for using EpCAM+ MPs as a promising new biomarker that could be added to the armamentarium to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions.

  11. Alterations in expressed prostate secretion-urine PSA N-glycosylation discriminate prostate cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Gaozhen; Dong, Zhenyang; Sun, Chenxia; Wen, Fuping; Wang, Haifeng; Guo, Huaizu; Gao, Xu; Xu, Chuanliang; Xu, Chuanliang; Yang, Chenghua; Sun, Yinghao

    2017-09-29

    The prostate specific antigen (PSA) test is widely used for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). However, its limited sensitivity has led to over-diagnosis and over-treatment of PCa. Glycosylation alteration is a common phenomenon in cancer development. Different PSA glycan subforms have been proposed as diagnostic markers to better differentiate PCa from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). In this study, we purified PSA from expressed prostate secretions (EPS)-urine samples from 32 BPH and 30 PCa patients and provided detailed PSA glycan profiles in Chinese population. We found that most of the PSA glycans from EPS-urine were complex type biantennary glycans. We observed two major patterns in PSA glycan profiles. Overall there was no distinct separation of PSA glycan profiles between BPH and PCa patients. However, we detected a significant increase of glycan FA2 and FM5A2G2S1 in PCa when compared with BPH patients. Furthermore, we observed that the composition of FA2 glycan increased significantly in advanced PCa with Gleason score ≥8, which potentially could be translated to clinic as a marker for aggressive PCa.

  12. Detection of prostate carcinomas with T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Value of two-compartment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiessling, F.; Lichy, M.; Farhan, N.; Delorme, S.; Kauczor, H.U.; Grobholz, R.; Heilmann, M.; Michel, M.S.; Trojan, L.; Werner, A.; Rabe, J.; Schlemmer, H.P.

    2003-01-01

    Aim The suitability of dynamic parameters of the two-compartment model for detecting prostate carcinomas and its correlation with tumor microvascular density were evaluated. The study included 43 patients with biopsy-proven prostate carcinoma: 28 were examined by 1.0-T MRI (Turbo-FLASH) and 15 by 1.5-T MRI (FLASH) with infusion of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Signal time curves were parametrized with an open two-compartment model in amplitude and exchange rate constants (k ep ).The microvascular density of resected prostate carcinomas was determined. The microvascular density in the tumors was significantly higher than in the adjacent healthy prostate tissue and correlated in both sequences with k ep . Prostate carcinomas of the peripheral zone were demarcated by amplitude and k ep . In the Turbo-FLASH sequence there was a significant difference between the tumor tissue and healthy peripheral zone in terms of k ep and in the FLASH sequence in terms of amplitude. Prostate carcinomas can be visualized with dynamic T1-weighted MR sequences using a two-compartment model. Moreover, the parameter k ep reveals the microvascular density in the tumor and can thus provide valuable clinical information for characterizing the tumors. (orig.) [de

  13. On the presence of prostatic secretion protein in rat seminal fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstroem, E.; Pousette, A.; Bjoerk, P.; Hoegberg, B.; Carlstroem, K.; Sundelin, B.; Gustafsson, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The copulating plug collected from the tip of the penis from rats immediately after decapitation contains a protein very similar and probably identical to PSP (prostatic secretion protein); this protein has earlier been purified from rat prostatic cytosol and characterized. The protein present in the copulating plug interacts with [3H]estramustine and binds to the antibody raised against rat PSP. The concentration of the protein in the copulating plug is 400 ng/mg of total protein, when measured using the radioimmunoassay technique developed earlier for measurement of PSP in rat prostate. The [3H]estramustine-protein complex formed in a preparation of the copulating plug has an apparent molecular weight of about 50,000 and a sedimentation coefficient of about 3S when analyzed using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The complex was retained on Concanavalin-A Sepharose indicating that the protein is a glycoprotein. Binding of the complex was also observed on hydroxylapatite and DEAE-Sephadex columns, from which it was eluted at 0.18 M KCl. Light microscope autoradiograms of rat sperms incubated with 125I-labeled PSP indicated that PSP is bound to all parts of the sperms. A macromolecule interacting with the PSP-antibodies is also present in human seminal fluid but at a concentration considerably lower than in rat seminal fluid. The present study shows that a macromolecule probably identical to prostatic secretion protein is present in the copulating plug from the rat. The biological role of this protein in normal male fertility is discussed

  14. Use of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay and formalin-fixed whole bacterial antigen in the detection of antigen-specific immunoglobulin in prostatic fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Shortliffe, L M; Wehner, N; Stamey, T A

    1981-01-01

    The prostatic fluid of two patients with Escherichia coli bacterial prostatitis was analyzed for evidence of a local immune response to bacterial infection. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay was modified to measure the immunoglobulin (Ig)A and IgG antigen-specific antibody responses to infecting bacteria in serum and prostatic fluid from patient. Formalin-fixed whole E. coli were used as antigen. In one patient with acute E. coli prostatic infection, measurements of antigen-specific antibody con...

  15. Proteolysis of complement factors iC3b and C5 by the serine protease prostate-specific antigen in prostatic fluid and seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Michael L; Williams, Simon A; Jelinek, Christine A; Kostova, Maya B; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2013-03-15

    Prostate-specific Ag (PSA) is a serine protease that is expressed exclusively by normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. The continued high-level expression of PSA by the majority of men with both high- and low-grade prostate cancer throughout the course of disease progression, even in the androgen-ablated state, suggests that PSA has a role in the pathogenesis of disease. Current experimental and clinical evidence suggests that chronic inflammation, regardless of the cause, may predispose men to prostate cancer. The responsibility of the immune system in immune surveillance and eventually tumor progression is well appreciated but not completely understood. In this study, we used a mass spectrometry-based evaluation of prostatic fluid obtained from diseased prostates after removal by radical prostatectomy to identify potential immunoregulatory proteins. This analysis revealed the presence of Igs and the complement system proteins C3, factor B, and clusterin. Verification of these findings by Western blot confirmed the high-level expression of C3 in the prostatic fluid and the presence of a previously uncharacterized C-terminal C3 cleavage product. Biochemical analysis of this C3 cleavage fragment revealed a putative PSA cleavage site after tyrosine-1348. Purified PSA was able to cleave iC3b and the related complement protein C5. These results suggest a previously uncharacterized function of PSA as an immunoregulatory protease that could help to create an environment hospitable to malignancy through proteolysis of the complement system.

  16. Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostatitis Overview Prostatitis is swelling and inflammation of the prostate gland, a walnut-sized gland situated directly below the bladder in ... produces fluid (semen) that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostatitis often causes painful or difficult urination. Other symptoms ...

  17. [Pathogens in expressed prostatic secretion and their correlation with serum prostate specific antigen: analysis of 320 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ming; Wu, Kai; Chen, Juan; Shi, Jian-Feng

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the pathogenic infection and its drug resistance in expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) and its correlation with serum PSA, and provide some evidence for the systematic and normalized diagnosis and treatment of prostatitis. Three EPS swabs were collected from each of the 320 prostatis patients following measurement of the serum PSA level, 1 for bacterial culture and identification, 1 for detection of Mycoplasma and drug sensitivity, and the other for examination of Chlamydia trachomatis antigen by colloidal gold immunoblot. Totally 244 strains were isolated from the 320 EPS samples, including 188 bacterial strains (dominated by Staphylococcus and sensitive to vancomycin or linezolid) and 44 Mycoplasma and Chlamydia strains (mainly Ureaplasma urealyticum and susceptible to josamycin or doxycycline). The serum PSA level was significantly higher in the pathogen-positive than in the pathogen-negative group ([6.98 +/- 0.56] microg/L vs [2.32 +/- 0.12] microg/L, P Prostatitis may lead to the elevation of the serum PSA level and the pathogens involved vary in their resistance to different antibacterial spectrums. Therefore, appropriate and individualized antibiotic therapy should be selected according to etiological diagnosis and the results of drug sensitivity test.

  18. Intracrine prostaglandin E2 pro-tumoral actions in prostate epithelial cells originate from non-canonical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Martínez, Antonio; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Lucio Cazaña, Francisco J

    2018-04-01

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) increases cell proliferation and stimulates migratory and angiogenic abilities in prostate cancer cells. However, the effects of PGE 2 on non-transformed prostate epithelial cells are unknown, despite the fact that PGE 2 overproduction has been found in benign hyperplastic prostates. In the present work we studied the effects of PGE 2 in immortalized, non-malignant prostate epithelial RWPE-1 cells and found that PGE 2 increased cell proliferation, cell migration, and production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, and activated in vitro angiogenesis. These actions involved a non-canonic intracrine mechanism in which the actual effector was intracellular PGE 2 (iPGE 2 ) instead of extracellular PGE 2 : inhibition of the prostaglandin uptake transporter (PGT) or antagonism of EP receptors prevented the effects of PGE 2 , which indicated that PGE 2 activity depended on its carrier-mediated translocation from the outside to the inside of cells and that EP receptors located intracellularly (iEP) mediated the effects of PGE 2 . iPGE 2 acted through transactivation of epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGFR) by iEP, leading to increased expression and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Interestingly, iPGE 2 also mediates the effects of PGE 2 on prostate cancer PC3 cells through the axis iPGE 2 -iEP receptors-EGFR-HIF-1α. Thus, this axis might be responsible for the growth-stimulating effects of PGE 2 on prostate epithelial cells, thereby contributing to prostate proliferative diseases associated with chronic inflammation. Since this PGT-dependent non-canonic intracrine mechanism of PGE 2 action operates in both benign and malignant prostate epithelial cells, PGT inhibitors should be tested as a novel therapeutic modality to treat prostate proliferative disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Data Mining of Small RNA-Seq Suggests an Association Between Prostate Cancer and Altered Abundance of 5′ Transfer RNA Halves in Seminal Fluid and Prostatic Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Dhahbi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular RNAs are gaining clinical interest as biofluid-based noninvasive markers for diseases, especially cancer. In particular, derivatives of transfer RNA (tRNA are emerging as a new class of small-noncoding RNAs with high biomarker potential. We and others previously reported alterations in serum levels of specific tRNA halves in disease states including cancer. Here, we explored seminal fluid for tRNA halves as potential markers of prostate cancer. We found that 5′ tRNA halves are abundant in seminal fluid and are elevated in prostate cancer relative to noncancer patients. Importantly, most of these tRNA halves are also detectable in prostatic tissues, and a subset were increased in malignant relative to adjacent normal tissue. These findings emphasize the potential of 5′ tRNA halves as noninvasive markers for prostate cancer screening and diagnosis and provide leads for future work to elucidate a putative role of the 5′ tRNA halves in carcinogenesis.

  20. urethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate on prostate- specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reduce blood flow in BPH, thereby preventing bleeding [6,7]. Thus ... urethra, prostate and surrounding tissue ... The peripheral blood and prostatic fluid of the patients ... Coronary heart ..... Length Density of Prostate Vessels, Intraoperative,.

  1. Modeling Bacteria-Water Interactions in Soil: EPS Dynamics Under Evaporative Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, J.; Hinestroza, H. F.; Guo, Y. S.; Gage, D. J.; Cho, Y. K.; Shor, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    The soil habitat represents a major linkage between the water and carbon cycles: the ability of soils to sequester or release carbon is determined primarily by soil moisture. Water retention and distribution in soils controls the abundance and activity of soil microbes. Microbes in turn impact water retention by creating biofilms, composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). We model the effects of bacterial EPS on water retention at the pore scale. We use the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), a well-established fluid dynamics modeling platform, and modify it to include the effects of water uptake and release by the swelling/shrinking EPS phase. The LB model is implemented in 2-D, with a non-ideal gas equation of state that allows condensation and evaporation of fluid in pore spaces. Soil particles are modeled according to experimentally determined particle size distributions and include realistic pore geometries, in contrast to many soil models which use spherical soil particles for simplicity. Model results are compared with evaporation experiments in soil micromodels and other simpler experimental systems, and model parameters are tuned to match experimental results. Drying behavior and solid-gel contact angle of EPS produced by the soil bacteria Sinorhizobium meliloti has been characterized and compared to the behavior of deionized water under the same conditions. The difference in behavior between the fluids is used to parameterize the model. The model shows excellent qualitative agreement for soil micromodels with both aggregated and non-aggregated particle arrangements under no-EPS conditions, and reproduces realistic drying behavior for EPS. This work represents a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding microbe-soil interactions at the pore scale.

  2. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  3. Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it ...

  4. Molecular assays for the detection of prostate tumor derived nucleic acids in peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnunen Martin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. Although serum PSA testing is widely used for early detection, more specific prognostic tests are needed to guide treatment decisions. Recently, the enumeration of circulating prostate epithelial cells has been shown to correlate with disease recurrence and metastasis following definitive treatment. The purpose of our study was to investigate an immunomagnetic fractionation procedure to enrich circulating prostate tumor cells (CTCs from peripheral blood specimens, and to apply amplified molecular assays for the detection of prostate-specific markers (PSA, PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion mRNAs. Results As few as five prostate cancer cells were detected per 5 mL of whole blood in model system experiments using anti-EpCAM magnetic particles alone or in combination with anti-PSMA magnetic particles. In our experiments, anti-EpCAM magnetic particles alone exhibited equivalent or better analytical performance with patient samples compared to a combination of anti-EpCAM + anti-PSMA magnetic particles. Up to 39% of men with advanced prostate cancer tested positive with one or more of the molecular assays tested, whereas control samples from men with benign prostate hyperplasia gave consistently negative results as expected. Interestingly, for the vast majority of men who tested positive for PSA mRNA following CTC enrichment, their matched plasma samples also tested positive, although CTC enrichment gave higher overall mRNA copy numbers. Conclusion CTCs were successfully enriched and detected in men with advanced prostate cancer using an immunomagnetic enrichment procedure coupled with amplified molecular assays for PSA, PCA3, and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion mRNAs. Our results indicate that men who test positive following CTC enrichment also exhibit higher detectable levels of non-cellular, circulating prostate-specific mRNAs.

  5. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  6. Prostaglandin E2 Prevents Hyperosmolar-Induced Human Mast Cell Activation through Prostanoid Receptors EP2 and EP4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Atencio, Ivonne; Ainsua-Enrich, Erola; de Mora, Fernando; Picado, César; Martín, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Background Mast cells play a critical role in allergic and inflammatory diseases, including exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in asthma. The mechanism underlying EIB is probably related to increased airway fluid osmolarity that activates mast cells to the release inflammatory mediators. These mediators then act on bronchial smooth muscle to cause bronchoconstriction. In parallel, protective substances such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are probably also released and could explain the refractory period observed in patients with EIB. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of PGE2 on osmotically activated mast cells, as a model of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Methods We used LAD2, HMC-1, CD34-positive, and human lung mast cell lines. Cells underwent a mannitol challenge, and the effects of PGE2 and prostanoid receptor (EP) antagonists for EP1–4 were assayed on the activated mast cells. Beta-hexosaminidase release, protein phosphorylation, and calcium mobilization were assessed. Results Mannitol both induced mast cell degranulation and activated phosphatidyl inositide 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, thereby causing de novo eicosanoid and cytokine synthesis. The addition of PGE2 significantly reduced mannitol-induced degranulation through EP2 and EP4 receptors, as measured by beta-hexosaminidase release, and consequently calcium influx. Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 phosphorylation were diminished when compared with mannitol activation alone. Conclusions Our data show a protective role for the PGE2 receptors EP2 and EP4 following osmotic changes, through the reduction of human mast cell activity caused by calcium influx impairment and MAP kinase inhibition. PMID:25329458

  7. Adrenomedullin increases the short-circuit current in the rat prostate: Receptors, chloride channels, the effects of cAMP and calcium ions and implications on fluid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S B; Cheung, K H; Cheung, M P L; Wong, P F; O, W S; Tang, F

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have investigated the effects of adrenomedullin on chloride and fluid secretion in the rat prostate. The presence of adrenomedullin (ADM) in rat prostate was confirmed using immunostaining, and the molecular species was determined using gel filtration chromatography coupled with an enzyme-linked assay for ADM. The effects of ADM on fluid secretion were studied by short-circuit current technique in a whole mount preparation of the prostate in an Ussing chamber. The results indicated that the ADM level was higher in the ventral than the dorso-lateral prostate and the major molecular species was the active peptide. ADM increased the short-circuit current through both the cAMP- and calcium-activated chloride channels in the ventral lobe, but only through the calcium-activated channels in the dorso-lateral lobe. These stimulatory effects were blocked by the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, hCGRP8-37. We conclude that ADM may regulate prostatic fluid secretion through the chloride channels, which may affect the composition of the seminal plasma bathing the spermatozoa and hence fertility. © 2014 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  8. Prostaglandin E2 and the protein kinase A pathway mediate arachidonic acid induction of c-fos in human prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the precursor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and increases growth of prostate cancer cells. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved in AA-induced prostate cell growth, induction of c-fos expression by AA was investigated in a human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. c-fos mRNA was induced shortly after addition of AA, along with a remarkable increase in PGE2 production. c-fos expression and PGE2 production induced by AA was blocked by a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, suggesting that PGE2 mediated c-fos induction. Protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 abolished induction of c-fos expression by AA, and partially inhibited PGE2 production. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X had no significant effect on c-fos expression or PGE2 production. Expression of prostaglandin (EP) receptors, which mediate signal transduction from PGE2 to the cells, was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in several human prostate cell lines. EP4 and EP2, which are coupled to the PKA signalling pathway, were expressed in all cells tested. Expression of EP1, which activates the PKC pathway, was not detected. The current study showed that induction of the immediate early gene c-fos by AA is mediated by PGE2, which activates the PKA pathway via the EP2/4 receptor in the PC-3 cells.

  9. Prostatic specific antigen. From its early days until becoming a prostate cancer biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellavedova, T

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been since the mid 80's the most commonly used biomarker for measuring current and future risk of prostate cancer, for its early detection and to measure response to treatments and detecting recurrence in all stages of the disease. PSA's early development came along with progress in the field of immunology, which allowed detection and study of antigens from different tissues and fluids when injecting them into rabbits to promote immune response. Rubin Flocks in 1960 was the first to investigate and discover prostate-specific antigens in benign and malignant tissue. Some years later, Hara, a Japanese forensic investigator, found 'gamma seminoprotein', that he used to detect human semen in rape cases. However, his work published in Japanese did not reach the Englishspeaking scientific community. In 1970 Ablin discovered both in prostatic fluid and tissue what he called "prostate-specific antigen", but he didn't characterize or describe it. Investigators Li and Beling, and Sensabaugh, approached the current PSA, but they were limited by available technology at that time. Dr T Ming Chu led a research team on prostate cancer in New York, USA and published their results in 1979. He finally received the patent for the discovery of "human purified prostate antigen" in 1984. Due to this work, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in USA, approved the use of PSA for monitoring recurrence after treatment. It was later known that PSA was not prostate-specific since it was produced in other tissues and fluids, but it was recognized that it was human species-specific. Works by Papsidero and Stamey showed new indications and utilities for PSA, but it was Catalona who first used it as a marker for prostate cancer in 1991. Thanks to these advances FDA authorized in 1994 the clinical use of PSA for early detection of prostate cancer.

  10. Enlarged prostate - after care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000398.htm Enlarged prostate - after care To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The prostate is a gland that produces the fluid that ...

  11. Detection of prostate carcinomas with T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Value of two-compartment model; Detektion von Prostatakarzinomen mit T1-gewichteter Kontrastmittel-unterstuetzter dynamischer MRT. Wertigkeit des Zweikompartimentemodells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, F.; Lichy, M.; Farhan, N.; Delorme, S.; Kauczor, H.U. [Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg (Germany); Grobholz, R. [Abteilung fuer Pathologie, Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany); Heilmann, M. [Abteilung fuer Physik in der Radiologie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg (Germany); Michel, M.S.; Trojan, L. [Abteilung fuer Urologie, Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany); Werner, A.; Rabe, J. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany); Schlemmer, H.P. [Abteilung fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Aim The suitability of dynamic parameters of the two-compartment model for detecting prostate carcinomas and its correlation with tumor microvascular density were evaluated. The study included 43 patients with biopsy-proven prostate carcinoma: 28 were examined by 1.0-T MRI (Turbo-FLASH) and 15 by 1.5-T MRI (FLASH) with infusion of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Signal time curves were parametrized with an open two-compartment model in amplitude and exchange rate constants (k{sub ep}).The microvascular density of resected prostate carcinomas was determined. The microvascular density in the tumors was significantly higher than in the adjacent healthy prostate tissue and correlated in both sequences with k{sub ep}. Prostate carcinomas of the peripheral zone were demarcated by amplitude and k{sub ep}. In the Turbo-FLASH sequence there was a significant difference between the tumor tissue and healthy peripheral zone in terms of k{sub ep} and in the FLASH sequence in terms of amplitude. Prostate carcinomas can be visualized with dynamic T1-weighted MR sequences using a two-compartment model. Moreover, the parameter k{sub ep} reveals the microvascular density in the tumor and can thus provide valuable clinical information for characterizing the tumors. (orig.) [German] Die Eignung dynamischer Parameter des Zweikompartimentemodells zur Erkennung von Prostatakarzinomen und deren Korrelation mit der Tumormikrogefaessdichte wurden evaluiert. 43 Patienten mit bioptisch gesichertem Prostatakarzinom wurden untersucht, 28 mit 1,0 T- (Turbo-FLASH-) und 15 bei 1,5-T-MRT (FLASH) unter Infusion von 0,1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Signal-Zeit-Kurven wurden nach einem offenen Zweikompartimentemodell in Amplitude sowie Austauschratenkonstante (k{sub ep}) parametrisiert. An resezierten Prostatakarzinomen wurde die Mikrogefaessdichte bestimmt.Ergebnisse Die Mikrogefaessdichte in den Tumoren war signifikant hoeher als im angrenzenden gesunden Prostatagewebe und korrelierte bei beiden Sequenzen mit k{sub ep

  12. Application of EoEP principle with variable heat transfer coefficient in minimizing entropy production in heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkan, F.

    2005-01-01

    A more realistic application of the entropy minimization principle EoEP is presented. This principle dictates uniform local entropy generations along the heat exchanger in order to minimize the total entropy generation rate due only to heat transfer. For a certain heat duty and area of an existing exchanger, this is done by changing the temperatures of one fluid while the temperatures of the other fluid are held constant. Since the heat duty is fixed, the change in the temperatures of the fluid after the change, however, may sometimes cause a drastic change in its flow rate. This may cause considerable changes in the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) and, consequently, in the entropy generation rate. Depending on the choice of the fluid for changing, the new entropy generation rates may be higher or lower than those based on constant U as is the case in papers recently published. So, the classical application of the EoEP principle needs to be modified to achieve more realistic entropy generation rates. In this study, the principle of EoEP with variable U is applied to some cases of heat exchange, and a simple method is presented as a criterion for the proper choice of the fluid to be changed

  13. Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigehisa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Kishi, Tomoya; Makino, Junichi; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. ► Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. ► We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. ► A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. ► We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial–mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed. The present findings show that fluid flow stress exerts a prolonged bioactive effect on mesothelial cells after termination

  14. Asymptomatic prostatic inflammation in men with clinical BPH and erectile dysfunction affects the positive predictive value of prostate-specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Shalini; Mittal, Rama Devi; Kapoor, Rakesh; Mandhani, Anil

    2014-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that sexual dysfunction in elderly men with benign prostatic hyperplasia leads to prostatic inflammation, diagnosed by prostatic fluid interleukin-8 (IL-8), which lowers the positive predictive value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Overall, 160 men with lower urinary tract symptoms between 50 and 75 years of age with an elevated PSA level of more than 4 ng/ml with normal digital rectal examination and 50 age-matched controls with normal PSA level were prospectively evaluated for prostatic fluid IL-8 levels. Erectile dysfunction was measured by self-administered questionnaire of the Sexual Health Inventory for Men. Total and free serum PSA levels and IL-8 in prostatic fluid were measured 6 to 8 weeks after a course of 400mg of ofloxacin and 20mg of piroxicam given daily for 2 weeks. Transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy was done only when PSA level did not decrease less than 4 ng/ml. Mean ages of patients and controls were 63.18 (standard deviation [SD]±7.10) and 60.18 (SD+6.02) years, respectively. Mean concentration of IL-8 in prostatic fluid of the patients was significantly higher, i.e., 6678 pg/ml (SD±1985.7) than in control, i.e., 1543 pg/ml (SD±375.7) (Pprostatic hyperplasia and erectile dysfunction had significant inflammation of the prostate to cause spurious rise in PSA level resulting in an unnecessary biopsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Male infertility workup needs additional testing of expressed prostatic secretion and/or post-massage urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margus Punab

    Full Text Available The male factor accounts for almost 50% of infertility cases. Inflammation may reduce semen quality via several pathways, including oxidative stress (OxS. As male infertility routinely is assessed using semen analysis only, the possible presence of non-leukocytospermic asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis may be overlooked. We compared local and systemic OxS levels in male partners of infertile couples with different inflammation patterns in their genital tract and/or oligospermia. Subjects (n=143 were grouped according to inflammation in their semen, expressed prostatic secretion (EPS, and/or post-massage urine (post-M. Systemic (8-isoprostanes in urine and local (diene conjugates and total antioxidant capacity in seminal plasma OxS was measured The levels of OxS markers were significantly elevated in both severe inflammation groups--leukocytospermic men and subjects whose inflammation was limited only to EPS and/or post-M. Comparison between oligospermic and non-oligospermic men with genital tract inflammation, and oligozoospermic men with or without inflammation in the genital tract indicated that inflammation but not oligospermia status had significant impact on the measured OxS markers. Hence, a high leukocyte count in prostate-specific materials (EPS, post-M, even in absence of clear leukocytopsermia, is an important source of local and systemic OxS that may be associated with male infertility and affect general health. We suggest including the tests for detection of inflammation of the prostate into the workup of infertile men as was suggested in the WHO 1993 recommendation.

  16. Reprogramming of cell junction modules during stepwise epithelial to mesenchymal transition and accumulation of malignant features in vitro in a prostate cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Xi-song; Li, Wen-cheng; Hovland, Randi; Qu, Yi; Liu, Run-hui; McCormack, Emmet; Thorsen, Frits; Olsen, Jan Roger; Molven, Anders; Kogan-Sakin, Ira; Rotter, Varda; Akslen, Lars A.; Oyan, Anne Margrete; Kalland, Karl-Henning

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is pivotal in tumor metastasis. Our previous work reported an EMT model based on primary prostate epithelial cells (EP156T) which gave rise to cells with mesenchymal phenotype (EPT1) without malignant transformation. To promote prostate cell transformation, cells were maintained in saturation density cultures to select for cells overriding quiescence. Foci formed repeatedly following around 8 weeks in confluent EPT1 monolayers. Only later passage EPT1, but not EP156T cells of any passage, could form foci. Cells isolated from the foci were named EPT2 and formed robust colonies in soft agar, a malignant feature present neither in EP156T nor in EPT1 cells. EPT2 cells showed additional malignant traits in vitro, including higher ability to proliferate following confluence, higher resistance to apoptosis and lower dependence on exogenous growth factors than EP156T and EPT1 cells. Microarray profiling identified gene sets, many of which belong to cell junction modules, that changed expression from EP156T to EPT1 cells and continued to change from EPT1 to EPT2 cells. Our findings provide a novel stepwise cell culture model in which EMT emerges independently of transformation and is associated with subsequent accumulation of malignant features in prostate cells. Reprogramming of cell junction modules is involved in both steps.

  17. Highlights from e-EPS: EPS and EuChems are joining forces

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   On the occasion of the EPS Council 2013 in Strasbourg, a memorandum of understanding was signed between the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Societies (EuCheMS) and the European Physical Society (EPS) by presidents Ulrich Schubert and Luisa Cifarelli. EuCheMS and EPS share many objectives, such as community building, scientific excellence, communication and representation of their respective members to European policy makers. The two societies recognise that issues in many fields such as education, publication, support for basic sciences and frontier research are similar in their respective disciplines. They wish to combine efforts in developing and presenting common standpoints to their mutual benefit as European representatives in chemistry ...

  18. Prostaglandin E2 activates the mTORC1 pathway through an EP4/cAMP/PKA- and EP1/Ca2+-mediated mechanism in the human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PANC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Hua; Young, Steven H; Sinnett-Smith, James; Chou, Caroline Ei Ne; Moro, Aune; Hertzer, Kathleen M; Hines, Oscar Joe; Rozengurt, Enrique; Eibl, Guido

    2015-11-15

    Obesity, a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, is associated with inflammation and insulin resistance. Proinflammatory prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and elevated insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1), related to insulin resistance, are shown to play critical roles in pancreatic cancer progression. We aimed to explore a potential cross talk between PGE2 signaling and the IGF-1/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in pancreatic cancer, which may be a key to unraveling the obesity-cancer link. In PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells, we showed that PGE2 stimulated mTORC1 activity independently of Akt, as evaluated by downstream signaling events. Subsequently, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we demonstrated that PGE2-induced mTORC1 activation is mediated by the EP4/cAMP/PKA pathway, as well as an EP1/Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. The cooperative roles of the two pathways were supported by the maximal inhibition achieved with the combined pharmacological blockade, and the coexistence of highly expressed EP1 (mediating the Ca(2+) response) and EP2 or EP4 (mediating the cAMP/PKA pathway) in PANC-1 cells and in the prostate cancer line PC-3, which also robustly exhibited PGE2-induced mTORC1 activation, as identified from a screen in various cancer cell lines. Importantly, we showed a reinforcing interaction between PGE2 and IGF-1 on mTORC1 signaling, with an increase in IL-23 production as a cellular outcome. Our data reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of PGE2-stimulated mTORC1 activation mediated by EP4/cAMP/PKA and EP1/Ca(2+) signaling, which may be of great importance in elucidating the promoting effects of obesity in pancreatic cancer. Ultimately, a precise understanding of these molecular links may provide novel targets for efficacious interventions devoid of adverse effects. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF PROSTATE TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Brizhatyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate tuberculosis is difficult to be diagnosed, especially if lesions are limited only by this organ. The article analyses the experience of differential diagnostics of prostate tuberculosis based on the data of examination of 84 patients. 45 of them were diagnosed with prostate tuberculosis, and 39 patients were diagnosed with chronic bacterial prostatitis. Pathognomonic diagnostics criteria of prostate tuberculosis were the following: detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in the prostatic fluid or ejaculate, signs of granulomatous prostatitis with areas of cavernous necrosis in prostate biopsy samples, and prostate cavities visualized by X-ray or ultrasound examinations. Should the above criteria be absent, the disease can be diagnosed based on the combination of indirect signs: symptoms of prostate inflammation with active tuberculosis of the other localization; large prostate calcification, extensive hyperechoic area of the prostate, spermatocystic lesions, leucospermia and hemospermia, failure of the adequate non-specific anti-bacterial therapy.

  20. An e-p facility for Europe. Weak interactions in e-p physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlay, R.

    1979-01-01

    We first present the recent development on an e-p collider in Europe occuring in the last year. Then a review of physics motivations for an e-p ring is discussed and developed with the latest work presented at the meeting on 'Study for an e-p Facility for Europe' held at Hamburg on April 2-3, 1979

  1. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome in adolescents compared with that in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keon-Cheol; Cho, In-Rae

    2017-07-01

    Chronic prostatitis (CP)/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) has been studied mainly in adults; reports in adolescents are rare. We compared the clinical characteristics of adolescent CP/CPPS patients with those of young adults. We retrospectively analyzed 20 adolescents with CP/CPPS aged prostatitis symptoms index (NIH-CPSI) questionnaire, urinalysis, expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) or semen analysis, transrectal prostate ultrasonography, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were performed. Based on the EPS or semen analysis, patients were divided into category III-A or III-B. The mean age was 16.5±2.0 and 32.8±5.0 years in the adolescent and control groups, respectively. A sexual activity history was seen in 2 patients; 9 and 11 patients were in category III-A and III-B, respectively. The PSA was 0.65±0.39 and 1.22±0.48 ng/mL in the adolescent and control groups, respectively. The prostate size was 12.4±4.4 and 21.0±4.9 g in the adolescent and control groups, respectively. The NIH-CPSI scores in the adolescent group were 9.2±5.2, 5.5±3.5, 7.5±3.2, and 22.2±8.1 for pain, voiding, quality of life (QoL) domains, and total scores, respectively. The adolescent group showed a tendency to exhibit high voiding symptom scores. CPPS has an equally severe impact on QoL in adults and adolescents. Apart from high voiding symptom scores in adolescents, no difference was found in terms of urologic clinical parameters.

  2. PGE2 receptor EP3 inhibits water reabsorption and contributes to polyuria and kidney injury in a streptozotocin-induced mouse model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouneh, Ramzi; Nasrallah, Rania; Zimpelmann, Joe; Gutsol, Alex; Eckert, David; Ghossein, Jamie; Burns, Kevin D; Hébert, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    The first clinical manifestation of diabetes is polyuria. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor EP3 antagonises arginine vasopressin (AVP)-mediated water reabsorption and its expression is increased in the diabetic kidney. The purpose of this work was to study the contribution of EP3 to diabetic polyuria and renal injury. Male Ep 3 (-/-) (also known as Ptger3 (-/-)) mice were treated with streptozotocin (STZ) to generate a mouse model of diabetes and renal function was evaluated after 12 weeks. Isolated collecting ducts (CDs) were microperfused to study the contribution of EP3 to AVP-mediated fluid reabsorption. Ep 3 (-/-)-STZ mice exhibited attenuated polyuria and increased urine osmolality compared with wild-type STZ (WT-STZ) mice, suggesting enhanced water reabsorption. Compared with WT-STZ mice, Ep 3 (-/-)-STZ mice also had increased protein expression of aquaporin-1, aquaporin-2, and urea transporter A1, and reduced urinary AVP excretion, but increased medullary V2 receptors. In vitro microperfusion studies indicated that Ep 3 (-/-) and WT-STZ CDs responded to AVP stimulation similarly to those of wild-type mice, with a 60% increase in fluid reabsorption. In WT non-injected and WT-STZ mice, EP3 activation with sulprostone (PGE2 analogue) abrogated AVP-mediated water reabsorption; this effect was absent in mice lacking EP3. A major finding of this work is that Ep 3 (-/-)-STZ mice showed blunted renal cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression, reduced renal hypertrophy, reduced hyperfiltration and reduced albuminuria, as well as diminished tubular dilation and nuclear cysts. Taken together, the data suggest that EP3 contributes to diabetic polyuria by inhibiting expression of aquaporins and that it promotes renal injury during diabetes. EP3 may prove to be a promising target for more selective management of diabetic kidney disease.

  3. Molecular and preclinical basis to inhibit PGE2 receptors EP2 and EP4 as a novel nonsteroidal therapy for endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosh, Joe A.; Lee, JeHoon; Balasubbramanian, Dakshnapriya; Stanley, Jone A.; Long, Charles R.; Meagher, Mary W.; Osteen, Kevin G.; Bruner-Tran, Kaylon L.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Banu, Sakhila K.

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a debilitating, estrogen-dependent, progesterone-resistant, inflammatory gynecological disease of reproductive age women. Two major clinical symptoms of endometriosis are chronic intolerable pelvic pain and subfertility or infertility, which profoundly affect the quality of life in women. Current hormonal therapies to induce a hypoestrogenic state are unsuccessful because of undesirable side effects, reproductive health concerns, and failure to prevent recurrence of disease. There is a fundamental need to identify nonestrogen or nonsteroidal targets for the treatment of endometriosis. Peritoneal fluid concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are higher in women with endometriosis, and this increased PGE2 plays important role in survival and growth of endometriosis lesions. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of pharmacological inhibition of PGE2 receptors, EP2 and EP4, on molecular and cellular aspects of the pathogenesis of endometriosis and associated clinical symptoms. Using human fluorescent endometriotic cell lines and chimeric mouse model as preclinical testing platform, our results, to our knowledge for the first time, indicate that selective inhibition of EP2/EP4: (i) decreases growth and survival of endometriosis lesions; (ii) decreases angiogenesis and innervation of endometriosis lesions; (iii) suppresses proinflammatory state of dorsal root ganglia neurons to decrease pelvic pain; (iv) decreases proinflammatory, estrogen-dominant, and progesterone-resistant molecular environment of the endometrium and endometriosis lesions; and (v) restores endometrial functional receptivity through multiple mechanisms. Our novel findings provide a molecular and preclinical basis to formulate long-term nonestrogen or nonsteroidal therapy for endometriosis. PMID:26199416

  4. [Efficacy and safety of Longjintonglin Capsule for the treatment of type III prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xue-Jun; Geng, Qiang; Duan, Jian-Min; Zheng, De-Quan; Xie, Lei; Guo, Jun

    2014-12-01

    To study the therapeutic effect and safety of Longjintonglin Capsule in the treatment of type III prostatitis (chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS). We selected 240 patients with type III prostatitis according to the diagnostic standards of the American National Institute of Health (NIH) and treated them with Longjintonglin Capsule orally 3 capsules once tid for 12 weeks. Based on the NIH chronic prostatitis symptom index (NIH-CPSI), traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome score, and leukocyte count in the expressed prostatic secretion (EPS), we evaluated the results of treatment. Totally 238 patients completed the treatment, including 108 IIIA and 120 III B prostatitis cases. Before and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment, the total NIH-CPSI scores were 23.12 ± 6.99, 18.22 ± 6.39, 14.12 ± 5.88, and 12.36 ± 6.04 (P prostatitis patients and 22.01 ± 6.28, 17.56 ± 5.89, 13.67 ± 5.18, and 11.45 ± 5.22 in the III prostatitis patients (P prostatitis, deserves to be recommended for clinical application.

  5. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with osseous metastases in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee-Parritz, D.E.; Lamb, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Bone scintigraphy was used to diagnose osseous metastasis of prostatic adenocarcinoma in a 10-year-old dog with neck pain and ataxia and a large, sensitive prostate gland. Although radiography revealed a normal spine, prostatic fluid cytologic and ultrasonographic findings were compatible with prostatitis or neoplasia. Scintigraphic hot spots were seen in the axial skeleton, ribs, pelvis, humerus, and femur and corresponded to sites of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma

  6. Vacuolar Localization of Endoproteinases EP(1) and EP(2) in Barley Mesophyll Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, S S; Huffaker, R C

    1984-05-01

    The localization of two previously characterized endoproteinases (EP(1) and EP(2)) that comprise more than 95% of the protease activity in primary Hordeum vulgare L. var Numar leaves was determined. Intact vacuoles released from washed mesophyll protoplasts by gentle osmotic shock and increase in pH, were purified by flotation through a four-step Ficoll gradient. These vacuoles contained endoproteinases that rapidly degraded purified barley ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) substrate. Breakdown products and extent of digestion of RuBPCase were determined using 12% polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Coomassie brilliant blue- or silver-stained gels were scanned, and the peaks were integrated to provide quantitative information. The characteristics of the vacuolar endoproteinases (e.g. sensitivity to various inhibitors and activators, and the molecular weights of the breakdown products, i.e. peptide maps) closely resembled those of purified EP(1) and partially purified EP(2). It is therefore concluded that EP(1) and EP(2) are localized in the vacuoles of mesophyll cells.

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  9. Hemodynamic and metabolic characterization of orthotopic rat prostate carcinomas using dynamic MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiessling, F.; Lichy, M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Grobholz, R.; Heilmann, M.; Meding, J.; Huber, P.E.; Peschke, P.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was the noninvasive characterization of prostate carcinoma orthotopically implanted in rats using Gd-DTPA-assisted dynamic MRI (dMRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS). After surgical exposure of the prostate, Dunning R3327 orthotopic prostate carcinoma was induced by injecting cells of the MAT-LyLu subline. Six rats were examined 5 and 14 days after tumor induction with dMRI and 1 H-MRS at 1.5 T. Six tumor-free rats served as controls. Using an open two-compartment model, the parameters A (amplitude) and k ep (exchange rate constants) were calculated from the signal time curves of the dMRI. The relative signal intensities (Cho/Cr) of the resonances of choline (Cho) and the creatine-phosphocreatine complex (Cr) were computed from the MR spectra. Already after 5 days, the tumors in the prostate could be clearly identified based on the decrease in signal intensity to T2w and increase of A and k ep . High Cho/Cr levels and resonances of two lipid fractions (Lip 1 at 0.8-1.5 ppm and Lip 2 at 2.0-2.2 ppm) were observed by MRS in the highly necrotic tumors. The orthotopic rat prostate carcinoma model resembles human prostate carcinoma in regard to MR morphology, dMRI, and 1 H-MRS. The noninvasive characterization of perfusion and metabolism makes a comparative examination of different treatment modalities possible. (orig.) [de

  10. PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than 70%. Your risk of getting HIV from sex can be even lower if you combine PrEP with condoms and other prevention methods. Download PrEP 101 Consumer Info Sheet Vital Signs Fact Sheet on Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV (PrEP) Expand All Collapse All Video Introductions to PrEP What is PrEP? A Brief ...

  11. Grain-scale Sr isotope heterogeneity in amphibolite (retrograded UHP eclogite, Dabie terrane): Implications for the origin and flow behavior of retrograde fluids during slab exhumation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shun; Yang, Yueheng; Chen, Yi; Su, Bin; Gao, Yijie; Zhang, Lingmin; Liu, Jingbo; Mao, Qian

    2016-12-01

    To constrain the origin and flow behavior of amphibolite-facies retrograde fluids during slab exhumation, we investigate the textures, trace element contents, and in situ strontium (Sr) isotopic compositions (using LA-MC-ICP-MS) of multiple types of epidote and apatite in the UHP eclogite and amphibolites from the Hualiangting area (Dabie terrane, China). The UHP epidote porphyroblasts in the eclogite (Ep-E), which formed at 28-30 kbar and 660-720 °C, contain high amounts of Sr, Pb, Th, Ba, and light rare earth elements (LREEs) and have a narrow range of initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70431 ± 0.00012 to 0.70454 ± 0.00010). Two types of amphibolite-facies epidote were recognized in the amphibolites. The first type of epidote (Ep-AI) developed in all the amphibolites and has slightly lower trace element contents than Ep-E. The Ep-AI has a same initial 87Sr/86Sr ratio range as the Ep-E and represents the primary amphibolite-facies retrograde product that is associated with an internally buffered fluid at 8.0-10.3 kbar and 646-674 °C. The other type of epidote (Ep-AII) occurs as irregular fragments, veins/veinlets, or reaction rims on the Ep-AI in certain amphibolites. Elemental X-ray maps reveal the presence of Ep-AI relics in the Ep-AII domains (appearing as a patchy texture), which indicates that Ep-AII most likely formed by the partial replacement of the Ep-AI in the presence of an infiltrating fluid. The distinctly lower trace element contents of Ep-AII are ascribed to element scavenging by a mechanism of dissolution-transport-precipitation during replacement. The Ep-AII in an individual amphibolite exhibits large intra- and inter-grain variations in the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.70493 ± 0.00030 to 0.70907 ± 0.00022), which are between those of the Ep-AI and granitic gneisses (wall rock of the amphibolites, 0.7097-0.7108). These results verify that the infiltrating fluid was externally derived from granitic gneisses. The matrix apatite in the amphibolites has

  12. Feasibility of shutter-speed DCE-MRI for improved prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Priest, Ryan A; Woodward, William J; Tagge, Ian J; Siddiqui, Faisal; Huang, Wei; Rooney, William D; Beer, Tomasz M; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of shutter-speed model dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI pharmacokinetic analyses for prostate cancer detection was investigated in a prebiopsy patient cohort. Differences of results from the fast-exchange-regime-allowed (FXR-a) shutter-speed model version and the fast-exchange-limit-constrained (FXL-c) standard model are demonstrated. Although the spatial information is more limited, postdynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI biopsy specimens were also examined. The MRI results were correlated with the biopsy pathology findings. Of all the model parameters, region-of-interest-averaged K(trans) difference [ΔK(trans) ≡ K(trans)(FXR-a) - K(trans)(FXL-c)] or two-dimensional K(trans)(FXR-a) vs. k(ep)(FXR-a) values were found to provide the most useful biomarkers for malignant/benign prostate tissue discrimination (at 100% sensitivity for a population of 13, the specificity is 88%) and disease burden determination. (The best specificity for the fast-exchange-limit-constrained analysis is 63%, with the two-dimensional plot.) K(trans) and k(ep) are each measures of passive transcapillary contrast reagent transfer rate constants. Parameter value increases with shutter-speed model (relative to standard model) analysis are larger in malignant foci than in normal-appearing glandular tissue. Pathology analyses verify the shutter-speed model (FXR-a) promise for prostate cancer detection. Parametric mapping may further improve pharmacokinetic biomarker performance. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. EP BICYCLE POOL - VIGNETTES 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    EP-SMI Help Desk

    2002-01-01

    The vignettes (insurance certificates) for 2002 become obligatory from 1 June. If you have a bicycle from the EP Pool, please bring it to the EP-SMI Help Desk (Building 124) on any working day up to 31 May between 8h.30 - 12h.00 or 13h.30 - 17h.30. EP-SMI Help Desk

  14. HIV-negative male couples' attitudes about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and using PrEP with a sexual agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jason W; Lee, Ji-Young; Woodyatt, Cory; Bauermeister, José; Sullivan, Patrick; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-08-01

    One efficacious strategy to help prevent HIV is oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a daily regimen of antiretroviral treatment taken by HIV-negative individuals. Two of the recommendations of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for PrEP pertain to being in a relationship (i.e., male couples). Despite the recognition of how primary partners in male couples' relationships shape HIV risk and CDC's PrEP guidelines, there is a paucity of data that examine HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use and using PrEP with a sexual agreement. A sexual agreement is an explicit agreement made between two individuals about what sex and other related behaviors may occur within and outside of their relationship. In this qualitative study, we examine HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use and whether they thought PrEP could be integrated into a sexual agreement. Data for this study are drawn from couple-level interviews conducted in 2014 with 29 HIV-negative male couples who had a sexual agreement and were from Atlanta or Detroit. Both passive (e.g., flyers) and active (e.g., targeted Facebook advertisements) recruitment methods were used; the sample was stratified by agreement type. Thematic analysis was applied to identify the following themes regarding HIV-negative male couples' attitudes toward PrEP use: (1) PrEP and condom use; (2) concerns about PrEP (e.g., effectiveness, side effects, and promoting sexually risky behavior); and (3) accessibility of PrEP. Some thought PrEP could be a part of couples' agreement because it could help reduce sexual anxiety and sexual risk, and would help keep the couple safe. Others described PrEP use with an agreement as something for "others". Some were also concerned that incorporating PrEP could usurp the need for a sexual agreement in a couples' relationship. These themes highlight the need to improve informational messaging and promotion efforts about PrEP among HIV-negative male couples

  15. PrEP Whores and HIV Prevention: The Queer Communication of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieldenner, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been introduced as another biomedical tool in HIV prevention. Whereas other such tools-including post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and interruption of perinatal transmission-have been embraced by those impacted by HIV, PrEP has been met with more conflict, especially within the gay community and HIV organizations. The "PrEP whore" has come to designate the social value and personal practices of those taking PrEP. This study examines the "PrEP whore" discourse by using queer theory and quare theory. Within these theoretical vantage points, the study explicates four discursive areas: slut shaming, dirty/clean binaries, mourning the loss of condoms, and reclaiming the inner whore. The study illuminates possible discursive strategies that lie outside of the domains of public health and within the individual and community.

  16. Incremental value of diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation treatment: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Hricak, Hedvig; Gultekin, David H.; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya; Pei, Xin; Sperling, Dahlia; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the incremental value of diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI (T2WI) in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients (median age, 70 years) with a history of radiotherapy-treated prostate cancer underwent multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) and transrectal prostate biopsy. Two readers independently scored the likelihood of cancer on a 1-5 scale, using T2WI alone and then adding DW-MRI and DCE-MRI. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated at the patient and prostate-side levels. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DW-MRI and the K trans , k ep , v e , AUGC90 and AUGC180 from DCE-MRI were recorded. Biopsy was positive in 16/24 (67%) and negative in 8/24 (33%) patients. AUCs for readers 1 and 2 increased from 0.64 and 0.53 to 0.95 and 0.86 with MP-MRI, at the patient level, and from 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.90 and 0.79 with MP-MRI, at the prostate-side level (p values -3 mm 2 /s)], median K trans [1.07 vs. 0.34 (1/min)], and k ep [2.06 vs 1.0 (1/min)] (p values < 0.05). MP-MRI was significantly more accurate than T2WI alone in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. Production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by Serratia sp.1 using wastewater sludge as raw material and flocculation activity of the EPS produced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezawada, J; Hoang, N V; More, T T; Yan, S; Tyagi, N; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2013-10-15

    Growth profile and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production of Serratia sp.1 was studied in shake flask fermentation for 72 h using wastewater sludge as raw material. Maximum cell concentration of 6.7 × 10(9) cfu/mL was obtained at 48 h fermentation time. EPS dry weight, flocculation activity and dewaterability of different EPS (tightly bound or TB-EPS, loosely bound or LB-EPS and broth-EPS or B-EPS) were also measured. The highest concentration of LB-EPS (2.45 g/L) and TB-EPS (0.99 g/L) were attained at 48 h of fermentation. Maximum flocculation activity and dewaterability (ΔCST) of TB-EPS (76.4%, 14.5s and 76.5%, 15.5s), LB-EPS (67.8%, 8.1s and 64.7%, 7.6s) and broth EPS (61%, 6.1s and 70.4%, 6.8s) were obtained at 36 and 48 h of growth. Higher flocculation activity and dewaterability were achieved with TB-EPS than with the two other EPS. Characterization of TB-EPS and LB-EPS was done in terms of their protein and carbohydrate content. Protein content was much higher in TB-EPS where as carbohydrate content was only slightly higher in TB-EPS than LB-EPS. Morphology of the Serratia strain after fermentation in sludge and TSB was observed under a scanning electron microscope and the cell size was found to be bigger in the sludge medium than the TSB medium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen are the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/033/02/0195-0207. Keywords. Kallikrein; prostate cancer biomarker; proteinase activity; seminal plasma; tumour proliferation and metastasis; therapeutic target. Abstract. Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were each isolated from human seminal fluid and ...

  19. Anatomy and Histology of the Human and Murine Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittmann, Michael

    2018-05-01

    The human and murine prostate glands have similar functional roles in the generation of seminal fluid to assist in reproduction. There are significant differences in the anatomy and histology of murine and human prostate and knowledge of the normal anatomy and histology of the murine prostate is essential to interpreting changes in genetically engineered mouse models. In this review, the normal anatomy and histology of both human and mouse prostate will be described. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Identification of structural and secretory lectin-binding glycoproteins of normal and cancerous human prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, P M; Cooper, J F; Learn, D B; Olson, C V

    1984-12-07

    We have utilized the technique of lectin-loading of SDS gels with iodinated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin to identify glycoproteins in prostatic and seminal fluids as well as in prostate tissue fractions. The following subunits which bound both lectins were detected: (a) 50, 43 and 38 kDa subunits common to prostatic and seminal fluids, and an additional 55 kDa subunit which predominates only in prostatic fluid; (b) 78, 55, 50 and 43 kDa subunits in prostatic tissue cytosol and (c) 195, 170, 135, 116 and 95 kDa subunits present in the particulate fractions of prostatic tissue. Immunoblotting using specific rabbit antibodies revealed the 50 kDa band to be prostatic acid phosphatase and the 38 kDa band to be prostate-specific antigen. Interestingly, antibodies directed toward prostatic acid phosphatase were found to cross-react with the 43 kDa band. Fractionation on sucrose gradients showed that several of these particulate glycoproteins were associated with a vesicle fraction enriched in adenylate cyclase activity, implying that they are plasma membrane glycoproteins. Comparison of soluble and particulate fractions of normal and cancerous tissue homogenates was made by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms of lectin-loaded gels. Similar relative intensities of lectin-binding were obtained for corresponding proteins in normal and cancerous tissue fractions. Also, immunoblotting showed no differences in prostatic acid phosphatase or prostate-specific antigen between normal and cancerous soluble homogenate fractions. Our results suggest that major lectin-binding proteins are conserved in the transition from normal to cancerous tissue. These results may be useful in developing a multiple-marker profile of metastatic prostate cancer and for the design of imaging agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, to prominent soluble and particulate prostate glycoproteins.

  1. Etiology of chronic prostatitis syndrome in patients treated at the university hospital for infectious diseases "Dr. Fran Mihaljević" from 2003 to 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerk, Vianja; Cajić, Vjeran; Markovinović, Leo; Roglić, Srdan; Zekan, Sime; Skerk, Vedrana; Radosević, Velena; Tambić Andragević, Arijana

    2006-12-01

    A total of 835 patients with symptoms of chronic prostatitis syndrome and no evidence of structural or functional lower genitourinary tract abnormalities were examined in a three year period at the Outpatient Department for Urogenital Infections, University Hospital for Infectious Diseases "Dr. Fran Mihaljević" Zagreb, Croatia. Disease etiology was determined in 482 (57.72%) patients. Chlamydia trachomatis was proved to be the causative pathogen in 161 patients, Trichomonas vaginalis in 85, Escherichia coli in 68, Enterococcus in 51, Proteus mirabilis in 20, Klebsiella pneumoniae in 9, Streptococcus agalactiae in 15, Ureaplasma urealyticum in 49 patients with chronic prostatitis. Other patients had mixed infection. In 257 (53.32%) of 482 patients, the inflammatory finding (>10 WBCs/hpf) was found in EPS or VB3. Normal WBCs/hpf (<10) was found in 103 (63.98%) of 161 patients with symptoms of chronic prostatitis in whom C. trachomatis was detected in EPS or VB3, in 50 (58.82%) of 85 patients in whom Trichomonas vaginalis was isolated, and in 23 (46.94%) of 49 patients in whom Ureaplasma urealyticum was isolated.

  2. Fosforihapon epäpuhtauksien uuttaminen

    OpenAIRE

    Sengström, Heli

    2012-01-01

    Fosforihappoa tuotetaan yleisesti sekä märkäprosessilla että termisellä prosessilla. Märkäprosessilla tuotettuun fosforihappoon jää erilaisia epäpuhtauksia, joita ei happoa käytettäessä saisi olla. Yleisimmät epäpuhtaudet ovat erilaiset fluoridit, kloridit ja metallit. Tämän opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli selvittää, kuinka hyvin nämä epäpuhtaudet saadaan poistettua uuttamalla happoa liuottimella, jossa on 80 % tributyylifosfaattia (TBP) ja 20 % ExxsolTM D80 -laimenninta. Työn kokeellisessa ...

  3. Entropy production in a fluid-solid system far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bong Jae; Ortega, Blas; Vaidya, Ashwin

    2017-11-24

    The terminal orientation of a rigid body in a moving fluid is an example of a dissipative system, out of thermodynamic equilibrium and therefore a perfect testing ground for the validity of the maximum entropy production principle (MaxEP). Thus far, dynamical equations alone have been employed in studying the equilibrium states in fluid-solid interactions, but these are far too complex and become analytically intractable when inertial effects come into play. At that stage, our only recourse is to rely on numerical techniques which can be computationally expensive. In our past work, we have shown that the MaxEP is a reliable tool to help predict orientational equilibrium states of highly symmetric bodies such as cylinders, spheroids and toroidal bodies. The MaxEP correctly helps choose the stable equilibrium in these cases when the system is slightly out of thermodynamic equilibrium. In the current paper, we expand our analysis to examine i) bodies with fewer symmetries than previously reported, for instance, a half-ellipse and ii) when the system is far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Using two-dimensional numerical studies at Reynolds numbers ranging between 0 and 14, we examine the validity of the MaxEP. Our analysis of flow past a half-ellipse shows that overall the MaxEP is a good predictor of the equilibrium states but, in the special case of the half-ellipse with aspect ratio much greater than unity, the MaxEP is replaced by the Min-MaxEP, at higher Reynolds numbers when inertial effects come into play. Experiments in sedimentation tanks and with hinged bodies in a flow tank confirm these calculations.

  4. Incremental value of diffusion weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiation treatment: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, Oguz; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Gultekin, David H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Pei, Xin; Sperling, Dahlia; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Schwartz, Lawrence H. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-09-15

    To assess the incremental value of diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) to T2-weighted MRI (T2WI) in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. Twenty-four patients (median age, 70 years) with a history of radiotherapy-treated prostate cancer underwent multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) and transrectal prostate biopsy. Two readers independently scored the likelihood of cancer on a 1-5 scale, using T2WI alone and then adding DW-MRI and DCE-MRI. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated at the patient and prostate-side levels. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from DW-MRI and the K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}, AUGC90 and AUGC180 from DCE-MRI were recorded. Biopsy was positive in 16/24 (67%) and negative in 8/24 (33%) patients. AUCs for readers 1 and 2 increased from 0.64 and 0.53 to 0.95 and 0.86 with MP-MRI, at the patient level, and from 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.90 and 0.79 with MP-MRI, at the prostate-side level (p values < 0.05). Biopsy-positive and biopsy-negative prostate sides differed significantly in median ADC [1.44 vs. 1.68 (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s)], median K{sup trans} [1.07 vs. 0.34 (1/min)], and k{sub ep} [2.06 vs 1.0 (1/min)] (p values < 0.05). MP-MRI was significantly more accurate than T2WI alone in detecting locally recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy. (orig.)

  5. Prostaglandin E2 EP2 and EP4 receptor activation mediates cAMP-dependent hyperpolarization and exocytosis of renin in juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla Glenert; Stubbe, Jane; Uhrenholt, Torben Rene

    2005-01-01

    /l), AE1-259-01 (1 nmol/l), EP4-selective agonist AE1-329 (1 nmol/l), and IP agonist iloprost (1 micromol/l) significantly increased C(m) mediated by PKA. The EP4 antagonist AE3-208 (10 nmol/l) blocked the effect of EP4 agonist but did not alter the response to PGE(2). Application of both EP4 antagonist....... The membrane potential hyperpolarized significantly after PGE(2), butaprost, AE1-329 and AE1-259 and outward current was augmented in a PKA-dependent fashion. PGE(2)-stimulated outward current, but not C(m) change, was abolished by the BK(Ca) channel inhibitor iberiotoxin (300 nmol/l). EP2 and EP4 m......RNA was detected in sampled JG cells, and the preglomerular and glomerular vasculature was immunopositive for EP4. Thus IP, EP2, and EP4 receptors are associated with JG cells, and their activation leads to rapid PKA-mediated exocytotic fusion and release of renin granules....

  6. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Gamat

    Full Text Available The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their

  7. Home-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP services for gay and bisexual men: An opportunity to address barriers to PrEP uptake and persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A John

    Full Text Available Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. Despite the promise of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP in reducing HIV transmission risk, barriers for uptake and persistence exist. We sought to identify whether GBM in a nationwide cohort who have not yet initiated PrEP (n = 906 would prefer to get PrEP-related care from a primary care provider (PCP compared to a specialist clinic or provider. We then sought to identify their level of interest and factors associated with preference for using home-based PrEP services (i.e., HB-PrEP, defined to participants as conducting HIV/STI self-testing from home with PrEP prescription mailing after an initial in-person clinic visit. We examined the associations of demographics, sexual HIV transmission risk, concern about frequent medical checkups associated with PrEP, health care access, and PrEP intentions with preferences for healthcare provider type and HB-PrEP. Concern about frequent medical checkups were associated with preferring a PCP for PrEP-related care, but men who perceived a barrier to bringing up the topic of PrEP with a doctor preferred a specialist clinic or provider more than a PCP. HB-PrEP was more appealing for younger men and those engaged in sexual HIV transmission risk, suggesting HB-PrEP could help reach GBM most vulnerable to HIV and in need of PrEP. HB-PrEP expansion has potential to increase PrEP uptake and persistence among GBM, particularly for men with barriers to clinic-based care and higher intentions to initiate PrEP. Clinical guidelines regarding HB-PrEP are needed to expand its use.

  8. Development of the nuclear weapons complex EP architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, C.; Halbleib, L.

    1996-07-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Guidance Team is an interagency committee led by Earl Whiteman, DOE that chartered the generation of EP40100, Concurrent Qualification and its successor EP401099, Concurrent Engineering and Qualification. As this new philosophy of concurrent operations has evolved and as implementation has been initiated, conflicts and insufficiencies in the remaining Engineering Procedures (EPs) have become more apparent. At the Guidance Team meeting in November 1995, this issue was explored and several approaches were considered. It was concluded at this meeting, that a smaller set of interagency EPs described in a hierarchical system could provide the necessary interagency direction to support complex-wide implementation. This set consolidates many existing EP processes where consistency and commonality are critical to success of the extended enterprise. The Guidance Team subsequently chartered an interagency team to initiate development activity associated with the envisioned new EP set. This team had participation from seven Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) sites as well as DOE/AL and DP-14 (team members are acknowledged later in this report). Per the Guidance Team, this team, referred to as the Architecture Subcommittee, was to map out and define an EP Architecture for the interagency EPs, make recommendations regarding a more agile process for EP approval and suggest an aggressive timeline to develop the combined EPs. The Architecture Subcommittee was asked to brief their output at the February Guidance Team meeting. This SAND report documents the results of the Architecture Subcommittee`s recommendations.

  9. Correlation of Th17 cell function with the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the course of prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of Th17 cell function with the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the course of prostatitis. Methods: A total of 128 patients with chronic prostatitis who were treated in our hospital between January 2015 and December 2016 were collected, and 50 healthy men who received physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as normal control group. The differences in Th17 cell ratio and IL-17 levels in peripheral blood, inflammatory factor levels in serum, and apoptosis gene expression in prostatic fluid were compared between the two groups. Pearson test was used to assess the correlation of Th17 cell function in peripheral blood with inflammation and apoptosis in patients with chronic prostatitis. Results: Th17 cell ratio and IL-17 level in peripheral blood of observation group were higher than those of normal control group; inflammatory factors IL- 1β, IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α and M-CSF levels in serum were higher than those of normal control group; apoptosis gene BAX mRNA in prostatic fluid was higher than that of control group while anti-apoptosis genes Bcl-2, livin and hPEBP4 mRNA expression were lower than those of normal control group. Pearson test showed that Th17 cell ratio and IL-17 level in peripheral blood of patients with chronic prostatitis were positively correlated with IL-1β, IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α and M-CSF levels in serum as well as BAX mRNA expression in prostatic fluid, and negatively correlated with Bcl-2, livin and hPEBP4 mRNA expression in prostatic fluid. Conclusion: There is Th17 cell hyperfunction in patients with chronic prostatitis, and it is an important cause of the systemic inflammatory response and prostate cell apoptosis aggravation.

  10. Radioimmunoassay for prostatic acid phosphatase in human serum. Methodologic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradalier, N; Canal, P; Pujol, A; Fregevu, Y [Groupe de Recherches du Centre Claudius-Regaud, Toulouse (France); Soula, G [Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Toulouse (France)

    1982-01-01

    We propose a double antibody radioimmunoassay for human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in serum for diagnosis and management of prostatic adenocarcinoma under treatment. The antigen is purified from human prostatic fluid by a gel-filtration on Sephadex G 100 followed by affinity chromatography on Con A Sepharose. A specific antibody is raised in rabbits and purified by immunoadsorption with a female serum. The described technique offers both radioisotopic sensibility and immunologic specificity. Physiological values determined in the serum of 125 healthy males are below 2 ng/ml. No significative differences are observed with age. The proposed technique also shows significant differences between values evaluated for benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  11. Evaluation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) combined with external radiation in an orthotopic rat model of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, M.; Thiesen, B.; Taymoorian, K.; Gneveckow, U.; Waldoefner, N.; Koch, M.; Scholz, R.; Lein, M.; Jung, K.; Loening, S.A.; Jordan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a new concept of cancer treatment based on AC magnetic field-induced excitation of biocompatible superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Preliminary studies of MFH using nanoscaled aminosilan-coated magnetites have demonstrated the feasibility of minimally invasive MFH in the Dunning tumor model. Here we evaluated the effect of two sequential MFH treatments, combined with external radiation, in an orthotopic Dunning R3327-MatLyLu prostate cancer model. MFH led to a significant growth inhibition in this orthotopic model of the aggressive MatLyLu tumor variant. Furthermore, combined MFH and radiation with 20 Gy equally effective in inhibiting tumor growth as radiation with 60 Gy, suggesting a significant synergistic effect. Intratumoral deposition of magnetic fluids was found to be stable, allowing for serial MFH treatments without repeated injection. The optimal treatment schedules of this combination regarding temperatures, sequencing and fractionation need to be defined in further experimental studies. (author)

  12. Association between penile dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI-derived quantitative parameters and self-reported sexual function in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Donati, Olivio F; Wibmer, Andreas; Goldman, Debra A; Mulhall, John P; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-10-01

    The high incidence of prostate cancer, coupled with excellent prostate cancer control rates, has resulted in growing interest in nononcological survivorship issues such as sexual function. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being performed for local staging of prostate cancer, and due to the close anatomical relationship to the prostate, penile enhancement is often depicted in prostate MRI. To evaluate the associations between quantitative perfusion-related parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI of the penis and self-reported sexual function in patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. This retrospective study included 50 patients who underwent DCE-MRI for prostate cancer staging before prostatectomy. The following perfusion-related parameters were calculated: volume transfer constant (K(trans)), rate constant (k(ep)), extracellular-extravascular volume fraction (v(e)), contrast enhancement ratio (CER), area under the gadolinium curve after 180 seconds (AUC180), and slope of the time/signal intensity curve of the corpora cavernosa. Associations between perfusion-related parameters and self-reported sexual function were evaluated using the Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test. Patient responses to the sexual function domain of the Prostate Quality of Life survey. Five of the six DCE-MRI parameters (K(trans), v(e), CER, AUC180, and slope) were significantly associated with the overall score from the sexual domain of the survey (P = 0.0020-0.0252). CER, AUC180, and slope were significantly associated with the answers to all six questions (P = 0.0020-0.0483), ve was significantly associated with the answers to five of six questions (P = 0.0036-0.1029), and K(trans) was significantly associated with the answers to three of six questions (P = 0.0252-0.1023). k(ep) was not significantly associated with the overall survey score (P = 0.7665) or the answers to any individual questions (P = 0

  13. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of PMN/CNFs/EP Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Minxian; Huang Zhixiong; Qin Yan

    2011-01-01

    In this research, piezoelectric ceramic PMN(lead magnesium niobate-lead zirconate-lead titanate)/carbon nano-fibers(CNFs)/epoxy resin(EP) ccomposites were prepared and the dynamic mechanical properties and damping mechanism of PMN/CNFs/EP composites were investigated. The addition of CNFs into PMN/EP composite results in decrease of volume resistivity of the composite. When the concentration of CNFs is 0.6% weight of epoxy resin the volume resistivity of PMN/CNFs/EP composite is about 10 8 Ω·m. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicates that the loss factor, loss area, and damping temperature range of PMN/CNFs/EP composites increase with the CNFs content increasing till to 0.6% of weight of epoxy resin. When the CNFs content is more than 0.6% the damping properties of composites decrease oppositely. In PMN/CNFs/EP composites, the CNFs content 0.6% and the volume resistivity of PMN/CNFs/EP composites about 10 8 Ω·m just satisfy the practicing condition of piezo-damping, so the composites show optimal damping property.

  14. Selected engineering properties and applications of EPS geofoam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elragi, Ahmed Fouad

    Expanded polystyrene (EPS) geofoam is a lightweight material that has been used in engineering applications since at least the 1950s. Its density is about a hundredth of that of soil. It has good thermal insulation properties with stiffness and compression strength comparable to medium clay. It is utilized in reducing settlement below embankments, sound and vibration damping, reducing lateral pressure on substructures, reducing stresses on rigid buried conduits and related applications. This study starts with an overview on EPS geofoam. EPS manufacturing processes are described followed by a review of engineering properties found in previous research work done so far. Standards and design manuals applicable to EPS are presented. Selected EPS geofoam-engineering applications are discussed with examples. State-of-the-art of experimental work is done on different sizes of EPS specimens under different loading rates for better understanding of the behavior of the material. The effects of creep, sample size, strain rate and cyclic loading on the stress strain response are studied. Equations for the initial modulus and the strength of the material under compression for different strain rates are presented. The initial modulus and Poisson's ratio are discussed in detail. Sample size effect on creep behavior is examined. Three EPS projects are shown in this study. The creep behavior of the largest EPS geofoam embankment fill is shown. Results from laboratory tests, mathematical modeling and field records are compared to each other. Field records of a geofoam-stabilized slope are compared to finite difference analysis results. Lateral stress reduction on an EPS backfill retaining structure is analyzed. The study ends with a discussion on two promising properties of EPS geofoam. These are the damping ability and the compressibility of this material. Finite element analysis, finite difference analysis and lab results are included in this discussion. The discussion with the

  15. Radioimmunoassay for prostatic acid phosphatase in human serum. Methodologic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradalier, N.; Canal, P.; Pujol, A.; Fregevu, Y.; Soula, G.

    1982-01-01

    We propose a double antibody radioimmunoassay for human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in serum for diagnosis and management of prostatic adenocarcinoma under treatment. The antigen is purified from human prostatic fluid by a gel-filtration on Sephadex G 100 followed by affinity chromatography on Con A Sepharose. A specific antibody is raised in rabbits and purified by immunoadsorption with a female serum. The described technique offers both radioisotopic sensibility and immunologic specificity. Physiological values determined in the serum of 125 healthy males are below 2 ng/ml. No significative differences are observed with age. The proposed technique also shows significant differences between values evaluated for benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma [fr

  16. Hypoxia and Prx1 in Malignant Progression of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    promoter composition of human prx1 gene and identified EpRE elements and Nrf2 as critical regulatory component of its up- regulation in prostate cancer...nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm in the rat kidney (42). The presence of Prx1 in the nucleolus of hepatic parenchymal cells has also been shown in the...Gpx; KO, knock-out; JNK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase. THE JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY VOL. 282, NO. 30, pp. 22011–22022, July 27, 2007 © 2007 by The

  17. Highlights from e-EPS: Jean-Michel Raimond wins EPS Edison-Volta Prize 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Martina Knoop, e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The European Physical Society has the pleasure to announce that the 2014 EPS Edison-Volta Prize is awarded to Jean-Michel Raimond for “seminal contribution to physics (that) have paved the way for novel explorations of quantum mechanics and have opened new routes in quantum information processing”. J.-M. Raimond’s PhD thesis was supervised by Serge Haroche at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, in the early 1980′s, and together S. Haroche, M. Brune and J.-M. Raimond have built an extremely successful research group since then. J.-M. Raimond has made seminal contributions to the development of cavity QED experiments, in particular involving circular Rydberg atoms interacting with very high-Q superc...

  18. A maladaptive role for EP4 receptors in mouse mesangial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-xia Yang

    Full Text Available Roles of the prostaglandin E2 E-prostanoid 4 receptor (EP4 on extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation induced by TGF-β1 in mouse glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs remain unknown. Previously, we have identified that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of FN and Col I in mouse GMCs. Here we asked whether stimulation of EP4 receptors would exacerbate renal fibrosis associated with enhanced glomerular ECM accumulation. We generated EP4(Flox/Flox and EP4(+/- mice, cultured primary WT, EP4(Flox/Flox and EP4(+/- GMCs, AD-EP4 transfected WT GMCs (EP4 overexpression and AD-Cre transfected EP4(Flox/Flox GMCs (EP4 deleted. We found that TGF-β1-induced cAMP and PGE2 synthesis decreased in EP4 deleted GMCs and increased in EP4 overexpressed GMCs. Elevated EP4 expression in GMCs augmented the coupling of TGF-β1 to FN, Col I expression and COX2/PGE2 signaling, while TGF-β1 induced FN, Col I expression and COX2/PGE2 signaling were down-regulated in EP4 deficiency GMCs. 8 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx, WT and EP4(+/- mice exhibited markedly increased accumulation of ECM compared with sham-operated controls. Albuminuria, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (BUN and Cr concentrations were significantly increased in WT mice as compared to those of EP4(+/- mice. Urine osmotic pressure was dramatically decreased after 5/6 Nx surgery in WT mice as compared to EP4(+/- mice. The pathological changes in kidney of EP4(+/- mice was markedly alleviated compared with WT mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant reductions of Col I and FN in the kidney of EP4(+/- mice compared with WT mice. Collectively, this investigation established EP4 as a potent mediator of the pro-TGF-β1 activities elicited by COX2/PGE2 in mice GMCs. Our findings suggested that prostaglandin E2, acting via EP4 receptors contributed to accumulation of ECM in GMCs and promoted renal fibrosis.

  19. Neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Popescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This review aims to provide practicing clinicians with the most recent knowledge of the biological nature of prostate cancer especially the information regarding neuroendocrine differentiation. Methods: Review of the literature using PubMed search and scientific journal publications. Results: Much progress has been made towards an understanding of the development and progression of prostate cancer. The prostate is a male accessory sex gland which produces a fraction of seminal fluid. The normal human prostate is composed of a stromal compartment (which contains: nerves, fibroblast, smooth muscle cells, macrophages surrounding glandular acins – epithelial cells. Neuroendocrine cells are one of the epithelial populations in the normal prostate and are believed to provide trophic signals trough the secretion of neuropeptides that diffuse and influence surrounding epithelial cells. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. In prostate cancer, neuroendocrine cells can stimulate growth of surrounding prostate adenocarcinoma cells (proliferation of neighboring cancer cells in a paracrine manner by secretion of neuroendocrine products. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer is an aggressive variant of prostate cancer that commonly arises in later stages of castration resistant prostate cancer. The detection of neuroendocrine prostate cancer has clinical implications. These patients are often treated with platinum chemotherapy rather than with androgen receptor targeted therapies. Conclusion: This review shows the need to improve our knowledge regarding diagnostic and treatment methods of the Prostate Cancer, especially cancer cells with neuroendocrine phenotype.

  20. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producing bacterial strains of municipal wastewater sludge: isolation, molecular identification, EPS characterization and performance for sludge settling and dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala Subramanian, S; Yan, S; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2010-04-01

    Wastewater treatment plants often face the problems of sludge settling mainly due to sludge bulking. Generally, synthetic organic polymer and/or inorganic coagulants (ferric chloride, alum and quick lime) are used for sludge settling. These chemicals are very expensive and further pollute the environment. Whereas, the bioflocculants are environment friendly and may be used to flocculate the sludge. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by sludge microorganisms play a definite role in sludge flocculation. In this study, 25 EPS producing strains were isolated from municipal wastewater treatment plant. Microorganisms were selected based on EPS production properties on solid agar medium. Three types of EPS (slime, capsular and bacterial broth mixture of both slime and capsular) were harvested and their characteristics were studied. EPS concentration (dry weight), viscosity and their charge (using a Zetaphoremeter) were also measured. Bioflocculability of obtained EPS was evaluated by measuring the kaolin clay flocculation activity. Six bacterial strains (BS2, BS8, BS9, BS11, BS15 and BS25) were selected based on the kaolin clay flocculation. The slime EPS was better for bioflocculation than capsular EPS and bacterial broth. Therefore, extracted slime EPS (partially purified) from six bacterial strains was studied in terms of sludge settling [sludge volume index (SVI)] and dewatering [capillary suction time (CST)]. Biopolymers produced by individual strains substantially improved dewaterability. The extracted slime EPS from six different strains were partially characterized. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Family planning providers' role in offering PrEP to women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Dominika; Weber, Shannon; Carlson, Kimberly; Witt, Jacki

    2018-03-09

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) provides a radically different HIV prevention option for women. Not only is PrEP the first discrete, woman-controlled method that is taken in advance of exposure, but it is both safe and highly effective, offering over 90% protection if taken daily. While multiple modalities of PrEP are in development ranging from vaginal rings to injectables and implants, only PrEP with oral tenofovir/emtricitabine is currently FDA-approved. Family planning clinics provide key access points for many women to learn about and obtain PrEP. By incorporating PrEP services into family planning care, family planning providers have the opportunity to meet women's expectations, ensure women are aware of and offered comprehensive HIV prevention options, and reverse emerging disparities in PrEP access. Despite real and perceived barriers to integrating PrEP into family planning care, providing PrEP services, ranging from education to onsite provision, is not only possible but an important component of providing high-quality sexual and reproductive healthcare to women. Lessons learned from early adopters will help guide those in family planning settings initiating or enhancing PrEP services. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The longitudinal effect of ejaculation on seminal vesicle fluid volume and whole-prostate ADC as measured on prostate MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tristan; Gallagher, Ferdia A. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge, CamPARI Clinic, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Tanner, James; Gill, Andrew B.; Slough, Rhys A. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital and University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wason, James [University of Cambridge, MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2017-12-15

    To prospectively investigate the longitudinal effect of ejaculatory abstinence on MRI-measured seminal vesicle (SV) volume and whole-prostate ADC over consecutive days. 15 healthy male volunteers (mean 35.9 years, range 27-53) underwent 3-T MRI at baseline and 1, 2 and 3 days post-ejaculation. Prostate and SV volumes were derived by volume segmentation and whole-gland apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values calculated. A mixed-effects linear regression compared ADC values and prostate/seminal vesicle volumes in each volunteer between studies in a pairwise manner. All subjects completed the four MRIs. Mean prostate volume was 22.45 cm{sup 3} (range 13.04-31.21 cm{sup 3}), with no change between the four studies (p = 0.89-0.99). 13/15 subjects showed SV volume reduction from baseline to day 1, with group-mean decreasing from 6.45 to 4.80 cm{sup 3} (-25.6%, p < 0.001), and a significant reduction from baseline to day 2 (-18.1%, p = 0.002). There was a significant volume increase from both day 1 (+21.3%, p = 0.006) and day 2 (+10.2%, p = 0.022) to day 3 post-ejaculation. There was a significant reduction in ADC from 1.105 at baseline to 1.056 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s at day 1 (mean -4.3%, p = 0.009). The longitudinal effect of ejaculation on SV volume was demonstrated. Significant reductions in SV volume and whole-gland ADC were observed post-ejaculation, supporting a 3-day period of abstinence before prostate MRI. (orig.)

  3. Clinical significance of determination of changes of EPS IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 and LDH5/LDH1 levels in patients with chronic prostatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of the changes of expressed prostatic secretion IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 and LDH5/LDH1 levels in patients with chronic prostatitis. Methods: Expressed prostatic secretion IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 (with Radioimmunoassay) and LDH5/LDH1 (with cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis) levels were determined in 32 patients with chronic prostatitis and 35 controls. These 32 patients were of 3 groups: 1)chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP, n=10) 2) chronic pelvic pain syndrome IIIA (CPPS IIIA n=9) 3) CPPSIIIB n=13. Results: Expressed prostatic secretion levels of IL-1β, IL-2 and LDH5/LDH1 were significantly higher in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) groups than those in controls (all P 0.05). But the expressed prostatic secretion levels of IL-10 were still significantly lower in patients with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, chronic pelvic pain syndrome(CPPSIIIB) groups than those in controls (all P<0.05). Conclusion: There were changes of expressed prostatic secretion IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 and LDH5/LDH1 levels in patients with chronic prostatitis. Combined determination of the expressed prostatic secretion 4 markers levels is valuable for the diagnosis of chronic prostatitis and CPPSIII and for differentiation of CPPSIII types. (authors)

  4. [Longjintonglin Capsules for type IIIA prostatitis accompanied by abnormal semen liquefaction: A clinical observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hong-cai; Wan, Chang-chun; Geng, Qiang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Guo-wei; Shang, Xue-jun; Huang, Yu-feng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect of Longjintonglin Capsules on type IIIA prostatitis accompanied by abnormal semen liquefaction. We selected 140 patients with type IIIA prostatitis accompanied by abnormal semen liquefaction according to the diagnostic standards of the American Institutes of Health (NIH) and treated them with Longjintonglin Capsules orally 3 capsules once tid for 12 weeks. We obtained the NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Indexes (NIH-CPSI), traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome scores, leukocyte count in the expressed prostatic secretion (EPS), semen liquefaction time, and the results of semen analysis and compared these indicators before and after the treatment. Of the 140 cases, 132 were included in this study, excluding 8 due to their incomplete case histories. Before and after 4, 8 and 12 weeks of medication, the total NIH-CPSI scores were 24.52 ± 5.43, 21.28 ± 4.85, 18.01 ± 4.28, and 14.49 ± 3.65 (P prostatitis were cured and another 72 well responded, with an overall response rate of 78.0%. Of those with abnormal semen liquefaction, 61 were cured, 39 well responded, and 32 failed to respond, with an overall effectiveness rate of 75.8%. Semen analysis showed significantly increased percentage of progressively motile sperm after 4, 8 and 12 weeks of medication as compared with the baseline (P prostatitis accompanied by abnormal semen liquefaction.

  5. Highlights from e-EPS: Hetland to receive EPS-PED Award for Secondary School Teaching

    CERN Multimedia

    Urbaan Titulaer

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The EPS Physics Education Division selected Karl Thorstein Hetland, West Telemark Secondary School, Norway, as this year’s recipient of its Secondary School Teaching Award. K.T. Hetland developed the Energy Network, which aims to make students energy conscious and focus on renewable energy. The Energy Network, created in 2005, consists of 15 local networks, each involving an upper secondary school and several lower secondary schools, 55 schools in all. Material from the Network is used in physics classes in a large number of schools at national level and plays a major role in recruiting university physics students. K.T. Hetland will receive his award at the International Physics Education Conference, held together with the European Physics Educati...

  6. PGE2 maintains the tone of the guinea pig trachea through a balance between activation of contractile EP1 receptors and relaxant EP2 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säfholm, J; Dahlén, S-E; Delin, I; Maxey, K; Stark, K; Cardell, L-O; Adner, M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The guinea pig trachea (GPT) is commonly used in airway pharmacology. The aim of this study was to define the expression and function of EP receptors for PGE2 in GPT as there has been ambiguity concerning their role. Experimental Approach Expression of mRNA for EP receptors and key enzymes in the PGE2 pathway were assessed by real-time PCR using species-specific primers. Functional studies of GPT were performed in tissue organ baths. Key Results Expression of mRNA for the four EP receptors was found in airway smooth muscle. PGE2 displayed a bell-shaped concentration–response curve, where the initial contraction was inhibited by the EP1 receptor antagonist ONO-8130 and the subsequent relaxation by the EP2 receptor antagonist PF-04418948. Neither EP3 (ONO-AE5-599) nor EP4 (ONO-AE3-208) selective receptor antagonists affected the response to PGE2. Expression of COX-2 was greater than COX-1 in GPT, and the spontaneous tone was most effectively abolished by selective COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, ONO-8130 and a specific PGE2 antibody eliminated the spontaneous tone, whereas the EP2 antagonist PF-04418948 increased it. Antagonists of other prostanoid receptors had no effect on basal tension. The relaxant EP2 response to PGE2 was maintained after long-term culture, whereas the contractile EP1 response showed homologous desensitization to PGE2, which was prevented by COX-inhibitors. Conclusions and Implications Endogenous PGE2, synthesized predominantly by COX-2, maintains the spontaneous tone of GPT by a balance between contractile EP1 receptors and relaxant EP2 receptors. The model may be used to study interactions between EP receptors. PMID:22934927

  7. Clinical hyperthermia of prostate cancer using magnetic nanoparticles - preliminary experience with a new interstitial technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, M.; Gneveckow, U.; Eckelt, L.; Feussner, A.; Waldoefner, N.; Scholz, R.; Deger, S.; Wust, P.; Loening, S.A.; Jordan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Thermotherapy using biocompatible superparamagnetic nanoparticles, also referred to as magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH), has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth in the Dunning rat model. Here we present the first clinical application of interstitial hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles in locally recurrent prostate cancer. Treatment planning was carried out using computerized tomography (CT) of the prostate. Based on the individual anatomy of the prostate and the estimated specific absorption rate (SAR) of magnetic fluids in prostatic tissue, the number and position of magnetic fluid depots required for sufficient heat deposition was calculated using the AMIRA software and a newly developed prostate module. Nanoparticle suspensions (MagForce MFL AS, MagForce Nanotechnologies GmbH, Berlin, Germany) were injected transperineally into the prostate under transrectal ultrasound and flouroscopy guidance. Treatments were delivered in the first magnetic field applicator for use in humans (MFH300F, MagForce Nanotechnologies GmbH, Berlin), using an alternating magnetic field with a frequency of 100 kHz and variable field strength (0-18 kA/m). Invasive thermometry of the prostate was carried out in the first and last of 6 weekly hyperthermia sessions of 60 min duration. CT-scans of the prostate were repeated following the first and last hyperthermia treatment to document magnetic nanoparticle distribution and the position of the thermometry probes in the prostate. Nanoparticles were retained in the prostate during the treatment interval of 6 weeks, as documented by CT. Treatment was well tolerated. During the first treatment, maximum intra-prostatic temperatures measured by 4 thermometry probes at a magnetic field strength of 4.0-5.0 kA/m were 48.5, 43.0, 43.7 and 43.6 o C, whereas minimal temperatures were 41.2, 40.3, 40.0 and 41.1 o C, respectively. During the sixth and last treatment of the same patient, maximum intraprostatic temperatures were 42

  8. Echo-Planar Imaging-Based, J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    post-process the multi-dimensional MRS data from different prostate pathologies . Scope: Improved cancer detection (specificity) in differentiating...MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients Between March 2012 and May 2013, twenty-two patients with PCa with a mean age of 63.8 years (range, 46–79 years), who...tumor voxels, which was confirmed by the pathology report. After reconstruction, the EP-JRESI data were overlaid onto MRI images. MRI and MRSI A body

  9. Prostaglandin E2-Induced COX-2 Expressions via EP2 and EP4 Signaling Pathways in Human LoVo Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Hsien Hsu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the most dangerous risk faced by patients with hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC. The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs has been observed in several types of human cancers and regulates the efficacy of many therapies. Here, we show that treatment with various concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2; 0, 1, 5 or 10 μM promotes the migration ability of the human LoVo colon cancer cell line. As demonstrated by mRNA and protein expression analyses, EP2 and EP4 are the major PGE2 receptors expressed on the LoVo cell membrane. The Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt cell survival pathway was upregulated by EP2 and EP4 activation. Following the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, β-catenin translocated into the nucleus and triggered COX2 transcription via LEF-1 and TCF-4 and its subsequent translation. COX2 expression correlated with the elevation in the migration ability of LoVo cells. The experimental evidence shows a possible mechanism by which PGE2 induces cancer cell migration and further suggests PGE2 to be a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer metastasis. On inhibition of PGE2, in order to determine the downstream pathway, the levels of PI3K/Akt pathway were suppressed and the β-catenin expression was also modulated. Inhibition of EP2 and EP4 shows that PGE2 induces protein expression of COX-2 through EP2 and EP4 receptors in LoVo colon cancer cells.

  10. A Closer Look at Racism and Heterosexism in Medical Students' Clinical Decision-Making Related to HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): Implications for PrEP Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Krakower, Douglas S; Underhill, Kristen; Vincent, Wilson; Magnus, Manya; Hansen, Nathan B; Kershaw, Trace S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Betancourt, Joseph R; Dovidio, John F

    2018-04-01

    Social biases among healthcare providers could limit PrEP access. In this survey study of 115 US medical students, we examined associations between biases (racism and heterosexism) and PrEP clinical decision-making and explored prior PrEP education as a potential buffer. After viewing a vignette about a PrEP-seeking MSM patient, participants reported anticipated patient behavior (condomless sex, extra-relational sex, and adherence), intention to prescribe PrEP to the patient, biases, and background characteristics. Minimal evidence for racism affecting clinical decision-making emerged. In unadjusted analyses, heterosexism indirectly affected prescribing intention via all anticipated behaviors, tested as parallel mediators. Participants expressing greater heterosexism more strongly anticipated increased risk behavior and adherence problems, which were associated with lower prescribing intention. The indirect effect via condomless sex remained significant adjusting for background characteristics. Prior PrEP education did not buffer any indirect effects. Heterosexism may compromise PrEP provision to MSM and should be addressed in PrEP-related medical education.

  11. CLCA2 epigenetic regulation by CTBP1, HDACs, ZEB1, EP300 and miR-196b-5p impacts prostate cancer cell adhesion and EMT in metabolic syndrome disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porretti, Juliana; Dalton, Guillermo N; Massillo, Cintia; Scalise, Georgina D; Farré, Paula L; Elble, Randolph; Gerez, Esther N; Accialini, Paula; Cabanillas, Ana M; Gardner, Kevin; De Luca, Paola; De Siervi, Adriana

    2018-03-14

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer among men. Metabolic syndrome (MeS) is associated with increased PCa aggressiveness and recurrence. Previously, we proposed C-terminal binding protein 1 (CTBP1), a transcriptional co-repressor, as a molecular link between these two conditions. Notably, CTBP1 depletion decreased PCa growth in MeS mice. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms that explain the link between MeS and PCa mediated by CTBP1. We found that CTBP1 repressed chloride channel accessory 2 (CLCA2) expression in prostate xenografts developed in MeS animals. CTBP1 bound to CLCA2 promoter and repressed its transcription and promoter activity in PCa cell lines. Furthermore, we found that CTBP1 formed a repressor complex with ZEB1, EP300 and HDACs that modulates the CLCA2 promoter activity. CLCA2 promoted PCa cell adhesion inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and activating CTNNB1 together with epithelial marker (CDH1) induction, and mesenchymal markers (SNAI2 and TWIST1) repression. Moreover, CLCA2 depletion in PCa cells injected subcutaneously in MeS mice increased the circulating tumor cells foci compared to control. A microRNA (miRNA) expression microarray from PCa xenografts developed in MeS mice, showed 21 miRNAs modulated by CTBP1 involved in angiogenesis, extracellular matrix organization, focal adhesion and adherents junctions, among others. We found that miR-196b-5p directly targets CLCA2 by cloning CLCA2 3'UTR and performing reporter assays. Altogether, we identified a new molecular mechanism to explain PCa and MeS link based on CLCA2 repression by CTBP1 and miR-196b-5p molecules that might act as key factors in the progression onset of this disease. © 2018 UICC.

  12. PrEP implementation research in Africa: what is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Frances M; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Sanders, Eduard J; Mugo, Nelly R; Guedou, Fernand A; Alary, Michel; Behanzin, Luc; Mugurungi, Owen; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Of the two million new HIV infections in adults in 2014, 70% occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. Several African countries have already approved guidelines for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for individuals at substantial risk of HIV as part of combination HIV prevention but key questions remain about how to identify and deliver PrEP to those at greatest need. Throughout the continent, individuals in sero-discordant relationships, and members of key populations (sex workers, men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender women and injection drug users) are likely to benefit from the availability of PrEP. In addition, adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) are at substantial risk in some parts of the continent. It has been estimated that at least three million individuals in Africa are likely to be eligible for PrEP according to WHO's criteria. Tens of demonstration projects are planned or underway across the continent among a range of countries, populations and delivery settings. In each of the target populations, there are overarching issues related to (i) creating demand for PrEP, (ii) addressing supply-side issues and (iii) providing appropriate and tailored adherence support. Critical for creating demand for PrEP is the normalization of HIV prevention. Community-level interventions which engage opinion leaders as well as empowerment interventions for those at highest risk will be key. Critical to supply of PrEP is that services are accessible for all, including for stigmatized populations. Establishing accessible integrated services provides the opportunity to address other public health priorities including the unmet need for HIV testing, contraception and sexually transmitted infections treatment. National policies need to include minimum standards for training and quality assurance for PrEP implementation and to address supply chain issues. Adherence support needs to recognize that social and structural factors are likely to have an important influence

  13. Tracking and Functional Characterization of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Mesenchymal Tumor Cells During Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscetti, Marcus; Quach, Bill; Dadashian, Eman L.; Mulholland, David J.; Wu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been postulated as a mechanism by which cancer cells acquire the invasive and stem-like traits necessary for distant metastasis. However, direct in vivo evidence for the role of EMT in the formation of cancer stem-like cells (CSC) and the metastatic cascade remains lacking. Here we report the first isolation and characterization of mesenchymal and EMT tumor cells, which harbor both epithelial and mesenchymal characteristics, in an autochthonous murine model of prostate cancer. By crossing the established Pb-Cre+/−;PtenL/L;KrasG12D/+ prostate cancer model with a vimentin-GFP reporter strain, generating CPKV mice, we were able to isolate epithelial, EMT and mesenchymal cancer cells based on expression of vimentin and EpCAM. CPKV mice (but not mice with Pten deletion alone) exhibited expansion of cells with EMT (EpCAM+/Vim-GFP+) and mesenchymal (EpCAM−/Vim-GFP+) characteristics at the primary tumor site and in circulation. These EMT and mesenchymal tumor cells displayed enhanced stemness and invasive character compared to epithelial tumor cells. Moreover, they displayed an enriched tumor-initiating capacity and could regenerate epithelial glandular structures in vivo, indicative of epithelia-mesenchyme plasticity. Interestingly, while mesenchymal tumor cells could persist in circulation and survive in the lung following intravenous injection, only epithelial and EMT tumor cells could form macrometastases. Our work extends the evidence that mesenchymal and epithelial states in cancer cells contribute differentially to their capacities for tumor initiation and metastatic seeding, respectively, and that EMT tumor cells exist with plasticity that can contribute to multiple stages of the metastatic cascade. PMID:25948589

  14. Clinical Applications for EPs in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Matthew A; Kaplan, Peter W

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients, evoked potential (EP) testing is an important tool for measuring neurologic function, signal transmission, and secondary processing of sensory information in real time. Evoked potential measures conduction along the peripheral and central sensory pathways with longer-latency potentials representing more complex thalamocortical and intracortical processing. In critically ill patients with limited neurologic exams, EP provides a window into brain function and the potential for recovery of consciousness. The most common EP modalities in clinical use in the intensive care unit include somatosensory evoked potentials, brainstem auditory EPs, and cortical event-related potentials. The primary indications for EP in critically ill patients are prognostication in anoxic-ischemic or traumatic coma, monitoring for neurologic improvement or decline, and confirmation of brain death. Somatosensory evoked potentials had become an important prognostic tool for coma recovery, especially in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. In this population, the bilateral absence of cortical somatosensory evoked potentials has nearly 100% specificity for death or persistent vegetative state. Historically, EP has been regarded as a negative prognostic test, that is, the absence of cortical potentials is associated with poor outcomes while the presence cortical potentials are prognostically indeterminate. In recent studies, the presence of middle-latency and long-latency potentials as well as the amplitude of cortical potentials is more specific for good outcomes. Event-related potentials, particularly mismatch negativity of complex auditory patterns, is emerging as an important positive prognostic test in patients under comatose. Multimodality predictive algorithms that combine somatosensory evoked potentials, event-related potentials, and clinical and radiographic factors are gaining favor for coma prognostication.

  15. PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region: opportunities, implementation and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotska, Iryna; Grulich, Andrew E; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Anand, Tarandeep; Janyam, Surang; Poonkasetwattana, Midnight; Baggaley, Rachel; van Griensven, Frits; Lo, Ying-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV epidemics in the Asia-Pacific region are concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM) and other key populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention intervention and could be a potential game changer in the region. We discuss the progress towards PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region, including opportunities and barriers. Discussion Awareness about PrEP in the Asia-Pacific is still low and so are its levels of use. A high proportion of MSM who are aware of PrEP are willing to use it. Key PrEP implementation barriers include poor knowledge about PrEP, limited access to PrEP, weak or non-existent HIV prevention programmes for MSM and other key populations, high cost of PrEP, stigma and discrimination against key populations and restrictive laws in some countries. Only several clinical trials, demonstration projects and a few larger-scale implementation studies have been implemented so far in Thailand and Australia. However, novel approaches to PrEP implementation have emerged: researcher-, facility- and community-led models of care, with PrEP services for fee and for free. The WHO consolidated guidelines on HIV testing, treatment and prevention call for an expanded access to PrEP worldwide and have provided guidance on PrEP implementation in the region. Some countries like Australia have released national PrEP guidelines. There are growing community leadership and consultation processes to initiate PrEP implementation in Asia and the Pacific. Conclusions Countries of the Asia-Pacific region will benefit from adding PrEP to their HIV prevention packages, but for many this is a critical step that requires resourcing. Having an impact on the HIV epidemic requires investment. The next years should see the region transitioning from limited PrEP implementation projects to growing access to PrEP and expansion of HIV prevention programmes. PMID:27760688

  16. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen Leader Protein Coactivates EP300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Zhou, Hufeng; Xue, Yong; Liang, Jun; Narita, Yohei; Gerdt, Catherine; Zheng, Amy Y; Jiang, Runsheng; Trudeau, Stephen; Peng, Chih-Wen; Gewurz, Benjamin E; Zhao, Bo

    2018-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA) leader protein (EBNALP) is one of the first viral genes expressed upon B-cell infection. EBNALP is essential for EBV-mediated B-cell immortalization. EBNALP is thought to function primarily by coactivating EBNA2-mediated transcription. Chromatin immune precipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) studies highlight that EBNALP frequently cooccupies DNA sites with host cell transcription factors (TFs), in particular, EP300, implicating a broader role in transcription regulation. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of EBNALP transcription coactivation through EP300. EBNALP greatly enhanced EP300 transcription activation when EP300 was tethered to a promoter. EBNALP coimmunoprecipitated endogenous EP300 from lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). EBNALP W repeat serine residues 34, 36, and 63 were required for EP300 association and coactivation. Deletion of the EP300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain greatly reduced EBNALP coactivation and abolished the EBNALP association. An EP300 bromodomain inhibitor also abolished EBNALP coactivation and blocked the EP300 association with EBNALP. EBNALP sites cooccupied by EP300 had significantly higher ChIP-seq signals for sequence-specific TFs, including SPI1, RelA, EBF1, IRF4, BATF, and PAX5. EBNALP- and EP300-cooccurring sites also had much higher H3K4me1 and H3K27ac signals, indicative of activated enhancers. EBNALP-only sites had much higher signals for DNA looping factors, including CTCF and RAD21. EBNALP coactivated reporters under the control of NF-κB or SPI1. EP300 inhibition abolished EBNALP coactivation of these reporters. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat interference targeting of EBNALP enhancer sites significantly reduced target gene expression, including that of EP300 itself. These data suggest a previously unrecognized mechanism by which EBNALP coactivates transcription through subverting of EP300 and thus affects the expression of

  17. Abnormal placental development and early embryonic lethality in EpCAM-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nagao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: EpCAM (CD326 is encoded by the tacstd1 gene and expressed by a variety of normal and malignant epithelial cells and some leukocytes. Results of previous in vitro experiments suggested that EpCAM is an intercellular adhesion molecule. EpCAM has been extensively studied as a potential tumor marker and immunotherapy target, and more recent studies suggest that EpCAM expression may be characteristic of cancer stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain insights into EpCAM function in vivo, we generated EpCAM -/- mice utilizing an embryonic stem cell line with a tacstd1 allele that had been disrupted. Gene trapping resulted in a protein comprised of the N-terminus of EpCAM encoded by 2 exons of the tacstd1 gene fused in frame to betageo. EpCAM +/- mice were viable and fertile and exhibited no obvious abnormalities. Examination of EpCAM +/- embryos revealed that betageo was expressed in several epithelial structures including developing ears (otocysts, eyes, branchial arches, gut, apical ectodermal ridges, lungs, pancreas, hair follicles and others. All EpCAM -/- mice died in utero by E12.5, and were small, developmentally delayed, and displayed prominent placental abnormalities. In developing placentas, EpCAM was expressed throughout the labyrinthine layer and by spongiotrophoblasts as well. Placentas of EpCAM -/- embryos were compact, with thin labyrinthine layers lacking prominent vascularity. Parietal trophoblast giant cells were also dramatically reduced in EpCAM -/- placentas. CONCLUSION: EpCAM was required for differentiation or survival of parietal trophoblast giant cells, normal development of the placental labyrinth and establishment of a competent maternal-fetal circulation. The findings in EpCAM-reporter mice suggest involvement of this molecule in development of vital organs including the gut, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, eyes, and limbs.

  18. Abnormal placental development and early embryonic lethality in EpCAM-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Zhu, Jianjian; Heneghan, Mallorie B; Hanson, Jeffrey C; Morasso, Maria I; Tessarollo, Lino; Mackem, Susan; Udey, Mark C

    2009-12-31

    EpCAM (CD326) is encoded by the tacstd1 gene and expressed by a variety of normal and malignant epithelial cells and some leukocytes. Results of previous in vitro experiments suggested that EpCAM is an intercellular adhesion molecule. EpCAM has been extensively studied as a potential tumor marker and immunotherapy target, and more recent studies suggest that EpCAM expression may be characteristic of cancer stem cells. To gain insights into EpCAM function in vivo, we generated EpCAM -/- mice utilizing an embryonic stem cell line with a tacstd1 allele that had been disrupted. Gene trapping resulted in a protein comprised of the N-terminus of EpCAM encoded by 2 exons of the tacstd1 gene fused in frame to betageo. EpCAM +/- mice were viable and fertile and exhibited no obvious abnormalities. Examination of EpCAM +/- embryos revealed that betageo was expressed in several epithelial structures including developing ears (otocysts), eyes, branchial arches, gut, apical ectodermal ridges, lungs, pancreas, hair follicles and others. All EpCAM -/- mice died in utero by E12.5, and were small, developmentally delayed, and displayed prominent placental abnormalities. In developing placentas, EpCAM was expressed throughout the labyrinthine layer and by spongiotrophoblasts as well. Placentas of EpCAM -/- embryos were compact, with thin labyrinthine layers lacking prominent vascularity. Parietal trophoblast giant cells were also dramatically reduced in EpCAM -/- placentas. EpCAM was required for differentiation or survival of parietal trophoblast giant cells, normal development of the placental labyrinth and establishment of a competent maternal-fetal circulation. The findings in EpCAM-reporter mice suggest involvement of this molecule in development of vital organs including the gut, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, eyes, and limbs.

  19. COX-2 and Prostaglandin EP3/EP4 Signaling Regulate the Tumor Stromal Proangiogenic Microenvironment via CXCL12-CXCR4 Chemokine Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Hosono, Kanako; Ito, Yoshiya; Suzuki, Tatsunori; Ogawa, Yasufumi; Kubo, Hidefumi; Kamata, Hiroki; Mishima, Toshiaki; Tamaki, Hideaki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM)–derived hematopoietic cells, which are major components of tumor stroma, determine the tumor microenvironment and regulate tumor phenotypes. Cyclooxygenase (COX)−2 and endogenous prostaglandins are important determinants for tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis; however, their contributions to stromal formation and angiogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we observed that Lewis lung carcinoma cells implanted in wild-type mice formed a tumor mass with extensive stromal formation that was markedly suppressed by COX-2 inhibition, which reduced the recruitment of BM cells. Notably, COX-2 inhibition attenuated CXCL12/CXCR4 expression as well as expression of several other chemokines. Indeed, in a Matrigel model, prostaglandin (PG) E2 enhanced stromal formation and CXCL12/CXCR4 expression. In addition, a COX-2 inhibitor suppressed stromal formation and reduced expression of CXCL12/CXCR4 and a fibroblast marker (S100A4) in a micropore chamber model. Moreover, stromal formation after tumor implantation was suppressed in EP3−/− mice and EP4−/− mice, in which stromal expression of CXCL12/CXCR4 and S100A4 was reduced. The EP3 or EP4 knockout suppressed S100A4+ fibroblasts, CXCL12+, and/or CXCR4+ stromal cells as well. Immunofluorescent analyses revealed that CXCL12+CXCR4+S100A4+ fibroblasts mainly comprised stromal cells and most of these were recruited from the BM. Additionally, either EP3- or EP4-specific agonists stimulated CXCL12 expression by fibroblasts in vitro. The present results address the novel activities of COX-2/PGE2-EP3/EP4 signaling that modulate tumor biology and show that CXCL12/CXCR4 axis may play a crucial role in tumor stromal formation and angiogenesis under the control of prostaglandins. PMID:20110411

  20. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  1. EpsA is an essential gene in exopolysaccharide production in Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertli, Enes; Mayer, Melinda J; Colquhoun, Ian J; Narbad, Arjan

    2016-07-01

    Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 has an eps gene cluster which is required for the biosynthesis of homopolymeric exopolysaccharides (EPS)-1 and heteropolymeric EPS-2 as a capsular layer. The first gene of the cluster, epsA, is the putative transcriptional regulator. In this study we showed the crucial role of epsA in EPS biosynthesis by demonstrating that deletion of epsA resulted in complete loss of both EPS-1 and EPS-2 on the cell surface. Plasmid complementation of the epsA gene fully restored EPS production, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Furthermore, this complementation resulted in a twofold increase in the expression levels of this gene, which almost doubled amounts of EPS production in comparison with the wild-type strain. Analysis of EPS by NMR showed an increased ratio of the heteropolysaccharide to homopolysaccharide in the complemented strain and allowed identification of the acetylated residue in EPS-2 as the (1,4)-linked βGlcp unit, with the acetyl group located at O-6. These findings indicate that epsA is a positive regulator of EPS production and that EPS production can be manipulated by altering its expression. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Inflammatory (NIH-IV) Prostatitis in Chinese Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunlei; Zhang, Zhifu; Lu, Zheng; Liao, Ming; Zhang, Youjie; Xie, Yuanliang; Guo, Xuefeng; Yu, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Xiaobo; Gao, Yong; Tan, Aihua; Mo, Zengnan

    2013-01-01

    Background While many investigators have studied symptomatic prostatitis, little research has been done with regard to asymptomatic (NIH-IV) prostatitis. Purpose To describe the prevalence of and risk factors for NIH-IV prostatitis among a large male population. Methods The study population was comprised of 1,868 men at the second phase recruitment of a population-based cohort in China. Asymptomatic and symptomatic men were defined by the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis (CP) Symptom Index. Meanwhile, EPS specimens and their leukocyte count were collected. Lifestyle and demographic characteristics were obtained through a questionnaire. Results Prevalence of NIH-IV prostatitis was 21.1% among 1,868 asymptomatic men aged 19–78 years and increased with age. After adjusteing for potential confounding variables (age, smoking habits, alcohol drinking habits, education, physical activity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and diabetes), age remained a significant factor for NIH-IV prostatitis (OR = 1.35; 95% CI = 1.06–1.71; P = 0.01) and the risk of NIH-IV prostatitis was significantly higher in smokers≧15 pack/years than non-smokers (OR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.01–1.75; P = 0.03). In addition, compared with non-drinkers, the OR of NIH-IV prostatitis in drinkers ≧1 drinks/week was 1.35 (95% CI = 1.03, 1.77, p = 0.02) after adjusting for the other variables above. In addition, having less than a college education may be a risk factor for NIH-IV prostatitis, although a statistically significant difference did not exist in our data (OR = 1.22; 95% CI = 0.97–1.52; P = 0.08). Conclusions Our findings suggest that NIH-IV prostatitis is prevalent in China. Age, smoking, drinking and lower education levels were associated with an increased risk of NIH-IV prostatitis. The prevalence of NIH-IV prostatitis should be taken into account when estimating the total prevalence of CP in future studies. PMID:23967188

  3. High-Intensity Laser Diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.-W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Junquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP is a new high-energy petawatt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from <1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy petawatt laser at full energy

  4. Epidermal growth factor pathway substrate 15, Eps15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Chen, H; Iannolo, G

    1999-01-01

    Eps15 was originally identified as a substrate for the kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Eps15 has a tripartite structure comprising a NH2-terminal portion, which contains three EH domains, a central putative coiled-coil region, and a COOH-terminal domain containing...... multiple copies of the amino acid triplet Aspartate-Proline-Phenylalanine. A pool of Eps15 is localized at clathrin coated pits where it interacts with the clathrin assembly complex AP-2 and a novel AP-2 binding protein, Epsin. Perturbation of Eps15 and Epsin function inhibits receptor-mediated endocytosis...... of EGF and transferrin, demonstrating that both proteins are components of the endocytic machinery. Since the family of EH-containing proteins is implicated in various aspects of intracellular sorting, biomolecular strategies aimed at interfering with these processes can now be envisioned...

  5. Exopolysaccharide (EPS synthesis by Oenococcus oeni: from genes to phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimopoulou

    Full Text Available Oenococcus oeni is the bacterial species which drives malolactic fermentation in wine. The analysis of 50 genomic sequences of O. oeni (14 already available and 36 newly sequenced ones provided an inventory of the genes potentially involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS biosynthesis. The loci identified are: two gene clusters named eps1 and eps2, three isolated glycoside-hydrolase genes named dsrO, dsrV and levO, and three isolated glycosyltransferase genes named gtf, it3, it4. The isolated genes were present or absent depending on the strain and the eps gene clusters composition diverged from one strain to another. The soluble and capsular EPS production capacity of several strains was examined after growth in different culture media and the EPS structure was determined. Genotype to phenotype correlations showed that several EPS biosynthetic pathways were active and complementary in O. oeni. Can be distinguished: (i a Wzy-dependent synthetic pathway, allowing the production of heteropolysaccharides made of glucose, galactose and rhamnose, mainly in a capsular form, (ii a glucan synthase pathway (Gtf, involved in β-glucan synthesis in a free and a cell-associated form, giving a ropy phenotype to growth media and (iii homopolysaccharide synthesis from sucrose (α-glucan or β-fructan by glycoside-hydrolases of the GH70 and GH68 families. The eps gene distribution on the phylogenetic tree was examined. Fifty out of 50 studied genomes possessed several genes dedicated to EPS metabolism. This suggests that these polymers are important for the adaptation of O. oeni to its specific ecological niche, wine and possibly contribute to the technological performance of malolactic starters.

  6. Influence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on Cd adsorption by bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Xing [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fang Linchuan [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Cai Peng, E-mail: cp@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang Qiaoyun [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Chen Hao [College of Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liang Wei; Rong, Xinming [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in Cd adsorption by Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida was investigated using a combination of batch adsorption experiments, potentiometric titrations, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). An increased adsorption capacity of Cd was observed for untreated bacteria relative to that for EPS-free bacteria. Surface complexation modeling of titration data showed the similar pK{sub a} values of functional groups (carboxyl, phosphate and hydroxyl) between untreated and EPS-free bacteria. However, site concentrations on the untreated bacteria were found to be higher than those on the EPS-free bacteria. FTIR spectra also showed that no significant difference in peak positions was observed between untreated and EPS-free bacteria and carboxyl and phosphate groups were responsible for Cd adsorption on bacterial cells. The information obtained in this study is of fundamental significance for understanding the interaction mechanisms between heavy metals and biofilms in natural environments. - Highlights: > The presence of EPS on bacterial surfaces facilitates the adsorption of Cd. > The promoting effects on Cd adsorption are more remarkable on Gram-positive B. subtilis cells than that on Gram-negative P. putida cells. > Carboxyl and phosphate groups are mostly responsible for Cd binding on untreated and EPS-free cells. > Intact bacterial cells and EPS-free cells have similar binding mechanisms for Cd. - Intact bacterial cells and EPS-free cells have similar binding mechanisms for Cd.

  7. Biodistribution studies of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-directed monoclonal antibodies in the EpCAM-transgenic mouse tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosterink, Jos G. W.; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Hendrikse, Harry H.; Van Zanten, Jacoba; Van Garderen, Evert; Harmsen, Martin C.; De Leij, Lou F. M. H.

    2007-01-01

    The human pancarcinoma-associated epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) (EGP-2, CO17-1A) is a well-known target for carcinoma-directed immunotherapy. Mouse-derived mAbs directed to EpCAM have been used to treat colon carcinoma patients showing well-tolerable toxic side effects but limited

  8. Rectal culture-directed antibiotic prophylaxis before transrectal prostate biopsy: Reduced infectious complications and healthcare costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissera-Aradas, J V; Rodríguez-Villamil, L; Blanco-Fernández, R; Pérez-García, C; Viejo de la Guerra, G; González-Rodríguez, I; Mosquera-Madera, J

    2018-01-10

    Transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TUPB) is associated with infectious complications (ICs), which are related to a greater prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria (CRB) in rectal flora. We examined the ICs that occurred in 2 groups: A guided antibiotic prophylaxis (GP) group and an empiric prophylaxis (EP) group. We assessed the financial impact of GP. The GP group was studied prospectively (June 2013 to July 2014). We collected rectal cultures (RCs) before the TUPB, which were seeded on selective media with ciprofloxacin to determine the presence of CRB. The patients with sensitive bacteria were administered ciprofloxacin. Patients with resistant bacteria were administered GP according to the RC antibiogram. The EP group was studied retrospectively (January 2011 to June 2009). RCs were not performed, and all patients were treated with ciprofloxacin as prophylaxis. The ICs in both groups were recorded during a period no longer than 30 days following TUPB (electronic medical history). Three hundred patients underwent TUPB, 145 underwent GP, and 155 underwent EP. In the GP group, 23 patients (15.86%) presented CRB in the RCs. Only one patient (0.7%) experienced a UTI. In the EP group, 26 patients (16.8%) experienced multiple ICs (including 2 cases of sepsis) (P<.005). The estimated total cost, including the management of the ICs, was €57,076 with EP versus €4802.33 with GP. The average cost per patient with EP was €368.23 versus €33.11 with GP. GP achieved an estimated total savings of €52,273.67. Six patients had to undergo GP to prevent an IC. GP is associated with a marked decrease in the incidence of ICs caused by CRB and reduced healthcare costs. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular pathology of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazares, L H; Drake, R R; Esquela-Kirscher, A; Lance, R S; Semmes, O J; Troyer, D A

    2010-01-01

    This chapter includes discussion of the molecular pathology of tissue, blood, urine, and expressed prostatic secretions. Because we are unable to reliably image the disease in vivo, a 12 core method that oversamples the peripheral zone is widely used. This generates large numbers of cores that need to be carefully processed and sampled. In spite of the large number of tissue cores, the amount of tumor available for study is often quite limited. This is a particular challenge for research, as new biomarker assays will need to preserve tissue architecture intact for histopathology. Methods of processing and reporting pathology are discussed. With the exception of ductal variants, recognized subtypes of prostate cancer are largely confined to research applications, and most prostate cancers are acinar. Biomarker discovery in urine and expressed prostatic secretions would be useful since these are readily obtained and are proximate fluids. The well-known challenges of biomarker discovery in blood and urine are referenced and discussed. Mediators of carcinogenesis can serve as biomarkers as exemplified by mutations in PTEN and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. The use of proteomics in biomarker discovery with an emphasis on imaging mass spectroscopy of tissues is discussed. Small RNAs are of great interest, however, their usefulness as biomarkers in clinical decision making remains the subject of ongoing research. The chapter concludes with an overview of blood biomarkers such as circulating nucleic acids and tumor cells and bound/free isoforms of prostate specific antigen (PSA).

  10. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  11. High-intensity laser diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Jungquist, R.; Stoeckl, C. [Rochester Univ., Lab. for Laser Energetics, NY (United States)

    2006-06-15

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a new high-energy peta-watt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from < 1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy peta-watt laser at full energy. (authors)

  12. High-intensity laser diagnostics for OMEGA EP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.; Bahk, S.W.; Vickery, D.S.; Waxer, L.J.; Irwin, D.; Bagnoud, V.; Boni, R.; Moore, M.D.; Jungquist, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a new high-energy peta-watt laser system under construction at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. This paper describes our designs for two diagnostics critical to OMEGA EP's mission. The focal-spot diagnostic (FSD) is responsible for characterizing the focal spot of OMEGA EP's off-axis parabolic mirror at full energy. The ultrafast temporal diagnostic (UTD) is responsible for characterizing pulse shapes of full-energy target shots ranging in width from < 1 to 100 ps as well as setting the desired pulse width before the shot. These diagnostics will enable, for the first time, complete spatial and temporal characterization of the focus of a high-energy peta-watt laser at full energy. (authors)

  13. e-EPS News: Light for Development

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles by the e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   A central goal of the EPS International Year of Light project will be to promote optical technologies and optics education to improve the quality of life in the developing world – under the theme of ‘Light for Development’. Light plays a central role in human activities in science, technology and culture. On a fundamental scientific level, light is necessary for the existence of life itself, whilst on a more technical level, light-based technologies will underpin the future development of human society. The systematic study of the physics of light and electromagnetic waves has been central to the evolution of modern science and – in the 20th century alone – there have been many fundamental ...

  14. Commentary on "Asymptomatic prostatic inflammation in men with clinical BPH and erectile dysfunction affects the positive predictive value of prostate-specific antigen." Agnihotri S, Mittal RD, Kapoor R, Mandhani A, Department of Urology & Renal Transplantation, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.: Urol Oncol 2014; [Epub ahead of print]. doi: 10.1016/j.urolonc.2014.03.004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Chunxiao; Wang, Jia; Wei, Qiang; Han, Ping

    2015-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that sexual dysfunction in elderly men with benign prostatic hyperplasia leads to prostatic inflammation, diagnosed by prostatic fluid interleukin-8 (IL-8), which lowers the positive predictive value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Overall, 160 men with lower urinary tract symptoms between 50 and 75 years of age with an elevated PSA level of more than 4ng/ml with normal digital rectal examination and 50 age-matched controls with normal PSA level were prospectively evaluated for prostatic fluid IL-8 levels. Erectile dysfunction was measured by self-administered questionnaire of the Sexual Health Inventory for Men. Total and free serum PSA levels and IL-8 in prostatic fluid were measured 6 to 8 weeks after a course of 400mg of ofloxacin and 20mg of piroxicam given daily for 2 weeks. Transrectal ultrasonography-guided biopsy was done only when PSA level did not decrease less than 4ng/ml. Mean ages of patients and controls were 63.18 (standard deviation [SD]±7.10) and 60.18 (SD+6.02) years, respectively. Mean concentration of IL-8 in prostatic fluid of the patients was significantly higher, i.e., 6,678pg/ml (SD±1,985.7) than in control, i.e., 1,543pg/ml (SD±375.7) (Pprostatic hyperplasia and erectile dysfunction had significant inflammation of the prostate to cause spurious rise in PSA level resulting in an unnecessary biopsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Preparing for the Rollout of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP: A Vignette Survey to Identify Intended Sexual Behaviors among Women in Kenya and South Africa if Using PrEP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Corneli

    Full Text Available Several clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP in reducing HIV risk. One concern with introducing PrEP is whether users will engage in riskier sexual behaviors.We assessed the effect that PrEP may have on sexual risk behaviors by administering a survey to 799 women in Bondo, Kenya, and Pretoria, South Africa. Participants were asked about their sexual behavior intentions twice--once as if they were taking PrEP and once as if they were not taking PrEP--within four risk situations (vignettes. They responded using a 5-point ordinal scale. We used a series of linear mixed effects models with an unstructured residual covariance matrix to estimate the between- and within-subject differences in the mean likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior across the PrEP and non-PrEP contexts. We also calculated the total percentage of participants who reported a greater likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior if taking PrEP than if not taking PrEP, by vignette.We found statistically significant differences in the mean likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior with the between-subject comparison (-0.17, p < 0.01 and with the within-subject comparison (-0.31, p < 0.001. Depending on the vignette, 27% to 40% of participants reported a greater likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behavior if taking PrEP than if not taking PrEP.Our findings indicate that modest increases in risky sexual behavior could occur with PrEP. Although responses from the majority of participants suggest they would not be more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior if they took PrEP, a substantial proportion might. Programs rolling out PrEP should be prepared to assist similar women in making informed choices about reducing their risk of HIV and about their sexual health beyond HIV prevention.

  16. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. EP 1000 -The European Passive Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, Ed; Oyarzabal, Mariano; Saiu, Gianfranco

    1998-01-01

    A group of European utilities, along with Westinghouse and its industrial partner GENESI (an Italian consortium including ANSALDO and FIAT) initiated a program to evaluate Westinghouse passive nuclear plant technology for application in Europe. The European utility group consisted of: Agrupacion electrica para al Desarrollo Technologico Nuclear (DTN), Spain; Electricite de France; ENEL, SpA., Italy; IVO Power Engineering, Ltd., Finland; Scottish Nuclear Limited (acting for itself on behalf of Nuclear Electric plc, U.K.; Tractebel Energy Engineering, Belgium; UAK (represented by NOK-Beznau), Switzerland; and Vattenfall AB, Ringhals, Sweden. The European Passive Plant (EPP) program, which began in 1994, is an evaluation of the Westinghouse 600 MWe AP 600 and 1000 MWe Simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR) designs in meeting the European Utility Requirements (EUR), and where necessary, modifying the design to achieve compliance. Phase 1 or the EPP program was completed and included the two major tasks of evaluating the effect of the EUR on the Westinghouse nuclear island and developing the EP 1000, a 1000 MWe passive plant reference design that conforms to the EUR and would be licensable in Europe. The EP 1000 closely follows the Westinghouse SPWR design for safety systems and containment and the AP 600 design for auxiliary systems. It also includes features that where required to meet the EUR and key European licensing requirements. The primary circuit of the EP 1000 retains most of the general features of the current-day designs, but some evolutionary features to enhance reliability, simplicity of operation, ease of maintenance, and plant safety have been incorporated into the design. The core, reactor vessel, and reactor internals of the EP 1000 are similar to those of currently operating Westinghouse PWR plants, but several new features are included to enhance the performance characteristics. The basic EP 1000 safety philosophy is based on use of inherent

  18. Estrogen receptors in the human male prostatic urethra and prostate in prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Bruun, J; Balslev, E

    1999-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) in the prostate and prostatic urethra were examined in 33 men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 11 with prostate cancer (PC). The Abbot monoclonal ER-ICA assay was used for immunohistochemical investigation. In the BPH group, ERs were revealed in the prostatic...... demonstrated in the prostatic stroma and/or prostatic urethra in 6 out of 11 cases. In both BPH and PC patients, immunoreactivity was weak and confined to few cells, indicating low ER content in the prostate as well as in the prostatic urethra. Dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) analysis was used for detection...... and quanticization of cytosolic and nuclear ERs. In the BPH group, ERs were detected once in the prostate and prostatic urethra in the nuclear and cytosol, and additionally in the prostatic urethra in the cytosol fraction in three cases. In all cases, ER content was low, ranging from 10-15 fmol/mg protein. In the PC...

  19. EpCAM nuclear localization identifies aggressive Thyroid Cancer and is a marker for poor prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralhan, Ranju; Cao, Jun; Lim, Terence; MacMillan, Christina; Freeman, Jeremy L; Walfish, Paul G

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain (EpEx) of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nuclear signaling by its intracellular oncogenic domain Ep-ICD has recently been implicated in increased proliferation of cancer cells. The clinical significance of Ep-ICD in human tumors remains an enigma. EpEx, Ep-ICD and β-catenin immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies was conducted on 58 archived thyroid cancer (TC) tissue blocks from 34 patients and correlated with survival analysis of these patients for up to 17 years. The anaplastic (ATC) and aggressive thyroid cancers showed loss of EpEx and increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD. In contrast, the low grade papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) showed membranous EpEx and no detectable nuclear Ep-ICD. The ATC also showed concomitant nuclear expression of Ep-ICD and β-catenin. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis revealed reduced overall survival (OS) for TC patients showing nuclear Ep-ICD expression or loss of membranous EpEx (p < 0.0004), median OS = 5 months as compared to 198 months for patients who did not show nuclear Ep-ICD or demonstrated only membranous EpE. We report reciprocal loss of membrane EpEx but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD in aggressive TC; nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor OS of TC patients. Thus nuclear Ep-ICD localization may serve as a useful biomarker for aggressive TC and may represent a novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic target for aggressive TC

  20. Prostate-specific antigen density: correlation with histological diagnosis of prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Iersel, M. P.; Witjes, W. P.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Oosterhof, G. O.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the additional value of prostate-specific antigen density in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in patients who undergo prostate biopsies. The study comprised 376 patients with symptoms of prostatism who were undergoing prostate biopsy. Digital rectal examination (DRE) and transrectal

  1. Characterisation of the exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11 and its non-EPS producing derivative strains as potential probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Milica; López, Patricia; Strahinic, Ivana; Suárez, Ana; Kojic, Milan; Fernández-García, María; Topisirovic, Ljubisa; Golic, Natasa; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2012-08-17

    Traditional fermented foods are the best source for the isolation of strains with specific traits to act as functional starters and to keep the biodiversity of the culture collections. Besides, these strains could be used in the formulation of foods claimed to promote health benefits, i.e. those containing probiotic microorganisms. For the rational selection of strains acting as probiotics, several in vitro tests have been proposed. In the current study, we have characterized the probiotic potential of the strain Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11, isolated from a Serbian soft, white, homemade cheese, which is able to produce a "ropy" exopolysaccharide (EPS). Three novobiocin derivative strains, which have lost the ropy phenotype, were characterized as well in order to determine the putative role of the EPS in the probiotic potential. Under chemically gastrointestinal conditions, all strains were able to survive around 1-2% (10(6)-10(7)cfu/ml cultivable bacteria) only when they were included in a food matrix (1% skimmed milk). The strains were more resistant to acid conditions than to bile salts and gastric or pancreatic enzymes, which could be due to a pre-adaptation of the parental strain to acidic conditions in the cheese habitat. The ropy EPS did not improve the survival of the producing strain. On the contrary, the presence of an EPS layer surrounding the strain BGCG11 hindered its adhesion to the three epithelial intestinal cell lines tested, since the adhesion of the three non-ropy derivatives was higher than the parental one and also than that of the reference strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Aiming to propose a potential target application of these strains as probiotics, the cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed. The EPS-producing L. paraplantarum BGCG11 strain showed an anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressor profile whereas the non-ropy derivative strains induced higher pro-inflammatory response. In addition, when

  2. Highlights from e-EPS: the 2015 EPS High Energy Physics Prize winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas Lohse, e-EPS News

    2015-01-01

    The EPS High Energy Physics Division announces the winners of its 2015 prizes, which will be awarded at the Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP 2015), Vienna (Austria) 22−29 July. Many people from CERN were among the winners.   The 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to James D. Bjorken “for his prediction of scaling behaviour in the structure of the proton that led to a new understanding of the b interaction”, and to Guido Altarelli, Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Lev Lipatov, and Giorgio Parisi “for developing a probabilistic field theory framework for the dynamics of quarks and gluons, enabling a quantitative understanding of high-energy collisions involving hadrons”. The 2015 Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize, for an outstanding contribution to Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in the past 15 years, is awarded to Francis Halzen “for his visiona...

  3. Estrogen receptors in the human male prostatic urethra and prostate in prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Bruun, J; Balslev, E

    1999-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) in the prostate and prostatic urethra were examined in 33 men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 11 with prostate cancer (PC). The Abbot monoclonal ER-ICA assay was used for immunohistochemical investigation. In the BPH group, ERs were revealed in the prostatic...... stroma in eight cases and in the glandular epithelium in one. In four cases ERs were seen in the prostatic stroma and in the glandular epithelium. In the prostatic urethra, ERs were found in 19 cases located in the urothelium, lamina propria and/or periurethral glands. In the PC group, ERs were...... demonstrated in the prostatic stroma and/or prostatic urethra in 6 out of 11 cases. In both BPH and PC patients, immunoreactivity was weak and confined to few cells, indicating low ER content in the prostate as well as in the prostatic urethra. Dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) analysis was used for detection...

  4. Machining of Molybdenum by EDM-EP and EDC Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, K. L.; Chen, H. J.; Lee, H. M.; Lo, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    Molybdenum metal (Mo) can be machined with conventional tools and equipment, however, its refractory propertytends to chip when being machined. In this study, the nonconventional processes of electrical discharge machining (EDM) and electro-polishing (EP) have been conducted to investigate the machining of Mo metal and fabrication of Mo grid. Satisfactory surface quality was obtained using appropriate EDM parameters of Ip ≦ 3A and Ton EDMed Mo metal. Experimental results proved that the appropriate parameters of Ip = 5A and Ton = 50μs at Toff = 10μs can obtain the deposit with about 60μm thickness. The major phase of deposit on machined Mo surface was SiC ceramic, while the minor phases included MoSi2 and/or SiO2 with the presence of free Si due to improper discharging parameters and the use of silicone oil as the dielectric fluid.

  5. EpCAM nuclear localization identifies aggressive Thyroid Cancer and is a marker for poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Christina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain (EpEx of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM and nuclear signaling by its intracellular oncogenic domain Ep-ICD has recently been implicated in increased proliferation of cancer cells. The clinical significance of Ep-ICD in human tumors remains an enigma. Methods EpEx, Ep-ICD and β-catenin immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies was conducted on 58 archived thyroid cancer (TC tissue blocks from 34 patients and correlated with survival analysis of these patients for up to 17 years. Results The anaplastic (ATC and aggressive thyroid cancers showed loss of EpEx and increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD. In contrast, the low grade papillary thyroid cancers (PTC showed membranous EpEx and no detectable nuclear Ep-ICD. The ATC also showed concomitant nuclear expression of Ep-ICD and β-catenin. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis revealed reduced overall survival (OS for TC patients showing nuclear Ep-ICD expression or loss of membranous EpEx (p Conclusion We report reciprocal loss of membrane EpEx but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD in aggressive TC; nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor OS of TC patients. Thus nuclear Ep-ICD localization may serve as a useful biomarker for aggressive TC and may represent a novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic target for aggressive TC.

  6. Xanthogranulomatous Prostatitis, a Rare Prostatic Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Noyola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several benign prostatic pathologies that can clinically mimic a prostate adenocarcinoma. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the prostate and a rare entity. A 47-year old male, with 3 years of lower urinary tract symptoms, with a palpable hypogastric tumor, digital rectal examination: solid prostate, of approximately 60 g. Initial PSA was 0.90 ng/mL. He underwent surgical excision of the lower abdominal nodule and prostatectomy. Histopathology showed xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, without malignancy. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is an extremely rare entity that can simulate prostate adenocarcinoma, therefore having a correct histopathological diagnosis is essential.

  7. Druhý Čep

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubíček, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 1 (2014), s. 35-45 ISSN 0009-0468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP406/11/1421 Institutional support: RVO:68378068 Keywords : Czech literature * modern prose * Čep, Jan * narrative analysis Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  8. Preferences for Long-Acting Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), Daily Oral PrEP, or Condoms for HIV Prevention Among U.S. Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, George J; Swann, Greg; Fought, Angela J; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Hope, Thomas J; Kiser, Patrick F; Mustanski, Brian; D'Aquila, Richard T

    2017-05-01

    HIV prevention method preferences were evaluated among 512 U.S. men who have sex with men (MSM; median age: 22 years). Approximately 90 % consistently preferred one option across pairwise comparisons of condoms, daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and long-acting PrEP delivered via either an injectable or one of two types of PrEP implants differing in visibility. Condoms were most frequently preferred (33.8 %), followed by non-visible implants (21.5 %), and oral PrEP (17.0 %); HIV risk was reported by more choosing implants. In a follow-up question comparing the four PrEP options only, daily oral pills and non-visible implants were most frequently preferred (35.5 and 34.3 %, respectively), followed by injections (25.2 %) and visible implants (4.3 %). An inductive, open-coding approach determined that convenience, duration of protection, and privacy were the most commonly cited reasons for a PrEP method choice, and associated with self-report of HIV risk. Tailoring PrEP product development to privacy and other concerns important to those at highest HIV risk may improve HIV prevention.

  9. Purification and properties of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) antigens produced by different mould species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notermans, S; Wieten, G; Engel, H W; Rombouts, F M; Hoogerhout, P; van Boom, J H

    1987-02-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) antigens produced by different mould species were purified and partially characterized. Purification included (NH4)2SO4 treatment, Sepharose CL-4B column chromatography and Con A-sepharose chromatography. The EPS of Penicillium digitatum, Mucor racemosus and Cladosporium cladosporioides showed high antigenic capacities. Immunologically the EPS were partially genus-specific, but cross-reactivity was observed. The EPS antigens produced by species of Penicillium, Aspergillus repens and Geotrichum candidum lost their immunological activity upon heating (100 degrees C) at pH 1.8, while the EPS antigen of M. racemosus, Rhizopus oligosporus and C. cladosporioides were stable under the same conditions. The dominant monosaccharides present in the EPS antigen were mannose, galactose and glucose. The EPS obtained from cultures of M. racemosus and R. oligosporus also contained rhamnose. In the EPS produced by Penicillium spp. and A. repens the galactose residues were determined to be immunodominant.

  10. Synergistic interaction of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis on prostate cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, S-C; Lai, S-W; Tsai, P-Y; Chen, P-C; Wu, H-C; Lin, W-H; Sung, F-C

    2013-01-01

    Background: The incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in Asian men than in Western men. This study investigated whether prostate cancer is associated with prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and other medical conditions in the low-incidence population. Methods: From the claims data obtained from the universal National Health Insurance of Taiwan, we identified 1184 patients with prostate cancer diagnosed from 1997 to 2008. Controls comprised 4736 men randomly selected from a cancer-free population. Both groups were 50 years of age or above. Medical histories between the two groups were compared. Results: Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that prostatitis and BPH had stronger association with prostate cancer than the other medical conditions tested. Compared with men without prostatitis and BPH, a higher odds ratio (OR) for prostate cancer was associated with BPH (26.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 20.8–33.0) than with prostatitis (10.5, 95% CI=3.36–32.7). Men with both conditions had an OR of 49.2 (95% CI=34.7–69.9). Conclusion: Men with prostate cancer have strong association with prostatitis and/or BPH. Prostatitis interacts with BPH, resulting in higher estimated relative risk of prostate cancer in men suffering from both conditions. PMID:23612451

  11. Prostatic urethra malformation associated with retrograde ejaculation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Jianzhong; Xu, Aiming; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-12-21

    Retrograde ejaculation can have anatomical, neurogenic, or pharmacological causes. Among these factors, malformation of the prostatic urethra is an uncommon cause. We describe a 29-year-old Han Chinese man with absence of his verumontanum combined with ejaculatory duct cysts, and no other cause for ejaculatory dysfunction. His verumontanum was replaced by a deep groove adjacent to his bladder neck, which could significantly influence bladder neck contraction. In addition, the large cysts in the ejaculatory duct could obstruct the anterior outlet of his prostatic urethra and prevent seminal fluid flow in an anterograde direction. There are few reports of retrograde ejaculation associated with congenital malformations of the posterior urethra. Malformations associated with bladder neck laxity and increased tone of the prostatic urethral outlet can contribute to retrograde ejaculation. Malformation of the prostatic urethra is an uncommon cause of retrograde ejaculation, and can be difficult to treat.

  12. Structural features of subtype-selective EP receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovič, Tijana; Jakopin, Žiga; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 is a potent endogenous molecule that binds to four different G-protein-coupled receptors: EP1-4. Each of these receptors is a valuable drug target, with distinct tissue localisation and signalling pathways. We review the structural features of EP modulators required for subtype-selective activity, as well as the structural requirements for improved pharmacokinetic parameters. Novel EP receptor subtype selective agonists and antagonists appear to be valuable drug candidates in the therapy of many pathophysiological states, including ulcerative colitis, glaucoma, bone healing, B cell lymphoma, neurological diseases, among others, which have been studied in vitro, in vivo and in early phase clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Relaxin of prostatic origin might be linked to perineal hernia formation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebauer, Gert W; Shibly, Sarina; Seltenhammer, Monika; Pirker, Armin; Brandt, Sabine

    2005-05-01

    Perineal hernia occurs spontaneously in older male dogs after idiopathic weakening of the pelvic diaphragm. Hernias invariably contain cystic paraprostatic tissues. Castration reduces incidence and recurrence after surgical repair. Although cystic prostatic hypertrophy is a consistent feature in patients with perineal hernia, an endocrine link of the disease to steroid sex hormones has not been demonstrated. Employing immunohistochemistry, we found intense relaxin immunoreactivity in dogs with perineal hernia within the epithelia of hypertrophic prostates and in periprostatic tissues. The prostate of normal dogs exhibited similar but less intense relaxin staining. In neutered dogs with prostatic atrophy, relaxin immunostaining was weak or absent. Periprostatic cysts highly expressed relaxin precursors in the fluid phase as shown by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Relaxin of prostatic origin, therefore, is possibly a local factor in connective tissue weakening and subsequently in perineal hernia formation.

  14. Prostate extracellular vesicles in patient plasma as a liquid biopsy platform for prostate cancer using nanoscale flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Ali A.; Pardhan, Siddika; Brett, Sabine I.; Guo, Qiu Q.; Yang, Jun; Wolf, Philipp; Power, Nicholas E.; Durfee, Paul N.; MacMillan, Connor D.; Townson, Jason L.; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Fleshner, Neil E.; Izawa, Jonathan I.; Chambers, Ann F.; Chin, Joseph L.; Leong, Hon S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles released by prostate cancer present in seminal fluid, urine, and blood may represent a non-invasive means to identify and prioritize patients with intermediate risk and high risk of prostate cancer. We hypothesize that enumeration of circulating prostate microparticles (PMPs), a type of extracellular vesicle (EV), can identify patients with Gleason Score≥4+4 prostate cancer (PCa) in a manner independent of PSA. Patients and Methods Plasmas from healthy volunteers, benign prostatic hyperplasia patients, and PCa patients with various Gleason score patterns were analyzed for PMPs. We used nanoscale flow cytometry to enumerate PMPs which were defined as submicron events (100-1000nm) immunoreactive to anti-PSMA mAb when compared to isotype control labeled samples. Levels of PMPs (counts/μL of plasma) were also compared to CellSearch CTC Subclasses in various PCa metastatic disease subtypes (treatment naïve, castration resistant prostate cancer) and in serially collected plasma sets from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Results PMP levels in plasma as enumerated by nanoscale flow cytometry are effective in distinguishing PCa patients with Gleason Score≥8 disease, a high-risk prognostic factor, from patients with Gleason Score≤7 PCa, which carries an intermediate risk of PCa recurrence. PMP levels were independent of PSA and significantly decreased after surgical resection of the prostate, demonstrating its prognostic potential for clinical follow-up. CTC subclasses did not decrease after prostatectomy and were not effective in distinguishing localized PCa patients from metastatic PCa patients. Conclusions PMP enumeration was able to identify patients with Gleason Score ≥8 PCa but not patients with Gleason Score 4+3 PCa, but offers greater confidence than CTC counts in identifying patients with metastatic prostate cancer. CTC Subclass analysis was also not effective for post-prostatectomy follow up and for

  15. Who Will Use Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Why?: Understanding PrEP Awareness and Acceptability amongst Men Who Have Sex with Men in the UK--A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankis, Jamie; Young, Ingrid; Flowers, Paul; McDaid, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical trials suggest that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) may reduce HIV transmission by up to 86% for men who have sex with men (MSM), whilst relatively high levels of PrEP acceptability have been reported to date. This study examines PrEP awareness amongst sub-groups of MSM communities and acceptability amongst MSM in a low prevalence region (Scotland, UK), using a mixed methods design. Quantitative surveys of n = 690 MSM recruited online via social and sociosexual media were analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. In addition, n = 10 in-depth qualitative interviews with MSM were analysed thematically. Under one third (29.7%) of MSM had heard of PrEP, with awareness related to living in large cities, degree level education, commercial gay scene use and reporting an HIV test in the last year. Just under half of participants (47.8%) were likely to use PrEP if it were available but there was no relationship between PrEP acceptability and previous PrEP awareness. Younger men (18-25 years) and those who report higher risk UAI were significantly more likely to say they would use PrEP. Qualitative data described specific PrEP scenarios, illustrating how risk, patterns of sexual practice and social relationships could affect motivation for and nature of PrEP use. These findings suggest substantial interest PrEP amongst MSM reporting HIV risk behaviours in Scotland. Given the Proud results, there is a strong case to investigate PrEP implementation within the UK. However, it appears that disparities in awareness have already emerged along traditional indicators of inequality. Our research identifies the need for comprehensive support when PrEP is introduced, including a key online component, to ensure equity of awareness across diverse MSM communities (e.g. by geography, education, gay scene use and HIV proximity), as well as to responding to the diverse informational and sexual health needs of all MSM communities.

  16. Who Will Use Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP and Why?: Understanding PrEP Awareness and Acceptability amongst Men Who Have Sex with Men in the UK--A Mixed Methods Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Frankis

    Full Text Available Recent clinical trials suggest that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP may reduce HIV transmission by up to 86% for men who have sex with men (MSM, whilst relatively high levels of PrEP acceptability have been reported to date. This study examines PrEP awareness amongst sub-groups of MSM communities and acceptability amongst MSM in a low prevalence region (Scotland, UK, using a mixed methods design.Quantitative surveys of n = 690 MSM recruited online via social and sociosexual media were analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. In addition, n = 10 in-depth qualitative interviews with MSM were analysed thematically.Under one third (29.7% of MSM had heard of PrEP, with awareness related to living in large cities, degree level education, commercial gay scene use and reporting an HIV test in the last year. Just under half of participants (47.8% were likely to use PrEP if it were available but there was no relationship between PrEP acceptability and previous PrEP awareness. Younger men (18-25 years and those who report higher risk UAI were significantly more likely to say they would use PrEP. Qualitative data described specific PrEP scenarios, illustrating how risk, patterns of sexual practice and social relationships could affect motivation for and nature of PrEP use.These findings suggest substantial interest PrEP amongst MSM reporting HIV risk behaviours in Scotland. Given the Proud results, there is a strong case to investigate PrEP implementation within the UK. However, it appears that disparities in awareness have already emerged along traditional indicators of inequality. Our research identifies the need for comprehensive support when PrEP is introduced, including a key online component, to ensure equity of awareness across diverse MSM communities (e.g. by geography, education, gay scene use and HIV proximity, as well as to responding to the diverse informational and sexual health needs of all MSM communities.

  17. Living with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS): the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Helen; Summers, Angela; Beaver, Kinta; Caress, Ann-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Although relatively rare, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is nonetheless a major concern within the renal community. Risk of developing EPS is associated with long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). High mortality was previously reported, although surgery has since improved outcomes. Research into EPS focuses on imaging and early detection methods, genetics, biomarkers and preventive strategies. No previous studies have examined patients' experiences of EPS. The aim of the present study was to explore the experience of patients who have undergone surgery for EPS in one center in the North of England. A qualitative phenomenological approach, involving in-depth interviews, was adopted. Nine participants were recruited out of a total of 18 eligible. Most participants were interviewed twice over a 12-month period (October 2009 to October 2010). Interpretive data analysis was conducted, following the philosophical tradition of hermeneutics, to draw out themes from the data. Data collection and analysis took place concurrently and participants were sent a summary of their first interview to allow a period of reflection prior to the subsequent interview. EPS presented the most serious challenge participants had faced since developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Three major themes were identified, each with subcategories. The key issues for patients were related to identification of early symptoms and lack of understanding. The patients' sense of 'not being heard' by health care professionals led to a loss of trust and enhanced their feelings of uncertainty. The enormity of the surgery, the suffering, and what they had to endure had an enormous impact, but an overriding aspect of this experience was also the loss they felt for their independence and for the PD therapy over which they had control. The findings of this study highlight a number of important issues relevant to clinical practice, including lack of information and understanding of EPS, particularly its

  18. Nanotechnology-Based Detection of Novel microRNAs for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0157 TITLE: Nanotechnology -Based Detection of Novel microRNAs for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nanotechnology -Based Detection of Novel microRNAs for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...identify novel differentially expressed miRNAs in the body fluids (blood, urine, etc.) for an early detection of PCa. Advances in nanotechnology and

  19. A host defense mechanism involving CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion in bacterial prostatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostatitis is associated with a characteristic increase in prostatic fluid pH; however, the underlying mechanism and its physiological significance have not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study a primary culture of rat prostatic epithelial cells and a rat prostatitis model were used. Here we reported the involvement of CFTR, a cAMP-activated anion channel conducting both Cl(- and HCO(3(-, in mediating prostate HCO(3(- secretion and its possible role in bacterial killing. Upon Escherichia coli (E. coli-LPS challenge, the expression of CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II, along with several pro-inflammatory cytokines was up-regulated in the primary culture of rat prostate epithelial cells. Inhibiting CFTR function in vitro or in vivo resulted in reduced bacterial killing by prostate epithelial cells or the prostate. High HCO(3(- content (>50 mM, rather than alkaline pH, was found to be responsible for bacterial killing. The direct action of HCO(3(- on bacterial killing was confirmed by its ability to increase cAMP production and suppress bacterial initiation factors in E. coli. The relevance of the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- secretion in humans was demonstrated by the upregulated expression of CFTR and CAII in human prostatitis tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CFTR and its mediated HCO(3(- secretion may be up-regulated in prostatitis as a host defense mechanism.

  20. Role of miRNA Let-7 and Its Major Targets in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Wagner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is worldwide the sixth leading cause of cancer related death in men thus early detection and successful treatment are still of major interest. The commonly performed screening of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA is controversially discussed, as in many patients the prostate-specific antigen levels are chronically elevated in the absence of cancer. Due to the unsatisfying efficiency of available prostate cancer screening markers and the current treatment outcome of the aggressive hormone refractory prostate cancer, the evaluation of novel molecular markers and targets is considered an issue of high importance. MicroRNAs are relatively stable in body fluids orchestrating simultaneously the expression of many genes. These molecules are currently discussed to bear a greater diagnostic potential than protein-coding genes, being additionally promising therapeutic drugs and/or targets. Herein we review the potential impact of the microRNA let-7 family on prostate cancer and show how deregulation of several of its target genes could influence the cellular equilibrium in the prostate gland, promoting cancer development as they do in a variety of other human malignant neoplasias.

  1. Functional and bioinformatics analysis of an exopolysaccharide-related gene (epsN) from Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingrui; Tang, Wei; Zheng, Yongna; Xing, Zhuqing; Wang, Yanping

    2016-09-01

    A novel lactic acid bacteria strain Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens ZW3 exhibited the characteristics of high production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). The epsN gene, located in the eps gene cluster of this strain, is associated with EPS biosynthesis. Bioinformatics analysis of this gene was performed. The conserved domain analysis showed that the EpsN protein contained MATE-Wzx-like domains. Then the epsN gene was amplified to construct the recombinant expression vector pMG36e-epsN. The results showed that the EPS yields of the recombinants were significantly improved. By determining the yields of EPS and intracellular polysaccharide, it was considered that epsN gene could play its Wzx flippase role in the EPS biosynthesis. This is the first time to prove the effect of EpsN on L. kefiranofaciens EPS biosynthesis and further prove its functional property.

  2. Chronic bacterial seminal vesiculitis as a potential disease entity in men with chronic prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Hwan; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Choo, Gwoan-Youb; Chung, Yeun-Goo; Seong, Do-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Ho; Choe, Won-Sik; Ryu, Dong-Soo; Hyun, In Young; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2015-05-01

    To investigate bacterial infection in the seminal vesicles by bacteriological examination and radionuclide imaging in men with chronic prostatitis. The study included 50 patients with chronic prostatitis who showed hot uptake in seminal vesicles on Tc-99m ciprofloxacin imaging and eight patients who did not show hot uptake. The evaluation included the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index and four-glass test. In all participants, transperineal aspiration of seminal vesicle fluid under the guidance of transrectal ultrasonography and bacteriological examination was carried out. Of the 50 patients who showed hot uptake in the seminal vesicles on the isotope study, microorganisms were isolated from the seminal vesicle fluid in 17 patients (positive predictive value, 34%). The most common causative organisms were Escherichia coli in 13 patients (26%), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species in two patients (4%), Enterococcus faecalis in one patient (2%) and Chlamydia trachomatis in one patient (2%). No microorganisms were isolated in the eight patients who did not show hot uptake in the seminal vesicles (negative predictive value, 100%). However, there were no significant differences in National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total scores and subscores between the study groups. Chronic bacterial seminal vesiculitis might simultaneously affect a considerable portion of patients with chronic prostatitis, although the clinical implication of the disease remains to be further investigated. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  3. Correlation between dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and quantitative histopathologic microvascular parameters in organ-confined prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niekerk, Cornelis G. van; Laak, Jeroen A.W.M. van der; Kaa, Christina A.H. de [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hambrock, Thomas; Huisman, Henk-Jan; Barentsz, Jelle O. [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Witjes, J.A. [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Urology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    To correlate pharmacokinetic parameters of 3-T dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-)MRI with histopathologic microvascular and lymphatic parameters in organ-confined prostate cancer. In 18 patients with unilateral peripheral zone (pT2a) tumours who underwent DCE-MRI prior to radical prostatectomy (RP), the following pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed: permeability surface area volume transfer constant (K{sup trans}), extravascular extracellular volume (Ve) and rate constant (K{sub ep}). In the RP sections blood and lymph vessels were visualised immunohistochemically and automatically examined and analysed. Parameters assessed included microvessel density (MVD), area (MVA) and perimeter (MVP) as well as lymph vessel density (LVD), area (LVA) and perimeter (LVP). A negative correlation was found between age and K{sup trans} and K{sub ep} for tumour (r = -0.60, p = 0.009; r = -0.67, p = 0.002) and normal (r = -0.54, p = 0.021; r = -0.46, p = 0.055) tissue. No correlation existed between absolute values of microvascular parameters from histopathology and DCE-MRI. In contrast, the ratio between tumour and normal tissue (correcting for individual microvascularity variations) significantly correlated between K{sub ep} and MVD (r = 0.61, p = 0.007) and MVP (r = 0.54, p = 0.022). The lymphovascular parameters showed only a correlation between LVA and K{sub ep} (r = -0.66, p = 0.003). Significant correlations between DCE-MRI and histopathologic parameters were found when correcting for interpatient variations in microvascularity. (orig.)

  4. Epithelial Na, K-ATPase expression is down-regulated in canine prostate cancer; a possible consequence of metabolic transformation in the process of prostate malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Vasallo Pablo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important physiological function of the normal prostate gland is the synthesis and secretion of a citrate rich prostatic fluid. In prostate cancer, citrate production levels are reduced as a result of altered cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. Na, K-ATPase is essential for citrate production since the inward Na+ gradients it generates are utilized for the Na+ dependent uptake of aspartate, a major substrate for citrate synthesis. The objective of this study was to compare the expression of previously identified Na, K-ATPase isoforms in normal canine prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostatic adenocarcinoma (PCa using immunohistochemistry in order to determine whether reduced citrate levels in PCa are also accompanied by changes in Na, K-ATPase expression. Results Expression of Na, K-ATPase α1 and β1 isoforms was observed in the lateral and basolateral plasma membrane domains of prostatic epithelial cells in normal and BPH prostates. Canine kidney was used as positive control for expression of Na, K-ATPase α1 and γ isoforms. The α1 isoform was detected in abundance in prostatic epithelial cells but there was no evidence of α2, α3 or γ subunit expression. In advanced PCa, Na, K-ATPase α1 isoform expression was significantly lower compared to normal and BPH glands. The abundant basolateral immunostaining observed in normal and BPH tissue was significantly attenuated in PCa. Conclusion The loss of epithelial structure and function and the transformation of normal epithelial cells to malignant cells in the canine prostate have important implications for cellular metabolism and are accompanied by a down regulation of Na, K-ATPase.

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF FRAME STRUCTURE ON SHALLOW FOUNDATION WITH EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Waluyohadi

    2015-08-01

    test results. A series of parametric study is conducted including the interface element and the variations of size of EPS. The use of EPS underneath shallow foundation do not show the correlation with the seismic response of structure if there is no interface element constructed. Variation of EPS size used were contributed to the acceleration and displacement of  structure with shallow foundation. As the larger size of EPS applied, the larger reduction of seismic responses will be obtained.

  6. Who Will Use Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Why?: Understanding PrEP Awareness and Acceptability amongst Men Who Have Sex with Men in the UK – A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankis, Jamie; Young, Ingrid; Flowers, Paul; McDaid, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent clinical trials suggest that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) may reduce HIV transmission by up to 86% for men who have sex with men (MSM), whilst relatively high levels of PrEP acceptability have been reported to date. This study examines PrEP awareness amongst sub-groups of MSM communities and acceptability amongst MSM in a low prevalence region (Scotland, UK), using a mixed methods design. Methods Quantitative surveys of n = 690 MSM recruited online via social and sociosexual media were analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. In addition, n = 10 in-depth qualitative interviews with MSM were analysed thematically. Results Under one third (29.7%) of MSM had heard of PrEP, with awareness related to living in large cities, degree level education, commercial gay scene use and reporting an HIV test in the last year. Just under half of participants (47.8%) were likely to use PrEP if it were available but there was no relationship between PrEP acceptability and previous PrEP awareness. Younger men (18–25 years) and those who report higher risk UAI were significantly more likely to say they would use PrEP. Qualitative data described specific PrEP scenarios, illustrating how risk, patterns of sexual practice and social relationships could affect motivation for and nature of PrEP use. Conclusion These findings suggest substantial interest PrEP amongst MSM reporting HIV risk behaviours in Scotland. Given the Proud results, there is a strong case to investigate PrEP implementation within the UK. However, it appears that disparities in awareness have already emerged along traditional indicators of inequality. Our research identifies the need for comprehensive support when PrEP is introduced, including a key online component, to ensure equity of awareness across diverse MSM communities (e.g. by geography, education, gay scene use and HIV proximity), as well as to responding to the diverse informational and sexual health

  7. PrEP implementation: moving from trials to policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Carlos F; O'Reilly, Kevin R; Mayer, Kenneth H; Baggaley, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that the HIV response will not be sustainable if the number of infections is not significantly reduced. For two decades, research has been ongoing to identify new behavioural and biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection. In the past few years, the efficacy of several new strategies has been demonstrated, including oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP; i.e. daily use of tenofovir/emtricitabine). Because several social, political and logistic barriers remain, however, optimal PrEP implementation will require a better dissemination of new evidence in a number of areas and additional implementation research from various disciplinary perspectives (i.e. social science, policy and ethics; health systems; and economics, including cost-effectiveness studies). Discussion of new evidence on those topics, as well as case studies of potential PrEP implementation in diverse environments, can improve the understanding of the role that PrEP may play in addressing the global HIV/AIDS epidemic.In light of these needs, the Network for Multidisciplinary Studies in ARV-based HIV Prevention (NEMUS) and the World Health Organization (WHO) were honoured to co-organize a special issue of JIAS aimed at contributing to a scholarly discussion of current conditions surrounding PrEP implementation, potential impact and efficiency, social science concerns and the study of PrEP implementation in specific country cases. The papers included in this monograph identify and cover many of the main aspects of the complex yet promising discussions around PrEP implementation today. This is a collection of timely contributions from global leaders in HIV research and policy that addresses geographic diversity, uses a trans-disciplinary approach and covers a variety of the complex issues raised by PrEP. As this publication will become accessible to all, we hope that it will remain a valuable resource for policy makers, programme managers, researchers and activists around the

  8. PrEP in Europe - expectations, opportunities and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Sheena Mary; Noseda, Veronica; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the global trend showing a decline in new HIV infections, the number reported in the World Health Organization (WHO) region of Europe is increasing. Health systems are disparate, but even countries with free access to screening and treatment observe continuing high rates of new infections in key populations, notably men who have sex with men (MSM). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is only available in France. This commentary describes the European epidemics and healthcare settings where PrEP could be delivered, how need might be estimated for MSM and the residual barriers to access. Health systems and government commitment to HIV prevention and care, both financial and political, differ considerably between the countries that make up Europe. A common feature is that funds for prevention are a small fraction of funds for care. Although care is generally good, access is limited in the middle-income countries of Eastern Europe and central Asia, and only 19% of people living with HIV received antiretroviral therapy in 2014. It is challenging to motivate governments or civil society to implement PrEP in the context of this unmet treatment need, which is driven by limited national health budgets and diminishing assistance from foreign aid. The high-income countries of Western Europe have hesitated to embrace PrEP for different reasons, initially due to key gaps in the evidence. Now that PrEP has been shown to be highly effective in European MSM in two randomized controlled trials, it is clear that the major barrier is the cost of the drug which is still on patent, although inadequate health systems and diminishing investment in civil society are also key challenges to overcome. The momentum to implement PrEP in European countries is increasing and provides a welcome opportunity to expand and improve clinical services and civil society support focused on HIV and related infections including other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections.

  9. OMEGA EP high-energy petawatt laser: progress and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maywar, D N; Kelly, J H; Waxer, L J; Morse, S F B; Begishev, I A; Bromage, J; Dorrer, C; Edwards, J L; Folnsbee, L; Guardalben, M J; Jacobs, S D; Jungquist, R; Kessler, T J; Kidder, R W; Kruschwitz, B E; Loucks, S J; Marciante, J R; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Okishev, A V

    2008-01-01

    OMEGA EP (extended performance) is a petawatt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. It will enable high-energy picosecond backlighting of high-energy-density experiments and inertial confinement fusion implosions, the investigation of advanced-ignition experiments such as fast ignition, and the exploration of high-energy-density phenomena. The OMEGA EP short-pulse beams have the flexibility to be directed to either the existing OMEGA target chamber, or the new, auxiliary OMEGA EP target chamber for independent experiments. This paper will detail progress made towards activation, which is on schedule for completion in April 2008

  10. Prostate Cancer Detection by Molecular Urinalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    subjected to physical manipulation, thus creating the potential for their non- invasive detection in either urine or expressed prostatic fluid ( EPF ...samples or EPF . The recent application of molecular techniques to the study of PC has led to the identification of several novel molecular alterations...focused on detecting such molecular changes in the urine or EPF [7-12,15]. Paralleling the advances in biomarker discovery, sig- nificant advances in

  11. EPS-LASSO: Test for High-Dimensional Regression Under Extreme Phenotype Sampling of Continuous Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Fang, Jian; Shen, Hui; Wang, Yu-Ping; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2018-01-25

    Extreme phenotype sampling (EPS) is a broadly-used design to identify candidate genetic factors contributing to the variation of quantitative traits. By enriching the signals in extreme phenotypic samples, EPS can boost the association power compared to random sampling. Most existing statistical methods for EPS examine the genetic factors individually, despite many quantitative traits have multiple genetic factors underlying their variation. It is desirable to model the joint effects of genetic factors, which may increase the power and identify novel quantitative trait loci under EPS. The joint analysis of genetic data in high-dimensional situations requires specialized techniques, e.g., the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). Although there are extensive research and application related to LASSO, the statistical inference and testing for the sparse model under EPS remain unknown. We propose a novel sparse model (EPS-LASSO) with hypothesis test for high-dimensional regression under EPS based on a decorrelated score function. The comprehensive simulation shows EPS-LASSO outperforms existing methods with stable type I error and FDR control. EPS-LASSO can provide a consistent power for both low- and high-dimensional situations compared with the other methods dealing with high-dimensional situations. The power of EPS-LASSO is close to other low-dimensional methods when the causal effect sizes are small and is superior when the effects are large. Applying EPS-LASSO to a transcriptome-wide gene expression study for obesity reveals 10 significant body mass index associated genes. Our results indicate that EPS-LASSO is an effective method for EPS data analysis, which can account for correlated predictors. The source code is available at https://github.com/xu1912/EPSLASSO. hdeng2@tulane.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  12. Antibody Responses to Prostate-Associated Antigens in Patients with Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricque, Brett B.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Background An important focus of tumor immunotherapy has been the identification of appropriate antigenic targets. Serum-based screening approaches have led to the discovery of hundreds of tumor-associated antigens recognized by IgG. Our efforts to identify immunologically recognized proteins in prostate cancer have yielded a multitude of antigens, however prioritizing these antigens as targets for evaluation in immunotherapies has been challenging. In this report, we set out to determine whether the evaluation of multiple antigenic targets would allow the identification of a subset of antigens that are common immunologic targets in patients with prostate cancer. Methods Using a phage immunoblot approach, we evaluated IgG responses in patients with prostate cancer (n=126), patients with chronic prostatitis (n=45), and men without prostate disease (n=53). Results We found that patients with prostate cancer or prostatitis have IgG specific for multiple common antigens. A subset of 23 proteins was identified to which IgG were detected in 38% of patients with prostate cancer and 33% patients with prostatitis versus 6% of controls (pprostate and prostate cancer, and suggest that IgG responses to a panel of commonly recognized prostate antigens could be potentially used in the identification of patients at risk for prostate cancer or as a tool to identify immune responses elicited to prostate tissue. PMID:20632317

  13. Structures and Logic of EP Implementation and Administration in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Grunow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes empirical observations gathered during a research project on the implementation of environmental protection (EP policies in China. The project focused on local EP in both urban and rural areas. Policy field analysis was used as a conceptual framework for structuring the observations. The paper develops in three main steps discussing the following topics: 1 Collective problems within the policy field of EP show that EP issues in general are unlike those of other policy fields. Official EP policies in China today resemble those of other countries – but they are separating issues and responsibilities, making local implementation very demanding. 2 China lags behind in its willingness and ability to implement these policies – leading to implementation gaps. To explore the causes and consequences, specific sites in China are described in an extended look at local implementation structures. It was found that although policies in China are basically the same everywhere, the structures for implementing them and the quality of their implementation vary widely with regard to resources, organization, coordination, staff qualifications, personnel placement, and other aspects. 3 Not all of the challenges hampering local implementation of environmental policies were China-specific; however, some of those which are can be described as the macro-context: an ineffective rule of law, insufficient involvement of civil society, and complicated macro-structures of public administration prevent a generally high level of successful EP implementation in China.

  14. 30 CFR 250.231 - After receiving the EP, what will MMS do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false After receiving the EP, what will MMS do? 250.231 Section 250.231 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE... Decision Process for the Ep § 250.231 After receiving the EP, what will MMS do? (a) Determine whether...

  15. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Thorsten; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Grobholz, Rainer; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is a Ca 2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6 alleles in healthy control individuals and prostate cancer patients

  16. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Thorsten; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Grobholz, Rainer; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-10-26

    The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is a Ca(2+) selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6 alleles in healthy control individuals and prostate cancer patients

  17. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flockerzi Veit

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6 is a Ca2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Methods Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. Results We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Conclusion Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6

  18. Role of the Prostaglandin E2 EP1 Receptor in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushakov, Alexander V.; Fazal, Jawad A.; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Brain injuries promote upregulation of so-called proinflammatory prostaglandins, notably prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leading to overactivation of a class of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptors, including EP1, which is considered a promising target for treatment of ischemic stroke. However, the role of the EP1 receptor is complex and depends on the type of brain injury. This study is focused on the investigation of the role of the EP1 receptor in a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model, a preclinical model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The therapeutic effects of post-treatments with a widely studied EP1 receptor antagonist, SC-51089, were examined in wildtype and EP1 receptor knockout C57BL/6 mice. Neurological deficit scores (NDS) were assessed 24 and 48 h following CCI or sham surgery, and brain immunohistochemical pathology was assessed 48 h after surgery. In wildtype mice, CCI resulted in an obvious cortical lesion and localized hippocampal edema with an associated significant increase in NDS compared to sham-operated animals. Post-treatments with the selective EP1 receptor antagonist SC-51089 or genetic knockout of EP1 receptor had no significant effects on cortical lesions and hippocampal swelling or on the NDS 24 and 48 h after CCI. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed CCI-induced gliosis and microglial activation in selected ipsilateral brain regions that were not affected by SC-51089 or in the EP1 receptor-deleted mice. This study provides further clarification on the respective contribution of the EP1 receptor in TBI and suggests that, under this experimental paradigm, the EP1 receptor would have limited effects in modulating acute neurological and anatomical pathologies following contusive brain trauma. Findings from this protocol, in combination with previous studies demonstrating differential roles of EP1 receptor in ischemic, neurotoxic, and hemorrhagic conditions, provide scientific background and further clarification of potential therapeutic

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 is required for ligand-regulated, but not constitutive, endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Confalonieri, S; Salcini, A E; Puri, C

    2000-01-01

    for endocytosis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the prototypical ligand-inducible receptor, but not of the transferrin receptor (TfR), the prototypical constitutively internalized receptor. Eps15, an endocytic protein that is tyrosine phosphorylated by EGFR, is a candidate for such a function....... Here, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 is necessary for internalization of the EGFR, but not of the TfR. We mapped Tyr 850 as the major in vivo tyrosine phosphorylation site of Eps15. A phosphorylation-negative mutant of Eps15 acted as a dominant negative on the internalization...... of the EGFR, but not of the TfR. A phosphopeptide, corresponding to the phosphorylated sequence of Eps15, inhibited EGFR endocytosis, suggesting that phosphotyrosine in Eps15 serves as a docking site for a phosphotyrosine binding protein. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 represents the first molecular...

  20. Identification of prostate cancer biomarkers in urinary exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øverbye, Anders; Skotland, Tore; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd; Seierstad, Therese; Berge, Viktor; Sandvig, Kirsten; Llorente, Alicia

    2015-10-06

    Exosomes have recently appeared as a novel source of non-invasive cancer biomarkers since tumour-specific molecules can be found in exosomes isolated from biological fluids. We have here investigated the proteome of urinary exosomes by using mass spectrometry to identify proteins differentially expressed in prostate cancer patients compared to healthy male controls. In total, 15 control and 16 prostate cancer samples of urinary exosomes were analyzed. Importantly, 246 proteins were differentially expressed in the two groups. The majority of these proteins (221) were up-regulated in exosomes from prostate cancer patients. These proteins were analyzed according to specific criteria to create a focus list that contained 37 proteins. At 100% specificity, 17 of these proteins displayed individual sensitivities above 60%. Even though several of these proteins showed high sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer as individual biomarkers, combining them in a multi-panel test has the potential for full differentiation of prostate cancer from non-disease controls. The highest sensitivity, 94%, was observed for transmembrane protein 256 (TM256; chromosome 17 open reading frame 61). LAMTOR proteins were also distinctly enriched with very high specificity for patient samples. TM256 and LAMTOR1 could be used to augment the sensitivity to 100%. Other prominent proteins were V-type proton ATPase 16 kDa proteolipid subunit (VATL), adipogenesis regulatory factor (ADIRF), and several Rab-class members and proteasomal proteins. In conclusion, this study clearly shows the potential of using urinary exosomes in the diagnosis and clinical management of prostate cancer.

  1. A urethrorectal fistula due to prostatic abscess associated with urolithiasis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agut, A; Lucas, X; Castro, A; De Membiela, F; Soler, M; Belda, E

    2006-06-01

    An 8-year-old, entire male crossbreed dog had a 2-day history of abdominal pain and straining to urinate and defecate. A diagnosis of urolithiasis with urinary retention, and probable prostatitis was made. The dog was treated with fluids and enrofloxacin. Five days later, ultrasonography of the prostate showed two hypoechoic areas compatible with abscesses. Twelve hours later, the patient started to urinate from the rectum during micturition and urethrorectal fistula was diagnosed. The omentalization of the prostatic abscesses and castration were performed and calculi were removed. The urethrorectal fistula was treated conservatively with an indwelling urinary catheter, a low residue diet and antibiotics. The dog recovered uneventfully without recurrence of the fistula.

  2. Spacecraft Electrical Power System (EPS) generic analysis tools and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gladys M.; Sheppard, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is provided of the analysis tools and techiques used in modeling the Space Station Freedom electrical power system, as well as future space vehicle power systems. The analysis capabilities of the Electrical Power System (EPS) are described and the EPS analysis tools are surveyed.

  3. Ep option at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1984-05-01

    The possibilities for colliding electrons with the 20 TeV proton beams of the SSC are considered. Kinematics of ep colliding beams is reviewed. Energies that may be possible and interesting are suggested, and detector problems associated with the highly imbalanced collisions are briefly considered

  4. The future of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdener, Ayşe Elif; Park, Tae Eun; Kalabalik, Julie; Gupta, Rachna

    2017-05-01

    People at high risk for HIV acquisition should be offered pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC) is currently the only medication recommended for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in people at high risk for HIV acquisition. This article will review medications currently under investigation and the future landscape of PrEP therapy. Areas covered: This article will review clinical trials that have investigated nontraditional regimens of TDF/FTC, antiretroviral agents from different drug classes such as integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) as potential PrEP therapies. Expert commentary: Currently, there are several investigational drugs in the pipeline for PrEP against HIV infection. Increased utilization of PrEP therapy depends on provider identification of people at high risk for HIV transmission. Advances in PrEP development will expand options and access for people and reduce the risk of HIV acquisition.

  5. Prostate Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the exact cause of your prostate problem. Prostatitis The cause of prostatitis depends on whether you ... prostate problem in men older than age 50. Prostatitis If you have a UTI, you may be ...

  6. Significance of prostatic weight in prostatism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Bruskewitz, R C; Iversen, P

    1983-01-01

    In addition to routine evaluation, 68 patients with prostatism underwent blinded urodynamic testing prior to transurethral prostatectomy and were reexamined symptomatologically and urodynamically at 3 and 12 months after surgery to determine if prostatic weight could predict postoperative outcome....... Resected prostatic weight correlated with estimated weight at cystoscopy and with obstructive symptoms, but not with urodynamic variables of infravesical obstruction. Patients with small prostates improved symptomatologically to the same degree as patients with larger glands, although they did not improve...... to the same degree urodynamically. Prostatic weight, therefore, could not be used to predict the outcome of transurethral surgery....

  7. Bacterial prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Bradley C; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    The review provides the infectious disease community with a urologic perspective on bacterial prostatitis. Specifically, the article briefly reviews the categorization of prostatitis by type and provides a distillation of new findings published on bacterial prostatitis over the past year. It also highlights key points from the established literature. Cross-sectional prostate imaging is becoming more common and may lead to more incidental diagnoses of acute bacterial prostatitis. As drug resistance remains problematic in this condition, the reemergence of older antibiotics such as fosfomycin, has proven beneficial. With regard to chronic bacterial prostatitis, no clear clinical risk factors emerged in a large epidemiological study. However, bacterial biofilm formation has been associated with more severe cases. Surgery has a limited role in bacterial prostatitis and should be reserved for draining of a prostatic abscess or the removal of infected prostatic stones. Prostatitis remains a common and bothersome clinical condition. Antibiotic therapy remains the basis of treatment for both acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Further research into improving prostatitis treatment is indicated.

  8. Hombro doloroso en trabajadores afiliados a eps-privada

    OpenAIRE

    Blandón Rodríguez, Jairo Alcibíades

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: Describir los elementos diagnósticos de la patología de hombro doloroso, en trabajadores calificados en medicina laboral EPS-privada, Bogotá (Colombia), año 2012. Método: Estudio descriptivo de corte transversal sobre una muestra de trabajadores afiliados a EPS-privada año 2012 calificados por patología de hombro doloroso de origen profesional. La muestra estudiada fue de 343 registros de trabajadores, que representa el 2.3% del total de la enfermedades profesionales y acci...

  9. Biomarkers of Prostatic Cancer: An Attempt to Categorize Patients into Prostatic Carcinoma, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, or Prostatitis Based on Serum Prostate Specific Antigen, Prostatic Acid Phosphatase, Calcium, and Phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana Sarwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatitis, BPH, and P.Ca are the most frequent pathologies of the prostate gland that are responsible for morbidity in men. Raised levels of PSA are seen in different pathological conditions involving the prostate. PAP levels are altered in inflammatory or infectious or abnormal growth of the prostate tissue. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were also found to be altered in prostate cancer and BPH. The present study was carried out to study the levels of PSA, PAP, calcium, and phosphorus in serum of patients with Prostatitis, BPH, or P.Ca and also to evaluate the relationship between them. Males in the age group of 50–85 years with LUTS disease symptoms and with PSA levels more than 4 ng/mL were included. A total of 114 patients were analyzed including 30 controls. Prostatitis in 35.7% of cases, BPH in 35.7% of the cases, and P.Ca in 28.57% of the cases were observed. Thus, the nonmalignant cases constitute a majority. PSA, a marker specific for prostatic conditions, was significantly high in all the diseases compared to controls. A rise in serum PSA and PAP indicates prostatitis or, in combination with these two tests, decreased serum calcium shows advanced disease.

  10. Deposition kinetics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on silica in monovalent and divalent salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pingting; Long, Guoyu; Ni, Jinren; Tong, Meiping

    2009-08-01

    The deposition kinetics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on silica surfaces were examined in both monovalent and divalent solutions under a variety of environmentally relevant ionic strength and pH conditions by employing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (DCM-D). Soluble EPS (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) were extracted from four bacterial strains with different characteristics. Maximum favorable deposition rates (k(fa)) were observed for all EPS at low ionic strengths in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. With the increase of ionic strength, k(fa) decreased due to the simultaneous occurrence of EPS aggregation in solutions. Deposition efficiency (alpha; the ratio of deposition rates obtained under unfavorable versus corresponding favorable conditions) for all EPS increased with increasing ionic strength in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions, which agreed with the trends of zeta potentials and was consistent with the classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Comparison of alpha for SEPS and BEPS extracted from the same strain showed that the trends of alpha did not totally agree with trends of zeta potentials, indicating the deposition kinetics of EPS on silica surfaces were not only controlled by DLVO interactions, but also non-DLVO forces. Close comparison of alpha for EPS extracted from different sources showed alpha increased with increasing proteins to polysaccharides ratio. Subsequent experiments for EPS extracted from the same strain but with different proteins to polysaccharides ratios and from activated sludge also showed that alpha were largest for EPS with greatest proteins to polysaccharides ratio. Additional experiments for pure protein and solutions with different pure proteins to pure saccharides ratios further corroborated that larger proteins to polysaccharides ratio resulted in greater EPS deposition.

  11. Relation between EPS adherence, viscoelastic properties, and MBR operation: Biofouling study with QCM-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweity, Amer; Ying, Wang; Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Yang, Fei; Bick, Amos; Oron, Gideon; Herzberg, Moshe

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fouling is one of the main constraints of the wide use of membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology. The biomass in MBR systems includes extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), metabolic products of active microbial secretion that adversely affect the membrane performance. Solids retention time (SRT) in the MBR is one of the most important parameters affecting membrane fouling in MBR systems, where fouling is minimized at optimal SRT. Among the operating parameters in MBR systems, SRT is known to strongly influence the ratio of proteins to polysaccharides in the EPS matrix. In this study, we have direct evidence for changes in EPS adherence and viscoelastic properties due to changes in the sludge removal rate that strongly correlate with the membrane fouling rate and EPS composition. EPS were extracted from a UF membrane in a hybrid growth MBR operated at sludge removal rates of 59, 35.4, 17.7, and 5.9 L day(-1) (corresponding SRT of 3, 5, 10, and 30 days, respectively). The EPS adherence and adsorption kinetics were carried out in a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technology in several adsorption measurements to a gold sensor coated with Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF). EPS adsorption to the sensor surface is characterized by a decrease of the oscillation frequency and an increase in the dissipation energy of the sensor during parallel flow of aqueous media, supplemented with EPS, above the sensor surface. The results from these experiments were further modeled using the Voigt based model, in which the thickness, shear modulus, and shear viscosity values of the adsorbed EPS layers on the PVDF crystal were calculated. The observations in the QCM-D suggested that the elevated fouling of the UF membrane is due to higher adherence of the EPS as well as reduction in viscosity and elasticity of the EPS adsorbed layer and elevation of the EPS fluidity. These results corroborate with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) image

  12. Review of HIV Pre exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and example of HIV PrEP Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    at Initiation of Sexual Activity Correct & Consistent Condom Use Prevention of mother-to- child transmission July 16, 2012: FDA approves...Okulicz JF, Medicine 2016 PrEP Utilization in a Managed Care System (Kaiser Permanente) 1200 ~ 1045 1000 . 800 600 . 400 200 0 835 657 0

  13. Environmental protection in actual circumstances of EPS recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilovic, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a brief summary of the state of environmental protection in the vicinity of Electric Power Industry of Serbia (EPS) power facilities, both when economy of FR Yugoslavia (FRY) was at an acceptable level and the current situation resulting from a drastic decline of economic power of country and EPS itself, from unfavourable political development from the past period, from the sanctions imposed by UN Security Council, from a prolonged isolation from modern courses worldwide as well as from bombing of facilities during NATO aggression against Yugoslavia. The paper is focused on the analysis of the possibilities of taking certain activities aimed at environmental protection under expected realistic circumstances of EPS recovery and its further development, in accordance with the overall economic recovery and development of the country, and to estimate the price of all environmental protection measures which, would otherwise have been realised in the course of the past period if sanctions of UN Security Council have not been imposed on FR Yugoslavia. (author)

  14. ep possibility for ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of adding an electron ring to ISABELLE is discussed in terms of cost, physics goals, count rate estimates, the detector requirements, and the possibility of producing intermediate bosons. The purpose of adding an electron ring to ISABELLE must be considered to be the study of e + p → e + x, e - p → νx, and e + p → anti νx. Other processes, such as W production, are less interesting for an ep ring than for a pp ring. However, there may be other new particles--such as leptonic quarks--that only turn up here. These processes are, however, exciting. In a 30 day run at L = 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 300 neutrino events are expected at q 2 > 5000 GeV 2 where the propagator is expected to be less than 1 / 4 . Thus the value of the mass in the propagator can be measured to 5%. The ep cross section would be measured over the momentum transfer range 1 2 2 ). This range is large enough that a logarithmic deviation from scaling can be distinguished easily from a power law approach to scaling

  15. The Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  16. Key developments of the EP1000 design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noviello, L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, a group of European utilities initiated, together with Westinghouse and its industrial partner GENESI (an Italian consortium including ANSALDO and FIAT), a program designated EPP (European Passive Plant) to evaluate Westinghouse passive nuclear plant technology for application in Europe. The Phase I of the European Passive Plant program involved the evaluation of the Westinghouse 600 MWe AP600 and 1000 MWe Simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR) designs against the European Utility Requirements (EUR), and when necessary, the investigation of possible modifications to achieve compliance with the EUR. In Phase 1 of the program, which has been completed in 1996, the following major tasks were accomplished: The impacts of the European Utility Requirements (EUR) on the Westinghouse nuclear island design were evaluated. A 1000 MWe passive plant reference design (EP1000) was developed which conforms to the EUR and is expected to be licensable in Europe. With respect to the NSSS and containment, the EP1000 reference design closely follows those of the Westinghouse SPWR design, while the AP600 design has been taken as the basis for the design of the auxiliary systems. Extensive design and testing efforts have been made for the AP600 and SPWR during the respective multi-year programs. While the results of these programs have been and will continue to be utilised, at the maximum extent, to minimise the work to be performed on the EP1000 design, the compliance with EUR is a key design requirement for the EP1000 The ultimate objective of Phase 2 of the program is to develop design details and perform supporting analyses to produce a Safety Case Report (SCR) for submittal to European Safety Authorities. The first part of Phase 2, hereafter referred as Phase 2A, started at the beginning of 1997 and will be completed at the end of 1998. Scope of this phase of the program is to develop the design modifications of important systems and structures so to comply with the

  17. INVESTIGATING THE Ep, i –Eiso CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Amati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the spectral peak photon energy, Ep, and the radiated energy or luminosity (i.e., the “Amati relation” and other correlations derived from it is one of the central and most debated topics in GRB astrophysics, with implications for physics and the geometry of prompt emission, the identification and understanding of various classes of GRBs (short/long, XRFs,sub-energetic, and GRB cosmology. Fermi is exceptionally suited to provide, also in conjunction with Swift observations, a significant step forward in this field of research. Indeed, one of the main goals of Fermi/GBM is to make accurate measurements of Ep, by exploiting its unprecedented broad energy band from ~8 keV to ~30MeV; in addition, for a small fraction of GRBs, the LAT can extend the spectral measurements up to the GeV energy range, thus allowing a reliable estimate of the bolometric radiated energy/luminosity. We provide a review, an update and a discussion of the impact of Fermi observations in the investigation, understanding and testing of the Ep,i –Eiso (“Amati” relation.

  18. Prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis: differential diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lima Lopes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a very rare condition; however, it may express as a typical benign prostatic hyperplasia or a simulating prostatic adenocarcinoma. This case report presents PCM mimicking prostatic adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this paper is to call the general physician's attention to this important differential diagnosis.

  19. EP4 as a Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Majumder

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, also called seven-transmembrane or heptahelical receptors are a superfamily of cell surface receptor proteins that bind to many extracellular ligands and transmit signals to an intracellular guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein. When a ligand binds, the receptor activates the attached G-protein by causing the exchange of Guanosine-5′-triphosphate (GTP for guanosine diphosphate (GDP. They play a major role in many physiological functions, as well as in the pathology of many diseases, including cancer progression and metastasis. Only a few GPCR members have been exploited as targets for developing drugs with therapeutic benefit in cancer. Present review briefly summarizes the signaling pathways utilized by the EP (prostaglandin E receptor family of GPCR, their physiological and pathological roles in carcinogenesis, with special emphasis on the roles of EP4 in breast cancer progression. We make a case for EP4 as a promising newer therapeutic target for treating breast cancer. We show that an aberrant over-expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2, which is an inflammation-associated enzyme, occurring in 40–50% of breast cancer patients leads to tumor progression and metastasis due to multiple cellular events resulting from an increased prostaglandin (PG E2 production in the tumor milieu. They include inactivation of host anti-tumor immune cells, such as Natural Killer (NK and T cells, increased immuno-suppressor function of tumor-associated macrophages, promotion of tumor cell migration, invasiveness and tumor-associated angiogenesis, due to upregulation of multiple angiogenic factors including Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF-A, increased lymphangiogenesis (due to upregulation of VEGF-C/D, and a stimulation of stem-like cell (SLC phenotype in cancer cells. All of these events were primarily mediated by activation of the Prostaglandin (PG E receptor EP4 on tumor or host cells. We show that

  20. Added economic value of limited area multi-EPS weather forecasting applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Deckmyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We compare the GLAMEPS system, a pan-European limited area ensemble prediction system, with ECMWF's EPS over Belgium for an extended period from March 2010 until the end of December 2010. In agreement with a previous study, we find GLAMEPS scores considerably better than ECMWF's EPS. To compute the economic value, we introduce a new relative economic value score for continuous forecasts. The added value of combining the GLAMEPS system with the LAEF system over Belgium is studied. We conclude that adding LAEF to GLAMEPS increases the value, although the increase is small compared to the improvement of GLAMEPS to ECMWF's EPS. As an added benefit we find that the combined GLAMEPS-LAEF multi-EPS system is more robust, that is, it is less vulnerable to the (accidental removal of one of its components.

  1. Phenotype-dependent effects of EpCAM expression on growth and invasion of human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martowicz, Agnieszka; Spizzo, Gilbert; Gastl, Guenther; Untergasser, Gerold

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer and stem cells and has emerged as an attractive target for immunotherapy of breast cancer patients. This study analyzes the effects of EpCAM on breast cancer cell lines with epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype. For this purpose, shRNA-mediated knockdown of EpCAM gene expression was performed in EpCAM high breast cancer cell lines with epithelial phenotype (MCF-7, T47D and SkBR3). Moreover, EpCAM low breast carcinoma cell lines with mesenchymal phenotype (MDA-MB-231, Hs578t) and inducible overexpression of EpCAM were used to study effects on proliferation, migration and in vivo growth. In comparison to non-specific silencing controls (n/s-crtl) knockdown of EpCAM (E#2) in EpCAM high cell lines resulted in reduced cell proliferation under serum-reduced culture conditions. Moreover, DNA synthesis under 3D culture conditions in collagen was significantly reduced. Xenografts of MCF-7 and T47D cells with knockdown of EpCAM formed smaller tumors that were less invasive. EpCAM low cell lines with tetracycline-inducible overexpression of EpCAM showed no increased cell proliferation or migration under serum-reduced growth conditions. MDA-MB-231 xenografts with EpCAM overexpression showed reduced invasion into host tissue and more infiltrates of chicken granulocytes. The role of EpCAM in breast cancer strongly depends on the epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype of tumor cells. Cancer cells with epithelial phenotype need EpCAM as a growth- and invasion-promoting factor, whereas tumor cells with a mesenchymal phenotype are independent of EpCAM in invasion processes and tumor progression. These findings might have clinical implications for EpCAM-based targeting strategies in patients with invasive breast cancer

  2. Exosomal miRNAs as biomarkers for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Pettersen Hessvik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that finely regulate gene expression in cells. Alterations in miRNA expression have been associated with development of cancer, and miRNAs are now being investigated as biomarkers for cancer as well as other diseases. Recently, miRNAs have been found outside cells in body fluids. Extracellular miRNAs exist in different forms - associated with Ago2 proteins, loaded into extracellular vesicles (exosomes, microvesicles or apoptotic bodies or into high density lipoprotein particles. These extracellular miRNAs are probably products of distinct cellular processes, and might therefore play different roles. However, their functions in vivo are currently unknown. In spite of this, they are considered as promising, noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic tools. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the Western world, but the currently used biomarker (prostate specific antigen has low specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are highly needed. In this review we will discuss possible biological functions of extracellular miRNAs, as well as the potential use of miRNAs from extracellular vesicles as biomarkers for prostate cancer.

  3. DAMPAK PENYAJIAN KEMBALI EPS DAN CFPS TERHADAP RETURN SAHAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imelda Sinaga

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem in this study is whether there is a positive influence of CFPS and EPS before and after restatement in giving positive impact on stock returns. The sample used in EPS before and after the restatement, while as many as 102 samples meanwhile CFPS before and after restatement using 82 sample companies listed on the Stock Exchange. Independent variables used in this study are the earnings per share and cash flow per share and the dependent variables used in this study is the stock return. Test equipment used in this study using multiple regression statistical model           The results of this study demonstrate that EPS before restatement did not impact significantly on the stock returns which indicates that investors have been aware that there is signal to improve the EPS before the restatement. EPS after restatement had no significant effect on return, this indicates that the new information is in accordance with the Market Efficiency hypothesis is that will make the market participants to react and take action to respond that new information. CFPS before and after restatement also had no significant effect on stock returns because investors do not use operating cash flow information as a basic for investment decisions. This can have implications on investors who use financial statements to make right decisions on the location of their assets in the companies that perform restatement as well for the company itself that financial report restatement can be made if it is seen as a form of commitment and sense of responsibility to the market to provide trustable information

  4. Diagnosis of prostate cancer via nanotechnological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang BJ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Benedict J Kang,1,2,* Minhong Jeun,1,2,* Gun Hyuk Jang,1,2 Sang Hoon Song,3 In Gab Jeong,3 Choung-Soo Kim,3 Peter C Searson,4 Kwan Hyi Lee1,2 1KIST Biomedical Research Institute, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST, 3Department of Urology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 4Institute for Nanobiotechnology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among the Caucasian adult males in Europe and the USA. Currently available diagnostic strategies for patients with prostate cancer are invasive and unpleasant and have poor accuracy. Many patients have been overly or underly treated resulting in a controversy regarding the reliability of current conventional diagnostic approaches. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research in the development of novel noninvasive prostate cancer diagnostics using nanotechnology coupled with suggested diagnostic strategies for their clinical implication.Keywords: bioassay, nanomaterial, nanodevice, PSA, non-PSA biomarker, bodily fluid

  5. About the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us About the Prostate Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors Prostate Cancer Prevention ... that connects to the anus. Ultrasound of the prostate Prostate Zones The prostate is divided into several ...

  6. Discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen, and some proposals to optimize prostate cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokudome S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shinkan Tokudome,1 Ryosuke Ando,2 Yoshiro Koda,3 1Department of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 2Department of Nephro-urology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, 3Department of Forensic Medicine and Human Genetics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan Abstract: The discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen (PSA have been much appreciated because PSA-based screening has saved millions of lives of prostate cancer (PCa patients. Historically speaking, Flocks et al first identified antigenic properties in prostate tissue in 1960. Then, Barnes et al detected immunologic characteristics in prostatic fluid in 1963. Hara et al characterized γ-semino-protein in semen in 1966, and it has been proven to be identical to PSA. Subsequently, Ablin et al independently reported the presence of precipitation antigens in the prostate in 1970. Wang et al purified the PSA in 1979, and Kuriyama et al first applied an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for PSA in 1980. However, the positive predictive value with a cutoff figure of 4.0 ng/mL appeared substantially low (~30%. There are overdiagnoses and overtreatments for latent/low-risk PCa. Controversies exist in the PCa mortality-reducing effects of PSA screening between the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC and the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO Cancer Screening Trial. For optimizing PCa screening, PSA-related items may require the following: 1 adjustment of the cutoff values according to age, as well as setting limits to age and screening intervals; 2 improving test performance using doubling time, density, and ratio of free: total PSA; and 3 fostering active surveillance for low-risk PCa with monitoring by PSA value. Other items needing consideration may include the following: 1 examinations of cell proliferation and cell cycle markers

  7. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes Jr., Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Christopher Mimun, L.; Maswadi, Saher M.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane. PMID:26450165

  8. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Caleb C; Barnes, Ronald A; Ibey, Bennett L; Beier, Hope T; Christopher Mimun, L; Maswadi, Saher M; Shadaram, Mehdi; Glickman, Randolph D

    2015-10-09

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, electrochemical interactions, thermoelastic expansion, and others. To date, very limited research has investigated non-electric phenomena occurring during nsEP exposures and their potential effect on cell nanoporation. Of primary interest is the production of acoustic shock waves during nsEP exposure, as it is known that acoustic shock waves can cause membrane poration (sonoporation). Based on these observations, our group characterized the acoustic pressure transients generated by nsEP and determined if such transients played any role in nanoporation. In this paper, we show that nsEP exposures, equivalent to those used in cellular studies, are capable of generating high-frequency (2.5 MHz), high-intensity (>13 kPa) pressure transients. Using confocal microscopy to measure cell uptake of YO-PRO®-1 (indicator of nanoporation of the plasma membrane) and changing the electrode geometry, we determined that acoustic waves alone are not responsible for poration of the membrane.

  9. Implications of HIV PrEP Trials Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Peter; Fletcher, Courtney V.; DeGruttola, Victor; McGowan, Ian; Becker, Stephen; Zwerski, Sheryl; Burns, David

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Six randomized clinical trials have been implemented to examine the efficacy of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and/or TDF/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) as preexposure prophylaxis for HIV-1 infection (PrEP). Although largely complementary, the six trials have many similar features. As the earliest results become available, an urgent question may arise regarding whether changes should be made in the conduct of the other trials. To consider this in advance, a Consultation on the Implications of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Trials Results sponsored by the Division of AIDS (DAIDS) of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) was held on January 29, 2010, at the Natcher Conference Center, NIH, Bethesda, MD. Participants included basic scientists, clinical researchers (including investigators performing the current PrEP trials), and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the agencies sponsoring the trials: the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the BMGF, and the U.S. NIH. We report here a summary of the presentations and highlights of salient discussion topics from this workshop. PMID:20969483

  10. Heavy quark physics in ep collisions at LEP+LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Barreiro, F.; Troconiz, J.F. de; Schuler, G.A.; Bij, J.J. van der

    1990-12-01

    We study electroweak production of heavy quarks - charm, beauty, and top - in deep inelastic electron-proton collisions at the proposed LEP+LHC collider at CERN. The assumed energy for the collisions is E e =50 GeV, E p =8000 GeV, providing an ep center of mass energy, √s≅1.26 TeV. We invoke the boson-gluon fusion model to estimate theoretical cross sections and distributions for the heavy quarks. Higher order QCD corrections are only approximately taken into account, by assuming a (normalization) K-factor of 2 for the charm and beauty quark production rates and incorporating the parton shower cascades. With these assumptions and the parameterization of Eichten et al. for the structure functions (EHLQ, set 1), we find the following cross sections: σ(ep→c+X)≅O(3 μb), σ(ep→b+X)≅O(40 nb), and σ(ep→t+X)≅4 pb for m t =120 GeV, decreasing to 0.5 pb for m t =250 GeV. These cross sections would provide O(6x10 9 ) charmed hadrons, O(8x10 7 ) beauty hadrons, and O(10 3 ) top hadrons, for an integrated ep luminosity of 1000 pb -1 . The heavy quark rates in ep collisions are considerably smaller than the corresponding rates in pp collisions at LHC, with √s=16 TeV. This gives a clear advantage to pp collisions for top searches. However, for the charmed and beauty quarks only a tiny fraction of the cross sections in p+p→Q+X can be triggered in comparison to the corresponding cross sections in e+p→Q+X, resulting in comparable number of measured heavy quark events in the ep and pp mode. We sketch the energy-momentum profile of heavy quark events in ep collisions and illustrate the kind of analyses that experiments at the LEP+LHC collider would undertake to quantitatively study heavy quark physics. In particular, prospects of measuring the particle-antiparticle mixing parameter x s =ΔM/Γ for the B s 0 -anti B s 0 meson system are evaluated, and search strategies for the top quark in ep collisions are presented. (orig.)

  11. Prostate-specific antigen velocity is not better than total prostate-specific antigen in predicting prostate biopsy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorday, William; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; de Koning, Lawrence; Naugler, Christopher T

    2015-12-01

    1.) Identify whether prostate-specific antigen velocity improves the ability to predict prostate biopsy diagnosis. 2.) Test whether there is an increase in the predictive capability of models when Gleason 7 prostate cancers are separated into a 3+4 and a 4+3 group. Calgary Laboratory Services' Clinical Laboratory Information System was searched for prostate biopsies reported between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Total prostate-specific antigen tests were recorded for each patient from January 1, 2007 to the most recent test before their recorded prostate biopsy. The data set was divided into the following three groups for comparison; benign, all prostate cancer and Gleason 7-10. The Gleason grade 7-10 group was further divided into 4+3 and 3+4 Gleason 7 prostate cancers. Prostate-specific antigen velocity was calculated using four different methods found in the literature. Receiver operator curves were used to assess operational characteristics of the tests. 4622 men between the ages of 40-89 with a prostate biopsy were included for analysis. Combining prostate-specific antigen velocity with total prostate-specific antigen (AUC=0.570-0.712) resulted in small non-statistically significant changes to the area under the curve compared to the area under the curve of total prostate-specific antigen alone (AUC=0.572-0.699). There were marked increases in the area under curves when 3+4 and 4+3 Gleason 7 cancers were separated. Prostate-specific antigen velocity does not add predictive value for prostate biopsy diagnosis. The clinical significance of the prostate specific antigen test can be improved by separating Gleason 7 prostate cancers into a 3+4 and 4+3 group. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. EpCAM as multi-tumour target for near-infrared fluorescence guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driel, P. B. A. A. van; Boonstra, M. C.; Prevoo, H. A. J. M.; Giessen, M. van de; Snoeks, T. J. A.; Tummers, Q. R. J. G.; Keereweer, S.; Cordfunke, R. A.; Fish, A.; Eendenburg, J. D. H. van; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Dijkstra, J.; Velde, C. J. H. van de; Kuppen, P. J. K.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; Löwik, C. W. G. M.; Sier, C. F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of resection margins during cancer surgery can be challenging, often resulting in incomplete tumour removal. Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) aims to aid the surgeon to visualize tumours and resection margins during surgery. FGS relies on a clinically applicable imaging system in combination with a specific tumour-targeting contrast agent. In this study EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) is evaluated as target for FGS in combination with the novel Artemis imaging system. The NIR fluorophore IRDye800CW was conjugated to the well-established EpCAM specific monoclonal antibody 323/A3 and an isotype IgG1 as control. The anti-EpCAM/800CW conjugate was stable in serum and showed preserved binding capacity as evaluated on EpCAM positive and negative cell lines, using flow cytometry and cell-based plate assays. Four clinically relevant orthotopic tumour models, i.e. colorectal cancer, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, and peritonitis carcinomatosa, were used to evaluate the performance of the anti-EpCAM agent with the clinically validated Artemis imaging system. The Pearl Impulse small animal imaging system was used as reference. The specificity of the NIRF signal was confirmed using bioluminescence imaging and green-fluorescent protein. All tumour types could clearly be delineated and resected 72 h after injection of the imaging agent. Using NIRF imaging millimetre sized tumour nodules were detected that were invisible for the naked eye. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the distribution and tumour specificity of the anti-EpCAM agent. This study shows the potential of an EpCAM specific NIR-fluorescent agent in combination with a clinically validated intraoperative imaging system to visualize various tumours during surgery

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment ... caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and ...

  15. Review article: Prostate cancer screening using prostate specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer among men in Nigeria and early detection is key to cure and survival but its screening through prostate specific antigen (PSA) has remain controversial in literature. Screening with prostate specific antigen (PSA) has led to more men diagnosed with prostate cancer than ...

  16. CERN's LHC is awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS), the Centro di Cultura Scientifica “Alessandro Volta” and Edison S.p.A. have awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize for outstanding contributions to physics to three CERN physicists.   The award was given to: • Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, • Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Computing, • Stephen Myers, CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology, for having led - building on decades of dedicated work by their predecessors - the culminating efforts in the direction, research and operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in many significant advances in high energy particle physics, in particular, the first evidence of a Higgs-like boson in July 2012. To learn more, check out e-EPS News.

  17. Ultrasonography and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechev, D.S.; Shcherbyina, O.V.; Yatsik, V.Yi.; Gladka, L.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the work is analysis of diagnostic possibilities of transrectal ultrasonography and PSA in differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. 142 patients have been investigated by transrectal ultrasonography. he transrectal ultrasonography and PSA are sensible tests in diagnosis of prostate cancer and in differential diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

  18. A Precision Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wallny, R.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive deep-inelastic neutral current e+p scattering cross section is reported in the region of four-momentum transfer squared, 12<=Q^2<=150 GeV^2, and Bjorken x, 2x10^-4<=x<=0.1. The results are based on data collected by the H1 Collaboration at the ep collider HERA at positron and proton beam energies of E_e=27.6 GeV and E_p=920 GeV, respectively. The data are combined with previously published data, taken at E_p=820 GeV. The accuracy of the combined measurement is typically in the range of 1.3-2%. A QCD analysis at next-to-leading order is performed to determine the parton distributions in the proton based on H1 data.

  19. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  20. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  1. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Białek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  2. Epidemiology of prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, John N.; Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Jeon, Jeonseong; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Liong, Men Long; Riley, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Prostatitis describes a combination of infectious diseases (acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis), chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic inflammation. Materials and methods We employed evidence-based methods to review the epidemiology of prostatitis syndromes. Results The prevalence of prostatitis symptoms could be compared in five studies surveying 10 617 men. Overall, 873 participants met various criteria for prostatitis, representing an overall rate of 8.2%, with prevalence ranging from 2.2 to 9.7%. A history of sexually transmitted diseases was associated with an increased risk for prostatitis symptoms. Men reporting a history of prostatitis symptoms had a substantially increased rate of benign prostatic hyperplasia, lower urinary tract symptoms and prostate cancer. In one study, the incidence of physician-diagnosed prostatitis was 4.9 cases per 1000 person-years. Two studies suggest that about one-third of men reporting prostatitis symptoms had resolution after 1 year. Patients with previous episodes and more severe symptoms are at higher risk for chronic pelvic pain. Discussion The prevalence of prostatitis symptoms is high, comparable to rates of ischamic heart disease and diabetes. Clinical evaluation appears necessary to verify that prostatitis is responsible for patients’ symptoms. Prostatitis symptoms may increase a man’s risk for benign prostate hypertrophy, lower urinary tract symptoms and prostate cancer. We need to define natural history and consequences of prostatitis, develop better algorithms for diagnosis and treatment, and develop strategies for prevention. PMID:18164907

  3. The USC-OSA-EPS section activities in optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymerich, María.; Cambronero-López, Ferran; Aragón, Ángel L.; Delgado, Tamara; Blanco, Manuel; Gómez Varela, Ana I.; Gargallo, Ana; Williamson, Sandra; Amorín, Adán.; Sánchez-García, Ángel; Bao-Varela, Carmen; Flores-Arias, M. Teresa

    2017-08-01

    The USC-OSA Student Chapter and USC-EPS Young Minds Section is a group financed by The Optical Society (OSA) and the European Physical Society (EPS). It is formed by PhD and degree students from the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC) and one supervisor of the Faculty of Physics. Its main goal is to promote and diffuse Optics in the society. For this purpose, the group carries out several activities in the academic and non-academic community. The group is also committed to the professional development of our members and motivates the exposition of our work into the scientific community.

  4. Merkel cell polyomavirus recruits MYCL to the EP400 complex to promote oncogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC frequently contains integrated copies of Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA that express a truncated form of Large T antigen (LT and an intact Small T antigen (ST. While LT binds RB and inactivates its tumor suppressor function, it is less clear how ST contributes to MCC tumorigenesis. Here we show that ST binds specifically to the MYC homolog MYCL (L-MYC and recruits it to the 15-component EP400 histone acetyltransferase and chromatin remodeling complex. We performed a large-scale immunoprecipitation for ST and identified co-precipitating proteins by mass spectrometry. In addition to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A subunits, we identified MYCL and its heterodimeric partner MAX plus the EP400 complex. Immunoprecipitation for MAX and EP400 complex components confirmed their association with ST. We determined that the ST-MYCL-EP400 complex binds together to specific gene promoters and activates their expression by integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq and RNA-seq. MYCL and EP400 were required for maintenance of cell viability and cooperated with ST to promote gene expression in MCC cell lines. A genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen confirmed the requirement for MYCL and EP400 in MCPyV-positive MCC cell lines. We demonstrate that ST can activate gene expression in a EP400 and MYCL dependent manner and this activity contributes to cellular transformation and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

  5. Merkel cell polyomavirus recruits MYCL to the EP400 complex to promote oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jingwei; Park, Donglim Esther; Berrios, Christian; White, Elizabeth A; Arora, Reety; Yoon, Rosa; Branigan, Timothy; Xiao, Tengfei; Westerling, Thomas; Federation, Alexander; Zeid, Rhamy; Strober, Benjamin; Swanson, Selene K; Florens, Laurence; Bradner, James E; Brown, Myles; Howley, Peter M; Padi, Megha; Washburn, Michael P; DeCaprio, James A

    2017-10-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) frequently contains integrated copies of Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA that express a truncated form of Large T antigen (LT) and an intact Small T antigen (ST). While LT binds RB and inactivates its tumor suppressor function, it is less clear how ST contributes to MCC tumorigenesis. Here we show that ST binds specifically to the MYC homolog MYCL (L-MYC) and recruits it to the 15-component EP400 histone acetyltransferase and chromatin remodeling complex. We performed a large-scale immunoprecipitation for ST and identified co-precipitating proteins by mass spectrometry. In addition to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) subunits, we identified MYCL and its heterodimeric partner MAX plus the EP400 complex. Immunoprecipitation for MAX and EP400 complex components confirmed their association with ST. We determined that the ST-MYCL-EP400 complex binds together to specific gene promoters and activates their expression by integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) and RNA-seq. MYCL and EP400 were required for maintenance of cell viability and cooperated with ST to promote gene expression in MCC cell lines. A genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen confirmed the requirement for MYCL and EP400 in MCPyV-positive MCC cell lines. We demonstrate that ST can activate gene expression in a EP400 and MYCL dependent manner and this activity contributes to cellular transformation and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

  6. Nonspecific Presentation of a Multiloculated Prostatic Abscess After Transurethral Prostatic Biopsy for Elevated Prostate-specific Antigen Level

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, Nilay M.; Lin, Joseph; Schaeffer, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Prostate postbiopsy infectious complications typically present in the form of prostatitis and uncommonly urosepsis. Prostatic abscesses are generally found after multiple bouts of prostatitis and are associated with a clinically septic picture requiring intensive care unit admission and resuscitation. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with prostatic abscess in the setting of nonspecific urinary symptoms after transrectal ultrasonography–guided prostate biopsy. At 4-month f...

  7. The Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis-Stigma Paradox: Learning from Canada's First Wave of PrEP Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Daniel; Jollimore, Jody; MacPherson, Paul; Strang, Matthew J P; Tan, Darrell H S

    2018-01-01

    With the emergence of daily oral tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use in Canada, questions have emerged concerning the impacts of this HIV prevention tool on gay men's social and sexual lives. We conducted small focus groups and individual qualitative interviews with 16 gay men in Toronto who were part of the 'first wave' of Canadian PrEP users. Participants were on PrEP for at least one year as part of a demonstration project (November 2014-June 2016). These participants accessed PrEP before regulatory approval by Health Canada in February 2016. The mean age of participants was 37.6 years (SD 11.02); 94% completed secondary education, and 69% were white. Sex-stigma emerged as a complex theme in men's accounts of PrEP use across three overlapping domains: (1) PrEP-related stigma, including discussions of concealment and stigma from friends, family, and sexual partners, (2) PrEP as a perceived tool for combating HIV-related stigma, where some men said that they no longer discussed HIV status with sexual partners, and (3) PrEP as illuminating structural stigma, where it was attributed to unmasking stigma related to sex and sexuality. For some participants, PrEP has allowed for liberating sex and a self-described return to normalcy-normal, exciting, pleasurable sex that was no longer reliant on condom use. Paradoxically, some men said that PrEP use both led them to experience stigmatizing reactions within their social and sexual networks, while also helping to remove stigma, shame, and fear related to HIV, sexuality, and sex with gay men living with HIV.

  8. The Vasopressin Type-2 Receptor and Prostaglandin Receptors EP2 and EP4 can Increase Aquaporin-2 Plasma Membrane Targeting Through a cAMP Independent Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Moeller, Hanne Bjerregaard; Assentoft, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Apical membrane targeting of the collecting duct water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is essential for body water balance. As this event is regulated by Gs coupled 7-transmembrane receptors such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) and the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4, it is believed to be c...

  9. Racial differences in the relationship between clinical prostatitis, presence of inflammation in benign prostate and subsequent risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, B A; Kryvenko, O N; Wang, Y; Jankowski, M; Trudeau, S; Chitale, D A; Gupta, N S; Rundle, A; Tang, D

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies, primarily done in white men, suggest that a history of clinically-diagnosed prostatitis increases prostate cancer risk, but that histological prostate inflammation decreases risk. The relationship between a clinical history of prostatitis and histologic inflammation in terms of how these two manifestations of prostatic inflammation jointly contribute to prostate cancer risk and whether racial differences exist in this relationship is uncertain. Using a nested design within a cohort of men with benign prostate tissue specimens, we analyzed the data on both clinically-diagnosed prostatitis (NIH categories I-III) and histological inflammation in 574 prostate cancer case-control pairs (345 white, 229 African American). Clinical prostatitis was not associated with increased prostate cancer risk in the full sample, but showed a suggestive inverse association with prostate cancer in African Americans (odds ratio (OR)=0.47; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.27-0.81). In whites, clinical prostatitis increased risk by 40%, but was only associated with a significant increased prostate cancer risk in the absence of evidence of histological inflammation (OR=3.56; 95% CI=1.15-10.99). Moreover, PSA velocity (P=0.008) and frequency of PSA testing (P=0.003) were significant modifiers of risk. Clinical prostatitis increased risk of prostate cancer almost three-fold (OR=2.97; 95% CI=1.40-6.30) in white men with low PSA velocity and about twofold in white men with more frequent PSA testing (OR=1.91; 95% CI=1.09-3.35). In our cohort of men with benign prostate specimens, race, and histological inflammation were important cofactors in the relationship between clinical prostatitis and prostate cancer. Clinical prostatitis was associated with a slightly decreased risk for prostate cancer in African American men. In white men, the relationship between clinical prostatitis and prostate cancer risk was modified by histological prostatic inflammation, PSA velocity, and

  10. Proteomic profiling of exosomes leads to the identification of novel biomarkers for prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Duijvesz (Diederick); K.E. Burnum-Johnson (Kristin); M.A. Gritsenko (Marina); A.M. Hoogland (Marije); M.S. Vredenbregt-van den Berg (Mirella); R. Willemsen (Rob); T.M. Luider (Theo); L. Paša-Tolić (Ljiljana); G.W. Jenster (Guido)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Current markers for prostate cancer, such as PSA lack specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are needed. Unfortunately, the complexity of body fluids often hampers biomarker discovery. An attractive alternative approach is the isolation of small vesicles, i.e. exosomes,

  11. The EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation (EPS-SG) micro-wave imaging (MWI) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojkov, B. R.; Accadia, C.; Klaes, D.; Canestri, A.; Cohen, M.

    2017-12-01

    The EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) will be followed by a second generation system called EPS-SG. This new family of missions will contribute to the Joint Polar System being jointly set up with NOAA in the timeframe 2020-2040. These satellites will fly, like Metop (EPS), in a sun synchronous, low earth orbit at 830 km altitude and 09:30 local time descending node, providing observations over the full globe with revisit times of 12 hours. EPS-SG consists of two different satellites configurations, the EPS-SGa series dedicated to IR and MW sounding, and the EPS-SGb series dedicated to microwave imaging and scatterometry. The EPS-SG family will consist of three successive launches of each satellite-type. The Microwave Imager (MWI) will be hosted on Metop-SGb series of satellites, with the primary objective of supporting Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) at regional and global scales. Other applications will be observation of surface parameters such as sea ice concentration and hydrology applications. The 18 MWI instrument frequencies range from 18.7 GHz to 183 GHz. All MWI channels up to 89 GHz will measure V- and H polarizations. The MWI was also designed to provide continuity of measurements for select heritage microwave imager channels (e.g. SSM/I, AMSR-E). The additional sounding channels such as the 50-55 and 118 GHz bands will provide additional cloud and precipitation information over sea and land. This combination of channels was successfully tested on the NPOESS Aircraft Sounder Testbed - Microwave Sounder (NAST-M) airborne radiometer, and it is the first time that will be implemented in a conical scanning configuration in a single instrument. An overview of the EPS-SG programme and the MWI instrument will be presented.

  12. The utiquity and many roles of exopolymers (EPS in aquatic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Wotton

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Exopolymers (EPS are produced by unicellular and multicellular organisms. They consist largely of polysaccharides that hydrate rapidly on contact with water and link to form gels. EPS have many uses: in attachment; in locomotion on substrata; as a protection against predators, pathogens and changes in physico-chemical conditions; as a means of overcoming the threat of desiccation; in preventing abrasion; and in feeding. When free of organisms, some EPS form loosely associated polymer gels that are important in the development of organic matter aggregates. These aggregates, together with mucus-bound faecal pellets, play an essential role in nutrient cycling, and in the metabolism of ecosystems.;

  13. Prostaglandin receptor EP3 regulates cell proliferation and migration with impact on survival of endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junyan; Trillsch, Fabian; Mayr, Doris; Kuhn, Christina; Rahmeh, Martina; Hofmann, Simone; Vogel, Marianne; Mahner, Sven; Jeschke, Udo; von Schönfeldt, Viktoria

    2018-01-02

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor 3 (EP3) regulates tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in numerous cancers. The role of EP3 as a prognostic biomarker in endometrial cancer remains unclear. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic significance of EP3 expression in endometrial cancer. We analyzed the EP3 expression of 140 endometrial carcinoma patients by immunohistochemistry. RL95-2 endometrial cancer cell line was chosen from four endometrial cancer cell lines (RL95-2, Ishikawa, HEC-1-A, and HEC-1-B) according to EP3 expression level. Treated with PGE2 and EP3 antagonist, RL95-2 cells were investigated by MTT, BrdU, and wound healing assay for functional assessment of EP3. EP3 staining differed significantly according to WHO tumor grading in both whole cohort (p = 0.01) and the subgroup of endometrioid carcinoma (p = 0.01). Patients with high EP3 expression in their respective tumors had impaired progression-free survival as well as overall survival in both cohorts above. EP3 expression in the overall cohort was identified as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free survival (HR 1.014, 95%CI 1.003-1.024, p = 0.01) when adjusted for age, stage, grading, and recurrence. Treatment with EP3 antagonists induced upregulation of estrogen receptor β and decreased activity of Ras and led to attenuated proliferation and migration of RL95-2 cells. EP3 seems to play a crucial role in endometrial cancer progression. In the context of limited systemic treatment options for endometrial cancer, this explorative analysis identifies EP3 as a potential target for diagnostic workup and therapy.

  14. Distinct roles of Eps8 in the maturation of cochlear and vestibular hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavazzani, Elisa; Spaiardi, Paolo; Zampini, Valeria; Contini, Donatella; Manca, Marco; Russo, Giancarlo; Prigioni, Ivo; Marcotti, Walter; Masetto, Sergio

    2016-07-22

    Several genetic mutations affecting the development and function of mammalian hair cells have been shown to cause deafness but not vestibular defects, most likely because vestibular deficits are sometimes centrally compensated. The study of hair cell physiology is thus a powerful direct approach to ascertain the functional status of the vestibular end organs. Deletion of Epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 (Eps8), a gene involved in actin remodeling, has been shown to cause deafness in mice. While both inner and outer hair cells from Eps8 knockout (KO) mice showed abnormally short stereocilia, inner hair cells (IHCs) also failed to acquire mature-type ion channels. Despite the fact that Eps8 is also expressed in vestibular hair cells, Eps8 KO mice show no vestibular deficits. In the present study we have investigated the properties of vestibular Type I and Type II hair cells in Eps8-KO mice and compared them to those of cochlear IHCs. In the absence of Eps8, vestibular hair cells show normally long kinocilia, significantly shorter stereocilia and a normal pattern of basolateral voltage-dependent ion channels. We have also found that while vestibular hair cells from Eps8 KO mice show normal voltage responses to injected sinusoidal currents, which were used to mimic the mechanoelectrical transducer current, IHCs lose their ability to synchronize their responses to the stimulus. We conclude that the absence of Eps8 produces a weaker phenotype in vestibular hair cells compared to cochlear IHCs, since it affects the hair bundle morphology but not the basolateral membrane currents. This difference is likely to explain the absence of obvious vestibular dysfunction in Eps8 KO mice. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Should Earnings per Share (EPS) Be Taught as a Means of Comparing Intercompany Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Charles E.; Clark, Stanley J.; Smith, W. Robert

    2007-01-01

    Accounting standards state that the purpose of presenting earnings per share (EPS) is to provide financial statement users with information on the performance of a single entity. Yet, several textbook authors go further to state that EPS can be used to make comparisons among firms. In this article, the authors show that although EPS comparisons…

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of urinary prostate protein glycosylation profiling in prostatitis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermassen, Tijl; Van Praet, Charles; Poelaert, Filip; Lumen, Nicolaas; Decaestecker, Karel; Hoebeke, Piet; Van Belle, Simon; Rottey, Sylvie; Delanghe, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Although prostatitis is a common male urinary tract infection, clinical diagnosis of prostatitis is difficult. The developmental mechanism of prostatitis is not yet unraveled which led to the elaboration of various biomarkers. As changes in asparagine-linked-(N-)-glycosylation were observed between healthy volunteers (HV), patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer patients, a difference could exist in biochemical parameters and urinary N-glycosylation between HV and prostatitis patients. We therefore investigated if prostatic protein glycosylation could improve the diagnosis of prostatitis. Differences in serum and urine biochemical markers and in total urine N-glycosylation profile of prostatic proteins were determined between HV (N=66) and prostatitis patients (N=36). Additionally, diagnostic accuracy of significant biochemical markers and changes in N-glycosylation was assessed. Urinary white blood cell (WBC) count enabled discrimination of HV from prostatitis patients (Pprostatitis patients from HV (Pprostatitis patients compared to HV (Pprostatitis. Further research is required to unravel the developmental course of prostatic inflammation.

  17. Optimization of Invasion-Specific Effects of Betulin Derivatives on Prostate Cancer Cells through Lead Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Härmä

    Full Text Available The anti-invasive and anti-proliferative effects of betulins and abietane derivatives was systematically tested using an organotypic model system of advanced, castration-resistant prostate cancers. A preliminary screen of the initial set of 93 compounds was performed in two-dimensional (2D growth conditions using non-transformed prostate epithelial cells (EP156T, an androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP, and the castration-resistant, highly invasive cell line PC-3. The 25 most promising compounds were all betulin derivatives. These were selected for a focused secondary screen in three-dimensional (3D growth conditions, with the goal to identify the most effective and specific anti-invasive compounds. Additional sensitivity and cytotoxicity tests were then performed using an extended cell line panel. The effects of these compounds on cell cycle progression, mitosis, proliferation and unspecific cytotoxicity, versus their ability to specifically interfere with cell motility and tumor cell invasion was addressed. To identify potential mechanisms of action and likely compound targets, multiplex profiling of compound effects on a panel of 43 human protein kinases was performed. These target de-convolution studies, combined with the phenotypic analyses of multicellular organoids in 3D models, revealed specific inhibition of AKT signaling linked to effects on the organization of the actin cytoskeleton as the most likely driver of altered cell morphology and motility.

  18. e-EPS News: Consultation on European Research, Innovation & Gender

    CERN Document Server

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing an article by the e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a new collaboration between the two publications.   EPS members have been invited to take part in a Public Consultation on the Future of Gender and Innovation in Europe. The consultation, which is intended to complement the EC Green Paper ‘From Challenges to Opportunities: Towards a Common Strategic Framework for EU Research and Innovation Funding’, will be published and discussed during the first European Gender Summit in Brussels on 8-9 November this year. It is hoped that the consultation – which is being coordinated by genSET and the organisers of the European Gender Summit – will create a better understanding of how Europe might benefit from a more effective mainstreaming of the gender dimension in research, innovation and scientific systems. Responses from the co...

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis based Ep-ICD subcellular localization index (ESLI) is a novel marker for metastatic papillary thyroid microcarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunavisarut, Tada; Kak, Ipshita; MacMillan, Christina; Ralhan, Ranju; Walfish, Paul G

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is among the fastest growing malignancies; almost fifty-percent of these rapidly increasing incidence tumors are less than or equal to 1cm in size, termed papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC). The management of PTMC remains a controversy due to differing natural history of these patients. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is comprised of an extracellular domain (EpEx), a single transmembrane domain and an intracellular domain (Ep-ICD). Our group reported nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor prognosis in thyroid cancer (Ralhan et al., BMC Cancer 2010,10:331). Here in, we hypothesized nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD and loss of membranous EpEx may aid in distinguishing metastatic from non-metastatic PTMC, which is an important current clinical challenge. To test our hypothesis, Ep-ICD and EpEx expression levels were analyzed in PTMC and the staining was correlated with metastatic potential of these carcinomas. Thirty-six PTMC patients (tumor size 0.5 - 1cm; metastatic 8 cases and non-metastatic 28 cases) who underwent total thyroidectomy were selected. The metastatic group consisted of patients who developed lymph node or distant metastasis at diagnosis or during follow up. The patients’ tissues were stained for Ep-ICD and EpEx using domain specific antibodies by immunohistochemistry and evaluated. PTMC patients with metastasis had higher scores for nuclear and cytoplasmic Ep-ICD immunostaining than the patients without metastasis (1.96 ± 0.86 vs. 1.22 ± 0.45; p = 0.007 and 5.37 ± 0.33 vs. 4.72 ± 1.07; p = 0.016, respectively). Concomitantly, the former had lower scores for membrane EpEx than the non-metastatic group (4.64 ± 1.08 vs. 5.64 ± 1.51; p = 0.026). An index of aggressiveness, Ep-ICD subcellular localization index (ESLI), was defined as sum of the IHC scores for accumulation of nuclear and cytoplasmic Ep-ICD and loss of membranous EpEx; ESLI = [Ep − ICD nuc + Ep − ICD cyt + loss of membranous EpEx]. Notably

  20. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen...... therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological...... studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH...

  1. Evaluating the impact of prioritization of antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jason; Myers, Julie E.; Nucifora, Kimberly A.; Mensah, Nana; Toohey, Christopher; Khademi, Amin; Cutler, Blayne; Braithwaite, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the value and effectiveness of different prioritization strategies of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in New York City (NYC). Design Mathematical modeling utilized as clinical trial is not feasible. Methods Using a model accounting for both sexual and parenteral transmission of HIV we compare different prioritization strategies (PPS) for PrEP to two scenarios—no PrEP and PrEP for all susceptible at-risk individuals. The PPS included PrEP for all MSM, only high-risk MSM, high-risk heterosexuals, and injection drug users, and all combinations of these four strategies. Outcomes included HIV infections averted, and incremental cost effectiveness (per-infection averted) ratios. Initial assumptions regarding PrEP included a 44% reduction in HIV transmission, 50% uptake in the prioritized population and an annual cost per person of $9,762. Sensitivity analyses on key parameters were conducted. Results Prioritization to all MSM results in a 19% reduction in new HIV infections. Compared to PrEP for all persons at-risk this PPS retains 79% of the preventative effect at 15% of the total cost. PrEP prioritized to only high-risk MSM results in a reduction in new HIV infections of 15%. This PPS retains 60% of the preventative effect at 6% of the total cost. There are diminishing returns when PrEP utilization is expanded beyond this group. Conclusions PrEP implementation is relatively cost-inefficient under our initial assumptions. Our results suggest that PrEP should first be promoted among MSM who are at particularly high-risk of HIV acquisition. Further expansion beyond this group may be cost-effective, but is unlikely to be cost-saving. PMID:25493594

  2. Association between asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV and prostatic calcification in patients with obstructive benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Paul F; Seklehner, Stephan; Brustmann, Herman; Riedl, Claus R; Lusuardi, Lukas

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of prostatic calcification and prostatitis NIH category IV in patients with obstructive BPH. Ninety-six patients with obstructive BPH who had undergone transurethral electroresection of the prostate gland were evaluated. In accordance with a preoperative transrectal ultrasound examination, patients were divided into one group with prostatic calcification (N.=31) and one without (N.=65). Prostatitis NIH category IV was classified according to the grading system by Irani. Correlations between the incidence of prostatic calcification, histological prostatitis, PSA, uric acid, cholesterol, triglycerides, CRP, IPSS, IIEF-25, and NIC-CPSI were analyzed. A stone analysis of prostatic calcification was performed using X-ray powder diffraction. Sixty-nine (71.9%) patients had NIH category IV prostatitis, accounting for 83.9% of those with prostatic calcification versus 66.1% of those without (Pprostatic calcification and the severity of inflammation (Pprostatic calcifications were elevated levels of uric acid. Such patients were 1.4times more likely of having calcifications in the prostate gland (OR=1.4, Pprostatic calcification. These were significantly more common in patients with NIH category IV prostatitis.

  3. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  4. PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN A Clue for the Prostatic Origin of Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    MANABE, Toshiaki; TSUKAYAMA, Chotatsu; YAMAGUCHI, Masae; YAMASHITA, Koshi

    1983-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen is a recently purified glycoprotein which is present only in the prostatic gland. In order to confirm the usefulness of this protein in isolating prostatic carcinomas from socalled metastatic carcinomas of unknown primary site, we immunohistochemically studied 19 non-neoplastic prostatic tissue, 18 primary carcinomas of the prostate, and 32 non-prostatic adenocarcinomas. From our study, we concluded that PSA is highly specific for the prostatic carcinomas. The ab...

  5. A novel biosorbent for dye removal: Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiqiang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment of Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Laboratoire de Sciences Analytiques (UMR CNRS 5180), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Xia Siqing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment of Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: siqingxia@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Wang Xuejiang; Yang Aming; Xu Bin; Chen Ling; Zhu Zhiliang; Zhao Jianfu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment of Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Leonard, Didier [Laboratoire de Sciences Analytiques (UMR CNRS 5180), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2009-04-15

    This paper deals with the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 used as a novel biosorbent to remove dye from aqueous solution in batch systems. As a widely used and hazardous dye, basic blue 54 (BB54) was chosen as the model dye to examine the adsorption performance of the EPS. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature on the sorption of BB54 to the EPS were examined. At various initial dye concentrations (50-400 mg/L), the batch sorption equilibrium can be obtained in only 5 min. Kinetic studies suggested that the sorption followed the internal transport mechanism. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum BB54 uptake of 2.005 g/g was obtained. Chemical analysis of the EPS indicated the presence of protein (30.9%, w/w) and acid polysaccharide (63.1%, w/w). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the EPS with a crystal-linear structure was whole enwrapped by adsorbed dye molecules. FTIR spectrum result revealed the presence of adsorbing groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups in the EPS. High-molecular weight of the EPS with more binding-sites and stronger van der Waals forces together with its specific construct leads to the excellent performance of dye adsorption. The EPS shows potential board application as a biosorbent for both environmental protection and dye recovery.

  6. A novel biosorbent for dye removal: Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiqiang; Xia Siqing; Wang Xuejiang; Yang Aming; Xu Bin; Chen Ling; Zhu Zhiliang; Zhao Jianfu; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Leonard, Didier

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of Proteus mirabilis TJ-1 used as a novel biosorbent to remove dye from aqueous solution in batch systems. As a widely used and hazardous dye, basic blue 54 (BB54) was chosen as the model dye to examine the adsorption performance of the EPS. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature on the sorption of BB54 to the EPS were examined. At various initial dye concentrations (50-400 mg/L), the batch sorption equilibrium can be obtained in only 5 min. Kinetic studies suggested that the sorption followed the internal transport mechanism. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum BB54 uptake of 2.005 g/g was obtained. Chemical analysis of the EPS indicated the presence of protein (30.9%, w/w) and acid polysaccharide (63.1%, w/w). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the EPS with a crystal-linear structure was whole enwrapped by adsorbed dye molecules. FTIR spectrum result revealed the presence of adsorbing groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl and amino groups in the EPS. High-molecular weight of the EPS with more binding-sites and stronger van der Waals forces together with its specific construct leads to the excellent performance of dye adsorption. The EPS shows potential board application as a biosorbent for both environmental protection and dye recovery

  7. Who Will Use Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Why?: Understanding PrEP Awareness and Acceptability amongst Men Who Have Sex with Men in the UK ? A Mixed Methods Study

    OpenAIRE

    Frankis, Jamie; Young, Ingrid; Flowers, Paul; McDaid, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background:\\ud Recent clinical trials suggest that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) may reduce HIV transmission by up to 86% for men who have sex with men (MSM), whilst relatively high levels of PrEP acceptability have been reported to date. This study examines PrEP awareness amongst sub-groups of MSM communities and acceptability amongst MSM in a low prevalence region (Scotland, UK), using a mixed methods design.\\ud Methods:\\ud Quantitative surveys of n = 690 MSM recruited online via social a...

  8. KTP laser selective vaporization of the prostate in the management of urinary retention due to BPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeman, M. W.; Nseyo, Unyime O.

    2003-06-01

    High-powered photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) is a relatively new addition in the armamentarium against bladder outlet obstruction due to BPH. With BPH, the prostate undergoes stromal and epithelial hyperplasia, particularly in the transitional zone, mediated by dihydrotestosterone (DHT). This periurethral enlargement can compress the prostatic urethra leading to bladder outlet obstruction and eventually urinary retention. Treatment of uncomplicated symptomatic BPH has evolved from the standard transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) to multiple medical therapies and the putative minimally invasive surgical procedures. These include microwave ablation, needle ablation, balloon dilation, stents, as well as fluid based thermo-therapy, ultrasound therapy and cryotherapy. Different forms of lasers have been applied to treat BPH with variable short and long term benefits of urinary symptoms. However, the controversy remains about each laser regarding its technical applicability and efficacy.

  9. Singapore Urological Association Clinical Guidelines for Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The first clinical guidelines for male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were published in 2005. An update is urgently needed in view of BPH being recognised as one of ten chronic illnesses by the Ministry of Health, Singapore. This review summarises the definition of BPH and the epidemiology of male LUTS/BPH in Singapore. BPH can be phenotyped with noninvasive transabdominal ultrasonography, according to intravesical prostatic protrusion and prostate volume, and classified according to severity (staging) for individualised treatment. At the initial evaluation, the majority of patients (59%) can be managed with fluid adjustment, exercise and diet; 32% with medications, using alpha blockers and/or 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for prostates weighing more than 30 g; and 9% with surgical intervention for more advanced disease. The 2015 guidelines comprise updated evidence that will help family medicine practitioners and specialists manage this common ailment more cost-effectively. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  10. Potent and Selective Peptidyl Boronic Acid Inhibitors of the Serine Protease Prostate-Specific Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Singh, Pratap; Isaacs, John T.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer cells produce high (microgram to milligram/milliliter) levels of the serine protease Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA). PSA is enzymatically active in the extracellular fluid surrounding prostate cancers but is found at 1,000- to 10,000-fold lower concentrations in the circulation, where it is inactivated due to binding to abundant serum protease inhibitors. The exclusive presence of high levels of active PSA within prostate cancer sites makes PSA an attractive candidate for targeted imaging and therapeutics. A synthetic approach based on a peptide substrate identified first peptide aldehyde and then boronic acid inhibitors of PSA. The best of these had the sequence Cbz-Ser-Ser-Lys-Leu-(boro)Leu, with a Ki for PSA of 65 nM. The inhibitor had a 60-fold higher Ki for chymotrypsin. A validated model of PSA’s catalytic site confirmed the critical interactions between the inhibitor and residues within the PSA enzyme. PMID:18635003

  11. Comparison of prostate cancer gene 3 score, prostate health index and percentage free prostate-specific antigen for differentiating histological inflammation from prostate cancer and other non-neoplastic alterations of the prostate at initial biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Stefano; Passera, Roberto; Bollito, Enrico; Manfredi, Matteo; Scarpa, Roberto Mario; Sottile, Antonino; Randone, Donato Franco; Porpiglia, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    To determine if prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) score, Prostate Health Index (PHI), and percent free prostate-specific antigen (%fPSA) may be used to differentiate prostatitis from prostate cancer (PCa), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) in patients with elevated PSA and negative digital rectal examination (DRE). in the present prospective study, 274 patients, undergoing PCA3 score, PHI and %fPSA assessments before initial biopsy, were enrolled. Three multivariate logistic regression models were used to test PCA3 score, PHI and %fPSA as risk factors for prostatitis vs. PCa, vs. BPH, and vs. HG-PIN. All the analyses were performed for the whole patient cohort and for the 'gray zone' of PSA (4-10 ng/ml) cohort (188 individuals). The determinants for prostatitis vs. PCa were PCA3 score, PHI and %fPSA (Odds Ratio [OR]=0.97, 0.96 and 0.94, respectively). Unit increase of PHI was the only risk factor for prostatitis vs. BPH (OR=1.06), and unit increase of PCA3 score for HG-PIN vs. prostatitis (OR=0.98). In the 'gray zone' PSA cohort, the determinants for prostatitis vs. PCa were PCA3 score, PHI and %fPSA (OR=0.96, 0.94 and 0.92, respectively), PCA3 score and PHI for prostatitis vs. BPH (OR=0.96 and 1.08, respectively), and PCA3 score for prostatitis vs. HG-PIN (OR=0.97). The clinical benefit of using PCA3 score and PHI to estimate prostatitis vs. PCa was comparable; even %fPSA had good diagnostic performance, being a faster and cheaper marker. PHI was the only determinant for prostatitis vs. BPH, while PCA3 score for prostatitis vs. HG-PIN. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1EP7B-1FAAA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1EP7B-1FAAA 1EP7 1FAA B A -------------GGSVIVIDSKAAWDAQLAKGKEEHKP...IVVDFTATWCGPCKMIAPLFETLSNDYAGKVIFLKVD-VDAVAAVAEAAGITAMPTFHVYKDGVKADDLVGASQDKLKALVAKHAAA LELALGT...AA A 1FAAA FLKLDCNQENK A 1FAAA VTEVN-KDTFW

  13. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lais Pêgas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tufting enteropathy (TE, also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED, is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epithelial diseases, or to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. The authors report a case of a Brazilian child with TE associated with c.556-14A>G mutation in the EpCAM gene (NM_002354.2.

  14. Comparison of telomerase activity in prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Mahjoub

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase enzyme that synthesizes telomeric DNA on chromosome ends. The enzyme is important for the immortalization of cancer cells because it maintains the telomeres. METHODS: Telomerase activity (TA was measured by fluorescence-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (FTRAP assay in prostate carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. RESULTS: TA was present in 91.4% of 70 prostate cancers, 68.8% of 16 prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, 43.3% of 30 BPH*, 21.4% of 14 atrophy and 20% of 15 normal samples adjacent to tumor. There was not any significant correlation between TA, histopathological tumor stage or gleason score. In contrast to high TA in the BPH* tissue from the cancer-bearing gland, only 6.3% of 32 BPH specimens from patients only diagnosed with BPH were telomerase activity-positive. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that TA is present in most prostate cancers. The high rate of TA in tissue adjacent to tumor may be attributed either to early molecular alteration of cancer that was histologically unapparent, or to the presence of occult cancer cells. Our findings suggest that the re-expression of telomerase activity could be one step in the transformation of BPH to PIN. KEY WORDS: Telomerase activity, prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  15. Proneoplastic effects of PGE2 mediated by EP4 receptor in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doherty, Glen A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the major product of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to assess PGE2 cell surface receptors (EP 1-4) to examine the mechanisms by which PGE2 regulates tumour progression. METHODS: Gene expression studies were performed by quantitative RT-PCR. Cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry with cell proliferation quantified by BrdU incorporation measured by enzyme immunoassay. Immunohistochemistry was employed for expression studies on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumour tissue. RESULTS: EP4 was the most abundant subtype of PGE2 receptor in HT-29 and HCA7 cells (which show COX-2 dependent PGE2 generation) and was consistently the most abundant transcript in human colorectal tumours (n = 8) by qRT-PCR (ANOVA, p = 0.01). G0\\/G1 cell cycle arrest was observed in HT-29 cells treated with SC-236 5 microM (selective COX-2 inhibitor) for 24 hours (p = 0.02), an effect abrogated by co-incubation with PGE2 (1 microM). G0\\/G1 arrest was also seen with a specific EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4A, L-161982) (p = 0.01). Treatment of HT-29 cells with either SC-236 or EP4A caused reduction in intracellular cAMP (ANOVA, p = 0.01). Early induction in p21WAF1\\/CIP1 expression (by qRT-PCR) was seen with EP4A treatment (mean fold increase 4.4, p = 0.04) while other genes remained unchanged. Similar induction in p21WAF1\\/CIP1 was also seen with PD153025 (1 microM), an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suggesting EGFR transactivation by EP4 as a potential mechanism. Additive inhibition of HCA7 proliferation was observed with the combination of SC-236 and neutralising antibody to amphiregulin (AR), a soluble EGFR ligand. Concordance in COX-2 and AR localisation in human colorectal tumours was noted. CONCLUSION: COX-2 regulates cell cycle transition via EP4 receptor and altered p21WAF1\\/CIP1 expression. EGFR pathways appear important. Specific targeting of the EP4 receptor or downstream targets may offer a safer alternative

  16. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of spontaneous acute prostatitis and transrectal prostate biopsy-related acute prostatitis: Is transrectal prostate biopsy-related acute prostatitis a distinct acute prostatitis category?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kang, Seok Ho; Park, Hong Seok; Moon, Du Geon

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the clinical and microbiological characteristics between acute bacterial prostatitis and transrectal biopsy-related acute prostatitis. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 135 patients hospitalized for acute prostatitis in three urological centers between 2004 and 2013. Acute bacterial prostatitis was diagnosed according to typical symptoms, findings of physical examination, and laboratory test results. Clinical variables, laboratory test results, and anti-microbial susceptibility results were reviewed. Patients were classified into the spontaneous acute prostatitis group (S-ABP) or biopsy-related acute prostatitis (Bx-ABP) for comparison of their clinical, laboratory, and microbiological findings. The mean age of all patients was 61.7 ± 12.9 years. Compared with S-ABP patients, Bx-ABP patients were significantly older, had larger prostate volumes, higher PSA values, higher peak fever temperatures, and higher incidence of septicemia and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Overall, of the 135 patients, 57.8% had positive bacterial urine and/or blood cultures. Bx-ABP patients had a higher incidence of bacterial (urine and/or blood) positive cultures compared to S-ABP patients (66.7% versus 55.6%). Escherichia coli was the predominant organism in both groups, but it was more common in Bx-ABP (88.9%) than in S-ABP (66.7%). Extended spectrum beta-lactamase -producing bacteria accounted for 64.7% of culture-positive patients in the Bx-ABP group compared to 13.3% in the S-ABP group. Bx-ABP patients showed a higher incidence of septicemia and antibiotic-resistant bacteria than S-ABP patients. These results have important implications for the management and antimicrobial treatment of Bx-ABP, which may well deserve to be considered a distinct prostatitis category. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Barriers and Facilitators to Oral PrEP Use Among Transgender Women in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rael, Christine Tagliaferri; Martinez, Michelle; Giguere, Rebecca; Bockting, Walter; MacCrate, Caitlin; Mellman, Will; Valente, Pablo; Greene, George J; Sherman, Susan; Footer, Katherine H A; D'Aquila, Richard T; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex

    2018-03-27

    Transgender women may face a disparate risk for HIV/AIDS compared to other groups. In 2012, Truvada was approved for daily use as HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). However, there is a dearth of research about barriers and facilitators to PrEP in transgender women. This paper will shed light on transgender women living in New York City's perceived and actual challenges to using PrEP and potential strategies to overcome them. After completing an initial screening process, four 90-min focus groups were completed with n = 18 transgender women. Participants were asked what they like and dislike about PrEP. Participants identified the following barriers: uncomfortable side effects, difficulty taking pills, stigma, exclusion of transgender women in advertising, and lack of research on transgender women and PrEP. Facilitators included: reducing pill size, increasing the types of available HIV prevention products, and conducting scientific studies to evaluate PrEP in transgender women.

  18. Polyadenylation site prediction using PolyA-iEP method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavakiotis, Ioannis; Tzanis, George; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents a method called PolyA-iEP that has been developed for the prediction of polyadenylation sites. More precisely, PolyA-iEP is a method that recognizes mRNA 3'ends which contain polyadenylation sites. It is a modular system which consists of two main components. The first exploits the advantages of emerging patterns and the second is a distance-based scoring method. The outputs of the two components are finally combined by a classifier. The final results reach very high scores of sensitivity and specificity.

  19. 30 CFR 250.214 - What geological and geophysical (G&G) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What geological and geophysical (G&G... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.214 What geological and geophysical (G&G) information must accompany the EP? The following G&G information must accompany your EP: (a) Geological...

  20. Comparison of sonographic features in benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Won Young; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kang, Eun Young; Seol, Hae Young; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1988-01-01

    Transrectal sonography of prostate was sensitive to textural changes produced by both benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancers. During recent 4 years, twenty cases of BPH and twenty cases of prostate cancers proven histologically were analyzed in their sonographic features, retrospectively, by using transrectal prostate sonography and suprapubic prostate sonography. The results were as follows: 1. Mean weights of BPH and prostate cancers was 40.4g and 47.6g, respectively. 2. Sonographic features of BPH revealed isoechogenecity in 11 cases, homogeneity in 18 cases, well defined capsular margins in 19 cases, and calcification in 16 cases. 3. Sonographic features of prostate cancers revealed mixed echogenecity in 14 cases, inhomogeneity in 15 cases, poorly defined capsular margin in 14 cases, and calcifications in 13 cases. 4. Authors concluded that prostate sonography were valuable diagnostic modality in the differentiation of BPH and prostate cancers.

  1. PrEP as a feature in the optimal landscape of combination HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillen, Jessica B; Anderson, Sarah-Jane; Hallett, Timothy B

    2016-01-01

    The new WHO guidelines recommend offering pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to people who are at substantial risk of HIV infection. However, where PrEP should be prioritised, and for which population groups, remains an open question. The HIV landscape in sub-Saharan Africa features limited prevention resources, multiple options for achieving cost saving, and epidemic heterogeneity. This paper examines what role PrEP should play in optimal prevention in this complex and dynamic landscape. We use a model that was previously developed to capture subnational HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. With this model, we can consider how prevention funds could be distributed across and within countries throughout sub-Saharan Africa to enable optimal HIV prevention (that is, avert the greatest number of infections for the lowest cost). Here, we focus on PrEP to elucidate where, and to whom, it would optimally be offered in portfolios of interventions (alongside voluntary medical male circumcision, treatment as prevention, and behaviour change communication). Over a range of continental expenditure levels, we use our model to explore prevention patterns that incorporate PrEP, exclude PrEP, or implement PrEP according to a fixed incidence threshold. At low-to-moderate levels of total prevention expenditure, we find that the optimal intervention portfolios would include PrEP in only a few regions and primarily for female sex workers (FSW). Prioritisation of PrEP would expand with increasing total expenditure, such that the optimal prevention portfolios would offer PrEP in more subnational regions and increasingly for men who have sex with men (MSM) and the lower incidence general population. The marginal benefit of including PrEP among the available interventions increases with overall expenditure by up to 14% (relative to excluding PrEP). The minimum baseline incidence for the optimal offer of PrEP declines for all population groups as expenditure increases. We find that using

  2. Methane oxidation and formation of EPS in compost: effect of oxygen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilshusen, J.H.; Hettiaratchi, J.P.A.; Visscher, A. de; Saint-Fort, R.

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen concentration plays an important role in the regulation of methane oxidation and the microbial ecology of methanotrophs. However, this effect is still poorly quantified in soil and compost ecosystems. The effect of oxygen on the formation of exopolymeric substances (EPS) is as yet unknown. We studied the effect of oxygen on the evolution of methanotrophic activity. At both high and low oxygen concentrations, peak activity was observed twice within a period of 6 months. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis showed that there was a shift from type I to type II methanotrophs during this period. At high oxygen concentration, EPS production was about 250% of the amount at low oxygen concentration. It is hypothesized that EPS serves as a carbon cycling mechanism for type I methanotrophs when inorganic nitrogen is limiting. Simultaneously, EPS stimulates nitrogenase activity in type II methanotrophs by creating oxygen-depleted zones. The kinetic results were incorporated in a simulation model for gas transport and methane oxidation in a passively aerated biofilter. Comparison between the model and experimental data showed that, besides acting as a micro-scale diffusion barrier, EPS can act as a barrier to macro-scale diffusion, reducing the performance of such biofilters. - 1.5% oxygen resulted in a slightly higher and more stable methane oxidation activity

  3. Expression and localization of GLUT1 and GLUT12 in prostate carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Jenalle D; Williams, Elizabeth D; Slavin, John L; Best, James D; Rogers, Suzanne

    2003-04-15

    association is that it may supply glucose to the Golgi for byproduct incorporation into the prostatic secretory fluid. Further work will investigate the importance of glucose transport and GLUT1 and GLUT12 in prostate carcinoma cell growth. Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.

  4. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1EP8B-1FAAA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1EP8B-1FAAA 1EP8 1FAA B A -------------GGSVIVIDSKAAWDAQLAKGKEEHKP...IVVAFTATWCGPCKMIAPLFETLSNDYAGKVIFLKVDVD-AVAAVAEAAGITAMPTFHVYKDGVKADDLVGASQDKLKALVAKHAAA LELALGT.../pdbChain> 1FAAA KLDCNQENKTL EEE HHH 1 1FAA A 1FAAA

  5. Does Core Length Taken per cc of Prostate Volume in Prostate Biopsy Affect the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliktas, Hasan; Sahin, Hayrettin; Cetinkaya, Mehmet; Dere, Yelda; Erdogan, Omer; Baldemir, Ercan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimal core length to be taken per cc of prostate volume for an effective prostate biopsy. A retrospective analysis was performed on the records of 379 patients who underwent a first prostate biopsy with 12 to 16 cores under transrectal ultrasound guidance between September 2012 and April 2015. For each patient, the core length per cc of the prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume were calculated, and these values were compared between the patients with and without prostate cancer. A total of 348 patients were included in the study. Cancer was determined in 26.4% of patients. The mean core length taken per cc of prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume were determined to be 3.40 ± 0.15 mm/cc (0.26%; range, 0.08-0.63 cc) in patients with cancer and 2.75 ± 0.08 mm/cc (0.20%; range, 0.04-0.66 cc) in patients without cancer (P = .000 and P = .000), respectively. Core length taken per cc of prostate of > 3.31 mm/cc was found to be related to an increase in the rates of prostate cancer diagnosis (odds ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-4.78). The rate of cancer determination for core length taken per cc of prostate of  3.31 mm/cc, 41.1%. Core length taken per cc of prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume are important morphometric parameters in the determination of prostate cancer. The results of study suggest a core length per cc of the prostate of > 3.31 mm/cc as a cutoff value for quality assurance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Granulomatous prostatitis: a pitfall in MR imaging of prostatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevenois, P.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Stallenberg, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Sintzoff, S.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Salmon, I. [Dept. of Pathology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Regemorter, G. van [Dept. of Urology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Struyven, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium)

    1992-08-01

    Granulomatous prostatitis is an uncommon disease that can mimic prostatic carcinoma on both digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound. Four patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate had a histological diagnosis of granulomatous prostatitis; three of them had recent urinary tract infections. The other patient had an associated midline prostatic cyst and a focus of malignancy. T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained in all cases. Peripheral zone lesions of decreased signal intensity, suggestive of carcinoma, were found in all four patients on T2-weighted images. Granulomatous prostatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of low signal intensity areas with prostatic magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  7. 76 FR 52952 - Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu; Transfer of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... will enable Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu to fulfill the obligations of the contract... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0038; FRL-8884-1] Student Services Contract EP-11... Business Information (CBI) by the submitter, will be transferred to Student Services Contract EP- 11-D...

  8. Urinary prostate-specific antigen: predictor of benign prostatic hyperplasia progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcic, Tomislav P; Tulic, Cane Dz; Lalic, Natasa V; Glisic, Biljana D; Ignjatovic, Svetlana D; Markovic, Biljana B; Hadzi-Djokic, Jovan B

    2013-04-01

    Urinary prostate-specific antigen (uPSA) can be used as additional parameter of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) progression. From January 2001 to December 2011, uPSA was determined in 265 patients with benign prostate. Based on total prostate volume (TPV), the patients with benign prostate were divided in two groups: TPV specificity of 0.83 and sensitivity of 0.67. The level of uPSA reflects prostatic hormonal activity and correlates with TPV, PSA and age. UPSA level ≥ 150 ng/mL can be used as additional predictive parameter of BPH progression.

  9. EPS Young Physicist Prize - CORRECTION

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The original text for the article 'Prizes aplenty in Krakow' in Bulletin 30-31 assigned the award of the EPS HEPP Young Physicist Prize to Maurizio Pierini. In fact he shared the prize with Niki Saoulidou of Fermilab, who was rewarded for her contribution to neutrino physics, as the article now correctly indicates. We apologise for not having named Niki Saoulidou in the original article.

  10. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of Vibrio cholerae EpsG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jens, Jason; Raghunathan, Kannan; Vago, Frank; Arvidson, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant V. cholerae EpsG has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.26 Å resolution. EpsG is the major pseudopilin protein of the Vibrio cholerae type II secretion system. An expression plasmid that encodes an N-terminally truncated form of EpsG with a C-terminal noncleavable His tag was constructed. Recombinant EpsG was expressed in Escherichia coli; the truncated protein was purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion against a reservoir containing 6 mM zinc sulfate, 60 mM MES pH 6.5, 15% PEG MME 550. The crystals diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.26 Å and belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 88.61, b = 70.02, c = 131.54 Å

  11. Kliininen päättely epäspesifin alaselkäkivun fysioterapeuttisessa arvioinnissa : narratiivinen kirjallisuuskatsaus

    OpenAIRE

    Penttilä, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Tämä opinnäytetyö tarkastelee, mitä on kliininen päättely ja miten fysioterapeutin tulisi arvioida epäspesifiä alaselkäkipua kliinisen päättelyn näkökulmasta. Toteutusmuotona on narratiivinen eli kuvaileva kirjallisuuskatsaus, joka ei tutkimusmetodina tarjoa analyyttistä tulosta vaan pyrkii kuvailemaan ilmiöitä sekä ajantasaistamaan tietoa. Epäspesifi alaselkäkipu on aiheena ajankohtainen, sillä noin 90 % alaselkäkivuista on epäspesifiä alaselkäkipua. Kuitenkin epäspesifin alaselkäkivun l...

  12. EP1000 passive plant description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiu, G.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994, a group of European Utilities, together with Westinghouse and its Industrial Partner GENESI (an Italian consortium including ANSALDO and FIAT), initiated a program designated EPP (European Passive Plant) to evaluate Westinghouse Passive Nuclear Plant Technology for application in Europe. In Phase I of the European Passive Plant Program which was completed in 1996, a 1000 MWe passive plant reference design (EP1000) was established which conforms to the European Utility Requirements (EUR) and is expected to meet the European Safety Authorities requirements. Phase 2 of the program was initiated in 1997 with the objective of developing the Nuclear Island design details and performing supporting analyses to start development of Safety Case Report (SCR) for submittal to European Licensing Authorities. The first part of Phase 2, 'Design Definition' phase (Phase 2A) will be completed at the end of 1998, the main efforts being design definition of key systems and structures, development of the Nuclear Island layout, and performing preliminary safety analyses to support design efforts. The second part, 'Phase 2B', includes both the analyses and evaluations required to demonstrate the adequacy of the design, and to support the preparation of Safety Case Report. The second part of Phase 2 of the program will start at the beginning of 1999 and will be completed in the 2001. Incorporation of the EUR has been a key design requirement for the EP1000 from the beginning of the program. Detailed design solutions to meet the EUR have been defined and the safety approach has also been developed based on the EUR guidelines. This paper integrates and updates the plant description reported in the IAEA TECDOC-968. The most significant developments of the EP1000 plant design during Phase 2A of the EPP program are described and reference is made to the key design requirements set by the EUR Rev. B document. (author)

  13. EPS insulated façade fires from a fire and rescue perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumm M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the challenges the fire and rescue services can meet at façade fires involving EPS insulation during construction and use of a building. The EPS characteristics are discussed in respect to the fire and rescue operation and results from orientating fire tests performed at a fire and rescue services training and test field are presented. Types of evacuation solutions, involving the fire and rescue services, where façade fires can delay or completely rule out the possibilities for safe evacuation, are presented. The restrictions in the Swedish building codes regarding use of combustible insulation are analysed and reflections over the practical problems with following the instructions to keep an EPS insulated façade safe through the building's whole lifespan are made. A number of occurred fires involving EPS are discussed and analysed from a fire and rescue perspective. Finally, recommendations are given for the fire and rescue services and future research fields are proposed.

  14. Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis: A Narrative Review of Provider Behavior and Interventions to Increase PrEP Implementation in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silapaswan, Andrew; Krakower, Douglas; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-02-01

    Since FDA approval of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention, attention has been focused on PrEP implementation. The CDC estimates that 1.2 million U.S. adults might benefit from PrEP, but only a minority are using PrEP, so there is a significant unmet need to increase access for those at risk for HIV. Given the large numbers of individuals who have indications for PrEP, there are not enough practicing specialists to meet the growing need for providers trained in providing PrEP. Moreover, since PrEP is a preventive intervention for otherwise healthy individuals, primary care providers (PCPs) should be primary prescribers of PrEP. There are important clinical considerations that providers should take into account when planning to prescribe PrEP, which are highlighted in the clinical case discussed. A growing body of research also suggests that some providers may be cautious about prescribing PrEP because of concerns regarding its "real-world" effectiveness, anticipated unintended consequences associated with its use, and ambiguity as to who should prescribe it. This review summarizes findings from studies that have assessed prescriber behavior regarding provision of PrEP, and offers recommendations on how to optimize PrEP implementation in primary care settings. Development and dissemination of educational interventions for PCPs and potential PrEP users are needed, including improved methods to assist clinicians in identifying appropriate PrEP candidates, and programs to promote medication adherence and access to social and behavioral health services. PCPs are well-positioned to prescribe PrEP and coordinate health-related services to improve the sexual health of their patients, but tailored educational programs are needed.

  15. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in relation to NIH category IV prostatitis in autopsy prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikov, Dorian; Bachurska, Svitlana; Staikov, Dimitri; Sarafian, Victoria

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative analysis of the number, normal and pathologic ratios between lymphocytes and epithelial cells (ECs), and the significance of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) in normal prostatic epithelium, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in relation to NIH category IV prostatitis (histologic prostatitis: HP) was studied in autopsy prostate. IELs were analysed in 59 autopsy prostates, which was routinely embedded in paraffin and immunohistochemically stained for CD3. An average of 300-500 ECs were counted per case. The number of IELs was calculated as the mean/100 ECs. Category IV prostatitis was evaluated using NIH consensus grading system in terms of anatomical localization and grade. In healthy individuals the mean number of IELs/100 ECs was 0.61 ± 0.34% or ≤1 lymphocyte/100 ECs, which is considered as the normal basal level of prostate IELs. In category IV prostatitis, the mean number of IELs/100 ECs was 8.53 ± 3.25% or 5-11 lymphocytes/100 ECs. The number of IELs in both around and inside inflammation areas correlated to the grade and location of HP (P prostatic inflammation (P prostatic IELs in normal prostate and in relation to category IV prostatitis. The detected normal upper limit of CD3+ IELs is 1 lymphocyte/100 ECs in the normal prostate epithelium. This is considered as an organ specific characteristic of the prostate-associated lymphoid tissue (PALT). Values >5 IELs/100 ECs indicate the presence of category IV prostatitis. The severity of inflammation correlates to the number of IELs. There is an intimate link between the quantity of the IELs, the degree of the severity and the localization of category IV prostatitis. HP is a chronic and dynamic inflammatory process affecting the whole prostate gland. The increased number of IELs suggests the immune or autoimmune character of category IV prostatitis, BPH and inflammatory preneoplastic (PIN) lesions in the prostatic tumor

  16. Symptom Severity Following Rifaximin and the Probiotic VSL#3 in Patients with Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (Due to Inflammatory Prostatitis Plus Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Vicari

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 on uro-genital and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS plus diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS compared with patients with D-IBS alone. Eighty-five patients with CP/CPPS (45 with subtype IIIa and 40 with IIIb plus D-IBS according to the Rome III criteria and an aged-matched control-group of patients with D-IBS alone (n = 75 received rifaximin and VSL#3. The primary endpoints were the response rates of IBS and CP/CPPS symptoms, assessed respectively through Irritable Bowel Syndrome Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS and The National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI, and performed at the start of therapy (V0 and three months after (V3. In IIIa prostatitis patients, the total NIH-CPSI scores significantly (p < 0.05 decreased from a baseline mean value of 21.2 to 14.5 at V3 , as did all subscales, and in the IIIb the total NIH-CPSI score also significantly decreased (from 17.4 to 15.1. Patients with IBS alone showed no significant differences in NIH-CPSI score. At V3, significantly greater improvement in the IBS-SSS and responder rate were found in IIIa patients. Our results were explained through a better individual response at V3 in IIIa prostatitis of urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms, while mean leukocyte counts on expressed prostate secretion (EPS after prostate massage significantly lowered only in IIIa cases.

  17. Symptom Severity Following Rifaximin and the Probiotic VSL#3 in Patients with Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (Due to Inflammatory Prostatitis) Plus Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemi, Michele; Sidoti, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano; Castiglione, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 on uro-genital and gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) plus diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS) compared with patients with D-IBS alone. Eighty-five patients with CP/CPPS (45 with subtype IIIa and 40 with IIIb) plus D-IBS according to the Rome III criteria and an aged-matched control-group of patients with D-IBS alone (n = 75) received rifaximin and VSL#3. The primary endpoints were the response rates of IBS and CP/CPPS symptoms, assessed respectively through Irritable Bowel Syndrome Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) and The National Institute of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI), and performed at the start of therapy (V0) and three months after (V3). In IIIa prostatitis patients, the total NIH-CPSI scores significantly (p < 0.05) decreased from a baseline mean value of 21.2 to 14.5 at V3 , as did all subscales, and in the IIIb the total NIH-CPSI score also significantly decreased (from 17.4 to 15.1). Patients with IBS alone showed no significant differences in NIH-CPSI score. At V3, significantly greater improvement in the IBS-SSS and responder rate were found in IIIa patients. Our results were explained through a better individual response at V3 in IIIa prostatitis of urinary and gastrointestinal symptoms, while mean leukocyte counts on expressed prostate secretion (EPS) after prostate massage significantly lowered only in IIIa cases. PMID:29099760

  18. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with needles or special ...

  19. Efeito da centrifugação e do líquido prostático homólogo na criopreservação de espermatozoides epididimários caninos Effect of centrifugation and homologous prostatic fluid on canine epydidimal spermatozoa cryopreservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I.V. Melo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizaram-se dois experimentos de criopreservação de espermatozoides epididimários caninos, investigando-se o efeito da centrifugação e da adição do líquido prostático sobre as características físicas do espermatozoide pós-descongelação. No experimento I, foi testado o efeito da centrifugação. As amostras congeladas sem centrifugação apresentaram pós-descongelação: motilidade total (MT de 26,7±21,2%, motilidade progressiva (MP de 21,2±20,1% e vigor espermático (V de 2,2±1,3, e as congeladas após a centrifugação: MT de 23,9±17,9%, MP de 20,6±17,4% e V de 2,2±1,0. No teste de termorresistência, o período médio de duração com MT mínima de 10% foi de 165±21,2 minutos sem centrifugação e de 77,5±63,6 minutos para as centrifugadas, indicando maior longevidade espermática das amostras não centrifugadas. No experimento II, foi avaliado o efeito da adição de líquido prostático homólogo no meio diluidor. As amostras congeladas sem líquido prostático no meio diluidor apresentaram MT de 13,3±13,1%, MP de 10,9±11,4% e V de 2,1±1,2, e as congeladas com líquido prostático MT de 14,1±12,6%, MP de 12,2±11,6% e V de 2,2±1,3. Os resultados sugerem que a centrifugação e a adição de 10% de líquido prostático ao diluidor não tiveram efeito sobre as características físicas do espermatozoide epididimário canino pós-descongelamento.The effect of centrifugation and the prostatic fluid addition were evaluated on the physical characteristics of the cryopreserved canine epydidimal spermatozoa. In the first experiment, the effect of centrifugation was analysed. The samples without centrifugation showed 26.7±21.2% of total motility (TM, 21.2±20.1% of progressive motility (PM, and 2.2±1.3 of intensity of movement (I. In addition, the samples after centrifugation showed 23.9±17.9% of TM, 20.6±17.4% of PM, and 2.2±1 of I. The mean time of samples duration, at least with 10% of total motility, was 165±21

  20. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Geary

    Full Text Available Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1 expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1. Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism

  1. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing γH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2μg/mL], Trinovin [10μg/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 μg/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10μg/mL) and Prostate Rx (6μg/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  2. Prostate-Specific Antigen Mass and Free Prostate-Specific Antigen Mass for Predicting the Prostate Volume of Korean Men With Biopsy-Proven Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Tae Yong; Chae, Ji Yun; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Jin Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Moon, Du Geon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose It has been reported that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) correlates with prostate volume. Recently, some studies have reported that PSA mass (PSA adjusted for plasma volume) is more accurate than PSA at predicting prostate volume. In this study, we analyzed the accuracy of PSA and the related parameters of PSA mass, free PSA (fPSA), and fPSA mass in predicting prostate volume. Materials and Methods We retrospectively investigated 658 patients who underwent prostate biopsy from 2006 t...

  3. Expression of EpCam and Villin in Barrett’s Esophagus and in Gastric Cardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Anders

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study we aimed to clarify the potential of EpCAM and villin as in vivo biomarkers for both Barrett esophagus (BE-associated neoplasia and BE versus cardiac mucosa. Immunohistochemical staining in BE with various degrees of intraepithelial neoplasia (IN, Barrett carcinoma (BC and in normal cardiac mucosa (CM revealed a lack of EpCam and villin in squamous esophageal epithelium. All specimens of IN and BC showed EpCam with varying staining intensities. In 57% of CM samples a weak signal was detected; the remainder displayed strong EpCam expression. Villin was found in 97% of BE specimens and in all those with IN; 37% of BC and 75% of CM specimens were also positive. We conclude that expression of EpCam and villin differs only between squamous epithelium and BE. Determination of these proteins does not allow discrimination between different degrees of neoplasia or between esophageal intestinal metaplasia and cardiac mucosa.

  4. Subcellular differential expression of Ep-ICD in oral dysplasia and cancer is associated with disease progression and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Kaur, Jatinder; Leong, Iona; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian J.; Walfish, Paul G.; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-01-01

    Identification of patients with oral dysplasia at high risk of cancer development and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) at increased risk of disease recurrence will enable rigorous personalized treatment. Regulated intramembranous proteolysis of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) resulting in release of its intracellular domain Ep-ICD into cytoplasm and nucleus triggers oncogenic signaling. We analyzed the expression of Ep-ICD in oral dysplasia and cancer and determined its clinical significance in disease progression and prognosis. In a retrospective study, immunohistochemical analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic Ep-ICD and EpEx (extracellular domain of EpCAM), was carried out in 115 OSCC, 97 oral dysplasia and 105 normal oral tissues, correlated with clinicopathological parameters and disease outcome over 60 months for oral dysplasia and OSCC patients. Disease-free survival (DFS) was determined by Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression analysis. In comparison with normal oral tissues, significant increase in nuclear Ep-ICD and membrane EpEx was observed in dysplasia, and OSCC (p = 0.013 and < 0.001 respectively). Oral dysplasia patients with increased overall Ep-ICD developed cancer in short time period (mean = 47 months; p = 0.044). OSCC patients with increased nuclear Ep-ICD and membrane EpEx had significantly reduced mean DFS of 33.7 months (p = 0.018). Our study provided clinical evidence for Ep-ICD as a predictor of cancer development in patients with oral dysplasia and recurrence in OSCC patients, suggesting its potential utility in enhanced management of those patients detected to have increased risk of progression to cancer and recurrence in OSCC patients

  5. Prostate specific antigen in a community-based sample of men without prostate cancer: Correlations with prostate volume, age, body mass index, and symptoms of prostatism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.H.R. Bosch (Ruud); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); C.H. Bangma (Chris); W.J. Kirkels (Wim); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe correlation between both prostate specific antigen levels (PSA) and prostate specific antigen density (PSAD) and age, prostate volume parameters, body mass index, and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) were studied in a community‐based population. A sample of 502 men

  6. When the science fails and the ethics works: 'Fail-safe' ethics in the FEM-PrEP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingori, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    This paper will explore the concept of 'fail safe' ethics in the FEM PrEP trial, and the practice of research and ethics on the ground. FEM-PrEP examined the efficacy of PrEP in African women after promising outcomes in research conducted with MSM. This was a hugely optimistic time and FEM-PrEP was mobilised using rights-based ethical arguments that women should have access to PrEP. This paper will present data collected during an ethnographic study of frontline research workers involved in FEM-PrEP. During our discussions, 'fail-safe' ethics emerged as concept that encapsulated their confidence that their ethics could not fail. However, in 2011, FEM-PrEP was halted and deemed a failure. The women involved in the study were held responsible because contrary to researcher's expectations they were not taking the oral PrEP being researched. This examination of FEM-PrEP will show that ethical arguments are increasingly deployed to mobilise, maintain and in some cases stop trials in ways which, at times, are superseded or co-opted by other interests. While promoting the interests of women, rights-based approaches are argued to indirectly justify the continuation of individualised, biomedical interventions which have been problematic in other women-centred trials. In this examination of FEM-PrEP, the rights-based approach obscured: ethical concerns beyond access to PrEP; the complexities of power relationships between donor and host countries; the operations of the HIV industry in research-saturated areas and the cumulative effect of unfilled expectations in HIV research and how this has shaped ideas of research and ethics.

  7. PrEP adopted by the brazilian national health system: What is the size of the demand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Paula M; Benzaken, Adele; Alencar, Tatianna M de; Pimenta, Cristina; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2018-05-01

    Brazil's response to the HIV epidemic now includes free access to preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to populations at substantial risk for HIV infection including men who have sex with men (MSM). We used nationally representative demographic, epidemiologic, and surveillance data to offer estimates for the number of MSM at substantial risk for HIV infection who might be eligible and willing to use PrEP in Brazil. Starting from the age/sex-stratified population, we calculated the number of men aged 15 to 64 years, in 5-year age groups, and the proportion of those who report sex with other men during their lifetime. We focused on 11 cities (representing all regions) that are responsible for a significant fraction of the HIV burden of the country and used city-specific HIV prevalence estimates to infer the fraction of MSM who are HIV-negative. We then derived the proportion of HIV-negative MSM under substantial risk for HIV infection defined as having unprotected receptive anal intercourse in the 6 months before study participation. Finally, PrEP uptake among the eligible was inferred from the PrEP Brazil study. Our results show that PrEP demand in these 11 cities is of 66,120 men aged 15 to 64 years. When we consider the lower and upper bounds for the available parameters, we find that PrEP demand in these 11 cities might vary from 33,378 to 97,962 men. If PrEP is restricted to those aged 15 to 49 years, demand drops by 20%. PrEP demand varies considerably by city, mostly because of the differences in population size and city-specific HIV prevalence. We have shed light on the probable size of PrEP demand in Brazil certain that the incorporation of PrEP as part of Brazil's combination prevention for populations at substantial risk for HIV infection is a necessary challenge. PrEP will not only prevent HIV infections, it will also expand testing among the most vulnerable with the added benefit of offering combination prevention for the uninfected and immediate treatment for

  8. Towards a fair consideration of PrEP as part of combination HIV prevention in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasi, Giovanni; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Baruch, Ricardo; Guanira, Juan Vicente; Luque, Ricardo; Cáceres, Carlos F; Ghidinelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in scaling up antiretroviral treatment, HIV prevention strategies have not been successful in significantly curbing HIV incidence in Latin America. HIV prevention interventions need to be expanded to target the most affected key populations with a combination approach, including new high impact technologies. Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended as additional prevention choice for individuals at higher risk of infection and could become a cost-effective prevention tool. We discuss the barriers and solutions for a fair consideration of PrEP as part of combination HIV prevention strategies in Latin America. Although demonstration projects are ongoing or being planned in a number of countries, to date no Latin American country has implemented a public PrEP programme. The knowledge of policymakers about PrEP implementation needs to be strengthened, and programmatic guidance and cost estimate tools need to be developed to support adequate planning. Despite high levels of awareness among health providers, especially if engaged in HIV or key population care, willingness to prescribe PrEP is still low due to the lack of national policies and guidelines. Key populations, especially men who have sex with men, transgender women and sex workers, have been engaged in demonstration projects, and qualitative research shows high awareness and willingness to use PrEP, especially if accessible in the public sector for free or at affordable price. Concerns of safety, adherence, effectiveness and risk compensation need to be addressed through targeted social communication strategies to improve PrEP knowledge and stimulate demand. Alliance among policymakers, civil society and representatives from key populations, healthcare providers and researchers will be critical for the design and successful implementation of PrEP demonstration projects of locally adapted delivery models. The use of mechanisms of joint negotiation and procurement of antiretrovirals

  9. Decrease in zinc adsorption onto soil in the presence of EPS-rich and EPS-poor Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdova, O Yu; Pokrovsky, O S; Lapitskiy, S A; Shirokova, L S; González, A G; Demin, V V

    2014-12-01

    The adsorption of Zn onto the humic and illuvial horizons of the podzol soil in the presence of soil bacteria was studied using a batch-reactor technique as a function of the pH (from 2 to 9) and the Zn concentration in solution (from 0.076mM to 0.760mM). Exopolysaccharides-forming aerobic heterotrophs Pseudomonas aureofaciens were added at 0.1 and 1.0gwetL(-1) concentrations to two different soil horizons, and Zn adsorption was monitored as a function of the pH and the dissolved-Zn concentration. The pH-dependent adsorption edge demonstrated more efficient Zn adsorption by the humic horizon than the mineral horizon at otherwise similar soil concentrations. The Zn adsorption onto the EPS-poor strain was on slightly lower than that onto EPS-rich bacteria. Similar differences in the adsorption capacities between the soil and bacteria were also detected by "langmuirian" constant-pH experiments conducted in soil-Zn and bacteria-Zn binary systems. The addition of 0.1gwetL(-1)P. aureofaciens to a soil-bacteria system (4gdryL(-1)soil) resulted in statistically significant decrease in the adsorption yield, which was detectable from both the pH-dependent adsorption edge and the constant-pH isotherm experiments. Increasing the amount of added bacteria to 1gwetL(-1) further decreased the overall adsorption in the full range of the pH. This decrease was maximal for the EPS-rich bacteria and minimal for the EPS-poor bacteria (a factor of 2.8 and 2.2 at pH=6.9, respectively). These observations in binary and ternary systems were further rationalized by linear-programming modeling of surface equilibria that revealed the systematic differences in the number of binding sites and the surface-adsorption constant of zinc onto the two soil horizons with and without bacteria. The main finding of this work is that the adsorption of Zn onto the humic soil-bacteria system is lower than that in pure, bacteria-free soil systems. This difference is statistically significant (psoil particles

  10. Reversal of Estrogen Receptor Beta Epigenetic Gene Silencing in Prostatic Adenocarcinoma by Soy Protein-Derived Isoflavonoid Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Japanese men. Cancer Sci 95, 65-71 (2004). 85. Goetzl, M.A., Van Veldhuizen , P.J. & Thrasher, J.B. Effects of soy phytoestrogens on the prostate...radical prostatectomy. Am J Surg Pathol 28, 928-34 (2004). 63. Noordzij, M.A., Bogdanowicz, J.F., van Krimpen, C., van der Kwast, T.H. & van ...accumulation in prostatic fluid in caucasian men. J Nutr 135, 1400-6 (2005). 118. Hedlund, T.E., van Bokhoven, A., Johannes, W.U., Nordeen, S.K. & Ogden, L.G

  11. Gendered differences in the perceived risks and benefits of oral PrEP among HIV-serodiscordant couples in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jennifer J; Ngure, Kenneth; Heffron, Renee; Curran, Kathryn; Mugo, Nelly R; Baeten, Jared M

    2016-08-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is effective for preventing HIV among HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples. Gender roles may influence perceived personal and social risks related to HIV-prevention behaviors and may affect use of PrEP. In this study, interviews and focus groups were conducted with 68 individuals from 34 mutually disclosed serodiscordant heterosexual partnerships in Thika, Kenya. Sociocultural factors that affect adherence to PrEP were explored using grounded analysis. Three factors were identified, which shape perceptions of PrEP: gendered power dynamics and control over decision-making in the household; conflicts between risk-reduction strategies and male sexual desire; culture-bound definitions of women's work. Adherence to PrEP in the Partners PrEP Study was high; however, participants articulated conflicting interests related to PrEP in connection with traditional gender roles. The successful delivery of PrEP will require understanding of key social factors, particularly related to gender and dyadic dynamics around HIV serostatus.

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  14. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  15. Dutasteride reduces prostate size and prostate specific antigen in older hypogonadal men with benign prostatic hyperplasia undergoing testosterone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephanie T; Hirano, Lianne; Gilchriest, Janet; Dighe, Manjiri; Amory, John K; Marck, Brett T; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2011-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia and hypogonadism are common disorders in aging men. There is concern that androgen replacement in older men may increase prostate size and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We examined whether combining dutasteride, which inhibits testosterone to dihydrotestosterone conversion, with testosterone treatment in older hypogonadal men with benign prostatic hyperplasia reduces androgenic stimulation of the prostate compared to testosterone alone. We conducted a double-blind, placebo controlled trial of 53 men 51 to 82 years old with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate volume 30 cc or greater and serum total testosterone less than 280 ng/dl (less than 9.7 nmol/l). Subjects were randomized to daily transdermal 1% T gel plus oral placebo or dutasteride for 6 months. Testosterone dosing was adjusted to a serum testosterone of 500 to 1,000 ng/dl. The primary outcomes were prostate volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging, serum prostate specific antigen and androgen levels. A total of 46 subjects completed all procedures. Serum testosterone increased similarly into the mid-normal range in both groups. Serum dihydrotestosterone increased in the testosterone only but decreased in the testosterone plus dutasteride group. In the testosterone plus dutasteride group prostate volume and prostate specific antigen (mean ± SEM) decreased 12% ± 2.5% and 35% ± 5%, respectively, compared to the testosterone only group in which prostate volume and prostate specific antigen increased 7.5% ± 3.3% and 19% ± 7% (p = 0.03 and p = 0.008), respectively, after 6 months of treatment. Prostate symptom scores improved in both groups. Combined treatment with testosterone plus dutasteride reduces prostate volume and prostate specific antigen compared to testosterone only. Coadministration of a 5α-reductase inhibitor with testosterone appears to spare the prostate from androgenic stimulation during testosterone replacement in older

  16. Ep-CAM expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: a potential therapeutic target and prognostic marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiper Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the expression and test the clinical significance of the epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC to check the suitability of esophageal SCC patients for Ep-CAM directed targeted therapies. Methods The Ep-CAM expression was immunohistochemically investigated in 70 primary esophageal SCCs using the monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4. For the interpretation of the staining results, we used a standardized scoring system ranging from 0 to 3+. The survival analysis was calculated from 53 patients without distant metastasis, with R0 resection and at least 2 months of clinical follow-up. Results Ep-CAM neo-expression was observed in 79% of the tumors with three expression levels, 1+ (26%, 2+ (11% and 3+ (41%. Heterogeneous expression was observed at all expression levels. Interestingly, tumors with 3+ Ep-CAM expression conferred a significantly decreased median relapse-free survival period (log rank, p = 0.0001 and median overall survival (log rank, p = 0.0003. Multivariate survival analysis disclosed Ep-CAM 3+ expression as independent prognostic factor. Conclusion Our results suggest Ep-CAM as an attractive molecule for targeted therapy in esophageal SCC. Considering the discontenting results of the current adjuvant concepts for esophageal SCC patients, Ep-CAM might provide a promising target for an adjuvant immunotherapeutic intervention.

  17. Microcalorimetric and potentiometric titration studies on the adsorption of copper by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), minerals and their composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Linchuan; Huang, Qiaoyun; Wei, Xing; Liang, Wei; Rong, Xinming; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng

    2010-08-01

    Equilibrium adsorption experiments, isothermal titration calorimetry and potentiometric titration techniques were employed to investigate the adsorption of Cu(II) by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from Pseudomonas putida X4, minerals (montmorillonite and goethite) and their composites. Compared with predicted values of Cu(II) adsorption on composites, the measured values of Cu(II) on EPS-montmorillonite composite increased, however, those on EPS-goethite composite decreased. Potentiometric titration results also showed that more surface sites were observed on EPS-montmorillonite composite and less reactive sites were found on EPS-goethite composite. The adsorption of Cu(II) on EPS molecules and their composites with minerals was an endothermic reaction, while that on minerals was exothermic. The positive values of enthalpy change (Delta H) and entropy change (DeltaS) for Cu(II) adsorption on EPS and mineral-EPS composites indicated that Cu(II) mainly interacts with carboxyl and phosphoryl groups as inner-sphere complexes on EPS molecules and their composites with minerals. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Knowledge, Practices, and Barriers to HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Prescribing Among Washington State Medical Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brian R; McMahan, Vanessa M; Naismith, Kelly; Stockton, Jonathan B; Delaney, Lori A; Stekler, Joanne D

    2018-01-04

    We aimed to assess HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) awareness and prescribing practices among Washington State medical providers from diverse professional disciplines and practice types. In May 2016, we administered an anonymous online survey to licensed medical practitioners who provide primary, longitudinal, walk-in, emergency, obstetric, gynecologic, sexually transmitted infection (STI), or family planning care. Of 735 eligible providers, 64.8% had heard of PrEP. Younger providers and providers with a Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree were more likely to be aware of PrEP compared to older providers (p=0.0001) and providers of other training backgrounds (Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner [ARNP], Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine [DO], or Physician Assistant [PA]) (p=0.04). Among providers aware of PrEP, most frequent reported concerns about prescribing were adherence (46.0%) and costs (42.9%). Providers felt very (20.1%) or somewhat (33.8%) comfortable discussing PrEP overall, but very (26.8%) or somewhat (44.7%) uncomfortable discussing cost and insurance issues. The 124 PrEP prescribers reported a median of 2 (range 1-175, total 1,142) patients prescribed PrEP. Prior authorizations and insurance denials had prevented prescriptions for 28.7% and 12.1% of prescribers, respectively. Interventions to improve PrEP access should include education to inform medical providers about PrEP, with particular attention to provider types less likely to be aware. Continued efforts to eliminate cost and insurance barriers and educate providers regarding financial resources would help improve PrEP access.

  19. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  20. Does Small Prostate Predict High Grade Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliskan, S.; Kaba, S.; Koca, O.; Ozturk, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The current study is aimed to assess the patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and investigate the association between prostate size and adverse outcomes at final pathology. Study Design: Comparative, descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Turkey, from January 2008 to January 2016. Methodology: The patients treated with open radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were reviewed. Patient characteristics including prostate specific antigen (PSA), free PSA levels, age, biopsy, and radical prostatectomy results were recorded. The patients whose data were complete or prostate weight was equal to or less than 80 gm, were included in the study. Patients with < 40 gm prostate weight was in group 1 and the patients in group 2 had a prostate weight from 40 to 80 gm. High grade prostate cancer was defined to have a Gleason score between 7 or higher at biopsy and final pathology. Pathology and biopsy results were compared within groups. MedCalc Statistical Software demo version was used for statistical analyses. Results: There were 162 patients in this study. Of these, 71 (43.82 percent) patients were in group 1 and 91 (56.17 percent) patients were in group 2. The age ranged from 49 to 76 years. Mean value of 62.70 +-6.82 and 65.82 +- 5.66 years in group 1 and 2, respectively. Fifty (70.42 percent) and 68 patients (74.74 percent) had a Gleason score of 6 in group 1 and 2, respectively. Organconfined disease was reported in 53 patients (74.64 percent) in group 1 and in 78 patients (85.71 percent) in group 2. Gleason score concordance between biopsy and prostatectomy was reported in 61 patients (67.03 percent) and downgrading was detected in 4 patients (4.4 percent) in group 2. The median tumor volume of the patients was 4.47 cm/sup 3/ in group 1 and 6 cm/sup 3/ in group 2 (p=0.502). High grade prostate cancer was reported in 52.11 percent and 45.05 percent of the patients in

  1. Transcription factors and molecular epigenetic marks underlying EpCAM overexpression in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, B. T. F.; de Groote, M. L.; Kazemier, H. G.; Arendzen, A. J.; Terpstra, P.; Ruiters, M. H. J.; McLaughlin, P. M. J.; Rots, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is overexpressed on carcinomas, and its downregulation inhibits the oncogenic potential of multiple tumour types. Here, we investigated underlying mechanisms of epcam overexpression in ovarian carcinoma. METHODS: Expression of EpCAM and DNA

  2. Nature of the endogenous pyrogen (EP) induced by influenza viruses: lack of correlation between EP levels and content of the known pyrogenic cytokines, interleukin 1, interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, K J; Bird, C R; Thorpe, R; Smith, H; Sweet, C

    1991-03-01

    Fever in influenza results from the release of endogenous pyrogen (EP) following virus-phagocyte interaction and its level correlates with the differing virulence of virus strains. However, the different levels of fever produced in ferrets by intracardial inoculation of EP obtained from the interaction of different virus strains with ferret of human phagocytes did not correlate with the levels of interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6 or tumour necrosis factor in the same samples as assayed by conventional in vitro methods. Hence, the EP produced by influenza virus appears to be different to these cytokines.

  3. Is Ep-CAM Expression a Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker for Colorectal Cancer? A Systematic Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu Han

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The present findings suggest that Ep-CAM expression may be associated with CRC carcinogenesis, while the loss of Ep-CAM expression is correlated with the progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis of CRC. Ep-CAM expression may be a useful biomarker for the clinical diagnosis of CRC.

  4. Hydrodynamic impacts on biogenic stabilisation and the fate of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in mixed sediment bedforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, J. A.; Aspden, R.; Schindler, R.; Parsons, D. R.; Ye, L.; Baas, J.; Paterson, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The stability and morphology of bedforms have traditionally been treated as a function of mean flow velocity/non-dimensional bed shear stress and sediment particle size, despite the known influence of key biological components such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). EPS is produced by microbial communities and can increase erosion thresholds by more than 300%. However, the mechanisms behind the influence of EPS on sediment transport and bedform dynamics is poorly understood, as is the fate of EPS and exchange of EPS between the sediment bed and water column during ripple formation. The exchange of EPS between the sediment bed and water column is dynamic, with important implications for a range of physical and geochemical processes, with the spatio-temporal variation in EPS content, from source to eventual fate, being extremely important for determining the behaviour and natural variability of sedimentary systems. This paper reports on a series of flume experiments where a tripartite mixture of sand, clay and model EPS (xanthan gum) was used to create a sediment substrate, which was subject to a unidirectional current (0.8 ms-1 for 10.5 hrs, n=6). For each run the spatio-temporal changes in concentration, distribution, and effect of EPS, on the evolving bed of mixed sediment was monitored throughout, with complete 3D bed morphology scans also acquired at ~360 s intervals. The various substrate mixtures produced bedforms varying from ripples to dunes and biochemical analysis of EPS concentration across the formed bedforms, suggest EPS is winnowed from the sediment - water interface, particularly at the bedform crests. The depth of winnowing in each run was found to be related to the bedform size, with variation in the stoss, crest and trough of the bedforms identified. The loss of EPS was also significantly correlated with the depth to which clay was winnowed, presumably due to a close association between the clay mineral and EPS fractions. The paper will

  5. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Nogueira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC. This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA, the prostate volume (PSA density, and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time. The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  6. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lucas; Corradi, Renato; Eastham, James A

    2009-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC). This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA), the prostate volume (PSA density), and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time). The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  7. Prostate-specific antigen lowering effect of metabolic syndrome is influenced by prostate volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Heo, Nam Ju; Paick, Jae-Seung; Son, Hwancheol

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen levels by considering prostate volume and plasma volume. We retrospectively analyzed 4111 men who underwent routine check-ups including prostate-specific antigen and transrectal ultrasonography. The definition of metabolic syndrome was based on the modified Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Prostate-specific antigen mass density (prostate-specific antigen × plasma volume / prostate volume) was calculated for adjusting plasma volume and prostate volume. We compared prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen mass density levels of participants with metabolic syndrome (metabolic syndrome group, n = 1242) and without metabolic syndrome (non-prostate-specific antigen metabolic syndrome group, n = 2869). To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen, linear regression analysis for the natural logarithm of prostate-specific antigen was used. Patients in the metabolic syndrome group had significantly older age (P prostate volume (P prostate-specific antigen (non-metabolic syndrome group vs metabolic syndrome group; 1.22 ± 0.91 vs 1.15 ± 0.76 ng/mL, P = 0.006). Prostate-specific antigen mass density in the metabolic syndrome group was still significantly lower than that in the metabolic syndrome group (0.124 ± 0.084 vs 0.115 ± 0.071 μg/mL, P = 0.001). After adjusting for age, prostate volume and plasma volume using linear regression model, the presence of metabolic syndrome was a significant independent factor for lower prostate-specific antigen (prostate-specific antigen decrease by 4.1%, P = 0.046). Prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with metabolic syndrome seem to be lower, and this finding might be affected by the prostate volume. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Search for Lepton Flavour Violation in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep->mu X and ep -> tau X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb-1 for e^+ p collisions and 13.7 pb^-1 for e^- p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchm"uller-R"uckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of lambda=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively.

  9. Search for lepton flavour violation in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, A. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Alexa, C. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)]|[National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2007-02-15

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep{yields}{mu}X and ep{yields}{tau}X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb{sup -1} for e{sup +}p collisions and 13.7 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchmueller-Rueckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of {lambda}=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively. (orig.)

  10. Search for lepton flavour violation in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, A.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-12-01

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep→μX and ep→τX is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb-1 for e+p collisions and 13.7 pb-1 for e-p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchmüller Rückl Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of λ=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon quark pair or a tau quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively.

  11. QCD studies in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F 2 , which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q 2 regimes are discussed. The low Q 2 transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure α s , and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs

  12. QCD studies in ep collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  13. Heavy Quark Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, I.

    2006-01-01

    Collisions of electrons with protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV are being recorded by the two experiments H1 and ZEUS at the ep accelerator HERA at DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Measurements involving beauty and charm quarks, performed by these experiments, provide a good environment to test perturbative QCD predictions as the large quark mass supplies a hard scale. Recent measurements of beauty and charm production in ep collisions are presented here. QCD predictions at next-to-leading order are found to generally agree with the measurements. Beauty measurements however are sometimes slightly higher than the predicted cross sections. Beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure were also measured and are well described by QCD predictions

  14. Production of Z0 bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2012-10-01

    The production of Z 0 bosons in the reaction ep → eZ 0 p (*) , where p (*) stands for a proton or a low-mass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb -1 of integrated luminosity. The Z 0 was measured in the hadronic decay mode. The elasticity of the events was ensured by a cut on η max max is the maximum pseudorapidity of energy deposits in the calorimeter defined with respect to the proton beam direction. A signal was observed at the Z 0 mass. The cross section of the reaction ep → eZ 0 p (*) was measured to be σ (ep → eZ 0 p (*) ) = 0.13 ± 0.06 (stat.) ± 0.01 (syst.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction of 0.16 pb. This is the first measurement of Z 0 production in ep collisions.

  15. Castor oil induces laxation and uterus contraction via ricinoleic acid activating prostaglandin EP3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunaru, Sorin; Althoff, Till F; Nüsing, Rolf M; Diener, Martin; Offermanns, Stefan

    2012-06-05

    Castor oil is one of the oldest drugs. When given orally, it has a laxative effect and induces labor in pregnant females. The effects of castor oil are mediated by ricinoleic acid, a hydroxylated fatty acid released from castor oil by intestinal lipases. Despite the wide-spread use of castor oil in conventional and folk medicine, the molecular mechanism by which ricinoleic acid acts remains unknown. Here we show that the EP(3) prostanoid receptor is specifically activated by ricinoleic acid and that it mediates the pharmacological effects of castor oil. In mice lacking EP(3) receptors, the laxative effect and the uterus contraction induced via ricinoleic acid are absent. Although a conditional deletion of the EP(3) receptor gene in intestinal epithelial cells did not affect castor oil-induced diarrhea, mice lacking EP(3) receptors only in smooth-muscle cells were unresponsive to this drug. Thus, the castor oil metabolite ricinoleic acid activates intestinal and uterine smooth-muscle cells via EP(3) prostanoid receptors. These findings identify the cellular and molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological effects of castor oil and indicate a role of the EP(3) receptor as a target to induce laxative effects.

  16. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Social accountability and the finance sector: the case of Equator Principles (EP) institutionalisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Sullivan, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    In June 2003, the Equator Principles (EP) were launched by ten international commercial banks. The EP were designed as a set of voluntary environmental and social risk management guidelines for project finance. Whilst lauded as a revolutionary initiative by the financial sector, the Principles were

  18. Further case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to a deletion in EP300.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foley, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a heterogeneous disorder with approximately 45-55% of patients showing mutations in the CREB binding protein and a further 3% of patients having mutations in EP300. We report a male child with a deletion of exons 3-8 of the EP300 gene who has RSTS. He has a milder skeletal phenotype, a finding that has been described in other cases with EP300 mutations. The mother suffered from pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome in the pregnancy. She subsequently developed a mullerian tumor of her cervix 6 years after the birth of her son.

  19. Positron annihilation analysis of epoxy/hydroxyl terminated butyl nitrile rubber (EP/HTBN) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Minfeng; Chen Ning; Ji Genzhong; Sun Xudong; Zhao Rener; Xiao Huiquan; Qi Chenze; Wang Baoyi

    2007-01-01

    The free volume properties of epoxy/hydroxyl terminated butyl nitrile rubber (EP/HTBN) have been studied by means of positron annihilation technique. The toughness effect is found to be correlated with the content of HTBN and the free volume properties of the EP/HTBN interfaces. When the content of HTBN component is 5%, the free volume size in the interface is close to that of EP, and the toughness effect is strong. But with further addition of HTBN, holes with big size free volume are formed in the interface, and the toughness effect is limited. (authors)

  20. Prostate Health Index improves multivariable risk prediction of aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Stacy; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Broyles, Dennis L; Wei, John T; Sanda, Martin; Klee, George; Partin, Alan W; Sokoll, Lori; Chan, Daniel W; Bangma, Chris H; van Schaik, Ron H N; Slawin, Kevin M; Marks, Leonard S; Catalona, William J

    2017-07-01

    To examine the use of the Prostate Health Index (PHI) as a continuous variable in multivariable risk assessment for aggressive prostate cancer in a large multicentre US study. The study population included 728 men, with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 2-10 ng/mL and a negative digital rectal examination, enrolled in a prospective, multi-site early detection trial. The primary endpoint was aggressive prostate cancer, defined as biopsy Gleason score ≥7. First, we evaluated whether the addition of PHI improves the performance of currently available risk calculators (the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial [PCPT] and European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer [ERSPC] risk calculators). We also designed and internally validated a new PHI-based multivariable predictive model, and created a nomogram. Of 728 men undergoing biopsy, 118 (16.2%) had aggressive prostate cancer. The PHI predicted the risk of aggressive prostate cancer across the spectrum of values. Adding PHI significantly improved the predictive accuracy of the PCPT and ERSPC risk calculators for aggressive disease. A new model was created using age, previous biopsy, prostate volume, PSA and PHI, with an area under the curve of 0.746. The bootstrap-corrected model showed good calibration with observed risk for aggressive prostate cancer and had net benefit on decision-curve analysis. Using PHI as part of multivariable risk assessment leads to a significant improvement in the detection of aggressive prostate cancer, potentially reducing harms from unnecessary prostate biopsy and overdiagnosis. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ...

  2. Tissue concentrations of prostate-specific antigen in prostatic carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretlow, T G; Pretlow, T P; Yang, B; Kaetzel, C S; Delmoro, C M; Kamis, S M; Bodner, D R; Kursh, E; Resnick, M I; Bradley, E L

    1991-11-11

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), as measured in peripheral blood, is currently the most widely used marker for the assessment of tumor burden in the longitudinal study of patients with carcinoma of the prostate (PCA). Studies from other laboratories have led to the conclusion that a given volume of PCA causes a much higher level of PSA in the peripheral circulation of patients than a similar volume of prostate without carcinoma. We have evaluated PSA in the resected tissues immunohistochemically and in extracts of PCA and of prostates resected because of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunohistochemical results were less quantitative than but consistent with the results of the ELISA of tissue extracts. Immunohistochemically, there was considerable heterogeneity in the expression of PSA by both PCA and BPH both within and among prostatic tissues from different patients. While the levels of expression of PSA in these tissues overlap broadly, PSA is expressed at a lower level in PCA than in BPH when PSA is expressed as a function of wet weight of tissue (p = 0.0095), wet weight of tissue/% epithelium (p less than 0.0001), protein extracted from the tissue (p = 0.0039), or protein extracted/% epithelium (p less than 0.0001).

  3. Differentiation of prostatitis and prostate cancer using the Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Schroers, Michael; Kukuk, Guido; Wolter, Karsten; Decker, Georges; Fischer, Stefan; Marx, Christian; Traeber, Frank; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Block, Wolfgang; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried

    2016-07-01

    To determine if prostate cancer (PCa) and prostatitis can be differentiated by using PI-RADS. 3T MR images of 68 patients with 85 cancer suspicious lesions were analyzed. The findings were correlated with histopathology. T2w imaging (T2WI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE), and MR-Spectroscopy (MRS) were acquired. Every lesion was given a single PI-RADS score for each parameter, as well as a sum score and a PI-RADS v2 score. Furthermore, T2-morphology, ADC-value, perfusion type, citrate/choline-level, and localization were evaluated. 44 of 85 lesions showed PCa (51.8%), 21 chronic prostatitis (24.7%), and 20 other benign tissue such as hyperplasia or fibromuscular tissue (23.5%). The single PI-RADS score for T2WI, DWI, DCE, as well as the aggregated score including and not including MRS, and the PI-RADS v2-score were all significantly higher for PCa than for prostatitis or other tissue (pprostatitis than for other tissue (p=0.029 and p=0.020), whereas the other parameters were not different. Prostatitis usually presented borderline pathological PI-RADS scores, showed restricted diffusion with ADC≥900mm(2)/s in 100% of cases, was more often indistinctly hypointense on T2WI (66.7%), and localized in the transitional zone (57.1%). An ADC≥900mm(2)/s achieved the highest predictive value for prostatitis (AUC=0.859). Prostatitis can be differentiated from PCa using PI-RADS, since all available parameters are more distinct in cases of cancer. However, there is significant overlap between prostatitis and other benign findings, thus PI-RADS is only suitable to a limited extent for the primary assessment of prostatitis. Restricted diffusion with ADC≥900mm(2)/s is believed to be a good indicator for prostatitis. MRS can help to distinguish between prostatitis and other tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prostatic MR imaging. Accuracy in differentiating cancer from other prostatic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikonen, S.; Kivisaari, L.; Tervahartiala, P. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept of Radiology; Vehmas, T. [Finnish Inst. of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland); Taari, K.; Rannikko, S. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept of Urology

    2001-03-01

    Purpose: We assessed the accuracy of MR imaging in differentiating between cancer and other prostatic disorders, and evaluated the diagnostic criteria for various prostatic diseases. Material and Methods: A total of 74 endorectal coil MR studies were performed on 72 patients. Twenty patients had prostatic cancer, 20 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 4 acute bacterial prostatitis, 5 chronic bacterial prostatitis (2 also belonging to the previous category), 19 chronic non-bacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and 6 were symptomless voluntary controls. All studies were interpreted by two experienced radiologists in random order. Radiologists were blinded to all clinical data including the age of the patients. Based on MR findings, both radiologists filled in a form covering diagnostic criteria and diagnosis. Results: Accuracy in diagnosing prostate cancer was 74%. Sensitivity was 50% and specificity 83%, and positive and negative predictive values were 53 and 82%, respectively. Bacterial prostatitis showed some features similar to carcinoma. Abundant BPH rendered cancer detection more difficult. No diagnostic criterion was clearly better than the others. Interobserver agreement on the MR diagnosis ranged from moderate to good. Conclusion: Without knowledge of accurate clinical data, MR seems to be too insensitive in detecting prostate cancer to be used as a primary diagnostic tool.

  5. Prostate-specific antigen superior serum marker for prostatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaney, J A; Allen, M A; Keane, T; Duffy, J J

    1987-05-01

    A new immunoradiometric assay based on dual monoclonal antibody reaction system (Hybritech-TANDEM/sup R/) was used to measure serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in 39 patients with prostatic carcinoma (CaP), in 57 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 14 without prostatic disease. Serum PSA was elevated in 82% of patients with CaP while PAP was elevated in only 54%. In this and other studies, PSA is superior to conventional serum markers in sensitivity, prediction of CaP stage and in longitudinal monitoring of disease. A 16% false positive rate precludes PSA as a screening test. The assay used was found to be simple and reliable.

  6. Prostate-specific antigen superior serum marker for prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaney, J.A.; Allen, M.A.; Keane, T.; Duffy, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new immunoradiometric assay based on dual monoclonal antibody reaction system (Hybritech-TANDEM R ) was used to measure serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in 39 patients with prostatic carcinoma (CaP), in 57 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 14 without prostatic disease. Serum PSA was elevated in 82% of patients with CaP while PAP was elevated in only 54%. In this and other studies, PSA is superior to conventional serum markers in sensitivity, prediction of CaP stage and in longitudinal monitoring of disease. A 16% false positive rate precludes PSA as a screening test. The assay used was found to be simple and reliable. (author)

  7. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  8. Overview of the 2014 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2014-10-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is a widely recognized world class program. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Integral data from the IRPhEP Handbook is used by reactor safety and design, nuclear data, criticality safety, and analytical methods development specialists, worldwide, to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques. The IRPhEP Handbook is among the most frequently quoted reference in the nuclear industry and is expected to be a valuable resource for future decades.

  9. 'PrEP is not ready for our community, and our community is not ready for PrEP': pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV for people who inject drugs and limits to the HIV prevention response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Andy; Albers, Eliot Ross; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2017-04-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV, or 'PrEP', is the use of antiretroviral medicines by people who are HIV-negative to protect themselves against acquiring HIV. PrEP has shown efficacy for preventing HIV acquisition. Despite the potential, many concerns have been voiced by people who inject drugs (PWID) and their organizations. There is a need to engage with these views and ensure their integration in to policy and strategy. This paper presents PWID views on PrEP to foster the uptake of these opinions into scientific and policy debate around PrEP METHODS: Critical analysis of a report of a community consultation led by the International Network of People who Use Drugs (INPUD). The INPUD report highlights enthusiasm from PWID for PrEP, but also three main concerns: the feasibility and ethics of PrEP, its potential use as a substitute for other harm reduction strategies and how a focus on PrEP heralds a re-medicalization of HIV. Each concern relates to evidenced gaps in essential services or opposition to harm reduction and PWID human rights. People who use drugs have fundamental concerns about the potential impacts of pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV which reflect a 'fault line' in HIV prevention: a predominance of biomedical approaches over community perspectives. Greater community engagement in HIV prevention strategy is needed, or we risk continuing to ignore the need for action on the underlying structural drivers and social context of the HIV epidemic. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. From Prostate to Bone: Key Players in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thobe, Megan N.; Clark, Robert J.; Bainer, Russell O.; Prasad, Sandip M.; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W.

    2011-01-01

    Bone is the most common site for metastasis in human prostate cancer patients. Skeletal metastases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and overall greatly affect the quality of life of prostate cancer patients. Despite advances in our understanding of the biology of primary prostate tumors, our knowledge of how and why secondary tumors derived from prostate cancer cells preferentially localize bone remains limited. The physiochemical properties of bone, and signaling molecules including specific chemokines and their receptors, are distinct in nature and function, yet play intricate and significant roles in prostate cancer bone metastasis. Examining the impact of these facets of bone metastasis in vivo remains a significant challenge, as animal models that mimic the natural history and malignant progression clinical prostate cancer are rare. The goals of this article are to discuss (1) characteristics of bone that most likely render it a favorable environment for prostate tumor cell growth, (2) chemokine signaling that is critical in the recruitment and migration of prostate cancer cells to the bone, and (3) current animal models utilized in studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. Further research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the extravasation of disseminated prostate cancer cells into the bone and to provide a better understanding of the basis of cancer cell survival within the bone microenvironment. The development of animal models that recapitulate more closely the human clinical scenario of prostate cancer will greatly benefit the generation of better therapies

  11. From Prostate to Bone: Key Players in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thobe, Megan N. [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Clark, Robert J. [Department of Molecular Pathogenesis and Molecular Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bainer, Russell O. [Department of Human Genetics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Prasad, Sandip M.; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W., E-mail: crinkers@uchicago.edu [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2011-01-27

    Bone is the most common site for metastasis in human prostate cancer patients. Skeletal metastases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and overall greatly affect the quality of life of prostate cancer patients. Despite advances in our understanding of the biology of primary prostate tumors, our knowledge of how and why secondary tumors derived from prostate cancer cells preferentially localize bone remains limited. The physiochemical properties of bone, and signaling molecules including specific chemokines and their receptors, are distinct in nature and function, yet play intricate and significant roles in prostate cancer bone metastasis. Examining the impact of these facets of bone metastasis in vivo remains a significant challenge, as animal models that mimic the natural history and malignant progression clinical prostate cancer are rare. The goals of this article are to discuss (1) characteristics of bone that most likely render it a favorable environment for prostate tumor cell growth, (2) chemokine signaling that is critical in the recruitment and migration of prostate cancer cells to the bone, and (3) current animal models utilized in studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. Further research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the extravasation of disseminated prostate cancer cells into the bone and to provide a better understanding of the basis of cancer cell survival within the bone microenvironment. The development of animal models that recapitulate more closely the human clinical scenario of prostate cancer will greatly benefit the generation of better therapies.

  12. Granulomatous prostatitis - an infrequent diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RPS Punia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatous prostatitis is a rare disorder of pros-tate. We encountered 10 cases of′grmudomatous prosta-titis consisting of 5 cases of non-specific granulomatous prostatitis, 2 cases of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, I case of tuberculous prostatitis, I case of malakoplakia prostate and I case of granulomatous prostatitis associ-ated with adenocarcinoma prostate. The diagnosis was made by histopathologic examination of trucut biopsy, TURP chips or retropubic prostatectomy specimen. In all the cases, granulomatous prostatitis was an incidental find-ing.

  13. Multiparametric MR imaging in diagnosis of chronic prostatitis and its differentiation from prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Sah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic prostatitis is a heterogeneous condition with high prevalence rate. Chronic prostatitis has overlap in clinical presentation with other prostate disorders and is one of the causes of high serum prostate specific antigen (PSA level. Chronic prostatitis, unlike acute prostatitis, is difficult to diagnose reliably and accurately on the clinical grounds alone. Not only this, it is also challenging to differentiate chronic prostatitis from prostate cancer with imaging modalities like TRUS and conventional MR Imaging, as the findings can mimic those of prostate cancer. Even biopsy doesn't play promising role in the diagnosis of chronic prostatitis as it has limited sensitivity and specificity. As a result of this, chronic prostatitis may be misdiagnosed as a malignant condition and end up in aggressive surgical management resulting in increased morbidity. This warrants the need of reliable diagnostic tool which has ability not only to diagnose it reliably but also to differentiate it from the prostate cancer. Recently, it is suggested that multiparametric MR Imaging of the prostate could improve the diagnostic accuracy of the prostate cancer. This review is based on the critically published literature and aims to provide an overview of multiparamateric MRI techniques in the diagnosis of chronic prostatitis and its differentiation from prostate cancer.

  14. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stromal androgen receptor roles in the development of normal prostate, benign prostate hyperplasia, and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-02-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa, much more attention has been focused on epithelial AR roles. However, accumulating evidence indicates that stromal AR is also irreplaceable and plays critical roles in prostate disease progression. Herein, we summarize the roles of stromal AR in the development of normal prostate, BPH, and PCa, with evidence from the recent results of in vitro cell line studies, tissue recombination experiments, and AR knockout animal models. Current evidence suggests that stromal AR may play positive roles to promote BPH and PCa progression, and targeting stromal AR selectively with AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, may allow development of better therapies with fewer adverse effects to battle BPH and PCa. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 EP2 Receptor Deletion Attenuates Intracerebral Hemorrhage-Induced Brain Injury and Improves Functional Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L. Leclerc

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a devastating type of stroke characterized by bleeding into the brain parenchyma and secondary brain injury resulting from strong neuroinflammatory responses to blood components. Production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is significantly upregulated following ICH and contributes to this inflammatory response in part through its E prostanoid receptor subtype 2 (EP2. Signaling through the EP2 receptor has been shown to affect outcomes of many acute and chronic neurological disorders; although, not yet explored in the context of ICH. Wildtype (WT and EP2 receptor knockout (EP2−/− mice were subjected to ICH, and various anatomical and functional outcomes were assessed by histology and neurobehavioral testing, respectively. When compared with age-matched WT controls, EP2−/− mice had 41.9 ± 4.7% smaller ICH-induced brain lesions and displayed significantly less ipsilateral hemispheric enlargement and incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage. Anatomical outcomes correlated with improved functional recovery as identified by neurological deficit scoring. Histological staining was performed to begin investigating the mechanisms involved in EP2-mediated neurotoxicity after ICH. EP2−/− mice exhibited 45.5 ± 5.8% and 41.4 ± 8.1% less blood and ferric iron accumulation, respectively. Furthermore, significantly less striatal and cortical microgliosis, striatal and cortical astrogliosis, blood–brain barrier breakdown, and peripheral neutrophil infiltration were seen in EP2−/− mice. This study is the first to suggest a deleterious role for the PGE2-EP2 signaling axis in modulating brain injury, inflammation, and functional recovery following ICH. Targeting the EP2 G protein-coupled receptor may represent a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of hemorrhagic stroke.

  17. A Numerical Study of Mesh Adaptivity in Multiphase Flows with Non-Newtonian Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, James; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Xie, Zhihua; Alberini, Federico; Simmons, Mark; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    We present an investigation into the computational efficiency benefits of dynamic mesh adaptivity in the numerical simulation of transient multiphase fluid flow problems involving Non-Newtonian fluids. Such fluids appear in a range of industrial applications, from printing inks to toothpastes and introduce new challenges for mesh adaptivity due to the additional ``memory'' of viscoelastic fluids. Nevertheless, the multiscale nature of these flows implies huge potential benefits for a successful implementation. The study is performed using the open source package Fluidity, which couples an unstructured mesh control volume finite element solver for the multiphase Navier-Stokes equations to a dynamic anisotropic mesh adaptivity algorithm, based on estimated solution interpolation error criteria, and conservative mesh-to-mesh interpolation routine. The code is applied to problems involving rheologies ranging from simple Newtonian to shear-thinning to viscoelastic materials and verified against experimental data for various industrial and microfluidic flows. This work was undertaken as part of the EPSRC MEMPHIS programme grant EP/K003976/1.

  18. Combinatorial effects of quercetin and sex-steroids on fluid and electrolytes' (Na+, Cl-, HCO3- secretory mechanisms in the uterus of ovariectomised female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Shahzad

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of uterine fluid environment could impair successful reproduction and this could be due to the effect of environmental estrogens. Therefore, in this study, effect of quercetin, an environmental estrogen on uterine fluid and electrolytes concentrations were investigated under sex-steroid influence. Ovariectomised adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were given 10, 50 or 100mg/kg/day quercetin subcutaneously with 17-β estradiol (E for seven days or three days E, then three days E plus progesterone (P (E+P treatment. Uterine fluid secretion rate, Na+, Cl- and HCO3- concentrations were determined by in-vivo perfusion. Following sacrifice, uteri were harvested and levels of the proteins of interest were identified by Western blotting and Realtime PCR. Distribution of these proteins in the uterus was observed by immunofluorescence. Levels of uterine cAMP were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA. Administration of quercetin at increasing doses increased uterine fluid secretion rate, Na+, Cl- and HCO3- concentrations, but to the levels lesser than that of E. In concordant, levels of CFTR, SLC4A4, ENaC (α, β and γ, Na+/K+-ATPase, GPα/β, AC and cAMP in the uterus increased following increased in the doses of quercetin. Co-administration of quercetin with E caused uterine fluid secretion rate, Na+, Cl- and HCO3- concentrations to decrease. In concordant, uterine CFTR, SLC26A6, SLC4A4, ENaC (α, β and γ, Na+/K+-ATPase, GPα/β, AC and cAMP decreased. Greatest effects were observed following co-administration of 10mg/kg/day quercetin with E. Co-administration of quercetin with E+P caused uterine fluid Na+ and HCO3- concentrations to increase but no changes in fluid secretion rate and Cl- concentration were observed. Co-administration of high dose quercetin (100 mg/kg/day with E+P caused uterine CFTR, SLC26A6, AC, GPα/β and ENaC (α, β and γ to increase. Quercetin-induced changes in the uterine fluid secretion rate and

  19. Circulating tumour cells escape from EpCAM-based detection due to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorges, Tobias M; Tinhofer, Ingeborg; Drosch, Michael; Röse, Lars; Zollner, Thomas M; Krahn, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have shown prognostic relevance in metastatic breast, prostate, colon and pancreatic cancer. For further development of CTCs as a biomarker, we compared the performance of different protocols for CTC detection in murine breast cancer xenograft models (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and KPL-4). Blood samples were taken from tumour bearing animals (20 to 200 mm 2 ) and analysed for CTCs using 1. an epithelial marker based enrichment method (AdnaTest), 2. an antibody independent technique, targeting human gene transcripts (qualitative PCR), and 3. an antibody-independent approach, targeting human DNA-sequences (quantitative PCR). Further, gene expression changes associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were determined with an EMT-specific PCR assay. We used the commercially available Adna Test, RT-PCR on human housekeeping genes and a PCR on AluJ sequences to detect CTCs in xenografts models. Phenotypic changes in CTCs were tested with the commercially available “Human Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition RT-Profiler PCR Array”. Although the AdnaTest detects as few as 1 tumour cell in 1 ml of mouse blood spiking experiments, no CTCs were detectable with this approach in vivo despite visible metastasis formation. The presence of CTCs could, however, be demonstrated by PCR targeting human transcripts or DNA-sequences - without epithelial pre-enrichment. The failure of CTC detection by the AdnaTest resulted from downregulation of EpCAM, whereas mesenchymal markers like Twist and EGFR were upregulated on CTCs. Such a change in the expression profile during metastatic spread of tumour cells has already been reported and was linked to a biological program termed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The use of EpCAM-based enrichment techniques leads to the failure to detect CTC populations that have undergone EMT. Our findings may explain clinical results where low CTC numbers have been reported even in patients with late

  20. Identification of genes regulating migration and invasion using a new model of metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banyard, Jacqueline; Chung, Ivy; Migliozzi, Matthew; Phan, Derek T; Wilson, Arianne M; Zetter, Bruce R; Bielenberg, Diane R

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the complex, multistep process of metastasis remains a major challenge in cancer research. Metastasis models can reveal insights in tumor development and progression and provide tools to test new intervention strategies. To develop a new cancer metastasis model, we used DU145 human prostate cancer cells and performed repeated rounds of orthotopic prostate injection and selection of subsequent lymph node metastases. Tumor growth, metastasis, cell migration and invasion were analyzed. Microarray analysis was used to identify cell migration- and cancer-related genes correlating with metastasis. Selected genes were silenced using siRNA, and their roles in cell migration and invasion were determined in transwell migration and Matrigel invasion assays. Our in vivo cycling strategy created cell lines with dramatically increased tumorigenesis and increased ability to colonize lymph nodes (DU145LN1-LN4). Prostate tumor xenografts displayed increased vascularization, enlarged podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels and invasive margins. Microarray analysis revealed gene expression profiles that correlated with metastatic potential. Using gene network analysis we selected 3 significantly upregulated cell movement and cancer related genes for further analysis: EPCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule), ITGB4 (integrin β4) and PLAU (urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)). These genes all showed increased protein expression in the more metastatic DU145-LN4 cells compared to the parental DU145. SiRNA knockdown of EpCAM, integrin-β4 or uPA all significantly reduced cell migration in DU145-LN4 cells. In contrast, only uPA siRNA inhibited cell invasion into Matrigel. This role of uPA in cell invasion was confirmed using the uPA inhibitors, amiloride and UK122. Our approach has identified genes required for the migration and invasion of metastatic tumor cells, and we propose that our new in vivo model system will be a powerful tool to interrogate the metastatic

  1. Radiation-Induced Leiomyosarcoma of the Prostate after Brachytherapy for Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Horiguchi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RTx has been employed as a curative therapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. RTx-induced sarcomas (RISs are rare, late adverse events, representing less than 0.2% of all irradiated patients. RISs are more aggressive tumors than prostatic adenocarcinomas. Herein, we present a case with RTx-induced prostatic leiomyosarcoma after permanent brachytherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. A 69-year-old male presented with dysuria and gross hematuria. Six years previously, he had been diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and was treated by permanent brachytherapy. Urethroscopy showed stenosis by a tumor at the prostate. Transurethral prostatectomy was performed for a diagnosis. Based on pathological findings, the diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma of the prostate. He was treated with three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CTx that consisted of doxorubicin and ifosfamide (AI, followed by a prostatocystectomy with intrapelvic lymphadenectomy. The tumor extended from the prostate and infiltrated the bladder wall and serosa with lymphatic and venous invasion. The surgical margin was negative, and no residual prostatic adenocarcinoma was observed. The proportion of necrotic tumor cells by neoadjuvant CTx was around 50%. Subsequently, adjuvant CTx was offered, but the patient chose a follow-up without CTx. Local recurrence and lung metastasis were detected by computed tomography 3 months after the surgery. He was treated again with AI. However, CTx was not effective and he died 6 months after the operation. In conclusion, an effective treatment strategy for prostatic sarcoma should be developed in the near future, although the clinical feature of prostatic sarcoma remains unclear due to its rare incidence.

  2. Comprehensive overview of prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farhan Ullah; Ihsan, Awais Ullah; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Jana, Ruby; Wazir, Junaid; Khongorzul, Puregmaa; Waqar, Muhammad; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2017-10-01

    Prostatitis is a common urinary tract syndrome that many doctors find problematic to treat effectively. It is the third most commonly found urinary tract disease in men after prostate cancer and Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH). Prostatitis may account for 25% of all office visits made to the urological clinics complaining about the genital and urinary systems all over the world. In the present study, we classified prostatitis and comprehensively elaborated the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of acute bacterial prostatitis (category I), chronic bacterial prostatitis (category II), chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) (category III), and asymptomatic prostatitis (category IV). In addition, we also tried to get some insights about other types of prostatitis-like fungal, viral and gonococcal prostatitis. The aim of this review is to present the detail current perspective of prostatitis in a single review. To the best of our knowledge currently, there is not a single comprehensive review, which can completely elaborate this important topic in an effective way. Furthermore, this review will provide a solid platform to conduct future studies on different aspects such as risk factors, mechanism of pathogenesis, proper diagnosis, and rational treatment plans for fungal, viral, and gonococcal prostatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Commentary: the value of PrEP for people who inject drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalind L Coleman; Susie McLean

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The offer of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended as an additional option for HIV prevention for people at substantial risk of HIV infection as part of combination HIV prevention approaches. Implementing this depends on integrating PrEP in public health programmes that address risky practices with evidence-based interventions, and that operate in an enabling legal and policy environment for the delivery of health services to those at higher risk of HIV infection. What ...

  4. Corporate actions for the climate - Greenhouse gas reduction practices at EpE member companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalendar, Pierre-Andre de

    2012-11-01

    Corporate awareness of the reality of climate change and the impact of human activity on global warming goes back some twenty years. It was at this time that EpE members decided to take voluntary action towards lowering greenhouse gas emissions. EpE member companies started out by measuring their emissions (see EpE publication entitled 'Measuring and Controlling Greenhouse Gas Emissions'), then worked to identify initiatives easiest to implement and those that would have the best reduction potential. This booklet is prepared to contribute to other businesses improving their knowledge and understanding of the best practices identified and implemented by EpE members, in order to speed up the reduction of global emissions, without hampering their competitiveness. The practices showcased here have intentionally been detailed so that they can be easier to adopt. (authors)

  5. [Bacterial prostatitis and prostatic fibrosis: modern view on the treatment and prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, A V; Pushkar, D Yu; Khodyreva, L A; Dudareva, A A

    2016-08-01

    Treatments of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CP) remain difficult problem. Bacterial prostatitis is a disease entity diagnosed clinically and by evidence of inflammation and infection localized to the prostate. Risk factors for UTI in men include urological interventions, such as transrectal prostate biopsy. Ensuing infections after prostate biopsy, such as UTI and bacterial prostatitis, are increasing due to increasing rates of fluoroquinolone resistance. The increasing global antibiotic resistance also significantly affects management of UTI in men, and therefore calls for alternative strategies. Prostatic inflammation has been suggested to contribute to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) by inducing fibrosis. Several studies have shown that prostatic fibrosis is strongly associated with impaired urethral function and LUTS severity. Fibrosis resulting from excessive deposition of collagen is traditionally recognized as a progressive irreversible condition and an end stage of inflammatory diseases; however, there is compelling evidence in both animal and human studies to support that the development of fibrosis could potentially be a reversible process. Prostate inflammation may induce fibrotic changes in periurethral prostatic tissues, promote urethral stiffness and LUTS. Patients experiencing CP and prostate-related LUTS could benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies, especially used in combination with the currently prescribed enzyme treatment with Longidase. Treatment results showed that longidase is highly effective in bacterial and abacterial CP. Longidase addition to standard therapeutic methods significantly reduced the disease symptoms and regression of inflammatory-proliferative alterations in the prostate.

  6. E&P data lifecycle: a case study in Petrobras Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastella, Laura; Campinho, Vania; Alonso, João

    2013-04-01

    Petrobras, the biggest Brazilian Petroleum Company, has been studying and working on Brazilian sedimentary basins for nearly 60 years. The corporate database currently registers over 25000 wells and all their associated products (geophysical logs, cores, sidewall samples) and analyses. There are thousands of samples, descriptions, pictures, measures, and other scientific data resulted from petroleum exploration and production. This data constitutes a huge scientific database which is applied to support Petrobras economic strategy. Geological models built during the exploration phase continue to be refined during both the development and production phases: data should be continually manipulated, correlated and integrated. As E&P assets reach maturity, a new cycle starts: data is re-analyzed and new hypotheses are made in order to increase hydrocarbon productivity. Initial geological models then evolve from accumulated knowledge throughout all the E&P phases. Therefore the quality control must be performed in the first phases of data acquisition, i.e., during the exploration phase, to avoid reworking and loss of information. The last decade witnessed a great evolution in petroleum industry technology. As a consequence, the complexity and particulars of the information generated have increased accordingly. Current technology has also facilitated access to networks and databases, making it possible to store large amounts of information. This scenario makes available a large mass of information from difference sources, which uses heterogeneous vocabulary as well as different scales and measurement units. In this context, knowledge might be diluted and the total amount of information cannot be applied in E&P process. In order to provide adequate data governance, data input is controlled by rules, standards and policies, implemented by corporate software systems. Petrobras' integrated E&P database is a centralized repository to which all E&P systems can have access. The

  7. Effects of lead(II) on the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and colony formation of cultured Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiang-dong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Dai, Wei; Xing, Ke-zhing; Yang, Fan

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of lead(II) on the production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), including bound extracellular polysaccharides (bEPS) and soluble extracellular polysaccharides (sEPS), and the colony formation of Microcystis aeruginosa, cultures of M. aeruginosa were exposed to four concentrations (5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L) of lead(II) for 10 d under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L lead(II) stimulated M. aeruginosa growth throughout the experiment while 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) inhibited M. aeruginosa growth in the first 2 d exposure and then stimulated it. As compared to the control group, significant increases in the bEPS and sEPS production were observed in 20.0 and 40.0 mg/L lead(II) treatments (P bEPS production, which conversely promoted colony formation, suggesting that heavy metals might be contributing to the bloom-forming of M. aeruginosa in natural conditions.

  8. Osteoblast-Prostate Cancer Cell Interaction in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Navone, Nora

    2001-01-01

    .... This suggests that prostate cancer cells interact with cells from the osteoblastic lineage. To understand the molecular bases of prostatic bone metastases, we established two prostate cancer cell lines, MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b (1...

  9. Rooting gene trees without outgroups: EP rooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, Janet S; Little, Roderick J A; Lake, James A

    2012-01-01

    Gene sequences are routinely used to determine the topologies of unrooted phylogenetic trees, but many of the most important questions in evolution require knowing both the topologies and the roots of trees. However, general algorithms for calculating rooted trees from gene and genomic sequences in the absence of gene paralogs are few. Using the principles of evolutionary parsimony (EP) (Lake JA. 1987a. A rate-independent technique for analysis of nucleic acid sequences: evolutionary parsimony. Mol Biol Evol. 4:167-181) and its extensions (Cavender, J. 1989. Mechanized derivation of linear invariants. Mol Biol Evol. 6:301-316; Nguyen T, Speed TP. 1992. A derivation of all linear invariants for a nonbalanced transversion model. J Mol Evol. 35:60-76), we explicitly enumerate all linear invariants that solely contain rooting information and derive algorithms for rooting gene trees directly from gene and genomic sequences. These new EP linear rooting invariants allow one to determine rooted trees, even in the complete absence of outgroups and gene paralogs. EP rooting invariants are explicitly derived for three taxon trees, and rules for their extension to four or more taxa are provided. The method is demonstrated using 18S ribosomal DNA to illustrate how the new animal phylogeny (Aguinaldo AMA et al. 1997. Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods, and other moulting animals. Nature 387:489-493; Lake JA. 1990. Origin of the metazoa. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87:763-766) may be rooted directly from sequences, even when they are short and paralogs are unavailable. These results are consistent with the current root (Philippe H et al. 2011. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella. Nature 470:255-260).

  10. Search for Leptoquark Bosons in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Leiner, B.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2005-01-01

    A search for scalar and vector leptoquarks coupling to first generation fermions is performed using the e^+p and e^-p scattering data collected by the H1 experiment between 1994 and 2000. The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 117 pb^{-1}. No evidence for the direct or indirect production of such particles is found in data samples with a large transverse momentum final state electron or with large missing transverse momentum. Constraints on leptoquark models are established. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength, leptoquarks with masses up to 275-325 GeV are ruled out. These limits improve and supercede earlier H1 limits based on subsamples of the data used here.

  11. Search for leptoquark bosons in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kückens, J.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Leißner, B.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2005-11-01

    A search for scalar and vector leptoquarks coupling to first generation fermions is performed using the ep and ep scattering data collected by the H1 experiment between 1994 and 2000. The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 117 pb. No evidence for the direct or indirect production of such particles is found in data samples with a large transverse momentum final state electron or with large missing transverse momentum. Constraints on leptoquark models are established. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength, leptoquarks with masses up to 275 325 GeV are ruled out at 95% confidence level. These limits improve and supercede earlier H1 limits based on subsamples of the data used here.

  12. Prostatitis and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrani, Saad; McGill, John; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction. Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis) is a common health problem affecting many young and middle aged men. Prostatitis is considered a correctable cause of male infertility, but the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment options of prostatitis in male infertility remain unclear. This literature review will focus on current data regarding prostatitis and its impact on male infertility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EP-DNN: A Deep Neural Network-Based Global Enhancer Prediction Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Gon; Harwani, Mrudul; Grama, Ananth; Chaterji, Somali

    2016-12-08

    We present EP-DNN, a protocol for predicting enhancers based on chromatin features, in different cell types. Specifically, we use a deep neural network (DNN)-based architecture to extract enhancer signatures in a representative human embryonic stem cell type (H1) and a differentiated lung cell type (IMR90). We train EP-DNN using p300 binding sites, as enhancers, and TSS and random non-DHS sites, as non-enhancers. We perform same-cell and cross-cell predictions to quantify the validation rate and compare against two state-of-the-art methods, DEEP-ENCODE and RFECS. We find that EP-DNN has superior accuracy with a validation rate of 91.6%, relative to 85.3% for DEEP-ENCODE and 85.5% for RFECS, for a given number of enhancer predictions and also scales better for a larger number of enhancer predictions. Moreover, our H1 → IMR90 predictions turn out to be more accurate than IMR90 → IMR90, potentially because H1 exhibits a richer signature set and our EP-DNN model is expressive enough to extract these subtleties. Our work shows how to leverage the full expressivity of deep learning models, using multiple hidden layers, while avoiding overfitting on the training data. We also lay the foundation for exploration of cross-cell enhancer predictions, potentially reducing the need for expensive experimentation.

  14. EP-DNN: A Deep Neural Network-Based Global Enhancer Prediction Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Gon; Harwani, Mrudul; Grama, Ananth; Chaterji, Somali

    2016-12-01

    We present EP-DNN, a protocol for predicting enhancers based on chromatin features, in different cell types. Specifically, we use a deep neural network (DNN)-based architecture to extract enhancer signatures in a representative human embryonic stem cell type (H1) and a differentiated lung cell type (IMR90). We train EP-DNN using p300 binding sites, as enhancers, and TSS and random non-DHS sites, as non-enhancers. We perform same-cell and cross-cell predictions to quantify the validation rate and compare against two state-of-the-art methods, DEEP-ENCODE and RFECS. We find that EP-DNN has superior accuracy with a validation rate of 91.6%, relative to 85.3% for DEEP-ENCODE and 85.5% for RFECS, for a given number of enhancer predictions and also scales better for a larger number of enhancer predictions. Moreover, our H1 → IMR90 predictions turn out to be more accurate than IMR90 → IMR90, potentially because H1 exhibits a richer signature set and our EP-DNN model is expressive enough to extract these subtleties. Our work shows how to leverage the full expressivity of deep learning models, using multiple hidden layers, while avoiding overfitting on the training data. We also lay the foundation for exploration of cross-cell enhancer predictions, potentially reducing the need for expensive experimentation.

  15. Acceptability of Daily Use of Free Oral Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Among Transgender Women Sex Workers in Shenyang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zixin; Lau, Joseph T F; Yang, Xueying; Cai, Yong; Gross, Danielle L; Ma, Tiecheng; Liu, Yan

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the acceptability of daily use of free oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and associated factors among transgender women sex workers in Shenyang, China, following a briefing on PrEP. A total of 183 HIV negative or sero-status unknown participants completed the cross-sectional survey. The prevalence of acceptability of daily use of free oral PrEP was 61.2%. Adjusting for education level and monthly income, variables on negative attitudes toward PrEP (i.e., having concerns about the side-effects of PrEP) [Adjusted odds ratios (AOR): 0.26], perceived subjective norms (i.e., perceiving support from male partners to take PrEP) (AOR: 2.08), and perceived behavioral control (e.g., perceiving complete control over using PrEP) (AOR: 2.10-16.72) were significantly associated with acceptability of daily use of free oral PrEP. In addition, experiencing violence during sex work, perceived risk of contracting HIV from clients and probable anxiety were also significant. Future PrEP promotion campaigns should consider these factors.

  16. Preparation and microwave-absorbing property of EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Huixia, E-mail: fenghx@lut.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Bai, Dezhong [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Tan, Lin; Chen, Nali [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Processing and Recycling of Nonferrous Metals, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Wang, Yueyi [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China)

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we introduced expanded perlite (EP) into the system of ferrite composites for the first time. By sol-gel self-propagating combustion method, expanded perlite/barium ferrite (EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) was prepared, and then ternary composites of expanded perlite/barium ferrite/polyaniline (EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI) were obtained by in-situ oxidative polymerization of aniline on EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} mixture. Although, as is well known, the values of saturation magnetization (Ms), remnant magnetization (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) of composites are all lower than the pure BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} particles owing to the existence of the nonmagnetic EP and PANI, the EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI composites exhibit absorption characteristics at the range of 2–18 GHz, the effective absorption bandwidth (less than −4 dB) reached 12.12 GHz and the minimum reflection loss of −5.66 dB at 8.48 GHz with only 2 mm thickness of absorbing layer. So the composites could resist urban electromagnetic pollution, such as wireless network, communication and so on, effectively. - Highlights: • The expanded perlite (EP) was introduced into the system of ferrite composites at the first time. • Novel ternary nanocomposite of EP/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19}/PANI is prepared by in-situ oxidative polymerization. • Composite absorber exhibit a minimum reflection loss of -5.66 dB at 8.48 GHz with a matching thickness of 2 mm. • Composite absorber possess the features like low-cost, lightweight and wide bandwidth absorption of civil EM radiation.

  17. Baldness, benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer and androgen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faydaci, Gökhan; Bilal, Eryildirim; Necmettin, Penpegül; Fatih, Tarhan; Asuman, Orçun; Uğur, Kuyumcuoğlu

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated the pattern of baldness and serum androgen levels in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. BPH, prostate cancer and androgenic alopecia (AA) were somehow androgen dependent and affect large population of elderly men. A total of 152 patients, 108 patients with BPH and 44 patients with prostate cancer were included in the study. We measured serum total, free and bioavailable testosterone, FSH, LH, prolactin, estradiol, albumin and SHBG levels. Baldness classification was based on Norwood's classification and we categorised baldness as vertex and frontal baldness. The frequency of AA in BPH and prostate cancer groups were not different. We looked for some correlation between the two groups with respect to AA and hormone levels. We did not find any correlation between AA and total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone or SHBG levels in both groups. This prospective study with selected small group of patients showed that there is no difference of male pattern baldness in BPH and prostate cancer patients and also there is no correlation between pattern of baldness and serum androgen levels.

  18. Seminal epithelium in prostate biopsy can mimic malignant and premalignant prostatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arista-Nasr, J; Trolle-Silva, A; Aguilar-Ayala, E; Martínez-Benítez, B

    2016-01-01

    In most prostate biopsies, the seminal epithelium is easily recognised because it meets characteristic histological criteria. However, some biopsies can mimic malignant or premalignant prostatic lesions. The aims of this study were to analyse the histological appearance of the biopsies that mimic adenocarcinomas or preneoplastic prostatic lesions, discuss the differential diagnosis and determine the frequency of seminal epithelia in prostate biopsies. We consecutively reviewed 500 prostate puncture biopsies obtained using the sextant method and selected those cases in which we observed seminal vesicle or ejaculatory duct epithelium. In the biopsies in which the seminal epithelium resembled malignant or premalignant lesions, immunohistochemical studies were conducted that included prostate-specific antigen and MUC6. The most important clinical data were recorded. Thirty-six (7.2%) biopsies showed seminal epithelium, and 7 of them (1.4%) resembled various prostate lesions, including high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations, adenocarcinomas with papillary patterns and poorly differentiated carcinoma. The seminal epithelium resembled prostate lesions when the lipofuscin deposit, the perinuclear vacuoles or the nuclear pseudoinclusions were inconspicuous or missing. Five of the 7 biopsies showed mild to moderate cellular atypia with small and hyperchromatic nuclei, and only 2 showed cellular pleomorphism. The patients were alive and asymptomatic after an average of 6 years of progression. The seminal epithelium resembles prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations and various types of prostatic adenocarcinomas in approximately 1.4% of prostate biopsies. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Stabilizing Effects of Bacterial Biofilms: EPS Penetration and Redistribution of Bed Stability Down the Sediment Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. D.; Zhang, C. K.; Zhou, Z.; Gong, Z.; Zhou, J. J.; Tao, J. F.; Paterson, D. M.; Feng, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Biofilms, consisting of microorganisms and their secreted extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), serve as "ecosystem engineers" stabilizing sedimentary environments. Natural sediment bed provides an excellent substratum for biofilm growth. The porous structure and rich nutrients allow the EPS matrix to spread deeper into the bed. A series of laboratory-controlled experiments were conducted to investigate sediment colonization of Bacillus subtilis and the penetration of EPS into the sediment bed with incubation time. In addition to EPS accumulation on the bed surface, EPS also penetrated downward. However, EPS distribution developed strong vertical heterogeneity with a much higher content in the surface layer than in the bottom layer. Scanning electron microscope images of vertical layers also displayed different micromorphological properties of sediment-EPS matrix. In addition, colloidal and bound EPSs exhibited distinctive distribution patterns. After the full incubation, the biosedimentary beds were eroded to test the variation of bed stability induced by biological effects. This research provides an important reference for the prediction of sediment transport and hence deepens the understanding of the biologically mediated sediment system and broadens the scope of the burgeoning research field of "biomorphodynamics."

  20. A completely calcified prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic calcification and prostatic calculus formation is commonly seen in adult population with chronic prostatitis, however, gross prostatic calcification which involves more than 3 cm2 of the gland is quite rare. We are presenting here one such case in which almost whole glandular prostate was converted into stone which is never reported so far.

  1. A protein-binding domain, EH, identified in the receptor tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 and conserved in evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, W T; Schumacher, C; Salcini, A E

    1995-01-01

    In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several heteroge......In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several...... heterogeneous proteins of yeast and nematode. The EH domain spans about 70 amino acids and shows approximately 60% overall amino acid conservation. We demonstrated the ability of the EH domain to specifically bind cytosolic proteins in normal and malignant cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and hematopoietic...... (for Eps15-related). Structural comparison of Eps15 and Eps15r defines a family of signal transducers possessing extensive networking abilities including EH-mediated binding and association with Src homology 3-containing proteins....

  2. Development of a new in vivo kit for detection of prostate specific antigen in human serum using immunoradiometric assay method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei, M. H.; Behradkia, P.; Shafii, M.; Movla, M.; Forutan, H.; Najafi, R.

    2006-01-01

    Prostate is a leading site for the cancer incidence, accounted for 31.0% of new cancer cases in men. Prostate-specific antigen is widely used in the detection and monitoring of the prostate cancer. Currently, immunoassay is used to detect Prostate-specific antigen in human serum. This technique is based on the interaction between antibody and antigen. The varied immunoassay formats and equipment to run the assays allow the users to measure the analytes rapidly, with the flexibility to run a small or a large number of samples. Among different immunoassay methods, immunoradiometric assay is a more sensitive and valuable detection approach. This study has been made in 4 parts: (1) purification of Prostate-specific antigen from seminal fluid; (2) preparation of hybridoma cells which secrete monoclonal antibody (mAb) against Prostate-specific antigen , (3) selection of pair monoclonal antibody among those antibodies, and finally (4) design of an immunoradiometric assay kit and it's quality control . The results of this study were: (1) obtaining a huge amount of Prostate-specific antigen as semi-purified and purified, that is a valuable material for preparation of standard kits; (2) preparation of 8 kinds of monoclonal antibodies; (3) finding 4 pairs of monoclonal antibodies which react with different epitopes on Prostate-specific antigen molecule; and (4) preparation of immunoradiometric assay kit for measuring Prostate-specific antigen concentration in human serum

  3. Sorption of ferrous iron by EPS from the acidophilic bacterium Acidiphilium Sp.: A mechanism proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapia, J.M.; MuNoz, J.; Gonzlez, F.; Blazquez, M.L.; Ballester, A.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the uptake of Fe(II) by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the acidophilic bacterium Acidiphillium 3.2Sup(5). These EPS were extracted using EDTA. EPS of A. 3.2Sup(5) loaded in sorption tests with Fe(II), were characterized using the following experimental techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental results indicate that EPS adsorb ferrous iron according to Freundlich model with a metal sorption uptake of K = 1.14 mg1−1/n L1/n g−1 and a sorption intensity of 1/n = 1.26. In addition, ferrous iron sorption by EPS took place by preferential interaction with the carboxyl group which promotes the formation of ferrous iron oxalates (FeC2O4). Since the interaction reaction was reversible (Log K = 0.77 ± 0.33), that means that the cation sorption can be reversed at convenience. (Author)

  4. BEHAVIOUR OF UNREINFORCED EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE (EPS-LWC WALL PANEL ENHANCED WITH STEEL FIBRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROHANA MAMAT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used steel fibre as reinforcement while enhancing the EPS-LWC strength. In line with architectural demand and ventilation requirement, opening within wall panel was also taken into account. Experimental tests were conducted for reinforced and unreinforced EPS-LWC wall panel. Two samples with size of 1500 mm (height x 1000 mm (length x 75 mm (thickness for each group of wall panel were prepared. Samples in each group had opening size of 600 mm (height x 400 mm (length located at 350 mm and 550 mm from upper end respectively. EPS-LWC wall panel had fcu of 20.87 N/mm2 and a density of 1900 kg/m3. The loading capacity, displacement profiles and crack pattern of each sample was analyzed and discussed. Unreinforced EPS-LWC enhanced with steel fibre resist almost similar loading as reinforced EPS-LWC wall panel. The presence of steel fibre as the only reinforcement creates higher lateral displacement. Wall panel experience shear failure at the side of opening. The number of micro cracks reduces significantly due to presence of steel fibre.

  5. Role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the management of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szollosi Attila

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men, after lung cancer. The gold standard procedure in prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis is the ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP used in solving the bladder outlet obstruction, can have a role in detection of PCa. The aim of this retrospective study is to examine the role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer.

  6. Perceived causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Oort, van I.M.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate self-reported causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands to obtain insight into the common beliefs and perceptions of risk factors for prostate cancer. Materials and methods A total of 956 prostate cancer survivors,

  7. Adhesion strength and spreading characteristics of EPS on membrane surfaces during lateral and central growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Tansel, Derya Z

    2013-11-01

    Deposition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on membrane surfaces is a precursor step for bacterial attachment. The purpose of this study was to analyze the morphological changes on a clean polysulfone ultrafilration membrane after exposure to effluent from a membrane bioreactor. The effluent was filtered to remove bacteria before exposing the membrane. The morphological characterization was performed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The lateral (2D) and central growth characteristics (3D) of the EPS deposits were evaluated by section and topographical analyses of the height images. The contact angle of single EPS units was 9.07 ± 0.50° which increased to 24.41 ± 1.00° for large clusters (over 10 units) and decreased to 18.68 ± 1.00° for the multilayered clusters. The surface tension of the single EPS units was 49.34 ± 1.70 mNm(-1). The surface tension of single layered small and large EPS clusters were 51.26 ± 2.05 and 53.48 ± 2.01 mNm(-1), respectively. For the multilayered clusters, the surface tension was 51.43 ± 2.05 mNm(-1). The spreading values were negative for all deposits on the polysulfone membrane indicating that the EPS clusters did not have tendency to spread but preferred to retain their shapes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A strange nucleon probe: the parity violation in ep{yields}ep; Une etrange sonde du nucleon: la violation de parite en diffusion ep{yields}ep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavata, Ch

    1998-10-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed the importance of strange quarks in the description of the spin structure of the proton. This unexpected fact has spurred an intense experimental activity to study the contribution of strange quarks to other aspects of the nucleon. In this framework experiments have been designed to weigh up this contribution to the charge distribution and the magnetization of the nucleon. The experimental way that leads to the measuring of the s-quark contribution is presented. The strange form factor can be deduced from the weak form factor of the proton combined with its electromagnetic form factors. The weak form factor can be measured by studying parity violation in ep elastic scattering. One of the chapters reviews the experimental equipment required to perform parity breaking measurements.The preliminary results of 2 experiments: SAMPLE and HAPPEX are given. (A.C.)

  9. Prognostic Importance of Small Prostate Size in Men Receiving Definitive Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether small prostate size is an adverse prognostic factor in men undergoing brachytherapy in the same manner in which it seems to be for men undergoing radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2008, 2024 patients underwent brachytherapy by a single brachytherapist. Median follow-up was 7.4 years. The role of small prostate size (≤20 cm 3 ) as a prognostic factor for biochemical progression-free survival, cause-specific survival, and all-cause mortality was investigated. The differences in survival between men with small and larger prostates were compared using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Results: Median prostate size for the entire cohort was 32.7 cm 3 . For the 167 men with small prostates, median prostate size was 17.4 cm 3 . There was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival (95.2% vs 96.2%, P=.603), cause-specific survival (97.7% vs 98.3%, P=.546), or all-cause mortality (78.0% vs 77.2%, P=.838) at 10 years for men with small prostates compared with men with larger prostates. On univariate and multivariate analysis, small prostate size was not associated with any of the primary outcome measures. Conclusion: Men with small prostates treated with brachytherapy have excellent outcomes and are at no higher risk of treatment failure than men with larger glands. High-quality implants with adequate margins seem sufficient to address the increased adverse risk factors associated with small prostate size.

  10. Phenotype and genotype in 52 patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by EP300 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergelot, Patricia; Van Belzen, Martine; Van Gils, Julien; Afenjar, Alexandra; Armour, Christine M; Arveiler, Benoit; Beets, Lex; Burglen, Lydie; Busa, Tiffany; Collet, Marie; Deforges, Julie; de Vries, Bert B A; Dominguez Garrido, Elena; Dorison, Nathalie; Dupont, Juliette; Francannet, Christine; Garciá-Minaúr, Sixto; Gabau Vila, Elisabeth; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Gener Querol, Blanca; Geneviève, David; Gérard, Marion; Gervasini, Cristina Giovanna; Goldenberg, Alice; Josifova, Dragana; Lachlan, Katherine; Maas, Saskia; Maranda, Bruno; Moilanen, Jukka S; Nordgren, Ann; Parent, Philippe; Rankin, Julia; Reardon, Willie; Rio, Marlène; Roume, Joëlle; Shaw, Adam; Smigiel, Robert; Sojo, Amaia; Solomon, Benjamin; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Stumpel, Constance; Suarez, Francisco; Terhal, Paulien; Thomas, Simon; Touraine, Renaud; Verloes, Alain; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Wincent, Josephine; Peters, Dorien J M; Bartsch, Oliver; Larizza, Lidia; Lacombe, Didier; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2016-12-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a developmental disorder characterized by a typical face and distal limbs abnormalities, intellectual disability, and a vast number of other features. Two genes are known to cause RSTS, CREBBP in 60% and EP300 in 8-10% of clinically diagnosed cases. Both paralogs act in chromatin remodeling and encode for transcriptional co-activators interacting with >400 proteins. Up to now 26 individuals with an EP300 mutation have been published. Here, we describe the phenotype and genotype of 42 unpublished RSTS patients carrying EP300 mutations and intragenic deletions and offer an update on another 10 patients. We compare the data to 308 individuals with CREBBP mutations. We demonstrate that EP300 mutations cause a phenotype that typically resembles the classical RSTS phenotype due to CREBBP mutations to a great extent, although most facial signs are less marked with the exception of a low-hanging columella. The limb anomalies are more similar to those in CREBBP mutated individuals except for angulation of thumbs and halluces which is very uncommon in EP300 mutated individuals. The intellectual disability is variable but typically less marked whereas the microcephaly is more common. All types of mutations occur but truncating mutations and small rearrangements are most common (86%). Missense mutations in the HAT domain are associated with a classical RSTS phenotype but otherwise no genotype-phenotype correlation is detected. Pre-eclampsia occurs in 12/52 mothers of EP300 mutated individuals versus in 2/59 mothers of CREBBP mutated individuals, making pregnancy with an EP300 mutated fetus the strongest known predictor for pre-eclampsia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Characterization of Pressure Transients Generated by Nanosecond Electrical Pulse (nsEP) Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Caleb C. Roth; Ronald A. Barnes Jr.; Bennett L. Ibey; Hope T. Beier; L. Christopher Mimun; Saher M. Maswadi; Mehdi Shadaram; Randolph D. Glickman

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) responsible for the breakdown (nanoporation) of cell plasma membranes after nanosecond pulse (nsEP) exposure remains poorly understood. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. However, the delivery of a high-voltage nsEP to cells by tungsten electrodes creates a multitude of biophysical phenomena, including electrohydraulic cavitation, el...

  12. Slepton and squark production and decay in ep collision at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, A.; Majerotto, W.; Oshimo, N.; Moesslacher, B.

    1991-06-01

    We present a detailed study of e+p → e+q+X and e+p → v+q+X and the subsequent decays of e,v, and q at the LHC (√s = 1.4 TeV). We explore the relevant supersymmetry parameter range. We calculate the cross section as well as the rates for interesting signatures such as the production of one or two leptons on the lepton side. (authors)

  13. Framing HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for the General Public: How Inclusive Messaging May Prevent Prejudice from Diminishing Public Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Underhill, Kristen; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Hansen, Nathan B; Kershaw, Trace S; Magnus, Manya; Krakower, Douglas S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Betancourt, Joseph R; Dovidio, John F

    2016-07-01

    Strategic framing of public messages about HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) may influence public support for policies and programs affecting access. This survey study examined how public attitudes toward PrEP differed based on the social group PrEP was described as benefiting ("beneficiary") and the moderating effect of prejudice. Members of the general public (n = 154) recruited online were randomly assigned to three beneficiary conditions: general population, gay men, or Black gay men. All participants received identical PrEP background information before completing measures of PrEP attitudes (specifying beneficiary), racism, and heterosexism. Despite anticipating greater PrEP adherence among gay men and Black gay men and perceiving PrEP as especially beneficial to the latter, participants expressed lower support for policies/programs making PrEP affordable for these groups vs. the general population. This disparity in support was stronger among participants reporting greater prejudice. Inclusive framing of PrEP in public discourse may prevent prejudice from undermining implementation efforts.

  14. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer FAQs Top 10 Things You Should Know About ... prostate cancer detected? What are the symptoms of prostate cancer? If the cancer is caught at its earliest ...

  15. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  16. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  17. MR spectroscopy of normal prostate, prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia: correlative study of metabolic characteristics with histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liangping; Wang Xiaoying; Ding Jianping; Li Feiyu; Shan Gangzhi; Xiao Jiangxi; Jiang Xuexiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To quantify and compare the metabolic characteristics of normal prostate, prostate cancer (PCa), and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) by using MR spectroscopy (MRS). Methods: Twenty-one cases of Pca, 23 cases of BPH proved by operation or systemic biopsy, and 17 cases of normal prostate were examined by MRS. The prostate was divided into 6 regions (left/ right bottom, middle, and tip), and the (Choline + Creatine)/Citrate (CC/C) value of each region was measured. After biopsy, all the puncture locations were marked and enrolled in one of the regions mentioned above. The average CC/C ratios of the normal prostate peripheral zone, the area of Pca, and the central zone of BPH were calculated. Results: The average ratio of CC/C for prostate cancer (2.13 ± 0.82) was statistically higher than that of normal prostate tissue (0.42 ± 0.19) and the regions of BPH (0.62 ± 0.19) (t 0.725, P=0.000; t=0.684, P=0.000). Conclusion: The difference of metabolic levels measured by MRS between PCa and BPH is statistically significant. MRS may be useful in the differential diagnosis of PCa and BPH. (authors)

  18. Appearance and methods of prostatic arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Gang; Yang Zhigang; Meng Fanzhe; Zhang Yingguang; Chen Zhiqiang; Yang Ming

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the methods of prostatic arteriography and evaluate the arteriographic appearance of prostatic blood supply. Methods: Selective and super-selective prostatic arteriographies were performed in 62 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic cancer. Results: The prostatic blood supply originated mainly from inferior vesical artery or internal pudendal artery or prostatic artery (80%). Prostatic arteriography could be performed successfully with skillful catheterization and high resolution DSA. Conclusions: Prostatic arteriography is helpful for evaluating the origin and quantity of prostate vasculature and important to differentiate benign prostatic hyperplasia from prostatic cancer

  19. Prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer and its relative factors in Lanzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Ganping; Wang Jiaji; Yue Zhongjin; Chen Xuehong

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer in Lanzhou, an investigation of the incidence of BPH and prostate cancer in 1356 male inhabitants over 50 years of age has been carried out including I-PSS, life quality (L), volume of prostate (V) and digital rectal examination. Plasma testosterone (T) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) were assayed in 145 cases. The incidence of BPH was 35.03%, being 41.04% in urban and 30.05% in rural inhabitants. The increase of BPH has been higher in urban inhabitants (P<0.05). The incidence of prostate cancer was 2.05%, being 3.09% in urban and 2.02% in rural inhabitants, the increase of prostate cancer has been higher in urban inhabitants (P< 0.05). A significant increase of prostate specific antigen was noted in prostate cancer patients (P<0.05). Conclusions: The increase of BPH and prostate cancer has been higher in urban inhabitants. The age, diet and residential areas might associate with a higher incidence of BPH and prostate cancer

  20. Threefold Increase in PrEP Uptake Over Time with High Adherence Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ethan; Moran, Kevin; Ryan, Daniel T; Mustanski, Brian; Newcomb, Michael E

    2018-05-04

    The goal of this work is to better understand utilization and uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) and transgender women (TGW). We assessed trends and correlates of PrEP use and adherence across three time points of longitudinal data collection among 885 YMSM and TGW (aged 16-29) from the RADAR cohort in Chicago, 2015-2017. Past 6-month PrEP use increased across three visits: from 6.6 to 17.5%. In multivariable models, past 6-month PrEP use was significantly associated with participation in condomless sex, having more sexual partners, and older age. At least three-quarters of current PrEP users reported being ≥ 90% adherent to PrEP medication across all visits. Past 6-month PrEP use increased over time with those who participated in high-risk HIV behaviors also those most likely to have taken PrEP. As PrEP uptake continues to rise, more research will be needed to understand predictors of PrEP usage, as well as patterns of sexual behavior change following uptake.

  1. Search for excited electrons in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2008-08-01

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb-1. The electroweak decays of excited electrons e→eγ, e→eZ and e→νW with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for excited electron production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on e production cross sections and on the ratio f/Λ of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited electron searches. The e production via contact interactions is also addressed for the first time in ep collisions.

  2. Special 2005 EPS HEPP prize colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Wahl, Heinrich; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    First evidence and measurement of direct CP violation by the NA31 experiment This is a colloquium celebrating the awarding of the 2005 EPS High Energy Particle Physics prize to Heinrich Wahl and the NA31 collaboration which showed for the first time Direct CP Violation in the decay of neutral K mesons. There will be an introduction to direct CP violation, followed by a review of experimental results.

  3. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma: A case suitable for active surveillance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Rais-Bahrami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to typical prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma is a rare variant of prostate cancer with low-grade clinical behavior. We report a case of a 66-year-old African-American male with an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen who underwent multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MRI/ultrasound fusion-guided biopsies. Pathology demonstrated low-volume Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 (Grade Group 1, acinar adenocarcinoma involving one core and PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma on a separate core. Herein, we discuss the potential role of active surveillance for patients with this rare variant of prostate cancer found in the era of advanced imaging with multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer.

  4. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  5. Commentary: the value of PrEP for people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Rosalind L; McLean, Susie

    2016-01-01

    The offer of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended as an additional option for HIV prevention for people at substantial risk of HIV infection as part of combination HIV prevention approaches. Implementing this depends on integrating PrEP in public health programmes that address risky practices with evidence-based interventions, and that operate in an enabling legal and policy environment for the delivery of health services to those at higher risk of HIV infection. What does this recommendation mean in terms of the diverse range of HIV prevention needs of key populations, some of whom are so discriminated against that they exist essentially outside formal systems such as national public health services, and for whom a substantial risk of HIV is part of a larger adverse and hostile situation? We discuss this question with reference to people who inject drugs, informed by concerns and comments that emerged from a series of consultations. HIV prevention is part of a spectrum of injecting drug users' priorities, and their access and uptake of HIV prevention services is contingent on their wider "risk environment." The need to address structural barriers to services and human rights violations, and to improve access to comprehensive harm reduction programmes are of prime importance and would have higher value than a mono-focus on HIV prevention. Where existing harm reduction activities are inadequate, fragile or dependent on external donors, shifts in funding priorities, including, for example, towards PrEP, could threaten investment in the broader programmes. For these reasons, it cannot be assumed that PrEP promotion will always be supported by people who inject drugs.The sexual partners of people who inject drugs, non-opioid users who also inject and for whom there is no established substitution treatment, as well as drug users who are unable to negotiate safe sex may value PrEP. As for all key populations, the involvement of people who inject drugs in

  6. Role of the pharmacist in pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP therapy for HIV prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clauson KA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available With a global estimate of 2.5 million new infections of HIV occurring yearly, discovering novel methods to help stem the spread of the virus is critical. The use of antiretroviral chemoprophylaxis for preventing HIV after accidental or occupational exposure and in maternal to fetal transmission has become a widely accepted method to combat HIV. Based on this success, pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP is being explored in at-risk patient populations such as injecting drug users, female sex workers and men who have sex with men. This off-label and unmonitored use has created a need for education and intervention by pharmacists and other healthcare professionals. Pharmacists should educate themselves on PrEP and be prepared to counsel patients about their means of obtaining it (e.g. borrowing or sharing medications and ordering from disreputable Internet pharmacies. They should also be proactive about medication therapy management in these patients due to clinically important drug interactions with PrEP medications. Only one trial exploring the safety and efficacy of tenofovir as PrEP has been completed thus far. However, five ongoing trials are in various stages and two additional studies are scheduled for the near future. Unfortunately, studies in this arena have met with many challenges that have threatened to derail progress. Ethical controversy surrounding post-trial care of participants who seroconvert during studies, as well as concerns over emerging viral resistance and logistical site problems, have already halted several PrEP trials. Information about these early trials has already filtered down to affected individuals who are experimenting with this unproven therapy as an “evening before pill”. The potential for PrEP is promising; however, more extensive trials are necessary to establish its safety and efficacy. Pharmacists are well-positioned to play a key role in helping patients make choices about PrEP, managing their therapy

  7. Radiological Findings of Prostatic Arterial Anatomy for Prostatic Arterial Embolization: Preliminary Study in 55 Chinese Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Zhang

    Full Text Available To describe the prostatic arterial supply using Cone-beam computed tomography (CT and digital subtraction angiography (DSA before prostatic arterial embolization (PAE for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH.In a retrospective study from January 2012 to January 2014, 55 male patients (110 hemipelves with BPH who underwent PAE were evaluated by Cone-beam CT in addition to pelvic DSA during embolization planning. Each hemipelvis was evaluated regarding the number of prostatic arteries (PA and their origins, diameters, territorial perfusion, and anastomoses with adjacent arteries.A total of 114 PAs were identified in 110 hemipelves. There was one PA in 96.4% of the hemipelves (n=106, and two independent PAs in the other 3.6% (n=4. The PA was found to originate from the anterior trunk of the internal iliac artery in 39.5% of cases (n=45 , from the superior vesical artery in 32.6% (n=37, and from the internal pudendal artery in 27.9% of cases (n=32. Extra-prostatic anastomoses between PA and adjacent arteries were found in 39.1% of hemipelves (n=43. Intra-prostatic anastomoses between PAs and contra-lateral prostatic branches were found in 61.8% of hemipelves (n=68. In 67.3% of our study population (n=37, the prostate was dominantly supplied via a unilateral PA.The prostatic vascularization is complex with frequent anatomic variations. Knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the prostate may provide indications for planning PAE and avoiding nontarget embolization.

  8. Optimization of Cultural Conditions for Production of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) by Serpentine Rhizobacterium Cupriavidus pauculus KPS 201

    OpenAIRE

    Arundhati Pal; A. K. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are complex biopolymers produced by a wide array of microorganisms for protection against dessication, aggregation, adhesion, and expression of virulence. Growth associated production of EPS by Ni-resistant Cupriavidus pauculus KPS 201 was determined in batch culture using sodium gluconate as the sole carbon source. The optimum pH and temperature for EPS production were 6.5 and 25°C, respectively. Optimal EPS yield (118 μg/mL) was attained at 0.35% Na-...

  9. Relationship of age, prostate-specific antigen, and prostate volume in Indonesian men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Ida Bagus O W; Hamid, Agus R A H; Mochtar, Chaidir A; Umbas, Rainy

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between age, prostate specific antigen (PSA), and prostate volume (PV) in Indonesian men with histologically proven benign prostatic hyperplasia. Data were generated from our BPH database from June 1994 until December 2013. Subjects were men with a minimum age of 40 years with chief complaint of LUTS or urinary retention, diagnosed with BPH. All patients underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. Patients with PSA level >10 ng/mL were excluded from the study to exclude the possibility of occult prostate cancer. PV was measured with TRUS. Appropriate statistical tests were employed for data analysis. In all, 1638 patients were enrolled in our study. There was a statistically significant difference in PSA (P = 0.03) and PV (P Prostate volume was significantly correlated with PSA. Even though the results were weaker, these results are consistent with results in other sets of population. The results vary between different countries and thus, ethnicities. Indonesia is a populous a sociocultural and ethnically diverse country. Therefore, aside from PSA, age, and PV, when investigating men with BPH, ethnicity may also need to be taken into account.

  10. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) as anti-corrosive additives for coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerder, J.; Breur, R.; Slaghek, T.; Holtman, W.; Vennik, M.; Ferrari, G.

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are a class of renewable polymers that show interesting anti-corrosive properties and could potentially be used as an alternative for zinc phosphates. When combined with a waterborne styrene-acrylic polymer dispersion (SA-1), exopolysaccharides were shown to give an

  11. Beam-strahlung effects in e-p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.

    1982-09-01

    The electromagnetic fields produced by one beam in an interaction point of a colliding-beam facility cause to the emission of synchrotron radiation by the other beam. This effect, the beam strahlung, for the e+e - colliders has been considered by several authors, and they have pointed out that the effect is very important consideration at very-high-energy e+e - colliders. At the first glance, the beam-strahlung effect can play an important role in the e-p collision due to the fact that the circulating currents in the collider are much higher than those of the e+e - machine. However the detailed study shows that is not the case because of the collision geometry involved. What follows in this note is the beam-strahlung derivations using the method previously used by Hofmann and Keil. The difference between this note and that of Hofman and Keil is that in the case of e+e - collider, equal mass particles are involved in the consideration and, in the e-p case, the electrons radiate and the protons provide the electromagnetic fields

  12. Highlights from e-EPS: Physics for fun

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   For many who measure time according to a university calendar, summer is a time to unwind. My experience, however, is that it is rare to find physics departments empty over the summer break. Many of us use the vacation period without classes to catch up with research, and I imagine that a colleague of mine speaks for many when he says that summer provides him with the freedom to do the physics he wants to do, and this is all the break needed to prepare for the next academic year! This reminds me a little of the Wobbling Plate story in “Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman”? When Richard Feynman had just started at Cornell following his time at Los Alamos, he felt burned out, and was wondering why he did not feel the same enthusiasm for physics t...

  13. NREL- and Sandia-Developed HyStEP Device Receives Far West FLC Award | News

    Science.gov (United States)

    | NREL NREL- and Sandia-Developed HyStEP Device Receives Far West FLC Award NREL- and Sandia -Developed HyStEP Device Receives Far West FLC Award September 1, 2016 The National Renewable Energy technologies and boost the regional economy. As FLC awards are granted for outstanding achievements in

  14. Damping the e-p instability in the SNS accumulator ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, N. J.; Deibele, C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Xie, Z.

    2018-03-01

    A broadband, digital damper system for both transverse planes developed for the SNS accumulator ring has recently damped the first indications of the broadband 50-150 MHz e-p instability in a 1.2 MW neutron production beam. This paper presents details of the design and operation of the SNS damper system as well as results of active damping of the e-p instability in the SNS ring showing a reduction in power of betatron oscillation over the 10-300 MHz band of up to 70%. The spectral content of the beam during operation, with and without the damper system is presented and performance of the damper system is evaluated.

  15. Biosorption of Cadmium by Non-Toxic Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS Synthesized by Bacteria from Marine Intertidal Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Camacho-Chab

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a major heavy metal found in polluted aquatic environments, mainly derived from industrial production processes. We evaluated the biosorption of solubilized Cd2+ using the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by Bacillus sp. MC3B-22 and Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10 (Microbactan; these bacteria were originally isolated from intertidal biofilms off the coast of Campeche, Mexico. EPS were incubated with different concentrations of cadmium in ultrapure water. Residual Cd2+ concentrations were determined by Inductive Coupled Plasma-Optic Emission Spectrometry and the maximum sorption capacity (Qmax was calculated according to the Langmuir model. EPS were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS before and after sorption. The Qmax of Cd2+ was 97 mg g−1 for Microbactan and 141 mg g−1 for MC3B-22 EPS, these adsorption levels being significantly higher than previously reported for other microbial EPS. In addition, XPS analysis revealed changes in structure of EPS after biosorption and showed that amino functional groups contributed to the binding of Cd2+, unlike other studies that show the carbohydrate fraction is responsible for this activity. This work expands the current view of bacterial species capable of synthesizing EPS with biosorbent potential for cadmium and provides evidence that different chemical moieties, other than carbohydrates, participate in this process.

  16. Nuclear regulatory policy concept on safety, security, safeguards and emergency preparedness (3S+EP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, Zurias

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory Policy is formulated in regulations that stipulate the assurance of workers and public safety and environmental protection. Legislation and regulations on nuclear energy should consider nuclear safety, security and safeguards, as well as nuclear emergency preparedness (3S+EP) and liability for nuclear damage. Specific requirements stipulated in international conventions and agreements should also be taken into account. Regulatory Policy is formulated in regulations that stipulate the assurance of workers and public safety and environmental protection. Legislation and regulations on nuclear energy should consider nuclear safety, security and safeguards, as well as nuclear emergency preparedness (3S+EP) and liability for nuclear damage. Specific requirements stipulated in international conventions and agreements should also be taken into account. By undertaking proper regulatory oversight on Safety, Security and Emergency Preparedness (3S+EP) as an integrated and comprehensive system, safe and secure use of nuclear energy can be assured. Licence requirements and conditions should fulfil regulatory requirements pertaining to 3S+EP for nuclear installation as an integrated system. An effective emergency capacity that can be immediately mobilized is important. The capacity in protecting the personnel before, during and after the disaster should also be planned. Thus, proper emergency preparedness should be supported by adequate resources. The interface between safety, security, safeguards and emergency preparedness has to be set forth in nuclear regulations, such as regulatory requirements; 3S+EP; components, systems and structures of nuclear installations and human resources. Licensing regulations should stipulate, among others, DIQ, installations security system, safety analysis report, emergency preparedness requirements and necessary human resources that meet the 3S+EP requirements.

  17. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio-orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0595 TITLE: Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer...Sep 2016 - 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate

  18. Production of Z{sup 0} bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] [and others; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration

    2012-10-15

    The production of Z{sup 0} bosons in the reaction ep {yields} eZ{sup 0}p{sup (*)}, where p{sup (*)} stands for a proton or a low-mass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The Z{sup 0} was measured in the hadronic decay mode. The elasticity of the events was ensured by a cut on {eta}{sub max} < 3.0, where {eta}{sub max} is the maximum pseudorapidity of energy deposits in the calorimeter defined with respect to the proton beam direction. A signal was observed at the Z{sup 0} mass. The cross section of the reaction ep {yields} eZ{sup 0}p{sup (*)} was measured to be {sigma} (ep {yields} eZ{sup 0}p{sup (*)}) = 0.13 {+-} 0.06 (stat.) {+-} 0.01 (syst.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model prediction of 0.16 pb. This is the first measurement of Z{sup 0} production in ep collisions.

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experiences of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Trial Participants in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Lauren; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Henderson, Faith L; Kebaabetswe, Poloko M

    2015-03-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that a daily dose of oral TDF/FTC pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is effective in reducing human immunodeficiency (HIV) risk. Understanding trial participants' perspectives about retention and PrEP adherence is critical to inform future PrEP trials and the scale-up and implementation of PrEP programs. We analyzed 53 in-depth interviews conducted in April 2010 with participants in the TDF2 study, a Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of daily oral TDF/FTC with heterosexual men and women in Francistown and Gaborone, Botswana. We examined participants' knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of the trial, identified facilitators and barriers to enrollment and retention, and compared participant responses by study site, sex, and study drug adherence. Our findings point to several factors to consider for participant retention and adherence in PrEP trials and programs, including conducting pre-enrollment education and myth reduction counseling, providing accurate estimates of participant obligations and side effect symptoms, ensuring participant understanding of the effects of non-adherence, gauging personal commitment and interest in study outcomes, and developing a strong external social support network for participants.

  20. Prostate Cancer Ambassadors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Anissa I.; Hunter, Jaimie C.; Carlisle, Veronica A.; Richmond, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    African American men bear a higher burden of prostate cancer than Caucasian men, but knowledge about how to make an informed decision about prostate cancer screening is limited. A lay health advisor model was used to train “Prostate Cancer Ambassadors” on prostate cancer risk and symptoms, how to make an informed decision for prostate-specific antigen screening, and how to deliver the information to members of their community. Training consisted of two, 6-hour interactive sessions and was implemented in three predominantly African American communities over an 8-month period between 2013 and 2014. Following training, Ambassadors committed to contacting at least 10 people within 3 months using a toolkit composed of wallet-sized informational cards for distribution, a slide presentation, and a flip chart. Thirty-two Ambassadors were trained, with more than half being females (59%) and half reporting a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer knowledge improved significantly among Ambassadors (p ≤ .0001). Self-efficacy improved significantly for performing outreach tasks (p < .0001), and among women in helping a loved one with making an informed decision (p = .005). There was also an improvement in collective efficacy in team members (p = .0003). Twenty-nine of the Ambassadors fulfilled their commitment to reach at least 10 people (average number of contacts per Ambassador was 11). In total, 355 individuals were reached with the prostate cancer information. The Ambassador training program proved successful in training Ambassadors to reach communities about prostate cancer and how to make an informed decision about screening. PMID:27099348

  1. Prostatic Artery Embolization for Enlarged Prostates Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. How I Do It

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, Francisco C.; Antunes, Alberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) has emerged as an alternative to surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patient selection and refined technique are essential for good results. Urodynamic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging are very important and technical limitations are related to elderly patients with tortuous and atherosclerotic vessels, anatomical variations, difficulty visualizing and catheterizing small diameter arteries feeding the prostate, and the potential risk of bladder and rectum ischemia. The use of small-diameter hydrophilic microcatheters is mandatory. Patients can be treated safely by PAE with low rates of side effects, reducing prostate volume with clinical symptoms and quality of life improvement without urinary incontinence, ejaculatory disorders, or erectile dysfunction. A multidisciplinary approach with urologists and interventional radiologists is essential to achieve better results

  2. Prostatic Artery Embolization for Enlarged Prostates Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. How I Do It

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnevale, Francisco C., E-mail: fcarnevale@uol.com.br [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Interventional Radiology Unit (Brazil); Antunes, Alberto A., E-mail: antunesuro@uol.com.br [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Division of Urology (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) has emerged as an alternative to surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patient selection and refined technique are essential for good results. Urodynamic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging are very important and technical limitations are related to elderly patients with tortuous and atherosclerotic vessels, anatomical variations, difficulty visualizing and catheterizing small diameter arteries feeding the prostate, and the potential risk of bladder and rectum ischemia. The use of small-diameter hydrophilic microcatheters is mandatory. Patients can be treated safely by PAE with low rates of side effects, reducing prostate volume with clinical symptoms and quality of life improvement without urinary incontinence, ejaculatory disorders, or erectile dysfunction. A multidisciplinary approach with urologists and interventional radiologists is essential to achieve better results.

  3. The impact of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) on HIV epidemics in Africa and India: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C.J. Vissers (Debby); H.A.C.M. Voeten (Hélène); N.J.D. Nagelkerke (Nico); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); S.J. de Vlas (Sake)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising new HIV prevention method, especially for women. An urgent demand for implementation of PrEP is expected at the moment efficacy has been demonstrated in clinical trials. We explored the long-term impact of PrEP on HIV

  4. Flaxseed suppressed prostatic epithelial proliferation in a rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Mahmoud M; Hassan, Nahla S; Schlicht, Michael J; Bosland, Maarten C

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a disease occurring frequently among elderly males, is a slow progressive enlargement of the fibromuscular and epithelial structures of the prostate gland. Dietary factors may influence the prostate and exert an influence on prostatic growth and disease. The current study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of dietary flaxseed supplementation against testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in male rats. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: (1) untreated control; (2) treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) to induce prostate enlargement; (3) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 5% milled flaxseed; (4) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 10% milled flaxseed; and (5) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 20 ppm finasteride. Treatment with TP significantly increased the absolute and relative weights of different prostatic lobes, serum testosterone (T), and testosterone/estradiol ratio, as well as prostatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, RNA synthesis per cell, and epithelial cell proliferation, detected as Ki67 labeling. Histopathological examination did not reveal marked differences in acinar morphology in ventral prostate, whereas morphometric analysis showed significantly increased epithelial cell height. Co-administration of flaxseed or finasteride with TP significantly reduced prostatic VEFG, epithelial cell proliferation, and RNA/DNA ratio, along with a significant increase in serum T and testosterone/estradiol ratio compared with TP-only-treated rats. Our results indicate that flaxseed, similar to the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, blocked TP-induced prostate enlargement in a rat model of BPH, likely through suppression of prostatic VEFG and cellular proliferation.

  5. [Detection and clinical value of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) mRNA positive circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Cheng, Jian-ping; Di, Li-jun; Song, Guo-hong; Ren, Jun

    2012-04-18

    To test for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) relying on epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression in metastatic breast cancer by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. In the study,47 metastatic breast cancer patients were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR for detecting EpCAM mRNA. In addition, analyses were carried out for their correlation with patients' clinicopathologic features, response, and the time to progression (TTP). The sensitivity of EpCAM mRNA in the metastatic breast cancer patients was about 40%. However, the specificity of EpCAM mRNA for 20 healthy controls was 100%. TTP was calculated, and compared with that between EpCAM mRNA-positive and EpCAM mRNA-negative groups. For the retrospective study, the median TTP was 7.1 months and 11.1 months (P=0.013) for patients with EpCAM mRNA-positive and EpCAM mRNA-negative, respectively, after the first cycle chemotherapy. Moreover, a statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between EpCAM mRNA and TTP in patients who underwent the first or the second-line chemotherapy (P=0.018), but there was no significance in the patients pretreated with two or more previous chemotherapy lines (P=0.471). This study provides evidence of the presence of EpCAM mRNA in approximately 40% of patients with metastatic breast cancer. There is a strong correlation between EpCAM mRNA results after the first cycle therapy and TTP in metastatic breast cancer patients, and EpCAM mRNA positive after chemotherapy may predict shorter TTP.

  6. E.P.S. HUAYCO: DECLARACIONES

    OpenAIRE

    Falla, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    EL ARTISTA Y LA ÉPOCA: UN «HUAYCO» DE CREACIÓN COLECTIVA» RICARDO FALLA Hace aproximadamente 3 años [sic], apareció en Barranco el Taller de Arte «Huayco» EPS con el deliberado propósito de mostrar las esencias de nuestro ser nacional. Francisco Mariotti (36), María Luy (30), Charo Noriega (23), Mariela Zevallos (21), Herbert Rodríguez (21), Armando Williams (24) y juan Javier Salazar (25), integrantes de esta singular experiencia, decidieron apoyarse mutuamente para «crear una alternativa o ...

  7. What Primary Care Providers Need to Know about Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV Prevention: Narrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakower, Douglas; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    As HIV prevalence climbs globally, including more than 50,000 new infections per year in the United States, we need effective HIV prevention strategies. The use of antiretrovirals for pre-exposure prophylaxis (known as “PrEP”) among high-risk HIV-uninfected persons is emerging as one such strategy. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that once daily oral PrEP decreased HIV incidence among at-risk MSM and African heterosexuals, including HIV serodiscordant couples. An additional randomized control trial of a pericoital topical application of antiretroviral microbicide gel reduced HIV incidence among at-risk heterosexual South African women. Two other studies in African women did not demonstrate the efficacy of oral or topical PrEP, raising concerns about adherence patterns and efficacy in this population. The FDA Antiretroviral Advisory Panel reviewed these studies and additional data in May 2012 and recommended the approval of oral tenofovir-emtricitabine for PrEP in high-risk populations. Patients may seek PrEP from their primary care providers and those on PrEP require monitoring. Thus, primary care providers should become familiar with PrEP. This review outlines the current state of knowledge about PrEP as it pertains to primary care including identification of individuals likely to benefit from PrEP, counseling to maximize adherence and minimize potential increases in risky behavior, and monitoring for potential drug toxicities, HIV acquisition, and antiretroviral drug resistance. Issues related to cost and insurance coverage are also discussed. Recent data suggest that PrEP, in conjunction with other prevention strategies, holds promise in helping to curtail the HIV epidemic. PMID:22821365

  8. A Rare Prostatic Diagnosis of an Old Man: A Pure Prostatic Leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. van Ulden-Bleumink

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A pure leiomyoma of the prostate is a rare benign tumor. An 82-year-old man was referred to our urology department with gross hematuria and complete urinary retention. Examination revealed a benign prostatic hyperplasia. Transrectal ultrasound showed a prostate of 125 mL. Serum PSA was 1.9 µg/L. A simple retropubic prostatectomy was performed. Histopathological examination showed a pure leiomyoma of the prostate, without the presence of glandular prostate tissue. The diagnosis, characteristics, and treatment of this tumor are described.

  9. Prostate atypia: does repeat biopsy detect clinically significant prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorin, Ryan P; Wiener, Scott; Harris, Cory D; Wagner, Joseph R

    2015-05-01

    While the treatment pathway in response to benign or malignant prostate biopsies is well established, there is uncertainty regarding the risk of subsequently diagnosing prostate cancer when an initial diagnosis of prostate atypia is made. As such, we investigated the likelihood of a repeat biopsy diagnosing prostate cancer (PCa) in patients in which an initial biopsy diagnosed prostate atypia. We reviewed our prospectively maintained prostate biopsy database to identify patients who underwent a repeat prostate biopsy within one year of atypia (atypical small acinar proliferation; ASAP) diagnosis between November 1987 and March 2011. Patients with a history of PCa were excluded. Chart review identified patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP), radiotherapy (RT), or active surveillance (AS). For some analyses, patients were divided into two subgroups based on their date of service. Ten thousand seven hundred and twenty patients underwent 13,595 biopsies during November 1987-March 2011. Five hundred and sixty seven patients (5.3%) had ASAP on initial biopsy, and 287 (50.1%) of these patients underwent a repeat biopsy within one year. Of these, 122 (42.5%) were negative, 44 (15.3%) had atypia, 19 (6.6%) had prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and 102 (35.6%) contained PCa. Using modified Epstein's criteria, 27/53 (51%) patients with PCa on repeat biopsy were determined to have clinically significant tumors. 37 (36.3%) proceeded to RP, 25 (24.5%) underwent RT, and 40 (39.2%) received no immediate treatment. In patients who underwent surgery, Gleason grade on final pathology was upgraded in 11 (35.5%), and downgraded 1 (3.2%) patient. ASAP on initial biopsy was associated with a significant risk of PCa on repeat biopsy in patients who subsequently underwent definitive local therapy. Patients with ASAP should be counseled on the probability of harboring both clinically significant and insignificant prostate cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tonry, Claire L

    2016-07-18

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i) might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease); (ii) would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii) those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and\\/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i) provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii) address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii) make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making.

  11. The Role of Proteomics in Biomarker Development for Improved Patient Diagnosis and Clinical Decision Making in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L. Tonry

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate Cancer (PCa is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Although increased expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA is an effective indicator for the recurrence of PCa, its intended use as a screening marker for PCa is of considerable controversy. Recent research efforts in the field of PCa biomarkers have focused on the identification of tissue and fluid-based biomarkers that would be better able to stratify those individuals diagnosed with PCa who (i might best receive no treatment (active surveillance of the disease; (ii would benefit from existing treatments; or (iii those who are likely to succumb to disease recurrence and/or have aggressive disease. The growing demand for better prostate cancer biomarkers has coincided with the development of improved discovery and evaluation technologies for multiplexed measurement of proteins in bio-fluids and tissues. This review aims to (i provide an overview of these technologies as well as describe some of the candidate PCa protein biomarkers that have been discovered using them; (ii address some of the general limitations in the clinical evaluation and validation of protein biomarkers; and (iii make recommendations for strategies that could be adopted to improve the successful development of protein biomarkers to deliver improvements in personalized PCa patient decision making.

  12. Lessons learned from the experiences of informal PrEP users in France: results from the ANRS-PrEPage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivierez, I; Quatremere, G; Spire, B; Ghosn, J; Rojas Castro, D

    2018-05-30

    Before January 2016, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), a new biomedical HIV-prevention tool, was only available in France via ANRS-Ipergay clinical study but informal use was reported outside this setting. PrEPage qualitative study reports profiles and experiences of participants who used PrEP outside of a biomedical trial before this prevention method was authorized. Between March 2015 and February 2016, a cross-section of twenty-four informal PrEP users, mostly MSM, was recruited to complete in-depth semi-structured interviews. While ANRS-Ipergay was still ongoing (2012-2016), participants described their initiation to PrEP, the way they used it and the difficulties they faced to acquire antiretroviral drugs in an environment where PrEP was still not widely known and often criticized . Through the testimonies, different user profiles and motivation toward informal PrEP use emerged: (a) participants who have increasing difficulties using condoms, (b) "opportunists" who tried PrEP without the intention of using it regularly and (c) participants with a risk aversion who sought additional protection against HIV. Participants chose to use PrEP and/or their usual prevention strategies depending on available supplies, type of partners and individual attitudes toward risk. The feeling of living a safer sex life helped participants to outweigh the fear of possible toxicity and drug resistance. Participants' needs and expectations about PrEP implementation in France were also presented.

  13. The Eps15 C. elegans homologue EHS-1 is implicated in synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Hilliard, M A; Croce, A

    2001-01-01

    implicated Eps15 in endocytosis, its function in the endocytic machinery remains unclear. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, zk1248.3 (ehs-1), is the orthologue of Eps15 in nematodes, and that its product, EHS-1, localizes to synaptic-rich regions. ehs-1-impaired worms showed temperature...

  14. Prostate-specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening: Past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Arnout R; Schoots, Ivo G; Roobol, Monique J

    2015-06-01

    Prostate-specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening remains a controversial topic. Up to now, there is worldwide consensus on the statement that the harms of population-based screening, mainly as a result of overdiagnosis (the detection of clinically insignificant tumors that would have never caused any symptoms), outweigh the benefits. However, worldwide opportunistic screening takes place on a wide scale. The European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer showed a reduction in prostate cancer mortality through prostate-specific antigen based-screening. These population-based data need to be individualized in order to avoid screening in those who cannot benefit and start screening in those who will. For now, lacking a more optimal screening approach, screening should only be started after the process of shared decision-making. The focus of future research is the reduction of unnecessary testing and overdiagnosis by further research to better biomarkers and the value of the multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, potentially combined in already existing prostate-specific antigen-based multivariate risk prediction models. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  15. Nonbacterial prostatitis: a comprehensive review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Rosette, J. J.; Debruyne, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The term 'prostatitis' denotes a condition of inflammation of the prostate. Prostatitis is usually employed to describe any unexplained symptom or condition that might possibly emanate from a disorder of the prostate gland. The diagnosis of nonbacterial prostatitis is reserved for those patients

  16. Poppers and PrEP: Use of Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Among Men Who Have Sex with Men Who Use Inhaled Nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrick, H Rhodes; Park, Su Hyun; Schneider, John A; Mayer, Kenneth H; Carrico, Adam W; Sherman, Scott E; Duncan, Dustin T

    2018-05-09

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) commonly use inhaled nitrites, or poppers, though their use is a risk factor HIV seroconversion. Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is effective for HIV prevention, but is not widely used, and little is known regarding PrEP use and acceptability among MSM who use inhaled nitrites. We surveyed 580 MSM in Paris, France in 2016 about popper use, sexual behaviors including condomless anal intercourse (CAI), serosorting, and sexual positioning, PrEP use, PrEP candidacy, and interest in alternate PrEP delivery modalities. We included 444 HIV negative participants for the current study. 46.2% reported popper use in the prior 3 months. Using multivariate adjusted logistic regression, we found that popper users were more likely than non-users to consider themselves candidates for PrEP [adjusted relative risk ratio (aRRR) = 2.73; 95% CI 1.54-4.83], but they were not more likely to be current (aRRR = 1.54; 95% CI 0.71-3.33) or past (aRRR = 1.37; 95% CI 0.44-4.28) PrEP users. Mediation analyses indicated that increased CAI and serosorting partly explained the relationship between popper use and PrEP candidacy. There was considerable interest in alternate proposed PrEP delivery modalities, particularly long-acting injectable PrEP [adjusted risk ratio (aRR) = 1.43; 95% CI 1.15-1.79].

  17. Hybrid modeling of microbial exopolysaccharide (EPS) production: The case of Enterobacter A47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rodolfo; von Stosch, Moritz; Portela, Rui M C; Torres, Cristiana A V; Antunes, Sílvia; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A M; Oliveira, Rui

    2017-03-20

    Enterobacter A47 is a bacterium that produces high amounts of a fucose-rich exopolysaccharide (EPS) from glycerol residue of the biodiesel industry. The fed-batch process is characterized by complex non-linear dynamics with highly viscous pseudo-plastic rheology due to the accumulation of EPS in the culture medium. In this paper, we study hybrid modeling as a methodology to increase the predictive power of models for EPS production optimization. We compare six hybrid structures that explore different levels of knowledge-based and machine-learning model components. Knowledge-based components consist of macroscopic material balances, Monod type kinetics, cardinal temperature and pH (CTP) dependency and power-law viscosity models. Unknown dependencies are set to be identified by a feedforward artificial neural network (ANN). A semiparametric identification schema is applied resorting to a data set of 13 independent fed-batch experiments. A parsimonious hybrid model was identified that describes the dynamics of the 13 experiments with the same parameterization. The final model is specific to Enterobacter A47 but can be easily extended to other microbial EPS processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor and interleukin-6 in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia: association with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Paul Friedrich; Seklehner, Stephan; Brustmann, Hermann; Lusuardi, Lukas; Riedl, Claus R

    2015-04-01

    This study prospectively investigated the immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and a possible association of these conditions with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis National Institutes of Health (NIH) category IV. The study included 139 consecutive patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and transvesical enucleation of the prostate (n = 82) or radical prostatectomy (n = 57). To characterize inflammatory changes the criteria proposed by Irani et al. [J Urol 1997;157:1301-3] were used. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was studied by a standard immunohistochemical method. Results were correlated with tumour, node, metastasis stage, Gleason scores, total prostate-specific antigen, International Prostate Symptom Score and body mass index. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was significantly higher in neoplastic prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue of prostate cancer patients (p Prostate cancer patients with prostatitis showed significantly higher IL-2R expression than those without inflammation (p prostatitis than in those without (p prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue. Patients with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV showed significantly greater activity.

  19. Provider perspectives on PrEP for adolescent girls and young women in Tanzania: The role of provider biases and quality of care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanlesta Pilgrim

    Full Text Available Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP has the potential to reduce HIV acquisition among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW in sub-Saharan Africa. However, health care providers' (HCPs perspectives and interactions with potential clients can substantially influence effective provision of quality health services. We examine if HCPs' knowledge, attitude, and skills, as well as their perceptions of facility readiness to provide PrEP are associated with their willingness to provide PrEP to AGYW at high risk of HIV in Tanzania.A self-administered questionnaire was given to 316 HCPs from 74 clinics in two districts and 24 HCPs participated in follow-up in-depth interviews (IDIs. We conducted bivariate and multivariable Poisson regression to assess factors associated with willingness to provide PrEP to AGYW. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the IDIs, which expanded upon the quantitative results.Few HCPs (3.5% had prior PrEP knowledge, but once informed, 61.1% were willing to prescribe PrEP to AGYW. Higher negative attitudes toward adolescent sexuality and greater concerns about behavioral disinhibition due to PrEP use were associated with lower willingness to prescribe PrEP. Qualitatively, HCPs acknowledged that biases, rooted in cultural norms, often result in stigmatizing and discriminatory care toward AGYW, a potential barrier for PrEP provision. However, better training to provide HIV services was associated with greater willingness to prescribe PrEP. Conversely, HCPs feared the potential negative impact of PrEP on the provision of existing HIV services (e.g., overburdened staff, and suggested the integration of PrEP into non-HIV services and the use of paramedical professionals to facilitate PrEP provision.Preparing for PrEP introduction requires more than solely training HCPs on the clinical aspects of providing PrEP. It requires a two-pronged strategy: addressing HCPs' biases regarding sexual health services to AGYW; and preparing

  20. Eps8 regulates hair bundle length and functional maturation of mammalian auditory hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Zampini

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hair cells of the mammalian cochlea are specialized for the dynamic coding of sound stimuli. The transduction of sound waves into electrical signals depends upon mechanosensitive hair bundles that project from the cell's apical surface. Each stereocilium within a hair bundle is composed of uniformly polarized and tightly packed actin filaments. Several stereociliary proteins have been shown to be associated with hair bundle development and function and are known to cause deafness in mice and humans when mutated. The growth of the stereociliar actin core is dynamically regulated at the actin filament barbed ends in the stereociliary tip. We show that Eps8, a protein with actin binding, bundling, and barbed-end capping activities in other systems, is a novel component of the hair bundle. Eps8 is localized predominantly at the tip of the stereocilia and is essential for their normal elongation and function. Moreover, we have found that Eps8 knockout mice are profoundly deaf and that IHCs, but not OHCs, fail to mature into fully functional sensory receptors. We propose that Eps8 directly regulates stereocilia growth in hair cells and also plays a crucial role in the physiological maturation of mammalian cochlear IHCs. Together, our results indicate that Eps8 is critical in coordinating the development and functionality of mammalian auditory hair cells.

  1. Eps8 regulates hair bundle length and functional maturation of mammalian auditory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Valeria; Rüttiger, Lukas; Johnson, Stuart L; Franz, Christoph; Furness, David N; Waldhaus, Jörg; Xiong, Hao; Hackney, Carole M; Holley, Matthew C; Offenhauser, Nina; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Knipper, Marlies; Masetto, Sergio; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-04-01

    Hair cells of the mammalian cochlea are specialized for the dynamic coding of sound stimuli. The transduction of sound waves into electrical signals depends upon mechanosensitive hair bundles that project from the cell's apical surface. Each stereocilium within a hair bundle is composed of uniformly polarized and tightly packed actin filaments. Several stereociliary proteins have been shown to be associated with hair bundle development and function and are known to cause deafness in mice and humans when mutated. The growth of the stereociliar actin core is dynamically regulated at the actin filament barbed ends in the stereociliary tip. We show that Eps8, a protein with actin binding, bundling, and barbed-end capping activities in other systems, is a novel component of the hair bundle. Eps8 is localized predominantly at the tip of the stereocilia and is essential for their normal elongation and function. Moreover, we have found that Eps8 knockout mice are profoundly deaf and that IHCs, but not OHCs, fail to mature into fully functional sensory receptors. We propose that Eps8 directly regulates stereocilia growth in hair cells and also plays a crucial role in the physiological maturation of mammalian cochlear IHCs. Together, our results indicate that Eps8 is critical in coordinating the development and functionality of mammalian auditory hair cells.

  2. Establishment of an isolation method of Nostoc commune cells free from extracellular polysaccharides (EPS using Percoll centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Kosugi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune Vaucher ex Bornet et Flahault occurs worldwide, including in Japan and Antarctica. N. commune has a large amount of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS that hold moisture and protect the cells and at the same time accumulate light-blocking substances which is believed to play an important part in adaptation to a severe environment. To evaluate the photoadaptation processes in N. commune and clarify the role(s of EPS under ambient environmental condition at Antarctica, separation of cells from EPS is necessary. High yield is a prerequisite for the use of only small amount of natural N. commune from Antarctica. For this purpose, we developed a separation method by improving the Percoll density gradient centrifugation method using an EPS-coated field-grown Nostoc population. We established the most suitable condition to separate naked cells from EPS at high yield retaining high photosynthetic activity. The method is composed of centrifugation of cell homogenated N. commune in 10% (v/v Percoll to separate cells efficiently from EPS followed by fractionating centrifugation to remove impurities using the gradient of Percoll (80% and 50%, v/v.

  3. Complex and Conflicting Social Norms: Implications for Implementation of Future HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP Interventions in Vancouver, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Knight

    Full Text Available HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP has been found to be efficacious in preventing HIV acquisition among seronegative individuals in a variety of risk groups, including men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs. To date, however, it remains unclear how socio-cultural norms (e.g., attitudes towards HIV; social understandings regarding HIV risk practices may influence the scalability of future PrEP interventions. The objective of this study is to assess how socio-cultural norms may influence the implementation and scalability of future HIV PrEP interventions in Vancouver, Canada.We conducted 50 interviews with young men (ages 18-24 with a variety of HIV risk behavioural profiles (e.g., young men who inject drugs; MSM. Interviews focused on participants' experiences and perceptions with various HIV interventions and policies, including PrEP.While awareness of PrEP was generally low, perceptions about the potential personal and public health gains associated with PrEP were interconnected with expressions of complex and sometimes conflicting social norms. Some accounts characterized PrEP as a convenient form of reliable protection against HIV, likening it to the female birth control pill. Other accounts cast PrEP as a means to facilitate 'socially unacceptable' behaviour (e.g., promiscuity. Stigmatizing rhetoric was used to position PrEP as a tool that could promote some groups' proclivities to take 'risks'.Stigma regarding 'risky' behaviour and PrEP should not be underestimated as a serious implementation challenge. Pre-implementation strategies that concomitantly aim to improve knowledge about PrEP, while addressing associated social prejudices, may be key to effective implementation and scale-up.

  4. The value of prostate specific antigen and prostate specific antigen density in the diagnosis ad treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Guoying; Yu Mingqi; Feng Xinli

    2001-01-01

    To study the clinical value of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostate specific antigen density (PSAD), the PSA levels of pre-and post-treatment were measured in 28 cases with prostate cancer (Pca) and 80 patients with being Prostate hyperplasia (BPH). PASD was measured in 18 cases Pca and 50 cases BPH of them. The results suggest that the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnosis for Pca were 85.7%, 80.0% and 81.4%, respectively. The false positive rate was 20%. PSAD is superior to PSA in distinguishing prostate cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia. The false positive rate was only 6%. But in the clinical application, the authors should combine PASD with other materials. The regular observation of post therapeutic PSA is of great value to the earlier discovery of local recurrence and metastasis as well as the judgement of curative effect and prognosis

  5. VCS-SSA Mainz Experiment. Measurement of the beam spin asymmetry in (e polarized p {yields} ep{gamma}) and (e polarized p {yields} ep{pi}{sup 0}). Final analysis - MEMO I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonvieille, H.; Bensafa, I. [LPC-Clermont-Fd, Universite Blaise Pascal, F-63170 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2006-02-15

    This note gives details on the final analysis of the VCS-SSA experiment in terms of Beam Spin Asymmetry. It summarizes the changes between the first and second pass analysis. Then the measured asymmetry is presented for both channels e polarized p {yields} ep{gamma} and e polarized p {yields} ep{pi}{sup 0} including systematic studies. The final experimental result is briefly compared to some model predictions. (authors)

  6. The role of prostatitis in prostate cancer: meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Jiang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Use systematic review methods to quantify the association between prostatitis and prostate cancer, under both fixed and random effects model. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Case control studies of prostate cancer with information on prostatitis history. All studies published between 1990-2012, were collected to calculate a pooled odds ratio. SELECTION CRITERIA: the selection criteria are as follows: human case control studies; published from May 1990 to July 2012; containing number of prostatitis, and prostate cancer cases. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: In total, 20 case control studies were included. A significant association between prostatitis and prostate cancer was found, under both fixed effect model (pooled OR=1.50, 95%CI: 1.39-1.62, and random effects model (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.36-1.98. Personal interview based case control studies showed a high level of association (fixed effect model: pooled OR=1.59, 95%CI: 1.47-1.73, random effects model: pooled OR= 1.87, 95%CI: 1.52-2.29, compared with clinical based studies (fixed effect model: pooled OR=1.05, 95%CI: 0.86-1.28, random effects model: pooled OR= 0.98, 95%CI: 0.67-1.45. Additionally, pooled ORs, were calculated for each decade. In a fixed effect model: 1990's: OR=1.58, 95% CI: 1.35-1.84; 2000's: OR=1.59, 95% CI: 1.40-1.79; 2010's: OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.22-1.56. In a random effects model: 1990's: OR=1.98, 95% CI: 1.08-3.62; 2000's: OR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.23-2.19; 2010's: OR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.03-1.73. Finally a meta-analysis stratified by each country was conducted. In fixed effect models, U.S: pooled OR =1.45, 95%CI: 1.34-1.57; China: pooled OR =4.67, 95%CI: 3.08-7.07; Cuba: pooled OR =1.43, 95%CI: 1.00-2.04; Italy: pooled OR =0.61, 95%CI: 0.13-2.90. In random effects model, U.S: pooled OR=1.50, 95%CI: 1.25-1.80; China: pooled OR =4.67, 95%CI: 3.08-7.07; Cuba: pooled OR =1.43, 95%CI: 1.00-2.04; Italy: pooled OR =0.61, 95%CI: 0.13-2.90. CONCLUSIONS: the present meta-analysis provides the statistical

  7. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  8. [Randomized clinical trial of IEP and EP regimens in the treatment of patients with small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Wang, Anlan; Huang, Zhihua; Zhou, Wenwei

    2004-06-20

    To observe and compare the efficacy and safety of IEP and EP regimens for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Sixty-four patients with SCLC pathologically proved were randomly divided into IEP group ( n =32) and EP group ( n =32). All the 64 patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. In IEP group, the total responsive rate, responsive rates of limited-stage patients and extensive-stage patients were 84.4%(27/32), 100.0%(15/15) and 70.6%(12/17) respectively; while in EP group, those were 75.0%(24/32), 85.7%(12/14) and 66.7% (12/18) respectively. The median duration of remission was 6 months and 1-year survival rate was 62.5% in IEP group, and 5 months and 56.2% in EP group. There was no significant difference in response rate, median duration of remission and 1-year survival between the two groups ( P > 0.05). The main toxicity was myelosuppression. Incidences of leukopenia at grade III-IV, nausea, vomiting and alopecia were significantly higher in the IEP arm than those in the EP arm ( P IEP and EP. IEP regimen shows a similar response rate compared with EP regimen. They might be considered as relevant regimens in initial patients with small cell lung cancer.

  9. Development and external multicenter validation of Chinese Prostate Cancer Consortium prostate cancer risk calculator for initial prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Xie, Liping; Xue, Wei; Ye, Zhangqun; Ma, Lulin; Gao, Xu; Ren, Shancheng; Wang, Fubo; Zhao, Lin; Xu, Chuanliang; Sun, Yinghao

    2016-09-01

    Substantial differences exist in the relationship of prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level between Western and Asian populations. Classic Western risk calculators, European Randomized Study for Screening of Prostate Cancer Risk Calculator, and Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator, were shown to be not applicable in Asian populations. We aimed to develop and validate a risk calculator for predicting the probability of PCa and high-grade PCa (defined as Gleason Score sum 7 or higher) at initial prostate biopsy in Chinese men. Urology outpatients who underwent initial prostate biopsy according to the inclusion criteria were included. The multivariate logistic regression-based Chinese Prostate Cancer Consortium Risk Calculator (CPCC-RC) was constructed with cases from 2 hospitals in Shanghai. Discriminative ability, calibration and decision curve analysis were externally validated in 3 CPCC member hospitals. Of the 1,835 patients involved, PCa was identified in 338/924 (36.6%) and 294/911 (32.3%) men in the development and validation cohort, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that 5 predictors (age, logPSA, logPV, free PSA ratio, and digital rectal examination) were associated with PCa (Model 1) or high-grade PCa (Model 2), respectively. The area under the curve of Model 1 and Model 2 was 0.801 (95% CI: 0.771-0.831) and 0.826 (95% CI: 0.796-0.857), respectively. Both models illustrated good calibration and substantial improvement in decision curve analyses than any single predictors at all threshold probabilities. Higher predicting accuracy, better calibration, and greater clinical benefit were achieved by CPCC-RC, compared with European Randomized Study for Screening of Prostate Cancer Risk Calculator and Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator in predicting PCa. CPCC-RC performed well in discrimination and calibration and decision curve analysis in external validation compared

  10. Different populations of prostaglandin EP3 receptor-expressing preoptic neurons project to two fever-mediating sympathoexcitatory brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y; Nakamura, K; Morrison, S F

    2009-06-30

    The central mechanism of fever induction is triggered by an action of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) on neurons in the preoptic area (POA) through the EP3 subtype of prostaglandin E receptor. EP3 receptor (EP3R)-expressing POA neurons project directly to the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and to the rostral raphe pallidus nucleus (rRPa), key sites for the control of thermoregulatory effectors. Based on physiological findings, we hypothesize that the febrile responses in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and those in cutaneous vasoconstrictors are controlled independently by separate neuronal pathways: PGE(2) pyrogenic signaling is transmitted from EP3R-expressing POA neurons via a projection to the DMH to activate BAT thermogenesis and via another projection to the rRPa to increase cutaneous vasoconstriction. In this case, DMH-projecting and rRPa-projecting neurons would constitute segregated populations within the EP3R-expressing neuronal group in the POA. Here, we sought direct anatomical evidence to test this hypothesis with a double-tracing experiment in which two types of the retrograde tracer, cholera toxin b-subunit (CTb), conjugated with different fluorophores were injected into the DMH and the rRPa of rats and the resulting retrogradely labeled populations of EP3R-immunoreactive neurons in the POA were identified with confocal microscopy. We found substantial numbers of EP3R-immunoreactive neurons in both the DMH-projecting and the rRPa-projecting populations. However, very few EP3R-immunoreactive POA neurons were labeled with both the CTb from the DMH and that from the rRPa, although a substantial number of neurons that were not immunoreactive for EP3R were double-labeled with both CTbs. The paucity of the EP3R-expressing neurons that send collaterals to both the DMH and the rRPa suggests that pyrogenic signals are sent independently to these caudal brain regions from the POA and that such pyrogenic outputs from the POA reflect different control mechanisms for BAT

  11. Clinical and MRI features of prostate sarcoma: comparison with prostate adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Jianping; Wang Xiaoying; Wang Zhenzhong; Zhou Liangping; Jiang Xuexiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical and imaging features of prostate sarcoma, and to compare the features with those of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa). Method: Six cases of prostate sarcoma proved pathologically were enrolled in this study. The clinical material and imaging features were compared with those of the PCa. Results: (1) Pathological result: Among the 6 prostate sarcomas, 3 were rhabdomyosarcoma, 1 was leiomyosarcoma, and 2 were sarcoma originated from interstitial tissue that could not be classified. (2) Clinical result: The 6 patients of sarcoma were younger (median age 36.5, 15-71 years) than the patients of PCa (median age 72, 50-78 years) (P -3 ng/L] was normal and lower than that of the PCa patients [median 27.80, (1.55-352.00) x 10 -3 ng/ L] (P 3 ) was larger than that of PCa (median 41.57, 17.16-179.44 cm 3 ) (P 2 -weighted images, with grossly normal structure of the prostate. Excapsular extension was more common in the sarcomas than in the PCa (83.3% vs 66.7%). Conclusion: The clinical and imaging features of prostate sarcoma are different from those of prostate adenocarcinoma

  12. Prostate-specific antigen as an estimator of prostate volume in the management of patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mochtar, CA; Kiemeney, LALM; van Riemsdijk, MM; Barnett, GS; Laguna, MP; Debruyne, FMJ; de la Rosette, JJMCH

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the ability of serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) to estimate prostate volume (PV) to aid in the management of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: From 1989 to 2002, data were collected from 2264 patients complaining of lower urinary tract symptoms

  13. Prostatitis - nonbacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBP; Prostatodynia; Pelvic pain syndrome; CPPS; Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis; Chronic genitourinary pain ... Possible causes of nonbacterial prostatitis include: A past ... common types of bacteria Irritation caused by a backup of urine ...

  14. Imaging and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    1996-01-01

    The use of imaging in evaluating patients with prostate cancer is highly dependent upon the purpose of the evaluation. Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, TC-99m Bone Scanning, and Positron Emission Tomography may all be utilized for imaging in prostate cancer. The utility of each of these modalities depends upon the intended purpose: for instance, screening, staging, or evaluating for progression of disease in patients with prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound is performed by placing a 5MHz to 7.5 MHz transducer in the rectum and imaging the prostate in the coronal and sagittal planes. Prostate cancer generally appears as an area of diminished echogenocity in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland. However, up to 24% of prostate cancers are isoechoic and cannot be well distinguished from the remainder of the peripheral zone. In addition, the incidence of malignancy in a lesion judged to be suspicious on ultrasound is between 20% and 25%. Therefore, while ultrasound is the least expensive of the three cross sectional imaging modalities, its relatively low specificity precludes it from being used as a screening examination. Investigators have also looked at the ability of ultrasound to evaluate the presence and extent of extracapsular spread of prostate cancer. The RDOG (Radiology Diagnostic Oncology Group) multi-institutional cooperative trial reported a disappointing overall accuracy of ultrasound of 58% for staging prostate cancer. The accuracy was somewhat higher 63%, for patients with advanced disease. The other cross-sectional imaging modalities available for imaging the prostate include Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Computed Tomography is useful as an 'anatomic' imaging technique to detect lymph node enlargement. It is not sensitive in detecting microscopic nodal involvement with tumor, or tumor in non-enlarged pelvic lymph nodes. The primary prostate neoplasm is generally the same attenuation as the normal

  15. Radiation therapy of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer and hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Hida, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy and hormone therapy to improve tumor control and survival. Eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy to improve their quality of life. Local control of the tumor was achieved in 9 of 10 patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer. Five of eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer obtained improved quality of life. Combined radiotherapy and hormone therapy were effective in the treatment of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer, and radiotherapy was useful for improving the quality of life of patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer. (author)

  16. Knowledge of Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV Prevention Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Denver, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tayyib, Alia A.; Thrun, Mark W.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Walls, N. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    As part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Denver, Colorado, we assessed knowledge of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP); willingness to use PrEP; and potential changes in risk behaviors among HIV-negative participants reporting sexual activity with a male partner in the preceding 12 months. We examined knowledge of PrEP before (2008) and after (2011) results of the iPrEx trial were available. Of the 425 participants in the 2008 sample, 91 (21 %) were aware of PrEP compared to 131 (28 %) of the 461 participants in the 2011 sample (adjusted prevalence ratio: 1.43, 95 % confidence interval: 1.18, 1.72). Despite the increase in 2011, few MSM in Denver were aware of PrEP. Educating high-risk MSM about the potential utility of PrEP as an adjunct to other effective prevention methods is needed when considering the addition of PrEP to the HIV prevention arsenal. PMID:23824227

  17. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.williams@oxfordtechnologies.co.uk [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sanders, Stephen [Oxford Technologies Ltd., 7 Nuffield Way, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 1RJ (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Weder, Gerard [Tree-C Technology BV, Buys Ballotstraat 8, 6716 BL Ede (Netherlands); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  18. Evolving the JET virtual reality system for delivering the JET EP2 shutdown remote handling tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Adrian; Sanders, Stephen; Weder, Gerard; Bastow, Roger; Allan, Peter; Hazel, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The quality, functionality and performance of the virtual reality (VR) system used at JET for preparation and implementation of remote handling (RH) operations has been progressively enhanced since its first use in the original JET remote handling shutdown in 1998. As preparation began for the JET EP2 (Enhanced Performance 2) shutdown it was recognised that the VR system being used was unable to cope with the increased functionality and the large number of 3D models needed to fully represent the JET in-vessel components and tooling planned for EP2. A bespoke VR software application was developed in collaboration with the OEM, which allowed enhancements to be made to the VR system to meet the requirements of JET remote handling in preparation for EP2. Performance improvements required to meet the challenges of EP2 could not be obtained from the development of the new VR software alone. New methodologies were also required to prepare source, CATIA models for use in the VR using a collection of 3D software packages. In collaboration with the JET drawing office, techniques were developed within CATIA using polygon reduction tools to reduce model size, while retaining surface detail at required user limits. This paper will discuss how these developments have played an essential part in facilitating EP2 remote handling task development and examine their impact during the EP2 shutdown.

  19. Original article The Relationship Between Prostate Volume, Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    ), prostate specific antigen. (PSA) and age in a cohort of Saudi men from the Urology Department, King Abdul Aziz University. Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Medical records of 447 Saudi men aged 20-89 years with benign prostatic ...

  20. Handwriting Movement Kinematics for Quantifying EPS in Patients Treated with Atypical Antipsychotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Michael P.; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Dean, Charles E.; Niculescu, Alexander B.; Lohr, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing monitoring of neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) is important to maximize treatment outcome, improve medication adherence and reduce re-hospitalization. Traditional approaches for assessing EPS such as parkinsonism, tardive akathisia, or dyskinesia rely upon clinical ratings. However, these observer-based EPS severity ratings can be unreliable and are subject to examiner bias. In contrast, quantitative instrumental methods are less subject to bias. Most instrumental methods have only limited clinical utility because of their complexity and costs. This paper describes an easy-to-use instrumental approach based on handwriting movements for quantifying EPS. Here, we present findings from psychiatric patients treated with atypical (second generation) antipsychotics. The handwriting task consisted of a sentence written several times within a 2 cm vertical boundary at a comfortable speed using an inkless pen and digitizing tablet. Kinematic variables including movement duration, peak vertical velocity and the number of acceleration peaks, and average normalized jerk (a measure of smoothness) for each up or down stroke and their submovements were analyzed. Results from 59 psychosis patients and 46 healthy comparison subjects revealed significant slowing and dysfluency in patients compared to controls. We observed differences across medications and daily dose. These findings support the ecological validity of handwriting movement analysis as an objective behavioral biomarker for quantifying the effects of antipsychotic medication and dose on the motor system. PMID:20381875

  1. Imaging of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The main role of imaging in prostatic diseases is for prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging tools used for the diagnosis of the diseases of the prostate gland. The main indications for TRUS is the evaluation for prostate cancer and guidance for prostate biopsy. On TRUS, the transition zone with a hypoechoic appearance can be differentiated from the peripheral zone, which appears relatively echogenic and homogenous in echotexture. Prostate cancer mainly involves the peripheral zone, though one fifth of the disease can be detected in the transition zone, which is the major site for hyperplastic changes in older men. Color Doppler ultrasound may be helpful for the differentiation of low-risk, hypovascular tumors from high-risk, hypervascular tumors, as the latter group is associated with higher Gleason tumor grades consistent with higher risk for extraprostatic spread. Nevertheless, targeted prostate biopsy solely based on high-frequency color or power Doppler imaging is not recommended, as the technique has inherent risk of missing a significant number of cancers. Although power Doppler ultrasound can enable the operator to perform more accurate sampling of the prostate by determining sites of focal hypervascularity, it has not been found to be superior to color Doppler ultrasound. It has been reported to be useful only for targeted biopsies with limited number of biopsy cores. Microbubble contrast agents may enable better visualization of prostatic microvasculature and cancerous prostate tissue. By means of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), the number of cores may be decreased by performing targeted biopsies. Importantly, the detection of the signals reflected by the microbubbles can be enhanced by the phase inversion (pulse-inversion) technology. Prostate cancer appears as a dark zone on elastography representing limited elasticity or compressibility. By means of the

  2. Androgen receptor and immune inflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Kouji; Li, Lei; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) are frequent diseases in middle-aged to elderly men worldwide. While both diseases are linked to abnormal growth of the prostate, the epidemiological and pathological features of these two prostate diseases are different. BPH nodules typically arise from the transitional zone, and, in contrast, PCa arises from the peripheral zone. Androgen deprivation therapy alone may not be sufficient to cure these two prostatic diseases due to its undesirable side effects. The alteration of androgen receptor-mediated inflammatory signals from infiltrating immune cells and prostate stromal/epithelial cells may play key roles in those unwanted events. Herein, this review will focus on the roles of androgen/androgen receptor signals in the inflammation-induced progression of BPH and PCa. PMID:26594314

  3. Eps15R is a tyrosine kinase substrate with characteristics of a docking protein possibly involved in coated pits-mediated internalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coda, L; Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S

    1998-01-01

    in NIH-3T3 cells overexpressing the receptor, even at low levels of receptor occupancy, thus behaving as physiological substrates. A role for eps15R in clathrin-mediated endocytosis is suggested by its localization in plasma membrane-coated pits and in vivo association to the coated pits' adapter protein...... AP-2. Finally, we demonstrate that a sizable fraction of eps15R exists in the cell as a complex with eps15 and that its EH domains exhibit binding specificities that are partially distinct from those of eps15. We propose that eps15 and eps15R are multifunctional binding proteins that serve...

  4. Prostanoid receptor EP2 as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota

    2014-06-12

    Cycoloxygenase-2 (COX-2) induction is prevalent in a variety of (brain and peripheral) injury models where COX-2 levels correlate with disease progression. Thus, COX-2 has been widely explored for anti-inflammatory therapy with COX-2 inhibitors, which proved to be effective in reducing the pain and inflammation in patients with arthritis and menstrual cramps, but they have not provided any benefit to patients with chronic inflammatory neurodegenerative disease. Recently, two COX-2 drugs, rofecoxib and valdecoxib, were withdrawn from the United States market due to cardiovascular side effects. Thus, future anti-inflammatory therapy could be targeted through a specific prostanoid receptor downstream of COX-2. The PGE2 receptor EP2 is emerging as a pro-inflammatory target in a variety of CNS and peripheral diseases. Here we highlight the latest developments on the role of EP2 in diseases, mechanism of activation, and small molecule discovery targeted either to enhance or to block the function of this receptor.

  5. Inhibition of Nitzschia ovalis biofilm settlement by a bacterial bioactive compound through alteration of EPS and epiphytic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia D. Infante

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marine ecosystems contain benthic microalgae and bacterial species that are capable of secreting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, suggesting that settlement of these microorganisms can occur on submerged surfaces, a key part of the first stage of biofouling. Currently, anti-fouling treatments that help control this phenomenon involve the use of biocides or antifouling paints that contain heavy metals, which over a long period of exposure can spread to the environment. The bacterium Alteromonas sp. Ni1-LEM has an inhibitory effect on the adhesion of Nitzschia ovalis, an abundant diatom found on submerged surfaces. Results: We evaluated the effect of the bioactive compound secreted by this bacterium on the EPS of biofilms and associated epiphytic bacteria. Three methods of EPS extraction were evaluated to determine the most appropriate and efficient methodology based on the presence of soluble EPS and the total protein and carbohydrate concentrations. Microalgae were cultured with the bacterial compound to evaluate its effect on EPS secretion and variations in its protein and carbohydrate concentrations. An effect of the bacterial supernatant on EPS was observed by assessing biofilm formation and changes in the concentration of proteins and carbohydrates present in the biofilm. Conclusions: These results indicate that a possible mechanism for regulating biofouling could be through alteration of biofilm EPS and alteration of the epiphytic bacterial community associated with the microalga.How to cite: Infante, C.D., Castillo, F., Pérez, V., et al. Inhibition of Nitzschia ovalis biofilm settlement by a bacterial bioactive compound through alteration of EPS and epiphytic bacteria. Electron J Biotechnol 2018;33 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejbt.2018.03.002. Keywords: Anti-fouling, Benthic microalgae, Biofilm, Biofouling, Epiphytic bacterial community, EPS, Marine ecosystems, Metagenomic, Nitzschia ovalis, Settlement inhibition

  6. Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy in Prostate Glands 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayadev, Jyoti; Merrick, Gregory S.; Reed, Joshua R.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry, treatment-related morbidity, and biochemical outcomes for brachytherapy in patients with prostate glands 3 . Methods and Materials: From November 1996 to October 2006, 104 patients with prostate glands 3 underwent brachytherapy. Multiple prostate, urethral, and rectal dosimetric parameters were evaluated. Treatment-related urinary and rectal morbidity were assessed from patient questionnaires. Cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival were recorded. Results: The median patient age, follow up, and pre-treatment ultrasound volume was 64 years, 5.0 years and 17.6cm 3 , respectively. Median day 0 dosimetry was significant for the following: V100 98.5%, D90 126.1% and R100 <0.5% of prescription dose. The mean urethral and maximum urethral doses were 119.6% and 133.8% of prescription. The median time to International Prostate Symptom Score resolution was 4 months. There were no RTOG grade III or IV rectal complications. The cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100%, 92.5%, and 77.8% at 9 years. For biochemically disease-free patients, the median most recent postbrachytherapy PSA value was 0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that brachytherapy for small prostate glands is highly effective, with an acceptable morbidity profile, excellent postimplant dosimetry, acceptable treatment-related morbidity, and favorable biochemical outcomes.

  7. Sequential evaluation of prostate edema after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy using CT-MRI fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taussky, Daniel; Austen, Lyn; Toi, Ants; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the extent and time course of prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients scheduled for permanent seed 125 I prostate brachytherapy agreed to a prospective study on postimplant edema. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasonography. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) fusion on the day of the implant (Day 1) and Days 8 and 30. The prostate was contoured on MRI, and the seeds were located on CT. Factors investigated for an influence on edema were the number of seeds and needles, preimplant prostate volume, transitional zone index (transition zone volume divided by prostate volume), age, and prostate-specific antigen level. Prostate dosimetry was evaluated by the percentage of the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V 100 ) and percentage of prescribed dose received by 90% of the prostate volume (D 90 ). Results: Prostate edema was maximal on Day 1, with the median prostate volume 31% greater than preimplant transrectal ultrasound volume (range, 0.93-1.72; p 100 on Day 1 was 93.6% (range, 86.0-98.2%) and was 96.3% (range, 85.7-99.5%) on Day 30 (p = 0.079). Patients with a Day 1 V 100 >93% were less affected by edema resolution, showing a median increase in V 100 of 0.67% on Day 30 compared with 2.77% for patients with a V 100 100 >93%)

  8. TRP Channels in Human Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Van Haute

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review gives an overview of morphological and functional characteristics in the human prostate. It will focus on the current knowledge about transient receptor potential (TRP channels expressed in the human prostate, and their putative role in normal physiology and prostate carcinogenesis. Controversial data regarding the expression pattern and the potential impact of TRP channels in prostate function, and their involvement in prostate cancer and other prostate diseases, will be discussed.

  9. Evaluation of the Genetic Response of U937 and Jurkat Cells to 10-Nanosecond Electrical Pulses (nsEP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb C Roth

    Full Text Available Nanosecond electrical pulse (nsEP exposure activates signaling pathways, produces oxidative stress, stimulates hormone secretion, causes cell swelling and induces apoptotic and necrotic death. The underlying biophysical connection(s between these diverse cellular reactions and nsEP has yet to be elucidated. Using global genetic analysis, we evaluated how two commonly studied cell types, U937 and Jurkat, respond to nsEP exposure. We hypothesized that by studying the genetic response of the cells following exposure, we would gain direct insight into the stresses experienced by the cell and in turn better understand the biophysical interaction taking place during the exposure. Using Ingenuity Systems software, we found genes associated with cell growth, movement and development to be significantly up-regulated in both cell types 4 h post exposure to nsEP. In agreement with our hypothesis, we also found that both cell lines exhibit significant biological changes consistent with mechanical stress induction. These results advance nsEP research by providing strong evidence that the interaction of nsEPs with cells involves mechanical stress.

  10. Prostate Cancer Screening : The effect on prostate cancer mortality and incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. van Leeuwen (Pim)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAt first glance, deciding whether to get the PSA screening test for prostate cancer seems to be pretty straightforward and attractive. It’s a simple blood test that can pick up the prostate cancer long before your symptoms appear. After all, your prostate cancer is earlier treated

  11. Cost-effectiveness of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in preventing HIV-1 infections in rural Zambia: a modeling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichols, B.E.; Boucher, C.A.B.; van Dijk, J.H.; Thuma, P.E.; Nouwen, J.L.; Baltussen, R.; van de Wijgert, J.; Sloot, P.M.A.; van de Vijver, D.A.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with tenofovir and emtricitabine effectively prevents new HIV infections. The optimal scenario for implementing PrEP where most infections are averted at the lowest cost is unknown. We determined the impact of different PrEP strategies on averting new

  12. MR imaging of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbach, P.; Haas, M.; Hamm, B.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Germany; however, there is a distinct difference between incidence and mortality. The detection of prostate cancer is based on clinical and laboratory testing using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and transrectal ultrasound with randomized biopsy. Multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate can provide valuable diagnostic information for detection of prostate cancer, especially after negative results of a biopsy prior to repeat biopsy. In addition the use of MR ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy has gained in diagnostic importance and has increased the prostate cancer detection rate. The prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) classification has standardized the reporting of prostate MRI which has positively influenced the acceptance by urologists. (orig.) [de

  13. Immunohistochemical expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in mucoepidermoid carcinoma compared to normal salivary gland tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Noura M; Salem, Hend M; Dahmoush, Heba M

    2017-07-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is the most common malignant salivary gland tumor which displays biological, histological and clinical diversity thus representing a challenge for its diagnosis and management. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a transmembrane glycoprotein identified as a tumor specific antigen due to its frequent overexpression in the majority of epithelial carcinomas and its correlation with prognosis. It is considered to be a promising biomarker used as a therapeutic target already in ongoing clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern, cellular characterization and level of EpCAM expression in MEC and demonstrate its correlation with histologic grading which may benefit future clinical trials using EpCAM targeted therapy. 48 specimens (12 normal salivary gland tissue and 36 MEC) were collected and EpCAM membranous expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Total immunoscore (TIS) was evaluated, the term 'EpCAM overexpression' was given for tissues showing a total immunoscore >4. A highly significant difference was observed between TIS percent values in control and different grades of MEC (p<0.001). High grade MEC (HG-MEC) was the highest EpCAM expressor. In addition, EpCAM expression pattern differed among the different grades. EpCAM expression was detected in MEC, and its overexpression correlated with increasing the histological grade. The diffuse membranous expression in HG-MEC could be of diagnostic value in relation to the patchy expression observed in both low grade and intermediate grade MEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Are Thai MSM willing to take PrEP for HIV prevention? An analysis of attitudes, preferences and acceptance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Wheelock

    Full Text Available We aimed to understand the attitudes, preferences and acceptance of oral and parenteral PrEP among men who have sex with men (MSM in Thailand.Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP, the use of antiretrovirals to prevent HIV acquisition, has shown promising results in recent trials. To assess the potential impact of this new HIV prevention method, in addition to efficacy data, we need to understand which psychosocial factors are likely to determine its uptake among members of potential user groups.Surveys of willingness to use PrEP products were administered to MSM. Spearman's rank tests were used to uncover associations between questionnaire items. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to ascertain differences between groups. Conjoint analysis was used to examine the attitudes and preferences of MSM towards PrEP attributes. Most participants were willing to consider taking PrEP (39.2% "yes, definitely" and 49.2% "yes, probably" and perceived PrEP as giving them new possibilities in their lives (38.5% "a lot of hope" and 55.8% "some hope", even after being instructed of potential side effects and costs. HIV testing was considered the most important attribute and a daily pill and longer lasting injection in the arm were the preferred routes of administration.Despite its multiple challenges, MSM in Thailand would be willing to take PrEP, even if they had to experience inconvenience and expense. If PrEP were to be implemented in Thailand, our findings show that its uptake could be considerable.

  15. Designing strip footing foundations using expanded polystyrene (EPS) as fill material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psarropoulos, Prodromos; Zania, Varvara; Spyrakos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    One of the modern uses of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is in strip footings as fill material. The current study investigates the effect of the geofoam filling in the static and seismic design of the base slab founded on strip footings. For this purpose the finite element method is employed, and three......-dimensional as well as two-dimensional parametric analyses are conducted taking into account static and seismic loading conditions. The interaction of the soil–geofoam–foundation system is taken into consideration. The use of EPS as fill material in foundation systems is proven to be not only technically but also...

  16. OMEGA EP: High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the OMEGA Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.H.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Bromage, J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Kessler, T.J.; Loucks, S.J.; Maywar, D.N.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Oliver, J.B.; Rigatti, A.L.; Schmid, A.W.; Stoeckl, C.; Dalton, S.; Folnsbee, L.; Guardalben, M.J.; Jungquist, R.; Puth, J.; Shoup III, M.J.; Weiner, D.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    OMEGA EP (Extended Performance) is a petawatt-class addition to the existing 30-kJ, 60-beam OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. When completed, it will consist of four beamlines, each capable of producing up to 6.5 kJ at 351 nm in a 1 to 10 ns pulse. Two of the beamlines will produce up to 2.6 kJ in a pulse-width range of 1 to 100 ps at 1053 nm using chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). This paper reviews both the OMEGA EP performance objectives and the enabling technologies required to meet these goals

  17. The rs10993994 risk allele for prostate cancer results in clinically relevant changes in microseminoprotein-beta expression in tissue and urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley C Whitaker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB regulates apoptosis and using genome-wide association studies the rs10993994 single nucleotide polymorphism in the MSMB promoter has been linked to an increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The promoter location of the risk allele, and its ability to reduce promoter activity, suggested that the rs10993994 risk allele could result in lowered MSMB in benign tissue leading to increased prostate cancer risk.MSMB expression in benign and malignant prostate tissue was examined using immunohistochemistry and compared with the rs10993994 genotype. Urinary MSMB concentrations were determined by ELISA and correlated with urinary PSA, the presence or absence of cancer, rs10993994 genotype and age of onset. MSMB levels in prostate tissue and urine were greatly reduced with tumourigenesis. Urinary MSMB was better than urinary PSA at differentiating men with prostate cancer at all Gleason grades. The high risk allele was associated with heterogeneity of MSMB staining and loss of MSMB in both tissue and urine in benign prostate.These data show that some high risk alleles discovered using genome-wide association studies produce phenotypic effects with potential clinical utility. We provide the first link between a low penetrance polymorphism for prostate cancer and a potential test in human tissue and bodily fluids. There is potential to develop tissue and urinary MSMB for a biomarker of prostate cancer risk, diagnosis and disease monitoring.

  18. The rs10993994 risk allele for prostate cancer results in clinically relevant changes in microseminoprotein-beta expression in tissue and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Hayley C; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ross-Adams, Helen; Warren, Anne Y; Burge, Johanna; George, Anne; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Jhavar, Sameer; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Saunders, Edward; Page, Elizabeth; Mitra, Anita; Mitchell, Gillian; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Evans, D Gareth; Blanco, Ignacio; Mercer, Catherine; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Clowes, Virginia; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Walker, Lisa; Donaldson, Alan; Izatt, Louise; Dorkins, Huw; Male, Alison; Tucker, Kathy; Stapleton, Alan; Lam, Jimmy; Kirk, Judy; Lilja, Hans; Easton, Douglas; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Neal, David E

    2010-10-13

    Microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB) regulates apoptosis and using genome-wide association studies the rs10993994 single nucleotide polymorphism in the MSMB promoter has been linked to an increased risk of developing prostate cancer. The promoter location of the risk allele, and its ability to reduce promoter activity, suggested that the rs10993994 risk allele could result in lowered MSMB in benign tissue leading to increased prostate cancer risk. MSMB expression in benign and malignant prostate tissue was examined using immunohistochemistry and compared with the rs10993994 genotype. Urinary MSMB concentrations were determined by ELISA and correlated with urinary PSA, the presence or absence of cancer, rs10993994 genotype and age of onset. MSMB levels in prostate tissue and urine were greatly reduced with tumourigenesis. Urinary MSMB was better than urinary PSA at differentiating men with prostate cancer at all Gleason grades. The high risk allele was associated with heterogeneity of MSMB staining and loss of MSMB in both tissue and urine in benign prostate. These data show that some high risk alleles discovered using genome-wide association studies produce phenotypic effects with potential clinical utility. We provide the first link between a low penetrance polymorphism for prostate cancer and a potential test in human tissue and bodily fluids. There is potential to develop tissue and urinary MSMB for a biomarker of prostate cancer risk, diagnosis and disease monitoring.

  19. Prostate cancer epigenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinaranagari, Swathi; Sharma, Pankaj; Bowen, Nathan J; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health burden within the ever-increasingly aging US population. The molecular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer are diverse and heterogeneous. In this context, epigenetic changes, both global and gene specific, are now an emerging alternate mechanism in disease initiation and progression. The three major risk factors in prostate cancer: age, geographic ancestry, and environment are all influenced by epigenetics and additional significant insight is required to gain an understanding of the underlying mechanisms. The androgen receptor and its downstream effector pathways, central to prostate cancer initiation and progression, are subject to a multitude of epigenetic alterations. In this review we focus on the global perspective of epigenetics and the use of recent next-generation sequencing platforms to interrogate epigenetic changes in the prostate cancer genome.

  20. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic intermediates involved in...lipid as measured by 1H MRSI, and prostate tumor aggressiveness; and 3) quantify the association between key metabolic intermediates involved in lipid

  1. Fear of prostate biopsy: a limitation in the management of prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of prostate cancer is increasing in the country and now constitutes 11% of allmale cancers. For diagnosis of prostate cancer, a histological diagnosis is necessary and this requires that a prostate biopsy be performed but patientsmay not readily accept this invasive procedure. A 2-year retrospective study was ...

  2. Multi-Lepton Production at High Transverse Momenta in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2008-01-01

    Processes leading to a final state with at least two high transverse momentum leptons (electrons or muons) are studied using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 463 pb-1. Di-lepton and tri-lepton event classes are investigated. Cross sections of the production of e+e- and mu+mu- pairs are derived in a restricted phase space dominated by photon-photon collisions. In general, good agreement is found with Standard Model predictions. Events are observed with a total scalar sum of lepton transverse momenta above 100 GeV where the Standard Model expectation is low. In this region, combining di-lepton and tri-lepton classes, five events are observed in e+p collisions, compared to a Standard Model expectation of 0.96+-0.12, while no such event is observed in e-p data for 0.64+-0.09 expected.

  3. Multi-lepton production at high transverse momenta in ep collisions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    H1 Collaboration; Aaron, F. D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Bacchetta, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Deák, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M. E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pejchal, O.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wegener, D.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wünsch, E.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2008-10-01

    Processes leading to a final state with at least two high transverse momentum leptons (electrons or muons) are studied using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 463 pb-1. Di-lepton and tri-lepton event classes are investigated. Cross sections of the production of ee and μμ pairs are derived in a restricted phase space dominated by photon photon collisions. In general, good agreement is found with Standard Model predictions. Events are observed with a total scalar sum of lepton transverse momenta above 100 GeV where the Standard Model expectation is low. In this region, combining di-lepton and tri-lepton classes, five events are observed in ep collisions, compared to a Standard Model expectation of 0.96±0.12, while no such event is observed in ep data for 0.64±0.09 expected.

  4. Prostate Cancer Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding a Doctor Treatment Options Side Effects Managing Prostate Cancer Treatment Related Side Effects Clinical Trials Patient Resources Guides Videos Prostate Cancer FAQs Information by Stage Newly Diagnosed with Prostate ...

  5. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher. Obesity. Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) ...

  7. Prostate Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostate cancers are often adenocarcinomas. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia is often present in association with prostatic adenocarcinoma. Find evidence-based information on prostate cancer including treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, genetics, and statistics.

  8. Prostate specific antigen velocity does not aid prostate cancer detection in men with prior negative biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Wolters, Tineke; Savage, Caroline J; Cronin, Angel M; O'Brien, M Frank; Roobol, Monique J; Aus, Gunnar; Scardino, Peter T; Hugosson, Jonas; Schröder, Fritz H; Lilja, Hans

    2010-09-01

    Prostate specific antigen velocity has been proposed as a marker to aid in prostate cancer detection. We determined whether prostate specific antigen velocity could predict repeat biopsy results in men with persistently increased prostate specific antigen after initial negative biopsy. We identified 1,837 men who participated in the Göteborg or Rotterdam section of the European Randomized Screening study of Prostate Cancer and who underwent 1 or more subsequent prostate biopsies after an initial negative finding. We evaluated whether prostate specific antigen velocity improved predictive accuracy beyond that of prostate specific antigen alone. Of the 2,579 repeat biopsies 363 (14%) were positive for prostate cancer, of which 44 (1.7%) were high grade (Gleason score 7 or greater). Prostate specific antigen velocity was statistically associated with cancer risk but had low predictive accuracy (AUC 0.55, p <0.001). There was some evidence that prostate specific antigen velocity improved AUC compared to prostate specific antigen for high grade cancer. However, the small increase in risk associated with high prostate specific antigen velocity (from 1.7% to 2.8% as velocity increased from 0 to 1 ng/ml per year) had questionable clinical relevance. Men with prior negative biopsy are at lower risk for prostate cancer at subsequent biopsies with high grade disease particularly rare. We found little evidence to support prostate specific antigen velocity to aid in decisions about repeat biopsy for prostate cancer. 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of obesity on the predictive accuracy of prostate-specific antigen density and prostate-specific antigen in native Korean men undergoing prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Heon; Doo, Seung Whan; Yang, Won Jae; Lee, Kwang Woo; Lee, Chang Ho; Song, Yun Seob; Jeon, Yoon Su; Kim, Min Eui; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of obesity on the biopsy detection of prostate cancer. We retrospectively reviewed data of 1182 consecutive Korean patients (≥50 years) with serum prostate-specific antigen levels of 3-10 ng/mL who underwent initial extended 12-cores biopsy from September 2009 to March 2013. Patients who took medications that were likely to influence the prostate-specific antigen level were excluded. Receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted for prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen density predicting cancer status among non-obese and obese men. A total of 1062 patients (mean age 67.1 years) were enrolled in the analysis. A total of 230 men (21.7%) had a positive biopsy. In the overall study sample, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of serum prostate-specific antigen for predicting prostate cancer on biopsy were 0.584 and 0.633 for non-obese and obese men, respectively (P = 0.234). However, the area under the curve for prostate-specific antigen density in predicting cancer status showed a significant difference (non-obese 0.696, obese 0.784; P = 0.017). There seems to be a significant difference in the ability of prostate-specific antigen density to predict biopsy results between non-obese and obese men. Obesity positively influenced the overall ability of prostate-specific antigen density to predict prostate cancer. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Low Prostate Concentration of Lycopene Is Associated with Development of Prostate Cancer in Patients with High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Simone; Lionetto, Luana; Cavallari, Michele; Tubaro, Andrea; Rasio, Debora; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Hong, Gena M.; Borro, Marina; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is a frequent male malignancy and represents the second most diagnosed cancer in men. Since pre-cancerous lesions, i.e., the high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), can be detected years before progression to PC, early diagnosis and chemoprevention are targeted strategies to reduce PC rates. Animal studies have shown that lycopene, a carotenoid contained in tomatoes, is a promising candidate for the chemoprevention of PC. However, its efficacy in humans remains controversial. The present study aimed to investigate the relevance of plasma and prostate concentration of lycopene after a lycopene-enriched diet in patients diagnosed with HGPIN. Thirty-two patients diagnosed with HGPIN were administered a lycopene-enriched diet (20–25 mg/day of lycopene; through 30 g/day of triple concentrated tomato paste) for 6 months. A 6-month follow-up prostate biopsy assessed progression to PC. Patients were classified into three groups according to the histopathological features of the 6-month follow-up biopsy results: prostatitis; HGPIN and PC. PSA and plasma lycopene levels were measured before and after the dietary lycopene supplementation. Prostatic lycopene concentration was only assessed after the supplementation diet. Only prostatic lycopene concentration showed significant differences between the three groups (p = 0.03). Prostatic lycopene concentration below a 1 ng/mg threshold was associated with PC at 6-month follow-up biopsy (p = 0.003). We observed no overall benefits from a 6-month lycopene supplementation, as the rate of HGPIN progression to PC in our population (9/32, 28%) was similar to rates reported in the literature. Baseline PSA levels also showed no significant changes after a lycopene-enriched diet. Our findings point to prostatic lycopene concentration as a promising biomarker of PC. Further prospective longitudinal studies are needed to assess the prognostic role of prostatic lycopene in PC. PMID:24451130

  11. The Role of Social Relationships in PrEP Uptake and Use Among Transgender Women and Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Megha L; Rivet Amico, K; McMahan, Vanessa; Glidden, David V; Defechereux, Patricia; Guanira, Juan V; Grant, Robert M

    2018-05-12

    Qualitative studies suggest that social relationships play an important role in HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use, but there have been few quantitative assessments of the role of social relationships in PrEP uptake or adherence. We examined the association between disclosure of study participation or LGBT identity and PrEP use in the 1603 HIV-negative participants enrolled in the iPrEx OLE study. We also evaluated the association between LGBT social group involvement and PrEP use. Study participation disclosure to parents and LGBT identity disclosure to anyone in a participant's social network were associated with greater PrEP uptake. Study participation disclosure to partners was associated with higher probability of having protective PrEP drug concentrations compared [risk difference 0.15 95% CI (0.01, 0.30)]. For each additional type of LGBT organization a participant was involved in, the probability of PrEP uptake and having protective drug concentrations increased by 0.04 [95% CI (0.03, 0.06)] and 0.04 (95% CI (0.02, 0.07)] respectively. Overall, social context was associated with PrEP use in iPrEx OLE, and should be taken into consideration when designing future PrEP implementation programs.

  12. 30 CFR 250.235 - If a State objects to the EP's coastal zone consistency certification, what can I do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If a State objects to the EP's coastal zone... EP's coastal zone consistency certification, what can I do? If an affected State objects to the coastal zone consistency certification accompanying your proposed EP within the timeframe prescribed in...

  13. The Role of Prostatitis in Prostate Cancer: Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunxia, Zhang; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Junjiang; Pumill, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Objective Use systematic review methods to quantify the association between prostatitis and prostate cancer, under both fixed and random effects model. Evidence Acquisition Case control studies of prostate cancer with information on prostatitis history. All studies published between 1990-2012, were collected to calculate a pooled odds ratio. Selection criteria: the selection criteria are as follows: human case control studies; published from May 1990 to July 2012; containing number of prostatitis, and prostate cancer cases. Evidence Synthesis In total, 20 case control studies were included. A significant association between prostatitis and prostate cancer was found, under both fixed effect model (pooled OR=1.50, 95%CI: 1.39-1.62), and random effects model (OR=1.64, 95%CI: 1.36-1.98). Personal interview based case control studies showed a high level of association (fixed effect model: pooled OR=1.59, 95%CI: 1.47-1.73, random effects model: pooled OR= 1.87, 95%CI: 1.52-2.29), compared with clinical based studies (fixed effect model: pooled OR=1.05, 95%CI: 0.86-1.28, random effects model: pooled OR= 0.98, 95%CI: 0.67-1.45). Additionally, pooled ORs, were calculated for each decade. In a fixed effect model: 1990’s: OR=1.58, 95% CI: 1.35-1.84; 2000’s: OR=1.59, 95% CI: 1.40-1.79; 2010’s: OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.22-1.56. In a random effects model: 1990’s: OR=1.98, 95% CI: 1.08-3.62; 2000’s: OR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.23-2.19; 2010’s: OR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.03-1.73. Finally a meta-analysis stratified by each country was conducted. In fixed effect models, U.S: pooled OR =1.45, 95%CI: 1.34-1.57; China: pooled OR =4.67, 95%CI: 3.08-7.07; Cuba: pooled OR =1.43, 95%CI: 1.00-2.04; Italy: pooled OR =0.61, 95%CI: 0.13-2.90. In random effects model, U.S: pooled OR=1.50, 95%CI: 1.25-1.80; China: pooled OR =4.67, 95%CI: 3.08-7.07; Cuba: pooled OR =1.43, 95%CI: 1.00-2.04; Italy: pooled OR =0.61, 95%CI: 0.13-2.90.CONCLUSIONS: the present meta-analysis provides the statistical evidence that

  14. HIV providers' likelihood to prescribe pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention differs by patient type: a short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Leah M; Balderson, Benjamin H

    2016-09-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the antiretroviral treatment regimen for HIV-negative people at high risk of acquiring HIV, has demonstrated efficacy across clinical trials in several patient populations. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have released detailed guidelines to aid providers in prescribing PrEP for their high-risk patients, including men who have sex with men (MSM), high-risk heterosexuals, and injection drug users (IDUs). Given that much attention in PrEP has focused on MSM patients, the present study used an online survey to assess factors involved in HIV care providers' (n = 363) decisions about prescribing PrEP, along with their willingness to prescribe PrEP to patients from various risk populations (e.g., MSM, heterosexuals, IDUs). The efficacy of PrEP was an important factor in providers' decisions about prescribing PrEP, as were considerations about patients' adherence to the regimen, regular follow-up for care, and medication costs. This survey's findings also suggest that providers' willingness to prescribe PrEP varies by patient group, with providers most willing to initiate the regimen with MSM who have an HIV-positive partner, and least willing to prescribe to high-risk heterosexuals or IDUs. In the context of the current CDC recommendations for PrEP that include MSM, heterosexuals, and IDUs, examining providers' rationales for and barriers against supporting this HIV prevention strategy across patient groups merits further attention.

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is used to guide the biopsy to specific regions of the prostate gland. When the examination is ... is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time ...

  16. Prostate-specific antigen increase during dutasteride to indicate the need for prostate biopsy: influence of prostatic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Alessandro; Maggi, Martina; Fasulo, Andrea; Salciccia, Stefano; Gentile, Vincenzo; Cattarino, Susanna; Gentilucci, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the significance of an increase in total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) serum levels despite dutasteride treatment as a predictor of prostate cancer (PC) at biopsy. We focused our attention on the rate of the first PSA increase and on the influence of prostatic inflammation. From 2011 to 2016, 365 men with a previous negative prostate biopsy and persistent elevated PSA levels received dutasteride treatment. The population was followed for a range of 12-48 months. One hundred twelve cases with a confirmed PSA increase >0.5 ng/ml over the nadir value during the follow-up were included in Group A and underwent a new prostate biopsy. In Group A, the PSA increase was associated with PC at the re-biopsy in 66% of cases. The percentage of PSA reduction after 6 months of treatment was not a significant indicator of the risk for PC. The distribution of inflammatory infiltrates significantly (pprostate biopsies. The relative risk for PC at biopsy significantly increased according to PSA level during dutasteride. Treatment with dutasteride can help to analyze PSA kinetic. A persistent prostatic inflammation is a factor able to reduce the performance of PSA kinetic during dutasteride treatment.

  17. EpSoc: Social-Based Epidemic-Based Routing Protocol in Opportunistic Mobile Social Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halikul Lenando

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In opportunistic networks, the nature of intermittent and disruptive connections degrades the efficiency of routing. Epidemic routing protocol is used as a benchmark for most of routing protocols in opportunistic mobile social networks (OMSNs due to its high message delivery and latency. However, Epidemic incurs high cost in terms of overhead and hop count. In this paper, we propose a hybrid routing protocol called EpSoc which utilizes the Epidemic routing forwarding strategy and exploits an important social feature, that is, degree centrality. Two techniques are used in EpSoc. Messages’ TTL is adjusted based on the degree centrality of nodes, and the message blocking mechanism is used to control replication. Simulation results show that EpSoc increases the delivery ratio and decreases the overhead ratio, the average latency, and the hop counts as compared to Epidemic and Bubble Rap.

  18. Prostate-specific antigen: does the current evidence support its use in prostate cancer screening?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Although widely used, the value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in screening asymptomatic men for prostate cancer is controversial. Reasons for the controversy relate to PSA being less than an ideal marker in detecting early prostate cancer, the possibility that screening for prostate cancer may result in the overdetection and thus overtreatment of indolent disease and the lack of clarity as to the definitive or best treatment for men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Although the results from some randomized prospective trials suggest that screening with PSA reduces mortality from prostate cancer, the overall benefit was modest. It is thus currently unclear as to whether the modest benefit of reduced mortality outweighs the harms of overdetection and overtreatment. Thus, prior to undergoing screening for prostate cancer, men should be informed of the risks and benefits of early detection. Newly emerging markers that may complement PSA in the early detection of prostate cancer include specific isoforms of PSA and PCA3.

  19. 30 CFR 250.226 - What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the EP? 250.226 Section 250.226 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.226 What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA...

  20. Predicting prostate biopsy outcome: prostate health index (phi) and prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) are useful biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Matteo; Bruzzese, Dario; Perdonà, Sisto; Mazzarella, Claudia; Marino, Ada; Sorrentino, Alessandra; Di Carlo, Angelina; Autorino, Riccardo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Buonerba, Carlo; Altieri, Vincenzo; Mariano, Angela; Macchia, Vincenzo; Terracciano, Daniela

    2012-08-16

    Indication for prostate biopsy is presently mainly based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) serum levels and digital-rectal examination (DRE). In view of the unsatisfactory accuracy of these two diagnostic exams, research has focused on novel markers to improve pre-biopsy prostate cancer detection, such as phi and PCA3. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of phi and PCA3 for prostate cancer using biopsy as gold standard. Phi index (Beckman coulter immunoassay), PCA3 score (Progensa PCA3 assay) and other established biomarkers (tPSA, fPSA and %fPSA) were assessed before a 18-core prostate biopsy in a group of 251 subjects at their first biopsy. Values of %p2PSA and phi were significantly higher in patients with PCa compared with PCa-negative group (pphi and PCA3 are predictive of malignancy. In conclusion, %p2PSA, phi and PCA3 may predict a diagnosis of PCa in men undergoing their first prostate biopsy. PCA3 score is more useful in discriminating between HGPIN and non-cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ... to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  4. Identification of distinct populations of prostasomes that differentially express prostate stem cell antigen,Annexin A1, and GLIPR2 in Humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberts, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313888515; van Dissel-Emiliani, F.M.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/089742354; van Adrichem, N.P.H.; van Wijnen, M.; Wauben, M.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112675735; Stout, T.A.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828831; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385

    2012-01-01

    In addition to sperm cells, seminal fluid contains various small membranous vesicles. These include prostasomes, membrane vesicles secreted by prostate epithelial cells. Prostasomes have been proposed to perform a variety of functions, including modulation of (immune) cell activity within the female

  5. Identification of distinct populations of prostasomes that differentially express prostate stem cell antigen, annexin A1, and GLIPR2 in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberts, M.; van Dissel-Emiliani, F.M.; van Adrichem, N.P.; Wijnen, M.H.; Wauben, M.H.M.; Stout, T.A.; Stoorvogel, W.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to sperm cells, seminal fluid contains various small membranous vesicles. These include prostasomes, membrane vesicles secreted by prostate epithelial cells. Prostasomes have been proposed to perform a variety of functions, including modulation of (immune) cell activity within the female

  6. Prostate-Specific G-Protein Coupled Receptor, an Emerging Biomarker Regulating Inflammation and Prostate Cancer Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M; Siwko, S; Liu, M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent among men in developed countries, but a significant proportion of detected cancers remain indolent, never progressing into aggressive carcinomas. This highlights the need to develop refined biomarkers that can distinguish between indolent and potentially dangerous cases. The prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR, or OR51E2) is an olfactory receptor family member with highly specific expression in human prostate epithelium that is highly overexpressed in PIN and prostate cancer. PSGR has been functionally implicated in prostate cancer cell invasiveness, suggesting a potential role in the transition to metastatic PCa. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing PSGR in the prostate were reported to develop an acute inflammatory response followed by emergence of low grade PIN, whereas mice with compound PSGR overexpression and loss of PTEN exhibited accelerated formation of invasive prostate adenocarcinoma. This article will review recent PSGR findings with a focus on its role as a potential prostate cancer biomarker and regulator of prostate cancer invasion and inflammation.

  7. Production of Z0 bosons in elastic and quasi-elastic ep collisions at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Kooijman, P.; Zotkin, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    The production of Z0 bosons in the reaction ep →eZ0 p(∗), where p(∗) stands for a proton or a lowmass nucleon resonance, has been studied in ep collisions at HERA using the ZEUS detector. The analysis is based on a data sample collected between 1996 and 2007, amounting to 496 pb−1 of integrated

  8. Prostatitis-bacterial - self-care

    Scienc